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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01472
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/11/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01472
System ID: UF00028308:01472
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







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Fort White soccer follows a 4-0


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POLOVO FORIDA
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GAINLES -UNI V O O





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www.Iakecityrepor rtecpm


New Look
Columbia may be part of new
three-team football district.
Sports, I B






reporter


Vol. 136, No. 278 E 75 cents


* DOT plans $27.5 million expansion


Today
Breakfast with Santa
Pancake Breakfast with
Santa.is 8 11 a.m. today at
the Holiday Inn & Suites.
Breakfast will include pan-
cakes, bacon, sausage, juice,
coffee, and hot chocolate.
There will also be holiday
music. Meals are $7 for
adults and $4 for children
ages 3-12. Proceeds benefit
Children's Medical Services
of North Florida. A collection
box for unwrapped toys will
also be available.

Nutcracker
The Nutcracker Ballet is
2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 11
in the Levy Performing Arts
Center. Led by the acclaimed
Gainesville Dance Alive group,
the production is supplement-
ed by more than 50 local boys
and girls.

Holiday happenings
Snow Day, sponsored by
Hopeful Baptist Church, is 9
a.m. 3:30 p.m. today in the
parking lot next to Gulf Coast
Financial. The event will
feature 30 tons of snow deliv-
ered along with two bounce
houses, a 26-foot dual-lane
slide, a rock climb wall, an
obstacle course and a bungee
challenge. The Festival of
Lights will take place around
Olustee Park throughout
the day and will feature arts
and crafts, food vendors
and live entertainment. The
Christmas Parade, present-
ed by the Lake City'Rotary
Club, is 6 p.m. Christmas
music will follow the parade
in Olustee Park until 9 p.m.

Home tours
Altrusa International,,
Inc. is sponsoring a tour
of decked out and festive
homes 12 5 p.m. today. The
tour begins at the Live Oak
Garden Club next to Shands
Hospital on County Road
136 in Live Oak. Tickets are
$10 and can be purchased in
advance. For more informa-
tion contact Marlene Giese at
386-364-1947.

Wreath-laying ceremony
Wreaths Across America
of Lake City honors the
fallen with a Wreath-laying
Ceremony at 12 p.m. today
at the Columbia County
Veterans' Memorial, located
in Olustee Park. Legion Post
#57 and the Columbia High
School JROTC Color Guard
will conduct the ceremony.
Visit www.wreathsacrossamer-
ica. com for more information.

Blank-Fest
The Third Annual Blank-
Fest is today at RockStar
Lounge..Admission is one
blanket per person, and the
blankets will go to the United
Way to be distributed to
the local homeless. Several
bands will perform during
the event.


US Highway 90's four
lanes to be extended
to Brown Road.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
The Florida Department of
Transportation plans to extend
the four lanes of U.S. Highway 90


from Brown Road to west of Lake
City Avenue.
"That's a project that's been in
our plans for several years,,as far
as the planning stages, and we've
finally secured the funding to be
able to construct about a mile
of four lanes on U.S. Highway 90
between Lake City Avenue, where
the four lanes now end, out to
Brown Road," said Gina Busscher,


FDOT District II public informa-
tion officer.
The work is scheduled to take
place in 2013 with an estimated
cost of $27.5 million. Preliminary
DOT reports indicate 1.3 miles of
roadway will be four lanes as part
of the project.
The project was listed on the
DOT's 5-year Transportation Plan
and was announced during a pub-


ACCESS GAINED


Students build ramp
that delivers freedom
of movement
'By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
aMiargaret
Woodard of
Lake City was
in need of a
new wheel-
chair-accessible ramp at her
home and Columbia High
School construction students
took on the project.
About 120 students recently
put their building skills to work
for two weeks at Woodard's.
home. They provided the labor
to construct the ramp that
Woodard, 72, needed to get in
and out of her house easily,
said Lara Robertson, Columbia
County Seniori- Services case
manager.
Woodard, a Columbia County
Senior Services client, said she
was in need of the ramp for
about six years, which now


..


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lara Robertson (left), a Columbia County Senior Services case man-
ager, hugs Lake City resident Margaret Woodard, 72, outside of her.
home.


allows her to go to and from
her home at her leisure.
."It's easier to get out," she
said. "I have friends that will
take me out now, which is
nice. They haven't been able to


before."
Robertson said without a
ramp, Woodard could not get
out and do things like going to
RAMP continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School student Dakota Owens, 17, wheels Margaret Woodard up the 32-foot-long ramp to
her home. '1I was in a wheelchair for six months, Owens said. 'I'm glad I can do it for her.' Students from
CHS's construction classes took about two weeks to build the wheelchair-accessible ramp for Woodard.


lic hearing earlier in the week.
"The project will be an urban
four-lane road with turn lanes,
bike lanes, sidewalks and a mul-
titude of improvements there
for that area of the community,"
Busscher said. "Plus we'll replace
all the traffic signals that are out
there."
DOT continued on 3A


Black officer

files race

complaint

with EEOC

Claims his superiors have
continually harassed,
discriminated against him.
From staff reports
Lake City Police Department offi-
cer Christopher C. Hughes has filed a
race and retaliation complaint with the
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission against the Lake City
Police Department.
The complaint was filed Oct 25 with
the EEOC, which handles federal work-
place discrimination allegations.
The earliest date of the alleged dis-
crimination was Jan. 1, 2010 and the
latest was Oct.. 6, according to the
complaint. It is allegedly a continuing
action.
Hughes, who is black, has been h
police officer with the LCPD since Aug.
18, 2009.
He complained about what he said
was a racist statement made by a for-
mer supervisor in January, according
to the report. He also complained that
two white dispatchers were allegedly
refusing to answer his calls.
Hughes alleges in the report his
current supervisor, Sgt Chris Barfield,
has been harassing him and subjecting
him to. less favorable terms and condi-
tions of employment throughout 2010.
Examples listed included scrutinizing
Hughes' reports more severely, bad-
mouthing him to citizens, and ordering
him to the station to correct even minor
errors while approving the reports of
others with minor errors.
"I believe I have been discriminated
against because of my race, black, and
in retaliation for complaining about rac-
ist statements," Hughes, wrote in his
discrimination statement. "I believe my
rights are being violated as protected
by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of
1964, as amended."
The LCPD provided a position state-
ment on the issues covered in the com-
plaint to the EEOC Tuesday.
"It is the position of the Lake City
Police Department that the complain-
ant, Christopher C. Hughes, has not
been subjected to a hostile Work envi-
ronment and that he has not been the
COMPLAINT continued on 3A


Blank-Fest collects blankets while entertaining


Four bands scheduled
to play throughout the
day at RockStar Lounge.

