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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01474
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/14/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01474
System ID: UF00028308:01474
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






What's Next

for Patriots?
Roll continues for Brady.
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMALL UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Iron Man

No More
Favre on inactive list,
streak ends at 297.
Sports, I B




orter


Tuesday, December 14, 2010


www.lakl


LSHA recruits new doctors


Three will treat
women's health
issues locally.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake Shore Hospital
Authority Board has signed
contracts with three doc-
tors to locate in Lake City
and provide OBGYN care.
During the board's reg-
ularly scheduled meeting
Monday, board members
unanimously voted in favor
signing the contracts.
Lake Shore Hospital
Authority's manager,


Jack Berry, said the new
doctors would also care
for some of the patients
who are being displaced
with the closure of one of
the University of Florida
Primary Care clinics.
"It's for female patients
and gynecology care," he
said. "We're not really get-
ting into the OB end of it,
which is done through a
Medicaid program. We're
getting into gynecology
care. We had a need out
there existing for female-
patient doctors and this
fills that gap."
The contracts were
signed with Dr. Emad


Atta, Dr. Joseph Charles
and Dr. Chandler Mohan.
Berry said all three doc-
tors are currently on staff
at Shands Lake Shore
Regional Medical Center.
Charles will be at an
office on Commerce Drive,
while Atta and Mohan will
share an office at 351 NE
Franklin St., across from
the hospital at the Women's
Center of Florida.
Shands Lake Shore
Regional Medical Center
'provides indigent care
for county residents who
qualify for the hospital's
financial program. Under
the terms of the contract,


the doctors will get $100
per visit from patients in
the Shands program.
* The contracts, which
will be reviewed annually,
begin today. The doctors
are also scheduled to start
taking patients today.
In other business, the
Board:
Postponed informa-
tion announcing results of
personnel evaluations until
next meeting.
Discussed establish-
ing Medicaid rates for out-
patient services.
The next board meet-
ing is scheduled for 5:15
p.m. Jan. 10.


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter
Two-car crash injures two
County EMS and fire department personnel attend to the
driver of a Ford Taurus (left) and its passenger as LCPD
officers conduct their investigation after a two-car crash on
Highway 90, near SW Stonegate Terrace, on Monday. The
driver and his passenger were injured and taken to a hospital.
The driver of the other vehicle, a Lincoln Navigator, was not
injured, police said.


C HEERS OF OY


CHS students unwrap warm presents

for local healthcare's lonely residents


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Florence Robinson, 80, (from left) and Lee Smith, 77, admire
a fleece blanket gifted to them by Columbia High drama
students who visited residents at Avalon Healthcare and
Rehabilitation Center on Monday. CHS students Shelby
Moore and Symone Mcknight hold it up for them.


Blankets and gifts
entertain elderly
at Avalon Center.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
olumbia
High School
drama stu-
dents brought
Christmas
cheer to 40 local elderly
residents in need of visi-
tors Monday.
Around 20 students ven-
tured to Avalon Healthcare
and Rehabilitation Center
to spend time with resi-
dents, sing Christmas
carols and present a spe-
cial delivery of more than
200 wrapped gifts, such
as blankets, toiletries and
socks.
Katelyn Curry, 16, an
11th-grade drama student,
said the CHS drama class-
es wanted to "adopt" a few
residents for the holiday
season. When Curry con-
tacted Avalon, she was told
40 residents were in need


of visitors.
"We couldn't just say a
few," Curry said. "We had
to make sure everyone got
something for Christmas."
Wendy Cousino, CHS
drama teacher, said the
drama program did not
have enough money to
sponsor the 40 residents,
but the school's faculty and
staff donated about $350
and the toiletries to make
the project happen.
'"The faculty and staff
stepped up big time," she
said.
The visit with gifts was
the third holiday visit the
students made, Cousino
said. Others included
donating a-live tree and
decorating it, poinsettias
for all resident rooms and
cookies made by CHS culi-
nary students.
Drama students will
return for more visits in
the new year, Cousino and
Curry said.
Monich Culbreath,
Avalon activities director,
CHEERS continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Libby Taylor, 16, a CHS drama student, reads a Christmas card to Gladys McRae, 83, an Avalon resident. Around 20 drama
students delivered more than 200 wrapped gifts, such as blankets, toiletries and socks, to 40 Avalon residents.


FR_ I Food drive collects 4,000 pounds


TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Reporter Circulation District Manager Joe Smith
uses a forklift to load a delivery truck with some of the
pallets of food donated during the newspaper's Third Annual
Community Food Drive on Saturday.


Readers also gave
$1,000 to help
the city's needy.
From staff reports

The Lake City Reporter's
Third Annual Community
Food Drive yielded nine
full shipping pallets of food
that weighed more than
4,000 pounds.
All food collected is
earmarked for Columbia
County's needy residents
and was given to the Food


Bank of Suwannee Valley for
distribution. Canned goods
collected at the Reporter
office through today will be
added to the total.
This year's effort set a
record for cash donations
as $1,000 was collected from
community residents, in
addition to the food items.
The Food Bank has arrange-
ments with local and nation-
al companies to buy food at
huge discounts and that is
where the donations will be
spent, Elkins said.
"This year's food drive


was a great success, thanks
to the kindness of our read-
ers and business partners,"
said Lake City Reporter
Publisher Todd Wilson. "I
want to thank everyone who
donated food and money
and also thank our dedicated
newspaper carrier force for
all they did Saturday in pick-
ing up a lot of canned goods
as they delivered Saturday's
newspaper.
"Our staff is honored to
work with our community
to make this food drive
a success for the third


straight year."
The need at the Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley
was more this year than
ever. Food Bank Director
Scott Elkins said people
who at one time were
donors to the food bank,
now are clients seeking
assistance.
"By the time we finished
weighing the food Monday
morning, we had three
agencies in line waiting
to get some of it," Elkins
FOOD continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


45
Sunny and cold
WEATHER, 2A


c;.L


Opinion ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................
School................


DAILY
BRIEFING
Nat and Kat win
'Amazing Race.'


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Shopping Night
at the Attic.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2010


Monday:
Afternoon: 9-3-1
Evening: 8-9-5


V.4; ,' Monday:
Afternoon: 2-7-9-5
Evening: 2-7-5-9


ezmatch..
Sunday:
9-12-17-24-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Nat and Kat win Amazing Race'


NEW YORK
Gal-pal doctors Nat and
Kat have crossed the
finish line to win "The
Amazing Race.
They have also made
history, becoming the first two-
woman team to claim the million-
dollar grand prize in the 17 seasons
of the CBS reality series.
Nat Strand, from Scottsdale, Ariz.,
and Kat Chang, from Santa Monica,
Calif., were first to reach the Los
Angeles destination on Sunday's
finale.
Finishing in second place were
a rival female duo, Brook Roberts,
of San Diego, Calif., and Claire
Champlin, of Reno, Nev., who are
best friends and hosts on a home
shopping network.
Coming in third were dating cou-
ple Jill Haney and Thomas Wolfard,
who live in Marina Del Rey, Calif.
During the hour, the three teams
had to bungee jump off a giant
crane at the Port of Long Beach,
decorate a float for the Tournament
of Roses parade and play a trivia
contest with veteran game-show
host Bob Eubanks.
The race ended on a terrace of
Beverly Hills' Greystone Mansion.
The finalists covered four conti-
nents, 30 cities and 32,000 miles,
"Amazing Race" host Phil Keoghan
told Strand and Chang as he
declared them the winners.

Rapper pleads guilty
in NY weapon case
NEW YORK Rapper Ja Rule on
Monday pleaded guilty to attempted
criminal possession of a weapon
stemming from a July 2007 stop of
his luxury sports car.
Wearing dark-blue jeans and
a black sweater, the rapper said
"guilty" and answered "yes" in a low


In this publicity image released by CBS, host Phil Keoghan (left) congratulates
doctors Nat Strand (center) of Scottsdale, Ariz., and Kat Chang, of Santa Monica,
Calif., as they are declared the winner of the 17th season of the reality competition
series 'The Amazing Race' in Los Angeles.


voice to a judge's questions.
"Because of your guilty plea here
today, you'll have a record of having
committed a violent felony. This is
a very serious matter," Manhattan
state Supreme Court Justice
Richard Carruthers
S.... told the rapper.
'"This isn't a good
day," Ja Rule said as
S he left the court. He
-- declined to discuss
the case.
Ja Rule's lawyer,
Ja Rule Stacey Richman,
had no immediate
comment.
Specifically, the rapper admitted
to a charge that involves attempting
to have a loaded gun outside one's
home or workplace.
Police said they found a loaded
semiautomatic gun in a rear door
of the $250,000-plus car after it was
stopped for speeding.


Ex-TV chef gets 9 years
in plot to kill wife
LOS ANGELES Former
"Calorie Commando" TV chef Juan-
Carlos Cruz has been sentenced in
Los. Angeles to nine years in prison
on a charge of soliciting two home-
less men to murder his wife. '
Cruz, who pleaded no contest ear-
lier this year, smiled and winked at
his wife, Jennifer Campbell, during
Monday's sentencing appearance.
Defense attorney Shawn
Chapman Holley told Superior
Court Judge H. Chester Horn Jr.
that Cruz is expected to serve half
of the nine-year term.
Cruz was arrested in May by
Santa Monica police after a home-
less man reported he was offered
$500 to kill Campbell.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Jazz musician Clark Terry
is 90.
* Singer-actress Abbe Lane
is 79.
* Actor Hal Williams is 72.
* Actress Patty Duke is 64.
* Entertainment executive
Michael Ovitz is 64.
* Rock singer-musician Mike
Scott (The Waterboys) is 52.
* Singer-musician Peter


"Spider" Stacy (The Pogues)
is 52.
* Actress Cynthia Gibb is
47.
* Actress Natascha
McElhone is 41.
* Actress-comedian
Michaela Watkins is 39.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Brian Dalyrimple (Soul For
Real) is 35.


Daily Scripture

"When he had called together
all the people's chief priests and
teachers of the law, he asked
them where the Messiah was
to be born.'In Bethlehem in
Judea,' they replied, 'for this is
what the prophet has written.'"
Matthew 2:4


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


2 men fall from
bridge, 1 survives
FORT LAUDERDALE
Authorities are inves-
tigating after two men
fell from a South Florida
bridge over the weekend.
Police said the men
were at an entertainment
complex Saturday when
they decided to go to
other establishments on
the other side of the river.
Authorities said they tried
to cross over by using the
automatically controlled
train bridge, which is pro-
grammed to remain in the
up position, unless a train
is headed towards it.
The bridge began to
rise as they crossed it and
although they tried to get
off, only one man made it
to the tracks.
Authorities found the
other man in the river.
Both men were hospital-
ized, where one man was
pronounced dead.

Man faces charge
for shooting teen
KEY LARGO -
Authorities say a Florida
Keys man was arrested
for shooting an 18-year-old
in the ankle after the teen
tried to open the man's
front door.
Authorities said 62-year-
old Dimitrios Theodosiou
told them he yelled
through the door upon
hearing someone trying
to open his front door.
Authorities said the per-
son ducked around the
corner of the home and
Theodosiou went outside,
returned inside and got his
handgun.
Authorities said
Theodosiou shot the teen
in the ankle when the teen
had already dropped to the
ground after trying to climb
over the fence to leave.
The teen was airlifted to
a hospital where he is in
stable condition.


V
4


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Cold front brings chilly air
Groundskeeper Jose Mojica of the Heron Bay Golf Club in
Parkland is bundled up as he grooms a sand trap before
the start of the Florida Panthers Foundation golf tournament
Monday in Parkland.


Woman accused
of schools threat
FORT LAUDERDALE
- A hearing is scheduled
for the Florida woman
accused of making an
e-mail threat that resulted
in an hours-long lockdown
of Broward County public
schools.
Prosecutors said
48-year-old Ellisa Martinez
should not be released
because she is a danger to
the community and a risk
to flee before trial.
Authorities said an
e-mail from an address
traced to Martinez was
sent to a conservative talk
show host in November,
expressing plans to do
"something big" around
a government building
in Broward, possibly a
school.
Broward placed all 300
public schools on lock-
down for several hours.

ICE operation
nets 95 arrests
MIAMI U.S. immi-
gration authorities have
rounded up nearly 100


foreign nationals with con-
victions of violent crimes,
sex offenses and drug traf-
ficking charges.
The five-day
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement operation
ended Friday with 93
administrative arrests
statewide for being in vio-
lation of immigration law.

Man arrested
after standoff
SEMINOLE -
A Pinellas County man
has been arrested after a
13-hour standoff with
sheriff's deputies.
The sheriff's office said
deputies who got inside
18-year-old Jonathan
Breingan's Seminole apart-
ment Monday morning
found him hiding in a
closet under blankets and
clothes.
Deputies said it began
Sunday night when
Breingan argued with
three people in a car
near his home. They said
he fired a gun into the
vehicle, but no one was
injured.
* Associated Press


SUNNY
AND COLD


HI 45LO i


ARTLY PARTLY CHANCE' CHANCE
CLOUDY| CLOUDY i-I0OF RAINi | ,-llOF RAIN


HI54 LO HI 69L0',I I H172LO g H168 LO
- _S ...... .:* r. -...-w.


