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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01473
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/12/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01473
System ID: UF00028308:01473
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






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Gator coach
"-.-. Aofnsive


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CC LTBBOF FLORITORDIGI-
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA

GAINESVILL FL 32611-1943


Lakeu


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Heisman goes
to Auburn QB.
Newton wins top college
football honor.
Sports, I B




Repay


Sunday, December 12, 2010


GOING





ONLINE


$1.8 million 911

Dispatch Center to go

live by end of January.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
T he unified
Columbia
C o u n t y
Emergency
..911 Dispatch
Communication Center -
complete with new equip-
ment is expected to go
live by the end of January.
"We're pushing very
hard for a go-live date by
the end of January," said
Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter. "We've done
our initial cutover to our
baseline for everything to


operate. We're very excited
about this."
The county E-911 cen-
ter, which is located in
the Columbia County
Emergency Operation
Center on Lake City
Avenue, was recently reno-
vated and the E-911 center
equipment upgraded.
The upgrade included
increasing the number of
dispatch consoles from five
consoles to 10 consoles, as
well as the implementation
of new computer mapping
and software. The battery
backup systems for an
emergency power supply


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jessica Robinson, a 911 public safety telecommunicator training officer, responds to a call at the Columbia County Emergency


911 Center.

have also been installed.
According to information
from the sheriff's office,
the total planned budget
for the communication cen-
ter is $1.8 million. It will
have $259,000 in planned
recurring costs. The proj-
ect has received $424,000


in equipment grants.
Hunter said the com-
bined communications
center is currently under
budget.
When the system
goes live in January, the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office, Columbia County


Fire/Rescue Department
and Lake City Fire,
Department will be hooked
into the system.
"The Lake City Police
Department will have a
separate go-live date to be
determined and we're con-
tinuing to work with them,"


Hunter said.
As part of the E-911 cen-
ter upgrade, the sheriff's
office will have access to
the latest version the Smart
Cops computer software.
"This is going to the new-
CENTER continued on 3A


Snow Day gives kids what they

want: Snowballs and sledding


Slippery-slope
annual event
draws thousands.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Rachael Tardif wanted to
make snow angels and have
a playful snowball fight. On
Saturday, she got to.
Tardif, 11, of Lake City
joined thousands of other
local children and families
at Snow Day, an annual
event during which 30 tons
of snow is made and piled
up downtown for children
to play in.
The event was hosted by
the Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce and the City
of Lake City. Its title spon-
sor was Hopeful Baptist
Church.
Children had the option
to romp in two different
piles of snow or they could
sled down a snowy slide.
Micah Morgan, 4, of
O'Brien said sledding down


the slide is his favorite part
of Snow Day.
"'The kids can come out
and play and have fun,"
said Travis Morgan, Micah
Morgan's father.
For many children, Snow
Day provided them their
first exposure to the icy
elements.
"Most kids from Florida
never get to see snow," said
Dennille Folsom, Chamber
executive director. "For the
first time they're getting to
play in it and see what it
feels like. We're just pro-
viding an opportunity that
people never get to have."
Jordan Harris, 9, of Lake
City said he likes to attend
Snow Day because Lake
City never gets snow.
"We never had snow up
here and it seems so fun
because everyone enjoys
it," said Tardif, Harris'


cousin.
"It's just something dif-
ferent for kids to do and ifs
fun to watch them play in


'I


SNOW continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Emily Gonzalez (from left), 5, her brother Adam, 4, and moth-
er Jessica cheer as floats pass by them along Marion Avenue
during the annual Christmas Parade Saturday.

Christmas Parade
again attracts big

viewing audience


1st Street Music
& Sound collects
top float honors.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
Participants smiled,
waved, and cheered "Merry


Christmas!" as they rode on
floats decorated in holiday
scenes or marched in the
annual Christmas parade
Saturday night.
Thousands of people
received the joyful, holiday
greetings as they watched

PARADE continued on 3A


CALLUS:
(386) 752-1293 59
SUBSCRIBE TO Showers
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755WEATHER, 8A 5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 8A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Above: Christopher Simmons (left), 5, and
his cousin Jayden Simmons, 7, glide down a
slide filled with shaved ice during Snow Day in
downtown Lake City on Saturday. Thousands
of children enjoyed throwing snowballs, slid-
ing across ice on 30 tons of snow during the
annual event.



Left: Mitchael Combs, 9, of Sanderson, sleds
down a snow slide head first during Snow Day
on Saturday.


Opinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


4A
IC
6A
4D"
2B


Festival of Lights'

displays offer crowds

plenty of options


Entertainment,
food and gifts in a
festive atmosphere.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
It wasn't just the snow
that drew crowds to down-

.- TODAY It
BUSINESS,
'shopping for
Christmas tree


town Lake City Saturday.
Listening to live music
and sipping hot chocolate
while wandering through
craft booths set up in and
around Olustee Park made
it a special Saturday with a
holiday feel.
UGHTS continued on 3A

N COMING
S TUESDAY
CHS drama students
es. give to Avalon.


eporter.com Vol.'1I6


[lIi!! 1Ui[
















Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
9-20-27-32 13 5-6-15-31-32 Afternoon: 4-8-2 Afternoon: 4-1-2-2 4-14-23-42-46-50 8-11-25-41-58-16
Evening: 7-3-0 Evening: 1-5-0-0


AROUND FLORIDA



FPL customers pay to keep manatees cozy and alive


COCOA
The biggest gath-
ering of Florida
manatees ever
observed sur-
vived a deadly
cold snap last winter by
huddling in warm water
discharged from a power
plant on the Indian River
Lagoon in Brevard County.
The 1960s-era Florida
Power & Light Co. plant
has since been pounded
into rubble. After recycling
or disposing of the debris,
the South Florida-based
utility will begin building
a larger, cleaner generator
on that site, but it won't
resume a flow of life-sus-
taining warmth into the
coastal lagoon until four
winters from now.
In the meantime, the util-
ity has installed $4.7 mil-
lion worth of heating equip-
ment at the Cape Canaveral
location to turn its canal
there into a winter refuge
for manatees. The system
is powerful enough, if tem-
peratures plunge, to con-
sume as much electricity
as thousands of homes, at
a rate of $550 an hour.
FPL officials acknowl-
edge the utility has a moral
responsibility to protect the
site's wintering manatees,
thought to make up one-
fifth of all the manatees in
Florida waters. But as wild-
life authorities have made
clear, ensuring a flow of
warm water for the animals
throughout the winter is
also required by the state
permit and the federal reg-
ulations linked to construc-
tiofl of the new plant.
"When power plants
began more than 60 years


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of Tampa's Lowery Park Zoo and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission prepare manatee "TECO
2" for release Nov. 23 in Apollo Beach. The zoo planned to release a total of three manatees back into the wild.


ago and they were dump-
ing out warm water, it was
not on anybody's radar that
somehow manatees would
find that attractive," said
Carol Knox, an administra-
tor for imperiled species at
the Florida Fish andWildlife
Conservation Commission
in Tallahassee.
It became obvious
to biologists over time,
though, that such elec-
tricity plants played a key
role in the welfare of the
endangered species, espe-
cially with the degrada-
tion of their native habitat.


The Cape Canaveral plant,
typical of coastal power sta-
tions, used as much as 700
million gallons of lagoon
water each day to cool its
internal plumbing, which
.raised the water's tempera-
ture by about 12 degrees
before returning it to the
Intracoastal Waterway.
Now that the old plant
is gone, Knox said, "They
(FPL) have to make sure
there is not a catastrophic
loss of manatees that have
grown over the past 50 years
to depend on that site."
Installation and opera-


tion of the temporary heat-
ing system is being paid
for by FPL customers, as
are other required environ-
mental measures, such as
the controls on chimney
emissions that cause smog
and acid rain.
The 957 manatees spot-
ted Jan. 14 at the Cape
Canaveral plant set a
record for the most seen
in one place during a single
day. That count was made
during Florida's annual
statewide survey of mana-
tees, which this year found
a record-setting 5,076 of


the marine mammals at
nine power plants, various
natural springs and other
waters.

Elderly woman
dies in house fire

TALLAHASSEE -
The Tallahassee Police
Department said a 75-year-
old woman died in a house
fire.
* Officers were called to
Betty Scott's home Friday
at about 5:40 p.m.
Officer Susan Newhouse,


a spokeswoman for the
police department, said
responders found the home
engulfed in flames and
smoke. They were unable
to enter the residence.
Fire rescuers extin-
guished the fire and found
Scott dead inside the
home.
The cause of the fire
remains under investiga-
tion.

Couple sentenced
for forced labor

MIAMI A Florida cou-
ple has been sentenced to
prison after pleading guilty
to forcing 39 Filipino nation-
als to work at country clubs
and hotels and threatening
them with deportation.
The Justice Department
announced Friday that
Sophia Manuel and Alfonso
Baldonado Jr. have been
sentenced to 78 months
and 51 months, respective-
ly, in federal prison.
Prosecutors said the
couple conspired to obtain
cheap workers by making
false promises to entice the
victims. They were then
kept in poor living condi-
tions and put to work for
little or no pay.
Authorities said work-
ers who complained were
threatened with arrest or
deportation.
Manuel was also sen-
tenced for making false
statements to obtain for-
eign labor certifications
and visas under the fed-
eral H2B guest worker pro-
gram.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Royal attack prompts security questions


LONDON
I t was a wrong-place, wrong-
time brush with danger:
Protesting students some
chanting "Off with their
heads!" attacked Prince
Charles and his wife, Camilla, as
they rode in their vintage Rolls-
Royce to a charity event at a London
theater.
How could the mob have gotten so
close, so easily, to the future king?
There was no quick answer
Friday, amid scathing criticism from
security experts and calls for offi-
cials to be fired.
The royal couple were unharmed
but visibly shaken Thursday after
the angry protesters, pumped up
by earlier scuffles with police, sur-
rounded their luxurious dark limo,
smashing a rear window and splash-
ing it with white paint
Video and pictures from The
Associated Press captured it all:
Camilla, her mouth wide in horror,
grasping for Charles as the rowdy
crowd pummeled the car. Both were
in full evening dress, Camilla's glit-
tering emerald and diamond neck-
lace nestled against the green satin
ruffle of her coat.
Buckingham Palace does not com-
ment on royal security procedures,
but security experts identified a host
of failures surrounding the royal out-
ing and warned that procedures
must be dramatically improved
before Prince William's wedding
to Kate Middleton at Westminster
Abbey this spring.
"It wasn't potentially dangerous
- it was dangerous," said security
analyst Charles Shoebridge, calling
the attack "one of the most seri-
ous security breaches of the past
decade."

After prison, Ron Isley
picks up where he left off
NEW YORK When Ron Isley
talked about the three years he spent
in prison for tax evasion, there was
no bitterness or anger in his voice:
At times, there almost seemed to be
a bit of nostalgia.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Britain's Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, react as their car is
attacked by angry protesters Thursday in London. An Associated Press photog-


rapher saw demonstrators kick the car in
shopping district. The car then sped off.

"I made a lot of friends. I was
treated like a king. I had all of the
respect that one would want. And it's
a part of that that I miss when I
say I miss, I miss the people that I
met," said the 69-year-old with the
golden tenor.
Isley's prison experience was prob-
ably a bit different from the average
person incarcerated for a tax offense.
But the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer
didn't credit his good fortune to his
legendary status. Instead, he cred-
ited a more potent factor.
"We have a lot of faith in God, No.
1, and we always know that he's with
us, so that will carry you through
anything," he said.
That faith led Isley to believe
there were better days ahead, and
his faith appears to have paid off: He
recently released a new album, "Mr.
Isley," and has a Grammy nomina-
tion for one of the key tracks: a duet
with Aretha Franklin on the classic
"You've Got a Friend."
Earlier in his career as part of The
Isley Brothers, his contributions to
music were formidable: "Fight the
Power," "Between the Sheets," "For


Regent Street, in the heart of London's


the Love of You," "Ifs Your Thing"
and "That Lady" have become pop
and soul classics and, through sam-
pling, hip-hop favorites over five
decades.

Big Man Clarence Clemons
is living in the future
NEW YORK The Big Man has
seen the future and it features
Bruce Springsteen and the E Street
Band.
Saxophonist Clarence Clemons
recorded a webcast this week with
his longtime bandmates in Asbury
Park, N.J. just part of his current
whirlwind of activities.
He's playing the national anthem
on Sunday at the Jets-Miami
Dolphins football game in New
Jersey, then heads to a California
show next week. He's also busy root-
ing on his nephew and fellow saxo-
phonist, Jake Clemons.
On Tuesday, he spent hours with
the E Street Band, recording the
performance at the historic Asbury
Park Carousel House.


* Former TV host Bob Barker
is 87.
* Former New York City
Mayor Edward Koch (kahch)
is 86.
* Basketball Hall of Famer
Bob Pettit is 78.
* Singer Connie Francis is 72.
* Singer Dionne Warwick is
70.


Daily Scripture


* Former race car driver
Emerson Fittipaldi is 64.
* Gymnast-turned-actress
Cathy Rigby is 58.
* News anchor Maggie
Rodriguez is 41.
* Actress Jennifer Connelly
is 40.
* Country singer Hank
Williams III is 38.


"Therefore the Lord himself
will give you a sign:The virgin
will conceive and give birth
to a son, and will call him
Immanuel."


- Isaiah 7:14


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(clrculation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ...................$48.79
52 Weeks .............. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .............. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


Local pilot gives flights to motivate I


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter.com

More than 100 young people
have received a free demonstra-
tion airplane ride in Lake City as
part of the Experimental Aircraft
Association's (EAA) "Young
Eagles" program.
Local pilot Jack Wells, a Lake
City resident, has been a pilot for
47 years privately, commercially
and in the Navy. Wells has been
part of the EAA for 10 years,
spending nine of them participat-
ing in the "Young Eagles" pro-


gram.
The time Wells has spent moti-
vating and teaching those inter-
ested in the world of flight has
been "a wonderfully enjoyable
experience that I recommend
highly. This is a program meant to
expose young people to aviation."
Wells believes the 100 plus free
rides he has given to youth in the
community has helped nurture
the interest they already had in
the wonder of flight. "When you
have an interest, it's best to start
as young as possible by reading,
studying about it and pursuing it


in any way you can," he said.
Beginning at an early age him-
self, Wells thought it was vital to
go as far as possible with your
dream. "I enjoy giving back and
exposing someone else to the
enjoyment I've gotten through all
these years," said Wells.
Wells is the president of the
EAA Chapter 977 in Lake City,
and was recently awarded a 100
person "Young Eagles" award for
giving flights to more than 100
young people.
The free flights Wells offers in
participation with "Young Eagles"


take place twice a year, generally
during the spring and fall. The
dates and times will be scheduled
and announced to the public via
the Lake City Reporter.
All are invited to attend the
event, and Boy Scout troops are
encouraged to bring their youth
to claim a merit badge. The people
of the EAA and the Cannon Creek
Airpark will host this future event.
Wells said, "If you're interested in
aviation, follow your dream and
don't miss out on a great experi-
ence."


A.C. Gonzalez/Lake City Reporter
Jack Wells has been giving free
flights to inspire youths for nine
years.


!LIGHTS: Festival draws holiday crowds downtown


Continued From Page 1A

The Festival of Lights
featured about 20 arts,
crafts and food vendors, as
well as 15 live entertainers
and musicians. It also pro-
vided bounce houses for
children.
"It's a community cele-
- bration with arts and craft
vendors and food," said
Dennille Folsom, Lake
City/Columbia County
Chamber of Contmerce
executive director.
The event was hosted by
the chamber and the City
of Lake City.
Folsom said people enjoy
visiting the downtown area
Sto see what the booths
have to offer and to listen
to a variety of live entertain-
ment
The Festival of Lights ran
in conjunction with Snow
- Day, she said.
"Everyone's so busy
around the holidays and
if we can put everything
in one day, we thought it
would be best to do that,"
Folsom said. '
Edith Marsee of Lake
City said she and her hus-
band always attend the
downtown festivals.
"Any time there's a fes-
tival we come downtown


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bobby Shotwell, 3, plays with his mother Jessi and his 11-month-old brother Matthew while
enjoying one of the bounce houses at the Festival of Lights.


because it's just exciting to
see what's going on," she
said.
Events like the Festival
of Lights create commu-
nity, Marsee said.
"Anytime they host
something like that, they
(people) read it in the
paper and it brings people
together," she said. "And
it creates an atmosphere


year round that you can
.depend on people in the
community."
Nancy Venz of Lake City
said she and her husband,
Don, look forward to the
. Festival of Lights each year
for the Christmas decora-
tions and small gifts the
craft booths sell.
"It brings people down-
town," Venz. said. "It gives


you more of a sense of com-
munity."
' "I just think it's very
festive and very fun," said
Sissy Smith of Lake City,
who attended both Snow
Day and the Festival of
Lights with her grandchil-
dren, Caleb and.Derik. "It
kind of helps get you in the
Christmas spirit."


PARADE: Big audience

Continued From Page 1A


and waved back from the
sidewalks lining Marion
Avenue where the partici-
pants marched south.
The Rotary Club of Lake
City organized the parade.
About 100 local businesses,
churches, schools and orga-
nizations were featured in
the event
Parade float contest win-
ners were announced by
the Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce. First place.
went to 1st Street Music
& Sound Co.; while the
Hamilton County School


District Transportation
Department took second.
Christ Central Ministries
Polar Express came in third
and an honorable men-
tion went to the Puppetone
Rockers.
Patrons said attending
'the parade is an annual fam-
ily custom.
"It's just tradition, really,"
said Charlotte Raulerson of
Lake City, who has been to
the parade for 11 years.
Laura Lindboe of Lake
City said she has attended
the parade since her child-
hood.


SNOW: First exposure

Continued From Page 1A


so-called snow when they
don't have it here," said
Marty Kurtz of Lake City,
who attended the event
'with his son, Samuel, 6; his.
daughter, Alayna, 3; and his
wife, Tracy.
Snow Day attendees said
the event brings families
and the community togeth-
er.
Peggy Riley of Lake
City, who had her ,grand-


son, Lucas, 5, in tow, said
Snow Day is a way to spend
family time together in the
community.
"It promotes real pride in
your community and com-
munity spirit," she said.
"I think anything that
is family centered is good
for the community," Kurtz
said. "I think it's good the
City does things like this.
It's a small-townfeel." ..,


CENTER: County upgrades system

Continued From Page 1A


est version of Smart Cops
and along with it we're
going to have tachometry
mapping and a new map-
ping system," Hunter said.
"We've done all the leg
work as far as migration of
information as far as get-
ting everything loaded and
ready to go. This will mean
for us that the deputies, in
their cars, will have comput-
ers that will be linked via
(wireless) AirCards back
to the 911. Some, of the
dispatching will not only
go over the radio, but they
will be able to actually see
the calls coming through
on their computer screens
in their cars."
The new technology
will allow deputies to have
"paperless" reporting,
which means they will be
able to file reports from
the computers in their cars
,and forward the informa-
tion electronically to their
commanding officer via the
wireless connection.
"This will save us wear
and tear on vehicles,
reduce man hours with the
deputies having to drive
the paper reports back to
the office," Hunter said,
noting deputies will contin-
ue to drive evidence back
to the main office. "This
will help out where we can
keep the deputies on the
streets more."
The jail module of Smart
Cop, at the Columbia
County Detention Facility,
was initiated a few months
ago. Deputies will have the
technology to send arrest
affidavits electronically and
reduce the amount of time
it takes to process crimi-
nals into the jail.
Hunter said in the
future this could poten-
tially allow the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
- to open a district office
in Fort White, which- will
have officers permanent-
ly assigned to zones in
the southern end of the
county.


The Columbia County
Board of Commissioners
will be in charge of the
operations of the center
and the City of Lake City
has agreed to participate
in the project through an
interlocal agreement.
The unified E-911 com-
munication center was
developed by a commit-
tee with Hunter serving


as chairman and members
representing the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office,
Columbia County Fire/
Rescue, Lake City Fire
Department and the Lake
City Police Department,
aind the Columbia County
and City of Lake City IT
(Information Technology)
departments.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427














OPINION


Sunday, December 12, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Big brother

should

stay out

of kitchen

he large number
of overweight and
obese children in
the nation's schools
represents a serious
health problem.
What students eat at school,
and the exercise that they get
there, can be part of the problem
and the solution. It can't be taken
lightly.
Rightfully, Michelle Obamah
has taken up this cause.
What's served students as
lunches and snacks during the
school day ought to be healthy
and nutritionally sound. Local
school boards and officials
should see an obligation to make
that happen.
Federal programs that pro-
vide food stuffs to schools for
lunch programs also need to
be sources of healthy and nutri-
tious ingredients and meals.
Nutritional standards and guide-
lines should be clear.
However, how all of this hap-
pens in the local schools should
be a local decision.
A child nutrition bill waiting
for President Obama's signature
would give the federal govern-
ment the authority to apply nutri-
tion standards not only to the
food stuffs it provides for school
lunches and snacks, but also to
what's contained in school vend-
ing machines and at fundraisers.
It has been interpreted as a
ban on bake sales and pizza fund-
raisers held during the school
day and, technically, that's what
it could be used to do. It doesn't
apply to after-school activities
and concession stands.
Secretary of Agriculture Tom
Vilsack has issued a letter saying
he does not intend to ban bake
sales. Well, if there's no intention
of banning bake sales and pizza,
then why is the language in the
bill?
. We don't want Big Brother
on the school cafeteria line, but
he's welcome to watch TV on the
couch in the living room.
For kids in school, the choice
between steaming hot slices of
pizza and brussels sprouts isn't
much of a choice.
Where do we make the choic-
es, locally or in Washington? The
answer should be "locally,"
* The Bismarck (N.D.) Tribune

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals-
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


"I am the 'C' in Christmas"


(Reprint from December 30,
2006)

When I was in
fifth grade, I
was in a school
play. I got stage
fright and for-
got my lines but got help from
an unexpected source.
Here is the story:
Mrs. Lucille Inman, our teach-
er, told our class that we would
be putting on a school play
called "'The 'C' in Christmas."
It would be a simple play with
a customary Christian theme,
and we would be presenting it
in front of the other elementary
classes.
She selected nine students
to be in the play one student
for each letter in the word
Christmas and each student
was assigned one of the letters
that spells Christmas.
For example, one kid would
be the "C" in Christmas, anoth-
er would be the "H," another
the "R," and so on.
The idea was that we kids
would line up across the
stage'holding a large cut-out
of their letter and the letters
seen all together would spell
"Christmas."
Then each kid would recite
his assigned,part, beginning
with a Christmas word that
started with the letter they were
holding.
Parts in the play were
assigned. Friend Cleveland
Brock would be the "C," I would
be the "H," another friend,
Beanie Bryant, would be the
"R," etc.
Cleve was a large, outgoing
boy but Beanie was the smallest
girl in our class and the quiet-
est She had had polio and wore
a heavy metal brace on her


LETTER


.. .