By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter.com
Providing entertainment while col-
lecting for the needy is the quest
of Blank-Fest Florida this weekend,
with the help of the United Way of
Suwannee Valley and the RockStar


Lounge.
A musical event hosted by the
RockStar featuring the bands Three
Legged Dawg, Copyrite, The South
Georgia All Stars and Six String
Sammy will cost one blanket per per-
son as an entry fee.
"We have bands that play all differ-
ent styles of .music, and this is a great
atmosphere to enjoy it," said Shawne
Hunt, owner of the lounge, located at
BLANK-FEST continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO

Going into
its third year,
Blank-Fest
collects
blankets for
those in need.


1 ,84264 00 02 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


68 44
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


,'~-1 /


Opinion ................
People..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
FAITH
Hispanics get
church.


COMING
SUNDAY
A look at a day of
festivities.


Saturday, December


'" k.;--.











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010


Friday:
Afternoon: 9-0-0
Evening: 3-5-7


y Friday:
Afternoon: 8-7-7-3
Evening: 2-2-1-7


Thursday:
C W 1-15-20-26-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Pink Floyd star's son sorry


LONDON
The son of Pink Floyd
guitarist David Gilmour
issued a public apology
Friday for climbing atop
of one of Britain's most
important war memorials during vio-
lent student demonstrations against
rising university fees.
Charlie Gilmour, 21, said he was
sorry for the "terrible insult" to the
thousands who died for the country.
Gilmour a Cambridge University
history student said he did
not realize that the monument he
climbed was the Cenotaph, which
commemorates Britain's war dead.
"I feel nothing but shame," he
said. "My intention was not to attack
or defile the Cenotaph. Running
along with a crowd of people who
had just been violently repelled by
the police, I got caught up in the
spirit of the moment"
Gilmour is the child of writer and
journalist Polly Samson and her
first husband, the poet Heathcote
Williams. He was adopted by the
Pink Floyd musician' after he and
Samson married.
Gilmour was among thousands of
students and youths protesting in
the streets of London on Thursday.
The demonstrations turned violent
when some students vandalized
buildings and threw objects at
police. Some attacked a car carrying
Prince Charles and his wife Camilla,
Duchess of Cornwall, to a royal func-
tion. The couple was unharmed.

Larry Hagman to visit
'Desperate Housewives'
NEW YORK Larry Hagman
will pay a visit to Wisteria Lane when
the former "Dallas" star appears
in a guest role on "Desperate
Housewives." :


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Thursday photo, Charlie Gilmour, the son of Pink Floyd guitarist David
Gilmour, is seen participating in a demonstration in central London against govern-
ment plans to triple tuition fees. Charlie Gilmour has issued a public apology for
climbing on top of one of Britain's most important war memorials and trying to rig a
British flag during the violent student protests against risinguniversity fees.


ABC said Hagman will play a love
interest of Stella Wingfield, who is
played by Polly Bergen on that net-
work's prime-time soap opera. Stella
is the mother of the character played
by series star Felicity Huffman.
The 79-year-old Hagman, best-
known as ruthless oil baron J.R.
, Ewing a quarter-century ago on the
long-running "Dallas," more recently
hhad a recurring role on "Nip/Tuck."
ABC didn't say Friday how soon
Hagman would arrive on "Desperate
Housewives" or how many episodes
he is signed for.

Injury forces Van Dyke
to cancel LA production
LOS ANGELES An injury has


forced Dick Van Dyke to cancel his
new musical show in Los Angeles.
Geffen Playhouse publicist Allison
Rawlings released a statement
Thursday that said Van Dyke is unable
to perform because of an injury to his
Achilles tendon, which began bother-
ing him last week. As a result, the the-
ater was forced to cancel the upcom-
ing run of "Dick Van Dyke Step in
Time: A Musical Memoir."
Van Dyke, who turns 85 on
Monday, performed in the preview
show Wednesday night, but Rawlings
said he aggravated the injury.
In the statement, Van Dyke said the
injury has forced him to be off his feet
for awhile and thanked everyone for
their understanding and support.

E Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Composer Elliott Carter is
102.
* Actress Rita Moreno is 79.
* Former California state
lawmaker Tom Hayden is 71.
* Pop singer David Gates
(Bread) is 70.
* Actress Donna Mills is 68.
* Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.)
is 67.
* Singer Brenda Lee is 66.


* Actress Lynda Day George
is 66.
* Actress Teri Garr is 63.
* Singer Jermaine Jackson
is 56.
* Rock musician Nikki Sixx
(Motley Crue) is 52.
* Rock musician Darryl
Jones (The Rolling Stones)
is 49.
* Actor Ben Browder is 48.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, RFla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ.Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivety or ser-
vice related credits will be issued. "
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or Ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax,
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks................. $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man charged with
cyber stalking

TALLAHASSEE -
Authorities have arrested
a Key West man on charg-
es he used Facebook to
sexually harass sorority
pledges at Louisiana Stite
University.
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement said
Friday that 27-year-old
Mitchell W. Hill also was a
suspect in similar cases at
schools in Florida and pos-
sibly other states.
Hill was arrested
Thursday on a Louisiana
warrant charging him with
video voyeurism and extor-
tion of female students.
Florida authorities said
someone using the name
"Marissa" and "Lexie" on
Facebook claimed to be
part df victims' pledging
process. The women said
he asked them for explicit
photographs and taunted
them.
Hill's lawyer did not
immediately return a call
seeking. comment.

