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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01476
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/16/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01476
System ID: UF00028308:01476
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Recruiting Jernigan
Columbia standout trims
college litr to 3 favorites.
000016 120511 ****3 DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611- 1943




Lake lR



Thursday, December 16, 2010 www.'akecityreporter.com


Hoop standouts
Lake City Middle School
teams look strong.

Sports, I B





reporter



Vol. 136, No. 282 E 75 cents


FINDING A DIFFERENT WAY



To HELP THE COMMUNITY


County to accept

$900,000 grant to

bring new business


Funding to help
build entrance
road in Eco Park.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county commission
is poised to officially accept
a grant that will cover up to
$900,000 in costs for a proj-
ect that's needed to locate a
new business in the area.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will vote on
accepting the grant at its
regular meeting today.
Florida's Office of
Tourism, Trade and
Economic Development
recently approved the
Economic Development
Transportation Trust grant
after the county applied for
it on behalf of Columbia
Technology Inc., a new
business locating on N U.S.
Highway 41.
The funding will be used
on a transportation proj-


ect to construct a 1.2 mile
entrance road leading from
north U.S. Highway 41 to
the entrance of the busi-
ness' site in Eco Park. A
left-hand deceleration turn
lane from northbound U.S.
Highway 41 and aright-hand
acceleration turn lane from
the entrance road to south-
bound U.S.
Highway
41 will also
be con-
structed.
Grant
dollars will
cover up to Roberts
$900,000 of Roberts
the project's cost.
"Whatever the cost of
the project is, it's reimburs-
able up to that amount,"
said Lisa Roberts, assistant
county manager.
Construction on the
entrance road and turning
lanes could begin in approx-
imately three months,
said Jim Poole, Columbia
COMMISSION continued on


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Rev. Alvin L. Greene is seen inside the St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church, which is now a Florida Department of Health
certified HIV/AIDS testing site. 'It's an epidemic that's killing the black race,' Greene said. 'The church should be a center and
foundation of the community. What better way to get the message out?'

Church becomes certified HIV/AIDS testing site


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
W hen the Rev. Andrew
McRae sought local
support to help
fight against HIV/
AIDS in Columbia
County, the Rev. Alvin Greene and
St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church
answered the call. ,
"I knew the love and care he has
for people," McRae said of Greene.
St. Paul is now a Florida
Department of Health' certified HIV/
AIDS testing site'. Ten members
of the church completed a 21-hour
course to gain certification.
McRae is the founder of FAITH
Inc. Finding Alternatives that
Initiate and Transform Hope a
community organization based in
Gainesville that provides testing,
counseling and education on HIV/
AIDS. The Rev. Ruby Davenport is
the executive director.


"The church is right
in the community.You
could be coming in for
prayer, counseling or
testing. Nobody has to
know."

Rev. Andrew McRae
Founder of FAITH Inc.
'We saw how devastating (HIV/
AIDS) was to the black commu-
nity and wanted to do something,"
McRae said.
McRae and Davenport received
training through the Florida
Department of Health on HIV/AIDS
and now travel all over the state
training churches, he said. No other
church-based testing sites were
located in Columbia County.
"I've been trying for years to get
here," he said.
The HIV swab test, or mouth


swab test, will be used at the church.
The outer gums are swabbed one
time around and the testing device"
is inserted into a vial containing a
developer solution.
' "It doesn't take but five minutes,"
Davenport said. "We are left without
excuses if we don't know our status."
The church hopes to have test-
ing up and running by the middle
of January, Greene said. All that
remains is a test site number from
the state.
Greene and McRae were already
good friends, from working together
at the Florida State Prison and in the
ministry. Green saw the need for a
site in the area and went to his con-
gregation for support.
"It's not to make a name for our-
selves," he said. 'We have a con-
cern about our community and our
people."
Statistics show that 1 in 46 African
CHURCH continued on 3A


Niblack Elementary

students show signs

of improvement


School recovering
from'D' grade
received last year.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Data taken from recent
testing shows that Niblack
Elementary students are
steadily improving as the
school continues to work
toward an "A" Florida
School Grade.
Niblack Elementary
dropped to a "D" in the past
school year.
The Columbia County
School Board, district
officials and Niblack
Elementary administration
and staff recently gath-
ered at the school's Media
Center for a State-of-the-
School meeting to discuss


student progress.
William Murphy, Niblack
Elementary principal, pre-
sented data to the board
taken from various stan-
dardized tests and writing
prompts given to students
multiple times through-
out the year to measure
progress in core subjects
in preparation for the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test.
Elementary school grades
are based solely on FCAT
test results.
For instance, students
have taken the Thinkgate
test a progress-moni-
toring test that provides
student progression data
of learning the state stan-
dards for their grade levels
- twice and will take it for
SCHOOL continued on 3A


Dream Machine needs more sponsors for kids


Organization had scored said MeallyJenkins,
940 children sign Christmas Dream Machine
gl director and founder. "We
up for gift bags. have 105 children whose
gifts were due Wednesday.
By TONY BRITT We've done excellent so far
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com this year."
The most recent
More than 100 names Christmas Dream Machine
of children remain on the records from Tuesday indi-
Christmas Dream Machine cate this year the organiza-
Christmas tree, represent- tion had 940 children sign
ing children hoping to on to receive services.
receive gifts for Christmas. Jenkins said she expects
The Christmas Dream to distribute gift bags to
Machine provides toys and about 300 children on
clothes to disadvantaged Friday, with the other dis-
children and their families bursements taking place
who meet the organiza- Monday, Tuesday and
tion's financial criteria. Wednesday.
"There are 106 children Dream Machine officials
who are still on the tree want to have toys and cloth-
that have not been spon- ing for the 106 children by


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
Meally Jenkins (right), Christmas Dream Machine director and
founder and Sherry Moran, a volunteer, adjust disadvantaged
children's wish lists at the organization's office in the mall.


Dec. 19.
The Christmas Dream
Machine has been pro-


viding for disadvantaged
children for 22 years.
Jenkins said this year is


unique because despite the
economy, the will to give
and sponsor the children
remains strong.
"With the economy
being the way it is we had
a lot of concerns as to get-
ting the sponsorship of the
children," Jenkins said.
'We have a lot faith and
we believe and it has hap-
pened people are still
giving. They're giving from
their heart and that makes
what we do here at the
Christmas Dream Machine
shine, because the children
are being taken care of.
These are children that the
parents have been 'certi-
fied eligible the working
parent people who are
struggling on unemploy-


ment or low income and
they just need a little help
at Christmas, with clothes
and toys."
As part of this year's
Christmas Dream Machine
effort, organization volun-
teers will wrap gifts for mall
customers from Dec. 18 -22
as a fundraiser.
"Every dollar that we
raise on Dec. 22 is going
to go towards helping one
of our mothers, who is
listed on the tree, who has
terminal cancer," Jenkins
said. "All that money will
be given to pay for her
utility bills. It's not given
to her directly, we're
going to actually take it
to where it needs to go to
be paid."


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293


67


SUBSCRIBE TO Mostly sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


- Opinion................4A
S ^...-a People.................. 2A
- Obituaries ..............6A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
HEALTH
-Aii,:ut frt ..r 'i


COMING
FRIDAY
L :-1 1 '1 i ,it


NI 1 4, )) I











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2010


~ay~4)


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-5-0
Evening: 8-7-1


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 5-4-0-3
Evening: 0-6-5-5


Tuesday:
4-18-20-25-29


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Zuckerberg is 'Person ofYear'


Celebrity Birthdays


* Civil rights attorney Morris
Dees is 74.
* Actress Joyce Bulifant is
73.
* Actress Liv Ullmann is 72.
* CBS news correspondent
Lesley Stahl is 69.
* Pop musician Tony Hicks
(The Hollies) is 65.
* Pop singer Benny
Andersson (ABBA) is 64.

Daily Scripture


* Actor Ben Cross is 63.
* Rock singer-musician Billy
Gibbons (ZZ Top) is 61.
* Actor Xander Berkeley is
55.
* Actor Sam Robards is 49.
* Actor Benjamin Bratt is 47.
* Country singer-songwriter
Jeff Carson is 47.
*,Actor Daniel Cosgrove is
40.


NEW YORK

Facebook founder and
CEO Mark Zuckerberg
has been named Time's
"Person of the Year" for
2010, joining the ranks of
winners that include heads of state
and rock stars as the person the
magazine believes most influenced
events of the past year.
At 26, Zuckerberg is the youngest
"Person of the Year" since the first
one chosen, Charles Lindbergh; he
was 25 when he was named in 1927,
Time said Wednesday. Zuckerberg
beat out Britain's Queen Elizabeth II
by just two weeks: She was 26 when
she was named in 1952.
Incidentally, Queen Elizabeth II
has recently joined Zuckerberg's,
social networking behemoth.
Time's "Person of the Year" is
the person or thing that has most
influenced the culture and the news
during the past year for good or for
ill. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke received the honor last
year. The 2008 winner was then-
President-elect Barack Obama. The
2007 winner was Russian Prime
Minister Vladimir Putin. Other pre-
vious winners have included Bono,
President George W. Bush, and
Amazon.com CEO and founder Jeff
Bezos.
In naming Zuckerberg, Time cited
him "for changing how we all live
our lives."
In a posting on his Facebook page,
Zuckerberg said that being named
Time's "Person of the Year" was "a
real honor and recognition of how
our little team is building something
that hundreds of millions of people
want to use to make the world more
open and connected. I'm happy to be
a part of that."
Zuckerberg has put himself on the
map not only as one of the world's
youngest billionaires, but also as a


"But the angel said to her, "Do
not be afraid, Mary; you have
found favor with God.You will
conceive and give birth to a
son, and you are to call him
Jesus."


- Luke 1:30-33


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo shows Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg smiling at an announcement
in San Francisco. Another 17 of America's richest people, including Zuckerberg,
have pledged to give away most of their wealth. They are the latest to join Giving
Pledge, an effort led by Microsoft founder Bill Gates and investor Warren Buffett,
to commit the country's wealthiest people to step up their charitable donations.


prominent newcomer to the world
of philanthropy. Earlier this year, he
pledged $100 million over five years
to the Newark, N.J., school system.

Kidman weeps in 'Rabbit
Hole,' revels in home life
LOS ANGELES Nicole Kidman
is giving audiences grief with her lat-
est drama, "Rabbit Hole," playing a
disconsolate woman coping with the
death of her child.
Yet 10 years after one of
Hollywood's most-publicized splits,
the breakup of her marriage to Tom
Cruise, Kidman is in the happiest of
places, with little to sob about.
After a shaky few years when she
made such dud s as "The Stepford
Wives," "Bewitched," "The Golden


Compass" and "The Invasion,"
Kidman is back in Academy Awards
contention for the first time since
back-to-back nominations for 2001's
"Moulin Rouge!" and 2002's "The
Hours," which earned her a best-
actress Oscar.
Kidman also is a producer on
"Rabbit Hole," opening Friday as
the first release from her production
company, Blossom Films.
She's four years into her mar- -
riage with country music star Keith
Urban. Kidman, who had a mis-
carriage while married to Cruise,
now has a 2-year-old daughter with
Urban. The family has settled so
comfortably at their Nashville home
that Kidman is not terribly inclined
to rush out looking for work.

* Associated Press


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake'City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m;
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a,ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question Or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Gunman had date
circled on calendar

PANAMA CITY The
ex-convict who calmly held
a school board at gunpoint
and then began randomly
firing had circled the date
on a calendar found in his
mobile home, evidence he
had been planning the attack
for some time, police said.
Bay District officials also
confirmed Wednesday that
ClayA Duke's wife had been
fired earlier this year from
her job teaching special edu-
cation. Video of Tuesday's
meeting showed Duke, 56,
complaining about taxes and
his wife being fired before
shooting at close range as
the superintendent begged,
"Please don't"
The shooting was not "a
spur of the moment thing,"
Panama City Police ChiefJohn
Van Etten told The Associated
Press. Police also found anti-
government paraphernalia at
Duke's home, but the chief
didn't provide details.
Minutes before the shoot-
ing, the room had been filled
with students accepting
awards, but no one was hurt
except Duke, who shot him-
self after exchanging fire with
a security guard, police said.
Video shows Duke rising
from his seat, spray-painting
a red V on the wall, then wav-
ing a 9mm Smith & Wesson
handgun and ordering every-
one to leave the room except
the men on the board. They
dove under the long desk
they had been sitting behind
as he fired at them.
Duke rambled to the
board about tax increases
and his wife, but also appar-
ently created a Facebook
page last week that refers
to class warfare and is laced
with images from the movie
"V for Vendetta," in which a
mysterious figure battles a
totalitarian government.
Superintendent Bill
Husfelt was calm as he tried
to persuade Duke to drop
the gun, but Duke just shook


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this image taken from video and released by WJHG-TV,
Clay A. Duke points a handgun at Bay City school board
members and staff Tuesday. Duke, a 56-year-old ex-convict,
calmly held the school board at gunpoint and said he was
seeking redress for his wife's firing before shooting at the
superintendent at short range and then killing himself.


his head.
Duke shot twice at Husfelt
from about 8 feet away and
squeezed off several more
rounds before district secu-
rity chief Mike Jones, a for-
mer police officer, bolted in.
Police said Wednesday
the pair exchanged at least
14 shots, with Jones hitting
Duke four times, felling him.
Duke then shot himself fatal-
ly in the head.
Somehow, no one else in
the small board room was
injured in the clash that lasted
several minutes. Husfelt said
at least two rounds lodged in
the wall behind him.

Aide fired after
abuse allegations

OCALA A teacher's
aide accused of verbally
abusing a 7-year-old special
needs child has been fired.
The Marion County
Schdol Board dismissed
Deborah J. Adams on
Tuesday. She did not chal-
lenge Superintendent of
Schools Jim Yancey's rec-
ommendation to fire her.
Adams and teacher
Rhoda Richardson were
accused of verbally abusing
a Maplewood Elementary
School student who has


autism.
Both women have been
on unpaid leave since
October, when the alleged
abuse was brought to the
school district's attention.
The alleged abuse was
secretly recorded by the
child's mother, who left a
digital recorder in the girl's
backpack.

Movement sets
legislative goals

TALLAHASSEE A
children's advocacy effort
modeled after the Tea Party
movement has introduced
$300 million in legislative
priorities that it believes
will bolster Florida's invest-
ment in kids.
The Children's
Movement of Florida,
which also calls itself the
"Milk Party," Wednesday
announced five key recom-
mendations endorsed by
Florida TaxWatch, a busi-
ness-backed group.
The proposals include
providing health insurance
for more children, strength-
ening pre-school standards
and increasing mentoring
programs.


Tallahassee *
65/54
SPensacola '- S
69/61 Panalma City
67/58


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
, Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


MOSTLY MOSTLY.
SUNNY| | SUNNY|


HI 57LO | | HI 61 LO 36
^wKii.6- XiWse w ^: ^B .aeli.il.a.li...G[BIa


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
,67/47 Daytona Beach
SFt. Lauderdale
ville a Daytona Beach Fort Myers
46 66/48 Gainesville
Ocala \ Jacksonville
,68/46 West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
68/47 67/50 Lake City
/ 4 Miami
pa Naples
53 West Palm Beach Ocala
72/54 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers, 73/59 Pensacola
72/52 Naples e Tallahassee
73/55 Miami Tampa,
KevWst 74/58 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
70/63


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n. 7:20 a.m.
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today 1:57 p.m.
today 2:47 a.m.
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im. 3:44 a.m.