SValdosta City Wednesday Thursday
4 1 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral S. 1 ? 6' .' Y l
Tallahassee Lake City, 45/22 Daytona Beach 55/37/pc 69/50/s
47/22 45/21 Ft. Lauderdale 66/50/s 74/57/s
Pensacola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 62/40/s 71/53/s
48/36 PanamaCity 46/23 50,28 Gainesville 55/32/s 68/46/pc
48/31 Ocala Jacksonville 54/33/pc 66/47/pc
8/2 and Cape Canaveral Key West 68/50/s 71/58/s
50/28 53/42 Lake City 54/31/s 69/47/pc
50/28 Miami 67/50/s 74/57/s
Tampa M Naples 62/41/s 71/51/s
53/32/ West Palm Beach Ocala 57/32/s 69/46/s
56/34 Orlando 56/36/pc 68/49/s
Ft Lauderdale Panama City 56/52/pc 69/58/pc
Ft Myers, 58/40 Pensacola 60/54/pc 71/57/pc
55/32 Naples Tallahassee 56/44/pc 69/55/pc
54/33 Miami Tampa 58/40/s 69/55/s
58/39 Valdosta 54/39/pc 67/53/pc
Key Wst W. Palm Beach 65/42/s 74/56/s


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


45
34
68
45
85 in 1948
13 in 1962

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
0.98"
46.78"


SUN
Sunrise today 7:19 a.m.
Sunset today 5:32 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 7:19 a.m.
Sunset tom. 5:32 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 12:53 p.m.
Moonset today 12:59 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 1:23 p.m.
Moonset tom. 1:52 a.m.


Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan.
21 27 4 12
Full Last New First


4
MOORAME
45 nies tolbum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

'.me-: -^^ s ei**s


An exclusive
service
I ^.jto
our readers
by
The W ith.
Channel.



weather.com


Forecasts, data and graph-
o Ics 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
-" www.weatherpubllsher.com





a, G Oonnected


on Txwo fTI


CASH3


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
Fax number ..............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ................755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityrdporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. a.m. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia county, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the perrnis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-880. vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City.Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427 (Tuesday through Sunday)
After 1:00p.m. 12 Weeks.................. $26.32
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52 Weeks...................$83.46
ADVERTISING Rates indude 7% sales tax.
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(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks.................. $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks................... $82.80
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks.................$179.40


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424















Pancake breakfast


7 *fundraiser Sunday


LEANNE TYO/Lake Cty Reporter
Brittany Barker, 19, a CHS drama student, helps Dean Moses, 41, an Avalon resident, jnwrap
a Christmas gift. Barker said she was happy to be a part of the drama program's project of
visiting the residents for the holiday season and donating gifts. "It makes me happy ani I like
making people happy," she said. "And I like helping others.".


CHEERS: Family atmosphere shared


Continued From Page 1A
said a lot of residents don't
have family to come visit
them.
"Especially during the
holidays, they miss that
family atmosphere," she
said.
Residents look forward to
the students spending time
with them, she said, and it
has an impact on their lives.
"It brings a lot of cheer to


them," Culbreath said.
"I love them (the stu-
dents) because they're so
full of joy," said 77-year-old
Lee Smith, an Avalon resi-
dent "And it's Jesus' birth-
day, and they remember
that"
Timmy Jernigan, 18, a
senior, said some residents
don't have visitors at any
time during the year and


need them especially at
Christmas.
"It makes the residents'
day when we comeaere,"
said Darren Burch,16, a
sophomore. "They enjoy us
being here."
'They deserve tohave
someone come seelhem
on Christmas," Cury said.
"And it's fun for us.We love
to come."


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Wednesday, Dec. 8
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Charlene Jacobs-
Robinson, 40, 22133 NW
202nd Avenue, High
Springs, warrant Insurance
fraud by preparing a false
claim and uttering a forgery.
Jerrid Christian
Campbell, 18, 671 SE St
Johns Street, warrant
Burglary of a dwelling and
third-degree grand theft
(two counts).
Terrance Levon
Means, 32, 534 SE Country
Club Road, warrant Dealing
in stolen property.
James Afidrew
Pilkington 11I, 27, 432 SW
Lynnwood Avenue, bur-
glary, grand theft, violation
of probation on original
charge of possession of a
controlled substance and
criminal mischief.
Talmadge Lamar
Powell III, 32, 149 SE Patio
Glen, warrant Grand theft.
Kimberly Dawn


Reigner, 35, 1413 Chablis
Court N., Orange Park, war-
rant Violation of probation
on original charge of aiding
escape.

Lake City
Police Department
James Ellis Davis, no
age given, 586 NE Montana
Street, aggravated battery
(domestic violence).
Deeante Devon :
Gibson, no age given, 1003
SE Maple Lane, robbery
while armed with a firearm
and aggravated battery with
a firearm.

Columbia County
Detention Facility
Rohan Anthony Gray,
28, 9252 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, warrant Failure to
appear to pre-trial confer-
ence on original charge of
fleeing police officer and
felony driving while license
suspended/revoked.

Thursday, Dec. 9
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Christopher Alan
Walker, 25, 322 SW Lenvil
Lane, Fort White, dealing
in stolen property and retail
theft.
Derek Turnsplenty, 20,


5002 SW County Road 240,
warrant Violation f proba-
' tion on original cha-ges
of attempted fleeing and
eluding and drivingwhile
license suspended/tevoked.
Marcus Anthmy
Marshall, 20, 13416NW
147 Lane, Alachua, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of psses-
sion of a controlledsub-
stance.
Cecil James Bird, 31,
Double Run Road, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
Debra Kaye Heaton,
44,112 NE Curt Cairt,
theft, possession ofa con-
trolled substance, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
and possession of certain
drugs without a preocrip-
tion.

Florida
Highway Patrol
n Lance Robert IVartin,
32, 113 Milltone CV,
Crestview,
Lake City
Police Department
Deborah Ann fellows,
no age given, 128 SV
Walton Glen, Fort Vhite,
grand theft and fraid
swindle.
From Staff Repor,


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

The Columbia County
Recreation Department
will hold a pancake break-
fast fundraiser to gener-
ate proceeds for two local
youth basketball teams.
The pancake breakfast
will take place from 7-
11 a.m. Saturday in the
Richardson Community
Center cafeteria building,
255 NE Coach Anders
Lane. Tickets are $5.
Pancakes, grits, eggs,
sausage and orange juice
will be served.
"The proceeds from the
pancake breakfast will be
used as a fundraiser for the
USSSA 14-and-younger and


12-and-younger boys bas-
ketball teams," said Nicole
Smith, Columbia County
Recreation Department
secretary. "We're holding
the fundraiser for them
because the season is
about to get started."
Smith said the 12-and-
younger team needs uni-
forms, while the 14-and-
younger team needs fund-
ing for their total expens-
es, including travel and
tournament expenses.
The Columbia County
Recreation Department
hosted the initial fundrais-
er last year when there
was only team, the 14-and-
younger team.
Last year the 14-and-
younger team was co-spon-


scored by the Richardson
Community Center/Annie
Mattox North Board. The
team played a full sched-
ule of games and was
entered in three tourna-
ments across the state.
"This year we're adding
the 12-and-younger team,"
Smith said. "We need to
get some more support
for the teams since we are
doubling our efforts 'this
year. We're putting the 12-
and-younger team in there
this year just to serve
more students and it's
co-sponsored by the Lake
City Parks and Recreation
Department."
The basketball season
for both teams will begin
at the end of January.


Residents to join Scott parade


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Local faces will be in
the mix during the inau-
gural parade for Governor-
elect Rick Scott Jan. 4 in
Tallahassee.
The Columbia County
Republican Executive
Committee was invited to
participate in the parade.
This is the first time the
REC has been invited to
an inaugural parade, said
Tony Buzzella, chair.
"We're excited about
that," 'he said. "It's an
honor. It's not about a par-
ticular political party. It's
about the best of Columbia,
County and celebrating its


diversity."
The theme for the float
is "Moving onward and
upward, yes we will."
"It just came to me,"
Buzzella said.
Ideas for the float
include having live music,
a banner identifying it as
part of Columbia County
and "lots of smiles," he
said.
"The main thing is to
promote the community,"
Buzzella said. 'We voted
in record numbers. It's a
victory for everyone. We'll
be there with bells on to
show Columbia County
is a force to be reckoned.
with."
Buzzella is excited about


the new election cycle, he
said.
"I put a lot of faith in the
governor and the newly
elected officials," he said.
"If they actually deliver
on what they promise that
will be most refreshing."
Planning for the float
design is still in the infant
stage, Buzzella said.
Anyone in the community
is invited to be a part of
the project, regardless of
political affiliations.
Call Buzzella at 386-755-
5856 or 386-965-9256.
'We want to be a first
class float, but also we
want to have fun," he said.
"It will just be a great day
to celebrate."


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter

More than 100 attend Columbia cakewalk
Linda Brooks (from right), Kristine Benton, Jackie Williams and Candace Hines eye a seat
during a cakewalk at the faculty and staff holiday party Monday at Columbia High School.
More than 100 people participated in 'Columbia County's Biggest Cakewalk,' said Melinda
Moses, assistant principal. A total of 80 cakes were brought in for the event.


FOOD: Donations earmarked for needy families


Continued From Page 1A
said. "This food drive hits
at the right time. Most of
the agencies will give out
their final Christmas bas-
kets this Saturday, so the
food comes right when we
need it most."
The Community Food
Drive, created in 2008
by the newspaper, tar-
gets the time frame
between Thanksgiving
and Christmas when food
supplies are scarce, but
demand from needy fami-
lies reaches some of the
highest levels of the year.
All food collected is
earmarked for Columbia
County agencies serving
local residents.
"I'm thrilled beyond
words over the partner-
ship with the Lake City
Reporter and this com-
munity," said Suzanne
Edwards, executive direc-
tor of Catholic Charities
in Lake City. '"They have
a heart to help those who
are hungry. This year's
Community Food Drive
was a great effort.
"Remember, 365 days
a year, people get hun-
gry. It's something that


doesn't go away."
The Food Bank of the
Suwannee Valley is a
subsidiary of Catholic
Charities. Its office in Lake
City serves 36 agencies in
four counties that assist
people in need.
Of those agencies, 12

We thefanmily oj
TASHANDA JONLS
extends our sincere
appreciation and thanks
to everyone for the many
" acts of kindness, love and
expressions of sympathy
shown throughout our
time of bereavement. We
are truly grateful Jor "your
visits, prayers, cards, floral
Sarrangements, and many
telephone calls. Tashanda
7 will always he in our
Hearts and minds and
with God as our corner
Stone and your continued
prayers we will begin our
journey on the road of
healing. God bless each
of you.
C The Family


are in Columbia County.
The Food Bank )nly. sup-


plies other agencies, not
individuals.


Man Goes "TOAD-AL" at High School Reunion
BEXAR COUNTY After using Thera-Gesic' on aching joints,
Tom W. attended last Friday's reunion where, according to 5 amused and
concerned classmates, he went TOAD-AL. He squatted, extended both
arms to the ground, arched his back and did his best to hop numerous times
while croaking.
When asked to explain his behavior, he painlessly replied,
"None of your dang business!"

SAVE, LIVE,- IE
BUY THERA-GESIC'.