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williamsjh2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St
Lake City, FL 32055
left leg. Her brace made a soft,
clinking sound as she limped
along.
Everybody liked Beanie and
helped her when she needed
help.
We loved play rehearsal and
practiced our parts so much
that some of us came to know
each other's lines as well as our
own.
Time passed fast and soon
there we were standing on the
stage in front of all the other
kids, holding our letters.
Our narrator stepped forward
and said, "We are Mrs. Inman's
fifth-grade class and our play is
called "The 'C' in Christmas."
Then Cleve stepped for-
ward holding a big "C" and
said confidently, "I am the 'C'
in Christmas. 'C' stands for
Christ. We celebrate Christmas
because of the birth of Christ"
Then I stepped forward hold-
ing my 'H,' but as soon as I
looked out into the sea of faces,
I froze in my tracks. My mind
went completely blank and I just
stood there not knowing what
to do.
But, after a minute of utter
hopelessness, I heard the famil-
iar, soft clink of metal and out of
the corner of my eye, I saw little
Beanie limping out to stand
beside me.
She leaned toward me and


whispered, "Say 'I am the 'H'
in Christmas' "and I did. She'
knew my part and was going to
help me! Then, line-by-line, she
slowly whispered my part and
line-by-line I repeated what she
said.
"'H' Stands for Holy. Christ is
holy. Holy means Christ is pure,
perfect, free from sin." I was
done. My nightmare was over.
Beanie stayed out front and
said her part perfectly. So did
all the other students and the
short play was over. Then we
all held our letters high over
our heads for the final spelling
of "Christmas" and shouted,
"Merry Christmas, every-
body!"
The students clapped and
we marched off stage and back
to our classroom. Mrs. Inman
gave us all a big hug and told
us how proud she was of us..
Then she went to Beanie
and thanked her for helping
me, and Beanie said, 'Mrs.
Inman, you told us to always
help others when they need'
help; Everybody here helps
me every day and I try to help
them when I can."
With that, we all bounded
out of the room and ran home
for two weeks of glorious
Christmas vacation.
Cleve and Beanie, both now
long gone from this earth,
can still remind us of the two
essential lessons to remember
at Christmas and throughout
the year.
From Cleve, "The 'C' in
Christmas stands for Christ.
We celebrate Christmas
because of the birth of Christ."
And from Beanie, "Help others
when they need help."
Christmas is just as simple
and eloquent as that.


TO THE EDITOR


Practicing self-inflicted enslavement


America has been
under assault from
within, for decades.
There are those that
believe in American
exceptionalism.
They do not adhere to
America being "the only super-
power," or the example for every
other country to emulate.
They portray the American
dream as being a hoax.
They believe America is the
problem in the world instead of
being the world's only hope.
These people have found a
home in the Democratic Party
and have been in charge since
2006.
Since 2006 America has been
in free for all morally, socially,
economically, strategically, fun-
damentally, racially and constitu-
tionally.
Just how did these people


gain control of Congress and the
presidency? Their blueprint to
success is the following:
1. Expand the entitlement
ranks. Welfare recipients sup-
port the party that encourages.
them financially. There is a
mystique about watching the,
mail box or the bank statement
to verify that the money has
arrived each month. This prac-
tice is nothing more than self-
inflicted enslavement.
2. Immigrants support the
party that backs illegal amnesty.
Liberals play on our sympathy
using immigrant's children as
collateral.
3. Young adults support the
liberals because they are con-
stantly exposed to their doctrine
in our higher learning establish-
ments.
4. Class welfare may be their
newest approach to staying in


power. They pit the successful
achiever against the non-achiev-
er. The purpose is to redistrib-
ute the wealth. In effect, the
money makers are disdained for
being successful and must give
up their wealth to the masses.
The phrase "cradle to grave" is
the liberal mantra.
America is waking up, evi-
denced by the November elec-
tion results.
We must not slumber, rather
be ever vigilant to remove these
folks from their elected offices.

"The Democracy will cease to
exist when you take away from
those who are willing to work and
give to those who would not."
Thomas Jefferson

God Bless America!
Bill Glover
Lake City


Todd Wilson
twilson@jakecityreportercom


Thank you,

Lake City,

for helping

food drive

There were fam-
ily activities for
everyone in down-
town Lake City on
Saturday. Teams of
volunteers from the Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce, Hopeful Baptist
Church, Rotary Club of Lake
City, Church on the Way and
City of Lake City public works
employees and many others all
worked together to make a day
full of activities a success.
Snow Day, the Festival of
Lights and the Christmas Parade
all were great events to which
many people dedicated volunteer
hours. Events like this don't hap-
pen by accident and they don't
occur without intense planning.
We have dedicated volunteers in
our community and it was great
to see so many show up Saturday
to give back.
DennilJe Folsom, the
Chamber's executive director,
worked tirelessly to make sure
all of the parts came together,
coordinating the volunteers and
making sure everything ran
smoothly. Her day started at
5:30 a.m. downtown as the snow
machine arrived and did not
end until the Christmas Parade
ended Saturday night
Lake City Rotary Club mem-
bers, under the direction of
parade chairman Bruce Drawdy,
organized and implemented one
of the best Christmas parades
in Lake City's history, Rotary is
in its first year of sponsoring the
parade.
Moving the parade from its
Monday night slot to Saturday
night better accommodates
families with small children and
that's the audience the parade is
designed to entertain. This is a
new Christmas tradition in Lake
City that we all can embrace.

Nutcracker a holiday tradition
Packed in the middle of the
Chamber of Commerce's col-
lection of day-long downtown
events was the Community
Concerts performance of
"The Nutcracker" at the Levy
Performing Arts Center. As
always on its every-other-year
schedule of visiting Lake City,
the performers in the produc-
tion did an amazing job. And its
always such a treat to see local
dancers and gymnasts-have a
part in this holiday mainstay pro-
duction.
The show played to a packed
house at its two performances on
Saturday.

Food drive a success
To wrap an incredibly busy
day in Lake City, we completed
this year's Lake City Reporter
Third Annual Community Food
Drive on Saturday morning.
Through the kind hearts and
dedication of our readers and
community business partners,
we collected nine pallets of non-
perishable food and $1,000 in
donations to the Food Bank of
Suwannee Valley.
Canned goods were up from
last year and we set a record for
cash donations.
We will collect any late dona-
tions on Monday if anyone has
anything they would like to con-
tribute.
Thanks to all of our kind read-
ers for their donations and to all
of our newspaper carriers and
staff members who gathered the
donations.

* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A
















FACES & PLACES

Scenes from Saturday's Snow Day, Festival of Lights and Christmas Parade.

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Members of the DanZers for Christ Dance Studio
wave to the audience.


Cam Bryce, 81, places a wreath on a headstone during the Wreaths Across America ceremony at Olustee Park on Saturday
to memorialize those in the United States Naval Air Force that gave their lives for their country. 'When I went overseas to
Korea, there were 22 of us,' Bryce said. 'Four came home. This (ceremony) makes you think, it makes you shed a tear.'We all
get shook up because we remember those people and we should remember.'


Paul Gunter (from left), Herman Gunter IV and Lydia
Gunter enjoy Saturday's festivities.


Riders aboard the Wellborn Baptist Church Christmas Parade float greet specta-
tors as they ride through downtown Lake City.


Clayton Black, 5, struggles to score a goal while participating in a tug-of-war game during the
Festival of Lights in Olustee Park on Saturday.


Right: The float for 1st
Street Music & Sound Co.
passes by patrons during
the Christmas Parade. The
float won first place.



Left: Richard Rodriguez,
the children's pastor at
Hopeful Baptist Church,
gingerly rakes slush and
chunks of melting ice to the
center of an ice hill.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
A Christmas Carol

A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 2 p.m. today
at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya
and at highspringscommu-
nitytheater.com.

Monday
Restaurant Meeting
The Columbia Federated
Republican Women
Organization meet at 7 p.m.
Monday at the Guangdong
Chinese Restaurant in the
Lake City Mall. For those
who want to enjoy the buf-
fet, come at 6:30 p.m. For
further information contact
Gayle Cannon at 386-303-
2616.

Tuesday
Shopping night
Kids' Holiday Shopping
Night at the Attic is 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Haven Hospice
Attic Resale Store, 1077
US Highway 90 W., Suite
120. The event gives
children in need the
opportunity to purchase
specially-priced gifts for
family members using
"Attic Bucks." Festivities
will include gift wrap-
ping, photos with Santa,
pu' h and cookies-all
free of charge. There
will also be door prizes
and special drawings. All
children must be accom-
panied by an adult. The
event is open to the pub-
lic. Call 386-752-0230: or
go to havenhospice.org.

Wednesday


A Christmas Carol
A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8p.m. Friday at the
High Springs Community
Theater. Tickets are avail-
able at The Framery on
W. Baya and at highspring-
scommunitytheater com.

Saturday
FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City announces a Christmas
party taking place from 6:30
p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Saturday
at the Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall. 'Enjoy
a night of culture, dancing,
and entertainment, and
possibly become a member
of FACS. For more informa-
tion, contact Bob Gavette at
386-965-5905.

Pancake breakfast
The RCC/AMN Inc.
is having a pancake
breakfast 7 a.m. to 11
a.m. Saturday at the
Richardson Community
Center. The tickets are $5
and the breakfast will con-
sist of pancakes, Nettle's
sausage, grits, eggs and
orange juice. All proceeds
will benefit the 14 & Under
and 12 & under boys bas-
ketball teams. To make
a donation or for. more
information contact Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith
at 386-754-7096.

Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts "The Life
of a Christian Teenager"
.at 6:15 p.m. Saturday. The
theater .is. located at 348
N. Marion Avenue. Call
386-344-0319.


Enrollment and Dinner Flapjack breakfast


SHINE is holding open
enrollment from 12:30 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Wednesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The R.O.T.C. will
also be holding a dinner
at 6:30 p.m. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion, call 386-755-0235.

Friday


A Relay For Life fund-
raising flapjack break-
fast is 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Saturday at Applebee's.
The meal will include pan-
cakes, scrambled -eggs,
homefries, bacon, sau-
sage, juices, coffee and
tea all you can eat. Tickets
are $10. Of the proceeds
$7 will go to Relay for,
Life.


Cultural Presentation A Christmas Carol


A cultural presentation
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center will be at 1 p.m.
on Friday in the Reading
Room. The center is locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court
For more information call,
386-755-0235.


A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Saturday
at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets are available at The


live from 11 a.m. to 11:45
a.m. Dec. 29 in the Dining
Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. A
game of bingo will follow
at 1 p.m. The, center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa'
.tion call 386-755-0235.

Every day
J!, .Mall Walkers
"Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7
^ a.m. Monday-Saturday
and 10 a.m. Sunday for
those who want to walk
for exercise.

Every Monday
SSuwanne Valley
Composite Squadron.
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron
Civil Air Patrol meets
:at 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Mondays.. For more infor-
mation, call Maj. Grant
Meadows, 386-365-1341.

S.. Every Fourth
Monday
Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meeting

The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets fronr
11-to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyld
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Ct. Call 755-
0235.

Every First
COURTESYPHOTO Monday

Pancake breakfast raises funds for United Way Weight-loss support
Flriri Gatewav Conlleane President Chuck Hall flins n ancakes Fridav mornin at th e conlleaenp's group


Lobo Caf. The pancake breakfast, a fundraiser for the United Way of the Suwannee
raised nearly $200 for the organization.


Framery on W. Baya and at
highspringscommunitythe-
atercom.

Gift wrapping
Sevepro is hosting a gift
wrapping fundraiser from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday
at Lowes. Donations will
be accepted. Money raised
will go toward Relay For
Life.

Cartwheel-a-thon
BARD Gymnastics is
hosting a cartwheel-a-thon
2 p.m. to 4 p.m Saturday at
the Lake City Mall. Sponsors
may pledge so much money
per cartwheel or make a,
one-time donation. Checks
can be made to the Christian
Service Center and the dona-
tion is tax deductible. Call
BARD Gymnastics at 386-
752-1710.


Tuesday, Dec. 21


e Valley,,




1y,


386-755-0235.


Leads Club #1 meeting Wednesda


The next Columbia
County Chamber Leads
Club #1 meeting is 8 a.m.
,Dec. 21 at Holiday Inn &
Suites. Breakfast is $6 per
person. Leads Clubs are
dynamicgroupsof Chamber
Partners who meet bi-
monthly to exchange busi-
ness leads and ideas with
fellow business profession-
als. Call 386-752-3690.

Theatre performance
Come watch the Geri-
Actors perform live on
stage at 6:30 p.m. Dec.
21 in the Dining Hall of
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. .The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For ticket informa-
tion, contact Patrick' at


uec. zz


Theatre performance

The Geri-Actors serve
up a Matinee Performance
from 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
and from 12:30 1:30 p.m.
Dec. 22 in the Dining Hall
of the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The performance
is free to the public., The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court. For more
information, call 386-755-
0235.

Wednesday,
Dec. 29
Live Performance

Fred Perry performs


The Thinner Me Weight
Lbss. Surgery Support
Group holds ,meetings at 7.
p.m., op .the first and third
Monday of every month
in the Classrooms at Lake
City Medical Center.
. Meetings are for people
that have had weight loss
surgery, contemplating sur-
gery or just trying to lose
weight on their own. E-mail
thethinnerme@gmail.corn
or call (386) 288-9153.

Every Third
Monday
MS support group

An MS support group
meets every third Monday
of the month, at the Lake
City Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157
SE Hernando Ave. Call
Karen Cross at (386) 755-
2950 or Jane Joubert at
(386) 755-5099 for more
information.


FGC to host annual Musical Christmas with Friends


From staff reports

Christmas will come
early to Lake City Monday
night, as some of the most
popular tunes and carols
- along with a dose of
Big Band music will be


performed during the 16th
Annual Musical Christmas
with Friends.
The event, featuring local
singers and musicians, will
take place Monday night at
the Levy Performing Arts
Center at Florida Gateway


College. The concert begins
at 7:30 p.m. and is free and
open to the public.
Harry Wuest and Matt
Johns will conduct the
evening performances, and
the concert will feature
appearances by Cyndi K


and Alfonso Levy. Band
members consist of musi-
cians from Lake City and
Columbia County.
I The concert continues to
be a tradition in Columbia
County, said Wuest, even
after 16 years.


"This is music people
like," Wuest said. "There's a
core audience that attends


every year, older people and
younger. Ifs music for the '
holidays."


OBITUARIES


John William Clements
John William Clements, January
10, 1948 December 6, 2010,
age 62, formally of the Lake
City, Live Oak area passed away
Monday, December 6, 2010, at
his home in Hammond, IN. The
Gainesville, FL native moved
to Indiana six months ago from
Chicago, IL. He worked as a
self-employed carpenter. He
lived life with gusto, loved learn-
ing new things and remained a
voracious reader all of his life.
Survivors include one son, John
Eric Clements and wife Latasha,
Kemersville, WV; one daughter,
Julia Carlisle and husband Mi-
chael, Tacoma, Washington: his
mother, Ruby Clemei1n of
Gainesville, FL; one brother,
Donald Clements and wife Lin-
da, Kennesaw, GA. As well as
several aunts, uncles and cousins.


Visitation and Funeral Services
will be held at Mt. Pisgah Baptist
Church on Monday, December
13th. Visitation will begin at 1:30.
Funeral services start at 2:00 PM.
Interment will follow
in the church cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to Mt. Pisgah
Baptist Church Cemetery fund,
19233 77th Road,
McAlpin, FL 32062.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.harrisfuneralhomeinc.
net. HARRIS FUNERAL
HOME & CREMATIONS,
INC., 932 N. Ohio Ave.,
Live Oak, 386-364-5115 is in
charge of all arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


LAST MONTH FOR TAX CREDIT PROGRAM
Tax Savings for MAJESTIC*
Wood Stoves
up to $1500
or 30% off
Woodstove,

and Labor.




"Model # WR 244 shown"


THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
611 N. Main St. M-F 9:30 5:30 p327-5
Gainesville Sat. 9:30 4:00


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


BRIEFS


Obama to Congress: Pass tax-cut deal


Palin tours Haiti
with mercy mission

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
Former Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palin arrived Saturday
in Haiti as part of a brief
humanitarian mission in an
impoverished nation strug-
gling to overcome post-elec-
tion violence and a cholera
epidemic.
Her first stop was to tour
a shelter with Rev. Franklin
Graham, whose Samaritan's
Purse relief organization
helped build temporary
houses for those left home-
less by January's devastat-
ing earthquake.
"I've really enjoyed meet-
ing this community," Palin
said in a statement posted
on the organization's Web
site. 'They are so full of
joy. We are so fortunate in
America and we are respon-
sible for helping those less
fortunate."
The Web site posted pic-
tures of Palin reaching her
hand out to Haitian fami-
lies and children gathered
around her, but the pictures
were later removed without
explanation.

Edwards funeral
draws hundreds
RALEIGH, N.C. With
stories that spanned
decades and spectrums,
family and friends of
Elizabeth Edwards recalled
her Saturday as an idealistic
law student who challenged
professors, a political sage
who offered advice at every
turn and a matriarch who
comforted her family even
as she was dying of breast
cancer.
Edwards' funeral drew
hundreds to Edenton Street
United Methodist Church,
where she once mourned
her 16-year-old son, Wade,
after he died in a car crash
in 1996. She was to be bur-
ied next to him during a
private ceremony.
Speakers reflected on a
multi-faceted personality:
Edwards, 61, was an intel-
lectual who frequented dis-
count clothing stores like
T.J. Maxx, she was a fiery
competitor without an ego,
and she was a public figure
who won the private confi-
dence of virtually everyone
she met

Gunbattle kills 11
in Mexican town

MEXICO CITY A
gunbattle between rival
gangs killed 11 people dur-
ing a Virgin of Guadalupe
celebration in a western
Mexican town, authorities
said Saturday.
Armed men arrived in
three cars and opened fire
on another group of gun-
men in the main plaza of
Tecalitlan just as a crowd
was gathering Friday night,
the Jalisco state attorney
general's office said in a
statement. One of the gun-
men hurled a grenade.
Eight men were killed at
the scene and two others
died at a hospital, the office
said.
Another man, the brother
of one of those killed in the
plaza, was found shot to death
next to a car on the highway
just outside the small town,
the statement said.

Beau suspect in
designer's death

NEW YORK-An Oscar-
winning songwriter's son
was ordered held without
bail Saturday during his
first court appearance after
being accused of choking
his swimsuit designer girl-
friend at a swanky New


York City hotel.
Nicholas Brooks, 24, was
charged with attempted
murder and strangulation in
the investigation surround-
ing Sylvie Cachay's death.
Brooks' attorney, Jeffrey
C. Hoffman, said Saturday
before his court appearance
that Cachay was "absolutely
fine" when last seen by her
boyfriend.
* Associated Press


By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama said the tax-cut deal
he negotiated with Republicans is
a "good deal for the American peo-
ple," and he called on Congress to
pass it before the end of the year
to keep tax rates from rising for
just about everyone in 2011.
The deal would extend for all
earners cuts in income tax rates
that are set to expire next month.
It also would renew jobless bene-
fits for the long-term unemployed
and trim Social Security taxes for
one year. Republicans support the
plan because it would not impose
higher taxes on the wealthiest
Americans, as Obama long had
wanted to do. Democrats object to
the pact on grounds that it is too
generous to the rich.
In his weekly radio and Internet
address Saturday, Obama
acknowledged that passage of the
deal means both parties will have
to accept some things they don't
like. But he said the agreement
will help the middle-class families
that he and others have argued
should be spared further econom-
ic hardship.
'The opportunity for families
to send their kids to college hing-
es on this debate," Obama said
Saturday. "The ability of parents
to put food on the table while
looking for a job depends on this
debate. And our recovery will be
strengthened or weakened based
on the choice that now rests with,
Congress.
"So I strongly urge members of
both parties to pass this plan. And
I'm confident that they will do the
right thing," he said.
Lawmakers were expected to


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama, accompanied by former President Bill Clinton, speaks briefly in the briefing room of the
White House in Washington Friday before giving the microphone to Clinton, where he talked about Obama's urging
of the Congress' to move on the tax compromise he made with Republican congressional leaders.


begin voting on the measure next
week.
Obama won some high-profile
backing for the agreement from
former President Bill Clinton. The
former president told reporters
after an Oval Office meeting with
Obama on Friday afternoon that "I
don't believe there is a better deal
out there."
In their weekly address,


Republican Rep.-elect Kristi Noem
of South Dakota applauded the
deal and said it's good for small
businesses.
'"With unemployment still rising,
the No. 1 thing our family-owned
small businesses need right now
is certainty," she said. "They need
to know that the government is not
going to come in and do anything to
jeopardize their ability to keep their


doors open. So its certainly encour-
aging to see that President Obama
has proposed a potential agreement
to stop all the tax hikes scheduled
to take effect on Jan. 1."
But she said additional steps
will be needed to spur economic
growth, including spending cuts,
making government smaller and
repealing the new health care
law.


Madoff's eldest son hangs self in NYC


By COLLEEN LONG
and TOM HAYS
Associated Press

NEW YORK Every
day for two years, he car-
ried the toxic burden of a
name that meant fraud to
the world. On Saturday,
the eldest son of dis-
graced financier Bernard
Madoff hanged himself in
his Manhattan apartment,
another casualty in the
saga that sent his father to
prison and swindled thou-
sands of their life savings.
On the second anniversa-
ry of the day his father was
arrested in the worst invest-
ment fraud in American
history, Mark Madoff, 46,
was found dead in the living
room of his SoHo loft. He
was hanging from a black
dog leash while his 2-year-
old son slept nearby.
People close to him said
he was despondent over,
press coverage of his father's
case, an ongoing criminal
investigation of Madoff fam-
ily members in the multibil-
lion-dollar scheme and his
struggle to rebuild his life.
The intense scrutiny
approaching the anniver-
sary "became too much for
him," said a person who had
recent contact with him,
speaking on condition of
anonymity because of the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reporters work across the street from the apartment building Mark Madoff lived in on
Saturday in New York. Mark, son of Bernard Madoff, was found dead in his apartment
in Manhattan's SoHo neighborhood Saturday morning and died of an apparent suicide,
according to law enforcement officials.


sensitivity of the case.
Mark Madoff's wife,
Stephanie, sent her stepfa-
ther to the couple's $6 mil-
lion dollar apartment after
he e-mailed her at Disney
World in Florida, where she
was vacationing with their
4-year-old daughter. In the
messages, he told her he
loved her and that some-
one should check on their
2-year-old child, Nicholas,
police said. He left no sui-
cide note.