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7 4 12
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On this date in
1988, Fairbanks,
Alaska reported
freezing rain and
record warm tem-
peratures. The
afternoon high of
41 degrees was
43 degrees above
normal.


An exclusive
| service
brought to
MOOMI our readers
Today's by
ultra-violet The .', -
radiation risk Channel
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

'A' weather.com

Forecasts, data and graph-
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www.weatherpublisher.com


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











Page Editor: Cd. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2010


County's best performer on stage


at Columbia's Top Talent Show


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. corn
They are probably count-
ing the days. No, not the days
until Christmas; but the day
when they could conquer the
stage at Columbia's Top Talent
Show.
Auditions are closed, leav-
ing 25 students of the original
3.6 left to move to the next
round, organizers said.
Ronnie Collins, event orga-
nizer, said 21 students going
to the competition hail from
Columbia .High School and


three students will be rep-
resenting Fort White High
School. One home-schooled
student also made the list.
The show, taking place at 6
p.m. Friday, pits 25 students
against each other in a compe-
tition meant to showcase their
musical skills. The winners in
this round of competition will
go on to the final level taking
place on the last Friday of
March. The grand prize will
be the recording of a CD to
the singer or band that takes
first place.
"Were looking forward to


finding some new talent,"
Collins said, "and helping give
them the opportunity to go
into the music business."
The show will take place in
the CHS auditorium and tick-
ets will be sold today in front
of the school for $3 to stu-
dents, and $5 for adults. The
cost of the tickets at the door
will go up to $5 for .students
and $7 for adults. The entire
community is invited to come
and experience the new tal-
ent being offered by Columbia
County, said Collins.
Special entertainment is


offered throughout the show,
by guests such as the duet
Colby Craig and Caitlin Eadie,
Small Town, and the CHS
Golden Divas Step Team.
After the competition, there
will be a dance held in the
multipurpose room behind the
auditorium. All proceeds will
go to benefit the CHS basket-
ball team.
"It's going to be a wonder-
ful evening, and it gives kids
the opportunity to be a part of
something, that will hopefully
grow bigger in time," Collins
said.


SCHOOL: Improvement in overall grades is promising
Continued From Page 1A


a third time in March. Almost all of the
data from the two Thinkgate tests shows
increases in performance, Murphy said.
Fourth-grade students have also
undergone writing simulations such as
Columbia Writes and Niblack Writes that
test students on prompts -similar to what
will appear on the FCAT. Murphy said the
average on writing has gone from a 1.71
to a 2.58, but he wants everyone to be at a-
4 in time for the FCAT.
"As the year goes on, their writing is
improving," he said.
. Mike Millikin, superintendent of
schools, said it looks like Niblack
Elementary is making progress,.
"It certainly appears students are
where we want them to be at this point
in the school year," he said.


The school has .
seen an increase in
parent involvement
through various
activities like a Fall
Festival and a Parent
Science Night, .,
Murphy said, and .'
the number of disci-
pline referrals is also lop
improving with more Hudson '
motivational awards
for appropriate behavior.
Other ways the school continues to
track progress is through teacher-to-stu-
dent and administration-to-teacher data
meetings every nine weeks and weekly
questions that monitor where students
are with different skills in math, science


and reading.
"My staff and students are working
hard every day to get back to an 'A,"'
Murphy said.
Steve Nelson, board member, asked the
Niblack Elementary staff and administra-
tion to continue focusing on how they
can keep improving from the past school
year.
"That's what I want in everybody's
mind when they're going into work," he
said.
He also asked the faculty to identify any
barriers standing in the way of success
that the board can help with.
"You're moving in the right direction
and we want to be of help in any way we
can," said Keith Hudson, board member.


COMMISSION: Grant to help business to be accepted
Continued From Page 1A


County Industrial Development Authority
executive director.
"As quick as we can work out a memo-
randum agreement and get it signed,"
Poole said, of when the business will
come to the area. "Hopefully in 90 days
some kind of construction will be happen-
ing on the road arid hopefully they'll start-
construction of the first phase of their
business."
In other discussion and action:


The board will vote on allowing the
current Fort White library to close from
Jan. 5 to Jan. 9 for relocation to the new
library building, which is scheduled to
open after the relocation.
Special counsel to the board will pres-
ent a counter-offer on the Giles Property,
the-largestand final parcel left for acquisi-
tion before construction can begin on the
Bascom Norris Road connector.
The City of Lake City has requested


forming a joint city and county work group.
to discuss the issues it has surround-
ing the Columbia County Emergency
911 Dispatch Communication Center, a
request the board will discuss.
The Columbia County Board of County
Commissioners will meet at 7 p.m. at
the Columbia County School Board
Administrative Complex auditorium, 372
W. Duval St.


CHURCH: Testing
Continued From Page 1A
Americans in Florida are HIV positive,
McRae said.
'"That statistic does not stop at the
door of the church," he said.
Besides the disease, health depart-
ments are often viewed negatively by
African Americans, McRae said, add-
ing that HIV is an ongoing problem
that's not being dealt with.
Many people don't even know they
have the disease and have never been
tested, he said.'Offering testing at a
church is another way to combat the
disease.
'The church is right in the commu- *
nity," McRae said. "You could be com-
ing in for prayer, counseling or testing.
Nobody has to know."
Training a church to be a testing
site offers a different opportunity to
work in the community, McRae said.
Churches are not just a religious insti-
tution, but an institution of service.
"It's an opportunity to go back to
serving," he said. "We left serving and
took up entertainment."
Davenport was the head instruc-
tor for the church's training. She first
gauged participants on how much
-prior knowledge they had about HIV/
AIDS.
Curriculum focused on areas such as
removing stigmas often association with
the disease and teaching abstinence
education as well as prevention meth-
ods. Homework assignments and teAt-
ing were also. a part of the curriculum.
"Our job is to educate not only the
people in the pews but get out and
educate the ones that don't know," he
said.
Churches allow politicians to come
in and talk, and HIV/AIDS education
should be done as freely, she said.
"Don't shy away from it," Davenport
said. "We're here to educate."
Once people have been educated
about HIV/AIDS, they must be held
accountable for their actions.
"You are the one responsible,"
Davenport said. "My responsibility it
so take care of myself."
Greene said he believes St. Paul can
be a light in Lake City through offering
the testing service. But the task is too
big for just one church.'-
St Paul will become a model for other.
churches in the community as the new-
est local testing site, McRae said. He
hopes to have a coalition of churches in.
the area following:itheirJlead,......,
"Once they see the work, it will be
a domino effect and move them to get
on board," he said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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OPINION


Thursday, December 16. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Simplify

tax code


for all

President Obama was
said to be pondering
whether to make
comprehensive tax
reform a top legis-
lative priority next year, but
on Dec. 10 the White House
stepped back from those com-
ments.
We hope they go for it.
Simplifying the tax code
would benefit all Americans and
the economy.
According to The New York
Times, the president has asked
hisseconomic team to review
the parameters of possible
reform by studying possible
"options for closing loopholes
and simplifying income taxes
for corporations and individu-
als, though the study of the
corporate tax system is farther
along."
There are many reasons we
hope that the administration
moves forward with compre-
hensive tax reform. A simpli-
fication of the code would be
popular among voters of both
parties.
A successful bipartisan
overhaul would be the first
small step in rebuilding voter
confidence in Washington.
More importantly, simplifica-
tion would save millions of
households the hassle of wast-
ing time and money wrestling
with tax codes that have grown
needlessly complex. By lower-
ing these extraneous costs,
individual filers and business
owners would have more incen-
tive to be in compliance.
A reform of the country's
tax code is long overdue.
Over the years, a convoluted
hodgepodge of deductions
and exemptions have made
life miserable for the average
taxpayer but also has allowed
some upper-income-earners to
deftly manipulate the system.
A flattened rate, without end-
less exemptions, is likely to
increase revenue even if tax
rates remain the same for the
top bracket
Certainly, one problem
doesn't have to wait for the
other, because tax reform
would mean immediate, tangi-
ble benefits for households and
businesses across the country.


* The Denver Post


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's'name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Pitfalls in Obama's tax plans


WASHINGTON

Long of Louisiana
used to sum up
American attitudes
toward taxation this
way. "Its simple," the then
chairman of the Senate Finance
Committee would say every
time the subject of revising the
Internal Revenue code came up.
"It's don't tax me, don't tax thee,
tax that man behind the tree."
The flamboyant, brilliant
son of the even more so Huey
Long, famous or infamous
depending on one's point of
view for among other things
advocating the redistribution of
wealth, regarded the payment of
taxes a "quality problem." If one
didn't make any money, then
one wouldn't have to pay them.
He also didn't like the word
"reform" when applied to this
subject, noting that one man's
reform is another's poison.
Now in the midst of a major
political confrontation with his
Democratic party over exten-
sion of tax cuts first initiated
by George W. Bush, President
Obama is said to be contem-
plating a move to reorder the
individual and corporate income
tax structure, an initiative that
took place the last time in any
major way 24 years ago under
Ronald Reagan in a startling
burst that shocked even long-
time advocates of tax simplifica-
tion. Obama has ordered his
own economic advisers and
Treasury officials to begin ana-
lyzing the options.
The young president should
take note of the pitfalls and
unintended consequences in
such an ambitious undertak-
ing which at best could take
years. The 1986 tax reform
- there's that word again -
was hatched in a Washington


Dan K.Thomasson
.pub over a pitcher of beer by
Oregon Republican Sen. Robert
Packwood and an aide. The out-
lines reportedly were scribbled
on a bar napkin. It may or may
not be relevant that Packwood
was later identified by several
complainants as a sort of hap-
less masher with a drinking
problem. The charges ended his
career.
The plan was not compli-
cated. It essentially called for
eliminating a number of major
tax shelters, substantially lower-
ing the tax rate and greatly sim-
plifying the form. It would leave
in place traditional deductions
for interest on home mortgages
and charitable contributions, the
price of support from two major
lobbies, although deductions for
credit card interest were elimi-
nated. Despite the fact there
had been no serious push for
major tax revision at the time,
the Packwood plan took on a life
of its own, gaining incredible
momentum in a short period of
time and forcing Congress to
adopt it and Reagan to sign it
into law.
Obama's discussions seem to
be headed down a similar path.
This time, however, it would
eliminate the sacred mortgage
and charity loopholes and
drop the tax rate much lower
than the mid-30s top rate of
the Packwood plan, bringing it
much closer to the long debated
flat tax approach in which near-
ly every conceivable deduction
is eliminated in favor of rates as


low as 18 percent.
A major problem arose in the
1986 act because it eliminated
the shelters that had kept com-
mercial real estate among the
more attractive investments.
There was an instantaneous
collapse of that market as
investment money dried up,
projects collapsed and now
unattractive limited partner-
ships disappeared over night.
Investors rushed to dump their
properties. The unintended
consequences lengthened and
deepened what had been a mild
recession.
There is another serious
concern. While cleansing the
admittedly complicated system
of its loopholes, an equitable
result would be tax rates fixed
for some time. That's the
rub. A Congress that likes to
spend can easily find ways to
satisfying its revenue hunger
by letting rates creep upward.
Without any way to offset that
through deductions most tax-
payers would be hard hit. That,
of course, is probably an over
simplification of a very complex
subject. But it was a flaw in
Packwood's plan.
Without a doubt the current
structure has grown new shel-
ters and has been made even
more complex over the last
two decades plus since the last
broad overhaul. The national
debt and deficit spending have
made the situation even thorn-
ier with political ramifications
heightened by the fact this pres-
ident is only half way through
his first term, unlike Reagan at
the time.
Perhaps we should suggest a
pitcher of beer at a Capitol Hill
watering hole.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


The latest breed of
anarchist is not
a protester who
takes to the streets,
Molotov cocktail in
hand. His weapon of choice is
the laptop and his battleground
the Internet, which he uses to
steal information or to disrupt
life in the digital age.
The personification of these
Internet intifadists is Julian
Assange of WikiLeaks infamy.
Retaliating for his arrest on
rape charges and his pariah
status in Internet commerce,
a band of hackers known as
Anonymous used denial-of-ser-
vices attacks to crash the web-
sites of Visa, MasterCard and
other corporations that refused
to have anything more to do
with Assange.
Sure enough, Anonymous got
the world's attention. But the
scary fact is that group is just
a visible example of growing
cyberwarfare.


A concentrated attack via the
Web could disrupt any facet of
American life, from banking
to medicine to transportation
- and with the same murder-
ous effect as a conventional act
of terror.
Make no mistake: America's
enemies will work that game if
they can.
Already, Web-savvy jihadists
are scouring the WikiLeaks doc-
uments for signs of American
vulnerability. According to the
Middle East Media Research
Institute, "a member of the
jihadi forum the Shumukh Al-
Islam initiated a 'workshop'
aiming to collect, categorize and
pinpoint all U.S. interests world-
wide mentioned in documents
released by WikiLeaks." That
information will without ques-
tion be transmitted digitally,
most likely to those most
willing and able to harm the
United States.
America must block such a


catastrophe from happening by
mounting a massive and ever-
evolving cybersecurity drive.
Assange has been arrested
on rape charges unrelated to his
cyberanarchy. The government
appears to be moving to indict
him under the Espionage Act.
President Obama called
cyberwarfare "one of the most
serious economic and national
security threats our nation
faces." But America's response
has fallen far short of the mark.
The government must devote
the research and money neces-
sary to exponentially increase
cybersecurity.
Former White House ter-
rorism adviser Richard Clarke
proposed creation of a Cyber
Defense Administration. That
type of big thinking is what the
U.S. needs. So let's get moving,
Washington. The only thing we
can't do is do nothing.
* The (N.Y.) Daily News


Martin Schram
mortin.schram@gmoil.com


Larry King

style soon

to become

lost craft

It was almost midnight on
the night after election
night, 1988, and Larry
King was multi-tasking.
He'd finished his CNN
evening show hours earlier, then
drove across the Potomac to his
second nightly gig at the time
his even more famous late night
nationwide radio show. What was
about to happen would become
a slapstick funny on-air moment
starring this iconic talk show
host who will retire this week
after a 50,000-interview career.
Never mind that you'll never
see this moment in his high-
lights reel.
Election night had been very
long and 'this next night was the
sort of throwaway most famous
figures turn down. Maybe that's
why I was there as King's desig-
nated pundit
Our first caller, a lady from
Kansas City, asked about the
election that had just made
George H. W. Bush certifiably
presidential and Michael (Zorba
the Clerk) Dukakis forever for-
gettable. As I began my yadda-
yadda, King began his multi-
tasking. Which is to say: hosting
on-air radio while catching up on
his lost nights sleep.
First, behind his huge then-
fashionable glasses, King's eyes
became bleary slits, then van-
ished behind descending eyelids.
His head nodded downward
until his chin came to rest on his
chest Alas, King's blissful seren-
ity was not shared in the control
room.
On the other side of the huge
window glass, the producer and
the engineer jumped up simul-
taneously but I held up my
hand, signaling not to worry.
I was going to give my friend
King the gift of a few lost winks.
I began a colloquy with the caller
while quietly balling up a sheet
of paper. After 10 minutes, I
fired the paper-wad across the
six-foot diameter table and
plunked King in the forehead.
He snapped awake and didn't
miss a beat.
"Thank you, Kansas City," the
radio-famous baritone resonated,
as great hilarity ensued in the
control room. The producer held
up a sign: "San Diego." And King
heeded the cue: "Now lets go
to SanDiego. Whats on your
mind?"
San Diego spoke. I bantered.
King snoozed in snore-free
silence. Ten minutes and one
more paper-wad fastball later,
King again snapped awake and
guided us into an extended com-
mercial.
As an interviewer, King was
frankly viewed dismissively by
my print colleagues. It was part
jealousy. After all, politicians
flocked to King's show knowing
he didn't like to prep and wasn't
about pinning them down with
hardball follow-ups. King knew
pols and celebs liked to talk and
he liked to get them talking.
So he asked the shortest on-air
questions and asked things
ordinary people wanted to ask
famous people.
He always seemed to have
just one agenda: Showcasing
his guests not himself. The
opposite of the Fox News and
MSNBC standard fare, where
hosts are about showcasing
themselves and use guests as
their foils.
Like glassblowing and cal-


ligraphy, the Larry King style of
on-air interviewing is becoming a
lost craft. We are not better for it
* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A


OTHER OPINION

US needs to increase cybersecurity











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Students serenade shoppers at Lake City Mall
Members of the Richardson Middle School chorus sing holiday songs Wednesday at the Lake
City Mall along with other local elementary and middle schools.


