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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01475
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/15/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01475
System ID: UF00028308:01475
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






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Wednesday, December 15, 2010 wvw,


Vol. 136, No. 281 75 cents


Board adopts policies dealing with abuse, restraint


New regulations
state-mandated,
take effect today.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
New policies dealing with
dating violence and abuse


and physical restraint for
students with disabilities
are now a part of county
school district policy.
The Columbia County
School Board unanimously
adopted the new policies, in
addition to amending eight
other district policies, after
a public hearing at its regu-


lar meeting
Tuesday.
New and '
amended .e1 '
policies ;, '
will go .
into effect [ i
today. Millikin
Mike
Millikin, superintendent of


schools, said both of the
new policies are state-man-
dated.
The dating violence and
'abuse policy outlines pro-
tective measures school
staff should take if they
suspect there is abuse
between students. It pro-
vides the responsibilities of


staff in that situation, and
what signs of abuse staff
should look for, he said.
The use of time-out,
seclusion and physical
restraint for students with
disabilities policy outlines
the requirements and
conditions for restraining
a student with a disabil-


ity, Millikin said, and also
explains how to properly
report the situation to the
student's family.
Amendments adopted
for other policies are minor
changes that reflect chang-
es in state law, Millikin said.
BOARD continued on 3A


THE PERFECT GIFT


Shopping Night
teaches kids how to
shop for others.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Not having money
to buy gifts for
her family made
8-year-old Jiayi
Brown sad until
she went to Kids' Holiday
Shopping Night.
"Here I got gifts for free, and
I'm so happy," she said.
More than 100 children
attended the Third Annual
Kids' Holiday Shopping Night
Tuesday at Haven Hospice
Attic.
The event helped teach local
children about giving to oth-
ers instead of just receiving,
said Michael Ingram, Haven
Hospice manager of retail
operations.
Each child received $5 in
"Santa Bucks" to buy gifts for
family members, he said. Gifts
were arranged in different
price piles from 50 cents to
several dollars for children to
choose from.
The children also learned
about budgeting by selecting
gifts in their price range.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Volunteer Marian McClenaghan (right) wraps a present for Sabra Plummer, 14, that she picked out for her
grandmother. 'I feel good about this,' Plummer said. 'It's been rough on us since my dad died.'


The community supported
the event by providing the
items for the children to
choose from, as well as


refreshments and wrapping
paper, Ingram said.
Volunteers helped children
select gifts, which were then
wrapped. More than 20 volun-
teers helped with the event.
"This is one of the favorite
events for the volunteers at
Haven Hospice," he said. "It
makes you feel really good."
The evening's festivities also


included photos with Santa
Claus and refreshments.
Shopping night is a worth-
while project for Haven
Hospice, said Renee Cobb of
Lake City, one of the event's
volunteers. It teaches children
the spirit of Christmas, which
is giving to others.
SHOPPING continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Fort White Middle School student Zofia Pierce (right),
13, helps Louis Rodriguez, 4, shop for presents for his family on
Tuesday. 'I think this is really nice,' Pierce said. 'I just like helping
kids, especially the kids that don't have much.'
Right: Christopher Cox (left), 7, and his brother Noah, 5, tell Santa
Claus what they want for Christmas Tuesday at the Kids' Holiday


Spaces still

available for

Home and

Patio Show

Eighth annual event
slated for March 5-6 at
County Fairgrounds.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Spaces are filling up for. the Eighth
Annual North Florida Home and
Patio Show.
The Rotary Club of Lake City
Downtown is the presenting sponsor
of the event, scheduled for 9 a.m. 5
p.m. March 5 and 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
March 6 at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds.
Co-sponsors include the Lake City
Reporter, Sunstate Federal Credit
Union and Newman Media.
The show features more than 80
local vendors in home and patio-relat-
ed businesses, such as landscaping,
SHOW continued on 3A


Legislators

visit Lake

City to hear

concerns

Annual event meant
to address issues of
interest to residents.
From staff reports
State legislators representing the
area will be in Lake City Thursday to
hear concerns from local residents
and officials before the upcoming
legislative session.
The Columbia County Legislative
Delegation Hearing will take place
from 9 a.m. noon Thursday in a
third-floor courtroom at the Columbia
County Courthouse.
State senators Steve Oelrich and
Charlie Dean and state representa-
tives Elizabeth Porter and Leonard
Bembry, who represent Columbia
County citizens in the Florida
Legislature, are scheduled to attend
the delegation hearing.
Each year, the delegation holds a
HEARING continued on 3A


Local hotel selected as one of nation's best


Comfort Suites
earns Rookie of
the Year Award.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Comfort Suites Hotel of
Lake City is the recipient of


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


the APEX Award for prop-
erty excellence as the 2010
Rookie of the Year Award
by Choice Hotels.
The hotel's co-owners,
Nick Patel and PJ Patel, and
staff received the award
Tuesday evening from a
Choice Hotels' representa-
tive.


53
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


"We are proud of this
hotel," Nick Patel said.
"When we created this
hotel in 2009 we definitely
wanted to create a differ-
ent type of hotel very
upscale and contemporary
in design. I think the award
speaks for itself. The cus-
tomers have spoken and

,l" Opinion .....
V People.......
Events.......
Advice & Comi
Puzzles ......


after almost a year in opera-
tion, we can see that the
guest satisfaction scores
have gone really high.
Receiving this award sim-
ply makes me feel proud
that we did the right thing.
Definitely we're proud of
our employees and the per-
formance of the hotel."


........... 4A
........... 2A
........... 5A
cs . . . . 3B
........... 2B


Patrick Lewis, Choice
Hotels and Brand
Performance consultant
for Florida, said the award
recognizes new properties
in the Choice Hotels group.
He also noted that there
are 700 Comfort Suites
hotels that are active, and
the Lake City Comfort

TODAY It
PEOPLE
Oprah visits
Australia.


Suites ranked in the top-10
nationally.
"This hotel in Lake City
won for the Southeastern
United States for a new
construction build," he
said, noting the local hotel
was competing against
HOTEL continued on 3A

N COMING
THURSDAY
Local church offers
tests for AIDS.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


CA$H3.


LOS ANGELES Scarlett
Johansson and Ryan Reynolds are
breaking up.
"After long and careful consider-
ation on both our parts, we've decid-
ed to end our marriage," the two
entertainers said Tuesday through
their publicist, Meredith O'Sullivan.


i 4',
0. ,4


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 8-8-9
Evening: 1-0-2


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 3-8-1-2
Evening :7-8-3-2


ezmtcJ,


PEOPLE IN- THE NEWS



Sydney gives Oprah warm welcome


SYDNEY
Sydney swapped opera for
Oprah Tuesday when the
host brought thousands
of screaming fans to the
city's landmark arts center
to tape shows for her final series.
The interlocking shell-shaped
roof of Sydney Opera House formed
part of the backdrop to two shows,
which are part of a week-long
trip by Oprah Winfrey and 300
U.S. audience members billed as
"Oprah's Australian Adventure."
At least three shows from the
Australia trip will screen next year
.in the final series of "The Oprah
Winfrey Show" that is expected to
be watched by millions of people in
more than 100 countries.
- The trip is being sponsored by
the government body Tourism
Australia and corporate partners,
with officials saying state and feder-
al governments have spent around
$5 million on the trip.
The first Sydney-filmed episode
features appearances by Aussie
actor Russell Crowe and rapper Jay-
Z. Some 300 U.S. audience mem-
bers traveled throughout Australia
for a week before Tuesday, and
were given front row seats at the
Opera House shows. Thousands of
Australian fans who were randomly
selected after applying for tickets
also crowded the steps of the Opera
House to see the taping.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Talk show host Oprah Winfrey is greeted by fans during the filming of Oprah's
Ultimate Australian Adventure at the Sydney Opera House in Sydney on Tuesday.


"We entered our relationship with
love, and it's with love and kind-
ness we leave it. While privacy isn't
expected, it's certainly appreciated,"
they said.
The 26-year-old actress and 34-
year-old actor were engaged in May
2008 and married that September.
The couple kept their courtship
and nuptials private, releasing few
details about their wedding and
rarely appearing in public together.
Johansson's recent credits
include "Iron Man 2" and "He's Just
Not That Into You."


..un ,,-,yu .
LOS ANGELES Funk pioneer
George Clinton wants a federal
judge to force the Black Eyed Peas
to shut up when it comes to sam-
pling his music.
Clinton sued the Grammy-win-
ning pop group in Los Angeles on


Friday, claiming it used elements
of his 1979 song "(Not Just) Knee
Deep" in remixes of their song
"Shut Up."
The song first appeared on the
group's 2003 album "Elephunk,"
and it released "Shut Up Remix"
the same year. It also was used
in another remix included on the
deluxe edition of the Peas' 2009
release, "The E.N.D.," according to
the complaint.
Clinton said he never granted
permission for the use of his
music, and he is seeking copyright
infringement damages and an
injunction to block further sales of
the remixes.
His lawsuit also named as defen-
dants will.i.am and Fergie, the two
highest-profile members of Black
Eyed Peas. He is also suing the
group's label, Universal Music
Group.

N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor-comedian Tim
Conway is 77.
* Singer Cindy Birdsong
(The Supremes) is 71.
* Rock musician Dave Clark
(The Dave Clark Five) is 68.
* Rock musician Carmine
Appice (Vanilla Fudge) is 64.
* Actor Don Johnson is 61.
* Rock musician Paul
Simonon (The Clash) is 55.'

Daily Scripture


* Political strategist Donna
Brazile is 51.
* Country singer Doug
Phelps (Brother Phelps;
Kentucky Headhunters) is
50.
* Actress Helen Slater is 47.
* Actress Molly Price is 45.
Actor Michael Shanks is 40.
* Actor Stuart Townsend is
38.


"God sent the angel Gabriel to
Nazareth, to a virgin pledged
to be married to a man named
Joseph.The virgin's name was
Mary.The angel went to her
and said,'Greetings, the Lord is
with you'"
Luke 1:26-28


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks ................ $179.40


CORRECTION


In Tuesday's edition, a headline detailing the Columbia
County Recreation Department's pancake breakfast
fundraiser should have indicated the event will take place
Saturday.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Estefan produces
book on Cubans
MIAMI The Miami
Herald together with
Cuban-American producer
and mogul Emilio Estefan
have produced a new his-
tory of Cuban exiles just in
time for the holidays.
The release of the nearly
200-page coffee table book
was celebrated Tuesday
night at Miami's historic
Freedom Tower, where
many Cuban exiles were
first processed after reach-
ing the United States in
the 1960s.
Estefan said he wanted
the book to help sec-
ond-generation Cuban-
Americans, like his daugh-
ter, remember what their
parents went through.
The book is published
by Crescent Moon
Publications, Inc. It inter-
sperses the stories of the
exile community's most
successful members,
including the late power
broker Jorge Mas Canosa
and the Fanjul sugar mag-
hates, with the history
of regular Cubans who
arrived by raft, including
those who arrived during
the Mariel Boatlift in 1980.