The person who had
recent contact with Madoff
said he was struggling to
find steady employment
and was upset by coverage
of his father's case, includ-
ing a slew of stories in the
past week about investor
lawsuits.
"This is a terrible and
unnecessary tragedy," Mark
Madoff's attorney, Martin
Flumenbaum said in a
written statement "Mark
was an innocent victim


LAKE CITY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (CRA)
REQUEST FOR CITIZEN VOLUNTEERS TO SERVE ON
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE (CDAC)

THE CITY OF LAKE CITY IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS TO SERVE ON A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
ADVISORY COMMITTEE (CDAC). THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE IS PRESENTLY BEING FORMED TO
CONSIST OF SEVEN (7) MEMBERS AND WILL BE IMPLEMENTED DURING EARLY 2011. APPLICANTS FOR
THIS COMMITTEE MUST BE CITY RESIDENTS AND/OR OPERATE A BUSINESS WITHIN THE CITY
(PREFERABLY WITHIN THE CRA).
PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE SHALL BE:
1. PERIODIC REVIEW OF THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN AND WHEN APPROPRIATE
SUBMIT RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CRA FOR CHANGES.
2. MAKE WRITTEN RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CRA ON PLAN IMPLEMENTATION, INCLUDING
DEVELOPING AN ANNUAL WORK PROGRAM, SETTING PROJECT PRIORITIES, AND
DEVELOPING INCENTIVES TO FURTHER COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT EFFORTS.
3. HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING CITIZEN INPUT RELATED TO THE
REDEVELOPMENT AREA AND TO REPORT SUCH INFORMATION TO THE CRA.
4. EVALUATE AND PROVIDE RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CRA ON THE EXPENDITURE OR USE
OF LOCAL, STATE AND/OR FEDERAL FUNDS FOR REDEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE
REDEVELOPMENT AREA.
ELIGIBLE CITIZENS INTERESTED IN SERVING ON THIS COMMITTEE MAY FIND OUT MORE INFORMATION
OR OBTAIN AN APPLICATION BY CONTACTING:

CITY OF LAKE CITY
JACKIE KITE, CRA ADMINISTRATOR
205 N. MARION AVE.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
(386) 719-5766


of his father's monstrous
crime who succumbed to
two years of unrelenting
pressure from false accusa-
tions and innuendo."
Mark Madoff and his
brother Andrew, who noti-
fied authorities their father
had confessed to them the
day before he was arrest-
ed on Dec. 11, 2008, have
said they were unaware of


his crimes. But they have
remained under investiga-
tion and been named in the
multiple civil lawsuits accus-
ing them of profiting from
the scheme.
Another law enforcement
official said Saturday that
Madoff's arrest was not
imminent, and that inves-
tigators pursuing possible
charges against him, his
brother and uncle hadn't
contacted him for more
than a year.
The official wasn't autho-
rized to speak publicly about
the case and spoke on con-
dition of anonymity.
A lawyer for Mark's
mother, Ruth Madoff, said,
"She's heartbroken." The
lawyer, Peter Chavkin, had
no further comment
Bernard Madoff, 72,
swindled a long list of inves-
tors out of billions of dol-
lars. He admitted that he
ran his scheme for at least
two decades, cheating thou-
sands of individuals, chari-
ties, celebrities and institu-
tional investors. Losses are
estimated at around $20 bil-
lion, making it the biggest
investment fraud in U.S.
history. He is serving a 150-
year prison term in North
Carolina.


Charl e RSp s





WestfIeld


Special Interests Include:
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S* Geriatric Care
# Women's Health
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Minsh Patc, MD Ehi h Khy Most appointments in 24 hours
N-.n,, ARNP Most Insurances accepted


I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


THE WEATHER


-...e -_-
SHOWERS
i EARLY



S"159Lo0


- i- -. f .. .

SUNNY
AND



H1I45WLO2"


----_-----



SUNNY MOSTLY;
SUNNY
*15


HI 49 LO ;


MOSTLY
SUNNY'


HI 59 LO HI68 LO -


5* 1Val2sta4 City Monday Tuesday
C ap *Jacksonville Cape Canaveral -J ? c, :
Tallahassee Lake City 61 27 Daytona Beach ':- n. ?.
|.. 25 .5t9 26 Ft. Lauderdale I9 55 -i. -
Pensacola Gainesville DaytonaBeach Fort Myers .
51 26 PanamaCity 62.28 Galnesvlle -21 : 1 .
54 28 Ocala Jacksonville J4 21 J 4 ;
66 31t' p p i Key West 2 ? i: f, :
Oriando Cape Canaveral City .: 9 2?
69 36 68 C e- M
Miami -. JO : t,'. 44 .
eTampa Naoles .. As ,r, 5.1 :


67/44 West Palm Beach Ocala
74/40 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers. 77/45 0 Pensacola
72/45 Naples Tallahassee
71/50 Miami Tampa
77/45 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
75/64


60 intesbtotIn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


TEMPERATURES SUN
High Saturday 68 Sunrise today 7:17 a.m.
Low Saturday 48 Sunset today 5:31 p.m.


Normal nign
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


69
45
84 in 1971
23 in 1981


0.00"
0.04"
39.02"
0.82"
46.62"


Sunnse torn.
Sunset tom.


7 :8O a.m.
5:32 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 11:55 a.m.
Moonset today
Moonrfse tom. 12:24 p.m.
Moonset tom. 12:06 a.m.



Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan.
13 21 27 4
First Full Last New


50/22/s
55/30/s
45/27/s
47/25/s
44/25/s
56/33/sh
42/21/s
56/39/s


52/26/s
59/34/s
49/33/pc
51/35/s
47/27/pc
57/37/s
46/21/s
55/43/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by.
The Weather
Channel.




weather.comrn


,* Forecasts, data and graph-
-" ~,..' Ics 2010 Weather Centrpl
r "- LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system extending from the Ohio River Valley down to
the Gulf Coast of Florida will be responsible for widespread rain along the Atlantic Coast and
snowfall over the far Northeast. Widespread snowfall across the Midwest and Ohio River
Valley will also be associated with this system.


-- ...-. --.- .- ,



r-^ r" 1 ?J ,Dr 1-1






ln 3Os ,

---- ... a.....


i 58.47 II



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Fr$- o 5 VS 7 -


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d'D.s 8015


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tii|..iiiniimri* Biit^ r- r. w.i i-mrnr-i f 7T r-Tar,^^.a w rrfr- ... i ... r'nr i ..ni-


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Dr tona Beach
Denver


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
43/28/0 45/39/r
58/35/0 59/29/pc
18/16/.01 17/-2/pc
49/34/0 38/18/rs
43/23/0 50/30/r
26/10/0 36/32/sn
56/43/0 33/17/c
3/-1/.08 2/-7/s
41/31/0 48/37/c
45/29/0 50/45/r
39/35/0 40/26/rs
51/42/.25 60/30/sh
52/26/0 38/16/sn
49/25/0 48/24/sh
29/20/0 42/33/pc
36/23/.02 28/7/sn
49/25/0 29/17/sn
43/27/0 34/24/sn
49/35/0 51/24/sh
63/47/0 47/25/s
66/48/0 67/32/sh
39/20/0 53/30/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso.
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami.
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


High: 89, Lareao, Texas Low: -190, Wolf Point, Mont


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
46/19/.18 7/-5/s
41/22/0 34/13/sn
69/47/0 68/35/pc
-9/-13/.01 -28/-47/pc
46/27/0 47/24/r
43/21/0 48/41/r
75/68/.56 80/68/pc
77/58/0 59/31/s
41/30/.03 25/11/sn
69/45/0 44/20/pc
61/50/0 61/27/sh
48/18/.01 20/5/s
*66/44/0 68/46/s
60/48/.15 38/16/pc
72/54/0 77/55/s
55/47/.88 35/16/sf
77/57/0 77/45/s
22/19/.95 5/-15/s
68/44/0 48/21/pc
72/55/0 51/29/s
46/34/0 53/41/r
50/39/0 40/15/s


Saturday Today


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
49/12/0
68/50/0
45/26/0
73/48/0
47/24/0
41/23/0
43/40/.62
41/26/.08
19/11/0
61/42/0
45/24/0
59/55/0
46/39/.26
43/35/.01
75/43/0
72/51/0
58/55/0
45/39/.02
34/32/0
61/44/0
72/45/0
46/30/0


HI/Lo/W
11/-5/s
69/36/sh
56/35/r
80/52/s
39/20/sn
45/41/sn
58/47/pc
50/25/r
21/15/pc
60/31/s
52/31/r
65/47/s
22/7/sn "
51/35/sh"
59/28/s
76/56/s
64/49/s
54/47/r
44/35/sh
67/44/sh
79/45/s
50/33/r


V iil 'i Ii


7a 'p -7p -I 6a n t n
Sunday onday 6a 1882 Por'tanrd.
Ore. as Orenchel
Svith 7.6.6 inch es of
Srain, a record 2J
. .j3ro. ur 'oiail or triat
S -t"'- .. location.


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GetCnnected
--*ta-mfe--WM

. nSmB~xii~~T
* ^^^^^flQ


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BelJlng
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
* Kingston
.' ,1? ,


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
84/70/0 86/70/s
46/45/0 39/31/pc
39/35/.08 52/34/pc
75/57/0 75/59/pc
36/14/0 40/23/pc
41/32/0 34/26/sn
86/55/0 71/53/pc
68/57/0 56/48/sh
41/25/0 .40/25/s
73/50/0 74/53/s
19/9/.23 24/12/pc
72/68/0 78/69/sh
S .3 0 .., 83/73/t


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
61/45/0 62/44/sh
73/64/0 73/61/pc
48/41/0 40/33/pc
55/43/0 64/46/pc
73/34/0 71/34/s
34/25/.05 36/33/rs
23/10/0 23/20/sf
75/61/.39 77/61/t
81/63/.03 81/70/pc
48/48/0 73/50/s
25/14/.12 18/9/pc
82/75/.35 82/74/t
15.41.0 ,..41 3sl,.p,"


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto-
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday Todayj
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
90/77/0 91/76/s
55/32/0 :9 4 ..
81/73/0 84 7ti.l
83/74/0 -. ".J I
70/52/.03 68/39/s
41/16/0 40/23/pc
90/77/0 90/77/t
84/63/0 79/64/pc
70/63/.19 56/48/sh
* 64/43/0 57/45/s
39/34/.01 33/21/sn
39/23/.16 36/29/sn
* 32/19/.07 33/27/sn


KEY TO CONDIrIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f= r. r,'-log ri,- n i-:<"p.:-( ., *:l.:.ua,,', r-i iir ,Jrr,.
sh-showers, sn- -:. L-.=iI.un r': .,rm i.s. ., 'i .


" " "..- -..''.:- ': .r.




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71 - . ,. *. - '





Al. .


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today! CAPUS

Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, # USA
Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!3 l i i


1 Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position are
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payments of $1842.04 and one final payment of $1787:83, total finance charge of $10,468.19; for a total of payment of $11 0,468-19. The amount financed is $99,833.00 the APR is 4.072% APR=Annual Percentage Rate
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Lake* Ciy13S acmNri r vle- .Cmu 20S t v.W aps1900 SW3t-t oevle17N 4t erae Hne' ak51 W4r t oe S qur 75SW7tSt


ill..


r-


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I


I








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@aokeatyreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday, December 12, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Muschamp takes over at Florida


Texas defensive
coordinator to
replace Meyer.
By MARK LONG and
JIM VERTUNO
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Texas
defensive coordinator Will
Muschamp has left the
Longhorns to take over at
Florida.
Muschamp will succeed
Urban Meyer, who won two
national championships in six
seasons with the Gators but
resigned Wednesday after a 7-5
season.


The 39-year-old Muschamp
spent three seasons at Texas,
where he was the head-coach-in-
waiting to replace Mack Brown.
Muschamp, who lived in
Gainesville for 10 years as
a child, said taking over the
Florida program is a "dream
come true."
"I grew up watching the
Gators and whatever other
SEC team was on television,"
Muschamp said in a state-
ment. "I have great memories
watching SEC football with my
father on Saturdays and playing
football in the back yard with
my two brothers right here in
Gainesville."
Muschamp will be introduced


at a news conference Tuesday
evening.
Florida athletic directorJeremy
Foley said Muschamp was the
"only person we met with and
the only person we offered the
job to."
Foley said Muschamp's famil-
iarity with the Southeastern
Conference he graduated
from Georgia and coached at
Auburn and LSU was an
important factor. So was his
knowledge of recruiting in
Florida.
"We wanted a candidate who
was high energy and had been
on the big stage," Foley said in
a statement. "We wanted a can-
didate who was respected by


his players and his peers, and
we wanted someone who had
a passion for the University of
Florida. Coach Muschamp is all
of those things and more."
Muschamp was already one
of the hottest names among
assistant coaches when he was
hired at Texas before the 2008
season.
Internet video clips of his exple-
tive-filled tirades on the sidelines
at Auburn excited Longhorns
fans. He had alternate nicknames
of "Coach Boom!". for his noted
enthusiasm and "Coach Blood"
because he once ignored blood
pouring down his face after a
cut in the first game of the 2008
season.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas defensive coordinator Will Muschamp
has accepted an offer to be head coach at
Florida.


Card


table


memories


Lake City women meet to play bridge each
Thursday at WillowBrook Assisted Living. The two tables
of players have their history in clubs that began in the 1940s. Playing in a JASON MATTHEW WALKER!
recent game are Abby Mann (from left), Betty Norris, Mildred Bishop, L r,
Marge Brown, Imogene Miller, Fran Ward, Genevieve Nelson and Helena Powers.


Lake City women keep bridge alive with weekly club date


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
(nce a mainstay
in the social
fabric of Lake
City, the game
of bridge has
taken a back seat.
Eight ladies gather once
a week at WillowBrook
Assistant Living to keep
the dream alive.
The two Thursday tables
are a tribute to bridge
clubs that formed more
than 60 years ago, and
to all the members who
bid, played, defended and
discussed the landscape of
Lake City during that time.
There were many clubs
through the years, but
two that began play in the
1940s are represented by
the WillowBrook crowd.
Genevieve Nelson an'd


Helena Powers are charter
members ofthe Thursday
afternoon club.
"There was a crowd of
young women who learned
bridge," Nelson said. "I
> don't know who taught us
how to play."
Back in the day,
Thursday play began with
lunch at one of the
members' homes and there
were special games.
'We always fixed lunch
when we were able,"
Powers said. "We started
with one table when all of
us were learning. I
remember having 12 tables
at my house one time."
'We played at the
country club for years and
we would have lunch out
there," Nelson said.
Mary Brown Butler,
Madge Van Arsdall,
Lulie Bloodworth,


Nettie McColskey, Lois
McColskey and Gertrude
Jacobs were early
members of the Thursday
club. Mary Phillips and
Janie Wheeless joined
later.
Marge Brown and
Mildred Bishop are charter
members of the Tuesday
evening club.
"When the Lions Club
formed, the wives went to
play bridge," Brown said.
"I learned after I married
in 1942. Bess Heirs Rumph
taught me.".
"I always liked the
bridge club," said Bishop,
who learned the game after
her marriage in 1939.
Fran Ward and Bishop
were invited to join the
Thursday club in 1951.
"My parents played and
I learned to play auction
bridge before contract,"


Ward said. "I went to two
other clubs and they asked,
'Do you keep score?'; when
I said yes they said, 'You
have got to join up.'"
Betty Norris, like Brown,
was a teacher and joined
the Tuesday club.
"I learned to play at
Erskine College in South
Carolina," Norris said. "We
learned to play Rook and
graduated to bridge. There
were teachers involved in
the Tuesday club and
they were working in the
daytime."
Virginia Smith, Blanche
Kirby, Mary Lindsey,
Frankie Summers, Mary
Newton McConahey and
Millie Ward were early
members of the Tuesday
club. Marie Kennon and
Edith Purser Vass were
long-time members.
Abby Mann and


Imogene Miller also play in
the WillowBrook sessions.
"I took Mary Brown
Butler's place in the
Thursday club," Mann
said. "We were couples
when we learned to play in
the '50s. One couple knew
how and they were very
patient and tolerant. I am
still learning."
Miller, a long-time
pianist and organist at
the First Baptist Church,
revived her bridge
enthusiasm after retiring
as a music teacher.
"I played regularly in
college at Florida State,"
Miller said. "I played a lot
with Madge Van Arsdall at
the Newcomers Club."
Bridge was the focal
point for the ladies, but
celebrating special events
for the club families was a
must.


'"We had to entertain for
anybody who got married,"
Bishop said.
The Thursday club
served up the
wedding reception for Pat
Summerall.
"We used to have big
teas at the Woman's Club
for any of the daughters
that got married," Nelson
said. "Everything used to
be so formal in Lake City,
more so than it is now."
Thursday's game has
morning and afternoon
sessions with a break for
lunch.
"We look forward to
the ladies coming every
Thursday," said
managing partner Mike
Roper, a bridge player
himself, who sometimes
fills in at the club. "We
enjoy having them at
WillowBrook."


District success

for Tigers hoops


Columbia evens
record at 3-3 with
win over Lee.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High bounced
back in the district race with
a 55-45 win against Robert
E. Lee High on Friday.
The Tigers rallied when


down six points late in the
second quarter to tie the
game 29-29 going into the
half. From there, it was all
Tigers as Columbia pulled
away for the 10-point win.
Marquez Marshall led
all scorers in the contest
as he dropped in 20 points
for Columbia. Three Tigers
scored in double digits
CHS continued on 2B


Auburns' Newton wins

Heisman in landslide


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn quarterback Cam Newton reacts during a news
conference after winning the Heisman Trophy award,
Saturday in New York.


Quarterback
erases doubt,
wins trophy.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
NEW YORK Cam
Newton won the Heisman
Trophy as if there was
any doubt.
Whether he gets to keep
it is still to be determined.
Auburn's hulking quar-


terback brushed off an
NCAA investigation of his
recruitment as he did so
many tacklers this sea-
son and captured college
football's biggest individual
award Saturday night in a
landslide vote.
"Honestly, it's a dream
come true for me, some-
thing every child has a
dream that plays the sport
of football, and I'm living
testimony that anything is
possible," Newton said.









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
9:30 a-m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Alfred
Dunhill Championship, final round, at
Mpumalanga, South Africa (same-day
tape)
3 p.m.
NBC Shark Shootout, final round,
at Naples (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
S4 p.m.
FSN Boston College at Maryland
6 p.m.
FSN Clemson at Florida St.
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC Philadelphia at Dallas
SOCCER
4 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I, Men's
College Cup, championship match,
Louisville vs. Akron. at Santa Barbara,
Calif.
.WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN -Tennessee at Texas
Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Baltimore at Houston
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Los Angeles at Detroit
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Arsenal at
Manchester United

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


New
N.Y
Miai
Buff

Jack
India
Hou


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF I
w England 10 2 0.833 379 2
.jets 9 3 0.750 267 2
mi 6 6 0.50021521
alo 2 10 0.167243 3:
South
W L TPct PF I
sonville 7 5 0.583 257 31
anapolis 7 6 0.538 347 3
uston 5 7 0.417288 3


PA
69
32
38
33
PA
00
18
21


Tennessee 5 8 0.385291 265
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Pittsburgh 9 3 0.750267 191
Baltimore 8 4 0.667260 201
Cleveland 5 7 0.417229 239
Cincinnati 2 10 0.167255 322
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 8 4 0.667 295 237
Oakland 6 6 0.500 283 269
San Diego 6 6 0.500 323 253
Denver 3 9 0.250 256 333
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 8 4 0.667 308 247
Philadelphia 8 4 0.667344 281
Washington 5 7 0.417222 293
Dallas 4 8 0.333 294 336
South
W L TPct PF PA
Atlanta 10 2 0.833 304 233
New Orleans 9 3 0.750299 227
Tampa Bay 7 5 0.583243 251
Carolina I 11 0.083 154 307
North
W L TPct PF PA
Chicago 9 3 0.750246 192.
Green Bay 8 4 0.667303 182
Minnesota 5 7 0.417227 253
Detroit 2 10 0.167278 306
West
W L TPct PF PA
Seattle 6 6 0.500 240 289
St. Louis 6 6 0.500232 237
San Francisco 4 8 0.333 203 259
Arizona 3 9 0.250 200 338
Today's Games
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, I p.m.
Cleveland at.Buffalo, I p.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, I p.m.
Oakland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, I p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Denver atArizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Baltimore at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Game
San Francisco at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 19
Kansas City at St. Louis, I p.m.
Washington at Dallas, I p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Den\er at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.


N.Y Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 20
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Denver at New York, 12 p.m.
New Orleans at Philadelphia, 12 p.m.
LA. Lakers at New Jersey, I p.m.
Portland at San Antonio, 3:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Orlando at LA. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
New Orleans at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8-p.m.
Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Saturday's Games
No. I. Duke (10-0) 84, Saint Louis 47.
No. II Tennessee 83, No. 3. Pittsburgh
76
No. 4. Kansas (9-0) 76, Colorado
State 55.
No. 5. Kansas State 68 Loyola of
Chicago 60
No. 7. Michigan State 77, Oakland, 76
No. 8. Syracuse 100, Colgate 43
No. 15. Missouri 70, Presbyterian 55.
No. 17. Kentucky 81, Indiana 81-62
No. 18. BYU 87,Arizona 65
No. 19. Purdue 77, North Florida 57
No. 20. UNLV 69, No. 24 Louisville 77
No. 21.Washington 62,Texas A&M 63
No. 22. Minnesota 71, Eastern
Kentucky 58
No. 25.Texas 101,Texas State 65

Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio St. vs.W. Carolina, 4 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown vs. Appalachian
State, Noon
No. 12Villanova at La Salle, 2 p.m.
No. 16 Illinois vs. N. Colorado, 6 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Garries
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Los Angeles at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Columbus at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose 10:30 p.m.