755-5440 or

755-5441 Edwardjones
"woeen 8:00ar & 5.00pm MAKING SENSE OF ESTIN


Robert Woodard
Financial Advisor


148 North Marion Ave Downtown
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
robert.woodard@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














OPINION


Tuesday, December 14, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Top secret:

Canada

is friendly

nation

It is widely agreed, includ-
ing by the officials who
are in charge of the
process, that the U.S.
government classifies
way too much information.,
Give bureaucrats a "top secret"
stamp and they will use it free-
ly. No one ever gets called on
the carpet for a document that
doesn't get out.
As the Associated Press found
in reviewing the classified docu-
ments posted by WikiLeaks,
U.S. diplomats classified.as
secret or confidential infor-
mation that was in the public
domain public speeches,
summaries of what the local
newspapers were saying,
accounts of widely reported
political feuds and stuff of only
passing historical interest like
how deceased dictator Josef
Stalin was being taught in
schools.
One classified cable from
our embassy in Ottawa to new
President Barack Obama con-
tained this startling revelation:
"No matter which politi-
cal party forms the Canadian
government during your
Administration, Canada will
remain one of our staunchest
and most like-minded of allies,
our largest trading and energy
partner, and our most reliable
neighbor and friend."
Despite periodic stabs at
transparency, like Obama tell-
ing bureaucrats to err on the
side of openness, the natural
tendency of governments is to
err on the side of secrecy.
The refusal of government
agencies to share classified
information with each other
Was fingered as a critical U.S.
weakness in the war on terror.
Classifying innocuous or
pointless information also
.devalues the job of protecting
it.
How seriously can someone .
be expected to take the job of
keeping secret the insight that
Canada is our friendly neighbor
to the north?
Getting rid of that kind of
material would make it that
much easier to safeguard
what's left.
M Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong. communities --Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher .
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


The coddled world of pro sports


WASHINGTON

months of stultifying
debate over a reluc-
tant, divisive and,
petulant defensive
lineman who was paid millions
of dollars but showed little or
no interest in playing, thoughts
naturally turn back to those
days when only a handful of
professional athletes made not
much more than a living wage
but participated for the love of
the game. It hasn't been that
long ago.
The mistakes made in the
hiring and handling of Albert
Haynesworth, a 300 pound-plus
behemoth, admittedly talented
tackle when he wanted to play,
are numerous.. Not the least of
these was his seeming refusal
to perform under the letter
or spirit of his contract and
the club's failure to perform
due diligence on his character
before signing him. He will now
appeal a suspension without pay
despite overwhelming evidence
of intransigence. -
How important is this? Not
very except to the legion of
loyal Washington Redskin fans,
particularly the-regular ticket
holders, who have been cheated
and exploited for years now
by an owner who obviously
wouldn't know a football from
a softball, bftt has made untold
millions off them.
Daniel Snyd.r is a'kid who
got rich on someone else's
money and thought how great
it would be to be a "sportsman"
who could associate with and
decide the fate of guys he was
never big enough to join on the
playing field.
.What makes this worth dis-
cussing is what it says about
the state of professionalism in


Dan K.Thomasson
America. Teachers who'doi't
want to teach. Doctors wh(
don't want to doctor. It is a
metaphor for the excessesin
entertainment that keep teis of
millions of devoted fans ghled
to their TV sets and the con-
parative few who can afford the
exorbitant prices to be in tie
arenas. Professional athletes
are among our most pampered
souls, having been indulge
from pre-ptibescence by dating
parents, coaches and agent
who see their talent as an even-
tual lottery ticket to riches.:
Along the way it is no wonder
they develop a sense of enitle-
ment that frequently leads hem
into terrible practices.
This tarnished system
produces far too many
Haynesworths in the rarefed
atmosphere of collegiate aid
professional athletics. Whie .
it always has existed to sone
degree, it took on new dinrren-
sions with the huge cash fbw of
television. A very good friend,
the late Dr. Kenneth Haggrty,
who was an all-star in NewYork
City, prep basketball and laer
after World War II a captain
of the Holy Cross basketbdl
team that included Bob Coisy,
explained once that he had
been recruited by the Boston
Celtics but turned them dovn
because the pay was only $1,000
a year. It was a paltry sum, ie
said, compared to the amount
he expected to earn as an cral


surgeon. Do you know a dentist
today that makes an average
NBA player's pay?
The brilliant American paint-
er, Wilson Hurley, whose art
brings six and seven figures, put
it this way: "I'm getting so I can
just about match the salary of a
good outfielder." The late great
John Wood6n played profession-
al basketball for $5 a game.
When he signed with the
Redskins, Haynesworth's con-
tract was estimated at more
than $100 million if played out.
About $41 million was guaran-
teed, including a $21 million
signing bonus, which he already
has received. For that amount,
he played 20 games and made
70 tackles. To this addled brain
it comes out to more than half a
million bucks a tackle. For that
amount, he became an utter
disruption to new coach Mike
Shanahan's efforts to rebuild
what is now a third-rate fran-
chise except in profits.
For that amount, he clearly
considered himself immune
from the same responsibili-
ties as his teammates and his
coaches.
It would be wrong to tar with
the same brush all those who
play some kind of professional
team sport. A large number are
,outstanding men and women
who aren't tainted by the moun-
tains of cash thrust upon them
and who take their obligations
seriously. Unfortunately, howev-
er, too many regard themselves
as special.
Who's to blame? To quote
the late, great possum phenom-
enon, Pogo, "We have met the
enemy and he is us."

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


An agreement to
extend tax cuts and.
unemployment ben-
efits is far from per-
fect, but it should be
approved by Congress.
Democrats are understand-
ably angry that President
Barack Obama did not ful-
fill his. campaign pledge to
keep the lower tax rates for
working-class families 'but not
the wealthy. .They also are right
that Republican concerns about
reducing the deficit ring hollow
when they also demand extend-
ing tax cuts to the top 2 percent
of earners at a cost of $700
billion over 10 years and a
huge tax break on multimillion-
dollar estates.
On the whole, however, the
benefits of the package, includ-
ing certainty for businesses and
investors for the next two years,
outweigh the negatives.
In essence, President Obama
convinced Republican leaders
to support a long-term exten-


sion of federal unemployment
benefits 'in exchange for man-
taining tax rates lowered murder
the Bush administration fortwo
years. By moving rightwarcin
his stance on tax cuts and low
they'll spur economic growth,
he also clearly launched th(
2012 presidential campaignthis
week.
If this agreement is not
accepted now, hundreds of
laid-off workers will go without
unemployment benefits an(
uncertainty about tax rateswill
continue well into next yea
when a more heavily Repullican
Congress would begin the
debate anew. With Republi:an
control of the House and aslim-
mer Democratic majority ii
the Senate, it would be moe
difficult to negotiate a packlge
that included benefits for vork-
ing families like those Preadent
Obama secured in the current
agreement.
President Obama has loig
said that he would lower taces


for those earning less than
$250,000 a year. Republicans
made it clear that they would
only support extending the
Bush era tax cuts to everyone,
not just the middle class.
As a result, the president
is pushing a compromise that
extends the tax cuts for two
years. Included in this extension
are child care, college and low-
income credits that will espe-
cially benefit low- and middle-
income earners. It also reduces
by 2 percentage points the
Social Security payroll tax for
a year and extends unemploy-
ment benefits for 13 months.
Economists agree that
extending unemployment ben-
efits is well worth the cost and
that their abrupt end would slow
economic growth.
This outweighs the negative
aspects of the compromise plan.
Overall, the package deserves
a positive vote in Congress.

* Bangor (Maine) Daily News


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


Who would

steal from

Salvation

Army?


officers were still
tracking down plac-
es a Salvation Army
bell ringer might
have set up his kettle to collect
money for the needy.
Unfortunately, he himself was
the designated needy.
That's right. Some guy used
his mama's good name and the.-
Salvation Arniy's good repu-
tation to collect a few bucks
for himself. I don't know if he
smiled and said "God bless
you" when someone dropped
money into the red kettle, but I
wouldn't be surprised.
The man we'll call him
Judas came across as a true -
disciple when he showed up
at the Salvation Army office
in Gainesville, Ga., using his
mother's maiden name so
that a criminal background
check would not reveal that
he was a convicted felon. His
mama's name cleared beauti-
fully. So with a kettle, a bell
and an apron, he was ready for
business. I
The last place he was seen
- before he was arrested -
was at a Walmart in Acworth,
Ga., ringing his little bell.
Acworth is a little out of the
territory.
. After Judas was caught, he
had no comment. But several
folks did. Some of them wanted
to ring his bell.
'Which is understandable,
because the Salvation Army
does so many good things.
Ask veterans of World War II
who came to their aid when
they needed it. The Salvation
Army. Ask victims of Hurricane.
Katrina who was quietly help-
ing while the federal govern-
ment was fiddling around. The
Salvation Army. Ask the truly
needy who is there to hand out
warm clothes when the temper-
ature drops below freezing. The
Salvation Army. Ask who has
a warm bed for the homeless,
food and toys for children and
families, help with rent and util-
ities, help for the unemployed.
The Salvation Army.
Ask who says "God bless.
you" and means it when some-
one drops even a coin into a
red kettle at Christmastime.
The rest of the paid workers
and volunteers of the Salvation
Army.
So it's no wonder that several
folks want to ring Judas' bell.
But then I talked to Lt Matt
Cunningham, commander of
the Salvation Army post that
hired Judas. "What would Jesus
say about this situation?" I
asked him.
"You know, we see Jesus say
a lot of things about the guilty,"
he said. "I believe that justice
should be brought to the situa-
tion. But I also believe that this
guy, when he's sorry, deserves
forgiveness. ... When he feels
bad for doing his crime and
he is truly sorry, I fully forgive
him. And if he came to my front
door asking for help, I would
treat him the way Jesus would
treat him. That's what we're all
about."
And that's what Christmas is
all about. It's about giving, not
taking. It's about honoring, not
dishonoring. Ifs about forgiving
- and being forgiven.
Surely, even Judas knows
this. And, as the lieutenant said,
if he's truly sorry, he should be
forgiven, too.
Even a deceptive disciple can
be forgiven.
* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A


EPSTUiWik.coitM


OTHER OPINION

Congress should OK tax compromise











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Shopping night

Kids' Holiday Shopping
Night at the Attic is 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. today at the Haven
Hospice Attic Resale Store,
1077 US Highway 90 W., Suite
120. The event gives chil-
dren in need the opportunity
to purchase specially-priced
gifts for family members using
"Attic Bucks." Festivities will
include gift wrapping, photos
with Santa, punch and cook-
ies-all free of charge. There
will also be door prizes and
special drawings. All children
must be accompanied by an
adult. The event is open to the
public. Call 386-752-0230 or go
to havenhospice.org.

Wednesday
Enrollment and Dinner
SHINE is holding open enroll-
ment from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The R.O.T.C.
will also be holding a dinner at
6:30 p.m. The center is located at
628 SE Allison Court. For more
information, call 386-755-0235.

Friday
Cultural Presentation
A cultural presentation at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center will
be at 1 p.m. on Friday in the
Reading Room. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison Court.
For more information call, 386-
755-0235.

A Christmas Carol

A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Friday at the
High Springs Community Theater.
Tickets are available at The
Framery on W. Baya and at high-
springscommunitytheatercom.


PUPPETONE RC


COURTESY PHOTO

Puppetone Rockers to pull musical strings at SOSMP
The Puppetone Rocker will impress and bring smiles to the faces of visitors at The Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak. Suwannee Lights is all aglow as more than five million twinkling lights adorn a two-mile
wonderland of delightful scenes of Christmas. Suwannee Lights admission Sunday to Thursday is $2 children,
$6 adults; Friday and Saturday IS $2 children, $8 adults. The atmosphere is like a winter wonderland with a
visit with Santa Claus, roasted marshmallows, hot chocolate and cookies. The Kazoobie Show, just like the
Puppetone Rockers, will entertain kids and adults alike.


Saturday
Theatrical Play

The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts 'The Life of a
Christian Teenager" at 6:15 p.m.
Saturday. The theater is located'
at 348 N. Marion Avenue. Call'
386-344-0319.

I4CS Christmas Party

The Filipino American Cultural
Society of Lake City announces a
Christmas party taking place from
6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Saturday


at the Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. Enjoy a night of cul-
ture, dancing, and entertainment,
and possibly become a member of
FACS. For more information, con-
tact Bob Gavette at 386-965-5905.

Flapjack breakfast

A Relay For Life fundraising
flapjack breakfast is 8 a.m. to
10 a.m. Saturday at Applebee's.
The meal will include pancakes,
scrambled eggs, homefries,
bacon, sausage, juices, coffee
and tea all you can eat. Tickets
are $10. Of the proceeds $7 will


go to Relay for Life.

A Christmas Carol

A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Saturday at
the High Springs Community
Theater. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya and
at highspringscommunitytheater.
comn.

Pancake breakfast

The RCC/AMN Inc. is having


a pancake breakfast 7 a.m. to 1-1
a.m. Saturday at the Richardsor"
Community Center. The tickets
are $5 and the breakfast will
consist of pancakes, Nettle's
sausage, grits, eggs and orange
juice. All proceeds will benefit
the 14-&-under and 12-&-under
boys basketball teams. To make
a donation or for more informa-
tion contact Mario Coppock or
Nicole Smith at 386-754-7096.

Gift wrapping

Sevepro is hosting a gift wrap-
ping fundraiser from 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday at Lowes.
Donations will be accepted.
Money raised will go toward
Relay For Life.

Cartwheel-a-thon

BARD Gymnastics is hosting a
cartwheel-a-thon 2 p.m. to 4 p.m
Saturday at the Lake City Mall.
Sponsors may pledge so much
money per cartwheel or make
a one-time donation. Checks
can be made to the Christian
Service Center and the dona-
tion is tax deductible. Call BARD
Gymnastics at 386-752-1710.

Tuesday, Dec. 21
Leads Club #1 meeting
The next Columbia County
Chamber Leads Club #1 meeting
is 8 a.m. Dec. 21 at Holiday Inn &
Suites. Breakfast is $6 per person.
Leads Clubs are dynamic groups
of Chamber Partners who meet
bi-monthly to exchange business
leads and ideas with fellow busi-
ness professionals. Call 386-752-
3690.

Theatre performance

Come watch the Geri-Actors
perform live on stage at 6:30
p.m. Dec. 21 in the Dining Hall
of the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is located at
628 SE Allison Court. For ticket
information, call 386-755-0235.