Suspect saved
man, robbed wife

TITUSVILLE Police
are questioning the motives
of a central Florida conve-
nience store hero who per-
formed CPR on a customer
suffering a heart attack and
then stole a purse from the
victim's car.
Titusville police said the
hero turned villain on Dec.
3 when he performed CPR
on the man and even wait-
ed for paramedics to arrive.
In a cruel twist, authori-
ties said he comforted the
man's wife with a hug, then
snatched her purse and
coat before she took off for
the hospital.
The woman's husband
later died.
Police offered a reward
Thursday for tips leading to
his arrest.


THE WEATHER


" SUNNY


HI 68 L044


MOSTLY MOSTLY | MOSTLY
. SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


HI 48 L21 HI 51 LO 26 HI 60 LO 36


0 1,ADeco


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

United Way December luncheon
Leona White (left) and Sharon Hodges attended.Thursday's
United Way luncheon at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center.


Web assessment
tool introduced

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida has launched a new
web-based tool on education
assessment and standards
with parents in mind.
Education Commissioner
Eric Smith said Thursday
that it'll help school officials
better work with parents in
preparing their children for
success as national stan-
dards are introduced into
Florida's classrooms.
Through the Success
Measures Pathway Tool,
parents can submit the
school year, grade level and
anticipated courses their
students will be taking.
The tool then generates
a report on the tests for
those courses and the con-
tent the tests will cover.
It can be found at this
Department of Education
web page: www.fldoe.org/
SuccessMeasures

Boy charged with
killing parents

NAPLES A 14-year-
old southwest Florida boy
charged with fatally shoot-
ing his parents appeared


in court Friday morning,
surrounded by his grand-
mother and more than a
dozen family members.
Attorney Lee Hollander
said Alexander Crain is
"confused" and "in shock"
after being charged with
two counts of second-
degree murder.
Collier County Sheriff's
deputies arrived at the
Crain home Thursday after
a report of a gunshot and
found Crain walking down
the driveway with his hands
in the air. He told deputies
that his parents were inside
and that a gun was stashed
in the bathroom, according
to an arrest report.
Authorities said 40-year-
old Thomas Crain and 39-
year-old Kelly Crain died
from gunshot wounds
inside their home.
On Friday, Crain's grand-
mother requested to stand
by his side during the pro-
ceeding.
Assistant State Attorney
Rich Montecalvo said it
will take a few weeks to
determine if the boy will be
charged as an adult. If so,
he could face life in prison.
Crain is set to be arraigned
Dec. 30.


63/50


Tallahassee *
66/51 .,,
N\ /.
PanamaCity
64/50


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


* Vadosta
65/46
Lake City,
i8/44A




59
35
69
45
84 in 1972
23 in 1917


0.00"
0.04"
39.02"
0.74"
46.54"


* Jacksonville
,67/47


Sunday Monday


54 '32.z
52/26/s
58/39/s
61/37/pc
49/22/s
49/22/s
66/53/s
48/21/s
58/40/pc
56/38/s
52/24/s
55/30/s
45/25/s
50/28/s
45/20/s
55/35/pc
44/21/pc
56/39/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Cape Canaveral 68, 37. sh
Daytona Beach 67/33/sn


V + Ft. Lauderdale
linesville Daitona Beach Fort Myers
39/44 7248 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
70/44 Key West
0Orando Cape Canaveral Lake City
72/49 71/52 Lake City
72/ 4 Miami
TamIpae \ Naples
71/55 West Palm Beach Ocala
75/53 Orlando
*1 Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers, 77/56 0 Pensacola
75/54 Naples 4 Tallahassee
72/52 Miaomi Tampa
u. W.,4 76/58 Valdosta


Keyj west
75/64


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:17 a.m.
5:31 p.m.
7:17 a.m.
5:31 p.m.

11:26 a.m.
11:14 p.m.
11:55 a.m.


Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan.
13 21 27 4
First Full Last New


On this date in
1988, arctic cold
invaded the central
and eastern U.S.
Sault Sainte Marie,
Mich. reported a
record low of 14
degrees below zero,
and International
Falls, Minn. was
the cold spot in the
nation with a low of
25 degrees below
zero.


79/44/sh
73/49/sh
62/30/sh
61/28/sh
72/59/pc
60/27/sh
77/43/sh
72/48/sh
66/31/sh
68/35/sh
56/26/sh
56/29/pc
57/27/sh
68/47/sh
52/27/sh


W. Palm Beach 77/45/sh


4
MODOMIE
45 mnitesibum
Today's
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a scale from 0
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Daily Scripture


"The Lord your God will raise
up for you a prophet like me
from among you, from your fel-
low Israelites.You must listen to
him."


Deuteronomy 18:15


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CI,.TYAMN.AC -- -


F


WLQHER l yfl-cTHE-RONi^BH


H3.










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

More than $17,000 was
donated to local communi-
ty organizations during the
annual Lake City Medical
Center Volunteer Auxiliary
Christmas Brunch
Thursday.
The money for the dona-
tions is raised through the
Lighthouse Gift Shop in the
hospital, said Tina Haver,
president.
"We've made money
this year," she said. '"We've
made a lot of money. We
hope you enjoy it."
The auxiliary had a 20
percent increase in dona-
tions this year, Haver said.
Organizations receiv-
ing donations included:
Columbia County Senior
Services, United Way
of Suwannee Valley,
CARC, Another Way Inc.,
Christmas Dream Machine,
Gideon's International,
Christian Service Center,
March of Dimes, Have'n
Hospice, Columbia County
Humane Society, American
Cancer Society, Alzheimer's
Coalition, Tough Enough to


Wear Pink, Florida Gateway
College Foundations and
Pregnancy Care Center.
Mealy Jenkins Christmas
Dream Machine president
thanked the auxiliary for
the donation.


"I appreciate y'all," she
said. "Everything goes
back to the families. Keep
up the good work."
It's a wonderful thing for
the auxiliary to be able to
help each of the organi-


zations, Haver said. The
members worked hard in
the gift shop to help the
community.
"It's a blessing from God,"
she said.