Miami holds first practice


since Shannon dismissal


Associated Press

CORAL GABLES,
- The Miami Hurricanes
returned to the practice
field Saturday for the first
time since the dismissal of
head coach Randy Shannon
in preparation for the Sun
Bowl against Notre Dame.
Jeff Stoutland, who has
been the offensive line
coach the last four seasons,
stepped into the interim
coach role after Shannon
was fired Nov. 27.
"Whenever you go
through turmoil, tragedy,
any type of distress, time
kind of heals everything,"
Stoutland said. 'These are
young people we are deal-
ing with and they're resil-
ient"
Saturday's practice was
the first of nine practices in
Coral Gables before travel-
ing to El Paso, Texas.
"There was a lot of ener-
gy out there," Stoutland
said. "I guess it's like being
cooped up in your house for
so long and all of a sudden,
you're allowed out"
The Hurricanes went
7-5 in the regular season
with disappointing losses to
Florida State, Virginia, and
South Florida. Ohio State
and Virginia Tech also beat
Miami.
Stoutland has watched all
12 of Notre Dame's games


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly (left) and Miami head
coach Jeff Stoutland pose with the 77th annual Hyundai Sun
Bowl Trophy, Thursday, in El Paso, Texas.


already as both teams enter
the Dec. 31 game with iden-
tical records.
"They, have a lot of
really good players," he
said.
While the Miami assis-
tants are preparing for the
bowl game, their own fate
with their future at the
school is undetermined.
"When you go through a


bypass or a heart transplant,
you don't worry, you can't
worry," said Stoutland, who
went through triple-bypass
surgery in May. "It's not
in our hands. We are just
going to do a great job. We
are going to be profession-
als, we are going to finish
this off the right way and
then whatever happens,
happens."


CHS: Soccer falls in district contest
Continued From Page 1B


including Marcus Amerson
and Nigel Atkinson with 12
points each. Javonte Foster
almost hit double digits as
well with nine points in the
contest.
"We found pretty good
balance," Columbia coach
Horace Jefferson said. "I
was impressed by how well
we played in a physical
game. We responded. Nigel
had a couple of teeth dis-
placed and Marshall took a
hit on the lip. It was a hard-


fought game, and that's the
best winless team I've ever
seen. The. kids played hard
and just responded."
Columbia improved to
3-3 on the season with the
win and has a 1-1 district
record.

Columbia soccer

Columbia High's soccer
team fell in a tightly con-
tested district contest to
Ridgeview High on Friday.


The Tigers went on the
road to Ridgeview where
eliminated from playoff
contention last season and
fell 3-1 to the Panthers.
Cooper Hall had
Columbia's only goal with
an assist from Jimmy
Blakely.
Columbia fell to 7-3-1
with the loss, but will have
a chance to bounce back
on Monday. The Tigers
travel to Wolfson High at
7:20 p.m.


Hopson's 27 points lead


No. 11 Tennessee over


No. 3 Pittsburgh, 83-71


Associated Press '

PITTSBURGH Scotty
Hopson scored a career-
high 27 points and the Vols
dealt the Panthers their
first non-conference loss
in Pittsburgh in nearly six
years.
Melvin Goins added
19 points and Cameron
Tatum hit a succession of
big shots while scoring 14
points as Tennessee (7-0)
opened leads of as many
as 21 points. Pitt (10-1)
needed a late flurry just
to cut the final margin to
single digits.
Brad Wanamaker scored
21 points, but Pitt still lost
a non-conference game in
the city for the first time in
58 games, dating to a Jan.
2, 2005 loss to Bucknell.

No. 1 Duke 84,
Saint Louis 47
DURHAM, N.C. -
Nolan Smith scored 15 of
his 22 points in the first
half and No. 1 Duke routed
Saint Louis 84-47 Saturday
for its 20th straight win.
Kyle Singler added 21
points for the Blue Devils
(10-0), who shot 53 percent,
turned 22 turnovers into 31
points and took command
with an overwhelming
early run.
The reigning national
champions won their 25th
straight at Cameron Indoor
Stadium and their 83rd in
a row at home against non-
conference opponents.

No. 7 Michigan St. 77,
Oakland 76
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
Kalin Lucas scored 25
points to help Michigan
State hold off hard-charg-
ing Oakland.
Lucas made a 3-pointer
and a jumper late in the
game to prevent the Golden
Grizzlies from getting
closer than 2 points until
Reggie Hamilton made a
3-pointer with 0.4 of a sec-
ond left.
The Spartans (7-3)
ACROSS 41 Tha
42 Coi
1 Cat or turkey Kel
4 Red-tag event 45 Int
8 Flow back 49 Epi
11 Iowa city 53 Hol
13 Deuces 54 Me
14 Sock part soi
15 Garden soil 55 Hud
16 Helpful thing tribe
18 Pina-- 56 149
20 Scuba site 57 Urc
21 Cornfield 58 An
sound pas
22 Fabric meas. 59 Far
24 Obstinate
27 Zoo building
30 Anguished wail
31 Well, to Yves 1 Bal
32 Golfer 2 Me
Woosnam 3 Lui
34 Cut down with 4 Wh
an ax 5 Flo
35 Mires 6 --
36 Tree trunk 7 Pai
37 Concert bonus Bes
39 Like some 8 Rai
communities 9 Bra
40 Address part sp(


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tennessee's John Fields (25) blocks a shot by Pittsburgh's
Ashton Gibbs (12) in the first half of the SEC-Big East
Invitational in Pittsburgh, Saturday.


had dropped three of
their last six games to
Connecticut, Duke and
Syracuse and are the only
team in The AP poll that
has played a road game
against a ranked team.

No. 22 Minnesota 71,
E. Kentucky 58
MINNEAPOLIS- Ralph
Sampson III had 19 points,
eight rebounds and four
.assists to help Minnesota
overcome a ragged start.
Trevor Mbakwe and
Blake Hoffarber each added
14 points for the Gophers
(9-1), who won despite
going 12 for 22 from the
free throw line and allow-
ing 10 3-pointers.
Justin Stommes scored
19 points for the Colonels
(5-5), who didn't score in
the second half until the 10-
minute mark. After taking
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a 22-13 lead, they were out-
scored 30-3 over a stretch
of nearly 17 minutes.

No. 24 Louisville 77,
No. 20 UNLV 69
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -
Preston Knowles scored
all 20 of his points in the
second half and Louisville
remained unbeaten with a
win in the Billy Minardi
Classic.
Kyle Kuric and Chris
Smith added 17 points each
for the Cardinals.
Knowles led the way,
keying an 21-6 surge that
helped Louisville erase a
nine-point deficit to take
a 57-51 lead with 9:52 to
-play. UNLV (9-1) would
get no closer than four
the rest of the way as the
L Cardinals. stayed perfect
at their new downtown
arena.

r to Previous Puzzle


PACT CARR
ISTS RUBY
RE BUDS
AR LIP
T KUBLAI
EDIT ELMO
EDEN DAD


EP NAP
S URGED
RODEAWAY
AVER EMU
GAS REL


Red meat
Loud kisses
Big Dipper bear
Dawnto dusk
Jacques -
Cousteau


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


23 Uproar
24 Derisive snort
25 Helm
position
26 Grassy area
27 Helper
28 Disorder
29 Kind of lock
31 Impolite
sound
33 Jarrett of
NASCAR
35 Me, to Miss
Piggy
36 Masked
superhero
38 Despot
39 Moo goo -
pan
41 Heron or egret
42 Like
custard
43 Shredded
44 Rotate
46 Osiris' wife
47 Prefix for sec-
ond
48 Chew at
50 Roman 1101
51 Museum con-
tents
52 Once named


@ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


12-13


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













Navy beats Army for ninth-straight time


By DAVE SKRETTA
Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA The
Midshipmen had already
lost the Commander-in-
Chief's Trophy. They
weren't. about to lose to
Army, too.
Ricky Dobbs threw the
longest touchdown pass in
the 111-year history of the
Army-Navy game, Wyatt
Middleton had the" longest
fumble return in school his-
tory, and the Midshipmen
extended their winning
streak against Army to nine
straight with a 31-17 victory
Saturday.
Dobbs passed for 186
yards and two touchdowns
in his final game against the
Black Knights (6-6), one of
24 seniors to never lose to
their rivals from West Point
Dobbs turned the ball over
four times three fumbles
and an interception in the
end zone but also ran
for a team-high 54 yards for
Navy (9-3).
Trent Steelman threw for
128 yards and two scores for
Army, but it was his fumble
late in the first half that put
the Black Knights in a hole
too deep to escape.
They already trailed


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Navy offensive tackle Jeff Battipaglia (61) leads Navy onto the field before an NCAA college football game against Army,
Saturday in Philadelphia.


17-7 with first-and-goal at the
Navy 3 when Steelman got
stood up on a quarterback
keeper. The ball squirted
from his hands and right
to Middleton, who turned
around to see nobody in
a black jersey between
him and the goal line. The


98-yard return made it
24-7 at halftime and silenced
the grey-clad Cadets in the
corner of Lincoln Financial
Field.
Middleton, a senior, was
named the game's MVP.
Army controlled the
ball much of the second


half, but could only muster
Alex Carlton's 42-yard field
goal before Steelman's late
touchdown pass to Malcolm
Brown provided the final
margin.
Both teams lost to Air
Force this season, end-
ing the Midshipmen's


seven-year grip on the
Commander-in-Chief's
Trophy awarded to the
top service academy. But
another victory over Army
- the game that matters
most on the schedule every
year certainly helped to
ease that sting.


Army is still headed to its
first bowl game since 1996,
the Armed Forces Bowl on
Dec. 30 in Dallas against
SMU. The Midshipmen
play San Diego State in the
Poinsettia Bowl on Dec. 23.
The latest edition of one
of college sports' marquee
matchups certainly wasn't
pretty, perhaps because of
long layoffs for both teams.
The Army-Navy game was
moved back on the sched-
ule to separate it from the
multitude of conference title
games that have assumed
the spotlight in recent years,
meaning ,the two schools
had not played a meaningful
snap since Nov. 20.
It showed right away,
when the two teams
swapped turnovers in the
first four offensive plays.
They combined to fumble
six times in the first half
alone, losing five of them.
Joe Buckley finally struck
for Navy with a 36-yard field
goal. After its defense held,
Dobbs found John Howell
alone behind the coverage
and hit him in the stride.
The sophomore outran
both Army safeties 77 yards
for the touchdown, the lon-
gest passing score in series
history.


BRIEFS

CHS SOFTBALL CHS SOCCER
Player/parent Moe's Night
meeting Monday set for Tuesday


Columbia High softball
has a mandatory player
and parent meeting for
those interested in trying
out for the 2011 team at
6:30 p.m. Monday in the
CHS cafeteria.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.


Columbia High's
soccer program has a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday at
Moe's Southwest Grill on
U.S. Highway 90 west. The
program will receive a
percentage of the sales.
For details, call 365-1877.


Registration for the Boys
Club of Columbia County's
2011 basketball program
continues through Friday.
Girls and boys ages 6-14
are eligible. Practices are
twice weekly and games
are played on Saturday.
Cost is $40.
For details, call 752-4184
or visit the club on Jones
Way.


I P AY OW1 OAL-ITCR


PECK THE HALLS WR





F C N H A C U

3322 W US HwV 90 R V T G M H
386-755-2502 i M E 0 Z K i
E E R 0 U I ]


JINGLE BELLS
cOOP kINc WENCESLASI


Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817 or Mario Coppock
at 754-7095.

E From staff reports


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, '"' He s always _
to form four ordinary words. unde w.n
inal neap ,
LIPTO

@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
FERAT -0:

'o

DINKLY E 1
WHAT HE
TURP-NEP H15 C-AR
z INTO,
TIFLLE INT .
"--' -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer: A ^i^i iI
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: SOOTY FOIST PURIFY NOZZLE
I Answer: A good strategy for a pocket billiards team -
"POOL" THEIR EFFORTS


FROSTY THE SHOWMAN

JOY TO THE WORLP

Updated apartments w/
tite floors & fresh paint.
Excellent location.
From $425 + Sec.

1 Eagie
Properties
(386) 752-9626
CaLL for info
LITTLE PRUMMER ROY

0 CHRISTMAS TREE
Helping Dreams Come True...
One Smile at a Time


I
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ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN, D.M.D
701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025

THE WASSAIL SOHN G

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M A N C W T M S G N 0' S 0 L M S
I L D E M I E R N L G S Z E A 0
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Deadline is Monday, December 13, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.
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lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
casak@(ackectyreporter.co!


BUSINESS


Sunday, December


12,2010.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Harvey Campbell
386-758- 397

Local radio

station's

updated

messages

Few area resi-
dents are aware
of the fact that
the Columbia
County Tourist
Development Council owns
and operates a radio station
and has done so for nearly
20 years.
The station is WNMY-
250 and can be found
at 530 on the AM radio
dial. The station is a
Federal Communications
Commission (FCC)
licensed low-power radio
station with 10 watts of
power. The broadcast sig-
nal has coverage of approx-
imately 12 miles and the
transmitter and antennae
is located at the Columbia
County Emergency
Operations Center, just off
U.S. 90 West.
Currently, the radio sta-
tion plays an eight-minute
endless loop which wel-
comes visitors to our area
and provides tourism infor-
mation. During an emer-
gency, the message can be
switched to information
about shelters, evacuation
details, etc.
The radio station also
has the capability of broad-
casting live, if necessary.
The digitally recorded mes-
sage will be updated within
the next 30 days with new
tourism information, the
sound track from the new
60-second Suwannee River
Valley television commer-
cial and specific informa-
tion about the most sig-
nificant upcoming festival,
which will be the Olustee
Battle Festival between
now and Feb. 20, 2011.
If you get a chance when
you're in your car, tune
to 530 AM and give us a
listen. The station is cur-
rently advertised on several
of our billboards on 1-75
and will also be promoted
in our new vacation guide
and the new official Florida
State Transportation Map.

Deadline is looming
for new vacation guide
This Wednesday, Dec.
15, is the deadline for both
advertising and editorial
content for the second edi-
tion of the Suwannee River
Valley Vacation Guide.
The publication is being
produced by the Lake City
Reporter and 40,000 cop-
ies of the Vacation Guide
will be printed. If you are
interested in details about
advertising, call the Lake
City Reporter at 752-1293. A
limited quantity of the orig-
inal edition of the Vacation
Guides is still available.
If you are interested in a
case of the guides (packed
200 to a box), please call
Brenda Clemente at 758-
1312. The Vacation Guide
serves as our primary
fulfillment publication and
is sent out in response to
consumer inquiries and is
also distributed at all of the
tourism shows we attend.

Research projects slated
for the spring of 2011
An important component
of marketing has always
TOURISM continued on 2C


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jules LaBrie (right) helps Matt Jones wrap an eight-foot Fraser fir in a net for easy transport at Lowe's Home Improvement Friday morning.


Tree farms grow Christmas memories


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The lumbering
economy is
not sapping
the business of
live Christmas
trees.
"If people like live
trees, they're going to
buy them no matter what
the economy's doing,"
said Brian Flynt, zone one
manager of Lowe's Home
Improvement in Lake
City.
Hollis Jones, owner of
Jones Christmas Tree
Farms in'Branford, said
the economy hasn't kept
customers from purchas-
ing the live trees he sells.
"Not at all," he said.
"It's amazing. We thought
it would, but we make
our own wreaths right
here, which people like,
and they're buying the
wreaths faster than we
ever thought they would
this year."
Flynt said the economy


has slowed tree sales
- for both live and artifi-
cial trees over the past
four years, but it hasn't
affected complete sales.
Sales are slightly up
from the previous year,
he said.
"We're pretty much on
track for last year," Flynt
said. "Ift's actually been a
little bit more this year."
Jones said his farm has
seen a jump in sales from
Christmas 2009.
"So far, the sales seem
to be ahead considerably
from a year ago," he said.
Jones Christmas Tree
Farms, which has five
varieties of live trees for
people to cut down and
Fraser Firs from North
Carolina to choose from,
sells the most trees
the weekend following
Thanksgiving.
Flynt said Lowe's,
which offers 13 types
of artificial trees and a
variety of live trees like

FARM continued on 2C


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Stephanie Lunde (left) and Bonnie Dunn shop for the perfect
Christmas tree at Lowe's Home Improvement on Friday. 'Live
trees make the house smell good,' Dunn said. 'I was raised
with live trees in the house.'


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


Starting Investing
Q How can I start investing, if I
know very little about stocks
and don't have much money? -
MM., Phoenix
A Begin by increasing your
knowledge until you feel com-
fortable putting some of your hard-
earned dollars to work for you.
Don't jump in blindly.
Books such "One Up on Wall
Street" by Peter Lynch with John
Rothchild (Simon & Schuster, $16),
and "Stock Investing for Dummies"
by Paul Mladjenovic (For Dummies,
$22) can help you understand the.
world of stocks.
Online, go to www.fool.com/
how-to-invest/index.aspx and
www.morningstar.com
to learn the basics and more.
When you're ready to open a
brokerage account, find a good one
at www.brokerage-review.com or
www.consumersearch.com/
online-brokers.
If you end up deciding that you
don't want-to select stocks or mutual
funds on your own, your best bet is
probably to sock your long-term
money into one or more broad market
index funds, such as one based on the
S&P 500. Often charging very low
fees, they'll help you keep up with the
market's growth. Learn more at
www.indexfunds.com and
www.fooLcom/mvesting/basics/
index.aspx. ',


, What does it mean if a stock is */0
"priced for perfection"? ..
H.D., Greensboro. NC ,
A The tenm suggests that the stock
S is trading at a steep pnce.as if
perfect outcomes have been factored
in. In other words, investors appear to
be expecting great things from the
company, with no missteps or bad
news This can be rsky. because if the
company falters, the stock pnce may U
take a significant hit
Consider -"alue investing"
instead, where you seek stocks sell- *
ing for significantly less than you *-
think they're worth. This approach
can minimize your downside risk by *
providing-a-marginrof safety.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
-see Write to Us


TOURISM
From Page 1C
been research and that is
even more true today with
increased accountability
demanded by elected officials
and taxpayers.
In addition, good research
can allow us to more effec-
tively place advertising dollars
and pitch the appropriate mar-
kets that would be interested
in visiting our area. Toward
that end, the Suwannee River
Valley Marketing Group is hir-
ing Touch Poll Florida to con-
duct two research projects.
One will be done at the
Wanee Music Festival in
April and the other will be
conducted at three hotels and
one campground in Columbia
County. Touch Poll also did a
research project this year at
the Florida Folk Festival.
We will be collecting infor-
mation on how visitors learned
about our area and special
events we host We'll survey
people staying in area lodging
about our new billboard cam-
paign and if it has been effec-
tive in getting visitors to stay
in Lake City and the Suwannee
River Valley.
We'll also collect economic
information about dollars spent
and other data to improve our
marketing skills and better
invest our promotional dollars.

Best Wishes from our
staff
On behalf of the staff of
the Columbia County Tourist
Development Council, we
wish all of you a Merry
Christmas and hopes for a
safe and successful New Year.
We greatly appreciate
the support and assistance
provided to us by our tour-
ism industry and many
other friends in Lake City,
Columbia County and the
Suwannee River Valley.
Harvey Campbell is the
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council. He can
be reached at 386-758-1397.


Rating and
Target-Price Dangers
In the financial press, you'll
frequently run across stories like
this: "Wingtip Investments
raises rating for Sisyphus
Transport Corp. (ticker:
UPDWN) from 'hold' to czy
'accumulate' and sets 12-
month target price of $80."
That seems like very valuable infor-
mation, but it's not. At Fool HQ, we
don't pay much attention to analyst
ratings. Consider, for instance, that
analysts don't issue "sell" ratings very
often. Could it be that they don't want
to tick off companies that might.
employ their firm in the future? That
would be a conflict of interest, and
one that hurts us investors.
Analyst target prices also are not
the definitive pieces of information
that they appear to be. Let's review
one way that they're calculated.
Imagine that Sisyphus Transport
reported $2 in earnings per share
(EPS) in the past 12 months and
that its stock is trading around $40
per share. To determine its price-to-


earnings (P/E) ratio, you'd divide
$40 by $2 and would get 20. One
way to think of the P/E is to see that
investors (or "the market") value
UPDWN shares at 20 times its
earnings. That's sometimes referred
to as a "multiple" of 20.
Now imagine that after studying
the company, you estimate that next
year it will earn $4 per share and
that its multiple will remain around
20. Since you know this formula for
the P/E ratio, you can simply multi-
ply the expected earnings of $4 by
the multiple of 20 and voila -
you've got a price target of $80 per
share for next year.
Remember that price targets 'are just
based on estimates, which may well
prove to be too optimistic or conserv-
ative. If the industry is suddenly seen
as very attractive, the multiple (or
P/E) could be higher. Or the EPS
might be lower, if growth slows.
A far better way to arrive at
investment decisions is to study
companies on your own, assessing
their health, growth prospects, man-
agement quality, competitive advan-
tages and performance trends. Or
get guidance from trusted sources,
not from unfamiliar and possibly
conflicted analysts.


Name That Company

My market capitalization,
north of $240 billion, tops .
\ Microsoft's, yet you probably don't
/ know me. Founded in 1885 and
based in Melbourne, Australia, I'm
l- one of the world's biggest mining
7j K-4- --I ,0


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Now and then we hear about
thieves making off with air condi-
tioners, drain pipes and telephone
lines to capture the increasing scrap
value of their copper. Copper thefts
appear to be set off when the metal's
price approaches $4 a pound, as it
did in 2008. It soon plunged
to earth, though, bottoming ,s9
out below $1.50 by early
2009. Since then, the base metal has
worked its way back to nearly $4.
As a result, the share price of cop-
per producer Freeport-McMoRan
Copper & Gold (NYSE: FCX)
dropped from almost $114 in July
2008 to the low $20s later in the
year. It's recently around $100.
Morgan Stanley sees copper
consumption up 5 percent in the
U.S. over last year, up 12 percent
in Europe and 37 percent in Japan.
It expects worldwide demand for
copper to outstrip supply until
2013, due largely to strong
demand in China. That bodes
well for copper producers.
Meanwhile, Freeport, which
increased its earnings by 27 per-
cent last quarter, is expanding its
capacity and has reached an ami-
able accord with the Democratic
Republic of Congo regarding the
operation of a big new mine there.
Freeport is likely to maintain
its strength for at least several
years. Keep an eye on this well--
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company with high-quality,
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November fed budget deficit highest on record


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON The
federal budget deficit rose
to $150.4 billion last month,
the largest November
gap on record. And the
government's deficits are
set to climb if Congress
passes a tax-cut plan that's
estimated to cost $855 bil-
lion over two years.
The Treasury
Department says
November's budget gap
was 25 percent more than
the deficit in November
2009.
For the first two months
of the current budget year,
which began Oct. 1, the
deficit totals $290.8 bil-
lion. That's 2 percent less
than for the same period a
year ago. And economists
had been estimating that
the full-year deficit would
decline after two years of
record highs.
But analysts say the
tax deal President Barack
Obama reached with
Republicans this week
will give the 2011 budget
year the largest deficit in
history $1.5 trillion,
according to economists at
JPMorgan Chase. It would
mark the third straight
year of trillion-dollar-plus
deficits.
Under the tax-cut plan,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Budget Director Jacob Lew (second from right) gestures during a meeting of the Deficit Commission in the Roosevelt
Room of the White House in Washington Thursday. Also attending the meeting are (from left) Commission member Alice
Rivlin, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of III.