OBITUARIES


Robert Browning
Mr. Robert "B-bop" B
ing, 69, of O'Brien, FL.
Sunday December 12,
after an extended illness:
was the son of the late
Spradley and Zuella Wa
He was of the Baptist
He is survived, by three
Robert G. Browning,
County, FL.; Roger B
ing ( Stephanie); O'Brien
Ronnie Browning ( Am;
Taylor County, FL, two d
ters Dora Browning, Jac
ville, FL.; Sandra Feagle,
City, FL.; his best friend
Gibbs, fifteen grandchildren
eleven great grandchildren
survive. Funeral services f
Browning will be Wedr
December 15, 2010 at
M.at Gateway-Forest Law
neral Home. With Pastor C
Istre officiating. Intermen
follow in Forest Lawn Met
Gardens Cemetery in Laki
Visitation with the family
on Tuesday, December 14,
from 5 to 7 P.M. at the f
home. GATEWAY-FO]
LAWN FUNERAL H(
3596 S. US Hwy 441,
City, FL 32025 (386-752-
is in charge of arranger
Please sign the guest bo
www: gatewayforestlawn

Charles W. Easterwoo
Charles W. "Chuck" E
wood, of Fort White, a
War II Veteran, passed av
natural causes in his hot
Thursday November 25. -
82 years old. He was b(
Lindale, Geor-
gia on May '
13, 1928 to the
late Clarence
and Lois East-
erwood. He
was preceded
in death by his
wife Melba.
Chuck enjoyed B
the view from
his porch while
smoking his
evening cigar,
listening to music, wa
movies and visits from
friends. He would often sa
blessed he was to have so
caring friends and neight
his life. He was very fond
sisters and spoke to them
Chuck will be loving
membered by his son Gar
daughter in-law Janet of]
Joy, PA; grandchildren,
and Wyatt Easterwood; tv
ters, Mary Alice Sawyer m
Clark, of Cowan TN, Sue
ertson wife ofReese, of Bel
TN; Ken and Jeana Cre
and their son Clinton; and
nieces, nephews and fi


Following cremation, in-
ternment will be private.
rown- ICS CREMATION &
died FUNERAL HOME
2010 (386) 752-3436
s. He
Pete
ildron Frank Alston North, Jr.
faith.
sons, Mr. Frank Alston "Dut" North,
Lake Jr., 53, a lifelong resident of
rown- Lake City, passed away at Ha-
, FL.; ven Hospice on Sunday, Decem-
anda); ber 12, 2010 following an almost
laugh- lifelong illness. Mr. North was
:kson- the son of the late Frank Alston
Lake and Esther Tompkins North, Sr.
Jackie He was preceded in death by two
en and siblings, Scotty Williams and
n also Jeannie North. Mr. North was
or Mr. born on April 6, 1957, and at
iesday the young age of thirteen he was
2:00P. attacked by a swarm of yellow
vn Fu- jackets which cost him the use
harles of his kidneys. Mr. North started
It will kidney dialysis at the age of six-
morial teen but still managed to gradu-
e City. ate from Columbia High School
will be with the Class of 1975. He had
2010, a kidney transplant that lasted
funeral nineteen years and had been on
REST dialysis for the last eleven years
OME, df his life. Due to his impair-
Lake ment, Mr. North was unable to
-1954) be employed, but he very much
ments. enjoyed helping out and hanging
ook at out with the "Good Time Gang"
.corn. at The Boat Doctors of Lake City.
He enjoyed rabbit hunting as a
d young man and loved spending
time at Sandy Point at the river
Easter- and fishing. He was passionate
World about his shiny blue truck and his
vay of beloved dog "Jaime". Mr. North
me on had been an active member of
-e was the Pine Grove Baptist. Church
orn in since the age often when he was
baptized there. Mr. North en-
joyed the men's Sunday school
? f class and other church activities.
k Mr. North is survived by his
brothers, David Richard Wil-
liams of Lucerne, Colorado;


James M. "Jimmy" North of
Lake City, Florida; and John
H. "Johnny" North (Claire) of
Geneva, Florida; his sisters,
Carolyn Williams Terry (Bill)
of Callahan, Florida and Shir-
ley Baker of O'Neal, Florida;
his aunts, Inez Reddick. of Lake
City and Callie Smith of Mel-
bourne, Florida and an uncle,
Jack Tompkins of Jacksonville,
Florida. Numerous nieces,
nephews, other family mem-
bers and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. North
will be conducted at 11:00
A.M. on Wednesday Decem-
ber 15, 2010 in the Pine Grove
Baptist Church with Rev. Ron
Thompson officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the Corinth
Cemetery (located on Hwy 441
North of Lake City). The fam-
ily will receive friends Tuesday
evening from 5:00-7:00 PM
at the funeral home. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn


Laurie Warren Williams
Laurie Warren "Tiny" Williams,
81, a resident of Lake City, Flor-
ida passed away Saturday, De-
cember11,2010.
Mr. Williams
was a -native of
Olustee, Florida
and had resided
in Columbia County all of his
life. He is the son of the late
Aubrey Birley and Bertie Bea-
sley Williams. He served in the
U.S. Army during the Korean
War. He is preceded in death
by his wife of fifty-four years,
Alice "Frankie" Williams. One
sister, Layenia Daughtry and
two brothers, Jennings J.W.
Williams and Francis .Wil-
liams. He was a devoted mem-
ber of the Watertown Congre-
gational Methodist Church.
Survivors include one daugh-
ter, Robin Nichols, Lake City,
Florida. Two sons, Guy (Linda)
Williams and Dale (Peggy) Wil-
liams both of Lake City, Florida.
One sister, Myrtle Godwin, Cal-
lahan, TFlorida. Six grandchil-
dren, Erin Weiffenbach, Laurie
Williams, Brent (Aimee), Wil-
liams, Ty Williams, Dustin
Gaylard and Ricki Nichols.
Funeral services for Mr. Wil-
liams wxii be conducted
Wednesday, December 15, 2010


at 10:00 A.M. in the Watertown
Congregational Church with the
Rev. Randy Ogburn, officiating.
Interment will follow in the Eb-
enezer Cemetery. In lieu of flow-
ers donations may be made to
the Watertown Congregational
Methodist Church, 378 NW
Waldo Street, Lake City, Florida
32055. The family will receive
friends Tuesday, December 14,


d k.


2010 from 6:00-8:00 P.M. at
the funeral home. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659
SW Main Blvd. Lake City is
in charge of arrangements.
Please sign guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome. net

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Bulletin Board

NEW S w ABOUT OUR SCOS *


Pinemount Elementary receives $11,000 from CPS Foundation

Media specialist Veronica Bennett and Donna McAdams, Pinemount Elementary principal, stand at Pinemount Elementary's
Media Center with a grant check for the school worth almost $11,000 from the Columbia Public Schools Foundation Inc. The
grant was made possible through the Florida Education Foundation School District Education Foundation Matching Grant
program. All money raised by the school from private donors was matched through the grant. It will be used to purchase
Accelerated Reader Books and Tests for the Pinemount Media Center, increasing the number of high-interest selections for
the students.


HomeSI Ier


IJuo


nAgen


i 1-..


For Life Insurance
Go With
Someone You Know
Ma
Fina


ary H. Summeravices Rep
ncial Services Rep.


I 234 SW Main Blvd. 752-5866


Happy Birthday


Name: Alisoni DeLoach
Age: 12
Parents: Virgil and
Holly DeLoach
School and grade: Fort
White Middle, seventh
grade
Achievements: A Honor
Roll
What clubs or orga-
nizations do you belong
to? FCA and Youth Group
at church


What do you like best
about school? I like com-
ing to school to see my
friends. My favorite subject
,is Language Arts.
Teachers' comments:
Alison is a hardworking
student who always makes
good choices and uses her
time well. She is always
willing to help others and is
well-liked. Alison is a good
role model for other stu-


dents and I am so glad to be
able to teach her this year.
Principal's com-
ments: Alison is a won-
derful young lady and a
great, all-around student.
She is very conscientious
and works hard to achieve
her goals. I am proud to
have her as a student here
at FWMS.
* -Student's comments
about honor: I am excited.


COURTESY PHOTO
Alison DeLoach


Verlinda


Wilson

Galloway
Dec. 13, 1947 Oct. 26, 2010


',
ri(


Wishing today as we have wished before
That God could have spared you many years more.
In our hearts your memory is kept,
To love, to cherish and to never forget.
We Love You Always and Forever"
Rentz,"Claretha, Clara,
-e.)^ Michelle & Lorenzo .


Vt&Pj0 -I


ON CAMPUS


Summers Elementary
Congratulations to stu-
dents chosen as November
Students of the Month.
They showed exemplary
behavior and were recog-
nized with a certificate,
coupon, Tiger Cub water
bottle and a bag of treats.
Kindergarten: Savannah
Bedenbaugh, Ashley Cox,
Adam Putnel, Brayden
Dupree, Rhys Evans, Oscar
Chen, Faith Reynolds and
Monica Flores. First grade:
Darien Lakes, Ja'Kardy
Combs, Sean Yates, Brooke
Dicks, Richard Bennett,
Adrianna Edwards and
Keniyia Patterson. Second
grade: Ie'shia Broom-Jones,
Tyeshia Broom-Jones,
Macy Fleming Scott,
Nevia Russell-Martinez,
John Saucer and Christa
Upshaw. Third grade:
Carlin Coleman, Sadie
Evans, Grayson Gill, Ember
Russell-Martinez, Justin
Steffens, Aaliyah Gaskins
and Jamie Zheng. Fourth
grade: Mical Anderson,
Linash Thomas, Gracie
Shaver, Marissa Congressi,
Chase Bonds, Moises Gary
and Nadira Medina. Fifth
grade: Deneb Delos-Trinos,
Journey Tucker, Cheyenna
Montoya and Marissa
Jolliffe.
Congratulations to
Science Fair winners, who
will participate in the county
Science Fair in January.
Second-grade winners
were Drew Evans, first
place; Kyle Scott, second
place; and Seth O'Gara,
third place. Third grade win-
ners were Carson Candler,
first place; Sebastian Ulloa,
second place; and Turner
Crews, third place. Fourth-
grade winners were Linash
Thomas, first place; Dara
Gaylard, second place; and
Aurora Rhea, third place.
Fifth-grade winners were
Deneb Delos-Trinos, first
place; Josiah Carr, second
place; and Cristian Higgins,
third place.


Fort White Elementary
Students recently com-
peted in the Local Elks
Hoops Shoot The winners
were Aubrey Callum and
Magnel Loper, ages 8 to 9;
lyanna Legree and Dylan
Cason, ages 10 to 11; and
Amber Olsen and Jonathan
Pearson, ages 12 to 13.
Loper went on to win the
County Elks Hoop Shoot
in his category and will
compete in the District com-
petition held Jan. 15 in Live
Oak. Young Artists of the
Month are Emaya Martinez,
fifth grade; Amy Bechtel,
fourth grade; Dalton
Brooks, third grade; Radley
Heinze, second grade;
Caleb Compton, first grade;
and Kenly Alveraz, kinder-
garten. The chorus will
perform at 12:20 p.m. at the
Lake City Mall Monday.

Melrose Park Elementary
Melrose Park Elementary
will launch a program
called Max's Buddies Jan. 6.
Fourth- and fifth-grade stu-
dents will visit Mrs. Ratliffs
IND classroom twice a
week to help special needs
students. Max's Buddies
and the IND students will
read, sing and interact
with one another. Students
will be nominated by their
teachers to become a Max
Buddy.

Eastside Elementary
Eastside students have
been very busy getting
ready for the Science Fair.
Students worked on their
projects for the fair, which
was held Nov. 18. Awards
were given Nov. 19. Second-
grade winners were Cole
Wehrli, first place; Sarah
Douglas, second place; and
Travis Dicks, third place.
Third-grade winners were
Maegan Brantley, first
place; Zoe Brantley, second
place; and Garrett Fennell,
third place. Honorable men-


tions went to third-graders
Hannah Lee and Ryan
Stubbs. Fourth-grade win-
ners were Jessica Harris,
first place; Kyle Booher,
second lace; and Hannah
Harper, third place.
Honorable mentions went
to fourth-graders Ashlyn
Lowery, Logan Charles,
Christian Davis and John
Twardowski. Fifth-grade
winners were Garet
Dicks, first place; Skyler
Colley, second place; and
Sarah Dicks, third place.
Honorable mentions went
to fifth-graders Bridget
Morse, Reid Wehrli, Jaden
Rentz and Sara Murawski.
Cole Wehrli, Maegan
Brantley and Jessica Harris
will represent Eastside at
the County Science Fair.
Congratulations to
Katelyn Hobby for winning
the Spelling Bee. She will
represent Eastside in the
County Spelling Bee in
January.

Niblack Elementary
The Niblack Elementary
Science Fair was held
Dec. 9. Kindergarten win-
ners are Ms. Lechner's
class, first place; Mrs.
Lopes' class, second place;
and Mrs. Latham's class,
third place. First-grade win-
ners were Ms. Warren's
class, first place; Mrs.
Lyons' class, second place;
and Mrs. Lee's class, third
place. Second-grade wip-
ners were Brianna Lee,
first place; Dwayne Cordell,
second; and Riley Bodden,
third. Third-grade winners
were Brianna Bowles, first
place; Nathan Anderson,
second; and Taylor Ivery,
third. Fourth-grade win-
ners were Ariyanna
Williams, first place; Aariah
Lewis, second; and Frank
Frederick, third. Fifth-
grade winners were Eldrina
Edwards, first place; Harley
Sheppard, second place;
and Latravious Miller, third
place.