Court restores
charge vs. teen
TALLAHASSEE An
appeal court has rein-
stated a child neglect
charge against a 17-year-
old baby sitter whose pit
bull attacked a 2-year-old
child under her care in the
Florida Panhandle.
A three judge panel of
the 1st District Court of
Appeal voted 2-1 Tuesday
to reverse a trial judge's
dismissal of the charge. It
carries a 15-year maximum
prison sentence because
the victim was severely
injured.
The attack took place in
March 2009 in Callaway
near Panama City.


PARTLY O l MOSTLY SHOWERS SHOWERS MOSTLY
CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY


H153L30 H168LO46 H172L0O50 1.I71L0O44 H159L0O34


RIM I M--


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Launching snow ball attack
Seth Willis, 10, of Lake City, launches a snow ball at other
children during the Snow Day event in downtown Lake City
Saturday.


Circuit Judge DeDee
Costello ruled a juvenile
cannot be charged with
neglect because only
adults can be caregivers
under state law.
The appeal court major-
ity said Costello misinter-
preted the law. District
Judge Philip Padovano
dissented, saying the law
is ambiguous.

Ex-US Rep. Foley
nixes mayoral run
WEST PALM BEACH
- Former U.S. Rep. Mark
Foley, who resigned his
House seat in 2006 amid
a scandal over his send-
ing of salacious Internet
messages to male teens
who worked as congres-
sional pages, said Tuesday
he decided not to run
for mayor of West Palm
Beach.


Foley had been publicly
weighing a decision to
seek the mayor's office but
announced on his radio
show that after talking
with his family, it wasn't
the right choice.
"I have come to the
conclusion that now is not
the right time to re-enter
public life," he said.
Criminal investigations
ended without charges.
That controversy has
been continually rehashed
in discussions of his pos-
sible run. Foley said he
reached his decision after
conversations with his
partner and his family.
Foley, a Republican, was
considered a political pari-
ah after the page scandal
broke before the 2006 elec-
tion. His seat was ultimate-
ly won by a Democrat.

N Associated Press


Pensacola
57/53


Valdosta
53/37-
Tallahassee Lake City
54/41 ..53/30
,e ./ Gainesville .
Panama City 53/28


53/47


Tam
56/


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total -
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


48
23
68
44
84 in 1967
19 in 1962

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.06"
46.86"


Ocala
9A/2I9


* Jacksonville
-52/32


Daytona Beach
58J/32
. 0


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


* n Key West,
Ordando Cape Canaveral Key West
58/34 57/38 Lake City
Miami
pa- Naples
40 West Palm Beach Ocala
62/43 Orlando
*, FtL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers, 63/50 : Pensacola
62/42 *Naples Tallahassee
60/40 Miami Tampa
63/50 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
61/56


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:19 a.m.
5:32 p.m.
7:20 a.m.
5:33 p.m.


1:23 p.m.
1:52 a.m.
1:57 p.m.
2:47 a.m.


O@eO
Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan.
21 27 4 12
Full Last New First


7Wednesda ip ursday 1945, a record
|December snow-
storm buried
Buffalo, N.Y. under
36.6 inches of
snow, with unofficial
totals south of the
"' city ranging up to 70
inches.


FrUcastid tempitnrF "Feels ie" temperate


4
MOMMfIE
45m nites lburn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Thursday Friday


68/50/s
69/48/s
75/62/s
73/55/s
68/45/s
67/47/s
73/58/s
68/46/pc
75/62/s
70/55/s
69/47/s
68/47/s
69/59/pc
70/58/sh
68/52/s
69/54/s
67/48/pc
74/57/s


73/59/s
75/57/s
77/69/pc
77/61/s
73/51/pc
71/52/pc
75/61/s
72/50/pc
78/67/s
78/62/pc
74/52/pc
75/55/s
71/59/sh
72/55/sh
75/58/sh
75/59/s
73/55/sh
77/66/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


f Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
S LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


"Get Connected



Ic.'a a"


Johansson, Reynolds
end 2 years of marriage George Clinton sues
RlBaL Fuald PDaae


5 EDESA


1! THUR


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


1! FRlIu


SATURDAY


19SLIAY









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


DOT reschedules

pavement testing

on 1-75 to Thursday


From staff reports

The pavement testing
scheduled to affect traffic
on Interstate 75 in southern
Columbia County will take
place Thursday, according
to the Florida Department
of Transportation.
The slow-moving opera-
tion, which was postponed
from Tuesday, is now sched-
uled 9 a.m. -1 p.m. Thursday
from U.S. 441 (Exit 414) to
the Santa Fe River (Alachua
County line), a distance of
five miles. The testing will
occur in both the north-
bound and southbound out-
side travel lanes.
The testing will be done
in coordination with the
National Center for Asphalt
Technology which is evalu-
ating a new type of ground
penetrating radar.
This specific research


will focus on using non-
destructive testing to
identify the separation
between layers of asphalt
pavement. The southern
section of 1-75 in Columbia
County was the FDOT's
first 'attempt at using a
method of paving called
"superpave." Normally, a
section of pavement would
have to be removed to be
tested, but this method
should identify the prob-
lems that are being expe-
rienced by using the new
radar technology, saving
time and money.
During testing, traf-
fic will be slowed in the
outside travel lanes so
motorists should use cau-
tion in the area and follow
the directional signs and
arrow boards and move
over to the inside lanes.


Suwannee River Valley



gets $200,000 package


Will be featured in
advertising campaign
aimed at Atlanta.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

Atlanta, Ga., residents will have
the opportunity to learn about the
Suwannee River Valley Region as part
of promotional advertising campaign
slated for January.
Visit Florida, Florida's official tour-
ism promotion organization, awarded
the Suwannee River Valley Marketing
Group a $200,000 media package to
promote the area.
Partnering with the Gwinnett Daily
Post newspaper and Gwinnett County
Public Schools, the month-long pro-
motion will feature fitness and adven-
ture as kids and their parents will read
about Florida and answer questions
from an activity page for a chance
to win a five-day family vacation in


Florida's Suwannee River Valley
Region, which includes Columbia,
Hamilton and Suwannee counties.
The vacation package will include
lodging, canoeing and kayaking on
the Suwannee River, visits to Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park, Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center State Park
and Ichetucknee Springs State Park.
Meals at area restaurants and other
adventure activities will be included.
"It's a great drive market for us, so
we arethrilled aboutgetting the grant,"
said Harvey Campbell, Columbia
County Tourist Development Council
director of tourism.
He said they were notified Dec.
2 they were choose as the grant
recipient and noted the grant will go a
long way in promoting the area.
"It's (advertisements) going to
school-aged children and their par-
ents," Campbell said. "We hope to
plant the seed that we're 300 miles
down Interstate-75 and this is a dif-
ferent Florida than what they con-


ventially think of with beaches and
theme parks."
According to information from
Campbell's office, as part of the pro-
motion, the Suwannee River Valley
will be included in 15 full-color ads
in the Gwinnett Daily Post on five
Sunday in January. The newspaper
has a Sunday circulation of 104,000.
In addition, the Suwannee River
Valley will be featured in the
January edition of "Kidsville" with
a circulation of 85,000 which is tar-
geted towards students in grades
1-5 in Gwinnett County. The promo-
tion will also include logo, hyper-
link, tagline, copy and images in
the online contest page on www.
gwinnettdailypost.com and Kidsville
online with an estimated 220,000
impressions.
Additional newspaper ads and
other promotional activities are
included in the campaign.


HOTEL: Comfort Suites gains national honors


Continued From Page 1A

more than 200 hotels in
Florida, Georgia, Alabama,
Mississippi, North Carolina
and South Carolina. "The
award is for hotels that
have had a fantastic start,
gotten involved in the com-
munity and performed well
in their market They were
able to score some of the
highest guest satisfaction
scores that our industry is
measuring. This is by far
one of the nicest Comfort
Suites we have in our sys-
tem nationwide."
Comfort Suites will be
two-years old in January.
Data from January to
June was used as award
criteria, with guest satisfac-
tion surveys, revenue per
available rooms, training
and certification require-
ments tabulated into the
scores.
The award was initially
given to Choice Hotels
group representatives at the
company's regional meet-
ing in Jacksonville a few
weeks ago. Lewis accepted
the award on behalf of the
local hotel.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Comfort Suites hotel co-owner PJ Patel (from left) stands with Comfort Suites
front-desk manager Amy Skowron, Comfort Suites general manager Jayeeni Patel, Choice
Hotels and Brand Performance Consultant for Florida Patrick Lewis and co-owner Nick Patel.
The hotel and its staff recently received an award for property excellence from Choice Hotels.


Nick Patel said he and
PJ Patel never thought the
hotel would be listed in
the top-10 Comfort Suites
nationally as a rookie
hotel.
"We never thought we


would do this good," he
said. "In fact, we always
underestimated ourselves
and we thought there were
others that do a better job
than us, but hey it's
always good to see that


we've done a very good job.
I think the hotel definitely
has changed the landscape
of the exit and I think when
customers speak they are
right. We are definitely
proud of this."


SHOW: Home and Patio Show vendors wanted

Continued From Page 1A


SHOPPING: Kids give

Continued From Page 1A


"I'm glad to see Haven
Hospice puts it on," she
said.
Letting children buy
gifts for their loved ones
is a wonderful thing, said
Brown's mother, Chanel
Brown of Lake City.
"I'm just grateful they
allow the kids to shop," she
said.
In many families, gift


giving focuses mainly on
the children and not the
parents, said Linda Smith
of Lake City; This was her
first time coming to the
event with her daughter,
Kiley Crist, 7.
"Children can come out
and get what they want for
their parents," she said. "It
helps them learn not to be
very selfish."