Altrusa International sponsors tour of festive homes


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Altrusa International of Live Oak
is sponsoring a tour of decked out
and festive homes 12 5 p.m. today.
The tour begins at the Live Oak
Garden Club.
This is the organization's eighth
year. sponsoring the tour, siad


Marlene Giese, fundraiser commit-
tee chairman. The tour features
four homes in Live Oak and three in
Dowling Park.
Maps and directions to each home
'will be available at the clubhouse,
she said. The program will list each
home and its history.
Money raised from the tour ben-
efits local organizations in the area,


such a Vivid Visions.
"It's a fundraiser we do each
year," she said.
Tickets are $10. Contact Gi6se at
386-364-1947 for more information.
The garden club is located next to
Shands Hospital on County Road
136 in Live Oak.
"We appreciate anyone comoning
and participating in it," Giese said.


RAMP: CHS students build ramp to help woman

Continued From Page 1A


the hairdresser or social
activities with peers at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. When she saw
Woodard's need kept her
homebound, Robertson
contacted CHS seeking stu-
dent help.
"It was just awesome
to know that the kids
got some experience,"
Robertson said. "They got
to help someone. Not only
did they learn building, but
they got to help their com-
munity."
Debby Freeman,
Columbia County Senior
Services director, said as
people age, they lose the
abilities to do things they
once could. Projects such
as these allow elderly peo-
ple to stay in their homes
longer, she said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Margaret Woodard thanks CHS student John Bacon, 17, for
his help in constructing the ramp. 'I feel pretty good about
it,' Bacon said. 'It makes me feel good that when they need
something and I can help, then they get what they need.'


"It keeps people indepen- building
dent," Freeman said. teacher,
Jimmy Williams, CHS applied


construction
said students
estimation and


planning skills, such as fig-
uring how to use materials
without wasting. The expe-
rience for his students is
twofold, he said.
"We get to learn by doing
instead of reading about it,"
Williams said, "and then
they get to see the impact
on somebody else's life."
Construction students
Dalton Parker, 16, and John
Bacon, 17, said they enjoy
both the learning experi-
ence and the chance to
assist someone.
"It comes by me like
nothing," Bacon said. "I
just like helping people."
"I tell my kids to just try
to take any situation and
make it better," Williams
said. "That's kind of our
philosophy."


COMPLAINT: Claims discrimination, harassment

Continued From Page 1A


subject of discrimination based on
his race or in retaliation for work-
place complaints he has filed," wrote
Richard E. Stadler, city attorney.
Hughes initial supervisor was Sgt.
Clint VannBennekom, Stadler wrote.
After making complaints against
VannBennekom, Hughes was trans-
ferred at his request to a different
shift under Barfield. The allegations
of discrimination and retaliation
directed at Barfield were from May


10 Aug. 13.
Stadler investigated three sepa-
rate written complaints concerning
a hostile work environment filed by
Hughes with the LCPD, the city man-
ager and the EEOC, he wrote. The
investigation included interviews with
Hughes and other officers mentioned
and reviewing a video tape of a traffic
court case and a tape of a-disputed
dispatch incident.
There was no evidence that Sgt.


BLANK-FEST: Schedtiled for today


Continued From Page 1A

723 E. Duval St.
Jami Kurtz, coordinator
of Blank-Fest Florida, is
promoting this third annual
musical event for charity.
"I started two years ago
when the homeless shelter
closed down, and the tim-
ing just seemed right."
Blank-Fest began in New
York, with the media cov-
erage it received sparking
Kurtz's interest to bring it
to Lake City to help the
homeless during the cold
snaps of the winter season.
"I really liked the cause,
and I would like it to get
bigger and better every
year," said Kurtz.
"We collect blankets as


admission to the show, and
I give them to United Way
here in Lake City."
After the blankets are
received by United Way,
Jennifer Lee, the home-
less coordinator, conducts
a survey of the individuals
who come in and hands
out the blankets and other
necessities to those who
qualify.
"As soon as we get the
blankets, we sort through
them, keep the small ones
for the goodie bags and dis-
tribute the larger blankets
to community organiza-
tions, such as the Christian
Service Center," said Lee.
"It's been a true blessing


to be able to collaborate
with Jami, and she's been
awesome."
The show will take place
inside the RockStar, which
means only those 21 years
and above are allowed in.
However, any donations of
blankets can be given to
anyone at the United Way
or to Kurtz at the event.
Hunt said, "I want to
invite everyone out to sup-
port this event in any way
they can. We want to have
it every year, and outdo
ourselves year after year."
For more information
on the event, visit www.
myspace. com/blankfestflor-
ida.


Barfield's actions were based on offi-
cer Hughes' race, Stadler wrote.
"The actions complained about by
officer Hughes were sporadic, non-
threatening, and did not interfere
with his job performance," he wrote.
"Therefore these actions cannot form
the basis of a claim for a hostile work
environment."
It is uncertain when the EEOC will
make a finding on the complaint.


''In Memory-J-

of
)BettyJean

North
We love and
A\ miss you!
I lost my

( best friend .
\ and mother.-
Kim, Buck
Famly


.
, -


Computers donated

to Fort White kids in

afterschool program


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Several students who
attend the Fort White High
School afterschool pro-
gram were the recipients
of new computers that will
help them continue their
studies.
Jenee DeLaney, Fort
White High School teach-
er and tutor with the Able
Trust Grant program, said
the donated computers
came through a grant fund-
ed, by Florida High School
High Tech and the Ready
to Achieve Mentoring pro-
gram. Thursday seven
computers were donated to
students in the afterschool
program.
DeLaney said the after-
school tutoring/mentor-
ing program is designed
to keep students motivated
and on track academically.
As part of the program,
students meet afterschool



i^s~S i Fi"ikB


twice a week at Fort White
High School and other
sites where the program
is offered through Florida
Crown.
"This is awesome," said
Keith Hatcher, Fort White
High School principal about
the students getting the
computers. "The comput-
ers will give the kids anoth-
er tool for their education.
I give my appreciation to
everyone for allowing us to
do this."
The computers, Eee PC
Netbooks, have cameras,
are Internet ready with
wireless access an are load-
ed with the Windows 7. The
students will be allowed to
keep the computers.
"What's awesome about
this is the kids can take
the computers back and
forth to school for tutoring
and to do their homework,"
DeLaney said. "I'm thrilled
the kids are going to have
this opportunity."