CATALOG SHOWROOM FOR COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS
..- 'Ft 1


STUDENT PROFILE


1


I IT- I


LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


a


c r


^SL^Wi










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jokectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Tuesday, December 14, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
5-8 p.m. today
Columbia High's
soccer program has a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. today at
Moe's Southwest Grill on
U.S. Highway 90 west.
The program will
receive a percentage of
the sales.
For details, call
365-1877.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Sign-up ongoing
at Boys Club
Registration for the
Boys Club of Columbia
County's 2011
basketball program
continues through
Friday.
Girls and boys ages
6-14 are eligible.
Practices are twice
weekly and games are
played on Saturday.
Cost is $40.
For details, call
752-4184 or visit the
club on Jones Way.
GYMNASTICS
Cartwheels for
charity event
Gymnasts from Bard
Gymnastics will be doing
cartwheels for charity at
the Lake City Mall from
2-4 p.m. Saturday to raise
money for the Christian
Service Center in Lake
City.
Each gymnast, who
competes at Bard, will
be seeking sponsors and
every dollar raised will
be matched for the
center. Sponsors may
pledge money per
cartwheel or make a
one-time donation.
Checks can be made to
the Christian Service
Center and the donation
is tax deductible.
The public is invited to
come out and watch the
cartwheel-a-thon.
For details, call Bard
Gymnastics at 752-1710.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817 or Mario
Coppock at 754-7095.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at University
Christian School in
Jacksonville, TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at Newberry High,
5 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Robert E. Lee
High, 5:30 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Williston
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Robert E. Lee
High, 7:20 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Ed White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball vs.
Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at University
Christian School in


Jacksonville, TBA


Golden introduced


New Hurricanes
coach promises
return to top.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
CORAL GABLES Big-
time football programs had
courted Al Golden before.
He's been on many short
lists for jobs around the
country, interviewing for
marquee gigs more than


once. And it's long been
believed that he covets the
chance to replace his for-
mer coach, Joe Paterno, at
Penn State one day.
So when the questions
came Monday "Why
here?" "Why now?"
- Golden didn't hesitate
before answering.
"Are you kidding me?"
That's how Golden got
a roomful of applause, his
first victory as coach of the
Miami Hurricanes.


A whirlwind week that
started in a New York
hotel ended Monday night
before a packed news con-
ference in Miami, where
Golden donned a new tie
and lapel pin both with
the "U" logo and vowed
to restore the Hurricanes'
program to greatness. He
and his wife arrived in mid-
afternoon, chatted with
university president Donna
MIAMI continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami head coach Al Golden speaks during a news
conference in Coral Gables on Monday.


Iron man no more


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 5 file photo, Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre reacts after being injured in the first quarter of the game
against the Buffalo Bills in Minneapolis.


Favre on inactive list, streak ends at 297


By NOAH TRISTER
Associated Press .
DETROIT No more,
Brett.
After 297 consecutive
starts over 19 seasons, one
of the greatest individual
streaks in all of sports, Brett
Favre ran into an injury he
couldn't beat and sat down.
The 41-year-old Vikings
quarterback who fought
through broken bones',
aches, pains and personal
grief to play week after
week, couldn't make it for
the Minnesota Vikings on
Monday night. Favre was
sidelined by a throwing
shoulder too damaged for
even him to overcome.


Jeff Anderson, a Vikings
spokesman, announced to
the public on Twitter that
the 41-year-old Favre was
out: "Vikings Inactives -
12, 19, 25, 31, 76, 90, 91...
and 4. The streak ends..."
The Vikings hoped Favre,
who has started despite a
broken foot and.elbow ten-
dinitis this season, could
do it again when the game
against the New York Giants
was delayed from Sunday
after the Metrqdome roof
collapsed. That forced the
game to be moved to Ford
Field, but it was not enough
time for Favre to get healthy
enough to play.
Leslie FraAler, Minnesota's
interim coach, said the plan


was for Favre to go through
a pregame throwing routine
to try and determine if he
could play, but the three-
time MVP wasn't on the field
about 90 minutes before
kickoff, and the Vikings
announced moments later
he was inactive.
"He had numbness in his
hand so it wasn't a hard
decision," Frazier told Fox
television reporter Pam.
Oliver before kickoff.
Favre finally came out
about 35 minutes before
the game started, wearing a
T-shirt and warmup pants.
He hugged a teammate
while receiving a few cheers
from the crowd, then stood
at the 15-yard line and chat-


ted with Tarvaris Jackson,
the new Minnesota starter.
Ron Jaworski previously
held the consecutive starts
record for a quarterback,
but Favre passed him all
the way back in 1999.
The crowd in Detroit,
where tickets were given
out for free, had a chance to
witness a bit of history.
"Ahhh, I feel bad for him,"
said Vikings season-ticket
holder JoAnn Brown, who
drove 12 hours to see the
game in Detroit. "I wish he
could've just got out there
for the first play and just
tossed the ball once to keep
the streak."
FAVRE continued on 2B


Giants


lead


at half

Tarvaris Jackson
10 of 13 passing
in two quarters.
Associated Press

DETROIT The
Minnesota Vikings sput-
tered through their first
two quarters without
Brett Favre as their start-
ing quarterback, falling
behind 14-3 at halftime
to the New York Giants
on Monday night in a
game that was moved to
Detroit's Ford Field.
Favre's record streak
of 297 consecutive starts
ended when he was deac-
tivated about 90 min-
utes before ,the- game.
Tarvaris Jackson took
his place and completed
10 of 13 passes for 77
yards in the first half, but
Minnesota couldn't reach
the end zone. Jackson
briefly hurt his knee at
one, point, then returned
to the game quickly.
The Giants trailed 3-0
after the first quarter, but
Brandon Jacobs changed
that in a hurry. First, he
broke free down the left
sideline for a 73-yard run
to the Minnesota 14. He
then finished the drive
with a touchdown run.
Eli Manning threw
two interceptions, but
he bounced back, lead-
ing a 71-yard, nine-play
drive that ended when he
threaded a 6-yard touch-
down pass to Kevin Boss,
who was covered by two
defenders near the back
of the end zone.
The game was moved
to Ford Field after the
Metrodome, roof in
Minneapolis collapsed.
The lower bowl was full,
and the upper deck was
about half full.


LEGENDS LEADERS





Big Ten Conference divides


Leaders, Legends
will vie for league
championship.
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio
- When the Big Ten
plays its first conference
championship game next
season, it'll be the Leaders
division against the
Legends division.
The conference, expand-


ing to 12 teams in all sports
and adding divisions and a
championship game in foot-
ball starting next season,
on Monday also unveiled
a new logo and 18 foot-
ball awards, each named
after two standout Big Ten
performers.
"The Legends, not too
hard in that we have 215
College Football Hall of
Fame members, we have 15
Heisman Trophy winners,"
Commissioner Jim Delany
said in an exclusive inter-


view with The Associated
Press. "We thought it made
perfect sense to recognize
the iconic and the legend-
ary through the naming of
the division in that regard.
... We've had plenty of lead-
ers in the conference, that's
for sure, but the emphasis
here is to recognize the
mission of using intercol-
legiate athletics and higher
education to build future
leaders."
BIG TEN continued on 3B


Fort White in new
District 5-4A, CHS
moves to 4-6A.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
The Florida High School
Athletic 'Association fol-
lowed up its new football
districts with the list dis-
tricts for other sports.
The new districts are for
the 2011-12 and 2012-13
school years and include
the core sports of volleyball,
girls and boys basketball,
girls and boys soccer, base-
ball and softball. Districts
are based on population
guidelines.
Fort White High will be


in District 5-4A. Joining
the Indians are Bradford,
Interlachen, Keystone
Heights, Santa Fe and
Williston high schools.
There are two exceptions:
Bradford has no boys soc-
cer team and Newberry
High will join the district
for girls soccer.
Columbia High's new dis-
trict is 4-6A and includes
Robert E. Lee High, St.
Augustine High, Stanton
College Preparatory School
and Wolfson High for all
sports.
The new classifications
reflect the smaller rural and
urban divisions and there
are eight classifications for
five team sports and seven
for soccer.


FHSAA releases

team districts











LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


Saturday
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
UTEP (6-6) vs. BYU (6-6), 2 p.m.
(ESPN)
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois (10-3) vs. Fresno
State (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Ohio (8-4) vs. Troy (7-5), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec.21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
Louisville (6-6) vs. Southern Mississippi
(8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec.22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Utah (10-2) vs. Boise State (11-1),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 23
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State (8-4) vs. Navy (8-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec.26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida
International (6-6), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 27
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4),
5 p.m. (ESPN2)
Dec.28
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 10 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec. 29
Military Bowl
At Washington
East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)


Outback Bowl winners

Jan. 1,2010-Auburn 38,Northwestern
35, OT
Jan. 1, 2009-Iowa 31 South Carolina
10
Jan. 1, 2008-Tennessee 21,Wisconsin
17
Jan. I, 2007-Penn St. 20, Tennessee
10
Jan. 2,2006-Florida 31, Iowa 24
Jan. I, 2005-Georgia 24, Wisconsin


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Tennessee at Baylor

FOOTBALL

NFL scores

Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay 17,Washington 16
Buffalo 13. Cleveland 6
Detroit 7, Green Bay 3
Jacksonville 38, Oakland 31 I
Pittsburgh 23, Cincinnati 7
Atlanta 31, Carolina 10
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, ppd.
San Francisco 40, Seattle 21
New Orleans 31 ISt. Louis 13
San Diego 31, Kansas City 0
Arizona 43, Denver 13
New England 36, Chicago 7
Miami 10, N.Y Jets 6
Philadelphia 30, Dallas 27
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants vs. Minnesota (n)
Baltimore at Houston (n)
Thursday's Game
San Francisco at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 19
Kansas City at St. Louis, I p.m.
Washington at Dallas, I p.m.
Houston atTennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 20
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.

AP Top 25

The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
Dec. 4, total points and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1.Auburn (36) 13-0 1,473 2
2. Oregon (23) 12-0 1,462 I
3.TCU (I) 12-0 1,379 3
4.Wisconsin 11-I 1,289 4
5. Stanford I I-I 1,283 5
6. OhioSt. 11-1 1,179 6
7. Michigan St. 11-I 1,101 7
8.Arkansas 10-2 1,085 8
9. Oklahoma 11-2 976 10
10, Boise St. I1-1 932 9
I 1. LSU 10-2 863 II
12.VirginiaTech 11-2 817 12
13. Nevada 12-1 759 14
14. Missouri 10-2 705 15
IS.Alabama 9-3 628 17
16. Oklahoma St. 10-2 622 16
17. Nebraska 10-3 608 13


18.TexasA&M 9-3 601 19
19. South Carolina 9-4 332 18
20.Utah 10-2 312 21
21.Mississippi St. 8-4 288 22
22.WestVirginia 9-3 283 23
23. Florida St. 9-4 188 20
24. Hawaii 10-3 III 25
25. Connecticut 8-4 74 -
Others receiving votes: UCF 63,
Maryland 30, Tulsa 18, Navy I I, Miami
(Ohio) 8, N. Illinois 7, San Diego St. 6,
Fresno St. 2, Pittsburgh 2, Air Force I,
Iowa I, N.C. State I.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Toronto at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
LA Lakers atWashington, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Denver,9 p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
LA. Lakers at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Boston at NewYork, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Chicago atToronto, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 9:30 p.m..

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Dec. 12, total points and last
week's ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
I. Duke (65) 10-0 1,625 I
2. Ohio St. 8-0 1,547 2
3. Kansas 9-0 1,467 4
4. Connecticut 8-0 1,343 6
S.Syracuse 10-0 1,331 8
6. Kansas St. 9-1 1,320 5
7.Tennessee 7-0 1,316 II
8. Pittsburgh 10-1 ,137 3
9. Baylor 6-0 1,023 10
10.Villanova 8-1 926 12
I I.San Diego St. 10-0 914 14
12. Illinois 10-1 779 16
13. Missouri 8-1 771 15
14. Michigan St. 7-3 755 7
15. Georgetown 9-1 722 9
16. BYU 10-0 688 18
17. Kentucky 7-2 668 17
18. Memphis 7-1 561 13
19.Purdue 9-1 506 19
20. Louisville 8-0 464 24
21.Minnesota 9-1 336 22
22.Texas 7-2 181 25
22. UNLV 9-1 181 20
24. Notre Dame 9-1 165 23
25.TexasA&M 9-1 105 -
Others receiving votes: UCF 62,
Florida 55, Washington 37, Temple
30, Vanderbilt 29, North Carolina 21,
Cleveland St. 15, Arizona 8, Wisconsin
8, Saint Mary's, Calif. 6, Cincinnati 5,
Northwestern 5, Washington St. 5,
Richmond 3, Old Dominion 2, West
Virginia 2, Boston College I.


AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 7 Tennessee vs. Oakland. Mich.,
7 p.m.
No. 20 Louisville vs. Drexel, 9 p.m.
No. 22 Texas vs. North Florida,
8 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Florida Gulf
Coast, 6:30 p.m.
No. 9 Baylor vs. Bethune-
Cookman, 8 p.m.
No.21 Minnesota vs.Akron, 8:30 p.m.
No. 22 UNLV vs. UC Santa Barbara,
10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 13 Missouri vs. Oral Roberts,
8 p.m.
No. 18 Memphis vs. Austin Peay,
8 p.m.
Friday's Game
No. 7Tennessee at Charlotte, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. South Carolina,
2 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas vs. Southern Cal, Noon
No. 5 Syracuse vs. lona, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Kansas State vs. Florida
at BankAtlantic Center, Sunrise,
5:30 p.m.
No. 8 Pittsburgh vs. Maryland-Eastern
Shore, 7 p.m.
No. 9 Baylor vs. Gonzaga at American
Airlines Center, Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
No. 10 Villanova vs. Delaware,
7:30 p.m.
No. 11 San Diego State vs. UC Santa
Barbara, 10 p.m.
No. 12 Illinois vs. Illinois-Chicago at
the United Center, 2 p.m.
No. 13 Missouri vs. Central Arkansas
at Missouri, 8 p.m.
No. 14 Michigan State vs. Prairie View,
6:30 p.m.
No. 15 Georgetown vs. Loyola, Md.,
Noon
No. 16 BYU vs. UCLA at the Honda
Center, Anaheim, Calif., 5:30 p.m.
No. 17 Kentucky vs. MVSU, 8 p.m.
No. 19 Purdue vs. Indiana State at
Conseco Fieldhouse,.4 p.m.
No. 20 Louisville vs. Gardner-Webb,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Texas vs. North Carolina at
Greensboro (N.C.) Coliseum, 4 p.m.
No. 22 UNLV vs. Southern Utah,
10 p.m.
No. 25 Texas A&M vs. Arkansas at
American Airlines Center, Dallas, 2 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Anaheim atWashington, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus atVancouver, 10 p.m.


Texas Bowl
At Houston
Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State
(10-2), 9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec.30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth,Texas
SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (10-3) vs.Washington (6-6),
10 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec.31
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida
(7-5), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida
State (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. I
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech
(7-5), Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Michigan State (I I-1) vs.Alabama (9-3),
I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5),
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl


Jan. 1, 2004-Ilowa 37, Florida 17
Jan. 1, 2003-Michigan 38, Florida
30
Jan. 1, 2002-South Carolina 31, Ohio
St. 28
Jan. 1, 2001-South Carolina 24, Ohio
St. 7
Jan. 1. 2000-Georgia 28, Purdue 25,
OT
Jan. 1,1999-Penn St.26, Kentucky
14
Jan. I, 1998-Georgia 33,Wisconsin 6
Jan. 1I, 1997-Alabama 17, Michigan 14
Jan. I, 1996-Penn St. 43,Auburn


At Jacksonville
Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State
(8-4), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma
(11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Stanford (11-I) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 4
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State (I I11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Plobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 7
Cotton Bowl
AtArlington,Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Jan. 8
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6),
Noon (ESPN)
Jan. 9
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada
(12-1), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 10
BCS National Championship
At Glendale,Ariz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 22
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Jan. 29
At Mobile,Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m., (NFLN)
Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs.The Nation All-Star Challenge,
2 p.m.


14
Jan. 2, 1995-Wisconsin 34, Duke 20
Jan. I, 1994-Michigan 42, NC State 7
Jan. I, 1993-Tennessee 38, Boston
College 23
Jan. I, 1992-Syracuse 24, Ohio St. 17
Jan. 1, 1991-Clemson 30, Illinois 0
Jan. I, 1990-Auburn 31,Ohio St. 14
Jan. 2, 1989-Syracuse 23, LSU 10
Jan. 2, 1988-Michigan 28,Alabama 24
Dec. 23, 1986-Boston College 27,
Georgia 24

Note: Hall of Fame Bowl (1986-95)


COURTESY PHOTO


Falcon Invitational won by host

Lake City Middle School's wrestling team hosted and won the 13-team Falcon Invitational on
Saturday. Team members are (front row, from left) Callie Ward, Shawn Ziegaus,
Ben Kuykendall and Sarah Ward. Second row (from left) are Trace Jenkins, Josh Walker,
Mathison Milligan, Witt Register, Zach Mitchell, Dustin Regar, Cody Waldron and
Brandy Britt. Third row (from left) are Dylan Beckelheimer, Cole Horton, Brandon Mattox,
Kaleb Warner, Austin Boidanoff, Wesley Leamon and Christian Collins. Fourth row (from left)
are Robert Martin, Dylan Bullard, Josh Rodgers, Christian Little, David Edmonds,
Tim Mallard, Jordan Daniels and coach Allen Worley. Fifth row (from left) are Mariaun Dallas,
Hunter Bullard, Dalton Nazworth, Bennie Harper, Blake Blevins, Jonathan Harris and
Bryson Britt. Sixth row (from left) are coach Kevin Warner, Tristan Laricey, Dylan Regar,
Lucas Bradley, Marcus Ziegler and coach Jason Langston. Mat girl Maddie Kennon also is
on the team.



FAVRE: Peyton Manning next at 205

Continued From Page 1B


Both Favre and Frazier
had made it clear he would
not be given a ceremonial
start like that.
Minnesota still has a
chance for the playoffs.
The quarterback was
injured when the Bills'
Arthur Moats hit him
square in the back and sent
him to the turf on the third
play from scrimmage last
weekend. The day after, the
rookie linebacker said he
had mixed emotions about
perhaps being the player
who ended Favre's streak.
"I don't want to see
anybody hurting and not
playing any more. If he
plays, that would be a good
thing," Moats said. "But if
he doesn't, and I was the
guy to end the streak, all
right. That's a little notable,
yeah."
Lions coach Jim Schwartz
compared Favre's run
to another athlete with a
famous streak.
,ACROSS 36 Say


1 Truck front
4 Marciano stat
7 Magazine for
GPs
11 Mary of "Sons
and Lovers"
12 Televises
14 Burden
15 Chenille item
17 Restless yen
18 Cooks clams
19 Distrustful
(hyph.)
21 Tibetan ox
22 Mohawk-sport-
ing actor (2
wds.)
23 Cortes foe
26 Frame'
inserts
29 Minstrel
30 Charged parti-
cles
31 Furnish
33 Mineral spring
34 Subpoena
35 Tearoom


"I grew up in Baltimore
and witnessed the Cal
Ripken streak, but football
is a completely different
sport," Schwartz said. "At
quarterback, you have a
target on you. It's a tough,
physical job and you aren't
ever delivering the blow.
It takes a self-sacrifice to
stand in there and take a
blow to make a play for the
team."
Ripken took a moment to
congratulate Favre as well.
"Brett has had an incred-
ible career and his con-
secutive games streak
is remarkable," he said
through aspokesman.-"As a.
football fan I cannot fathom
his accomplishment and I
appreciate his dedication to
and passion for the game.
He is a true gamer and has
provided us all with a lot of
wonderful memories."
Season No. 20, though,
has been one of Favre's
toughest. He's taken a beat-


ys a few


words
38 Slogan
39 Really big tees
40 Enthusiast
41 Capri's Blue -
44 Owing
(2 wds.)
48 Canyon
reply
49 Gobi's land
51 Qatar ruler
52 "En garde"
weapon
53 Pouch
54 Catch sight of
55 Make mistakes
56 Try to get
answers

DOWN

1 Windy City
team
2 What Hamlet
smelled (2 wds.)
3 noire
4 Runway sur-
face


ing on the field and played
not only through two frac-
tures in his left foot and
elbow tendinitis but 10
stitches in his chin along
with aches in his neck,
back and calf before he was
crunched by Moats.
Through it all, Favre has
led his team on the field,
extending his streak further
and further. Colts quarter-
back Peyton Manning now
holds the longest streak at
205 games. He would need
to keep it going for another
5/ years to surpass Favre.
"I far exceeded my
goals," Favre said last
. week. "I don't know if any
player comes in and says,
'Hey, I have a goal of play-
ing 300 straight games.' To
have done that with play-
offs (321 games), I don't
know how many consecu-
tive starts, it's a lot, and
had it ended several weeks
before or last year, it is still
quite an accomplishment"


Answer to Previous Puzzle

T OM S LE EBIB
AMS T WO OE
MORAM RECOURSE
COLADA R.E. El
CA W YDIS
KA KY AV I ARY
ALAS BI 1EIN -1AN
HE W M DS BOLE
ENCOE GA TED

ETTAW AIMIN
GO RA NDA SANM
GR CREEI NIN

.YIEN IITIEIR sow


Mall booth
Planet, in verse
Cheap night-
clubs
Picnic intruders
Lots of


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10 Wan
13 Earthworm
part
16 Made bales
20 Coffee brew-
ers
23 Weightlifter's
pride
24 Microwaves
25 Golf hazard
26 Hi's comic-
strip wife
27 Q.E.D. part
28 Prepare flour
30 Trying
32 Earth, in com-
bos
34 Poet Whitman
35 High-rise unit
37 Blackmail
38 Eating trough
40 Better quality
41 A few thou
42 Mounties' org.
43 Indiana neigh-
bor
45 Joy Adam-
son's pet
46 Slant
47 Picture hanger
50 Unfold,
in poetry


12-14 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


COLLEGE BOWL GAMES











Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14. 2010


Still no Tebow


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- It's not quite Tebow
Time.
Denver Broncos interim
coach Eric Studesville said
Monday he's sticking with
slumping quarterback
Kyle Orton as his starter.
Studesville left the door
open just a crack to the
possibility that first-round
draft pick Tim Tebow
could get more action with
the Broncos (3-10) head-
ing for what could be their
worst season since 1964.
But he said he's already
decided that Orton will
remain the starter next
weekend at Oakland.
So, fans in the Black
Hole will have to direct
their vitriol at the sideline
if they want to heckle the
raw rookie who has made
only cameo appearances in
his first NFL season. *
Studesville apparently
doesn't want to throw
Tebow to the wolves in
Oakland for the rematch
of the Raiders' 59-14 rout
of the Broncos on Oct. 24.
But what about playing
him extensively the final
two weeks of the season,
at home against Houston
and San Diego?
Studesville was noncom-
mittal as he spent more
than half of his 20-minute
news conference Monday
fielding questions about
his quarterbacks and alter-
nately defending each of
them.


Asked if he was consid-
ering a change there, he
said: "We're going to con-
sider to look at anything
that's going to help us play
better. If that's part of that
equation, then, yeah, we're
going to look at it."
Yet, when asked who
would start against the
Raiders, Studesville
replied: "Kyle's going to
start Sunday."
What does he have to
lose by turning to Tebow
at this point?
"I don't think this is
where we're at this partic-
ular second," Studesville
said.
He pledged to study the
situation with his staff but
demurred when asked
if there was anything he
might see this week that
could change his mind
about sticking with Orton,
who threw three intercep-
tions in the Broncos' 43-13
loss at Arizona on Sunday.
Over his last two games,
Orton has gone from a
prolific passer to a pedes-
trian one with no touch-
down throws and paltry
passer ratings that have
fans calling for Tebow to
take over.
With his favorite tar-
get, Brandon Lloyd, again
covered by a secondary
intent on stopping one of
the NFL's leading receiv-
ers, Orton never found a
rhythm Sunday with offen-
sive coordinator Mike
McCoy calling the plays
instead of coach Josh
McDaniels.


MIAMI: From Temple


Continued From Page 11
Shalala, then Golden met
his team for the first time.
"The most recognizable
brand in college football,"
Golden said. "Again, I go
back to the former play-
ers that are here, the five
national championships,
20 national award winners,
countless All-Americans,
incredible tradition. It's a
dream job.
"It's a tremendous
opportunity for my family
and I to build champion-
ships here."
Golden said those
words barely 24 hours
after striking a five-year
deal with the Hurricanes,
who considered a slew of
candidates before athletic
director Kirby Hocutt met
with the coach who pulled
off an almost-unthinkable
turnaround at Temple, tak-
ing the Owls to a bowl
game for the first time in
three decades last season
and getting the team to


upgrade its academic and
civic profiles as well.
Golden said the two
words. Miami fans love
most "national champi-
onship" more than once
in his first day on the job.
Hocutt hired Golden
with the charge of mak-
ing Miami relevant again
nationally, but stressed
that this effort, while per-
haps not as dire as what
Golden faced at Temple,
will take some time.
Temple went 3-31 in
the three seasons before
Golden arrived; the Owls
were 1-11 in his first sea-
son there, then won 26
games over the past four
years.
The 41-year-old Golden
played at Penn State under
Paterno.
He knows the Atlantic
Coast Conference, having
spent time as an assis-
tant at both Virginia and
Boston College.