_ BRIEFS


Special elections
set for 2 seats
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Charlie Crist has set
special elections in South
Florida to replace two
Democratic state lawmak-
ers who have resigned.
Sen. Frederica Wilson
of Miami is leaving the
Legislature because she
was elected to the U.S.
House in November. Rep.
Oscar Branyon II of Miami
Gardens has resigned to
run for Wilson's Senate
seat
Crist on Wednesday
set primary elections Feb.
8 and general elections
March 1 for both seats.
The Legislature convenes
in regular session March
8. Wilson won the 17th
Congressional District seat
given up by Democratic U.S.


Rep. Kendrick Meek, who
lost a the U.S. Senate race
to Republican Marco Rubio.
Crist, a former Republican,
also ran for the Senate seat
as as independent.

Former deputy
gets jail term
MILTON A for-
mer Santa Rosa County
Sheriff's Office lieutenant
has been sentenced to 30
years in prison for sexual
assault.
A judge sentenced 46-
year-old John Mitchell
Tomlinson on Tuesday.
He was found guilty in
November of three counts
of sexual assault on a vic-
tim between 12 and 18.
Tomlinson was initially
charged in March with
120 counts of sexual bat-
tery on a child between,


the ages of 12 and 18. He
was fired in May follow-
ing an investigation by
the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
Authorities say Tomlinson
molested two girls.

Hulk Hogan ties
the knot
CLEARWATER
BEACH Hulk Hogan
has tied the knot.
His Attorney told
The Associated Press
Wednesday that Hogan
and Jennifer McDaniel
got married at Hogan's
home Tuesday during
a small and private cer-
emony.
Hogan's children,
Brooke and Nick, were
both in attendance.

N Associated Press


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.
Thursday, Dec. 9
Lake City
Police Department
Karyn Cisneros, no
age given, 123 SW Santos
Terrace, grand theft and
fraud swindle.
Friday, Dec. 10
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Kyle Lee Herron,
21, 17507 County Road
250, Live Oak, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of pos-
session of controlled sub-
stance (two counts) and
battery on a law enforce-
ment officer, possession of
alcohol under the age of
21, resisting officer with-
out force, and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Alfabian Gerwayne
Connor, 30, New River
Correctional Institute,
Raiford, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charges of possession of a
controlled substance and
possession of drug para-
pliernalia.
James Robert Gaines,
40, 4512 86th Street,
Bradenton, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance.
John Timothy
Graham, 48, 298 SW Hall,
Fort White, warrant:
Sell/delivery/purchase
of controlled substance,
possession of a controlled
substance with intent to
sell or deliver, possession
of drug paraphernalia (two
counts) and trafficking in
Oxycodone.
Marvin Harris, 38,
174 SW Ferndale, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of battery
on a law enforcement offi-
cer.
Adam David Link, 34,
108 SE Lakeside Glen, pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell,
warrant: No valid driver's


license and tag attached
not assigned, warrant:
Failure to appear.
Brandon Jamar Smith,
27, Reception Medical
Center, Lake Butler, war-
rant: Failure to appear to
pre-trial conference on
original charge of contra-
band in prison.
Lake City
Police Department
Mario Antonio
Stewart, no age given, 580
NE Leon Street, aggra-
vated assault.
Saturday, Dec. 11
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Addie Elaine Smith,
25, 11i57 SW Paul Pierce
Lane, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charge of possession of a
controlled substance, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge. of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of resisting a mer-
chant (two counts).
James A. White, 33,
1703 NE Congress Street,
driving while license sus-
pended/revoked (nine
counts/habitual), warrant
Failure to appear, warrant
Writ of bodily attachment
Monday, Dec. 13
Lake City
Police Department
Shante Kama Gainey,
no age given, 780 SW
Amberwood Loop, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of utter-
ing forgedbills.
Robert Adam Regar,
no age given, 780 SW
Amberwood Loop, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of pos-
session of more than 20
grams of cannabis.
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Kenneth Ronald
Mendon, 50,457 SE Bennie
Lane, warrant Tampering
with evidence.
Asa Thomas
Copenhaver, 26, 14231
E. County Road 1474,
Gainesville, warrant
Obtained a controlled sub-
stance by fraud or forgery.
* From Staff Reports


3-Days
o'a DoorBusters
Thurs-Sat. December 16-18 Hurry in while quantities last! Coupons Excluded


.2 j- .


~Ik.


4w
'*A q w
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East Cordele Square, Triangle East Center, Ridgeview Crossing, Town and Country Plaza & Mooresville Festival


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Friday
Cultural Presentation

A cultural presentation at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center will
be at 1 p.m. on Friday in the
Reading Room. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison Court.
For more information call, 386-
755-0235.

A Christmas Carol

A performance -of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8. p.m. Friday at the
High Springs Community Theater.
Tickets are available at The
Framery on W. Baya and at high-
springscommunitytheatercom.

Saturday.
Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts "The Life of a
Christian Teenager" at 6:15 p.m.
Saturday. The theater is located
at 348 N. Marion Ave. Call 386-
344-0319.

FACS Christmas Party

The Filipino American Cultural
Society of Lake City announces a
Christmas party taking place from
6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Saturday
at the Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. Enjoy a night of cul-
ture, dancing, and entertainment,
and possibly become a member of
FACS. For more information, con-
tact Bob Gavette at 386-965-5905.

Flapjack breakfast

A Relay For Life fundraising
flapjack breakfast is 8 a.m. to
10 -ni. Saturday at Applebee's.
.. neal will include pancakes,
scrambled eggs, homefries,
bacon, sausage, juices, coffee
and tea all you can eat. Tickets
are $10. Of the proceeds $7 will
go to Relay for Life.

A Christmas Carol

A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Saturday at
the High Springs Community
Theater. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya and
at highspringscommunitytheater"
comn.

Pancake breakfast

The RCC/AMN Inc. is having
a pancake breakfast 7 a.m. to 11
a.m. Saturday at the Richardson
Community Center. The tickets
are $5 and the breakfast will
consist of pancakes, Nettle's


COURTESY PHOTO

'Four Tickets to Christmas' highlights importance of faith
Austin Martin (from left), the Rev. Louie Mabrey, Amanda Trippensee and Nancy Mabrey rehearse for an
upcoming production of 'Four Tickets to Christmas' at Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church. Show times
for the free, Christmas musical are 7 p.m. Friday, 4 p.m. Saturday and 6 p.m. Sunday. Wesley Memorial will
present the productions at the church, located at 1272 SW McFarlane Ave., next to Summers Elementary. The
Broadway-style musical is set in 1905 and follows an out-of-work family performing group who unexpectedly has
a rural Christmas, learning the importance of their faith and the holiday's true meaning. Call Jerry Sue Fatzinger
at (386) 755-3757, (386) 397-3249 or (386) 752-3513.


sausage, grits, eggs and orange
juice. All proceeds will benefit
the 14-and-younger and 12-and-
younger boys basketball teams.
For more information, contact
Mario Coppock or Nicole Smith
at 386-754-7096.

Gift wrapping

Sevepro is hosting a gift wrap-
ping fundraiser from 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday at Lowes.
Donations will be accepted.
Money raised will go toward
Relay For Life.

Cartwheel-a-thon'
BARD Gymnastics is hosting a
cartwheel-a-thon 2 p.m. to 4 p.m
Saturday at the Lake City Mall.
Sponsors may pledge so much
money per cartwheel or make
a one-time donation. Checks
can be made to the Christian
Service Center and the dona-
tion is tax deductible. Call BARD
Gymnastics at 386-752-1710.

Tuesday, Dec. 21
Leads Club #1 meeting
The next Columbia County
Chamber Leads Club #1 meeting
is 8 a.m. Dec. 21 at Holiday Inn &
Suites. Breakfast is $6 per person.


Leads Clubs are dynamic groups
of Chamber Partners who meet
bi-monthly to exchange business
leads and ideas with fellow busi-
ness professionals. Call 386-752-
3690.

Theatre performance

Come watch the Geri-Actors
perform live on. stage at 6:30
p.m. Dec. 21 in the Dining Hall
of the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is located at
628 SE Allison Court. For ticket
information, call 386-755-0235.

Wednesday, Dec. 22
Theatre performance
The Geri-Actors serve up a
Matinee Penformance from 11
a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and from 12:30
- 1:30 p.m. Dec. 22 in the Dining
Hall of the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The performance is free
to the public. The center is locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison. Court. For
more information, call 386-755-
0235.

Thursday, Dec. 23
Blood Mobile seeks donors
The LifeSouth Blood Mobile
is seeking donors; 12 to 8 p.m.


OBITUARIES


Dec. 23 at Lake City Mall. Each
donor will receive LifeSouth's
free gift wrapping services and
could possibly win a new Apple
iPad.


every month in the Classrooms
at Lake City Medical Center.
Meetings are for people that
have had weight loss surgery,
contemplating surgery or just
trying to lose weight on their
own. E-mail thethinnerme@
gmail.com or call (386) 288-9153.

Every third Monday
MS support group to meet
An MS support group
meets every third Monday of
the month, at the Lake City
Columbia County Historical
Museum, 157 SE Hernando
Ave. Call Karen Cross at (386)
755-2950 or Jane Joubert at
(386) 755-5099 for more infor-
mation.

Every Tuesday
Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center
are looking for members.
Meetings are 12:45 p.m. to 2
p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Anyone retired and interest-
ed in becoming an actor or
actress is invited. Call Frank at
752-8861.

Domestic violence support
group to meet
A support group for.survivors
of domestic violence meets at
5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Child care
is provided. Call Another Way
.at 386-719-2700.


UF Master Gardeners
Wednesday, Dec. 29 are available


Live Performance
Fred Perry performs live
from 11 11:45 a.m. Dec. 29 in
the Dining Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. A game
of bingo will follow at 1 p.m.
The center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court. For more infor-
mation, call 386-755-0235.

Every fourth Monday
Bridge Club meeting
The Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meets from 1 to 5 p.m.
every fourth Monday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center,
628 SE Allison Ct. Call 755-
0235.

Every first Monday
Weight-loss support group
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support Group
holds meetings at 7 p.m. on
the first and third Monday of


The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
Tuesday. They answer garden-
ing questions and conduct soil
pH tests free of charge. Call
386-752-5384, or stop at the UF/
IFAS Extension Office at the
Columbia County fairgrounds
for more information.

Lake City Lons to meet

The Lake City Lions meet
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, at the
Guangdong restaurant, in the
Lake City Mall. Call Truett
George at 386-497-2050 or
Marshall Barnard at 386-497-
3536 for more information.

Square Dancing

The Dixie Dancers week-
ly dance is held at 6:30 p.m.,
every Tuesday at Teen Town
Community Center. Couples 12
and older are welcome. Call 386-
497-2834.


Annie Chappell,
Annie Chappell, born No-
venmber 12, 1920 in Vidalia,
Georgia, passed away Decem-
ber 11, 2010 in Haven Hos-
pice, Gainesville, Florida.
She is survived by her daugh-
ters, Christine Mackey, Starke,
FL, Eva Mae Jacobs, Vida-
lia, GA.; 11 grandchildren;
26 great grandchildren; 11
great -great grandchildren.
Graveside services will be held
2:00 P.M. Saturday, December
1, 2010 at Fort Call Cemetery,
Lake Butler, FL. Visitation with
the family will be Friday, De-
cember 18, 2010 from 6-8:00
P.M. at Great Elizabeth Bap-
tist Church, Lake Butler, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Mildred E. Cussins
Mildred E. Cussins, 84, of Ft
White, Florida, died December
14, 2010 at the Avalon Health-
care and Rehabilitation Center
following an extended illness.
She was the daughter of the
late Marion and Annie Brown.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Jim Cussifis; two
sons, Robert Wayne Brandon of
Manchester, TN and Billy Ray
Brandon of Beachgrove, TN.
She is survived by her son, Roy
L. (Bonnie) Brandon, Ft. White,
FL.; grandson, Roy Anthany
"Andy" Brandon and grand-
daughter, Nancy Brandon both
of Lake City, FL.; six great
grandsons, Melvin Hatcher,
Brandon Thomas, John Thom-
as, Dustin Blair, Shean Bran-
don Johnathan Westberry, all of
Lake City, FL.; & great grand-
daughter Brittany Brandon.
Funeral Services will be con-
ducted at 11:00 a.m., Friday,


December 17, 2010 at Gateway-
Forest Lawn Funeral Home with
Pastor Ulis Taylor officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be held one hour prior to service
time on Friday. GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, South US Hwy 441
Lake City, FL. 32025 :(386)
752-1954. Please sign guestbook
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

Charles Otho Dees
Charles Otho Dees, 70, ofGaines-
ville, went to be with Jesus on De-
cember 13, 2010 at his residence.
He was born in Hatchbend, FL
on October 21, 1940 to Vernie
DeWitt and Bessie Marie Rob-
inson Dees. He worked for Gus-
tafson Dairy for 33 years and
retired in 1999. He was presi-
dent of the Full Gospel Busi-
ness Men's Thursday Chapter
Meetings. He was ordained as
a minister of the Gospel in Sep-
tember of 2000 and was an elder
in his church, Assembly of Faith
in Bronson, FL. He was a prayer
warrior and lead a prayer meet-
ing in his home for five years.
He is survived by his wife of 24
years, Judy Dees; a daughter,
Darlene (Robert) Nash bf Lake
City, FL, sons: Malcolm (Pat)
Dees of Charleston, SC, Vernie
(Brenda) Dees of Trenton, FL
and C.J. Jones; sisters, Mar-
vel Ann ,Swails and Elizabeth
"Pinkie" Land and a brother
Redden Dees; 10 grandchil-
dren and 9 great-grandchildren.
Family will receive guests on
Thursday, December 16, 2010 at
Forest Meadows Funeral Home,
725 NW 23rd Ave from 5 to 7
PM. A Celebration of His Life
will be held at Forest Meadows
Funeral Home Chapel at 1:00
PM on Friday, December 17,
2010 with Pastor Dewayne Bow-
doin officiating. Interment will
be at Forest Mead( us Memorial
Park East, 3700 SE Hawthorne
Road following the service.