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High School principal Keith Hatcher (front row,
seated) sits with Amber DeLoach; Elizabeth Wetherington
(back row from left) stands with students Emily Rojas, Jerel
Phillips, Joshua May and Kevin Poteat.


DOT: $27.5 million project

Continued From Page 1A


The traffic signal on
Brown Road will be replaced
and incorporated into the
new four-lane roadway.
Busscher said ,the DOT
traffic studies showed
increased volume of traffic
on the roadway. The proj-
ect was initially discussed
years ago.
"It's been a priority of
the county for quite a while
and we've seen the traf-
fic volume continually go
up on that segment of the
road," she said. "Funding
for capacity projects, to
add vehicle capacity to the
roadway, is hard to come
by, so it's taken us a while
to secure funding. The last
capacity project we did in
Columbia County was the
four lanes on State Road
47 between Interstate-75
and U.S. Highway 41. This
was the next segment that
was a priority of the county
commission and the City of
Lake City, to be able to add
lanes and have less (traffic)
congestion."


Busscher said the DOT
has already purchased all
of the right-of-way property
that is needed for the proj-
ect
Although the project is on
the DOTs 5-year work plan,
the project's final approval
must come from the state
legislature, Busscher said.
"We'll get that informa-
tion in the spring, when the
legislature approves our
budget on a yearly basis,"
she said. "Although we
work in a five-year cycle,
we still have to get approval
from the state legislature.
There's always the possibil-
ity that the project could
get cut because of funding
constraints, but right now
we have it in our tentative
work program for construc-
tion in 2013."
Anyone wishing to com-
ment on the proposed proj-
ect has until Dec. 30 to
give written comments to
DOT officials, which will
be included as part of the
public record.


Want to Reaty nyjoy the

H-1oldays Tid Year?


Then give yourself a wonderful gift and do your business bank-
ing at Peoples. At Peoples State Bank we understand what it
takes to make a business successful in our community. And
success is rarely achieved alone. Let our experienced banking
professionals provide financial solutions to help you grow
your business. With a little financial assistance from Peoples
you can spend less time worrying aboutyour business financ-
es and more time doing whatyou do best, running your busi-
ness. Stop by Peoples today and experience friendly service
and better banking foryourself. Peoples State Bank. Now
that's banking!


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W. US Hwy 90, Lake City FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES

STATE BANK


LCMC Volunteer Auxiliary donates

more than $17,000 to 15 charities


Courtesy photo
The Lake City Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary donated more than $17,000 to various
charities at its annual Christmas Brunch.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427














OPINION


Saturday, December I I, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


WikiLeaks

showed

no concern

for America

Many Americans
must be
delighted about
the trials and
travails plagu-
ing the WikiLeaks website and
its founder, Australian Julian
Assange. He and others have
shown no concern for our
nation and its men and women
in the military, after all.
Earlier this year, despite
warnings its action would
endanger U.S. troops,
WikiLeaks released thousands
of secret Defense Department
documents. Recently it began
making thousands of State
Department communications
public, even after U.S. officials
said the revelations would be
harmful to our country.
His website is taking its
lumps. Hackers have used
"denial of service" attacks to
keep WikiLeaks from making
secret documents public. Book-
selling giant Amazon stopped
hosting WikiLeaks on its web
servers.
Good. Assange deserves
every bit of trouble that can
be thrown at him. But none of
it will close the Pandora's Box
he opened. Beyond any doubt,
others are eager to emulate
Assange in disseminating
secret U.S. documents.
That means the only safe-
guard available is for the U.S.
Government to seal leaks
through which Assange and,
again, others can obtain
* information that threatens our
security as a nation and the
lives of our men and women in
the military. In all agencies of
government, that needs to be
done immediately.
E Jamestown (N.Y.) Post-Journal

HIGHLIG HTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Dec. 11.

On Dec. 11, 1936, Britain's
King Edward VIII abdicated
the throne in order to marry
American divorcee Wallis
Warfield Simpson.
In 1816, Indiana became
the 19th state.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


How to make the holidays better


Merry Christmas!
Happy Holidays!
The happiest'
time of the year!
Or, is it?
In reality, this is the time of
the year when sadness often
shows its ugly face. What goes
wrong?
We build up expectations
that the holidays will bring us
a breath of fresh air, joy and
good cheer. But often that's not
what we get. It's the first cold
weather of the year. We're away
from our usual activities that
take up our time and thoughts.
Winter days are shorter, with
less daylight. Lack of sunshine
can cause a seasonal depression
that psychologists call "seasonal
affective disorder," or SAD. We
spend more time indoors. We
see less of people we work with.
We have time on our hands.
We may get restless or bored.
Where is everybody? What's
everybody else doing? It can be
a lonely time.
If we feel sad or depressed,
what can we do about it? Most
people in the helping profes-
,sion now agree on the definition
of psychology as the scientific
study of thinking, behaving, and
feeling.
We sometimes feel happy,
sometimes sad. We think that
it's things that happen to us that
cause our feelings. But that's
only part of the story.
It turns out that it's not so
much what happens to us that
causes our emotions, but the
way we think about what hap-
pens, and what we do about it,
that causes our feelings.
Since those are things we can
do something about, we can do
something about making the
holidays better.
Here's how it works. Just like
a coin has two sides, we can
experience joy or depression.
If the way we think can cause
the way we feel, the first thing
I