BOARD: Abuse, restraint

Continued From Page 1A


The changes are recom-
mendations by the North
East Florida Educational
Consortium, he said, of
which the district is a mem-
ber.
NEFEC has a staff that
reviews educational laws
annually, Millikin said, and
will make suggested poli-
cy changes based on state
law to its member districts.
Once the district receives
the recommendations, its
staff and board attorney
will review them and the
district will follow the legal
process to adopt them,
Millikin said.
'Typically we almost
always make the changes


that are suggested," he said.
"Occasionally we will alter
the suggestions slightly to
better fit our school district
But regardless, almost all
changes relate to a change
in state law."
In other discussion:
School board members
congratulated Columbia
High School and its princi-
pal, Terry Huddleston, on
moving from a "D" to a "B"
Florida school grade for the
2009 to 2010 school year.
Eastside Elementary's
student council presented
Millikin and school board
members with certificates
of appreciation.


kitchen work and more.
"We are looking for ven-
dors that want to promote
their business while help-
ing people improve their
home and landscapes,"
said Keith Norris, past
Rotary Club president.
Outside booth sizes and
prices are: 20 feet by 20
feet is $350; 20 feet by 30
feet is $475; and 20 feet
by 40 feet is $600. Inside
prices are: 10 feet by 10
feet is $400; 20 feet by 10
feet is $780; and 30 feet by
10 feet is $1,100.
Businesses that partici-



HEARING

From Page 1A

public hearing to provide
local officials and the public
an opportunity to discuss
any issues of interest or
concern with their legisla-
tors.
"It's very beneficial to the
delegation to hear from res-
idents about issues impact-
ing their lives especially
at a time when we need
to prioritize spending and
make really tough decisions
that affect so many people,"
said Oelrich in a prepared
statement. "Our democracy
thrives on citizen participa-
tion."
Anyone wishing to be
placed on the agenda can do
so by contacting Oelrich's
office at (352) 375-3555.


pate in the show should
do very. well, Norris said.
More than 12,000 people
attended the event last
year.
The community is
able to find ideas and
local businesses offering
home improvement ser-
vices during the event.
Money raised dur-
ing the home and patio
show goes right back
into local charities, he
said. Rotary has helped
organizations such as
Haven Hospice, Catholic
Charities, the Christmas



Doctors' Discovery
Helps Diabetics
PHILADELPHIA A team of
doctors has found that a new formu-
lation of exotic sounding herbs and
spices gives new hope to diabetic
patients.
The formula, called Cinnatrol"M
promotes healthy blood sugar levels
y effectively metabolizing glucose
into energy. In a research study, all
patients taking just one capful of
the liquid (one ounee) daily, dramati-
cally lowered their blood sugar lev-
els compared to a placebo group. An-
other scientific study found that an
ingredient in Cinnatrol made insulin
20 times more capable converting
blood sugar to energy,
While individual results vary, one
patient in the first study lowered his
blood sugar from 220-245 to the
100-130 range in only 28 days, de-
spite being instructed not to change
his dietary habits or physical activ-
ity. Sorihe patients, under their doc-
tors care. are able to reduce or elimi-
nate their need for diabetic drugs.
Scientists say that Cinnatrol helps
diabetic drugs to work better. Get
full study results at cinnatrol.com.
Cinnatrol is available without a
prescription at pharmacies or call
1-800-339-3301. Now at:
Z ad~z y-aeg daid-


Dream Machine and
many more.
Any business inter-
ested in participating
in the home and patio
show is encouraged to
visit www.rotaryclubo-
flakecity.com to download
pricing information and
vendor applications. Call


386-344-7592 or e-mail
homeandpatioshow@rota-
rycluboflakecity.com for
more information.
"Booth space is going
quickly," Norris said.
"We expect this to be
one of ,the biggest home
shows to date."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












OPINION


Wednesday, December 15, 2010


- www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Minority

dictates

legislative

decisions


can a president and
a congressional
majority succumb
to the minority.
And it always seems to be the
Democrats who are the one's
making the concessions.
What gives?
Not too long ago, when a
Republican president led a
Democratic majority, compro-
mise wasn't an issue. Former
President George W. Bush saw
most of his big issues pushed
into law with the backing of a
Democratic Congress. He made
it look simple.
Fast forward two years, and
it still appears that Republicans
are getting their way. What
gives?
President Barack Obama,
probably looking at his hopes
for re-election in 2012, seems
content with caving to nearly
every Republican demand in
Washington, even if it's not
in the best interest of most
Americans. Only in America
does this seem possible.
There's something to be said
for compromise. It's certainly not
always bad. In fact, it's compro-
mise and bipartisanship (though
we're lacking in the bipartisan-
ship effort these days) that
keeps the cogs in Washington
turning. Rightfully so.
Compromise should be a
major component of governing.
No question. Rarely, if ever, will
we find an issue that everybody
agrees on. Compromise is the
bridge in these instances that
gets things accomplished.
The latest example is
the ongoing tax debate.
Republicans are getting their
way, and Obama's chocking
it up as a win. In reality, it's a
win for Republicans, but not
for Democrats, as many in
Obama's party are suggesting.
Call it strategy. Call it
political maneuvering. Call it a
Democratic loss or Republican
victory. Call it what you will.
But we can't escape the real-
ity that the minority is dictating
the momentum in Washington.
Only in America.
* Log Cabin (Ark.) Democrat

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers,
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number foe
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Worst part of the best job


I hae the best job in the
world. What makes being
a college professor so
great? It's not the pay and
it's not the hours; the first
is lower and the second is more
numerous than most people
think. It's not even the tenure,
which many misunderstand to
be a guarantee of employment
for life; it's not And it's certainly
not the prestige; I teach at a fine
school, but it's not Harvard.
No, the best thing about my
job is this: It's the only job I
know of that comes with the
guarantee of a fresh start at
least twice a year, at the begin-
ning of the fall and spring
semesters. Twice a year, no
matter how well pr how badly
things went last semester, my
job allows me to start over with
a clean slate.
The mistakes of one semes-
ter don't carry over into the
next, except as lessons learned.
Every semester represents
another opportunity to begin
again, not just for me, but for
my students, as well. And at the
beginning of each new semes-
ter, we both plan to get it right
this time.
But starting over twice a
year has a downside: For every
beginning, there's an ending.
I was thinking about this a few
days ago as I watched my stu-
dents grapple with their final
exams. We're at the end of a 16-
week semester, and everyone's
tired and ready to put the
semester behind them.
Our subject is writing, devel-
opmental and freshman com-


..77
It


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmarnedu


position, many students' least
favorite course. For sixteen
weeks, they've struggled with
this mysterious art, the elusive
craft that still intimidates many
already-well-educated people. In
an age characterized by images
and audio, higher education
insists on the value of writing,
and each semester my students
and I gamely take up the chal-
lenge.
A few of my students are
already good writers who don't
need much help from me; for
others, written English is almost
like a foreign language. Some of
them were high school cheer-
leaders and football captains just
a few months ago; others are
single mothers or middle-aged
men who are making career
changes. A few are just back
from Iraq or Afghanistan. Many
are serious, ambitious, and hard
working; others are just along
for the ride.
Some are tattooed and
pierced through improbable
parts of their bodies; others
are classic nerds, awkward and
.too shy to speak in class. A few
are ex-cons. Some struggled
all semester, and many fell by
the wayside. But sixteen weeks


ago they coalesced into an
interesting social dynamic, all of
them working in their own way
toward a common goal. I hope
they learned to write a little
better. We certainly learned a
lot about each other, and some-
times we had a little fun.
But now things take a serious
turn. Not everyone is going to
pass this semester. This isn't a
life-and-death situation, but the
decision I make is likely to have
a more profound impact on stu-
dents' lives than, say, the judg-
ments handed down in small
claims or traffic court.
Nearly all of my students
have a vague, if incomplete,
sense of the impact that a col-
lege degree will have on their
entire lives. A lot is at stake
besides the time, energy,
money, and ego that they've
invested in passing a college
course. Currently, national
unemployment hovers at close
to 10 percent; for college gradu-
ates, it's a little over five per-
cent.
So, students, do the best you
can on your finals, and I'll do
the best I can for you. If you
don't pass to the next level,
don't give up yet. It's too late
to worry about whether you
worked hard enough or wheth-
er I could have done something
more effectively. The time to
make judgments has arrived; I
plan to say "yes" as much as I
can. But having to say "no" is
the worst part of the best job in
the world.
E John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


n Dec. 15, 1941,
President Franklin
Delano Roosevelt
by proclamation
Celebrated the first
Bill of Rights Day. It was the
150th anniversary of the ratifi-
cation of those first 10 amend-
ments to the U.S. Constitution,
amendments that spelled out
our freedoms as well as our
rights.
On this 219th anniversary,
we would do well to reflect on
history for it was history that
spawned the Bill of Rights.
When the U.S. Constitution
.was being drafted in the late
1780s, the idea of a central


government wasn't an easy sell.
Men of genius had come up
with a plan for three govern-
mental branches executive,
legislative and judicial. And,
they had built in checks and
balances among the branches.
But citizens of the various states
- reflecting on history had
a healthy fear that a dream of a
government serving the people
could quickly change to a night-
mare of people being subservi-
ent to government.
Angry rallies and boycotts
ensued. Buckets of tar and bags
of feathers were made ready.
To get the Constitution rati-
fied by the states, the framers


had to promise there would be a
bill of rights to protect individu-
als from a strong central govern-
ment. This bill of rights would
not be a list of checks and bal-
ances between government and
the people. It would simply be
a list of checks against govern-
ment to ensure vital freedoms.
It took four years, but in 1791
a list of 10 rights was ratified by
enough states to be attached to
the Constitution.
Without that list, history
books about the United States of
America may well be thin, out-
of-print tomes.