Arrangements are entrusted
to FOREST MEADOWS
UNERAL HOME,
CEMETERIES AND
CREMATORY. Please sign
our guestbook at www.for-
estmeadowsfh.com http://
www.forestmeadowsfh. com

Mrs. Johnell Mills
Mrs. Johnell Mills, 86, of Cape
Coral, Florida, passed away
peacefully on Tuesday, Decem-
ber 14, 2010 in the Hope Hos-
pice in Cape Coral following an
extended illness. A native and
longtime resident of Lake City,
Mrs. Mills was the daughter of
the late John and Nell Clarise
Myrick and had moved from
Lake City to Cape Coral about
twenty years ago. Mrs. Mills
had worked for more than twen-
ty years as a seamstress with the
New Way Uniform and Towel
Company of Miami, Florida.
She was also a homemaker and
was not only a talented seam-
stress but also very talented
at crochet work as well. Mrs.
Mills was preceded in death
by her husband, David Mills,
a son, James "Buddy" Mills, a
daughter, Mary Buras and sib-
lings, Dorothy Harrington, Mil-
dred Henck and John Myrick.
Mrs. Mills was of the Baptist
faith and had been a member
of the Berea Baptist Church
when she lived in Lake City.
Mrs. Mills is survived by her
daughter and son-in-law, Ella
& Glenn Luethje of Cape Coral,
Florida; a step-sister, Julie Al-
ice of Crestview, Florida; and
her grandchildren, Michael Bu-
ras (Stephanie) New Orleans,
Louisiana; Tony DeVilliers,
Cape Coral, Florida and Re-
becca Thompson (Christopher)
of Guyton, Georgia. Her three
great grandchildren, Eliza-
beth Buras, Michael Buras and
Lilly Thompson also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Mills


will be conducted at 2:00 PM on
Saturday, December 18, 2010 in
the Chapel of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home with Rev.
Melanie Firebaugh officiating.
Interment will follow in the For-
est Lawn Memorial Gardens. The


family will receive friends from
Noon until2:00 P.M. on Saturday
in the chapel of the funeral home.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,


FL 32025 please sign the on-
line family guestbook at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


HEALTH


THURSDAY DECEMBER 16, 2010


ON HEALTH


Dr. Peter Gott


Reader

wonders if

vegan diet

healthful

D EAR DR.
GOIT: I would
like you to give
us interested
readers your
opinion on the vegan diet.
There are members of
my family who have taken
on this way of eating for
well over a year now. Yes,
indeed, they have lost a
lot of weight on it, but my
concern is what it is doing
or rather not doing for the
body. Their color seems
pale to me, for one thing,
and when they come to my
house, they eat whatever I
have with gusto.
DEAR READER: I'm
a bit confused. If they eat
whatever you prepare, they
are either being kind or
they aren't true vegans.
This diet excludes all ani-
mal-derived ingredients
such as meat, eggs and
dairy products. Many veg-
ans prefer not to eat any
foods that use animal prod-
ucts as part of the process-
ing, such as refined white
sugar.
The diet includes soy
milk, tofu, peanut butter,
rice, beans, fruits, nuts, veg-
etables and grains. Almost
all foods, with the exception
of alcohol, fats and sugar
provide some necessary pro-
tein to the daily diet. Keep in
mind that because the habit
is so popular, producers
are now manufacturing hot
dogs, cheeses, mayonnaise,
iced cream and couitles
other items all without
the use of animal products.
People may make the
decision to become vegans
for a variety of reasons,
such as health, weight
loss or for the environ-
ment Because the diet is
relatively free of saturated
fats and cholesterol, it's an
easy way to lose weight
The diet lacks vitamin D. A
simple means of combating
this is through exposure to
sunlight Calcium can be
obtained through the inclu-
sion of fortified orange juice,
dark leafy green vegetables,
tofu processed with calcium
sulfate and more. In fact,
orange juice fortified with
calcium will provide 300
milligrams in one 8-ounce
glass. The Recommended
Daily Allowance for adults
between the ages of 19 and
50 is 1,000 milligrams per
day, an easy goal to achieve
when dairy is part of the
diet
The key to a successful
diet is variety. Those who fol-
low it religiously can enjoy
stir-fried vegetables, whole-
wheat breads, dates, apples,
frozen fruit desserts, tofu
lasagna, soy iced cream, veg-
gie burgers and a great deal
more. I don't know about
you, but it sounds good to
me. Therefore, while it's not
my choice, I must accept
that some people prefer to
follow veganism.
I do recommend a person
check with his or her physi-
cian before making the dra-
matic change.
People should make sure
that they receive adequate
vitamins and minerals daily
and should undergo blood
tests periodically to deter-
mine that they are neither
anemic nor vitamin deficient
If so, dietary modifications
or supplements might be
appropriate. A physician' or
nutritionist can answer any
questions.
* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," available at


most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently'
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


i.... .. .

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Francisco Felix (left) and his wife, Flor Felix, talk in their Laveen, Ariz., home about how his
liver transplant was canceled because Medicaid suddenly would not pay for it. In Arizona,
lawmakers have stopped paying for some kinds of transplants, including livers for people
with hepatitis C. When the cuts took effect Oct. 1, Francisco Felix, 32, who needs a liver,
suddenly had to raise $500,000 to get a transplant.


Medicaid cuts lead to teeth

pulled, transplant called off


By CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO
n Illinois, a pharmacist closes his
business because of late Medicaid
payments. In Arizona, a young
father's liver transplant is can-
celed because Medicaid suddenly
won't pay for it. In California, dentists
pull teeth that could be saved because
Medicaid doesn't pay for
root canals. "Elderly
Across the country, suffer t
state lawmakers have They're
taken harsh actions to try h
to rein in the budget-bust- around
ing costs of the health care tee
program that serves 58
million poor and disabled
Americans. Some states Dr. Naga
have cut payments to doc-
tors, paid bills late and


trimmed benefits such as insulin pumps,
obesity surgery and hospice card.
Lawmakers are bracing for more work
when they reconvene in January. Some
,states face multibillion-dollar deficits.
Federal stimulus money for Medicaid is
soon to evaporate. And Medicaid enroll-
ment has never been higher because of job
losses.
In the view of some lawmakers, Medicaid
has become a monster, and it's eating the
budget In Illinois, Medicaid sucks up more
money than elementary, secondary and
higher education combined.
"Medicaid is such a large, complicated
part of our budget problem, that to get our
hands around it is very difficult It's that
big. Its that bad," said Illinois Sen. Dale
Righter, a Republican and co-chairman of
a bipartisan panel to reform Medicaid in
Illinois, where nearly 30 percent of total
spending goes to the program.
Medicaid costs are shared by the federal
and state governments. It's not just the poor
and disabled who benefit Wealthier people
do, too, such as when middle-class families
with elderly parents in nursing homes are
relieved of financial pressure after Medicaid


Doctors launch]

last-ditch met

to fight superb


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
superbug named C-diff is
on the rise, a germ that
so ravages some people's
intestines that repeated
tries of the strongest, most
expensive antibiotic can't
conquer their disabling
diarrhea.
Now a small but growing
number of doctors are try-
ing a last-ditch treatment:
Using good bacteria to fight
off the bad by transplanting
stool from a healthy per-
son into the sick person's
colon.
Yes, there's a yuck fac-
tor. But reports of several
dozen cases in a medical
journal and at a meeting
of the nation's gastroenter-
ologists this fall suggest
that with no more inconve-
nience than a colonoscopy,
people who have suffered
C-diff for months, or longer,
can rapidly improve.
' "'his is the ultimate pro-
biotic," said Dr. Lawrence
Brandt of New York's
Montefiore Medical Center,
who has performed 17 of


starts picking up the bills.
Contrary to stereotype, its the elderly
and disabled who cost nearly 70 cents
of every Medicaid dollar, not the single
mother and her children.
In California, Medicaid no longer pays
for many adult, dental services. But it still
pays for extractions, that is, tooth-pulling.
The unintended consequence: Medicaid
patients tell dentists to pull teeth that could
be saved.


y patients
he most.
B walking
with no
rth."

raj Murthy


"The roots are fine.
The tooth could be saved
with a root canal," said Dr.
Nagaraj Murthy, who prac-
tices in Compton, Calif. "I
had a patient yesterday. I
said .we could do a root
canal. He said, 'No, it's
hurting. Go ahead and
pull it I don't have the
money.'"
Murthy recently pulled


an elderly woman's last tooth, but Medicaid
no longer pays for dentures.
"Elderly patients suffer the most,"
Murthy said. "They're walking around with
no teeth."
States can decide which optional ser-
vices Medicaid covers, and dental care is
among cutbacks in some places.
In Arizona, lawmakers stopped paying
for some kinds of transplants, including
livers for people with hepatitis C. When
the cuts took effect Oct. 1, Medicaid
patient Francisco Felix, who needs a liver,
suddenly had to raise $500,000 to get a
transplant.
The 32-year-old's case took a dramatic
turn in November when a friend's wife
died, and her liver became available.
Felix was prepped for surgery in hopes
financial donations would come in. When
the money didn't materialize, the. liver
went to someone else, and Felix went
home. His doctor told him he has a year
before he'll be too sick for a transplant.
'They are taking away his opportu-
nity to live," said his wife, Flor Felix. "It's
impossible for us or any family to get that
much money."

h ,, I'* CO
h

hod 7 '


ug


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Lawrence Brandt, at
the medical center in New
York, is among a small but
growing number of doctors
trying a last-ditch effort to
fight an intestinal superbug.

the procedures.
Dr. Alexander Khoruts of
the University of Minnesota
took a genetic fingerprint of
the gut bacteria in a woman
left emaciated after eight
months of severe C-diff.
Not only did the diarrhea
disappear after a fecal
transplant, but that nor-
mal bacteria mirroring her
husband's the donor
- quickly took root in her
recovering intestine.


Report: US man

may have been

cured of AIDS


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press
NEW YORK A very
unusual blood transplant
appears to have cured an
.American man living in
Berlin of infection with
the AIDS virus, but doc-
tors say the approach is
not practical for wide use.
The man, who is in his
40s, had a blood stem cell
transplant in 2007 to treat
leukemia." His donor not
only was a good blood
match but also had a gene
mutation that confers nat-
ural resistance to HIV.
Now, three years later,
the recipient shows no
signs of leukemia or HIV
infection, according to a
report in the journal Blood.
"It's an interesting proof-
of-concept that with pretty
extraordinary measures
a patient could be cured
of HIV," butt t is far too
risky to become standard
therapy even if matched
donors could be found,


said Dr. Michael Saag of
the University of Alabama
at Birmingham.
He is past chairman of the
HIV Medicine Association,
an organization of doctors
who specialize in treating
AIDS.
Transplants of bone mar-
row or, more commonly
these days, of blood stem
cells are done to treat
cancer, and their risks in
healthy people is unknown.
It involves destroying the
person's native immune
system with powerful drugs
and radiation, then replac-
ing it with donor cells to
grow a new immune sys-
tem. Mortality from the
procedure or its complica-
tions can be 5 percent or
more, Saag said.
"We can't really apply
this particular approach
to healthy individuals
because the risk is just
too high," especially when
drugs can keep HIV in
check in most cases,
Saag said.


FDA cracks down on

illegal supplements


Associated Press

WASHINGTON
- The Food and Drug
Administration is crack-
ing down on manufactur-
ers of certain weight loss,
body building and sexual
enhancement supplements
that contain potentially dan-
gerous ingredients.
The FDA said
Wednesday that some
manufacturers are decep-
tively labeling products
to .hide that they con-
tain 'ingredients known
to cause adverse health
effects. Other supple-
ments contain ingredients
that should only be avail-


able by prescription.
"These tainted products
can cause serious adverse
effects, including strokes,
organ failure, and death,"
said FDA Commissioner
Margaret Hamburg. "The
manufacturers selling
these tainted products
are operating outside the
law."
Dietary supplements
can slip through the reg-
ulatory cracks because,,
unlike drugs, they do not
have to be approved by
the FDA before they are
marketed. Manufacturers
are responsible..for mak-
ing sure their products
are safe.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010


Factory output, low prices '


give economy a boost : S


ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The economy
appears to be settling into a period of
moderate but enduring growth.
Factories are producing more
goods, retail prices are low, and the
malls are full ahead of the holidays.
Still, the housing market remains
a major drag on the economic recov-
ery. Builders, who are competing
with millions of foreclosed proper-
ties, are pessimistic about their pros-'
pects over the next six months.
The latest government and private-
sector reports support a more opti-
mistic but measured view that the
economy is growing at a faster rate,
and that 2011 will be better than most
economists thought just months ago.
In addition to the improved data,
Congress is on the cusp of passing
a package of tax cuts and an exten-
sion of emergency unemployment
benefits. That will put more money in
the pockets of consumers and busi-
nesses.
"This is all consistent with an econ-
omy that is getting back on track and
developing momentum going into
next year," said Carl Riccadonna, an
economist at Deutsche Bank.
Manufacturers have been a. major
reason for the momentum.
Factory output grew 0.3 percent in
November, the fifth straight month
of gains, the Federal Reserve said
Wednesday. Production of, comput-


ers, industrial equipment, appliances
and electronic goods all rose. That's
evidence that companies and con-
sumers are spending more, econo-
mists said.
Factory output has recovered
by 10.6 percent since its low point
in June 2009, according to Steven
Wood, chief economist with Insight
Economics LLC. Still, it remains 9.1
percent below its peak in April 2007.
Riccadonna noted that businesses
will get a tax break for buying new
equipment next year, under the tax
agreement hammered out between
President Barack Obama and con-
gressional Republicans. That measure
passed the Senate Wednesday and is
now headed to the House. If approved,
that could spur further business invest-
ment, Riccadonna said.
Consumers would also benefit,
and many are already increasing
their spending. Retail sales rose in
November, the fifth straight monthly
gain. That's a sign the holiday shop-
ping season will be a healthy one.
One reason for that is tame inflation.
Consumer prices barely changed in
November, the Labor Department said
Wednesday. Small increases in food and
energy costs pushed the Consumer
Price Index up 0.1 percent.
Excluding food and energy costs',
core consumer prices rose 0.1 per-
cent, the first increase in four months.
In the past year, the core index rose


0.8 percent. That's slightly higher
than October's 0.6 percent annual
increase, which was the lowest since
the index began in 1957.
Prices have stabilized since the
summer, when the index dropped for
three straight months. That raised
fears of deflation, a prolonged and
debilitating drop in prices, wages and
the value of stocks, homes and other
assets. But since then, the index has
increased for five straight months.
Food prices rose slightly last month,
mostly because of to higher costs for
meats, eggs and fish. Cereals, baked
goods and nonalcoholic beverages
also rose substantially.
Gas prices increased 0.7 percent,
driving energy costs up for the fifth
straight month.
Most Americans won't feel much
better about the economy until they
see more jobs and the 9.8 percent
unemployment rate begins to fall.
President Obama pressed 20 lead-
ers from the nation's largest com-
panies to help with job creation on
Wednesday. He wants them to invest
some of the more than $1.9 trillion in
untapped corporate cash in the eco-
nomic recovery.
Many economists' expect to see at
least some increase in hiring in the
months ahead. That would reverse a
disappointing showing in November,
when employers added a net total of
only 39,000 jobs.