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


we can do is to make a choice
to make the holidays happy and
meaningful.
What makes you happy?
Being with people, or quiet time
by your self?
Finding life fun, funny, loving,
rewarding, exciting, challeng-
ing, creative, productive?
Make a list of things you
enjoy, like particular television
shows, parties, games, reading,
listening to music, attending
church, creating something,
building or making something,
or just spending time with folks
you care about. Shopping? Just
thinking of these things and
making the list will probably
help, and should motivate you
to pursue them.
Research has shown that just
thinking about things you enjoy
produces almost the same joy
as doing them. If you close your
eyes and picture your favorite
place, like a tropical beach, and
picture yourself doing your
favorite things, like sailing or
visiting with friends, your brain'
doesn't see much difference
between that and actually being
there.
That's why meditation and
visualization work.
Just as thinking can influence
your mood, so can behavior.
One study divided subjects into
two groups for an interview.
One group was told to focus on
maintaining a smile while doing
the interview, and the other
group was given no smiling


instructions.
After the interviews, the
participants were asked to rate
their level of happiness on a
scale of 1 to 10. The results
clearly demonstrated that the
people who smiled during the
interview reported feeling
significantly happier after the
interview.
Smiling is a behavior that
gives our own bodies the mes-
sage that we're happy. To make
it even better, if we're smiling
through our day, others will be
more open and friendly towards
us.
If behavior (what we do)
influences our feelings, why not
choose to do things you really
enjoy doing? What are things
we could do that might make
your holiday merrier? Do you
like Christmas tree lighting
ceremonies, or parades? How
about going to one of these
public Christmas parties, where
you take a nametag off the tree
and give that child a gift? How
about visiting a senior center or
a retirement home and bringing
some cookies?
Most homeless centers have
lots of donated food, but need
volunteers to help serve special
holiday meals. Come up with
some things you can do to make
your own and others' holidays
happier and more meaningful
this year.
This isn't the complete
answer. Sometimes depression
can be too much for us.
If you have serious symptoms
like problems sleeping, change
in your diet, feelings of worry,
and lack of joy or hope in your
life, I'd suggest seeking out pro-
fessional help, from your doctor
or a mental health professional.
There is valuable and effec-
tive help available. Make it a
great holiday season.
* Contact Robert Denny at (386)
454-4950.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


No longer associated
with Guardian program
I would like to thank my
friends in the community.
As of Nov. 30, I was no longer
associated with or working with
the Guardian ad Litem program
as a volunteer.
I have volunteered with the
Guardian ad Litem for more
than 12 years, working closely
with children and their needs.


I feel that I have always looked
outside the box to help children
or provide for their needs. I
have enjoyed and loved every
part of working with the chil-
dren.
During my 12 years with the
program, I approached many in
the community and my friends
to assist in the support of the
children and the program. I was
involved in the fundraising for
the program. I thank every per-


son who helped me make this a
safe time for the children.
Therefore, it is with a heavy
heart that I must advise that I
am no longer associated with
the Guardian ad Litem program.
However, I will continue
working with children in our
community in a volunteer role,
giving children in need all of my
support and love.
Helen George
Lake City


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


Lesson

in proper

English


usage

once read that we have a
hormone that provides a
certain amount of inhibi-
tion against speaking our
minds. As we age we lose
that hormone.
All I can say is, "uh-oh."
It's already happening to me.
I know this because of ho.w
often I mentally and lately
actually correct other peo-
ple's English. Just this morning
I sent an e-mail back to a friend
with a correction. She used "I
could care less" when of course
she meant, "I couldn't care
less."
What kind of a person cor-
rects other people's language
use? Well, a curmudgeon, thafs
who. I am increasingly becom-
ing one.
Now I'm the first to admit
that I give editors snits because
I will often deliberately or
otherwise break the rules
of grammar. Actually, because
I went to grade school in the
1970s, I never actually learned
the rules of grammar. I just
kind of felt my way along. So,
for instance, I like to start sen-
tences with "and," apparently a
"no-no." I also tend to use sen-
tence fragments. A lot. And I'll
probably never get."which" vs.
"that" quite right
Now even I accept that
sometimes "you" just sounds
better than "one," even when
the latter is technically correct,
so okay. You don't have to go
out of your way to sound stiff.
I'm even comfortable with the
politically correct use of some
pronouns. "He" used to often
mean, "he or she" and no one
was particularly offended. Now
one person is often rendered
"them" for the sake of gender
politics. "Check with your
child, then. have them return
the form." Ick, but at least I
know why it's happening. But
still, there are a few iterations
of the English language that
make me simply, increas-
ingly, crazy. Things that go way
beyond "I did good" when one
does "well."
Here are a few more:
"Anyways" is not a word.
Ever. "Anyway" is.
"I literally blew up at her!"
Well, no, unless you physically
exploded into bits on the spot,
you did not "literally" blow-up
at anyone.
"I feel badly" about some-
thing tells me that you have
. poor nerve endings in the tips
of your fingers. Rather, you
probably felt "bad" about some-
thing.
But the mother of all mis-
takes, the one that causes
me mental fireworks partly
because I routinely hear it from
newscasters, in movies, and
even from my children's teach-
ers, is the misuse of pronouns
when one probably thinks he
or she is being very proper
indeed. "Would you like to go
with David and I?" is wrong,
wrong, wrong. One uses
together whatever pronouns
one would use separately. I
would say, "would you like to
go with me?" So, if I ask you
to go to the movies with "us," I
would say "please go with Dave
and me."
More to the point, five years
ago none of this would have
phased me. Not anymore. That
protective hormone is dropping
by the day.
Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


4A











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
A Christmas Carol

A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. today at the High
Springs Community Theater.
Tickets are available at The
Framery on W. Baya and at high-
springscommunitytheater com.

Canned food drive
Peoples State Bank is hosting
a canned food drive from now
until Jan. 4 at either branch loca-
tion in Lake City. Donated items
will benefit the Food Bank of
Suwannee Valley.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County Health
Department is offering flu shots
by appointment Monday through
Friday. The cost is $25, and
Medicare Part B is accepted.
Pneumonia vaccinations are also
available for those eligible at $40.
Call for an appointment at 758-
1069.

VA flu shots
Enrolled and -eligible veterans
may still obtain a seasonal flu
vaccination until Jan. 28 at the
Lake City VA Medical Center.
Hours are 8 a.m. noon and
12:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m. Call the
Veteran Flu Hotline at 352-376-
1611, ext. 3358.

Festival of Lights

The Festival of Lights is 5:30
- 9 p.m. today until Dec. 31
at Stephen Foster Folk Culture
CenterState ParkinWhite Springs.
Park entrance fees are $2 per per-
son. Visit www.FloridaStateParks.
org/StephenFoster or call 877-635-
3655.