BIG TEN: Name awards
Continued From Page 1B


With Nebraska becom-
ing the conference's 12th
team next year, the con-
ference created new divi-
sions that it introduced
in September. Illinois,
Indiana, Ohio State,
Penn State, Purdue and
Wisconsin will be in the
Leaders Division, with
Iowa, Michigan, Michigan
State, Minnesota, Nebraska
and Northwestern in the
Legends Division.
Delany said the con-
ference had considered
naming the divisions after
coaches, players, commis-
sioners and faculty but it
was too difficult to single
out just two.
It also disdained from
going with compass points
since geography had been
only the third consider-
ation when the conference
announced the divisional
setup three months ago.
In order, the main
factors were competitive
balance, maintaining rival-
ries, and then geography.
Asked if Leaders and
Legends was too bland,
or not unique to the Big
Ten, Delany responded,
"All of these things will
engender discussion. We
want to engage our fans.
All I can tell you is that
we thought long and hard


about what not to do. We
thought harder about what
to do."
The logo is a block "Big
Ten" which includes an
homage to the original
10 members with those
numerals embedded in
the last two letters of the
word Big.
The design firm
Pentagram came up with
the new logo. And, no, the
conference never seriously
considered putting a 12 in
its logo or changing its
well-known brand name
to include the number of
members today.
The conference also
introduced 18 new foot-
ball awards which will be
presented starting in 2011
with the advent of division-
al play and Nebraska join-
ing the fold.
The awards include
the Stagg-Paterno
Championship Trophy,
presented to the winner of
the conference title game,
an offensive player of the
year award honoring Otto
Graham and Eddie George
and a defensive trophy
which will honor Bronko
Nagurski and Charles
Woodson. The Hayes-
Schembechler Coach of
the Year trophy will also be
introduced next season.


What next for Patriots?


By JIM LITKE
Associated Press
CHICAGO Ift's not as
if Tom Brady needed the
work.
Midway through the
third quarter Sunday, the
Patriots' destruction of the
Bears was nearly complete.
They'd already humbled
Chicago's defense,
shrugged off the town's
much-fiercer weather,
removed any doubt who
the league's best team was
and locked up a playoff
spot in the bargain. They
hadn't been tested in the
first half and were still 29
points clear in a blizzard
that made a comeback
next to impossible.
Brady's quarterback
rating, meanwhile, was
hovering around 120, but
if adjusted for the lousy
conditions, would have
been closing in on perfect.
Again. There was nothing
left for him to prove and
even less reason,
considering the injury risk,
not to take a seat on the
heated bench.
But there Brady was,
with coach Bill Belichick's
full blessing, still
throwing. Still taking snaps
in a backfield emptied
of blockers, still peering
between snowflakes in
search of the next big play,
still every bit as hungry
and determined as the day
he lucked into the starting
job in New England nearly.
a decade ago.
By the time he was
pulled, with less than five
minutes still to play, Brady
had thrown for 369 yards,
two touchdowns and no
interceptions.
'Was that fun?"
someone asked afterward,
as if Brady just returned
from a dip in nearby
Lake Michigan wearing a
Speedo.
He considered the
question briefly, then
flashed that killer smile.
'They don't cancel
football games very often,"
he said. "It's not baseball.
... You're out in
whatever the elements
are," he added a moment
later. "You've got to be
mentally tough enough to
play in them."
A little bit of craziness
doesn't hurt, either, though
in Brady's case, there is a
method to the madness.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England quarterback Tom Brady throws a pass against
the Chicago Bears in the Patriots' 36-7 win at Soldier Field in
Chicago on Sunday.


At times, he and
Belichick aren't content
just measuring themselves
against the opponent at
hand, but against what
might be possible. When
other coaches run up the
score, they mumble an
apology and dread what
might happen if the shoe
ever winds up on the
other foot. Belichick does
neither.
It's rarely personal
with him, save, perhaps,
for the remainder of the
season after the Patriots
got caught videotaping
opponents' practices. He's
so consumed trying to
run it up against everyone
- which in a roundabout
way explains the
videotaping that there's
no point in trying to keep
track of grudges.
It's hard, too, to find


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another coach so
willing to take risks with
the franchise's best player,
let alone a player who
embraces the risk the way
Brady does. And because
it emanates from the top
of the organization, every
player on the Patriots'
roster understands he's
expendable; not just that,
but because Brady
practices as hard as he
plays, that message is
reinforced every day.
As he was finishing up in
the interview room, Brady
was asked about two of his
receivers, Deion Branch
and Wes Welker, catching
passes for more than 100
yards each.
'They're both
dependable, tough,


















A










to form four ordinary words.
SAMDAMi
AMDAMI


disciplined, smart and
incredibly skilled," he
began. 'They made some
huge plays today."
By the time he was
done, Brady looked over to
find Branch standing off to
one side, waiting
for his turn behind the
microphone.
"I said some nice things
about you," Brady said.
"You can return the favor.'
Branch did, with a story
that illustrated how deep
Brady's stubborn streak
runs.
At the end of the first
half, already ahead 27-0,
New England had the ball
at their own 41 with 12
seconds left. Without a
huddle and with Brady
a good 15 yards away in
shotgun formation, he stole
a glance at Branch lined up
at the left sideline.
. "There was a lot of stuff
going on," Branch recalled,
and he didn't mean the
howling winds and swirling
snow.
'There was a lot of
yelling and screaming. I
know I heard one of tlh
coaches say they want to
take a knee, b at Tom's
eyes got a little big. H:
looked over at me like, 'No,
we're going to take this
shot,"' he said, "and we
did. It worked out."
What Brady had seen
was one of the Bears two
safeties cheating toward
the middle of the field,
effectively abandoning the
cover-2 scheme and
leaving co, nerback Charles
Tillman matched
one-on-one g-ainst Branch.
Brady waited until Branch
was behind the cornerback
and hit him in full stride for
a 59-yard touchdown.
When it was all over,
Belichick seemed like the
least impressed spectator
in the stadium.. Asked how
it felt to make the playoffs,
he replied, "good." He
wasn't going to look any
further ahead than next
week.
"I'm pretty sure when
the end of the season
comes," Belichick said,
"someone will tell us what
we need to do."

Jim Litke (jlitke@ap.org) is a
national sports columnist for
The Associated Press.


^wjff? .-n ~~-.T-. ar"


DOPTION








THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


THEIG



YINJET/



DIMYAD

7T\ /


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: L X XXX -"


Yesterday's Jumbles: PILOT
Answer: What h
A "TIN


(Answers tomorrow)
AFTER KINDLY FILLET
he turned his car into -
KER" TOY


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY. DECEMBER 14. 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY. DECEMBER 14, 2010


DILBERT
WOULD YOU LIKE TO 8 NO. THE ONLY PEOPLE
BE PART OF A MASTERS WHO WILL BE THERE
FORUM TO SHARE ARE THE ONES WHO
KNOWLEDGE ACROSS 5 DON'T HAVE ANYTHING
DISCIPLINES? BETTER TO DO. I TRY
TO AVOID PEOPLE LIKE T
THAT.


v5


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
.Ko 64tI A YoWB O4T'TFRE
(4 t1HAS A VAUP L EA ,o4 COULP WiT4 MY tGILFRPIENol
Se- EXCUeP FROM BArTTr... A VALIP REA6ON4/


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


I ThWNr- Aon AW11e
TEMS S TEe OF
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W f 9' Up


B.C,


FRANK & ERNEST

( Tf-INF JAt -, / TA-LOONS Og'DIG Tie PIG-
LUAIgry. . ROASTING PIT


S. INFLATION
: Og09
PCPRCWgf-CS10N"I


DEAR ABBY


Man bothered and bewildered

by crush on younger woman


I'M THE ILL
CHAIR- GET A LOT
PERSON. DONE THAT
DAY!


DEAR ABBY: I am a
60-year-old man with three
children. I'm in excellent
health and have been hap-
pily married for 39 years.
I have a woman friend at
work who is 28. We talk a
lot, and I buy her chocolate
once a week. I have never
tried to see her outside of
work and don't intend to,
but I like her very much.
Is there something
wrong with me that I like
her so much? I think about
her constantly. She says it's
no problem. I am so fond
of her it drives me crazy. I
have no bad intentions to-
ward her, and I'm not look-
ing for an affair. She is just
such a sweet young lady.
Is it normal to feel like
this? Do you think I should
try to forget about her?
- BLUSHING IN SCHA-
UMBURG, ILL.
DEAR BLUSHING: It
has been my experience
that the more a person tries
NOT to think about some-
thing, the more he or she
does. Please understand
that you are in the throes of
an old-fashioned crush. Ac-
cept it for what it is; enjoy it
while it lasts. The intensity
will lessen eventually.
P.S. If you stop buying
her chocolate and quit feel-
ing so guilty, you will has-
ten the process.
DEAR ABBY: I am a


CAROLINA
DEAR ANONYMOUS:
Start by telling your hus-
band that with a third child
on the way, you are in no
position to take on another
job but he IS. If he re-
fuses and he very well
may then you will need
to think seriously about
your and your children's
future, and to what degree
it includes him. And please,
until you are financially
stable, hold off on having
more children.
DEAR ABBY: My girl-
friend is Jewish; I am not.
Her mother recently found
out that I am not circum-
cised. She has been put-
ting pressure on me to get
"snipped." Circumcision at
my age would hurt a lot. I
am not sure what I should
do. What do you suggest?
DOESN'T LIKE PAIN
DEAR DOESN'T LIKE
PAIN: If you are seriously
considering converting to
Judaism, then you should
discuss your concerns with
a rabbi. If not, it's time to
inform your girlfriend's
mother that there are cer-
tain subjects you feel are
none of her beeswax and
that part of your anatomy is
first on your list.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Take a deep
breath and refrain from say-
ing something that might
cost you. Not everyone will
be on your side or want to
agree with you. Consider
what's being criticized, and
how you can turn' it'into a
positive for you. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Take your best
shot at achieving your goals
and you won't be disap-
pointed. Speak your mind
and you will get the backing
you need to move ahead.
Love is in the stars. A trip or
gathering will be informa-
tive. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): It's what you do
for others that will make the
difference. Money matters
will cause emotional upset
if debts can't be paid on
time. A last-minute change
of plans will leave you un-
decided about taking part.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Work-related
problems are likely to set in
if you let your emotions get
the better of you. Don't take
personally anything that is
said. A romantic connection
will give you something
positive to think about. **
LEO (July23-Aug. 22):
Listen to what's being said
or offered but don't jump in


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

before you have done your
research and understand
the risks involved. You have
to protect your assets and
your future from any sort
of negative backlash. Avoid
a business or financial part-
nership. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Get your home ready
for the end of year festivi-
ties. A conversation with
someone you love will help
to clear up any matters that
have been left dangling.
Don't allow your emotions
to come between you and
your money. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Follow through with
your original plans. Focus
on completing unfinished
projects. Refuse to let your
anger show. Go about your
own business and ignore
anyone being negative or
critical. An old friend or
lover may cause problems.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You must take
a position if you want to
be taken seriously. Make a
decision about travel, edu-
cation, the skills you have
and what you want to add to
your resume. Advancement
is attainable. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Overindul-
gence will be the enemy. A
promise made must be kept
if you don't want to look
bad. Unforeseen changes at
home or within your person-
al relationships may leave
you wondering what's going
to happen next. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Getting to-
gether with friends or col-
leagues for a little festive
cheer will result in a greater
interest in someone who
shares your concerns and
hobbies. Let the friendship
grow before you decide to
let your emotions take over.
**
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't ask for
favors or offer donations.
Protect what you have. An
old acquaintance will put
pressure on you to get to-
gether. Before you accept,
remember why you didn't
become lasting friends in
the first place. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Taking on too
much will add stress and
can make you look bad. You
are better off chipping away
at what you already have to
complete before the year
comes to a close, instead of
trying to be the super hero.
Overdoing, overindulging
and overreacting must all
be kept in check. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: B equals P
" I RN CG H TH J MGG TH JYH KUTWCP,
U Y W K WK C X PCTHC R Z PTI JRE
HC IWY E C IW H ZG RTWY I X RI WR B "
Y W T G R ST G N Y I R
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Love involves a peculiar unfathomable combination
of understanding and misunderstanding." Photographer Diane Arbus
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-14


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
young mother in my early
20s with two young children
and another on the way. I
have been married to my
high school sweetheart for
three years. We have been
together since we were
young teenagers. Both of
us come from single-parent
families, and our marriage
has been less than perfect.
I work a full-time swing
shift. My husband works
only a part-time swing shift
job. I have asked him to
take on another part-time
job so we can be more com-
fortable financially, but he
refuses. He says if I want
more money in the house-
hold, I will have to get a sec-
ond job.
If it wasn't for our fami-
lies' free baby-sitting, I
don't know how we could
afford child care. We have
no money in the bank,
and we are deep in debt.
I feel overwhelmed with
too much responsibility
and don't know what to do
about it. ANONYMOUS
MOTHER IN NORTH


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS











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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14. 2010

Lake City Reporter





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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-000580
Division #
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-
pany, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley
ABS Capital I, Inc., Trust 2007-HE3
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Evelyn Morales; A & B Marketing,
Inc.
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated November 29,
2010, entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000580 of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company, as Trustee for Mor-
gan Stanley ABS Capital I, Inc.,
Trust 2007-HE3, PLaintiff and Eve-
lyn Morales are defendantss, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash AT THE WEST FRONT
DOOR OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LO-
CATED AT 145 HERNANDO
STREET, LAKE CITY, COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AT
11:00 A.M. on January 5, 2011, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 1, BLOCK 7, COUNTRY
CLUB ESTATES REPLAT, A SUB-
DIVISION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 32, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
LESS AND EXCEPT THE NORTH
24.00 FEET FOR ROAD RIGHT
OF WAY,
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
/s/ B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted BY: ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
4630 Woodland.Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813) 880-8888
(813) 880-8800
10-170156
05524592
December 14, 21, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-273-CP
PROBATE DIVISION:
IN RE: The Estate of:
JANET GLORIA CUNEO,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JANET GLORIA CUNEO, de-
ceased, who died on October 9,
2010, and whose social security
number is is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
Case No. 10-273-CP, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemando Street,
Post Office Box 2049, Lake City,
Florida 32056. The name and ad-
dress of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF.A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 14, 2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive: /s/ John E. Norris
Florida Bar No. 058998
Norris & Norris, P.A.
253 NW Main Blvd.
Post Office Drawer 2349
Lake City, Florida 32056-2349
Telephone: (386) 752-7240
Personal Representative:
/s/ Lisa Cuneo Lash
712 Lee Avenue
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
05524584
December 14,21,2010