* Scripps Howard News Service


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com


Searching

for the

perfect gift.


anything like me
(and for your sake, I
hope you aren't), you.,
may be wondering
what to give that special some-
one for Christmas.
The only thing worse than giv-
ing an unwanted gift once is to
give it twice to the same person.
Take my word for it "Once" says
you didn't know the person quite
as well as you thought you did.
'Twice" says you shouldn't be
allowed to drive.
*But even harder than knowing
what to give is knowing what to
ask for in return. I don't like to
tell people what to give me for
Christmas. I figure, if they want
to give me a gift, they shouldn't
have to ask what I want
I have tried, with limited suc-
cess, to use the same approach
when shopping for the names on
my gift list
Unfortunately, what I want
them to have isn't always some-
thing they want Or can use.
But I try. Sometimes I get it
right Occasionally, I score big.
Take, for example, my sister's .
last birthday. She's a huge Elvis
fan. Over the years, I've given
her Elvis CDs, Elvis movies, Elvis
pretty-much-you-name-it
For her last birthday, just to be.
different, I gave her a life-sized,
cardboard cutout of Elvis. She
keeps him in the living room by
the TV in front of the shelves with,:
all her family photos.
That was it I decided I cannot
do another Elvis gift, certainly
not one that would ever top that
Besides, her house is starting to
look like an Elvis shrine.
* Finally I came up with a plan
- a pretty smart one, if I do say -
so myself the perfect gift for
"someone who has everything."
It works for any size, any age,
any budget and you don't even ;;
need to gift-wrap it It's easy. Just,:
take a piece of paper and write
five (or more) things you would
like to tell someone.
For my sister, for example,
I call it "Five of Forty Billion
Things I Know and Love about
You."
1. A memory: I will always
remember when we were little
girls, how you made me feel safe:,,
when I was scared, and told me
everything would be all right
And I will never forget, after we
were grown, how you once tried
to shoot me with a real gun, just
because I poured a Diet Pepsi
down your pants.
2. Something you do that I
greatly admire: You take our
blind brother out to eat every
week at his favorite restaurant
Then you sneak food off his plate
to hurry him along.
3. Something you do that
drives me crazy: You make me
wait in the car for hours while
you cruise the aisles at Walmart.
And you keep the radio locked on
the Elvis channel.
4. Why I like being, with you
and miss you when I'm not You
listen to what I say, even if I've .
said it before.
5. What I would give you this
Christmas, if I could give you
anything: A magic mirror to
see yourself the way that I see
you. Frequent trips to visit me
in Las Vegas, with stopovers at
Graceland. And a real-live version
of that cardboard cutout in your
living room.
That's the list I'll give my sister
for Christmas. Maybe someone
will give it to me, too.
Feel free to use it, if you like,
or ask someone to give it to you.
And may all your Christmas
wishes come true.
Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


4A


-c t 13 T"e.
Secestson BalL"


OTHER OPINION


Let's celebrate Bill of Rights Day








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Enrollment and Dinner

SHINE is holding open enroll-
ment from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.
today at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The R.O.T.C. will also be
holding a dinner at 6:30 p.m. The
center is located at 628 SE Allison
Court For more information, call
386-755-0235.

Friday
Cultural Presentation
A cultural presentation at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center will.
be at 1 p.m. on Friday in the
Reading Room. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison Court
For more information call, 386-
755-0235.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p,m. Friday at the
High Springs Community Theater.
Tickets are available at The.
Framery on W. Baya and at high-
springscommunitytheatercom.

Saturday
Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts '"The Life of a


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Young angel flaps his wings during Snow Day event
Debi Groth crumbles bits of snow on her grandson. Kyle Bowen, 5, of Jacksonville, as he makes a snow angel
during the Snow Day event Saturday in Lake City. 'We've been looking forward to this for months,' Groth said.


Christian Teenager" at 6:15 p.m.
Saturday. The theater is located
at 348 N. Mariori Avenue. Call
386-344-0319.

FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American Cultural


Society of Lake City announces a
Christmas party taking place from
6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Saturday
at the Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. Enjoy a night of cul-
. ture, dancing, and entertainment,
and possibly become a member of
FACS. For more information, con-


tact Bob Gavette at 386-965-5905.

Flapjack breakfast
A Relay For Life fundraising
flapjack breakfast is 8 a.m. to
10 a.m. Saturday at Applebee's.
The meal will include pancakes,


scrambled eggs, homefries,
bacon, sausage, juices, coffee
and tea all you can eat. Tickets
are $10. Of the proceeds $7 will
go to Relay for Life.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Saturday at
the High Springs Community
Theater. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya and
at highspringscommunitytheater
com.

Pancake breakfast
The RCC/AMN Inc. is having
a pancake breakfast 7 a.m. to 11;
a.m. Saturday at the Richardson
Community Center. The tickets
are $5 and the breakfast will
consist of pancakes, Nettle's
sausage, grits, eggs and orange
juice. All proceeds will benefit
the 14-and-younger and 12-and-
. younger boys basketball teams.
For more information, contact
Mario Coppock or Nicole Smith
at 386-754-7096.

Gift wrapping
Sevepro is hosting a gift wrap
ping fundraiser from 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday at Lowes.
Donations will be accepted.
Money raised will go toward
Relay For Life.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.
Wednesday, Dec. 1
Lake City
Police Department
Billy Lamar Dortly, no
age given, 772 NE Gurley
Ave., attempted murder
with firearm discharged,
discharging firearm in
public, aggravated assault
with firearm and warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of battery.
Friday, Dec. 3
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jimmie Johns, 31,
17941 Nicks Drive, Spring
Hill, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charge of driving while
license suspended/
revoked.
Jessie J. Davis, 78,
1646 SW Nautilus Road,
warrant- Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of sex offender violation by
failure to register.
* Felishc Rene Messer,
30, 1815 SE 46th Drive,
Gainesville, warrant,
Violation of probation on
original charge of carrying
a concealed weapon by a
felon.
Kelly Frank Watson,
no age given, 595 SW
Mauldin Ave., driving
while license suspended/
revoked (habitual).
Zack R1 Murray, 18,
439 SE Lillian Loop, war-
rant Violation of probation
on original charges of pos-
session of controlled sub-
stance, possession of drug
paraphernalia, petit theft
over $100 and third-degree
grand theft.
Lake City
Police Department
Donald Frank
Waldron, no age given, 217
NE Laverne St, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of burglary
of an unoccupied structure
and trafficking in stolen
property (two counts).
Jack N. Moore, no
age given, 734 SE Monroe
St, aggravated battery on
police officer, resisting with
violence and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Saturday, Dec. 4
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Little David Combs
Jr., 42, 256 SE Bikini
Drive, driving while
license suspended/
revoked (habitual) and
violation of probation on


original charge of driving
while license suspended/
revoked.
James Zachary "Zack"
Stripling, 25, 494 SE Bailey
St, robbery while armed
with firearm and aggra-
vated assault
Stephen P. Milliken,
40, 8986 SW Tustenuggee
Ave., felony battery by
strangulation (domestic
violence).
Sunday, Dec. 5
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Brittney L Dalton, 21,
1429 Knowling Loop Road,
Talbott, Tenn., warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of grand
theft and credit card fraud.
Lake City
Police Department
Thomas Eric Nelson,
no age given, 3151
NW 68th Court Fort
Lauderdale, warrant
Possession of Oxycodone.
Florida
Highway Patrol
Keith Bernard
Walker, 35, 3830 NW 183rd
St, Miami Gardens, felony
traffic violation driving
while license suspended/
revoked (third offense)
and failure to appear
despite written promise.
Monday, Dec. 6
Lake City
Police Department
Jose Carlos Palma,
no age given, 1258 NW
Klondike Glen, battery on
law enforcement officer
and resisting with violence.
Patricia M.


MAm
John W Burns III, Agent
234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056
Bus: 386-752-5866
john.burns.cnj5@statefarm.com


Thompson, no age given,
2680 SW Windsong
Circle, warrant Driving
while license suspended/
revoked (habitual).
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jose Luis Gonzalez-
Castro, 27, 164 SE Craig
Ave., warrant: Aggravated
battery with a deadly
weapon, possession of a
controlled substance, pos-
session of drug parapher-
nalia, reckless driving, no
driver's license and leav-
ing the scene of a crash.
Earntraevis Claridy,
21, 297 SE Avalon Ave.,
warrant Attempted mur-
der, aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon, dis-
charging firearm in public
and furnishing a firearm
to a minor.
Ryan Paul
McCartney, 24, 2249 SW
Little Road, grand theft
auto.
Maria Danielle
Willis, 32, 740 SE Mayhall
Terrace, child neglect
Michael Jerome Lee,
no age given, P.O. Box
164, Macclenny, driving
while license suspended/
revoked (habitual).
Florida
Highway Patrol
N Maria Danielle
Willis, 32,-740 SE Mayhall
Terrace, driving under the
influence and damage to
property.

* From staff reports


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


Scenes from Snow Day event Saturday in Lake City.


el -ae n Tuff Holland (from left), Shane Holland and Kim Holland


Mikayla Register (left) and Heather Lindboe


Garrett Cook (from left), Denise Register and Mathan Cook


Makesha Hill and Juan Hernandez


MEETS MEDICAL IMAGING.
SHANDS IMAGING CENTER & WOMEN'S MEDICAL SPA


F, .0 116 1i ,l ,ii. 1 I'.i I O c ci.' h .5i;' !

A whole new concept. A completely new environment.
Welcome to Lake City's only spa-like diagnostic imaging
center for the whole -.ariiil,.
Other features include:
Special area designed s. --: ifi.: Aii for women
State-of-t,,e-.art imaging technology


Dr. Jill Dalba, Shands Imaging Center
full-time, on-site radiologist.


South side of US 90
west of 1-75 on Stonegate Terrace


Diagnostic services include:
Digital mammogri._,r,
Bone densitome-r,


r i :i-,:und

* Open MRI
CT


break :-t :., ,:I.i:


Shands hr C E
Wini, it~ 'i's M dic1 LSpa
38Ci-292-7733
289 Stonegate Terrace, Suite 102 1 Lake City, FL 32024


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Wednesday, December 15,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Sign-up ongoing
at Boys Club
Registration for the
Boys Club of Columbia
County's 2011
basketball program
continues through
Friday. Girls and boys
ages 6-14 are eligible.
Practices are twice
weekly and games are
played on Saturday.
Cost is $40.
For details, call
752-4184 or visit the club
on Jones Way.
GYMNASTICS
Cartwheels for
charity event
Gymnasts from Bard
Gymnastics will be doing
cartwheels for charity at
the Lake City Mall from
24 p.m. Saturday to raise
money for the Christian
Service Center in Lake
City. Each gymnast, who
competes at'Bard, will
be seeking sponsors and
every dollar raised will
be matched for the
center. Sponsors may
pledge money per
cartwheel or make a
one-time donation, which
is tax deductible. The
public is invited to come
out and watch the
cartwheel-a-thon.
For details, call Bard
Gymnastics at 752-1710.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball
games for men 18 and
older are played at
Richardson Community
Center from 5-8 p.m. on
Sunday. Cost is $3 per
session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.
YOUTH GOLF
Arrowhead golf
tourney offered
The Arrowhead
Junior Golf Tour Carter
Plantation Junior
Classic is Jan. 15-16 in
Springfield, La. The
36-hole tournament for
ages 12-18 is ranked by
the National Junior Golf
Scoreboard. Discounted
accommodations are
available at the Carter
Plantation Villas. Call
(225) 294-7555.
To enter, call (318)
402-2446 or go online at.
www. arrowheadjgt. com.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at University
Christian School in
Jacksonville, TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at Newberry High,
5 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Robert E. Lee
High, 5:30 p.m.,
Fort White High girls
basketball at Williston
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Robert E. Lee
High, 7:20 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Ed White
High, 7;30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball vs.
Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at University
Christian School in


Jacksonville, TBA


Columbia soccer

falls to Wolfson in

chilly conditions


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Bryce McCarthy (14) fights with Brandon Brooks for possession of the ball
while driving down the field in a game against Fort White on Nov. 9.