JPMorgan economist
Michael Feroli said he
expects a $1.5 trillion defi-
cit this year to be followed
by a $1.2 trillion gap in
2012.
While many economists
expected the Bush-era tax
cuts would be extended
and reflected that in their
deficit forecasts for coming
years, they had not factored
in other parts of the tax-cut
package including a 2 per-
centage-point reduction in


the Social Security payroll
tax for next year, taking the
tax for individuals from 6.2
percent to 4.2 percent, at a
cost to the government of
$112 billion over the next
year.
Before the tax cut agree-
ment, many private econo-
mists were forecasting that
the deficits would start to
slowing fall in coming years.
The major Wall Street firms
who serve as primary deal-
ers for the government's


debt auctions projected last
month that the 2011 deficit
will dip to $1.21 trillion and
decline further to $1.02 tril-
lion in 2012.,
The 2009 deficit is the
current all-time high, at
$1.42 trillion. The second-
highest deficit ever is the
$1.29 trillion deficit for the
2010 budget year, which
ended Sept. 30.
Economists do expect
the tax cut package, which
the Senate is expected to


begin voting on Monday, to
boost economic growth.
Nariman Behravesh,
chief economist at IHS
Global Insight, said
Friday, he believed the
tax cut package would
boost overall economic
growth, as measured by
the gross domestic prod-
uct, to 3 percent in 2011,
up from the firm's fore-
cast before the tax deal of
2.4 percent GDP growth
in 2011.


FARM: Business grows despite faltering economic climate
Continued From Page 1A


Fraser Firs and Douglas Firs,
normally peaks in tree sales the
first full week of December.
Both Flynt and Jones agreed
that tradition is the reason
people seek a live tree for the
holidays.
"It's been a long-standing tradi-
tion for their kids and when they
were kids and when their grand-


parents were kids," Flynt said.
"It's one of those things people
are going to do regardless."
"It's kind of a family tradi-
tion of coming out and select-
ing their Christmas tree and
cutting it," Jones said. He also
noted customers want to pur-
chase live trees to help protect
the environment.


Jones said he most enjoys
meeting new people as he sells
his Christmas trees.
"It's really a joy to visit with
the people and so many of the
people are interested in keep-
ing Christ in Christmas," he
said. "That's our philosophy
here."
For Flynt, selling Christmas


trees is a pleasant experience.
"It's the most fun time of
the year, are you kidding me?"
Flynt said:
"People are always in great
moods and good spirits," he
said. "The same goes for the
employees and customers alike,
so it's always a really fun and
exciting time."


The Motley Fool'

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


r-


I skte ol Ilg


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











Stocks edge higher on positive economic signs


By MATTHEW CRAFT
and DAVID K. RANDALL
Associated Press
NEW YORK An encourag-
ing trade report and signs that a
tax cut package would pass the
Senate sent stocks edging higher
Friday.
The government reported
Friday morning that the U.S.
trade deficit fell to its lowest
level in nine months in October.
Growing demand for American
goods overseas pushed exports
to their highest level in more


than two years. The trade deficit
narrowed to $38.7 billion, 13.2
percent below September's defi-
cit of $44.6 billion.
The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose 40.26, or 0.4 percent, to
11,410.32.
General Electric Co. led the 30
stocks that make up the index
with a 3.4 percent jump to $17.72.
GE announced Friday that it
planned to raise its dividend by
17 percent.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 7.40, or 0.6 percent, to
1,240.40. All 10 company groups


that make up the index rose.
It was the third straight day
that the S&P index closed at
a new high for the year. It has
gained 11.2 percent this year.
The Nasdaq composite index
rose 20.87, or 0.8 percent, to
2,637.54.
Prospects were improving that
the Senate would approve legisla-
tion aimed at avoiding sweeping
tax increases Jan. 1. Negotiators
added a few sweeteners to pro-
mote ethanol and other forms
of alternative energy. A test vote
was set for Monday.


House Democrats have balked
at the proposal to extend tax cuts,
voting in a closed-door meeting
Thursday not to allow the pack-
age to reach the floor for a vote
without changes to scale back tax
cuts for the rich.
Tom di Galoma, head of fixed
income trading at Guggenheim
Partners in New York, said trad-
ers see passage of the deal as
nearly inevitable. 'To stimulate
the economy, it really has to be
done," he said. "The last thing
you want to do is raise taxes in
the middle of a recession."


On the off chance it failed, di
Galoma said, stocks would prob-
ably lose the gains made over
the past two weeks. Treasurys
would jump, causing their yields
to plummet.
The Treasury Department said
Friday afternoon that the federal
government's budget shortfall
hit $150.4 billion in November.
Treasury prices dropped after
the report was released, pushing
yields higher. The yield for the
10-year note rose to 3.33 per-
cent, up froril 3.21 percent late
Thursday.


Nebraska Supreme

Court revives two

investor lawsuits


By JOSH FUNK
AP Business Writer
OMAHA, Neb. -The
Nebraska Supreme Court
has revived parts of two
lawsuits dozens of investors
filed against a stockbroker's
former employer after los-
ing millions on risky invest-
ments.
The high court decided
a lower court should exam-
ine whether Kirkpatrick
Pettis fraudulently misled
investors when it said
that Rebecca Engle was
laid off, not fired, in 2000.
Kirkpatrick Pettis was
owned by Mutual of Omaha
then, so Mutual is a defen-
dant
The investors say Engle
went on to other positions,
where she improperly sold
them risky investments
when they wanted conserva-
tive ones. She has agreed
to plead guilty to securities
fraud, but her criminal case
is on hold while one of her
former associates is pros-
ecuted.
The investors' lawyer, J.L
Spray, of Lincoln, said the
ruling should allow the case


to go to trial. "We're very
pleased," Spray said.
Mutual of Omaha issued
a statement Friday empha-
sizing that all of the alleged
misdeeds in the case took
place years after Engle left
Kirkpatrick Pettis. The com-
pany said it would continue
fighting the lawsuits.
"Although the Supreme
Court disagreed with the
trial court's initial decision
to dismiss all of the claims,,
there is no merit in any
of the claims and we are
confident that they all will
ultimately be dismissed,"
Mutual said in its statement
Kirkpatrick Pettis' cur-
rent operations, which
Mutual sold in 2005, are not
involved in the case. Those
brokerage operations were
sold to DA Davidson and
Co. of Great Falls, Mont,
and Smith Hayes Financial
Services of Lincoln.
Investors working with
Engle in Nebraska City
lost more than $20 mil-
lion, mostly on securities
in American Capital Corp.
and Royal Palm, which
were described in glowing
terms as can't-miss deals.


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4C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


.~.5,
.
I* ~


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


A NYSE
7,823.30 +71.72


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TenetHIth 6.65 +2.36 +55.0
Bklreind 2.81 +.97 +52.7
McClatchy 4.48 +1.13 +33.7
GerovaF rs 26.78 +6.52 +32.2
SunriseSen 5.37 +1.21 +29.1
KomFer 22.44 +4.68 +26.4
Arbitron 38.47 +7.96 +26.1
DexOnen 8.41 +1.71 +25.5
BeckCoult 72.08+13.60 +23.3
MediaGen 5.55 +.99 +21.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GtAPc39 6.12-10.64 -63.5
Talbots 8.61 -3.07 -26.3
Bitauto n 9.04 -2.86 -24.0
ChinaEd 2.71 -.74 -21.4
SWS Grp 4.27 -.98 -18.7
CAI Int 17.33 -3.84 -18.1
Raythn wt 8.36 -1.80 -17.7
ChinaSoAir 30.29 -5.69 -15.8
CSVS2xVxS66.35-12.43 -15.8
ChinaEAs 25.34 -4.54 -15.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Ciigrp 62636804 4.77 +.32
BkofAm 11160020 12.80 +.94
S&P500ETF6124133124.48+1.59
SPDR Fncl3742876 15.76 +.57
GenElec 3658244 17.72 +.94
FordM 3089913 16.73 -.07
SprntNex 2800237 4.22 +.30
iShEMkts 2551313 46.59 -.55
iShSilver 2445786 27.98 -.62
Pfizer 2323992 17.02 +.30

Diary
Advanced 1,670
Declined 1,481
New Highs 568
New Lows 87
Total issues 3,198
Unchanged 47
Volume 25,066,576,168


A Amex A Nasdaq
2,118.20 +13.07 '2,637.54 +46.08


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
ParaG&S 2.59 +.79 +43.9 ChiCera un 24.00 +16.00 +200.0
NDynMn g 13.41 +3.38 +33.7 ZionO&G wt 4.75 +2.15 +82.7
Emergent 7.68 +1.59 +26.1 Orexigen 8.41 +3.60 +74.8
ChinaShen 3.78 +.70 +22.7 Verigy 13.25 +4.11 +45.0
CagleA 10.08 +1.83 +22.2 EnteroM rs 2.48 +.70 +39.3
KodiakOg 6.24 +1.05 +20.2 Vivus 9.39 +2.52 +36.7
MinesMgt 3.43 +.55 +19.1 Cytokinet 2.93 +.75 +34.4
UQMTech 2.37 +.38 +19.1 Synergetc 4.67 +1.18 +33.8
DGSE 4.28 +.58 +15.7 SterdBcwt 2.21 +.55 +33.1
CaracoP 5.24 +.70 +15.4 SuperMda n 9.03 +2.24 +33.0

Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
PudaCoal 12.25 -3.16 -20.5 UniPixel rs 5.25 -2.25 -30.0
Gastargrs 4.33 -.96 -18.1 OptiBkH rs 3.21 -1.35 -29.6
Gainsco 8.50 -1.25 -12.8 Uroplasty 3.84 -1.42 -27.0
NewConcEn 4.07 -.56 -12.1 EntreM rs 5.44 -1.55 -22.2
VistaGold 2.70 -.35 -11.5 Ku6Media 6.38 -1.62 -20.3
UraniumEn 5.94 -.76 -11.3 Abiomed 9.46 -2.26 -19.3
LucasEngy 2.43 -.27 -10.0 Subaye 6.49 -1.55 -19.3
BovieMed 3.01 -.33 -9.9 GeronCp 4.87 -1.14 -19.0
LongweiPI 2.56 -.28 -9.9 CDCCprs 3.44 -.77 -18.3
AdcareHwt 2.00 -.20 -9.1 Aastromrs 2.37 -.51 -17.7

Most Active ($1 or more) Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg
KodiakO g 470469 6.24+1.05 Cisco 3595514 19.70 +.63
NovaGIldg 345217 15.10 +.18 SiriusXM 3213936 1.40 +.03
NAPallg 222389 6.19 -.15 Intel 2773272 21.91 +.22
GoldStrg 188924 4.46 -.09 PwShsQQQ235198054.50 +.63
NwGoldg 179941 9.23 -.88 Microsoft 2167397 27.34 +.32
DenianMg 169110 3.34 +.01 MicronT 1473065 8.25 +.33
NthgtMg 167086 3.12 +.04 DryShips 1404604 6.33 +.45
VantageDi 158383 1.94 +.23 Oracle 1133569 29.95 +1.14
EndvSilvg 143394 7.11 +24 HuntBnk 871231 6.64 +.43
PudaCoal 142597 12.25-3.16 Nvidia 862108 14.95 +.16

Diary Diary
Advanced 229 Advanced 1,874
Declined 303 Declined 930
New Highs 54 New Highs 534
New Lows 35 New Lows 75
Total issues 552 Total issues 2,872
Unchanged 20 Unchanged 68
Volume 736,425,670 Volume 8,908,960,833


I[ l y


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chgg hg %Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.68 28.89 +.40 +1.4 +3.1
AutoZone NY ... 264.74 -.46 -0.2 +67.5
BkofAm NY .04 12.80 +.94 +7.9 -15.0
Bklrelnd NY 1.04 2.81 +.97 +52.7 -52.9
BobEvans Nasd .80 34.28 +1.36 +4.1 +18.4
CNBFnPANasd .66 14.70 +.05 +0.3 -8.1
CSX NY 1.04 64.10 -.31 -0.5 +32.2
Chevron NY 2.88 87.03 +2.14 +2.5 +13.0
Cisco Nasd ... 19.70 +.63 +3.3 -17.7
Citigrp NY 4.77 +.32 +7.2 +44.1
CocaCI NY 1.76 64.65 +.15 +0.2 +13.4
Delhaize NY 2.02 70.31 -.85 -1.2 -8.4
DirFnBear NY ... 9.90 -1.00 -9.2 -49.0
DrxFBull s NY ... 26.81 +2.37 +9.7 +8.5
DryShips Nasd ... 6.33 +.45 +7.7 48.8
FamilyDir NY .62 49.76 -1.31 -2.6 +78.8
FordM NY 16.73 -.07 -0.4 +67.3
GenElec NY .56 17.72 +.94 +5.6 +17.1
HomeDp NY .95 34.40 +.92 +2.7 +18.9
iShJapn NY .16 10.58 -.06 -0.6 +8.6
iShSilver NY ... 27.98 -.62 -2.2 +69.2
iShEMkts NY .59 46.59 -.55 -1.2 +12.3
iShR2K NY ..79 77.75 +2.08 +2.7 +24.5
Intel Nasd .72 21.91 +.22 +1.0 +7.4
JPMorgCh NY .20 41.43 +1.82 +4.6 -.5
LVSands NY 45.35 -3.89 -7.9+203.5
Lowes NY .44 25.22 +.36 +1.4 +7.8
MGMRstsNY ... 13.25 -.25 -1.9 +45.3


Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.52
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .33
PrUShS&PNY
QwestCm NY .32
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.31
SearsHldgs Nasd ..
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .16
TenetHith NY
TimeWam NY .85
US NGsFd NY
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20


77.56 -2.20 -2.8 +24.2
8.25 +.33 +4.2 -21.9
27.34 +.32 +1.2 -10.3
8.64 +.40 +4.9 +11.3
9.61 +.45 +4.9 -22.2
52.00 +.90 +1.8 -1.6
-7.90 +.32 +4.2 -24.4
93.04 +1.68 +1.8 +14.4
33.96 +.18 +0.5 +27.6
64.90 -.27 -0.4 +6.7
17.02 +.30 +1.8 -6.4
139.87 -4.29 -3.0 +28.9
54.50 +.63 +1.2 +19.1
24.55 -.65 -2.6 -30.0
7.33 +.21 +2.9 +74.1
6.46 +.38 +6,.3 +22.1
47.67 +2.47 +5.5 +15.8
124.48 +1.59 +1.3 +11.7
68.18 +.12 +0.2 -18.3
1.46 +.03 +2.1+133.2
37.82 -.30 -0.8 +13.5
4.22 +.30 +7.7 +15.3
15.76 +.57 +3.8 +9.4
6.65 +2.36 +55.0 +23.4
31.79 +1.15 +3.8 +9.1
6.09 +.15 +2.5 -39.6
54.28 -.03 -0.1 +1.6
30.27 +1.22 +4.2 +12.2


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs =.Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
ol at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vi = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When Issued. wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA= not available, p = previous day's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Acthves must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sates figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.12 0.14
6-month 0.17 0.19
5-year 1.95 1.61
10-year 3.29 3.01
A 4l 1:1


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1. 148 1.0173


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials -19.90 -3.03 13.32 -2.42 40.26
Close: 11,410.32 ., <)
1-week change: 28.23 (0.2%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
11,500 ...... ......

11,000








9,500 J J A S 0 N D



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Reurn/Rank Pct MinInt
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


II


I I


Britain 1.5802 1.5750


Canada 1.0089 1.0109
Euro .7558 -.7554
Japan 83.90 83.70
Mexico 12.4550 12.4900
Switzerlnd .9813 .9839
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


PIMCOTotRetls Cl
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
Vanguard TotStldx LB
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Amedcan Funds CpWldGrIA m WS
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
American Funds lnvCoAmA m LB
Vanguard 500Adml LB
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
Dodge& Cox InUtStk FV
Vanguard 5001nv LB
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Vanguard TollntI d FB
Arr,.,:.in Fund. WAMutlniv m LV
FI MCi TsH. 1,T, t, Cl
Fr, T TI :- r .lr': A m CA
Amrr..e.r, Fur,.3 t;e'vPerl'pA m WS
',T,lln :.,r, Furit Frilrn A ir, LB
American Funds BaA m MA
Vanguard InstPlus LB
PIMCO TotRetA m Cl
Fidelity GrowCo LG
American Funds BondA m Cl
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl


143,530 10.76 -7.5
63,045 30.25 +1.2
61,363 31.26 +2.5
58,903 67.92 +1.6
56,569 49.85 -1.3
52,156 35.47 -1.2
50,822 113.91 +2.0
50,190 16.59 0.0
46,301 27.92 +1.2
41,479 114.67 +2.0
41,001 31.27 +2.5
40,263 106.51 +2.5
40,184 35.53 -0.8
38,029 114.64 +2.0
37,624 41.32 -1.4
37,609 15.60 -2.0
36,877 27.01 +1.8
34,830 10.76 -7.6
32,801 2.15 +0.1
31,604 28.49 +0.4
S30,977 36.30 +1.6
30,311 17.77 +0.5
29,982 113.92 +2.0
28,256 10.76 -7.6
27,779 83.34 +4.6
26,808 12.16 -2.1
26,806 10.60 -2.0


+2.0/E
+12.8/E
+17.5/A
+19.8/B
+7.2/D
+7.3/E
+14.8/B
+11.4/C
+10.4/E
+14.8/B
+17.6/A
+13.2/C
+12.9/A
+14.7/B
+8.7/C
+9.2/C
+12.1/C
+1.8/E
+13.6/A
+12.5/C
+14.0/C
+11.8/C
+14.8/B
+1.6/E
+25.1/A
+6.2/C
+4.8/0


+7.0/A
+2.2/C
+2.5/B
+4.7/A
+4.3/C
+4.8/B
+1.9/B
+4.4/B
+2.2/B
+1.8/C
+2.6/B
-0.1/D
+5.0/A
+1.8/C
+5.8/A
+4.3/B
+1.6/B
+6.7/A
+5.7/A
+6.0/A
+4.1/A
+3.6/C
+1.9/B
+6.5/A
+5.8/A
+3.5/E
+5.9/B


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
3.75 1,000
NL 2,500
3.75 250
NL 10,000


CA .Consenrvative AlocationCl -Intenediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -forei nLargeGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -Wodd Alkoation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Lare Growth, LV -Larae Value, MA .Moderate Allocation, MB -MdCap Blend, MV -
Mk-Cap Value, S -Specy-heat, WS -Wod Stock, Total Retum: Chn n AV with dividends reinvested. Rank How fund peormnned vs.
others with same obe e: A isuin top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min lnr InvtMinimuM $ needed to invest in und. Source: Morningstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68 .
AbtLab 1.76
Accenture .90
AMD
Aeropostl s ...
Aetna .04
Agilent
Airgas 1.00
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Adldrish
Allstate .80
Altria 1.52
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp' ...
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .88
Annaly 2.60 1
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
ATMOS 1.36
BB&TCp .60
BakrHu .60
Baldor .68
BcBilVArg .57
BcoBrades .82
BcoSantand .80
BcoSBrasil .33
BkofAm .04
BkIrelnd 1.04
BkNYMel .36
BariPVixrs...
BarrickG .48
BerkH Bs ..
BestBuy .60
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
Borders
BostonSci ..
BoydGm ...
BrMySq 1.28
CBS B .20
CIGNA .04
CMS Eng .84
CVS Care .35
CablvsnNY .50
Cameron
CampSp 1.16
CapOne .20
CardnolHth .78
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78
CntryUnk 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp
CocaCI 1.76
Comerica .40
ComSop ...
CmtyHIl ...
Cohpellent ...
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80


15 -.01 -14.4
12 +1.70 +21.3
41 +.48 -31.7
... -.38 +3.1
8 +.40 +3.1
12 +.25 -11.8
17 +1.44 +10.0
5 +.42 -16.6
10 +1.29 +7.4
8 -.01 -3.4
20 +1.06 +24.0
22 -2.86 +33.2
23 ... +42.9
... +.10 '-8.1
+.02 -11.6
... +.29 -63.8
15 +.63 +3.0
13 +1.04 +26.6
19 +.26 -9.1
13 -135 +2.4
15 +1.38. +14.2
... +5.19 +63.3
39 +.03 +10.6
16 +.11 +19.5
13 -.09 +4.4
28 +1.23 -21.0.
42 -.15 +44.3
11 +.68 -.8
14 -.62 2"-58
24 +2.44 +7.0
36 -1.14 +33.2
43 +.12+125.6
... -.12 -40.8
... -.71 +7.2
... -.21 -33.0
... +.11 -3.7
19 +.94 -15.0
... +.97 -52.9
15 +.95 +3.5
... -3.17 -72.0
19 -.70 +35.3
16 -.22 +22.8
13 -1.03 +5.9
9 -.12 -42.4
14 -2.38 +18.5
+.12 +1.7
.+.28 -21.0
51 +.01 +16.8
13 +.13 +3.1
29 +.57 +28.5
9 -.33 +6.7
16 +.14 +19.8
14 +1.23 +4.5
32 +2.12 +62.9
24 -2.01 +18.1
15 +.42 +2.0
8 +3.45 +10.1
14 -.09 +15.2
30 +.56 +57.8
... +.07 -13.9
14 -.06 +9.2
12 +1.20 +23.3
15 +.76 -11.4
10 +2.14 +13.0
20 -.14 -12.2
6 +.06 +7.2
... +.32 +44.1
20 +.15 +13.4
... +1.39 +38.6
98 -.35 +18.1
12 +3.73 +.8
... +1.20 +26.6
14 +.25 -3.1
10 +.66 +26.5
22 -1.43 -11.7
14 -.14 +7.6
1 -.19 -19.3
9 +.09 -2.5
... +.59 -9.1