Holiday donations
The Haven Hospice Attic
Resale Store is in need of dona-
tions, such as cookies and bev-
erages, as well as inexpensive
gifts that -will appeal to children
and adults in their lives for Kids'
Holiday Shopping Night at the
Attic. The event gives children in
need the opportunity to purchase
specially-priced gifts for family
members using "Attic Bucks."
Call 386-752-0230 or go to haven-
hospice.org. -

Basketball registration
The Boys and Girls Club of
Columbia County are taking reg-
istrations now though Dec. 17 for
the basketball program. All boys
and girls ages 6 -14 are eligible to
play. For information on fees and
practices call 386-752-4184, or
stop by the club on Jones Way.

Blanket drive

Catholic Charities is having
its Warm Wishes blanket drive


JaSOUNl I fEv VYW LRLrae r LyR nerpuote

Chamber of Commerce celebrates season with a mixer
Karen Green (center left), owner of GeGee's Studio, dances with Joanie Kniseley during a Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce Mixer on Thursday. Pictured are Ben Grier (from left), Green and Kniseley, Bre-
Anne Shaw, Yolanda Amadeo, Shirley deTreville and Tonya Townsend.


through Dec. 23. New throws,
single and double blanks will be
donated to those in need. Call
386-754-9180.

Matching Funds Drive
The Christian Service Center
is having its Matching Funds
Drive from now until Dec. 31.
All donations will be doubled by
local sponsors. Mark your check
"Matching Funds" and mail to
Christian Service Center, PO.
Box 2285 Lake City, FL 32056.
Call 755-1770.

Sunday
Crafts Bazaar and Festival
The annual "Lake City Holiday
Crafts Bazaar & Festival" is 12
- 5 p.m. Sunday at the Lake City
Mall. The event will feature the
"Children's Section" entertain-
ment, live vendor demonstrations
and more. Visit www.lakecityba-
zaar.com.

A Christmas Carol

A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 2 p.m. Sunday at
the- High Springs Community
Theater. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya and
at highspringscommunitytheater.
com.

Monday
Restaurant Meeting
The Columbia Federated
Republican Women Organization
meet at 7 p.m. Monday at the
Guangdong Chinese Restaurant
in the Lake City Mall. For those


who want to enjoy the buffet,
come at 6:30 p.m. For further
information contact Gayle Cannon
at 386-303-2616.

Tuesday
Shopping night at the Attic
Kids' Holiday Shopping Night
at the Attic is 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Haven Hospice
Attic Resale Store, 1077 US
Highway 90 W., Suite 120. The
event gives children in need the
opportunity to purchase special-
ly-priced gifts for family members
using "Attic Bucks." Festivities
will include gift wrapping, pho-
tos with Santa, punch and cook-
ies-all free of charge. There will
also be door prizes and special
drawings. All children must be
accompanied by an adult. The
event is open to the public. Call
386-752-0230 or go to havenhos-
pice.org.

Wednesday
Enrollment and Dinner
SHINE is holding open
enrollment from 12:30-4 p.m.
Wednesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The R.O.T.C.
will also be holding a dinner at
6:30 p.m. The center is located at
628 SE Allison Court. For more
information, call 386-755-0235.

Friday
Cultural Presentation
A cultural presentation at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center at
1 p.m. on Dec. 17 in the Reading
Room. The center is located at
628 SE Allison Court. For more
information call, 386-755-0235.


A Christmas Carol

A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Friday at the
High Springs Community
Theater. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya and
at highspringscommunitytheater
com.

Saturday, Dec. 18

FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American Cultural
Society of Lake City announces
a Christmas party taking place
from 6:30 10:30 p.m. Dec. 18 at
the Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. Enjoy a night of cul-
ture, dancing, and entertainment,
and possibly become a member
of FACS. For more information,
contact Bob Gavette at 386-965-
5905.

Pancake breakfast

The RCC/AMN Inc. is having
a pancake breakfast 7 a.m.-11
a.m. Dec. 18 at the Richardson
Community Center. The tickets
are $5 and the breakfast will
consist of pancakes,- Nettle's
sausage, grits, eggs and orange
juice. All proceeds will benefit
the 14 & Under and 12 & under
boys basketball teams. Toomake
a donation or for more informa-
tion contact Mario Coppock or
Nicole Smith at 386-754-7096.

Theatrical Play

The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts "The Life of a
Christian Teenager" at 6:15 p.m.
Dec. 18. The theater is located
at 348 N. Marion Avenue. Call


386-344-0319.

Flapjack breakfast
A Relay For Life fundraising
flapjack breakfast is 8 10 a.m.
Dec. 18 at Applebee's. The meal
will include pancakes, scram-
bled eggs, homefries, bacon,
sausage, juices, coffee and tea
all you can eat. Tickets are $10.
Of the proceeds $7 will go to
Relay for Life.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the radio--
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Dec. 18 at
the High Springs Community,
Theater. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya and
at highspringscommunitytheater
com.

Gift wrapping
Sevepro is hosting a gift wrap-
ping fundraiser from 8 a.m. 1
p.m. Dec. 18 at Lowes. Donations
will be accepted. Money raised
will go toward Relay For Life.

Cartwheel-a-thon
BARD Gymnastics is hosting
a cartwheel-a-thon 2 p.m.-4 p.m
Dec. 18 at the Lake City Mall.
Sponsors may pledge so much
money per cartwheel or make
a one-time donation. Checks
can be made to the Christian
Service Center and the dona-
tion is tax deductible. Call BARD
Gymnastics at 386- 752-1710.


Tuesday, Dec. 21
Leads Club #1 meeting

The next Columbia County
Chamber Leads Club #1 meeting
is 8 a.m. Dec. 21 at Holiday Inn &
Suites. Breakfast is $6 per person.
Leads Clubs are dynamic groups
of Chamber Partners who meet
bi-monthly to exchange business
leads and ideas with fellow busi-
ness professionals. Call 386-752-
3690.

Theatre performance
Come watch the Geri-Actors
perform live on stage at 6:30 p.m.
Dec. 21 in the Dining Hall of the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE Allison
Court For ticket information con-
tact Patrick at 386-755-0235.