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Pool Maintenance


Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on JANUARY 19,
2011, at 10:20 A.M., for a Termina-
tion of Parental Rights Advisory
Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 3rd JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY
Case #:2010-CA-000575
Division #:
UNC:
Litton Loan Servicing, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
William W. Moody and Ruth A.
Moody, His Wife; CitiFinancial
Equity Services, Inc.; SFC Funding
Trust c/o Service Finance Co.; Un-
known Tenants in Possession #1;
Unknown Tenants in Possession #2;
If living, and all Unknown Parties
claiming by, through, under and
against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said Un-
known Parties may claim an interest
as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant-
ees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION TO FORE-
CLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROP-
ERTY
TO: William W. Moody; ADDRESS
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 6050 South
US Highway 441, Lake City, FL
32025 and Ruth A. Moody; AD-
DRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS:
6050 South US Highway 441, Lake
City, FL 32025
Residence unknown, if living, in-
cluding any unknown spouse of the
said Defendants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of said De-'
fendants are dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors, -and
trustees, and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s) and the afore-
mentioned named Defendants and
such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendant(s) as
may be infants, incompetents or oth-
erwise not sui juris. YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real prop-
erty, lying and being and situated in
Columbia County, Florida, more par-
ticularly described as follows:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NORTH
HALF OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
SOF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
AND THENCE RUN N. 01'36'30"
W., ALONG LAND LINE, 186.32
FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE RUN S. 79'24' W.,
FOR A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET;
THENCE RUN N. 19'04' W., FOR
A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET;
THENCE RUN N. 79'51'E., 200
FEET, TO THE WEST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY
41, THENCE RUN S. 3007'E.,
ALONG WEST RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 41. 60.00
FEET TO A POINT WHERE THE
WEST LINE OF THE EAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 28 INTERSECTS THE
WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
U.S. HIGHWAY 41, THENCE
S.0136'30" E., FOR A DISTANCE
OF 40 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
ALSO, COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE
NORTH HALF 'OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
AND RUN THENCE N. 01'51'E.,'
ALONG LAND LINE, 186.32 FEET
FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE N. 01'51'E.,
40.0 FEET THE SOUTH RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY
41; THENCE RUN S. 30'10'E.,
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE, 46.62 FEET; THENCE RUN
S. 89'54'W., 24.72 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
more commonly known as 6050
South U.S. Highway 441, Lake City,
FL 32025.
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any,
upon SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP,
Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 4630 Woodland Corporate
Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614,
within thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this notice and file the
original with the clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately there after;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on the 17th day of No-
vember, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Circuit and County Courts
/s/: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
10-185442
05524513
December 14, 21, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2009-89-DP
S. J. Y. M.
DOB: 10/29/2009
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Syeisha Teresa Kilby
Address Unknown
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
clerk of court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon


Jr & High school
Math teacher needed.
Please fax resumes to:
386-758-3018


Legal

FIELD.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT********
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on
this 10th day of December 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No.46860
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In ac-
cordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, if you are a person
with a disability who needs any ac-
commodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hernando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
04542675
December 14, 21, 28, 2010
January 4, 2010



010 Announcements








100 Job
100 Opportunities

04542450
CDLA OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542623
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following position:
INFORMATION SYSTEM
ADMINISTRATOR
Application deadline is 5:00
PM, December 22, 2010.
Associate's Degree required
with preferred Major(s) in
Computer Science, Data
Processing, or related field.
Five years experience in
network management and PC
maintenance. Hardware and
software experience required.
Windows Server Operating
System required. Experience
with Database and Web based
applications connectivity and
operating systems, token-ring
and Ethernet preferred.
Bachelors Degree may
substitute for three years
experience. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U.S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.com.
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO .Employer

04542664
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help is meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Represefitative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, FI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524599
LUBE TECH WANTED
Apply @ Rountree-Moore
Chevrolet
4316W US Hwy 90
Lake City. FL 32055
Ask For: Jimbo Pegnctter


t00 Job
100 Opportunities

05524I64
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE


Medical
120 Employment

04542278

Senior Home Care

HEALTHCARE
OPPORTUNITIES
You know what your patients
need. And you always go the
extra mile to make sure they
know how much you care.
Healthcare professionals like
you thrive here at Senior Home
Care, a fast-growing industry
leader that's meeting the health-
care needs of today's seniors.

OTs-Full-Time
Lucrative Sign-On Bonus!

PTs, OTs &
SLPs-PRN

RN Supervisor

Apply online:
www.seniorhomecare.net
or call 866-676-5627
EOE Drug-Free Workplace




04542677
LPN
Full time position, 11-7 Shift
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City,
FI 32025 or fax resume to
386-752-7337

05524555

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988
Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time

Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479 *
next class-12/13/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

AKC BOSTON Terrier.
6 mo old. Female, red & white.
All shots current. $500
386-867-4335


RED MICROFIBER
couch & recliner. $150.
386-752-8996 or
918-822-7233


TWIN SIZE captains bed.
Solid wood.
$100.00
386-752-8996 or 918-822-7233


416 Sporting Goods
XL Glider System,
nearly new, folding,
$70 obo
386-365-5967


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PLAYOWN!

THE. AKECIT


Member Service Manager
Suwannee Valley Electric Coop., Inc. (SVEC).has
an opening for the position of Member Services
Manager. This is a full-time position responsible
for managing the Member Services Department.
A minimum of 6 years customer service with su-
pervisory experience required. Applications and
job descriptions may be picked up at the SVEC
administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak
or reviewed on www.svec-coop.com. Applica-
tions should be turned in, to attention Vicky, at
the above address, mailed to PO Box 160, Live
Oak, FL 32064 or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.
com. The deadline for accepting applications
is Wednesday, December 22, 2010. SVEC is an
equal opportunity employer.

S uwannee
Valley

E electric
Cooperative


Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Iss

EtLiiL^


i


310 Pets & Supplies
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231

Beautiful neutered 6 mo old
Orange Tiger Cat, vaccinations
complete, good home needed
386-755-8561
CKC MINIATURE PINSCHER
Black & Tan, tail docked, health
certificate, ready 12/24, $400,
$50 deposit to hold 386-438-3229
or 386-497-1469.

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
Baby Pigs for sale
Ready Now!
$50 each
386-965-2215

Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Washer and Dryer
$250.
Dryer almost new.
SOLD


404 Baby Items

Baby Crib, converts to toddler bed,
large drawer under bed,
dresser attaches to end of bed,
$300 obo 386-688-0334


4-07^, 4 peters
S- computer tower
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Lift Recliner. Blue, electric.
Used only 1 month, like new.
Paid $1,400 asking $700.
386-752-8013










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14. 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: APEX DVD Player
w/Remote. Also, 5 DVD Movies
Please Call 386-438-5293 between
noon and 6pm $100. for all

450 Good Things
Sto Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728

Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college,1 acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142
3BR/2BA Double wide. Lg.
Rooms. $750 a month. 1st month
and security. Please call
386-365-1243 or 386-965-7534.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524588
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
& Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy.Shows
After hours 386-208-8547


SUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05524441
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments.
(386) 758-8455
05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D.hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
30 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.'",
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364


1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2/1 House, near Elementary
School. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near corner of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br.
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/5695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances.Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2.on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
82O Farms&
SAcreage


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks






950 Cars for Sale
2005 PT Cruiser Touring Edition
PS/PW/PM, white, 55, 500
miles,Auto, Cruise Control, AC
$7900 386-965-8656

LAKrF ('i P i HEPOTF It

T n IS
Fit W


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
A'1vertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.

gg" -717-------


nl Print,
2008 Toyota Tacoma L b t
4DR, access cab. 2005 PT Cruiser 2007 Dutchmen Lite A Online
17,250 mi., AT, all power, Touring Edition 25' TT xlt. cond, 10' s/o, l
Tonneau cover, bedliner, PS, PW, PM, CC, AC, tow with 1/2 ton. e LA
class III hitch, nerf bars, white, 55,500 miles. One Low
AM-FM stereo w/CD, $12995 OBO
AM- 995 $7,900 $12,995 OBO P ce

Call 386-965-8656 386-754-2769
386-752-8227 386-75 79


W w P A K I

G H J O A M L G


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Lake City

Reporter's

popular weekly
word search is

a great way to
get attention
with a fun new

puzzle every

week at a price
any business
can afford.


Fo mor ifomatoncal (86 75-440

Deadline is Wednesday at.4pm


Adoption


ADOPTION. A childless happily married couple seeks to
adopt. Loving home. Large extended family. Financial secu-
rity. Expenses paid. Laurel & James. (888)488-4344. Laure-
lAndJamesAdopt.com FL Bar #0150789

Announcements

NEED MORE RESPONSE? Advertise in Over 100 Florida
Papers reaching MILLIONS of people. Advertising Networks
of Florida, Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.flor-
ida-classifieds.com.

DIVORCE with or without Children $125.00. With FREE
name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast
and easy. Call us 24hrs./7days: (888)789-0198; www.CourtDi-
vorceService.com

Auctions

Absolute Auction Estate probate vehicles Online timed bid-
ding only www.abalauction.com (850)510-2501 Abal Auction
Real Estate AB2387 AU 3239

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING ROUTE Be your own boss 25-ma-
chines/ candy all or-$9,995. All major credit cards accepted.
(877)915-8222 Vend 3. AINB02653

BE YOUR OWN BOSS- START TODAY! OWN A RED
HOT! DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX OR DIS-
COUNT PARTY STORE FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE!
100% TURNKEY (800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS4.COM


Condos For Sale


Condo Foreclosure! Own for pennies on the dollar! Spec-
tacular brand new 3 bed 2-1/2 bath condo (2,262 sf) on Amelia
Island, FL. Prime location, upscale amenities -only $249,900.
Own for less than half price! Includes private beach club mem-
bership! Must see -call now (877)888-6381, x 42

Financial

CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity
payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-
738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on
TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++with-
in 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.!lawcapital.com

For Sale

LICORICE LOVERS browse largest selection gourmet
licorice in USA. www.Licoricelntemational.com. 1-800-LIC-
ORICE. Guaranteed fresh. Fast Delivery. Free sample with or-
der. Enter codeAl216 for $5 thru 1-13-11.

Help Wanted

ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-40 cpm. Excellent Benefits
Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR. (877)258-8782 www.melt-
ontruck.com


is required. Substantial earnings potential. Please contact mer-
edith.brewer@coloniallife.com or call (904)424-5697

Drivers Earn up to 49/mi! 1 year minimum OTR experi-
ence qualifies you to be a trainer for our fleet! Call: (888)417-
7564 CRST EXPEDITED www.JoinCRST.com

Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED OTR posi-
tions available NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker REQ'D. Outstanding
pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter TODAY! (877)882-6537 www.
oakleytransport.com

**ABLE TO TRAVEL** Hiring 6 people, Free to travel all
states, resort areas. No experience necessary. Paid training/
Transportation. OVER 18. Start ASAP. (888)295-0108

Drivers Hornady Transportation Miles Money & Home
Time! Start up to .42 cpm Sign on Bonus Available Great Ben-
efits!! Great Hometime!! OTR Experience Req'd. No felonies
Lease Purchase Available (800)441-4271 X FL-100

Regional Opportunity 100% Owner Operator Reefer Com-
pany $2,000.00 SIGN ON BONUS! Great rates and family
atmosphere. Call (800)237-8288 or visit www.suncocarriers.
com


Miscellaneous


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call (877)206-5165, www.Centura.us.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing available. CALLAviation Institute of Main-
tenance (866)314-3769.

Money To Lend

$500 Christmas Cash No Credit Check 6 months to repay.
Payments $55 biweekly. Active checking acct and $1,000/
month min. income required (904)206-RUNI1 (7861)

Schools & Education

"Can You Dig It?" Heavy Equipment School. 3wk training
program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local Job place-
ment asst. Start digging dirt Now. (866)362-6497

Steel Buildings

FACTORY DIRECT STEEL BUILDINGS Buy at Contrac-
tors Cost. Commercial, Industrial, Farm, Churches, Hangers &
All Uses. Our Factory Representative will visit and assist you
in planning your project in person. In-field support and erection
available (888)907-6260.




ANF
ADVERTISING NETWORK OF FLORIDA

C -.'" i' y Ir d lIrn Daily


Colonial Life seeks entrepreneurial professional with sales
experience to become a District Manager. Life/Health license W eek of December 13, 2010
<_____________________________


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555-5555