Fort White teams
lose to Santa Fe,
Suwannee.
From staff reports

Columbia High received
an unexpected district loss
at Wolfson High on Monday
as the Wolfpack beat the
Tigers, 4-2, in dramatic
weather conditions.
With temperatures near
freezing, Columbia gave up
four goals in the opening 20
minutes of the game. The
Tigers fought back scor-
ing two goals, but weren't
able to overcome the early
deficit


Muschamp introduced



as Gators head. coach
Florida's new
man grew up in
Gainesville.


By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Will Muschamp spent
part of his childhood in
Gainesville, growing up
just a few streets from
Florida Field and cheering
for the Gators.
He left in the mid-80s,
then returned as a player at
Georgia and as an assistant
coach with Auburn and
LSU.
He's back again this
time in a much different
capacity.
Muschamp, who agreed
to a five-year contract worth
$13.5 million to replace
Urban Meyer, was formal-
ly introduced as Florida's
new coach Tuesday. He
took center stage for a 40-
minute news conference
filled with confidence,
enthusiasm and witty one-
liners.
"University of Florida is
about winning champion-
ships," he said. "I under-
stand the expectations and
that's what we're here to
do. ... We're not on a five-
year plan here."
Muschamp expects
to hire his staff after the
Outback Bowl and intends
to install a pro-style offense,
welcome news for Florida
Fans who groaned about
the spread all season. His
decision could keep quar-
terback John Brantley,
blamed for the team's
lackluster offense, around
another year.
"It's going to be a good
thing around here," said


A




ASSOCIATED PRESS
Will Muschamp, the new head coach for the University of Florida's football team describes
what he expects from Florida as he speaks to the media in Gainesville on Tuesday.


Brantley, who added that
he still plans to talk with
his parents about the
possibility of transferring.
With Brantley, several
mpre current players
and a few former stars in
attendance, Muschamp
said all the right things.
He wants Meyer to remain
part of the program follow-
ing the Jan. 1 bowl game,
he reached out to former


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Chas Henry (17) punts the ball against Georgia on
Oct. 30 in Jacksonville.


coach Steve Spurrier and
he spoke volumes about
2007 Heisman Trophy
Tim Tebow. He mentioned
everyone in Florida's Ring
of Honor except running
back Emmitt Smith, wel-
comed sky-high expecta-
tions and shared an ambi-
tious plan for a program
- one that included more
accountability for players
after 30 arrests in the last


six years.
"As a football team, I
want to be known as a blue-
collar, overachieving unit,"
Muschamp said. "We're
going to recruit good play-
ers here. But they need
to buy into the fact of tak-
ing the talent they have
and what God has blessed
them with and stretch it to
the potential that they've
got."


"The wind and cold was
the most difficult opponent
tonight," Columbia head
coach Trevor Tyler said.
It was constantly blowing
over 20 mile per hour gusts.
I'm proud of the way the
team played tonight, how-
ever. They played hard."
Cooper Hall and Nick
Tuttle scored the Tigers'
two goals.
"We had other 1vl (one
on one) opportunities, but
we weren't able to put them
away," Tyler said.
With the loss, Columbia
falls to 7-4-1 on the season.
The Tigers return to action
PREP continued on 2B


Golden

hits'

ground

running

Miami coach had
busy first day at
new program.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
CORAL GABLES -
Miami coach Al Golden was
to be picked up for his first
day in the Hurricanes foot-
ball office at 8:15 a.m.
He was ready at 8:14.
And that might have been
the only unscheduled min-
ute of his first full day with
the Hurricanes.
Golden woke up Sunday
as Temple's football coach;
when his day started
Tuesday, his wife was look-
ing for a new South Florida
home, he was trying to fig-
ure out which of his new
keys fit into what lock, and
hammering out final details
of his five-year contract with
the Hurricanes that could
be worth up to $2 million
annually if certain incen-
tives are reached.
"I'm here now and I'm
ready," Golden told The
Associated Press in a rare
quiet moment in his new
office, where the sounds
of football players clanging
iron in the weight room
below could be clearly
heard. "But there's a mil-
lion things that have to be
done."
There were some major
things on that list. Some
not-so-major ones, too.
Golden is living in a
Miami dormitory for now,
and his parking spot was
unfilled Tuesday a
car provided by the uni-
versity will be coming
soon.


Henry, Hudson only

players from Florida

schools on AP first team


Black earns
second-team
selection at safety.
Associated Press

NEW YORK Florida
State offensive lineman
Rodney Hudson and
Florida punter Chas Henry
have been named to The
Associated Press' annual All


American team.
They were the only play-
ers from Florida schools
who garnered first-team AP
honors Tuesday. Hudson
was one of only three play-
ers from the Atlantic Coast
Conference to be named
to the team while Henry
was one of four from the
Southeastern Conference.
A finalist for the Outland
Trophy symbolic of the


nation's most outstanding
lineman, Hudson becomes
Florida State's .first AP
All American since offen-
sive tackle Alex Barron
in 2004. A four-year start-
er at Florida State, the
280-pound Hudson was a
second-team pick by AP last
year.
Florida safety Ahmad
Black was a second-team
selection this year.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Boston at NewYork
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Portland at Dallas
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS N.Y. Rangers
Pittsburgh

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
W L
x-New England II 2
N.Y. ets 9 4
Miami 7 6
Buffalo 3 10
South
WL T
Jacksonville 8 5
Indianapolis 7 6
Houston 5 8
Tennessee 5 8
North


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


N.Y
Phila
Was
Dall

Adtla
New
Tanm
Car


W L
10 3
9 4
5 8
2 I1
West
W L
8 5
7 6
6 7
3 10


T Pct PF PA
0.846415 276
0.692 273 242
0.538 225 244
0.231 256 339

Pct PF PA
0.615295 331
0.538347 318
0.385316 355
0.385 291 265
TPct PF PA
0.769290 198
0.692 294 229
0.385235 252
0.154 262 345
TPct PF PA
0.615 295 268
0.538 354 253
0.462314 307
0.231 269 376


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF I
. Giants 9 4 0.692 329 2.
adelphia 9 4 0.692 374 31
shington 5 8 0.385 238 3
as 4 9 0.308321 36
South
W L TPct PF I
nta 11I 2 0.846335 2,
w Orleans 10 3 0.7693302.
ipaBay 8 5 0.6152602
olina I 12 0.077 164 3
North


PA
50
08
10
66

'A
43
40
67
38


W L TPct PF PA
Chicago 9 4 0.692253 228
Green Bay 8 5 0.615306 189
Minnesota 5 8 0.385 230 274
Detroit 3 10 0.231 285 309
West
W L TPct PF PA
Seattle 6 7 0.462261 329
St. Louis 6 7 0.462 245 268
San Francisco 5 8 0.385 243 280
Arizona 4 9 0.308 243 351
x-clinched playoff spot
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants 21, Minnesota 3
Baltimore 34, Houston 28, OT
Thursday's Game
San Francisco at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.

AP All-American Team

FIRST TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback Cam Newton, junior,
6-foot-6, 250 pounds,Auburn. ..
Running backs LaMichael James,
sophomore, 5-9, 185, Oregon; Kendall



FSU's


Ponder


still hurt

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State has returned
to the practice field to pre-
pare for its Dec. 31 Chick Fil
A Bowl game against South
Carolina, but without quar-
terback Christian Ponder.
Seminoles coach Jimbo
Fisher said Tuesday that
Ponder would resume prac-
tice Dec. 26 in anticipa-
tion of playing against the
Gamecocks. Ponder battled
an arm injury for much of
the season while leading the"
Seminoles to a 9-3 record.



PREP

Continued From Page 1B

against Lee High at 7 p.m.
on Friday.

Fort White soccer

Fort White High's soccer
teams visited two of the top
teams in District 5-3A on
Monday and both lost, 7-0.
The Lady Indians played
at Santa Fe High (11-4-1),
which got a hat trick from
Jordan Register.
Fort White's boys went to
Live Oak to play Suwannee
High (7-1-1). Jackson
Brown scored four goals
and added two assists for
the Bulldogs.
Fort White's girls (3-6-3,
2-4-1) wrap up District 5-3A
play with a 5 p.m. match
Friday at Newberry High.
Fort White's boys (3-9,
2-3) are off until Jan. 4.