Senate sends tax-rate bill to House


ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON In a
reach across party lines,
the Senate overwhelmingly
passed sweeping legisla-
tion Wednesday to pre-
vent a Jan. 1 income tax
increase for millions and to
renew jobless benefits for
the long-term unemployed.
A House vote is expected
today.
Within moments of the
81-19 Senate vote, President
Barack, Obama urged the
House to follow suit without
making any changes a
slap at rebellious liberals
working to stiffen the terms
of an estate tax provision
they characterize as a give-
away to millionaires and bil-
lionaires.
"I know there are different
aspects of this plan to which
members of Congress,
on both sides of the aisle,
object," Obama said. "That's
the nature of compromise.
But we worked hard to nego-
tiate an agreement that's a
win for middle-class families
and a win for our economy.
And we can't afford to let it
fall victim to either delay or
defeat"
At its core, the legislation
provides a two-year exten-
sion of the tax cuts at all
income levels that Congress
approved while George W.
Bush was president Without
action, they will expire on
Dec. 31.
The bill also would cut
2011 Social Security taxes
for all wage earners, a reduc-
tion that will mean an extra
$1,000 in take home pay
for an individual earning
$50,000.
In addition, the legislation
renews a program of jobless
benefits for millions who
were laid off more than six
months ago. Officials said
that without the bill, govern-
ment checks will be cut off
for two million Americans
over the holidays, and mil-
lions more over the next
year.
Energy tax provisions,
including extension of a gov-
ernment subsidy for ethanol
and breaks for producers
of other alternatives to oil,
were added in recent days to
strengthen lawmakers' sup-
port for the measure.
The legislation amounted
to the first fruits of a new
era of divided government, a
deal sealed little more than a
week ago by Obama, who is
nursing a fragile economic
recovery midway through
his term, and Republicans
whose position was greatly
strengthened in last month's
elections.
Concessions made by
the president sparked criti-
cism from liberals who were


angered at tax cuts for the
wealthy that he had long
criticized. Some provisions
agreed to by Republican
leaders brought objections
from conservatives unhappy
that the cost of the jobless
benefits would swell the fed-
eral budget deficit
And in the hours before
final passage, lawmakers
on both sides maneuvered
for political gain, a sign of
renewed struggle in 2011.
A Democratic attempt to
ease the paperwork burden
imposed by this year's big
health care bill was blocked by
Republicans. Democrats coun-
tered by vetoing a GOP alterna-
tive that would have included
offsetting spending cuts.
In the end, though, the
tax bill drew support from
44 Democrats and 37
Republicans, testament to
the appeal of lower taxes
and renewal of a program of
aid for victims of the reces-
sion at a time of 9.8 percent
unemployment. Fourteen
Democrats and -five
Republicans voted against
the bill.
Obama's call for the
House to accept the Senate-
passed measure continued a
postelection season of con-
tentiousness between the
president and Democrats
distressed that they lost their
majority in November.
Democratic House lead-
ers said they intended to
have the bill debated and
voted on by Thursday, but
declined to say what their
approach would be to the
estate tax.


Their dilemma was evi-
dent trying to keep faith
with members of the rank
and file who want to change
the legislation, yet avoid at
all costs having Democrats
saddled with blame if taxes
increase on Jan. 1.
That's what the Senate
Republicanleader,Sen.Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky,
warned might happen if the
bill was changed.
'This agreement is not
subject to being reopened,"
he said on Tuesday. "In
other words, we have an
understanding." -
However, McConnell's
insistence didn't extend
to a series of Republican
attempts to make modi-
fications in the moments
before Senate passage.
He and other
Republicans sided with a
failed attempt by Sen. Jim
DeMint, R-S.C. to make
the tax cuts permanent,
and again when Sen. Tom
Coburn, R-Okla., unsuc-
cessfully proposed spend-
ing cuts to cover the cost
of the unemployment
benefits.
In the House, Obama's
liberal critics were out-
spoken.
A closed-door meeting
of the rank and file ended
inconclusively Tuesday
night, and afterward Rep.
David Wu, accused the
president of showing
weakness in the face of an
emboldened Republican
Party.
"He has no street cred,"
the Oregon Democrat told


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reporters. "This tax bill is
a thin part of the problem.
They're going to get eaten
alive by the Republicans in
this chamber," he added,
referring to White House
officials.
By far the most con-
troversial element of the
bill concerned the estate
tax. Under the measure,
individual estates as large
as $5 million would pass
to heirs tax free an
amount that would reach
$10 million for couples
- with the balance taxed,
at a rate of 35 percent.
Under the Bush-era tax
cuts, the estate tax was
repealed for 2010, but
scheduled to return on
Jan. 1 with a top rate of 55
percent on the portion of
estates above $1 million
- $2 million for couples.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo, a battery pack is shown prior to being installed
in a Chevrolet Volt at the General Motors Hamtramck assem-
bly plant in Hamtramck, Mich. U.S. factory output grew for the
fifth straight month, adding to evidence that manufacturing
remains an engine of economic growth.



[ -


i1ffAm


i remember
S each day
so special
I ad sweet.
nmuch more
in oii furiture
if you iTill

Ma13 y Me
-, Pri. *; -"** ,- f '*."


Do You Need to

| POPTIHE

QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!
755-5440 or
755-5441
bl.r.. en '3 ,"am & 5 00pm

,! *tv


Michael Marino
BOB: 8/27/52
Height: 5' 5"
Weight: 144 lbs.
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Blue
Wanted For: VOP Grand Theft
Forgery x3; Uttering a
Forgery x2


' 7 .
" '5.-o. : .
.:r


Melinda D. Medley
AKA: Melinda D. Wood
DOB: 10/2/67
Height: 5' 3"
Weight: 140 Ibs.
Hair: Blonde Eyes: Blue
Wanted For: VOP Possession
of More Than 20 grams
Cannabis; Possession of Drug
Paraphernalia


WANTED AS OF 12/13/10
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


COLUMBIA COUNTY


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
www.columbiacrimestoppers.net


I Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General



GIVE THE GIFT CARD THAT BRINGS REALJOY!
We see it every time someone
comes to spend their gift card! r "
Real joy! Our gift cards are / i
available in any dollar amount
and they never expire. Stop by .
today and pick up some real joy
for your loved one!

LIVING PLANTS ARE A GIFT YOU'LL BE REMEMBERED FOR!
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


J










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010 9A


BRIEFS

28 asylum seekers
die as boat sinks
SYDNEY Australians
on a high cliff watched
helplessly Wednesday as
a wooden boat smuggling
about 70 would-be migrants
was smashed against the
rocks of Christmas Island
by monstrous waves,
dumping screaming men,
women and children into
the stormy surf. At least 28
people died.
The deaths underscored
the dangers faced by hun-
dreds of refugees who have
tried to sail from Indonesia
to Australia in recent years
often in cramped, barely
seaworthy bats to start
new lives after escaping
from poor, war-ravaged
countries.
"It was just horrible.
People getting crushed.
Bodies, dead children, the
whole thing was pretty
awful"' island resident
Simon Prince told The
Associated Press.

Feds sue BP
in Gulf oil spill
WASHINGTON The
Justice Department on
Wednesday sued BP and
eight other companies in
the Gulf oil spill disaster in
an effort to recover billions
of dollars from the largest
offshore spill in U.S. his-
tory.
The Obama administra-
tion's lawsuit asks that the
companies be held liable
without limitation under
the Oil Pollution Act for
all removal costs and dam-
ages caused by the oil spill,
including damages to natu-
ral resources. The lawsuit
also seeks civil penalties
under the Clean Water Act.
"We intend to prove
these violations caused or
contributed to the massive
.oil spill," Attorney General
Eric Holder said at a news
conference.
The federal lawsuit says
inadequate cementing of
the well contributed to the
disaster.

House takes up
repeal of policy
: WASHINGTON The
House initiated Wednesday
what could be the last
chance for now to repeal
the "don't ask, don't tell".
.policy that has stifled the
service of gays in the mili-
tary.
The stand-alone legisla-
tion heading for a House
vote later in the day would
end the policy that since
1993 has barred recruiters
from asking about sexual
orientationn while prohibit-
ing soldiers from acknowl-
:edging that they are gay.
The House is likely to
pass the bill. That would
throw the issue back to the
Senate, where Democratic
leaders pledging a vote are
running out of time before.
adjourning this session
of Congress. President
Barack Obama has called
on Congress to end the
policy.

Air Force blocks
sites with 'leaks'
WASHINGTON -The
Air Force is blocking
computer access to The
New York Times and other
media sites that published
sensitive diplomatic docu-
ments released by the
Internet site WikiLeaks,
a spokeswoman said
Tuesday.
Air Force Maj. Toni
Tones said more than
25 websites have been
blocked and cannot be


viewed by any Air Force
computer. The ban
- aimed at preventing the
viewing of classified infor-
mation does not apply to
personal computers.
She said the action
was taken by the 24th Air
Force, which is command-
ed by Maj. Gen. Richard
Webber and is respon-
sible for cyberwarfare and
computer security for the
service.
* Associated Press


Possible serial killer link on NY beach road


Associated Press

BABYLON, N.Y. The
FBI is offering its resourc-
es to assist New York homi-
cide investigators chasing
a possible serial killer after
four women's bodies were
found dumped alongside a
remote beach highway.
Suffolk County Police
Commissioner Richard
Dormer said in a brief
statement that investiga-


tors from his department
met with officials from the
FBI's New York office on
Wednesday. The agents
offered any assistance
they could provide, but an
FBI spokesman said it was
not immediately clear what
services Long Island police
would require. Dormer had
previously said the FBI
could be helpful in identi-
fying the victims.
The meeting came as


investigators were look-
ing into the disappearance
of two out-of-state women
working as prostitutes last
seen on Long Island. One
of the women, a 24-year-old
from New Jersey, was last
seen in the area where the
bodies were found, while
the second, a 22-year-old
from Maine, was reported
missing from a hotel about
15 miles away.
None of the bodies has


* i.., I--i ~


4


beeri identified.
Suffolk police discovered
the first body on Saturday
and the other three on
Monday while following
up on a missing' persons
report for the New Jersey
woman. The woman, iden-
tified by Jersey City, N.J.,
police as Shannon Gilbert,
had arranged to meet a
client on May 1 on nearby
Fire Island, about three
miles from where the bod-


ies were discovered.
Megan Waterman, of
Scarborough, Maine, adver-
tised her escort services on
Craigslist and was last seen
inJune at a Hauppauge, N.Y.,
hotel where she went with
her boyfriend. Detectives
believe the four were killed
elsewhere and then brought
to the site, a narrow strip of
land that divides the Great
South Bay from the Atlantic
Ocean.,


* ~


Let's Build Something Togethe



Shop for last-minute gifts

any way you want.


* Go to Lowes.com
* Visit the store near you
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receive 2u/o on bamsung major appliances priced $227 or more (before taxes) or
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ALL HOLIDAY
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Applies to Indoor and outdoor hoflday
decohations, live wreaths'aqd, garland and
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Details on our policies and services: Prices may vary after 12/20/10 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 12/9/10 and may vary based on Lowe's
Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. While Lowe's strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve
the right to correct any error. Prices and promotions apply to US locations only, and are available while supplies last. ++20 Minute Guarantee: In-stock merchandise ordered and paid for on
Lowes.com will be ready for pick up within 20 minutes of order completion. Guarantee valid only at store selected by customer when placing order, only during store's normal operating hours, and
only on orders completed at least 60 minutes prior to store closing. Orders placed less than 60 minutes prior to closing or outside of normal operating hours will be ready for pickup 20 minutes
after store opening on the next business'day. 20-minute period refers to preparation of product for pick up and excludes customer wait time. Time of order completion will be determined by Lowe's'
order confirmation e-mail. Guarantee excludes special orders, orders involving additional services, and LowesforPros orders, and is not valid the Friday following Thanksgiving day. See store or
Lowes.com for details. 2010 Lowe's Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Lowe's, the gable design and Let's Build Something Together are registered trademarks of LF, LLC. (101291)

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1OA LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010


2010 UNIVERSAL MEDIA SYNDICATE. INC. SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE


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By R.K. BERRY
Universal,Media Syndicate
UMS Have you heard about the free heater
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You just can't find custom made Amish man-
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2010 HS P O5503A OFI3312R


10A LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tklrby@lakeatygeporter.com


SPORTS


Thursday. December 16. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GYMNASTICS
Cartwheels for
charity event
Gymnasts from Bard
Gymnastics will be doing
cartwheels for charity at
the Lake City Mall from
2-4 p.m. Saturday to raise
money for the Christian
Service Center in Lake
City.
Each gymnast, who
competes at Bard, will
be seeking sponsors and
every dollar raised will
be matched for the
center. Sponsors may
pledge money per
cartwheel or make a
one-time donation.
Checks can be made to
the Christian Service
Center and the donation
is tax deductible.
The public is invited to
come out and watch the
cartwheel-a-thon.
For details, call Bard
Gymnastics at 752-1710.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at University
Christian School in
Jacksonville, TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at Newberry High,
5 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Robert E. Lee
High, 5:30 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Williston
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Robert E. Lee
High, 7:20 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Ed White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball vs.
Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at University
Christian School in
Jacksonville, TBA


Jernigan's


list


narrows to three


One of nation's
top recruits calls
Lake City home.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
n both Lake City
and the world
of high-school
recruiting, Timmy
Jernigan's name is
associated with football.
Good or bad, Jernigan
can't run from football.
It's in his blood, but once
you get to know him it
becomes evident that his
college decision will be
about much more than
football.
Jernigan believes in
the power of building
relationships. It's going
to be one of the deciding
factors for one of the
nation's top-ranked
players. He's been near
the top of the list of
college coaches and
recruiting sites for the
past couple of years,
drawing comparisons.to
many big name athletes.
ESPN.com said Jernigan
is "an active defender who
can be like a tornado at
times."
Those aren't bad words
for a high school student.
Rivals. corn has Jernigan
rated as the No. 3 player
at defensive tackle in
the country, but you
wouldn't know it talking
to him. When asked about
the rigors of everyday
calls from coaches and
recruiting sites, Jernigan
was candid.
"I never mind talking,
especially when it's for
the hometown paper,"
Jernigan said referring to
the Lake City Reporter.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan takes a breather during practice for the Old Oaken Bucket
against Suwannee High earlier this year. Jernigan, one of the nation's top recruits, said that
Alabama, Florida State and LSU are currently his top three schools.


Still, with phone calls
coming daily throughout
his senior season, the
process has been a long


one for Jernigan. Despite
the phone calls, Jernigan
doesn't plan to rush into
any decision. He also


wants to be able to share it
with those closest to him.
JERNIGAN continued on 3B


PSU

looks to

bounce

back

Nittany Lions
take on Florida in
Outback Bowl.
Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
- Linebacker U. didn't live
up to its lofty standards this
season.
Penn State allowed an
uncharacteristically high
164 rushing yards per game
and lacked a pass rush.
They were porous in the
red zone, allowing foes to
score 30 of 32 times inside
the 20 (24 touchdowns). -
So a defense ravaged by
injuries sees the Outback
Bowl on Jan. 1 vs. Florida
(7-5) as a chance to take the
first step toward shoring up
the holes in 2011.
"I think we've grown tre-
mendously as linebackers
and that's going to move on
toward these next couple
practices and to the bowl
game and after the bowl
game to next season," junior
linebacker Nathan Stupar
said. "I have a feeling that
you guys are really going to
see that next season."
There were flashes of
dominance at times, but
those moments were out-
numbered by periods of
middling defense not a
term that typically comes
to mind when talking Penn
State football. This is the
program, after all, that
.has produced linebacking
greats like Jack Ham and
Shane Conlan, not to men-
tion more recent standouts
like Sean Lee and Navorro
Bowman. Those playmak-
ers left last season, along
with defensive tackle Jared
Odrick, three stars who
BOWL continued on 3B


Lake City Middle School basketball


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2010-11 Lake City Middle School boys basketball team are (front row,
from left) Devon Burcker, manager Kaylon Jonas, Alex Adams, Derontae Jordan,
Roger Cray, Dedrick Vanover, Jordan Coppock, Alexis Ortiz and Darrell Jones. Back row
(from left) are coach Casharo Thomas, Paul Perry, manager Lance Gilbert, Jamarea Frierson,
Wayne Broom, Malachi Jean, Kelvin Jonas, Lonnie Underwood and coach Mardell Jackson.
Dilian Hall also is on the team.