Lat Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


CypSharp 2.40 1
DRHorton .15
DTE 2.24
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.40
DelMnte .36
DeltaAir ...
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ..
DrxFBull s ..
DirxSCBull 4.77
DirxLCBear ...
Discover .08
Disney .40
DollarGen ...
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
DukeRIty .68
Dynegy rs ...
ECDang n ..
EMC Cp
Ecolab .70
Edisonlnt 1.28
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGid g .05
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCana g .80
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FstBcpPR ...
FstHorizon .72
FirstEngy 2.20
RagstB rs ...
FordM
FMCG 2.00
FrontierCm .75
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenGrPrn ...
GenMills s 1.12
GenMotn ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .36
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac ..
GpTelevisa .52
HCP Inc 1.86
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HitMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
Honwillntl 1.33
HostHotls .04
Huntsmn .40
iShGolds ...
iShBraz 2.58
iShGer .30
iSh HK .48
iShJapn .16
iSTaiwn .21
iSh UK .44
iShSilver
iShChina25 .68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20 T 3.86
IS Eafe 1.38
iShR2K .79
iShREst 1.88


5 -.50 -5.3
14 +.03 +2.5
13 +.53 +5.8
9 +1.35 -52.0
19 +3.83 +51.9
15 +.10 +66.1
27 -.61 +14.4
...-1.42 -67.1
-1.00 -49.0
... +2.37 +8.5
... +5.48 +64.6
... -.34 -46.0
16 +.43 +31.0
18 -.53 +13.7
18 -2.36 +38.5
14 -.80 +6.9
23 +.71 +23.3
12 -.26 +1.9
-.39 -9.4
+.27 -38.8
+9.6
28 +.12 +27.4
22 +.40 +7.6
10 +.11 +9.8
10 -.41 +36.8
... +.58 -11.8
47 -.85 +26.5
22 +.80 +35.3
15 +.18 -11.3
11 -.01 -18.1
13 +.99 +5.9
... +.09 -84.7
+.43 -17.6
13 +.02 -23.3
... +.08. -76.5
8 -.07 +67.3
14 +3.92 +40.6
16 +.10 +20.0


12.79
11.14
46.11
8.66
82.14
18.84
13.02
16.21
9.90
26.81
70.37
9.24
19.27
36.66
31.07
41.62
34.07
17.53
11.02
,5.54
32.79
22.25
47.99
38.18
13.45
5.75
17.93
57.64
28.73
40.04
72.18
.35
10.53
35.65
1.41
16.73
112.87
9.37


9 +.91 +1.4 22.24
6 +1.08 +5.7 15.69
12 +.04 +3.0 21.48
... -.80 +8.1 15.14
15 +.09 +.8 35.70
... -.74 -1.1 33.81
... -.04 -37.4 3.58
20 +.50 +15.0 13.05
... +.77 -20.0 13.54
4 -.33 +35.7 17.79
... -.97 +17.1 46.07
10 +6.16 -.2 168.47
41 +1.42 -19.5 11.35
..-2.28 -92.1 .93
+.07 +17.8 24.46
50 -1.22 +6;0 32.36
25 -.93 +33.7 40.22
9 +1.80 +10.7 25.74
15 +.51 +31.1 9.53
... +.18 +72.8 10.68
41 +.71 +16.8 13.92
10 +.22 +23.2 74.52
11 -.41 -17.3 42.62
18 +.92 +18.9 34.40
20 +.53 +32.6 51.98
... +.30 +47.3 17.19
21 +.10 +40.6 15.87
... -.26 +26.3 13.56
-2.52 +1.4 75.63
-.18 +7.2 24.06
.. -.18 +22.7 19.21
... -.06 +8.6 10.58
... +.20 +15.5 14,98
.. +31 +7.3 17.39
.. -.62 +69.2 27.98
... -.99 +2.8 43.43
.. -.55 +12.3 46.59
...-1.74 +3.6 93.15
... +.22 +4.3 57.63
... +2.08 +24.5 77.75
... -.65 +19,1 54.67


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ITWN 1.36 2.7 16 +.65 +6.4 51.06
IngerRd .28 .6 27 +1.57 +24.3 44.41
IBM 2.60 1.8 13 -.56 +10.6 144.82
Intl Coal ... ... 85 +.46+119.2 8.46
IntlGame .24 1.4 22 +.54 -10.1 16.87
IntPap .50 1.9 54 +.61 +.3 26.85
Interpublic ...... '35 +.29 +50.5 11.11
Invesco .44 1.9 29 +.24 -1.1 23.23
ItauUnibH .60 2.6 ... -.93 ,+.1 22.85
IvanhMg ... ... ... -3.03 +63.9 23.94
JPMorgCh .20 .5 12 +1.82 -.5 41.43
Jabil .28 1.7 21 +.55 -3.8 16.71
JanusCap .04 .3 17 +.78 -8.0 12.38
JohnJn 2.16 3.5 13 -.65 -3.9 61.91
JohnsnCtl .64 1.7 17 -1.07 +39.4 37.96
JnprNtwk ... ... 48 +1.56 +34.5 35.88
KKR Fn .56 6.2 5 -.27 +56.2 9.06
Kellogg 1.62 3.3 15 +.28 -6.4 '49.78
Keycorp .04 .5 ... +.18 +51.0 8.38
Kimco .72 4.2 59 -.13 +26.8 17.15
Kinross g .10 .5 28 -.31 +.2 18.44
Kohls ... ... 15 -1.37 -.5 53.64
Kraft 1.16 3.8 12 +.43 +13.1 30.75
LDK Solar ... ... 10 -.32 +47.9 10.37
LSI Corp ... ... 33 +.02' -.3 5.99
LVSands ....... -3.89 +203.5 45.35
LennarA .16 .9 33 +.43 +38.5 17.69
UllyEli 1.96 5.6 8 +.84 -2.0 34.98
Limited .60 1.9 17 -.29 +63.9 31.54
UncNat .20 .7 13 +2.93 +13.1 28.14
LyonBasA ... ... ... +.58 +41.4 31.10
MBIA ... ... ... -.36+151.3 10.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
+14 -11.7


MEMC
MFA Fncl .90 10.9
MAGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20 .8
Manitowoc .08 .6
Manpwl .74 1.2
Manulife .52 ...
MaralhonO 1.00 2.8
MktVGold .11 ...
MktVRus .08 .2
MktVJrGId ... ...
Marshlls .04 .7
Masco .30 2.2
MasseyEn .24 .5
McGrwH .94 2.6
Mechel
Medtmic .90 2.5
Merck 1.52 4.2
MetLife .74 1.7
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
MobileTel s ... I ...
Monsanto 1.12 1.8
MonstrWw...
MorgStan .20 .7
Mosaic .20 .3
Motorola
NCRCorp ...
NRG Egy
Nabors
NBkGreece .29


... +.14 -11.7
9 +.08 +12.7
... +.56 +70.8
... -.25 +45.3
17 +.43 +52.1
... +1.01 +29.8
41 +3.65 +15.8
... +1.74 -9.0
12 +.04 +12.6
...-1.05 +33.4
+.14 +18.1
-1.40 +61.5
... +30 +8.3
... +1.54 -2.0
... +1.56 +23.7
13 +.29 +7.4
15 -.10 +43.5
11 +1.73 -18.3
18 +.69 -1.5
12 +3.83 +24.4
21 +.24 +65.1
... +.13 +1.6
34 -1.35" +2.0
27 -1.87 -25.4
... +.79 +37.9
11 +1.31 -9.0
30 -.51 +14.8
41 +.40 +11.3
11 +.55 +34.9
9 -.45 -20.8
99 -.71 +4.5
+.07 -58.8


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NalGrid 7.04 6.4 .. -.44 -10.1 43.91
NOilVarco .44 .7 16 -.34 +42.1 62.66
NatSemi .40 2.9 11 -.96 -10.1. 13.81
NY Times ... ... 11 +.45 -22.2 9.61
NewellRub .20 1.1 13 -.11 +17.1 17.58
NewmtM .60 1.0 15 -.79 +29.8 61.42
NextEraEn 2.00 3.8' 13 +.90 -1.6 52.00
NiSource .92 5.3 14 +.32 +12.4 17.28
NobleCorp .90 2.6 8 +1.08 -14.8 34.67
NokiaCp .56 5.7.. -.19 -23.7 9.81
NortflkSo 1.44 2.3 16 -.19 +19.6 62.69
Nucor 1.45 3.5 65 +1.97 -10.2 41.88
OcciPet 1.52 1.6 17 +1.68 +14.4 93.04
OfficeDpt ......... -.02 -24.5 4.87
OlISvHT 2.54 1.0 -1.41 +14.6 136.18
PG&ECp 1.82 3.9 14 -1.10 +5.3 47.03
PMI Grp ... ... .. +.19 +42.5 3.59
PNC .40 .7 10 +3.41 +14.9 60.67
PPL Corp 1.40 5.5 14 -.31 -21.9 25.25
PatriotCoal ... ... ... -.20 +11.9 17.30
PeabdyE .34 .5 25 -1.30 +37.1 61.98
Penney .80 2.4 25 +.18 +27.6 33.96
PepsiCo 1.92 3.0 16 -.27 +6.7 64.90
Petrohawk ... 23 -.59 -20.7 19.02
PetrbrsA 1.12 3.7... -.55 -27.8 30.59
Petrobras 1.12 3.3 -.79 -29.5 33.60
Pfizer .72 4.2' 9 +.30 -6.4 17.02
PhilipMor 2.56 4.3 16 +.88 +22.4 59.00
PS USDBull...- ... .. .. +.24 4+.2 23.12
PrinFncl .55 1.7 17 +1.77 +30.8 31.45
PrUShS&P ... ... ..-.65 -30.0 24.55
ProUtQQQ ... ... .+1.85 +36.6 81.23
PrUShQQQ... ...... -.26 -38.6 11.69
ProUltSP .43 .9 ... +1.22 +21.9 46.60
ProUShL20 ... ...... +1.25 -23.3 38.28
ProUFin rs .09 ...... +4.05 +14.4 64.39
ProUSR2K ... ...... -.71 -48.9 12.88
ProUSSP500... ...... -.83 -43.9 20.37
ProUltCrude... ... ... -.39 -8.4 11.61
ProUSSIv rs... ... ... +.31 -75.9 11.55
ProgsvCp 1.16 .8 13 +.12 +16.6 20.97
ProLogis .45 3.3 ... +07 +.9 13.81
Prudentl 1.15 2.0 9 +3.19 +14.2 56.83
PSEG 1.37 4.4 10 -.27 -6.4 31.12
PulteGrp ... ... ... +.31 -29.8 7.02
Questars .56 3.2 -.19 +31.6 17.63
Quiksilvr ... ... 73 +.45+151.5 5.08
QwestCm .32 .4.4 52 +.21 +74.1 7.33
RadianGrp .01 .1 .. +.45 +8.9 7.96
RangeRs .16 .4.. -3.28 -15.0 42.36
Raytheon 1.50 3.3 8 -1.85 -11.5 45.58
SRegionsFn .04 .6 .. +.38 +22.1 6.46
RepubSvc .80 2.7 24 +1.14 +5.7 29.93
RiteAid ... ... ... -.03 -39.7 .91
RdxSPEW .62 1.3 ... +.60 +18.1 46.68
SAIC ... ... 10 -.75 -20.1 15.13
SLMCp ... ... 7 +.18 +9.1 12.30
SpdrOJIA 2.57 2.2 ... +35 +9.8 114.29
SpdrGold ... ... ...-2.66 +26.2 135.41
S&P500ETF2.31 1.9 .. +1.59 +117 124.48
SpdrHome .12 .7 +.35 +13.5 17.15
'SpdrKbwBk .11 .4 +1.42 +19.6 25.31
SpdrLehHY4.13 10.3 ... -.09 +2.9 39.95
SpdrKbwRB.30 1.2 .. +1.32 +13.7 25.29
SpdrRetl .57 1.2 .. +.06 +35.2 48.14
SpdrMetM .35 .5 ... +.20 +27.5 .65.79
Safeway .48 2.2 ... -.35 +.8 21.45
Salesforce ... ... ... +5.80 +101.5 148.61
SandRdge ... ... 6 +.72 -32.7 6.35
SaraLee .46 2.9 21 +.76 +31.4 16.00
Schlmbrg .84 1.0 32 -1.20 +25.3 81.54
Schwab .24 1.4 34 +.59 -11.2 16.72
SemiHTr .55 1.7 ... +.21 +17.7 32.86
SenHous 1.48 7.0 24 -1.08 -3.2 21.18
SiderNac s .58 3.5 ... +.08 +3.0 16.45
SilvWhtng ... ... 60 -.80+156.4 38.51
SilvrcpM g .08 ... -.73 +94.8 12.86
SmithfF ... ... 13 +2.18 +33.5 20.28
SouthnCo 1.82 4.8 15 -.30 +13.5 37.82


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
SwstAirl .02 .2 23 -.29 +12.9 12.90
SwstnEngy ... 20 -2.26 -26.0 35.65
SprintNex ... ...... +.30 +15.3 4.22
SP Matls 1.05 2.8 .. +.24 +12.9 37.25
SP HthC .58 1.9 ... +.20 +.7 31.29
SP CnSt .77 2.6 ... +.33 +10.1 29.14
SP Consum .43 1.1 ... +.14 +26.2 37.56
SPEngy 1.00 1.5 ... +.08 +15.6 65.90
SPDRFncl .16 1.0 ... +.57 +9.4 15.76
SP Inds .60 1.7 ... +.36 +23.8 34.40
SPTech .31 1.2 ... +.38 +9.8 25.19
SP Util 1.27 4.1 ... -.16 +.3 31.12
StateStr .04 .1 +.22 +5.5 45.93
StillwtrM ... ... 72 -1.73 +111.7 20.07
Suncorhgs .40 ..... -.19 +1.7 35.90
Suntech ... ......-.01 -50.3 8.27
SunTrst .04 .1 .. +1.84 +35.9 27.58
Supvalu .35 4.0 ... +.30 -31.5 8.70
Synovus .04 1.7 ... +.13 +16.6 2.39
TJX .60 1.3 13 -.22 +23.3 45.07
TaiwSemi .47' 3.9 ... +.11 +5.6 12.08
Talbots ... ... 19 -3.07 -3.4 8.61
Target 1.00 1.7 16 -.17 +21.9 58.95
TataMotors .32 1.1 ... -3.25 +68.4 28.40
TeckRes g .60 ...... +2.59 +63.9 57.32
TenetHIth ... ... 3 +2.36 +23.4 6.65
-Teradyn ... ... 9 +1.33 +31.0 14.06
Tesoro ... ... 22 +.03 +28.6 17.42
Texlnst .52 1.6 14 -.02 +25,9 32.80
Textron .08 .3 ... -.28 +24.4 23.40
3MCo 2.10 2.5 15 -2.62 +2.0 84.32
TimeWam .85 2.7 14 +1.15 +9.1 31.79
Total SA 3.13 6.0 ... +.85 -18.5 52.19
Transocn ... ... 8 +1.72 -12.8 72.23
Travelers 1.44 2.6 8 +.28 +9.9 54.78
TrinaSols ... ... 8 +.57 -10.0 24.28
Tycolntl .85 2.1 18 -.01 +15.4 41.17
Tyson .16 .9 9 +.84 +44.6 17.74
UBS AG ... ... ... +.46 +7.0 16.59
USAirwy ... ... 7 -.11 +125.8 10.93
UnionPac 1.52 1.6 18 -1.91 +45.0 92.64
UtdContl ... ... ...-1.63 +102A2 26.10
UtdMicro .08 2.6 -.15 -19.3 3.13
UPS B 1.88 2.6 23 +1.09 +27.1 72.89
US Bancrp .20 .8 17 +1.69 +17.5 26.45
US NGsFd ... .....+15 -39.6 6.09
US OilFd ... ...... -.65 -4.1 37.66
USSteel .20 .4 .. +2.56 -2.7 53.61
UtdhlthGp .50 1.4 9 -1.15 +20.3 36.67
ValeSA .76 2.2 -.41 +16.8 33.91
Vale SA pf .76 2.5 -.48 +20.4 29.88
ValeroE .20 .9 ... +.54 +29.1 21.62
VangEmg .55 1.2 ... -.43 +15.6 47.38
VerizonCml.95 5.7 +1.14 +10.0 34.04
ViacomB .60 1.5 13 -.26 +33.0 39.54
VimpelC n .46 ... -.68 -22.1 14.38
Visa .60 .7 20 +2.85. -8.3 80.20
Vishayint ... ... 12 -.36 +100.3 15.03
Walgm .70 1.9 17 -.43 -.8 36.43
WalterEn .50 -.4 19 +6.72 +55.7 117.24
WsteMInc 1.26 3.5 18 +1.07 +6.1 35.87
Weathflntl ... ... 94 -1.03 +15.5 20.69
WellPoint ... ... 5 +.66 -1.0 57.68
WellsFargo .20 .7 12 +1.22 +12.2 30.27
WendyArby .08 1.6 29 +.03 +4.3 4.89
WstnUnion .28 1.5 14 +.46 -.7 18.71
Weyerh .20 1.1 ... +.06 +12.1 17.76
WmsCos .50 2.1 33 +.39 +13.8 23.98
XLGrp .40 1.9 20 +.56 +15.2 21.11
XcelEngy 1.01 4.3 14 -.45 +10.4 23.42
Xerox .17 1.4 17 +.17 +41.8 12.00
Yamanag .12 1.0 29 -.17 +8.6 12.36
Youkun ... ... ... ... +12.1 37.50
YumBmds 1.00 2.0 22 -.31 +43.7 50.26


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... +1.82 +9.7 37.40
-.51 -3.8 2.37
17 -.06 +10.2 12.24
32 -.43 -21.9 28.71
... +.02 +93.3 1.56
61 -1.63 +102.6 51.33
55 +.27 -9.8 18.25
18 -.54 +64.3 37.18
... +.04 +290.1 5.58
71 -.06 +30.6 175.62
4 -.16 +10.4 29.31
6 +.22+223.0 7.88
11 +.16 -4.7 53.89
... +.67 -2.8 13.79
10 +1.57 -37.4 37.95
21 +3.12 +52.1 320.56
19 +.30 -4.2 13.36
... +.11 -56.9 1.53
54 ... +32.6 5.98
48 +.71 +169.2 12.41
46 +1.12 +53.9 39.11
19 +.16 +8.7 46.53
... -.15 +44.3 26.40
... +.02 +110.0 3.99
93 -1.38 +162.3 107.86
... +5.5 6.96
93 -.15 +98.1 26.84
28 +.29 +46.3 46.05
21 +.09 -29.0 5.42
16 +.03 +7.5 24.14
15 +.20 +40.4 8.41
... +.16 -28.1 .92
29 -3.13 +3.2 57.46
... +3.28 +77.2 19.21
14 +.27 +140.8 16.42
14 +.63 -17.7 19.70
... +.04 -1.4 .68
... +.17 -8.3 6.20


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ColdwtrCrk ...
ColumLabs ...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
CypSemi ...
DeckOuts ...
Dell Inc
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk ...
DryShips ...
eBay
ElectArs ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
EvrgrSIr h ...
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
FifthThird .04
Finisar
Rextm
FosterWhl ...
FresKabirt ...
GT Solar ...
Gentex .44
Genzyme ...
GeronCp ...
GileadSci
GreenMtC s...
HudsCity .60
HumGen ...
Infinera
IntgDv
Intel .72
Intersil .48


... -.48 -37.7
... +.25 +63.0
17 +.60 +27.1
16 +.47 +26.1
26 +.51 +60.3
3 +.04 -67.5
24 +2.86 +20.4
41 +4.17 +27.8
38 +.43 +70.8
24 -.10 +144.1
13 +.20 -3.3
24 -.42 +20.5
9 +.22 -9.5
24 +.45 +8.8
16 +1.08 +30.4
... +.64 -10.9
53 +1.73+282.7
... -.34 +15.6
... -.09 -53.8
17 +.39 +6.6
28 +.56 +26.7
... +1.30 +49.4
27 +1.32+184.0
23 +.39 +7.7
15 +2.34 +13.6
... -.00 -86.7
10 +1.14 +63.7
31 +2.15 +62.7
...-1.09 +42.5
... -1.14 -12.3
11 +.36 -13.1
72 -2.47 +24.5
11 +.32 -9.6
... -1.59 -21.5
... +1.39 +16.1
44 +.06 +9.7
12 +.22 +7.4
... +.66 -1.0


Name Div
Intuit
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
Level3h
ULbGlobA ...
UbtyMIntA ...
UnnEngy 2.64
lululemn g ...
MIPS Tech ...
MannKd
MarvellT ...
Maftel .83
MelcoCrwn ..
Microchp 1.38
MicronT ...
Microsoft .64
Micrvisn
Move Inc
NelApp
Netflix
NGenBiof h ...
NewsCpA .15
Novell
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20
Orexigen
PDLBio 1.00
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PacCapBh ...
PacEthh ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Popular


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
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22 -.15 +23.9 6.75
-.01 -36.5 .97
... ...+1.33 +68.1 36.79
17 +.04 +47.5 15.99
7.1 90 +.29 +32.5 36.95
... 52+15.32+128.2 68.70
... 35 +1.07 +244.9 15.07
... ... +1.17 -14.3 7.51
... 24 -.88 -5.7 19.56
3.3 15 -.55 +27.5 25.48
... ... -.27 +71.7 5.77
3.9 20 -.15 +21.0 35.16
... 4 +.33 -21.9 8.25
2.3 7 +.32 -10.3 27.34
... ... +.17 -45.1 1.74
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Name


Wkly
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AbdAsPac .42
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AmApparel...
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Wkly
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Wkly YTD Wkly
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Minetnd g


Minelnd g ...
NeoStem ...
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NAPallg ...
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NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
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OrienPap n ..
ParaG&S ...
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Rubicon g ...
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Tengsco.
TimberinR ...
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TwoHrbinv 1.48
US Geoth
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YM Biog q ..