Hunter, junior, 5-9, 200, Oklahoma State.
Tackles Gabe Carimi, senior, 6-7,
327, Wisconsin; Nate Solder, senior, 6-9,
315, Colorado.
Guards Rodney Hudson, senior,
6-2, 282, Florida State; John Moffitt,
senior, 6-5, 323,Wisconsin.
Center Chase Beeler, senior, 6-3,
285, Stanford.
Tight end Michael Egnew, junior,
6-6, 235, Missouri.
Wide receivers Justin Blackmon,
sophomore, 6-1, 205, Oklahoma State;
Ryan Broyles, junior, 5-1 I, 183, Oklahoma.
All-purpose player Randall Cobb,
junior, 5-11, 186, Kentucky.
Kicker Alex Henery, senior, 6-2,
175, Nebraska.
DEFENSE
Ends Da'Quan Bowers, junior, 6-4,
275, Clemson; Ryan Kerrigan, senior, 6-4,
263, Purdue.
Tackles Nick Fairley, junior, 6-5,298,
Auburn; Stephen Paea, senior, 6-1, 311.
Oregon State.
Linebackers Luke Kuechly,
sophomore, 6-3,235, Boston College; Greg
Jones, senior, 6-1, 240, Michigan State;Von
Miller, senior, 6-3,243,Texas A&M.
Cornerbacks Patrick Peterson,
junior, 6-1, 222, LSU; Prince Amukamara,
senior, 6-I, 205, Nebraska.
Safeties Tejay Johnson, senior, 6-I,
212, TCU; Quinton Carter, senior, 6-1,
200, Oklahoma.
Punter Chas Henry, junior, 6-3,
222, Florida.
SECOND TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback Andrew Luck,
sophomore, Stanford.
Running backs Jordan Todman,
junior, Connecticut; Mikel Leshoure,
junior, Illinois.
Tackles '- Lee Ziemba, seniorAuburn;
Derek Sherrod, senior, Mississippi State.
Guards Stefen Wisniewski, senior,
Penn State; Justin Boren, senior, Ohio
State.
Center Jake Kirkpatrick, senior,
TCU.
Tight end Lance Kendricks, senior,
Wisconsin.
Wide receivers Alshon Jeffrey,
sophomore, South Carolina; Julio Jones,
juniorAlabama.
All-purpose player Damaris
Johnson, juniorTulsa.
Kicker- Dan Bailey, senior, Oklahoma
State.
DEFENSE
Ends J.J. Watt, junior, Wisconsin;
Jeremy Beal, senior, Oklahoma.
Tackles Drake Nevis. senior, LSU;
Jared Crick, junior, Nebraska.
Linebackers Tank Carder, junior,
TCU; Justin Houston. junior, Georgia;
Lavonte David, junior, Nebraska.
Cornerbacks Jayron Hosley,
sophomore, Virginia Tech; Cliff Harris,
sophomore, Oregon.
Safeties Mark Barron, junior,
Alabama; Ahmad Black, senior,
Florida.
Punter Drew Butler, junior,
Georgia. ,.
THIRD TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback Kellen Moore, junior,
Boise State.
Running backs Vai Taua, senior,
Nevada; John Clay, junior,Wisconsin.
Tackles Anthony Castonzo, senior,
Boston College; Nate Potter, junior, Boise
State.
Guards Barrett Jones, sophomore,
Alabama; Caleb, Schlauderaff, senior, Utah.


i I

6
11

12 F
13
14 I
15
16 (

17
18,
19


Center Ryan Pugh, senior.Auburn.
Tight end D.J. Williams, senior,
Arkansas.
Wide receivers Greg Salas,
sophomore, Hawaii; Titus Young, senior,
Boise State.
All-purpose player Denard
Robinson, sophomore, Michigan.
Kicker -- Dannny Hrapmann, junior,
Southern Mississippi.
DEFENSE
Ends -Adrian Clayborn, senior, Iowa;
Sam Acho, senior, Texas.
Tackles Billy Winn, junior, Boise
State; Marcell Dareus, junior, Alabama.
Linebackers Mason Foster, senior,
Washington; Nate Irving. senior, North
Carolina State; Akeem Ayers, junior.
UCLA.
Cornerbacks Reggie Rembert,
senior, Air Force; Stephon Gilmore,
freshman, South Carolina.
Safeties Rahim Moore, junior,
UCLA; Eric Hagg, senior, Nebraska.
Punter Kyle Martens, junior, Rice.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Boston at NewYork, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Boston, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Denver, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Florida Gulf
Coast, 6:30 p.m.
No. 9 Baylor vs. Bethune-
Cookman, 8 p.m.
No. 21 Minnesota vs.Akron, 8:30 p.m.
No. 22 UNLV vs. UC Santa Barbara,
10 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Washington, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Anaheim at N.Y. Islanders. 7 p.m.
Phoenix at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Ottawa at Minnesota. 8 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.


ACROSS 35 Persona non -
37 Reproving
Late-summer clucks
sign 39 Cummerbund
Chewy roll 40 Stimpy's
Oater brawl buddy
locale 41 Knock off
Fancy 45 Classical poet
Liver go-with 47 Bright
Hollow rocks 48 de corps
Lacking sense 51 Viking, maybe
Orchard prod- 52 Kind of pig
uct 53 Motorcycle
Fill the hull race
Stein filler 54 Toes the line
"Dancing 55 Attack on all
Queen" group sides


23 Arizona city
25 Lurk
26 Faucet word
29 Chocolate
bean
31 Aloha token
32 Luau strum-
mer
33 Dalai Lama's
city, once
34 Coffee-break
treat


DOWN


Pat's cohost
Homer opus
Mickey or
Andy
Absent
Switch
positions
La tar pits
Parka


GOLF REPORTS



Gibson/Hunter win best ball


Bruce Gibson joined
Club Champion Terry
Hunter for victory in the
gross category of the two-
man best ball tournament.
The duo combined for a
round of 32-37-69.
Dennis Crawford and
Steve Thomas claimed
the net win with 33-33-66.
Day two of the event fell to
inclement weather.
Buddy Slay jumped to a
big lead in the Wednesday
blitz with four birdies on
the front nine and added an
insurance fifth on the back
side to coast to a three-
stroke win.
Chad Hunter managed
three birdies of his own for
a score of +3 and second
place.


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

Only one of Slay's birdies
held up in the skins game,
but it was a big one when
his birdie on the par 3 No. 7
took the pot hole prize.
Dwight Rhodes, Jordan
Hale, Keith Shaw and
Hunter had the other win-
ning skins.
In match one of Good
Old Boy's team play, Monty
Montgomery, Jerry West
and Bobby Simmons rolled
over Mark Risk, Stan
Woolbert and Jim Bell,
12-7.
Match two was slight-
ly closer when Ed Snow,


Howard Whitaker, Merle
Hibbard and Dan Stephens
took the measure of Derek
Tuell, Joe Persons, Tom
Elmore and Mike Spencer
by a score of 8-5.
Individual 18-hole scor-
ing continued to shine.
Jerry West's round of 36-
38-74 tied Montgomery's
37-37-74 for the top spot.
Mark Risk was a stoke
back at 37-38-75.
Derek Tuell (39-37-
76), Ed Snow (38-38-76),
Howard Whitaker (39-38-
77) and Bobby Simmons
(38-41-79) were all in the
hunt.
Woolbert took the nine-
hole contest with a 36 on
the front side, two shots
better than Mike Spencer.


Dream Machine a success


The Dream Machine
tournament was Saturday.
A lot of toys were collected
for families in need.
The tournament winners
were Gordon Fuller, Jordan
Leman and Sue Terlaje with
a gross 66.
Low net winners were
Don and Darlene Horn, and
Pete Skantzos with a 56.
Wednesday Blitz winners:


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

A Division Emerson
Darst +2, first; Mike
Kahlich Even, second; Don
Horn -1, third;
B Division Gerald
Smithy +3, first; Richard
Skipper +2, second; Alan


Phillips +1, third.
There were seven skins:
Horn with three, Chet
Carter with two, and Chris
Cox and Kahlich with one
each.
Horn won the pot hole
on Dunes No. 6.
Jack Tuggle won the Top
of the Hill on Dec. 6 with -1.
Gerald Smithy was second
at-2.


By RONALD BLUM and
STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press

NEW YORK Turns
out the Philadelphia Phillies
do have enough money
for both Cliff Lee and Roy
Halladay and Roy Oswalt
and Cole Hamels, too.
A year after Phillies trad-
ed him away, Lee chose
to rejoin them and form a
fearsome foursome that is
the envy of all of baseball.
The free-agent pitcher
passed up an extra $30 mil-
lion from the New York
Yankees and reached a
preliminary agreement


Answer to Previous Puzzle


URE A R|S ONUS


STEAMS GUN SHY



R I
YAK MRT









SPOT ERR ASKK


8 Traipse about
9 Riviera summer
10 Brown of
renown
11 Erosion loss
12 Curved molding


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


12-15


16 Soothed
18 Bombay
nanny
20 Thermometer
base
21 Roquefort hue
22 Similar
24 West Coast
sch.
25 Overcharge
26 Warm
welcomes
27 Green
pod
28 Drinks with
scones
30 Part of NBA
36 Prickly
38 Ten-armed
animals
40 Hayworth of
old movies
42 Excessive
43 Sluggish
44 Rookie
46 Strives to win
47 Levelheaded
48 Id companion
49 Long sand-
wich
50 Slapstick mis-
sile
51 Dixie fighter


2010 by UFS, Inc.


on a $120 million, five-year
contract with the Phillies,
two people familiar with
the deal told The Associated
Press. Lee approved
the idea of signing with
Philadelphia on Monday
night when talks hit the
$100-million mark, one per-
son said, adding that final
negotiations brought the
figure higher.
The agreement, includes
a buyout of a 2016 option
and is subject to the 32-
year-old left-hander passing
a physical, the person said
on condition of anonym-


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
FINEK I


ity because the agreement
was not final.
The Yankees and Texas
Rangers had been consid-
ered the front-runners, but
the Phillies wound up with
the most-prized free agent
of the offseason, reaching
a deal that gives them a
dominant rotation that like-
ly is the strongest in the
majors.
Lee, the 2008 AL Cy
Young Award winner,
joins Halladay, a two-time
Cy Young Award winner
who won the NL honor last
month.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHAT HAPPENED
| WHEN THE TRAPEZ-E

DOBOLY / STUNT FAIL-EP.
I Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: HE THE
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: MADAM EIGHT JITNEY MIDDAY
eser Answer: How she felt when the plane bounced around
in the storm "AGITATED"


SCOREBOARD


AP. Lee agrees to $120M


deal with Philadelphia


X I-














Call today to place a surprise ad for your child,
grandchild, God child or anyone you think
deserves something extra on their special day!


S Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days
prior to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.


Call 755.5440 or 755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


^. w










754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


DILBERT
DOES MY NEW
GOATEE MAKE ME
LOOK MANLY AND
INTELLECTUAL AT
THE SAME TIME?


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Fear of AIDS haunts future

for woman with risky past


IT MAKES YOU LOOK
TOO LAZY TO SHAVE
AROUND YOUR LIPS.


AND I YEAH.
THINK THAT ONE IS
SI SAWuj RESISTANT
SA FLEA. TO SOUP.