Boys off to unbeaten start


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. comr
Lake City Middle School's
basketball team is off to a
9-0 start.
The Falcons beat
Suwannee Middle School,
38-30, in Live Oak on
Monday to remain
undefeated.
Kelvin Jonas and Wayne
Broom led the Falcons with
10 points apiece.


Roger Cray added nine
points, with six points
from Jamarea Frierson,
two points each from Paul
Perry and Dilian Hall, and
a free throw from Darrell
Jones.
Rounding out the Lake
City roster are Devon
Burcker, Alex Adams,
Derontae Jordan, Dedrick
Vanover, Jordan Coppock,
Alexis Ortiz, Lance Gilbert,
Malachi Jean and Lonnie


Underwood.
The Falcons host Baker
County Middle School at
6:15 p.m. today in the final
game before Christmas
break.
Results of Lake City's
games follow with scorers
listed.
Lake City 41, at
Madison County Central 40
(Nov. 15): Cray 15, Jonas
FALCONS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2010-11 Lake City Middle School girls basketball team are (front row,
from left) Ashayla English, Arshayla Bryant, Sharday Warren, Tyla Henry, Bernita Brown,
Christie Perry and Alkedria Lewis. Back row (from left) are manager Takemma Stewart,
coach Shaniea Wright, Jasmine Gissendanner, Mattie Young, Lyric Boyd, Lona Wilson,
Shontaniese Jonas, coach Carlos Brown and Akaina Powell. Nakila Scippio also is a coach
for the team.

Lady Falcons move over .500


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
Lake City Middle
School's girls basketball
team started slow, but has
won five of six to improve
to 5-4.
The Lady Falcons beat
host Suwannee Middle
School, 26-19, on Monday
to move above .500.
Lona Wilson scored 10
points for Lake City, fol-


lowed by Lyric Boyd with
nine points, Shontaniese
Jonas with six points and
Mattie Young with one.
Other team members are
Ashayla English, Arshayla
Bryant, Sharday Warren,
Tyla Henry, Bernita
Brown, Christie Perry,
Alkedria Lewis, Jasmine
Gissendanner and Akaina
Powell.
Lake City hosts Baker
County Middle School at 5


p.m. today.
Results and scorers from
earlier games follow.
Richardson Middle
School 37, Lake City 31
(Dec. 9): Wilson 18, Boyd
5, Jonas 4, English 4;
Lake City 33, Trenton
16 (Dec. 7): Wilson 13,
Jonas 6, Boyd 4, Lewis 4,
Gissendanner 2, English 2,
Young 1, Henry 1;
LCMS continued on 2B


I












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, South
African Open, first round, at Western
Cape, South Africa (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT Atlanta at Boston
10:30 p.m.
TNT San Antonio at Denver
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NFL San Francisco at San Diego
PREP BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN LewWallace (Ind.) vs. Simeon
(I.), at Chicago
9 p.m.
ESPN Findlay Prep (Nev.) vs.Yates
(Texas), at Houston
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA, Division I
tournament, semifinal, Texas vs. Penn St.,
at Kansas City, Mo.
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA, Division I
tournament, semifinal, California vs.
Southern Cal, at K(ansas City, Mo.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
W L
x-New England 11 2
N.Y. Jets 9 4
Miami 7 6
Buffalo 3 10
South
W L T
Jacksonville 8 5
Indianapolis 7 6
Houston 5 8
Tennessee 5 8
North
W L
Pittsburgh 10 3
Baltimore 9 4
Cleveland 5 8
Cincinnati 2 II
West
W L
Kansas City 8 5
San Diego 7 6
Oakland 6 7
Denver 3 10


T Pct PF PA
0.846 415 276
0.692 273 242
0.538225 244
0.231 256 339

Pct PF PA
0.615295 331
0.538347 318
0.385 316 355
0.385291 265

T Pct PF PA
0.769290 198
0.692 294 229
0.385235 252
0.154 262 345

T Pct PF PA
0.615 295 268
0.538 354 253
0.462314 307
0.231 269 376


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas

Atlanta


East
W L TPct PF PA
9 4 0.692 329 250
9 4 0.692 374 308
5 8 0.385238 310
4 9 0.308321 366
South
W -L TPct PF PA.
II 2 0846335 243


New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

Seattle
St. Louis
San Francisco
Arizona


10 3
8 5
1 12
North
W L
9 4
8 5
5 8
3 10
West
W L
6 7
6 7
5 8
4 9


0.769 330 240
0.615 260 267
0.077 164 338

T Pct PF PA
0.692 253 228
0.615 306 189
0.385 230 274
0.231 285 309

T Pct PF PA
0.462261 329
0.462245 268
0.385 243 280
0.308243 351


x-clinched playoff spot
Today's Game
San Francisco at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Kansas City at St. Louis, I p.m.
Washington at Dallas, I p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at Circinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at'Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Boston, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Miami at NewYork, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 7.p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 13 Missouri vs. Oral Roberts,


8 p.m.
No.


18 Memphis vs. Austin Peay,


8 p.m.
Friday's Game
No. 7 Tennessee at Charlotte, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. South Carolina,
2 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas vs. Southern Cal, Noon
No. 5 Syracuse vs. lona, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Kansas State vs. Florida
at BankAtlantic Center, Sunrise,
5:30 p.m.


No. 8 Pittsburgh vs. Maryland-Eastern
Shore. 7 p.m.
No. 9 Baylor vs. Gonzaga at American
Airlines Center, Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
No. 10 Villanova vs. Delaware.
7:30 p.m.
No. II San Diego State vs. UC Santa-
Barbara, 10 p.m.
No. 12 Illinois vs. Illinois-Chicago at
the United Center, 2 p.m.
No. 13 Missouri vs. Central Arkansas
at Missouri, 8 p.m.
No. 14 Michigan State vs. Prairie View,
6:30 p.m.
No. 15 Georgetown vs. Loyola, Md.,
Noon
No. 16 BYU vs. UCLA at the Honda
Center, Anaheim, Calif., 5:30 p.m.
No. 17 Kentucky vs. MVSU, 8 p.m.
No. 19 Purdue vs. Indiana State at
Conseco Fieldhouse, 4 p.m.
No. 20 Louisville vs. Gardner-Webb,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Texas- vs. North Carolina at
Greensboro (N.C.) Coliseum, 4 p.m.
No. 22 UNLV vs. Southern Utah,
10 p.m.
No. 25 Texas A&M vs. Arkansas at
American Airlines Center, Dallas, 2 p.m.
Sunday's Game
No. 24 Notre Dame vs. Stony Brook,
4:30 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
SUNSHINE TOUR
South African Open
Site: Durban, South Africa.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Durban Country Club (6,733
yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.32 million. Winner's share:
$208,330.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Sunday, 9:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.southafricanopen.
corn
Sunshine Tour site: http://www.
sunshinetour.com
PGA European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Anaheim at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Carolina atAtlanta, 7 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8 p.m. ,
Ottawa at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Nashville at New'Jersey, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Colorado, 9 p.m.


Jets suspend Alosi indefinitely


Associated Press

FLORHAM PARK, NJ.
- The New York Jets have
suspended assistant coach
Sal Alosi indefinitely after
they discovered he ordered
five inactive players to form
a wall along the sideline
for a punt return, during
which he tripped a Miami
Dolphins player.
General manager
Mike Tannenbaum said
Wednesday that Alosi, the


team's strength and con-
ditioning coach, did not
initially acknowledge that
he ordered players to stand
that way during the investi-
gation Monday.
The team suspended
Alosi for the season with-
out pay and fined him an
additional $25,000 after he
stuck out a knee and tripped
Miami's Nolan Carroll, who
was covering the punt in
the third quarter of the
Dolphins' 10-6 win Sunday.


Carroll can't get away
from tripping incident

DAVIE Miam
Dolphins rookie cor
nerback Nolan Carrol
has found it difficult to ge
away from replays of the
tripping episode involve
ing him and the New Yorl
Jets.
Carroll said Wednesday
he has seen the replay on
TV more times than he can
count


FALCONS: Baker County visits today


Continued From Page 1B
11, Jones 9, Broom 4,
Hall 2;
Lake City 47, at
Richardson Middle School
18 (Nov. 18); Jonas 12,
Frierson 12, Coppock 9,
Hall 6, Cray 4, Jordan 4,
Broom 3, Underwood 2,
Burcker 2, Adams 1;
Lake City 54, at Baker
County 41 (Nov. 22): Jonas
18, Hall 9, Jones 7, Broom
6, Cray 6, Ortiz 3, Bucker 2,
Underwood 2;




LCMS
Continued From Page 1B
Lake City 19, Madison
County Central 18 (Dec. 6):
Wilson 10, Boyd 8, Bryant
2, Jonas 2;
Lake City 31, at
Hamilton County 22
(Dec. 2): Wilson 19, Jonas
10, Boyd 8, Young 2;
Lake City 22, Suwannee
11 (Nov. 30): Wilson 9,
Boyd 8, English 2, Bryant
2, Young 1;
at Baker County 27,
Lake City 20 (Nov. 22):
Wilson 9, Bryant 5, Jonas 3,
Boyd 2, Lewis 1;
at Richardson 22, Lake
City 22 (Nov. 18): Wilson 9,
Jonas 6, Boyd 5, Bryant 2;
at Madison 29, Lake
City 19 (Nov. 15): Jonas 8,
Wilson 8, Boyd 2, Young 1.


Lake City 39, Suwannee
19 (Nov. 30): Hall 8, Broom
8, Jonas 5, Cray 3, Jones
3, Underwood 2, Perry 2,
Adams 2, Jordan 1;
Lake City 56, at
Hamilton County 31 (Dec.
2): Cray 13, Jonas 12, Perry
7, Hall 6, Broom 4, Jean
4, Coppock 3, Jones 2,
Burcker 2;
Lake City 41, Madison
40 (Dec. 6): Jonas 12,'
Broom 11, Cray 9, Jones 5,




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SARBS I


Perry 5, Jean 2;
Lake City 41, Trenton
13 (Dec. 7): Ortiz 6, Cray
5, Adams 5, Broom 4
Underwood 4, Jones 4
Jean 4, Jordan 2, Perry 2
Frierson 2, Jonas 2, Hall 1;
Lake City 51
Richardson 27 (Dec. 9)
Jonas 9, Broom 8, Cray 8
Perry 6, Frierson 4, Hal
4, Underwood 2, Vanover
2, Jones 2, Jean 2, Ortiz 2
Adams 1.


THAT SCRAMBLED GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: T 1 (
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: KNIFE TULLE MAMMAL BLOODY
Answer: What happened when the trapeze stunt
failed HE TOOK THE "FALL"


i
-


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High wrestlers who placed at the Capital City Classic tournament are (front row,
from left) Michael Roberts, Daniel Graham and Cole Schreiber. Back row (from left) are
coach Andrew Porter, Monterance Allen, Joe Fields and Carlos Vega.


Columbia High wrestling


10th at Capital City Classic


From staff reports

Columbia High's wres-
tling team placed 10th in
the Capital City Classic
tournament at Chiles High
in Tallahassee on Friday
\and Saturday.
Niceville High nipped
Lincoln High, 207-206, to
win the 27-team event.
Columbia scored 94 team
points.
Cole Schreiber made the
best showing among the


Tigers. He placed second
in the 103-pound weight
class with a record of 3-1.
Monterance Allen (5-1)
placed third at 189 pounds,
while Daniel Graham (5-2)
was fifth at 145 pounds and
Joe Fields (3-2) was sixth at
171 pounds.
Other Columbia wres-
tlers: Jacob Dicks, 3-2 at
112 .pounds; Edriech Rosa,
1-2 at 119 pounds; Isaac
Henderson, 1-2 at 152
pounds; Daniel Devers,


2-2 at 160 pounds; Deontae
Crumitie, 1-2 at 215 pounds;
Chris Polbus, 0-2 at 289
'pounds.
Polbus and Michael
Roberts (145 pounds)
were undefeated in junior
varsity matches. Carlos
Vega was 3-1 at 189 pounds,
and Tyler Penner was 0-2 at
289 pounds.
Columbia is wrestling at
University Christian School
in Jacksonville this Friday
and Saturday.


Associated Press "It's great to be back
in Philadelphia," Lee said
PHILADELPHIA Cliff Wednesday at a news con-
Lee and the Phillies have ference at Citizens Bank
finalized a $120 million, Park. "I never wanted to
five-year contract that leave this place in the first
brings the star pitcher back place. To get an opportunity
to Philadelphia. to come back and be a part"
Lee spurned more lucra- of this rotation is something
tive offers from the New that can be historic."
York Yankees and Texas The deal was reached
Rangers to return to the late Monday night, and Lee
Phillies, who traded him arrived in Philadelphia late
away exactly one year ago Tuesdaynight.Thecontract
to this day after he helped was announced Wednesday
them reach the 2009 World after Lee passed a physi-
Series. cal.


l ACROSS

e 1 Cast a ballot
- 6 Ode or sonnet
k 10 Rise and shine
12 Angora
y sweater
n 14 High spirits
n 15 Whispered
loudly
16 Cheesy snacks
18 USN officer
19 Chevalier
musical
21 Employs
23 Brownish fruit
24 de plume
n 26 Claimant's cry
Y 29 Delia Street's
penner
31 Try for
apples
33 Ambition
35 Harrow rival
, 36 Levin or
: Gershwin
, 37 Go into seclu-
1 sion
r 38 Coal scuttles


40 Eddie Cantor's
wife
42 Hang back
43 Watches
the kids
45 Like the oceah
47 Last degree
50 Dulcimer's kip
52 Investigated
54 Trolls
58"Get
to safety
59 Commotion
60 Hold on to
61 Flagpole top-
per

DOWN

1 Comic-strip
prince
2 Have an out-
standing bal-
ance
3 Hebrew T
4 Really skimping
5 Make late
6 Self-assured
7 Fun house cries


The two-time All-Star
and 2008 AL Cy Young
Award winner helped the
Rangers reach their first
World Series this year.
He chose to rejoin the
Phillies and combine with
Roy Halladay, Roy .Oswalt
and Cole Hamels to form a
dynamic starting rotation.
He will wear No. 33.
"That was the main
thing, to be a part of that
rotation," Lee said. "And
with this team and whatve
they've accomplished, it
was a no-brainer."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

V IIRGO B A GE L
SALOON ORNATE
ONIONS GEODES
INANE PEAR
SYUMA SKULK

HOT CACAO LE

UKE E LHASA BUN
GRATA TSKS
SASH REN QUIT
OVVID SUNNY
ESPRIT RAIDER
GUINEA ENDURO
OBE Y S BESET


8 Make less
painful
9 Demeanor
11 UN locale
12 Electrical units
13 Hwys.


17 Joke teller
19 Circumference
20 Ice hut
22 Express relief
23 Retainer
25 Kimono sash
27 Purifies water
28 Nobelist from
Egypt
30 Purposes
32 Counterfeit
34 Relay compo-
nent
39 Appraise
(2 wds.)
41 Street crosser
44 Ocean
motion
46 Coffee shop
lure
47 Radio's PBS
48 Long hike
49 Yard tool
51 Elev.
53 Prior to yr.1
55 Coffee holder
56 Building
annex
57 Sault Marie


12-16 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


Cliff Lee, Phillies finalize


$120 million, 5-year deal


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


,


ROBAHR



SKENIC
71 -71
-' ^IL














Five division leaders can clinch 1I "


Associated Press

NEW YORK Five
division leaders can clinch
playoff berths this week-
end, and the Patriots and
Steelers can secure first-
round byes in the AFC.
Pittsburgh and
Jacksonville in the AFC,
Atlanta, Chicago and the
New York Giants in the
NFC all are in position to
earn postseason spots. The
Jaguars simply have to win
at Indianapolis to take the
AFC South.
New England wins the
AFC East and earns a bye
if it wins at home against
Green Bay and the Jets lose
at Pittsburgh. The Patriots
were the first team to clinch
a playoff berth last week.