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ASML Hid .27 .7
Aastrom rs ..
ActivsBliz .15 1.2
AdobeSy ...
AEtema g ...
AkamaiT ...
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .24 .6
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.1
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Amylin
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .28 2.1
ArenaPhm ...
ArtTech ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 3.1
AvagoTch .07 ...
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu s ... ...
BonaFilm n ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .32 .7
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc .16 .7
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...
Clearwire ...


I liv


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30-vear


2 4.4 4.31


"I











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage


One em per ad $250
4 lines 6 days E satcdd onal
Rate applies to private individuals selling
S ine is a non-reStblunda rate.



One m per ad 10
4 lines 6 days ne ddtitonal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 00 or les
Each Iteam must Include a price.
This Is a non-efundbl rate.



One Item per ad 6
4 lines 6 days 0 onal








Rate applied to pdnate ind duo n lin
Rate applies to private indivduals selling
Personal merchandla totalling $,000 or es.
Each item must include a price.
Thin Is a non-r fundnbln rate.



|On? Item per ad $2370
4 lines 6 days tach addiona
Rate applies to private s dvduas nseng
personal merchandise ottalilng $20500 o0ro less.
Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundabl rate. I





Rate applies to pvate Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S4,000 or less.
Each item must Include a pric
This Inn non1. efundable rate




4 lines 1,6 days Eacin$1.1165
Rate applies to private Individuals wling
pnrnonat marchandbse totalling $6,000 or es.
Each iten msnt Include o prine.
M-.,, nncr9 n-reut-atble rm


4lines 1 50
3 days J 7
Includes 2 Signs S Eladdiltmal oe '165


Limited to service type advertis-
*ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
,East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com




Ad is to Appear. Call by: FaidEmall by:
Tuesday Mn,10:00a.m. Mn, 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday on.,10:00 a.m. Mon, 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed,.00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. lDrt, 00 a.m.
Saturday Fri, 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 am.
Sunday F, 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.liccityrcportcr.eomn


Legal

PUBLIC AUCTION
Will be held by Davis Towing & Re-
covery, Inc, in Columbia County at
1226 NW Main Blvd., Lake City, Fl.
32055
Date December 23, 2010
Time: 9:00 A.M.
2002 Honda M/C
JH2PC350X2M300986
2001 Chevy Malibu
1G1ND52J416254914
2001 Chevy Blazer
IGNCS18W91K240652
1995 Nissan Pathfinder
JN8HD17S3SW068026
2003 Yamaha M7C
JYARJ06E33A009860
1994 Chevy Cavalier
IG1JC1445R7164775
2001 Chevy Cavalier
1G1JC124317237570
2001 Ford Crown Vic
2FAFP74W41X131647
1992 Acura
JH4DA9476NS006549
1993 Ford Explorer
1FMCU24X5PUB27118
1996 Infinity
JNKCP01D3TT542494
1990 Ford Ranger
1FTCR10A9LUB55287
1984 Ford Coachman M/H
1FDKE30L7EHC10055
04542653
December 12, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF File No. 10-
222-CP
ROBERT ALEXANDER REH-
BERG,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ROBERT ALEXANDER REH-
BERG, deceased, whose date of
death was March 21, 2010; File
Number 10-222-CP, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Columbia
County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Post Office Box
2069, Lake City, FL 32056. The
names
and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate,
on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS






Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.

Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BAR-
RED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: December 12, 2010.
Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire FBN:
114278
dba@gendersalvarez.com
Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire -
FBN: 146528
afd@gendersalvarez.com
GENDERS A ALVAREZ A DIECI-
DUE, PA.
2307 West Cleveland Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Phone: (813) 254-4744 Fax: (813)
254-5222
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
HELEN MOULTON
549 SW Brandywine Drive, Apt. 102
Lake City, FL 32025
04542660
December 12, 19, 2010


010 Announcements






S -n Job

100 Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542664
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us mfet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace


Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE



Member Service Manager
Suwannee Valley Electric Coop., Inc. (SVEC) has
an opening for the position of Member Services
Manager. This is a full-time position responsible
for managing the Member Services Department.
A minimum of 6 years customer service with su-
pervisory experience required. Applications and
job descriptions may be picked up at the SVEC
administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak
or reviewed on www.svec-coop.com. Applica-
tions should be turned in, to attention Vicky, at
the above address, mailed to PO Box 160, Live
Oak, FL 32064 or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.
com. The deadline for accepting applications
is Wednesday, December 22, 2010. SVEC is an
equal opportunity employer.

G Suwannee


E electric
Cooperative


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

04542623
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following position:
INFORMATION SYSTEM
ADMINISTRATOR
Application deadline is 5:00
PM, December 22, 2010.
Associate's Degree required
with preferred Major(s) in
Computer Science, Data
Processing, or related field.
Five years experience in
network management and PC
maintenance. Hardware and
software experience required.
Windows Server Operating
System required. Experience
with Database and Web based
applications connectivity and
operating systems, token-ring
and Ethernet preferred.
Bachelors Degree may
substitute for three years
experience. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U.S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.com.
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO .Employer

04542624



SYSTEMS
ADMINISTRATOR
Provides technical support for
enterprise network operations.
Functions include configuration,
implementations, and
maintenance of computer
network systems
Requires at leas 3 yrs. wk
experience. MSCE or other
network certifications preferred.
Hands-on knowledge of
personal computers, servers,
networking technology, and user
support is required. ,
Competitive annual salary with
Excellent Benefits
SEND/EMAIL APPLICATION:
Edward Blodgett
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
itjobs@youthranches.org
EOE/DFWP

Jr & High school
Math teacher needed.
Please fax resumes to:
386-758-3018


100 Job
10 Opportunities
04542646




Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches, Inc.
Accounts Payable Coordinator
This position is responsible for
the timely and accurate
processing of account payable
transactions, with additional
responsibilities related to fixed
asset management.
High school diploma or GED
with two years accounting
experience. Associate Degree in
accounting or business is
preferred. College accounting
courses may be substituted for
experience. High level of PC
software knowledge required.
$10.00 PER HOUR
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
Ed Leon
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranch
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-2429
EOE/DFWP

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colbum Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524598
The Suwannee River Water
SManagement District
is accepting applications for a
Land Manager/Operations. This
is a full-time professional posi-
tion requiring a bachelor's
degree from an accredited
college or university with at
least seven years work experi-
ence that confirms increasing
responsibility in natural resource
management, supervision and
planning. Must be proficient in
use of ARCGIS in both office
and field formats. This position
will lead and coordinate projects
related to land management
operations, facility installation
and maintenance, planning,
monitoring and public use. For'
additional information and to
receive an application, visit our
website at
MySuwanneeRiver.com or con-
tact Lisa Cheshire, Adm./Board
Coordinator, at 386/362-1001 or
cheshirel@srwmd.state.fl.us.
EOE/Vet Preference/
Drug Free Workplace

05524599
LUBE TECH WANTED
Apply @ Rountree-Moore
Chevrolet
4316 W US Hwy90
Lake City, FL 32055
Ask For: Jimbo Pegnetter

05524604
Administrative Assistant
Reports directly to controller,
needs to be proficient in Micro-
soft Office. Duties include
answering incoming calls,
general office and clerical, filing
and problem solving. Proficien-
cy in accounting is a plus.
Excellent working environment,
fast paced, growing company.
Apply via fax (386) 755-5170
or email to Barry@
Travel CountryRV.com.
We are a Drug Free Workplace


Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.


G E |w.lakecityreporter.com


CONNCTED


* NEWS

* WEATHER

* OPINION

* SPORTS

* ARCHIVES

* CLASSIFIED

* COMMUNITY

* ENTERTAINMENT


ST


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05524605
WAREHOUSE
OPERATIONS
SUPERVISOR
The nations leading retail and
supply chain organization,
SUPERVALU, Inc. has an
excellent career opportunity
available for a Warehouse
Operations Supervisor to assist
in ongoing operations for a
perishable facility (35 degrees to
-15 degrees) called
SUPERVALU LOGISTICS
Florida located in the Lake City
area. This position will be
responsible for supervising and
directing the warehouse work-
force and providing direction to
the support staff. The operation-
al areas that will require
direction and leadership include
receiving, order selection, load-
ing, letdowns and sanitation.
Previous experience in ware-
house logistics is required
including the following
areas of expertise:
4+ years of prior warehouse
logistics experience
Perishable warehouse
experience preferred
Knowledge of a mechanized
warehouse operation is desired
Excellent human relations and
communications skills
Proven record of achieving
operational and personal
objectives
Ability to maintain a safe and
productive working environment
Bi-lingual in
English-Spanish is a plus
College preferred
Effective coaching, training
and counseling skills
Technical/PC skills desired
Work schedules will be fluid as
typical with a warehouse.
Position requires availability
which includes weekends. In .
return for the above qualifica-
tions and skills we offer a com-
petitive compensation program
including medical, dental,
life insurance, Short Term
Disability, LTD, 401-K,
vacation and holidays. If you
feel that you meet or exceed the
above qualifications and are
seeking a new opportunity with
a solid, profitable and
progressive organization please
apply at Florida Crown,
1389 US Hwy. 90 West, Suite
170B, Lake City, FL 32025.


1 2 Medical
1 20 Employment

04542278

(Senior Home Care-

HEALTHCARE
OPPORTUNITIES
You know what your patients
need. And you always go the
extra mile to make sure they
know how much you care.
Healthcare professionals like
you thrive here at Senior Home
Care, a fast-growing industry
leader that's meeting the health-
care needs of today's seniors.

OTs-Full-Time
Lucrative Sign-On Bonus!

PTs, OTs &
SLPs-PRN

RN Supervisor

Apply online:
www.seniorhomecare.net
or call 866-676-5627
EOE Drug-Free Workplace

(:tpas2 1n


04542611
Dietary Assistant
/Dietary Aide
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Dietary Assistant and part time
position of Dietary Aide.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05524555

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?




Your -skiWl

e and e
.- postive attitude-,
...1 . . . .. j


Do you enjov

working with

children?



Are you

interested

ina

teaching

career?

We will pay 100% of
your FCCPC* classes,
books and fees to
become certified!

Seeking several Individuals for
Full-Time
INFANT-TODDLER
TEACHING POSITIONS
In Columbia and Hamilton Counties

Excellent starting pay from
$7.96 to $8.65 per hour,
Paid Holidays, Vacation, Sick Leave
plus add'l benfi ts.

Required:
U1 cial HS/GED transcript
Preferred:
DCF 40 Hours, FCCPC*
/CDA*

APPLY at
Suwannee Valley 4Cs
TODAY!

236 SW Columbia Ave., Lake City,
or
843 SW Mary Mac Street, Live Oak

Or CALL Anne Marie at
754-2222 x110
E-mail: arobinson@sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220
*FCCPS Florida Child Care
Professional Cerfi cate
*CDA Child Development Associate
Background screenings are required
before an offer may be made.
Suwannee Valley 4Cs is an EOE
and a drug-free workplace.


i


I


lIhUYI


SLL.ii


laFIlND II


I


7xaSS9g










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


120 Medical
120 Employment


\i' RIDIAN
BE A'IORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
's & LPN's
./ yr experience
CNA
Ff/ & PRN

Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center

Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke

Adult Substance Abuse
Licensed Therapists
Live Oak

Adult Case Manager
Live Oak

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial/Maintenance
Lake City
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.ore,
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP


130 Part Time
Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

240 Schools &
Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-75. -4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
AKC BOSTON Terrier.
6 mo old. Female, red & white.
All shots current. $500
386-867-4335


310 Pets & Supplies
AKC English Bull Dog Puppies.
assorted colors, health certs.males
& females Call for additional info
386-754-1359

Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300. AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
Beautiful neutered 6 mo old
Orange Tiger Cat. vaccinations
complete, good home needed
386-755-8561
CKC MINIATURE PINSCHER
Black & Tan, tail docked, health
certificate, ready 12/24, $400.
$50 deposit to hold 386-438-3229
or 386-497-1469.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies
6 yr old reg Quarter Horsedark
bay, trained for barrels, needs
more attn, professionally trained 4
months ago $800 386-288-9245

Baby Pigs for sale
Ready Now!
$50 each
386-965-2215
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
Washer and Dryer
$250.
Dryer almost new.
186-623-2848

404 Baby Items
Baby Crib, converts to toddler bed,
large drawer under bed,


4


408 Furniture
RED MICROFIBER
couch & recliner. S150.
386-752-8996 or
918-822-7233
TWIN SIZE captains bed.
Solid wood.
SIO0.00
386-752-8996 or 918-822-7233

416 Sporting Goods
XL Glider System.
nearly new. folding.
$70 obo
386-365-5967

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars. Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Huge indoor! Fishing. tools, gift
items/bags,deco. 8a-? Fri/Sat,lp-?
Sun, comer of Pinemount/252 &
137. follow signs 386-590-4085






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: APEX DVD.Player
w/Remote. Also, 5 DVD Movies
Please Call 386-438-5293 between
noon and 6pm $100. for all

Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tioeprptte dnncer selling firewoonnd


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
S395 S650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths). S/W. 1 acre
secluded lot. Bascom Norris By-
pass. $500 dep. $600 month.
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A.
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142
3BR/2BA Double wide. Lg.
Rooms. $750 a month. 1st month
and security. Please call
386-365-1243 or 386-965-7534.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

64A0 Mobile Homes
640U for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824


Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

SHoliday Cash $
NO App Fee. NO SD,
$250 off December.
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
| (386)758-8455

05524is1
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up. $520 month.
no, pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

7 0 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
? $1n.q.l 50 kl ,


55n'4587 -. pCulsL P-lJu. weeCCy
Palm Harbor Homes 386-752-5808
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides 30 Unfurnished
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k i 7 Home For Rent
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land


dresser attaches to end of bed, to go to competition, will deliver BANK REPO: Mobile Home On tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
$300 obo 386-688-0334 Call 386-965-3728 15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE 386-752-1364
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed

08 FurniHture Mobile Homes at $130,000.00., Call Billy Shows FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
3 for Rent After hours 386-208-8547 home, fenced on 5 acres on

Lift Recliner. Blue, electric. Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the PORT Classifieds $975. per month + utilities.
Used only 1 month, like new. country, Branford area, $450 mo., In Print and On Line Perfect place for children.
Paid $1,400 asking $700. 386-867-1833,386-590-0642 Broker/Owner- Annette Lanid @
386-752-8013 www.suwanneevaleyproperties.com www.lakecityreporter.com 386-935-0824
W-111111111-1


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

055'2477
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc..
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.".
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2 story comfortable home. Lg yard
w/trees, 4 br/2 ba, big rec. rm, liv-
ing rm, family rm,. kitchen, utility
rm storage rm, sun rm, and a cov-
ered patio on back. $800 a mo +
*sec dep. NO PETS. 386-365-1566
2/1 House, near Elementary
School. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276

Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
'I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mot Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


I L~~~v'--1 ?i~O af.
LI c~-~-~ LJKA.AJ


05524430
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own,,3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2'story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
SOld Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592
Live Oak 2bd/Iba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
05524425
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, nerf
bars, stereo. $16,995. 752-8227





950 Cars for Sale
2005 PT Cruiser Touring Edition
PS/PW/PM, white, 55,500
miles,Auto, Cruise Control, AC
$7900 386-965-8656
Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2001 Chevy Astro Van,
new trans., new AC, good tires,
runs great; clean,great work van
$2200 obo, 386-984-0572


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.





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Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
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Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@lakectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, December 12, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Protecting

ornamental

plants from

deep freeze

We may live
in North
Florida,
but we
still like
to create a tropical "feel"
in our landscapes with
beautiful, subtropical
plants. Although they
have been pushed well
beyond their northern
limit, these ornamental
plants can often be over-
wintered successfully.
What about the cold
that we experienced this
past week? Expect some
damage. When plants
can become slowly accus-
tomed to the cold, they
are tougher and have a
better chance of surviv-
ing. An early cold spell
can severely injure tender
plants that are not pro-
tected.
Patience is the key
when dealing with cold
damage on ornamentals.
If leaves turn brown,
just leave them. They'll
help protect the plant
from future cold weather.
Resist the temptation to
trim back injured plants
because this will only
stimulate tender new
growth which will be
killed. Wait until new
growth naturally appears
in early spring before
doing any pruning.
Now that winter has
your attention, prepare
to protect your plants
through the next deep
freeze. There are several
methods of protection
that can maximize your
chances of successfully
overwintering your favor-
ite plants.
The usual way is to
cover the plants with
sheets, frost blankets or
other coverings. Plastic
can injure foliage where it
touches the plant. Cover
plants early before the
ground heat escapes
and let the fabric extend
to the ground. You can
even place a light bulb or
Christmas lights beneath
the cover to produce heat.
Watering the soil during
the day will slow the loss
of heat during the night.
Potted plants can be
brought indoors' or put in
a shed. Group pots closely
together outside so there
will be less heat loss, and
then cover plants with
blankets or sheets. Don't
forget to uncover plants
in the morning before
the heat builds up under-
neath.
For more information
about protecting plants in
the winter, visit the UF/
IFAS website http://solu-
tionsforyourlife.com or call
the Master Gardeners at
352-5384. Columbia County
Extension is taking appli-
cations through January
5th for the University of
Florida Master Gardener
Class of 2011. Applications
may be obtained at the UF
Extension Office located
at the fairgrounds in Lake
City.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
,Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and


Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Four-month-old Jake Steele gets a kiss from his mother, Loren. 'I like (the club),' Steele said. 'It's a good outlet for stay-at-home moms to socialize and to get out
of the house. This is a good way for children to interact with other kids, plus the activities they do are fun.'







HELPING MOMS


Club makes life easier for Lake City mothers


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
W hen Jessica
Zartman moved
from Ohio-to
Lake City more
than a year ago,
she didn't know many mothers
in the area. Then she happened
to see a sign about the MOMS
Club MOMS offering Moms
Support at Publix.
"I contacted them and went to
a mom's night out (event), and
since then I've come to all the
gatherings," Zartman said.
MOMS Club is an international
organization established in 1983
by Mary James in California to
provide friendship, support and
weekly activities for mothers and
their children.
Deena Dorosheff, club presi-
dent, started the Lake City chap-
ter in 2007.
"A lot of it stems from mothers
moving to the area who don't feel
they have good social interac-
tions," she said.
The organization also benefits
the children, said Dorosheff,
a mother of two.
"It's a nice way to meet other
children their age," she said.
There are 20 mothers and
about 50 children involved in the
MOMS Club, Dorosheff said.
Children range from infants to 6
years old. Some of the mothers
stay-at-home and others work.
Monthly activities include a
business meeting, play dates,
field trips and more, all of which
are kid-friendly. Mommy-only
events include Mom's-Night-Out
evenings.
Meetings feature a guest
speaker for the moms and activi-
ties for children. The group also
participates in community service
activities, such as the Halloween
Bash, hosted in October.
The organization is a great
place to share with other
moms and socialize, said Kerri
Dahlgren. New moms in the area
don't have to feel isolated.
"I think it's a great way for
moms to get together and visit,"


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kimberly Ahrens helps her 1-year-old daughter, Gracie, pour glitter in a bag full of oatmeal during a reindeer food-mak-
ing activity at a meeting of the MOMS Club of Lake City on Thursday. The club is open to stay-at-home and working
mothers who want to socialize with other mothers and those who want their children to interact with other kids.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Nolan Martin, 3, peaks out while Shayne Morrow helps her daughter, Adia, 3,
sculpt a handmade Christmas ornament.


she said. "A lot of moms in the
group are not from here. I really
enjoy it."
Dahlgren heard about the


group from a friend after moving to
the area, she said. One of her favor-
ite activities is Mom's Night Out.
"Mom's talk and get a break,"


Dahlgren said.
WithoutMOMS Club, Melissa
Martin said she wouldn't know any
other mothers in the area.
"It definitely helps gain friend-
ships," she said.
Other moms are encouraged to
join the group because of the sup-
port it provides.
"This is a great group of ladies,"
Martin said.
MOMS Club of Lake City meets
at 10 a.m. the second Thursday
of each month at Christ Heritage
Church.
Dues are $20 for the first year
and $15 for returning members.
Contact momsclublakecityfl@gmail.
corn or visit www.momsclublakecity
webs. com.
"Find your own little network of
friends who are experiencing the
same thing you are," Dorosheff
said.













FGC offers high-tech engineering program


T he advantages
of flexibility,
precision,
speed and
endurance pro-
vided by today's modern,
high-tech instrumentation
and process control sys-
tems are providing manu-
facturing solutions to an
ever increasing number of
companies.
Training a workforce
to master these technolo-
gies has become essential
and also a challenge. The
technical training systems,
recently assembled by the
Engineering Technology
program at Florida
Gateway College, capture
these same technologies.
They were purchased to
support both the core and
advanced curriculum of
the program.
The technical training
systems are state-of-the-art
educational tools.
Each system is a device
by which a student makes
the transition from tradi-
tional, printed classroom
material to a dynamic


"hands-on" approach to
"involvement" training.
They are specifically
tailored to every level of
complexity, from introduc-
tory programs through
advanced design all the
way to troubleshooting
courses.
They can also be used
as a tool to create and
deliver customized train-
ing to improve a specific
set of skills for current
employees at an individual
company or institution.
Today's modern manu-
facturing plants and distri-
bution centers strive for
continuous improvement.
Efficient production and
consistency of product
depend on accurate con-
trol of process variables.
Our Process Control
Training System teaches
students to set up, oper-
ate and troubleshoot the
same actual instruments
and control systems used
in the process and power
generation industries to
control such physical
variables as pressure, tem-


Bob Deckon
386-754-4442


perature, level and flow.
In using microprocessor
based controls, various
types of closed-loop con-
trols, as well as a variety of
final control devices, are
covered.
Our Fluid Power
Transmission Training
Systems teach our stu-
dents the principles and
practices of hydraulic and
pneumatic power transfer.
Students learn how a pres-
surized fluid is transmitted
and controlled through
a conduit to an actuator,
which transforms the fluid
energy into mechanical
energy.
An Electronics Training
Systems teaches students
the basics of electronics


by way of computer-based
courseware and experi-
ment card sets, in the form
of printed circuit boards.
This interactive system
includes an oscilloscope,
function generator and
digital multimeter.
We currently have
courses in AC, DC, and
analog and digital circuits
along with the capability
to easily expand to meet
the growing needs of our
customers.
Two Programmable
Logic Controller Training
Systems provide industry
standard PLC and hard-
ware to teach students to
design, program, connect
and debug real world cir-
cuits.
A PLC is a solid-state
control device pro-
grammed and repro-
grammed to automatically
control electro-mechanical
systems in residential,
commercial and industrial
facilities.
All training has a strong
foundation of safety and
is supported with lesson


plans, web-based train-
ing, computer generated
graphics and lab manuals,
which contain a number
and variety of hands-on
experiments and projects.
They are made from indus-
trial grade components,
permanently mounted on
an eye-level vertical board
and mounted on rugged,
heavy-duty mobile frames
with casters.
All training systems are
equipped with instructor
- inserted faults.
Faults may be set one at
a time or in combination
to simulate actual process
problems to challenge the
students' troubleshooting
skills and raise their level
of understanding.
Flexibility and mobility
underscore the advantages
of these training systems.
All can be transported in
our new mobile training
lab. The lab is housed in
a 52-foot triple-axle trailer.
The trailer can transport
each of the training sys-
tems anywhere in our
five-county service area,


where they can easily be
rolled off the back into
any classroom or training
room. Or the lab can func-
tion as a standalone mobile
classroom, equipped with
its own on-board genera-
tor, air compressor, HVAC
system and complete video
system.
One full side of the
trailer can be opened up
to expand the viewing
area and create an open
classroom. The trailer is
wrapped in the college's
new colors and logo and
does an excellent job of
promoting the program,
the college and commu-
nity.
For additional informa-
tion about the exciting
world of engineering tech-
nology, opportunities and
skilled technical training,
visit http:www.engineering-
techprogram.com.