DEAR ABBY: I am a 34-
year-old woman who finally
beat a 13-year battle with
drugs. I now have a job, a car,
a place of my own and a bank
account. My problem is, while
I was on drugs I prostituted
myself in order to support my
habit. Now I'm terrified I have
AIDS, and afraid I'll be told I
don't have long to live.
I'm not dating right now, but
I've had a couple of boyfriends
since getting sober. I'm scared
for them, but so afraid of get-
ting a death sentence that I've
never mentioned my fears to
anyone. I know I'm being self-
ish with these guys' lives, but
I'm paralyzed by my fear. What
am I going to do? TERRI-
FIED IN THE U.S.A.
DEAR TERRIFIED: What
you are going to do is get your-
self tested! Please understand
that the fear you are dealing
with is the same that anyone
who has had multiple sex part-
ners has had to face.
You must realize that be-
ing exposed to HIV and hav-
ing AIDS are not the same. If
you have been exposed to HIV
- and therefore test "positive"
- you need to know it ASAP
so you can be prescribed anti-
viral medications that can
PREVENT you from getting
AIDS. Getting on those meds
can save your life. And you can
save the lives of your former
boyfriends, too, if you are HIV
positive, by telling them to get
tested.
DEAR ABBY: I have


HOROSCOPES


F*pONIc-TE M MY
PERFUCTcoN, MOM
I'PWY ITNA PUT
AN F-6. F IG
PIPN4'THE?


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST

o(/.1,D F6 P6F0CT! AT MY
\ LAST Jo f DID

A^rKONO/^1E~ S i AV 1 JTOT OF 1
A5T9oNos? $orTAgIN6o
WANTEP O,. OFF INTo

." .. -. "


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): If it's not possi-
ble to have a day of pamper-
ing, consider an outing with
the kids or fixing up your
place. Avoid all the people
who aggravate you and fo-
cus on those offering love
and appreciation. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You'll learn
something about someone
that will help you make a
good choice. Love and ro-
mance are in the stars and
time should be put aside to
socialize, if you are single,
or to spend time with the
special person in your life.

GEMINI (May21-June
20): Whether it's someone
you work with, a relative or
just a good friend, use your
imagination to come up with
a token of your apprecia-
tion that will go over well. It
will ensure you get the sup-
port you need emotionally,
financially or professionally
in the future. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Welcome change
with open arms. Being
adaptable will enhance your
career and your future.
Throw a little romance into
the mix late in the day and
you won't be sorry. Don't
hold back when there is so
much to say and do. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Take time to have
some fun with friends or
colleagues. Mixing busi-
ness with pleasure may not
be wise. Don't be fooled
by a financial deal that has
no substance. A personal
relationship may take a
nosedive if jealousy or
possessiveness take over.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Invite friends over or
spend time decking the
house with festive decora-
tions. You have plenty to
look forward to and to be
thankful for. Love is on the
rise and getting involved in
something that uses your
talent skillfully will pay off.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Someone will be very
critical if you don't stick to
the rules. Politely turn down
any invitation in which you
have no interest and focus
on something or someone
who can add to your plans
and your popularity. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Look at the past,
present and future and you
will see where you may
have gone wrong. Back up
and redo. Imagination, cou-
pled with talent, will help
you break ground in new


territory. Network and sell
your expertise. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You should
sit back and observe. If you
jump in too soon, you will
face opposition and com-
plaints. Changes within
friendships can be expected
and must be accepted for
what they are. Be willing to
move on. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't be
afraid to tell the people you
love how you feel and what
your intentions are. You
need an emotional release
and, in order to make it fa-
vorable, it's important that
yotu get your feelings out in
the open. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Use a little disci-
pline and you will get back
on track and feel good about
what you are doing. You'll
make the people you love
proud if you take on a re-
sponsibility that shows you
are ready to do something
good for others. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Make some
adjustments to your sur-
roundings. Romance looks
favorable and can lead to
a promise. A financial gain
through winnings, a settle-
ment, an old debt paid or
even a gift is forthcoming.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals N
"TPJ KLI RX EGJX EP E DX

KDLG LKEXG LZZ TPJ VLI E, RJ E

T P J C X SPE EP SP DPYX VHED


T P J G W X Z M."


- NJZHL GPRXGEW


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Novels as dull as dishwater, with the grease of
random sentiments floating on top." Italo Calvino
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-15


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
fW'l GOT Ste-S, W1 I SlNWlNG,MICHAflE&.-
I'MNM INRRE. 2 nt' lN& LtTeR W -,OM II
I'tM INtTHECHKISTM S16 GOTT-fHI NE.fAT" o:OT,
IFLRY FNG iMMiMR, j SEE- N' rlEB'atoraecJ
,J LOOK'. ) -7 N lM7E.W4 So


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
known my husband for eight
years and have been married
to him for three. He is a unique
and funny man, but he does
have a few annoying quirks.
The biggest one, and the rea-
son I'm writing to you, is his
need to have music blaring in
our car.
It's not just when we're driv-
ing, but also when we're going
through drive-thru restau-
rants, banks and gas stations.
Gas stations are the worst be-
cause he turns the volume up
even louder so he can hear it
outside. Not only is it painful
to my ears, but it's embarrass-
ing.
I have asked him a number
of times to turn it down, but it
just leads to arguments. Can
you help me talk to him before
I lose my hearing? BLEED-
ING EARS IN SPRING
VALLEY, CALIF.
DEAR BLEEDING
EARS: Could it be that your
husband suffers from hearing
loss (probably from listen-
ing to too-loud music), which
is why he needs the volume
turned up so high? Argu-
ing with him won't help. He
should be checked by an audi-


* M --.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


J1111111L ------------------- 11111111L.---J . I .


Page Editor: Emogene Graham,


ologist a hearing specialist
- so that he doesn't damage.
his hearing further, and yours
won't be affected.
Protecting your hearing
is important. That's why you
should consider using ear
plugs, when you drive with
him.
P.S. And when you get to
the gas station, offer to pump
the gas for him. If he refuses,
then leave the car with him.
DEAR ABBY: My husband
is 7 feet tall and we recently
became parents of a beautiful
baby girl. Everywhere we go,
people make comments about
my husband's height. He is
used to being the target of
stares and comments, having
experienced it his whole life.
Our daughter may grow up to
be tall; how would you handle
this? ANGELA IN BETH-
LEHEM, PA.
DEAR ANGEIA: I would
teach my daughter regard-
less of her height to be
proud of who she is. If your
daughter turns out to be tall,
she'll have plenty of compa-
ny, because each generation
seems to be growing taller
than the last one. A woman's
height does not have to be a
disadvantage unless she views
it that way. If you stress the
qualities you feel are impor-
tant, chances are that's the
person she'll grow up to be.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.





LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


U'


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Heat Pump Split System


It's time to get comfortable.,


ENDS DECEMBER 31, 2010


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No Service Fee


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Upfront Pricing


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F Fax (386) 496-3147
Licensed & Insured


Commercial & Residential


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Lic. : CAC058099


.3. .


I I I I I I


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010













olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City and


Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010 1



Customers 'always first' at Ms. Wezzie's


Salon owner says
cutting hair is her
form of art.

comes to
hair, Ms.
Wezzie's
Haircuts
believes in the four Cs
- cut, color, curl and
cuteness said Dinia
'Wezzie" Huelskamp,
owner.
The salon opened on
Sept. 1, 2008 as a result of
branching out on her own
after helping build another
shop's business, she said.
Huelskamp first picked
up scissors at the age of 9
and has been cutting hair
since then. She wanted to
be an art teacher but was
influenced by an aunt in
Palm Beach to become a
beautician.
Hair is now her art, she
said. She has more than 35
years of experience and is
a master cosmetologist.
Working alongside
Huelskamp is Lillian "Pep"
Elmore and Erin Misinec.
Elmore is her cousin, and
she cut Misinec's hair as
a child.
Huelskamp specializes
in cutting styles ranging
from tops and fades to
traditional and shags.
Elmore's specialties
include perms, shampoos
and sets. Misinec per-


ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
At Ms. Wezzie's 'You grow it, we cut it,' said Dinia 'Wezzie' Huelskamp, owner. Stylists at the salon are (from left) Lillian 'Pep'


Elmore, Huelskamp, and Erin Misinec.
forms chemical services, If a person brings in a
such as hair color, low picture of the style they
lights and high lights. want, it can be done,
'Without their help, I Huelskamp said. The
wouldn't be as successful," salon's motto is "You grow
Huelskamp said. it ... We cut it."
The shop tries to price "If you can dream it, we
its services for the work- can do it," she said.
ing person and provide Inside the shop is a
quality hair cuts, color or separate chemical room
perms, she said. The staff where services such as
listens to and cares about bleaching, perms and col-
what customers want ors are done. Customers


coming in for a cut won't
have to worry about smell-
ing the odors.
"It's something I feel is
important to customers,"
Huelskamp said.
Community involvement
is also an important part of
Ms. Wezzie's Haircuts.
Huelskamp believes
in helping the commu-
nity, especially veterans,
seniors and children, she


said.
Huelskamp volunteers
her time with organiza-
tions such as Haven
Hospice, provides free
haircuts to people in need
and raising money for dif-
ferent charities. She is also
Locks-of-Love certified and
hosts an annual event to
collect hair for the organi-
zation.
"If there is a need out


there, I am more than will-
ing to pitch in," she said.
"Without the community, I
wouldn't be in business."
The customers sup-
port the shop which in
turn allows it to help the
community, Huelskamp
said. Giving takes place
throughout the year.
"I.give when there is
a need and not to expect
something back," she said.
Rich or poor everyone
needs to look their best,
Huelskamp said.
"It's not about the
money," she said. "It's
about making everybody
look good."
Advertising through
the Lake City Reporter
helped people find her
shop, Huelskamp said.
"Advertising pays,"
she said. "If you don't
advertise, how will people
know where you are and
what you do?"
Ms. Wezzie's Haircuts
is located at 184 SW
Domino's Way, behind
Domino's Pizza. The
number is 386-758-7700.
The hours are 8:30
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday. Appointments
and walk-ins are wel-
come.
"It ain't all about
Wezzie, it's about the
customer," Huelskamp
said. "My customers are
always first."


3 MEDIUM I
I-TOPPING PIZZAS



$15
Plus Sales Tax, DeliveryExtra (LCR-12) Expires 1/31/11
----------- .J.