The Steelers get the AFC
North crown with a win
and a Baltimore loss, and
also can grab a bye if the
Steelers have the strength
of victory tiebreaker
over the Ravens and
Jaguars after this weekend's
games.
If Chicago wins Monday
night at Minnesota and
Green Bay loses, the Bears
take the NFC North.
Atlanta, which leads the
NFC South by one game
over New Orleans, makes
the playoffs with a victo-
ry or a tie at Seattle. The
Falcons get in even if they
lose if the Giants fall to
Philadelphia or tie, or the
Bears lose or tie, or Green
Bay loses or ties.
For the Giants to qualify,


they must beat the Eagles
at the Meadowlands the
teams currently are. tied
atop the NFC East at 9-4 -
and have Chicago, Green
Bay and Tampa Bay (home
for Detroit) all lose, plus
clinch the strength of vic-
tory component over the
Buccaneers.
Three division run-
ners-up also have shots at
securing playoff berths this
weekend.
The Saints do it with a
win and losses or ties by
the Giants and Bucs,' or
by the Bears and Bucs, or
by the Packers and Bucs.
They also get in with a tie
and losses by the Bucs and
Packers, or a tie and loss-
'es by the Bucs, Bears and
Giants.


Baltimore needs to win
and have the Colts and
Chargers (at home against
San Francisco on Thursday
night) lose or tie, or win and
see the Colts and Dolphins
(home for Buffalo) lose or
tie while the Chiefs (at St.
Louis) lose. A tie does it for
the Ravens if Miami, San
Diego and Indianapolis all
lose.
As for the Jets, a victory at
Pittsburgh combined with a
loss or tie by the Dolphins
and Colts and a loss by
the Chiefs get them into
the postseason. They also
qualify with a win and loss-
es or ties by the Dolphins,
Colts and Chargers, or
with a tie and losses by
Miami, Indianapolis and
San Diego.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Jeremy Mincey (94)
celebrates as he walks off the field after defeating the
Oakland Raiders 38-31 Sunday in Jacksonville.


BOWL: Line key for Nittany Lions


Continued From Page lB

commanded attention from
opposing offensive coordi-
nators.
The defensive line,
though, couldn't get enough
push up front, and two
juniors pegged for breakout
campaigns tackle Devon
Still and end Jack Crawford
- fell short of expectations.
Penn State (7-5) is ninth in
the Big Ten with 16 sacks.
Crawford was slowed by a
foot injury much of the sea-
son, but wasn't playing well,
even when healthy.
He was part of a lengthy
list of defenders sent to the
sideline. Among the other
notable names, safety Nick
Sukay (chest) is out for
the year, while it's unclear
whether defensive end
Eric Latimore (left wrist)
will return for the Outback
Bowl.
Penn State should have
top linebacker Michael
Mauti back, though, at 100
percent for Florida after
being hampered by a right
shoulder injury the last few
weeks of the season.
The sophomore stopped
short of saying the lineback-


ing crew took a step back
this year, but did note the
unit had three new start-
ers replacing three players
drafted into the NFL. Poor
tackling was a yearlong,
team-wide issue, too.
'"The more we play, we're
just going to get better,"
Mauti said. "That's what we
tried to do all season."
Not that 2010 was a com-
plete disappointment. The
Nittany Lions are second in
the league in pass defense,
and for the most part, didn't
stray too far from coordina-
tor Tom Bradley's "bend-
but-don't break" scheme.
And for all the talk from
coach Joe Paterno about
the youth of the team -
only three seniors are listed
as starters on the defensive
depth chart the hope
is that the younger players
benefited from the more-
than-expected playing time.
It was enough of a con-
cern for Paterno that he
told his staff to concentrate
on developing the younger
players during the first cou-
ple days of bowl practice.
Players are taking finals


now, and practice picks up
in Florida on Sunday.
Il said, 'Let's not worry
too much about the older
kids'," Paterno said. "I was
really pleased with the way
some of the younger kids
reacted. There's more per-
sonnel, better personnel,
with some of the younger
kids than I thought."
Like Penn State, Florida
struggled at times in con-
ference play. The Gators,
used to winning the SEC,
stumbled to a 4-4 finish in
their league. But Paterno
knows, in many ways, that
Florida is still Florida. And
that means the Gators could
have a speed advantage
over the Nittany Lions.
So, a stout, passionate
performance in Tampa
could be just the confi-
dence boost this Penn State
defense needs to prepare
for 2011.
"I think we showed some
high points during the sea-
son, but we also showed a
couple of low points," Still
said. "That's something for
us to look at during the
offseason."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Ahmad Black (35) breaks up a pass intended for Kris Durham (16) during the game
against Georgia in Jacksonville Oct. 30.



JERNIGAN: Taking time on decision


Continued From Page 1B

"It was possible that
I'd have committed at the
Army All-American game,
but I want my family to be
there," he said. "Not all of
them can travel, so it will
be after that. It could go all
the way to signing day."
Jernigan realizes the
decision is one that could
impact him down the line.
"It's not just a decision
for the next four years," he
said. "It can effect me for
the next 50 years, so I'm
being very cautious."
Jernigan does have
leaders for his decision,
but he leaves the door
open for a last-minute
change of heart.
"My favorite three are
Alabama, FSU and LSU,"
Jernigan said. "I feel like it
will be one of those three,
but with two months left,
you can never predict
anything in college football.
Anything can happen."
While education will
obviously play a role in
deciding which school he
will attend, Jernigan feels


that his list of choices all
offer excellent education
opportunities.
"I feel like I'll get a good
education at whatever
school I choose if I keep
the right mindset and
determination," Jernigan
said. "I feel like I'll play as
well if I put in the work.
I want to be comfortable
and feel like I'm at home.
That's the big factor. I
know I can play anywhere
if I do what I'm suppose to,
but I'm looking for a home
away from home."
Atmosphere has been a
major determining factor in
narrowing his list to three,
and Jernigan feels each of
the three offers something
a little different.
"Alabama has an
atmosphere of winning,"
he said. 'The coaches
mean business and they're
super coaches. LSU, I've
developed some real
friendships with their
players and some of the
recruits and I've just been
around FSU for so long


that I know them."
Jernigan's relationship
with Florida State
defensive line coach Odell
Haggans may give the
Seminoles an edge in the
end.
"He's real cool," Jernigan
said. "He came to the house
for an in-home visit, and we
didn't even talk football. We
just talked about ourselves
and how much we can
relate to each other."
Though Jernigan didn't
completely shut the door
on the Gators, he didn't
mention them in his top
three. Still, he's keeping
an eye on the situation in
Gainesville, in particular,
with the new coach.
"As far as (Will
Muschamp), I don't really
know him yet," he said.
"We haven't had a chance
to speak. I didn't have any
warning when (Urban) .
Meyer stepped down, and
it kind of shook me. It's
college football, so crazy
things happen late in the
season."


Favre hands over longest


streak tag to Manning


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS
- Peyton Manning has
never missed an NFL
game and he's not about
to -start now.
The NFL's new active
leader for consecu-
tive starts by a quar-
terback plans on being
out there on Sunday, as
usual, when the Colts
play Jacksonville. It
will be start No. 206 for
Manning.
Two days after Brett
Favre finally gave the
only four-time league
MVP a chance to chase
the record, Manning
said he hasn't even cal-
culated what it would
take to make up the gap
between himself and the
only other three-time
MVP in league history.
It would take 93 games
- five-plus seasons to
break it.
"I've always had a tre-
mendous appreciation for
that streak, and I think
when it ended, everyone
kind of took time to realize
how amazing and impres-
sive that was," Manning
said Wednesday. "I think
when you say or write 297
games, it doesn't really do
it justice. What he's done
for his teammates, to be
there every game, truly is
amazing."
By that definition,
Manning has been every
bit as impressive.
During Favre's 19-sea-
son span of consecutive
starts, which included
24 postseason games for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning (18) passes
as Tennessee Titans defensive end Jacob Ford (78) rushes


on Thursday in Nashville, Tenn.

a total of 321, he played
through pain, injuries and
personal tragedy. The inju-
ries sometimes put Favre's
streak in jeopardy, though
it didn't end until an ail-
ing right shoulder finally
put Favre on the bench
Monday night.
Manning has made his
223 consecutive starts
including the playoffs
look more routine.
He has rarely even been
listed on the injury report


and the significant injuries
Manning has endured can
essentially be summed up
this way: Injured knee in
a preseason game in 2001,
fractured jaw later that
season, neck surgery this
past offseason and injured
hamstring last season. The
most serious injury was
the infected bursa sac ii
his left knee, which kept
him out of training camp
in 2008 and hampered the
first half of that season.


COURTESY PHOTO

Punt, Pass & Kick championship
Five local students competed in the Punt, Pass & Kick championships in Jacksonville
on Sunday. Bottom row (from left) are: Tatum Morgan, second place ages 12-13; Joelyn
Myers, second place ages 8-9; Karndyn Kvistad, second place ages 10-11. Top row are:
Jamarea Frierson, fourth place ages 14-15 (left) and Hanna Baker, first place ages 14-15.
As a winner, Baker will qualify for competition at an NFL playoff game if she in the top 4 in
the nation for her age group. Myers attends Eastside Elementary; the other students attend
Lake City Middle School.


LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2010


' Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2010 4B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Journals spanning 22 years

will be the gift of a lifetime


DEAR ABBY: This is in
regard to "Blocked Writer in
Oklahoma" (Oct. 29), who
has been writing in journals
for her son for 22 years and
wonders when to give them to
him now that he's married and
has a son on the way himself.
I agree with you that giving
them to him- now would be un-
wise because he has too much
going on in his life.
She should give him a
year's worth of writings when
his son turns 1, so he'll know
what his mom was going
through when he was 1. Then
give him another year's worth
when his son turns 2, etc. All
I can say is, wouldn't it be a
great world if all kids had a
mom like Blocked! KATHY
IN EDMOND, OKIA.
DEAR KATHY: Thank you
for your letter. Blocked may
have been unsure of when to
present her son with the jour-
nals she had been keeping for
so many years, but readers ex-
perienced no writer's block in
expressing their views on the
subject. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: Any mother
who secretly keeps a jour-
nal for 22 years has a screw
loose. Instead of mothering,
she sounds like she is smoth-
ering. For her to record ev-
ery moment of her son's life
is an attempt to control him
forever. That woman ought to
get a grip and get a life of her
own. ANDREW IN SAN
FRANCISCO
DEAR ABBY: You advised
Blocked Writer to wait for a


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
milestone birthday (25th) to
give her son ,the journals. I
would implore her not to wait
three years. You never know
what life brings. NOW is the
time for sharing such a won-
derful, loving gift. LINDA
IN CALGARY, CANADA
DEAR ABBY: This journal
is priceless, not only to her son
and his posterity, but eventu-
ally to historians. Imagine how
it will be to read this journal
in 200 years and glimpse what
life was like for this family. I
beg her to make a copy of it
before she gives the original
to her son. I hope she can find
some historical society willing
to accept this journal as part of
its collection. JO ELLEN
IN BOUNTIFUL, UTAH
DEAR ABBY: I smell a
narcissist! No new father has
the emotional reserves to
confront this encyclopedia. If
the entries are all proud and
glowing, great. But many nar-
cissists time their gifts to steal
some spotlight from other mo-
mentous occasions. I'd save
the journal for a,future date.
Meanwhile, she should pitch
in and help the new parents.
This is one time when actions
speak louder than words.


- ANONYMOUS IN WEST
ORANGE, NJ.
DEAR ABBY: Giving the
journal now would be a waste.
She should continue writing.
Her son's life isn't over; he is
just beginning.
Continuing the journal on
his journey through life as a
parent, and memorializing her
feelings watching him and her
grandchild would be a better
gift for the son to "find" once
the mother is no longer here.
A journal should never replace
telling people in person how
you feel. If Blocked at any time
is unable to continue the writ-
ing, the last of the journal could
be dictated and transcribed by
a friend for her.
I agree she should start a
companion journal about her
life as well. But I encourage
her to continue writing her
son's journal. It would be the
gift of a lifetime. CHRISTY
IN TAMPA, FLA.
DEAR ABBY: Journaling
your child's life when he is a
child is fine and he may ap-
preciate having a record to
look back on. And once a child
becomes a teenager, it would
be all right to note special
events. But every day? NO!
Teenagers want some privacy.
Frankly, the idea that she has
continued this after he became
an adult strikes me as creepy
and stalker-ish. SHOCKED
IN CALIFORNIA
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't let anyone
bog you down with tedious
details. Spending time with
someone you love or work-
ing on a hobby or simply
enjoying .a good book will
better prepare you for the
rest of the week. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You can get so
much done if you get up
early and dig into your to-
do list. Get together with
friends, colleagues or a
group that shares your in-
terests. A romantic outing
should be scheduled in.