* Bob Deckon is director of
Engineering Technology at
Florida Gateway College. He,
can be reached at 386-754-
4442.


ome gifts can
seem last-min-
ute and imper-
sonal even if
they're actually
quite lovely and usable.
You probably reach
for those black cashmere
gloves or light up the vanil-
la-scented candle far more
often than you wear the
funky necklace or beaded
top that were under the
Christmas tree last year.
But; still, its hard to get
jazzed up about gloves,
right?
Ed Bucciarelli, CEO
and president of upscale
accessories-and-beauty
retailer Henri Bendel,
says you wouldn't feel that
way if they were the "per-
fect" gloves.
Perfect doesn't mean
a painstaking search,
though. As long as you
know a few key things
about the people you're
giving presents to, such
as their initials (and if
you don't, maybe your
list is too long), then
thoughtful gift-giving can
be essentially effortless,
Bucciarelli says.
Monograms, favorite
colors, scents that trigger
childhood memories or this
year's hottest trends add
the right level of detail to
elevate a gift, say experts.
And don't forget the pret-
ty package. The gift wrap,
says Linda Lee, group vice
president of Macy's by
Appointment shopping ser-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This product image courtesy of J. Crew shows their Keats-
stripe bow tie. For a hipster, you might try introducing him
to a bow tie, said trend and retail analyst Tom Julian.


vice, is what makes the first
impression.
Advice on turning a
potentially boring gift into a
great one:

Scarves and gloves
Bendel's Bucciarelli
thinks a leopard-print scarf
is fail-safe. It's ageless and
goes with almost any coat,
yet it always updates your
look, he says. "My 16-year-
old daughter and my 80-
year-old mother each want
one."
Nina Garcia, Marie
Claire fashion director
and Target style consul-
tant, says women can
never have too many lace
scarves: They can trans-
form any outfit into some-
thing romantic.
She, however, is hop-
ing Santa Claus has fur-
trimmed gloves with her
name on them. "Everyone


has gloves but not every-
one has fur-trimmed
gloves," she says. "You
might not think about buy-
ing these for yourself, but
it's a little touch of luxury
you can give to someone
else."
Cashmere is Macy's
Lee's top choice, again
because they're a bit of an
indulgence, yet available at
many price points.

Tie
For a hipster, you might
try introducing him to a
bow tie, says trend and
retail analyst Tom Julian.
Any age man can wear
one with the right atti-
tude, he says, but it's the
younger man who can
really rock it.
In more traditional
ties, a 3-inch width is the
norm and a 2-inch tie is
trendy.


WEDDING


Dennard-Pettrey
Dana Jean Dennard of
Wellborn and John William
Pettrey III of McAlpin were
united in marriage. Oct.
23 in the Quail Heights
Country Club banquet hall.
I The bride is the daughter
of Jerry and Vicky Dennard
of Wellborn. The groom is
the son of John and Sadie
Pettrey of McAlpin.
The bride was given in
marriage by her father. The
Rev. John Harrison offici-
ated the ceremony.
Aussia Davis was the flow-
er girl. Ariel Sceals was the
maid of honor. Bridesmaids
were Danielle Dennard and
Jordan Dennard.


ThebestmanwasKenneth
Pettrey. Groomsmen were
Jonathan Keel and William
SKeel. Veronica Baker was
the wedding director. DJ
was Scott .Carroll's mobile
Disc Jockey.
The bride is a 2009 grad-
uate of Lake City Christian
Academy. She is currently
attending Florida Gateway
College and will. graduate
with a degree in physical
therapy in 2011.
The groom was a 2003
graduate of Suwannee
High School. He is current-
ly employed as a logger
with Pettrey and Pettrey
Logging.
The couple will live in
McAlpin.


Dana Jean Dennard and
John William Pettrey III.


ENGAGEMENT


Hughes Ross
Patrick anid Tammy
Swinney of White Springs
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage -
of their daughter, Miranda
Louise Hughes of White .
Springs, to Tyler Charles
Ross of Branford. He is the -
son of Ty and Joan Ross of
Branford. '
The bride-elect is a 2010
graduatedofColumbiaHigh Dana Jean Dennard and John
School. She is employed
with Ross' Processing in The future groom is a
Branford and a member ', 2007 graduated of First
of First Baptist Church of Coast Academy. He is
White Springs. 'employed with Koon's Farm


COURTESY PHOTO
William Pettrey III.

Inc. in Mayo. The wedding
is planned for 'Dec. 18 at
Byrd's Hunting Camp and
Lodge in Mayo.


I~.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This product image courtesy of Target shows the Mossimo suede trapper hat, earmuffs and
gloves. Usable, practical gifts sometimes get a bad rap as boring but sometimes they
can be the best gifts at the holidays.


Sometimes the best gift


is the one that gets used

By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
Associated Press


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


11 N O.I.III I












Over-the-top gifts for the pet who has everything


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.

S anderella has 150 col-
lars and leashes, 200
couture dresses, 300
bows, a designer bed
in every room and
standing appointments with a
groomer and an acupuncturist
The 17-year-old Bichon poodle
mix rides in a carriage, eats mac-
aroni and cheese from a bowl
that has her name etched in gold
and has a pink mink made by
Saks Fifth Avenue.
So what do you get for
Christmas for the dog who has
everything?
"Definitely bling. We love
bling," said Margaret Souders,
68, who owns Sanderella and
Samantha, a 19-month-old
Bichon Frise. "I'm addicted to
my dogs. I love them to pieces.
My whole life revolves around
them."
Sounders is a regular cus-
tomer at the Beverly Hills Mutt
Club, one of many high-end
pet boutiques where the sky
is the limit, from Rodeo Drive
stalwarts like Neiman Marcus,
Prada, Louis Vuitton, Coach and
Saks to online marketplaces
where pet gifts can run in the
thousands of dollars.
The Mutt Club is small but
bursting with things made of
Swarovski crystal, pearls, cash-
mere, wool
and Italian "Definitel
leather.
Jewels and We love bl
canine addicted to
couture are I love them
best sellers, My whole lif
said Celina
Bojorquez, around t
who owns
the shop Margaret S
with her Owner of Sanderella
mom, Sandy
Siegler.
Other customers include Sandra
Bullock, Jamie Lee Curtis, Susan
Sarandon, Billy Joel and Vince
Neil, Siegler said.
Sanderella's first Chanel leash
and collar cost $650. Her bow
collection alone probably cost


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Paco, a 5-year-old Chihuahua, wears a Swarovski crystal dog collar at the Beverly Hills Mutt Club in Beverly
Hills, Calif. The shop is small but bursting with things made of Swarovski crystal, pearls, cashmere, wool, Italian
leather and other soft and shiny things.


4y
li
i
t
e
:h

o


$9,000, Souders said.
Some of the most unique gifts
for pets this year include a video
camera, treadmill and dog house
air conditioner
r bling. for $549, said
ng. I'm Geoff Mott,
y dogs, president of
my dogs. PetGadgets.com.
o pieces. The Eyenimal
revolves pet video cam-
iem." era with built-in
microphone sells
uders for $135, fits on
and Samantha your pet's collar
and can shoot up
to 2 1/2 hours
of continuous
video. The treadmill comes in
three sizes, and three prices
- $599 to $1,499.
Many pet retailers donate
some proceeds to animal causes.
Dsquared2 put a pair of $190


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sandy Seigler, owner of the Beverly Hills Mutt Club, tries a three row
,crystal necklace on her 5-year-old Chihuahua-Chin mix, Tatiana, and a
Candy Apple Couture dog gown at the shop in Beverly Hills, Calif. Tatiana
is standing on an Italian Made Volo dog bed.


limited edition leash and collar
sets on the newly launched yoox.
corn Pets Boutique, with all the


proceeds going to Much Love
Animal Rescue in Los Angeles.
A luxurious $486 Manfred of


Sweden lambskin coat can also
be found on the yoox site.
Dogs aren't the only pam-
pered pets. The "My First
Hamster Home Kit" from Petco
can be upgraded with a couch,
television set, lamp and other
furnishings, said Petco spokes-
woman Sandy Robbins.
For the cat who has every-
thing, including an owner with
time and patience, Robbins sug-
gested a $69.99 Litter Kwitter,
which will help you teach your
cat to,use a toilet instead of a lit-
ter box. Or try the Litter-Robot
self-cleaning litter box that sells
for $329.99 on litter-robot.com.
A floor-to-ceiling cat tree for
$299.99 is one of the most-popu-
lar items at Drs. Foster & Smith,
the largest catalog and online
seller of pet supplies in North
America.
You can also buy your fish
a new home a Marineland
Monterey Super System 220-gal-
lon aquarium, stand, canopy, fil-
tration system and 72-inch light
for $5,199.99. Salt water coral
grown next to the company's
Rhinelander, Wis., offices can go
for hundreds more.
But at Christmas time, a
dog's life is not so bad. An
Associated Press-Petside.com
poll found that 56 percent of
dog owners say they'll buy
their pets a gift this Christmas,
but only 48 percent of cat own-
ers plan a gift.
At the Ruff Ruff Couture
boutique, a block from Rodeo
Drive in Beverly Hills, one of
the hottest items is the Snuggle
Sack, an ultra-suede, double-
quilted, faux fur-lined pet car-
rier with a Swarovski crystal
brooch for about $125, said
owner Jaimie Pergament.
A Swarovski crystal lead
will run $275 to $600 at the
nearby Mutt Club, where an
Italian-made diva bed is priced
at $1,500 and a handmade wool
coat with fleece lining costs
between $120 and $180.
Still, even the most pam-
pered dog can't mask a certain
natural musk. Eau de per-'
fume for dogs comes in Puppy
Love, Vanilla Woof, Peaches
and Cream and Big Dog.


Be a Lucky Dog.*


*(or cat)


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ET Drawing to determine winners will be held on or after 4/8/11. Geographic scope of this promotion is FL, GA, AL, SC,
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...........
------- --- -


mwwf


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Man sends heartfelt thank you


to mother he may never find


DEAR ABBY: I would
like to say something to my
mother, but the truth is I
don't know who my biologi-
cal mother is. I was adopted
when I was a baby. I have
looked for her online over
the years, but -have yet to
find her. I have asked my-
self many times what I'd say
to her if I met her. Because
I know it may never happen,
I'm asking you to print my
message:
"Mama, I don't know the
circumstances of my birth,
and I don't really care. All I
know is that two loving par-
ents adopted me and helped
to shape me into the person
I am. Today I am a success-
ful professional with a lov-
ing spouse and wonderful
children, to whom I try to
give the best. I imagine that
is what you wanted to do for
me. Therefore, I have decid-
ed that I don't really need to
find you and say, Thank you.
You made a good choice. I am
doing fine and I love you.'" -
HER THANKFUL SON
DEAR THANKFUL
SON: I hope one day your
birth mother will be fortunate
enough to meet you and you
can say those words to her in
person. One of the most dif-
ficult decisions a mother can
make, but one of the most
loving, is to place a child for
adoption when she is unable


Abigail Van Buren
ww.dearabby.com

to provide a stable upbring-
ing for her baby. Most birth
mothers long for a reunion.
And for them, as well as for
you, I am printing your let-
ter.
DEAR ABBY: I am a
semi-retired professional
man. My wife and I have an
ongoing disagreement and
would like the benefit or your
wisdom. I was raised that
when a man enters a house
or a place of business, espe-
cially a restaurant, he should
remove his hat. It annoys
me to see young men sit in a
restaurant wearing baseball
caps, cowboys hats or even
stocking caps.
My wife says times have
changed recent genera-
tions were not raised the
same way and I should just
get over it. I say there is no
right or wrong age for com-
mon etiquette. I can overlook
this behavior in a fast-food
restaurant, but I also see it
happening in nice establish-
ments. I believe that restau-
rant managers should ask


men to remove their hats. If
they refuse, at least they will
have been told it is unaccept-
able behavior. Should I follow
my wife's advice, or do I have
a valid gripe? TONY IN
FLORIDA
DEAR TONY: Some res-
taurants still insist that their
patrons adhere to a strict
dress code but fewer of
them do than in decades ago.
In recent years the rigid rules
regarding the wearing of hats
have relaxed in part, I sus-
pect because of aging baby
boomers who use baseball
caps to camouflage their bald
spots.
However, according to
Emily Post, you do have a
valid gripe. She says there
are times when wearing 'a
hat is appropriate, and times
when it isn't.' According to
her, a man should remove
his hat (and this includes
baseball caps) upon enter-
ing a home, when indoors at
work (especially in an office),
at mealtime at the table, IN
RESTAURANTS AND COF-
FEE SHOPS (the italics are
mine), at a movie or indoor
performance, when the Na-
tional Anthem is played and
when the American flag pass-
es by as in a parade.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't let incompetence
or what others do or say frus-
trate you. Focus on what you
can accomplish. Don't fall
behind when dealing with
banks, institutions or govern-
ment agencies. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Take stock of what you
have managed to accomplish
and what still needs to be
done. You can make a deci-
sion regarding a course, ac-
tivity or hobby you want to
get involved in. If you are sin-
gle, you will attract someone
who can fulfill your dreams,
hopes and wishes. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Emotions will flare up if
you don't get your way. Try
not to lose control when deal-
ing with others. There will be
other opportunities, under
better conditions, if you bide
your time and wait for the
right moment. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be in the right
place at the right time. Don't
let any opportunity pass you
by. A new position or partner-
ship can lead to all sorts of
possibilities. Love is on the


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
rise. You will find good deals
if you go shopping. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Not everything will be crys-
tal clear, especially when
it involves contracts, legal
settlements or financial mat-
ters. You will have to do your
own fact finding. A sudden
change is likely to occur if
you are too open about your
personal life. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't complain about
things that don't go your
way. Focus on your ideas, the
people you love and what you
can do to make your world a
better place. Greater involve-
ment in helping others will
earn you respect and new
friendships. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Pay more attention to
what's going on at home and
to the people you live with.
You can make a difference
if you are aware of the situa-
tions that others face. Stand
up for your beliefs but don't
get involved in an argument
that solves nothing. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: D equals C
"BIMO TJ MIB MOR V SODPBTVH
PJWVFZIGVYBO DIGYTJVFTIJ IW
PJNOHRFVJNTJL VJN
GTRP J NOHRFVJ NTJL." -
SZIFIL HVSZOH NTVJO V HY PR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "We come to love not by finding the perfect person
but by learning to see an imperfect person perfectly." Angelina Jolie
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-13


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Enjoy old friends,
your lover and, of course,
your family. A quiet get-to-
gether will give you some
great ideas for pleasing oth-
ers. Decorating for year-end
festivities will relieve tension.
Tie up loose ends and move
on. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Rethink your
strategy for the future and
make amends with someone
you have not treated prop-
erly. Lend a helping hand or
give to those less fortunate. A
disciplined attitude will help
you finish projects. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Visit anyone or
anyplace that will help you
move forward. It's a time to
reflect and to revisit your
accomplishments and your
failures so that you can re-
align your goals and. set the
course. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Review your fi-
nancial situation. Now is the
time to lend a helping hand
to those who have been there
for you and supported your
efforts. Give and take will
lead to a closer bond with the
people who mean the most to
you. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You will be able
to make some interesting in-
vestments that will help you
get ahead financially in the
new year. Present or promote
what you have to offer. A ro-
mantic evening can lead to an
understanding. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


ON A ROLL By Ben Pall / Edited by Will Shortz 4 8 10 11 E 1213 14 15 16 1 18 1"


Across
1 Hearty drinks
7 Midwest city
named for an
Indian tribe
12 More sentimental
19 Major diamond
exporter
20 Closing to some
letters
21 Trapped
22 It makes the hair
stand on end
23 First step of
instructions for
what to do with
this finished
puzzle
25 N.Y.C.'s of
the Americas
26 Goal of a screen
test
28 Many an extra on
"Star Trek":
Abbr.
29 Vacation
conveniences,
for short
30 Vitamin C source
31 Raise a big
stink?
33 Kids
35 "___ Us," 1995
Joan Osborne hit
37 Path of
enlightenment
38 European leader?
39 Black
40 Flavor
42 Part of PIN:
Abbr.

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.
44 Make up


46 "Where does it
___?"
47 Is
48 '60s-'70s 114-
Across locale
51 Web browser
.provider
52 ___ fide
53 Part of every
month
54 Reveals
56 Instructions, part
2
63 Prohibition's
start
64 ___ Little, "The
Wire" gangster
65 Old Philadelphia
stadium,
informally, with-
"the"
66 Earthen pot
67 Bygone Starfire,
e.g., informally
68 __ Rebellion of
1857-59
70 Evicts
72 Org. in 2005's
Oscar-winning
"Crash"
73 Hightail it
74 Alternative' to
plata
75 Cellar item
76 Bedouin
77 Instructions, part
3
82 Demagnetize, say
83 St. in a
children's rhyme
84 Coupling
85 Previously
87 Half of many a
business
partnership
88 Ticks off
91 Plug's place


92 It's between
green and black
95 Viceroy, e.g.
96 Snap
97 Aware of
98 Nile biters
102 "We shun it
it comes": Emily
Dickinson
103 "Beat it!"
105 Little bit
106 Moolah
107 Except for
109 Certain tankful
110 alai
112Some funerary
ware
114 See 48-Across
115 Last step of the
instructions
119 Tie up
121 Cell phone plan
units
122 "Pick me! Pick
me!"
123 Long fights
124 Least puzzling
125 Pedestal toppers
126 Barrels along

Down
I Doha native
2 Lopsided
3 Said "yea"
4 The Beatles' "_
No One"
5 Edsel
6 19.84 Olympics
site
7 The Cowboys of
the Big 12 Conf.
8 Portions
9 Connecticut town
named for an
English river


10 Coop group
11 Wall St. worker
12 Second place
13 "___ it goes"
14 Bud
15 Dr.
16 Charges, in a way
17 Honda model
18 Begrudges
20 Follows through
with
24 Ripley's last
words?
27 Insurgent group
32 Pond fish
34 Acme product in
Road Runner
cartoons
35 Long-running hit
TV show based
in Chicago
36 ___-upper
40 Farrier
41 Polly of
literature, e.g.
43 Fade, maybe
45 Cond6
47 Revises
48 Doze
49 Artemis' twin
50 Pea observer
52 Time for a party,
in brief
53 Rapper with the
1988 platinum
album "Power"
,55 Plummet
57 Board
58 Latin lover's
word
59 Elicit
60 Alpaca relatives
61 Home of minor-
league baseball's
Diablos


62 Depress
68 Undersides
69 Greek god whose
name is one
letter off from
118-Down
70 Soak up rays
71 Second-largest
city in
Kyrgyzstan
75 "No problem"
76 "On tap" sign,
sometimes
78 Affirms


79 Depressing
darkness .
80 Scuttlebutt
81 Device for winter
sidewalks
86 Virtue
88 Take for granted
89 Superstate in
Orwell's "1984"
90 Good rolls in
craps
91 One-named
singer/actress


92 -la-la!"
93 Stampede
94 [That's awful!]
96 The rite person?
99 Waste
100 Finished second
101 Gray hair
producer, they
say
104 Superman's
closetful?
105 Vista


108 Pin holder
110 King in II Kings
111 Brouhahas
113 Trim
116 Packed away
117 Head, in slang
118 Greek goddess
whose name is
one letter off
from 69-Down
120 Virginia's ___
Highway'


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
G .lE IT 1 I I Ail l 11 1 I iA H II 1I 1 I N K


4 1 5 2


6 7 3 85


5 3 7 1


8 2 A 3


7 9 1


48 2


3 69


2 5 8


7 9 6


9 1 L 8 S 6 9 L

8i91?VZ L19 L16



L Z 6 9 9 L8 1V 6


Z6 CL -L 8 19 99









7 9 8 L 6 L 9




IE L 9 8 9 L 6 17


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Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup
Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bpamerica
youtube.com/bp


"My family's been fishing for eight generations. It's just a way of life.
That's why we've got to get this cleaned up."
Pete Floyd
Commercial Fisherman,
Pascagoula, Mississippi


When the spill hit, a lot of people said it would be the end. BP said
they would try. to make this right. But how was an energy company
going to help a fisherman?

Putting People to Work
The first thing they did was rent my boat and hire me to help with
the cleanup. They made up my losses so I could pay my bills. And
they worked with all kinds of people here from fishermen and
shrimpers to restaurant owners. It helped us keep our businesses
open. And it helped us make ends meet so we could support
our families.

Staying for the Long Haul
When they capped the well in July and finally killed it, we were all
relieved. But would BP stick around? Well, they did. The beaches
are clean and we're back on the water fishing so things are getting
a whole lot better. They are still here and have said they will keep
working for as long as it takes.

Getting Back to Normal
BP asked me to share my story with you to keep you informed. If
you still need help, please call 1-866-448-5816 or go to bp.com. If
you're wondering what you can do, well the next time you're
shopping, buy a little Gulf seafood. There is none finer.


For assistance, please call:
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com bp

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2010 BP, E&P


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2010


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