Cheese or Pepperoni


2 MEDIUM
2-TOPPING PIZZAS
PLUS 3 Cheezer Bread and Dipping Sauce


Carry-Out


Plus Sales Tax. Carry-Out Only (LCR-12) Expires 1/31/11 I
-----m-------------------------- mJ-


c~arL^

ma "W


Plus Sales Tax. Delihvey Extra (LCR-12) Expes 1/1 1/11









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


I-U
ITSi9gg-

I I 4T

FIND I>l-


One Item per ad $250
4 lines 6 days ahadditional
personal merchandise totalling $00or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




4 lines 6 days | ilS
Rate applies to private I duas selling
This Is a non-refundable rate.







One Item per ad c d o
4 lines 6 daysEach additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling |
Each Item must include a price.
This is a non-retundaebl rate.




One Item per ad 2l3 0 .
4 lines 6 days t Iddtsos


Rate applies to private Individuals se lling
personal merchandise totalling $2,000 or less.
Each Item must loclude a price




One em per ad Each additional
4 lines 6 days aline $1.65
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,000 or less.
S Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate..




4 nes *6daysEachd~ditionali
Rate applies to private Individals selling
personal merchandise totalling 000 or less.
Each item mst Include a prices
This Is a non-refundablh rate.


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertionrt



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoApear Call by: FaxEnmall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00am. Mon.,.00 am.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00am. Mon,00 a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10100a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00am. Fri.,100a.m.
Sunday Fi., 10:00 am. Fri., 00 am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrmi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeieitvreporter.eonm


Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on January 6,
2011, in the Columbia County
School Board Administration Build-
ing, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. consider
the adoption of an ordinance entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDI-
NANCE NO. 2007-15, SECTION 5,
RATES AND CHARGES, OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY AND
AMENDING SECTION 118.225,
RATES AND CHARGES, OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY CODE OF
ORDINANCES TO ESTABLISH
PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED
BOARD ACTION, STAFF ASSIST-
ED RATE CASES AND ALTER-
NATIVE RATE SETTING; PRO-
VIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
PROVIDING FOR REPEALER;
PROVIDING FOR CODIFICA-
TION; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision of the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above
references public hearing, a record of
the proceedings may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 10th day of December,
2011
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
04542673
December 15, 2010
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on January 6,
2011, in the Columbrla -County
School Board Administration Build-
ing, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. consider
the adoption of an ordinance entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE
BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY FLORIDA
ESTABLISHING POLICY ON
SERVICE DEPOSITS; ESTAB-
LISHING POLICY ON DAMAGE
AND REPLACEMENT OF ME-
TERS; ESTABLISHING POLICY
ON TAMPERING; ESTABLISH-
ING POLICY ON BILLING PRAC-
TICES; PROVIDING FOR SEVER-
ABILITY; PROVIDING FOR RE-
PEALER; PROVIDING FOR CO-
DIFICATION; AND PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida between the hours 6f
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision of the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above
references public hearing a record
of the proceedings may be needed
and in such event, such person may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the public hearing is made, which
record, includes the testimony and
evidence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 10th day of December,
2011
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
04542674
December 15,2010

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Pool Maintenance


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S
AUTO SERVICE gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on
12/29/2010, 08:30 am at 2550 SW
MAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL
32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes.
JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
IGBEG25K2PF331827 1993
CHEVROLET
04542686
December 15, 2010

Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 12/28/2010
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1993 GMC
VIN# 1GTCS 1Z8P8505911
2000 Polaris Magnum 325 ATV
VIN#4XACD32A6Y2145186
04542685 .
December-15, 2010


070 Rewards

LOST DOGS: Black Labrador
Retriever and Black and White
Boston Terrier in Hwy 245-A area,
REWARD! 386-365-1946

100' Job
100 Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring. Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs. O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542623
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following position:
INFORMATION SYSTEM
ADMINISTRATOR
Application deadline is 5:00
PM. December 22, 2010.
Associate's Degree required
with preferred Major(s) in
Computer .Science, Data
Processing, or related field.
.Five years experience in
network management and PC
maintenance. ,Hardware and
software experience required.
Windows Server Operating
System required. Experience
with Database and Web based
applications connectivity and
operating systems, token-ring
and Ethernet preferred.
Bachelors Degree may
substitute for three years
experience. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U.S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.c6lumbiasheriff.com.
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO .Employer
EXECUTIVE BOOKKEEPER
Multi-company high volume office
Must be expert w/ QuickBooks
/MS Office & multi-tasking.
Apply at jobs.jtbmedia.com


100w Opbportunities

04542664
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k. health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

04542689
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Housekeeping position
Part/full time. Great working
environment. MUST have strong
work ethic and be dependable.
Must be a Professional team
player. Ability to work a flexible
schedule including weekends and
holidays a must. Experience
preferred but not required. Apply
in person at Comfort Suites
located 3690 W US Hwy 90,
Lake City. Please do not call
regarding application.

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524599
LUBE TECH WANTED
Apply @ Rountree-Moore
Chevrolet
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
Ask For: Jimbo Pegnetter

05524634
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.


120 Medical
120 Employment

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?















Apply Online or In Persont 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sEtel.com EOE



Member Service Manager
Suwannee Valley Electric Coop., Inc. (SVEC) has
an opening for the position of Member Services
Manager. This is a full-time position responsible
for managing the Member Services Department.
A minimum of 6 years customer service with su-
pervisory experience required. Applications and
job descriptions may be picked up at the SVEC
administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak
or reviewed on www.svec-coop.com. Applica-
tions should be turned in, to attention Vicky, at
the above address, mailed to PO Box 160, Live
Oak, FL 32064 or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.
com. The deadline for accepting applications
is Wednesday, December 22, 2010. SVEC is an
equal opportunity employer.

Suwannee
Valley

E electric
Cooperative


1 Medical
120 Employment

04542278

( Senior Home Care-

HEALTHCARE
OPPORTUNITIES
You know what your patients
need. And you always go the
extra mile to make sure they
know how much you care.
Healthcare professionals like
.you thrive here at Senior Home
Care, a fast-growing industry
leader that's meeting the health-
care needs of today's seniors.

OTs-Vull-Time
Lucrative Sign-On Bonus!

PTs, OTs &
SLPs-PRN

RN Supervisor

Apply online:
www.seniorhomecare.net
or call 866-676-5627
EOE Drug-Free Workplace




04542677
LPN
Full time position, 11-7 Shift
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City,
FI 32025 or fax resume to
386-752-7337

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


130 Part Time
Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Beautiful neutered 6 mo old
Orange Tiger Cat, vaccinations
complete, good home needed
386-755-8561

Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Female 7 months old
386-965-2231
Mini-Dachshunds, toy poodles,
Yorkie-Poos. Males & Females of
each. Shih-tzu 'female. Ashleys Pet
Palace. 386-755-8668 Health Certs
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

o33l Livestock &
330 Supplies
Christmas Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231
Pigs for sale
6 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Washer and Dryer
$250.
Dryer almost new.
SOLD


404 Baby Items
Baby Crib, converts to toddler bed,
large drawer under bed,
dresser attaches to end of bed,
$300 obo 386-688-0334


407 Computers
Dell computer tower
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Ashley Furniture Living Room set,
includes 2 oversized sofa's & table
Dura-Pella fabric, dark green,
exc cond $500 386-288-4690
Lift Recliner. Blue, electric.
Used only 1 month, like new.
Paid $1,400 asking $700.
386-752-8013
RED MICROFIBER
couch & recliner. $150.
386-752-8996 or
918-822-7233
TWIN SIZE captains bed.
Solid wood.
$100.00
386-752-8996 or 918-822-7233

416 Sporting Goods
XL Glider System,
nearly new, folding,
$70 obo
386-365-5967


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.'
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648:


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: APEX DVD Player
w/Remote. Also, 5 DVD Movies
Please Call 386-438-5293 between
noon and 6pm $100. for all,

4 0 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
O63 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
'Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean, freshly
painted, near college,1 acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-69701900
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom'Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 ,or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157 .
3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142
3BR/2BA Double wide on I ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month. 1st
month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. References. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

640 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down..
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524588
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

Io05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet


* ADvantage


Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


40 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty. 2x6 wall. and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

as5524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy.
1 pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547
Unfurnished Apt.
71U For Rent
05524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD.
$250 off December.
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/1 bath. I car garage. W/D
hook up. $520 month.
no pets I month sec.
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage.
east side of town.
Ist. last & sec
386-755-6867
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A.
Carport. Carpet. tile. $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft. W/D hook up. CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75. spacious
deluxe 2BR apts.. garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up. + SD.
386 965-0276
Move in specials available.
1 & 2 bedroom units.
starting at $350 per month.
386-755-2423
The Lakes'Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl..
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2.
country acre 8 ni to VA. off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d-hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2" For Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Furnished Studio Apt
w/cable & all utilities included.
$500. mo. & $300. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk I prs. $179,2 ppl $189 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable. fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

15524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364
1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2/1 House, near Elementary
School. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch. all appliances,
Ig' garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
l-10/US90NWof LiveOak. 3Br.
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

7 0 Business &
75v Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

S810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbtli. fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

950 Cars for Sale
2005 PT Cruiser Touring Edition
PS/PW/PM, white. 55. 500
miles.Auto, Cruise Control, AC
$7900 386-965-8656
952 Vans & Sport
9 52Util. Vehicles
2001 Chevy Astro Van,
new trans., new AC, good tires,
runs great, clean,great work van
$2200 obo, 386-984-0572


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!

El w>^^^^ift


jOC


G E www.lakecityreporter.com


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STAY
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ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the,
same vehicle in print and online.

/-E


,FFrM- re Deails alMaryo
-Bridget 'afrt 386-75-5440


W %' P A K I C

G H JO A ML G C


C N A F U CE E M

Q HI I X BE F F


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B B C S I U V B


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H F M 0 E G L S


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G V

City


Reporter's
popular weekly
word search is
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with a fun new
puzzle every
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any business
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Fo mreinoratoncal 38) 55 .40
Deadlne i Wednsdayat,4


A+ EyeCare


CB NEyeglasses

-- Contacts

.r Exams

Sunglasses
15 =55






555-5555
1 -im -


Classified Department 755-5440





/ LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


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Exanm and Necessary X-rays
First-oiep
patient
Reg. $136 SAINGS OF $107
Expires December 30, 2010

.' .www.aspenlakecity.com


Rountree
STOYOTA


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 12/31/10


Central States Enterpr se, LLC


%20% OFF

CLOTHING
Camo Jeans Caps Gloves Etc.


SchIeIch


' 20% OFF

FOOTWEAR

MOSSY oA


DURA&G


IA costumess


j


Most cars & trucks
expires 12/31/10


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