GEMINI (May21-June
20): Take care of last-min-
ute paperwork if you want
to take advantage of a tax
break being offered. Disci-
pline will help you restruc-
ture your current position
for greater maneuverability
in the new year. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Competence will
be what secures your posi-
tion or helps you get a new
one. Get down to business.
A love relationship needs
a little tender, loving care.
Make plans to celebrate the
festive season with some-
one special. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Someone may be
trying to get you to spend
more than you can afford.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Spend time with the people
who want nothing from you
but your company. Good
friends and a little enter-
tainment will be the best
remedy for feeling low. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Time spent at home
will be rewarding if you
make it a family day. You
can travel to an outlet that
supplies something you
want to give to others as a
token of friendship, and get
it for a bargain. You can re-
solve a problem concerning
your home and property.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Complaints will only
come back at you, so don't
bother making any. You are
better off doing whatever
needs to be done so you
can get on with your day.
Negative people will bring
you down, so avoid working
with them. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Enjoy the com-
pany of your peers, friends
and neighbors. Taking an
honest look at your skills
and what you have to offer
will help you put together a
better resume or proposal
for a job. Love is in the
stars. ***
SAGHITARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Accept the
inevitable. Spend more time
making your surroundings
festive or looking at a do-
mestic investment that can
help you turn a profit. Now
is not the time to make a
move but rather to research
the possibilities..*****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Good for-
tune is heading your way.
Talking to someone with
experience will help you
make a decision regarding
where you want to be and
what you want to do. A ro-
mantic connection will ease
your stress and help you
relax. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Let your intu-
ition lead the way. Helping
someone in need will give
you a better sense of who
you are and what you are
capable of doing. Don't let
someone you love take ad-
vantage of your generous
spirit ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You may want
to make abrupt decisions
and changes that will affect
your status and your posi-
tion, but hold off. There
is time to take action and
waiting for the most oppor-
tune moment will pay off.
Patience and a sound strat-
egy will bring the highest
rewards. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: D equals F
"NXDL XU UFTMY, RKB XY XU FLML
YT AL NXSLB. .. YFLML' U GTML YT
NXDL YFRK IFLLWATKLU." WRYL
V X K U N L Y

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "You can be true to the character all you want, but
you've got to go home with yourself." Julia Roberts
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-16


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
SHELUOOO-RNV/BODY \, H1M-DAD1


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 10-272-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEE EDWARD YOUNG,
a/k/a LEE E. YOUNG,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of LEE
EDWARD YOUNG a/k/a LEE E.
YOUNGS, deceased, File No. 10-
272-CP, by the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32055; that the total cash value of
the estate is $3,000.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
NAME:
ADDRESS:
Edward Youngs
1584 Northfield Lane
Lafayette, CO 80026
John Youngs
8521 Bald Eagle Lane
Wilmington, NC 28411
William Youngs
PO Box 67
Steuben, ME 04680
Charles Youngs
422 Gorham Lane
Boyce, VA 22620
Kathy Carpenter
4506 S 950 W
Riverdale, Utah 84405
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of
the first publication of this notice -
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is December 9, 2010
Attorney for person giving notice:
/s/ Terry McDavid '
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896 '
Florida Bar No 052454
Person giving notice:
/s/ William Youngs
PO Box 67
Steuben, ME 04680

05524575
December 9, 16, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-631-CA
DEAS-BULLARD PROPERTIES
a Florida general partnership
Plaintiff
vs.
RICHARD V. SEXTON, a/k/a
RICHARD VERNON SEXTON,
SHANNON MARIE DELAIR
FOLLMANN SEXTON, CAPITAL
CITY BANK, and COLUMBIA
BANK, f/k/a COLUMBIA COUN-
TY BANK,
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 13, Cedar Hills, a subdivision as
recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 134,
public records of COLUMBIA
County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated December 13, 2010, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
January 19, 2011, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner, as of the date of thenotice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
13th day of December, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04542693
December 16, 23, 2010

To place your
classified ad call












Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-246-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WARREN JUNIOR CLYATT
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Warren Junior Clyatt, deceased,
whose date of death was April 30,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is December 16,
2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/: Nancy L. Chauncey
473 SW Kicklighter Terrace
Lake City, Florida 32024
/s/ Melvalee Yvonne Petty
946 SW Cannon Creek Drive
Lake City, Florida 32024
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/: John J. Kendron
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar Number 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Fax (386) 755-1336

05524603
December 16, 23, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000585

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN ROGERS A/K/A JOHN
ROGERS JR, et al,
Defendants

NOTICE OP ACTION
TO:
JOHN ROGERS A/K/A JOHN
ROGERS JR.
Last Known Address: 173 SE Osceo-
la Place, Lake City, FL 32025
Attempted Address At: 21509 Bub-
ble Gum Ln., Carrollton, VA 23314-
3825 And 3324 W University Ave
Apt 266.,
Gainesville, FL 32607 2540
Current Residence Unknown
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN
ROGERS A/K/A JOHN ROGERS
JR.
Last Known Address: 173 SE Osceo-
la Place, Lake City, FL 32025
Attempted Address At: 21509 Bub-
ble Gum Ln., Carrollton, VA 23314-
3825 And 3324 W University Ave
Apt 266.,
Gainesville, FL 32607 2540
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 13, BLOCK 5, OF OAK.HILL
REPLAT, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, -PAGE 52, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Marshall C. Watson, P.A. Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or be-
fore January 3, 2011, a date which is
within thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this notice in the
LAKE CITY REPORTER and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hemando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 1st day of December,
2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
BY: B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
10-29528
05524653
December 16, 23, 2010


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000798 f,
DIVISION
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION
Plaintiff,
vs.
LAURIE A RENEGAR A/K/A
LAURIE A SCHULTZ, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated November
30, 2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000798 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, is the Plaintiff and
LAURIE A RENEGAR A/K/A
LAURIE A SCHULTZ; TRAVIS M
RENEGAR, are the Defendants, The
Clerk of the Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 29th day of De-
cember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 18 OF SOUTHLAND SUBDI-
VISION, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 5; PAGE 47 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1990 SOUT
HS NO 60161163Z, WHICH IS
PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO
THE LANDS ABOVE DESCRI-
BED AND, AS SUCH, IS DEEMED
TO BE A FIXTURE AND A PART
OF THE REAL ESTATE.
A/K/A 188 SW PEACH GLEN,
HIGH SPRINGS FL 32643
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on December 1, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/P.A. Perry
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina C-.,.per. Court .Administra-
tion at I 3 NE Hernando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days
before your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7
days; if you are hearing or voice im-
paired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09117891 CENDANT-FHA

05524572
December 9, 16, 2010


Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of The Retro
Club at P.O. Box 7123, Lake City,
FL 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-365-
8940 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Jennlifer Scott
Extent of Interest: 60%
by:/s/ Jennifer Scott
Name: Patrick Scott
Extent of Interest: 40%
by:/s/ Patrick Scott

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF SUWANNEE
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 14th day of December, A.D.
2010.
by:/s/ Jennifer W. Thompson

05524659
December 16, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.
10-06-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, formerly know
as COLUMBIA COUNTY BANK
Plaintiffs,
vs.
4 MILE PROPERTY SERVICES ,
LLC, a Florida Limited Liability
company, CHARLES B. BROWN,
III, MICHAEL J. McCRANIE,
PHILLIP B. BAXLEY, JAMES L.
CUMMINGS, JAY WATERBURY,
SARAH WATERBURY, DEREK
PRIBBLE, and DIANN DAVIS.
Defendants
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE ID GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Order of Final Summa-
ry Judgment of Foreclosure dated
November 29, 2010, in the above-
styled cause, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash in Court-
room 1 Columbia County Court-
house, 173 Northeast Hemando Ave-
nue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at
11:00 a.m. on January 12, 2011, the
following described real property:
Tract 1: The West 1/2 of Lot 2,
Block 2, Quail Heights, a subdivi-
sion according to the map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page
104, public records of Columbia
County, Florida. Together with and
including a 1997 Cougar General
ID#GMHGA3419613697A and
#GMHGA3419613697B, which is
located on and affixed to the above
described real property.
Tract 2: The East 1/2 of Lot 2, Block
2, Quail Heights, a subdivision ac-
cording to the map or plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 3, page 104,
public records of Columbia County,
Florida. Together with and including
a 2000 Peachstate Navigator
ID#PSH2GA1757A and


Legal


ID#PSH2GA1757B, which is located
on and affixed to the above described
real property.
Tract 3: Lot 28, Forest Towne, as set
forth in Plat Book 3, page 1, public
records of Hamilton County, Florida.
Together with and including a 1997
Fleetwood mobile home, ID#s
GAFLT34A24206 and
GAFLT34B24206, which is located
of and affixed to be the above descri-
bed property. Tract 4: Lot 34, Block
A, Unit 1, Woodgate Village, a sub-
division according to the plat thereof
recorded at Plat Book 5, page 16,
public records of Columbia County,
Florida. Together with and including
a 1990 Fleetwood Pine Manor mo-
bile home, ID#s
GAFLK34A126498H and
GAFLK34B126498H which is locat-
ed on and affixed to the above de-
scribed property.
Tract 5: Lot 25, Loblolly Addition, a
subdivision according, to the plat
thereof recorded at Plat Book 6, page
35-35A, public records of Columbia
County, Florida. Together with and
including a 1985 Vega mobile home,
ID#s KH40D3FB5478GA and
KH40D3FB5478GB, which is locat-
ed on and affixed to the above de-
scribed property.
Tract 6: Commence at the SW comer
of the NW 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 20,
Township 3 South, Range 17 East,
Columbia County, Florida, and run
thence N 89'05'E along the South
line of said NW 1/4 of NE 1/4,
400.00 feet to the SW comer of Lot
23 of Sunnybrook Subdivision, an
unrecorded subdivision and to the
POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue N 89'05'E along said South
line 145.68 feet to the West line of
Double Run Road; thence N
2522'01"E along Said West line,
82.27 feet; thence N 78'25'04" W,
192.38 feet to the East line of Lot 24
of said Sunnybrook Subdivision;
thence S 3'44'56" E along said East
line, 115.54 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. Said lands being a
part of Lots 22 and 23 of Sunny-
brook Subdivision, according to an
unrecorded plat thereof Together
with and including a 1990 Fleetwood
Springhill Mobile Home, ID#s
GAFLL34A128739H and
GAFLL34B128739H, which is locat-
ed on and affixed to the above de-
scribed property.
Tract 7: Lot 23, Plantation Park Sub-
division, as recorded in Plat Book 4,
page 120, public records of Colum-
bia County, Florida. Together with a
1999 Cougar 16x76 single wide mo-
bile home,
VIN#GMHGA2439822562.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE -SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE. PRQPFRTY OWNERS.
AS OF THE SATE OF THE 'LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated: November 9, 2010
The Honorable Dewitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By: /s/ Belinda Scippio
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)

04542680
December 16, 23, 2010


010 Announcements


-

070 Rewards

LOST DOGS: Black Labrador
Retriever and Black and White
Boston Terrier in Hwy 245-A area,
REWARD! 386-365-1946

100 Job
Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

EXECUTIVE BOOKKEEPER
Multi-company high volume office
Must be expert w/ QuickBooks
/MS Office & multi-tasking.
Apply at jobs.jtbmedia.com


100 Job
SOpportunities


04542623
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following position:
INFORMATION SYSTEM
ADMINISTRATOR
Application deadline is 5:00
PM, December 22, 2010.
Associate's Degree required
with preferred Major(s) in
Computer Science, Data
Processing, or related field.
Five years experience in
network management and PC
maintenance. Hardware and
software experience required.
Windows Server Operating
System required. Experience
with Database and Web based
applications connectivity and
operating systems, token-ring
and Ethernet preferred.
Bachelors Degree may,
substitute for three years
experience. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U.S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.com.
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO .Employer

04542664
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with,
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

04542689
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY I
Housekeeping position
SPart/full time. Great WdiKiig
environment. MUST have strong
work ethic and be dependable.
Must be a Professional team
player. Ability to work a flexible
schedule including weekends and
holidays a must. Experience
preferred but not required. Apply
in person at Comfort Suites
located 3690 W US Hwy 90,
Lake City. Please do not call
regarding application.

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524634
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.

Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754

Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com


Member Service Manager
Suwannee Valley Electric Coop., Inc. (SVEC) has
an opening for the position of Member Services
Manager. This is a full-time position responsible
for managing the Member Services Department.
A minimum of 6 years customer service with su-
pervisory experience required. Applications and
job descriptions may be picked up at the SVEC
administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak
or reviewed on www.svec-coop.com. Applica-
tions should be turned in, to attention Vicky, at
the above address, mailed to PO Box 160, Live
Oak, FL 32064 or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.
com. The deadline for accepting applications
is Wednesday, December 22, 2010. SVEC is an
equal opportunity employer.

G Suwannee
Valley

E electric

Cooperative


I










Classified Departpent: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY. DECEMBER 16, 2010


120 EMedical
120 Employment

04542677
LPN
Full time position. 11-7 Shift
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City.
FI 32025 or fax resume to
386-752-7337

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City. FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time
Janitorial, seeking couple for P/T
evening work, must have reliable
transportation, clean background
and ref's 386-752-2147
Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

140 Work Wanted
CAREGIVER
Compassionate, private duty sitter
to care for elderly or disabled
persons, reasonable rates and
references available, Ruth
435-469-1237 or 386-454-8697

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 12/13/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Beautiful neutered 6 mo old
Orange Tiger Cat, vaccinations
complete, good home needed
386-755-8561
Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Female 7 months old
386-965-2231
Mini-Dachshunds, toy poodles,
Yorkie-Poos. Males & Females of
each. Shih-tzu female. Ashleys Pet
Palace. 386-755-8668 Health Certs
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Christmas Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231


330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
Pigs for sale
6 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fur.. China, Silver. Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Washer and Dryer
$250.
Dryer almost new.
SOLD

404 Baby Items
Baby Crib, converts to toddler bed,
large drawer utinder bed,
dresser attaches to end of bed,
$300 obo 386-688-0334

407 Computers
Dell computer tower
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Ashley Furniture Living Room set,
includes 2 oversized sofa's & table
Dura-Pella fabric, dark green,
exc cond $500 386-288-4690
Lift Recliner. Blue, electric.
Used only 1 month, like new.
Paid $1,400 asking $700.
386-752-8013
RED MICROFIBER
couch & recliner. $150.
386-752-8996 or
918-822-7233
TWIN SIZE captains bed.
Solid wood.
$100.00
386-752-8996 or 918-822-7233

416 Sporting Goods
XL Glider System,
nearly new, folding,
$70 obo
386-365-5967


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
MOVING SALE. Sat. Only.
West on 90, 3.4 mi from 1-75, to
427 SW Arbor Ln. Furniture,
household junque and much more.
Moving Sale Fri & Sat 8-? Ellis-
ville, by the Pecan house. 395
Rolling Hills Dr 42" TV,freezer,
Hshold &more! 813-477-9503






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


450 Good Things
450to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell. crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W. Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

6 ^ Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, I acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2/2, S/W. I acre secluded lot
Bascorn Norris Bypass. $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3 bd/3 bth MH, on approx 1 acre
of private property, 5 miles out
Pinemount Rd., $600 mon + dep,
call Debi 352-317-0995


3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142


3BR/2BA Double wide on.1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month. 1st
month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. References. 386-755-3288

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
PLA TOWN!

EHELAKIT


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,-.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

64(0 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524588
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832


/64O Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

055;463-
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole bar. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
5524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec. .
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181


720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568

Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Furnished Studio Apt
w/cable & all utilities included.
$500. mo. & $300. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $179,2 ppl $189 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
J3 Home For Rent

05524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage, pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
.2/1 House, near Elementary
School. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month, ref check,
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
I-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture.
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks







950 Cars for Sale
2005 PT Cruiser Touring Edition
PS/PW/PM, white, 55, 500
miles,Auto, Cruise Control, AC
$7900 386-965-8656

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2001 Chevy Astro Van,
new trans., new AC, good tires,
runs great, elean,great work van
$2200 obo, 386-984-0572


NEED HELP!


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2008Toyota Tacoma In Print,
2001 Chevy Astro 4DR, access cab 2005 PT Cruiser
2001 Chevy Astro 17,250 mi., AT, all power, Touring Edition & Online
Van1 Tonneau cover, bedliner, PS, PW, PM, CC, AC,
New trans., new AC,egood class III hitch, nerf bars, white, 55,500 miles. One LoW
tires, runs great, clean, AM-FM stereo w/CD, One Low
great work van. ,$7900 0
$2,200 OBO $16,995 al 9 Price!
386-984-0571 386-752-8227 386-965-8656


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.




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