Wednesday, Dec. 22
Theatre performance
The Geri-Actors serve up
a Matinee Performance from
11 11:45 a.m. and from 12:30
- 1:30 p.m. Dec. 22 in the
Dining Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The per-
formance is free to the public.
The center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court. For more infor-
mation call 386-755-0235.


OBITUARIES
------- .------------------ rii 1.1a?> J'Lfi, 1ik~. ^ iiiw laltaehron~tir~ifm


Clark Edward Dopp
1920 -2010
Clark Edward Dopp passed
peacefully and painlessly on
November 27, 2010 at 9:15 p.m.
Mr. Dopp was 90 years old. He
was born April
19, 1920, the
second child
of George E.
and Fredricka
Dopp (Myers)
in Douglas,
North Da-
kota. At the
age of 14, he and his family
moved to Fargo, North Dakota.
On August 1, 1951, Mr. Dopp
married Bertha Johnson of
Fargo. They remained husband
and wife until Mrs. Dopp's
passing in 1996. Mr. and Mrs.
Dopp had one child, Steven,
who was born in Fargo in 1953.
While living in southern Califor-
nia, Mr. and Mrs. Dopp were avid
campers and enjoyed country and
western music. Their son contin-
ued to live with them until his
graduation from college in 1977.
In 1982, Mr. and Mrs. Dopp
moved to Grants Pass, Oregon.
While in Grants Pass Mr. Dopp
regularly frequented the Jelly
Donut shop and was known for
riding a red, four-wheel, electric
mobility scooter around town.
In 2004, Mr. Dopp moved to
Lake City, Florida and resided
with his son and daughter-in-law
(Rita Dopp). While in Lake City
Mr. Dopp continued to be known
for riding a red, four-wheel,


electric mobility scooter around-
town. He was a regular visitor of
the Lake City Wal-Mart store. In
late 2009, Mr. Dopp moved to
Baya Pointe Nursing Home and
Rehabilitation Center of Lake
City, Florida. While at Baya
Pointe he was known for his gre-
garious, outgoing personality and
his love of chocolate milkshakes.
A memorial service will be held
for Mr. Dopp sometime dur-
ing the spring in Fargo, North
Dakota. The family requests
that, in lieu of flowers, dona-
tions be made in his memory
to United Way of Suwannee
Valley, 325 NE Hernando Av-
enue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 S. Lake City,
FL 32025 (386) 752-1954

Samuel Ray Moore
Samuel Ray Moore, "Sam" age
34, of Lake City, Florida passed
away Wednesday, December 8,
2010 at his home in Lake City,
FL. The St. Petersburg, FL na-
tive had resided in Lake City
for the past eight years having
moved from Live Oak. Sam
worked as a tile setter in con-
struction and in his spare time
enjoyed fishing and football es-
pecially the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers. He had the biggest heart
in the world and his family meant
more to him than anything.
He is survived by his father, Ray
Moore, Jr., St. Petersburg, FL;


his mother, Mary Jane Sanders,
Live Oak, FL; Fiance, Whitney
Taylor, Lake City, FL; two sons,
Jacob Dicks and Ethan Moore
both of Lake City, FL; two
brothers, Jesse Moore, St. Pe-
tersburg, FL and Joshua Sanders,
Live Oak, FL; one sister, Stacie
Hartsfield, White Springs, FL.
Memorial. services will be
held 11:00 AM Wednesday,
December 15th, 2010 at his
mother's residence, 4882
85th Road, Live Oak, FL.
Please sign the guestbook at
www. harrisfuneralhomeinc. net.
HARRIS FUNERAL HOME &
CREMATIONS, INC., 932 N.
OhioAve., Live Oak, FL386-364-
5115 is in charge ofarrangements.

Don Dennis Weiffenbach,
M.D.
Don Dennis Weiffenbach, M.D.,
74, passed away December 8,
2010 at his home in High Springs,
FL. Dr. Wei-
ffenbach was
born, Febru-
ary 29, 1936.
in Hermann,
Missouri and
grew up in
Clearwater,
FL. He gradu-
ated ftom the -
University of
Florida and the '"
University of
Miami School
of Medicine. He loved medicine,
and was board certified in Emer-


agency Medicine. Dr. Weiffen-
bach served in the United States
Navy as a Lieutenant after grad-
uation. He was in General Prac-
tice with L.G. Landrum, M.D.
for 12 years in Lake City, FL and
practiced emergency medicine
in Lake City, the Florida Keys,
and St. Augustine until his retire-
ment in 1999. He was preceded
in death by his parents, Eugene
and Mae Weiffenbach and his
brother, Gene Weiffenbach, M.D.
He is survived by his wife,
Elizabeth; son, David Weiffen-
bach; daughters, Marjorie (Ken)
Barber, Heidi (Robert) Spurling,
and Patti Brooks; stepchildren,
Tom Webb, Michele (Clint) Van-
Bennekom, and M. Scott (Gina)
Thomas; former wife, Betty
(Cliff) McKay, and 11 grand-
children also survive. Dr. Wei-
ffenbach loved the outdoors, and
was an avid fisherman & hunter.
He never met a stranger, and was
devoted to his family and friends.
A wake will be held at the family
home and friends are invited to
visit between 1:00 p.m. until 4:00
p.m. on Sunday, December 12,
2010. In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests that those wishing to
make donations, make a gift to
Hospice or other favorite charity.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 S. Lake City,
FL 32025 (386) 752-1954
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


remember "
r eachday v
so special
and sweet,
anS


much more
Sinourfuture v
v ifyou will

Marry Me!


Do You Need to

POPTIHE

QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!

755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm


I~ ~ ~ d hav to be plce by 4 ip/ jgfl
I~ ~~~3dy prio to aperac in A_ iBfllfI<'fB


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I -













FAITH


1 1,2010


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


BRIEFS


Angie Land
angieland3@windstreom.net


Bible


shows


other.


rooms

Have you
noticed how
every single
holiday com-
mercial prom-
ises that this is ."most won-
derful time of the year?"
Now, don't get me
wrong, I love the holidays,
but rarely does the real
world always live up to
those promises.
What about those years
we must face Christmas
without a loved one
because of death, conflict-
ing schedules, unresolved
conflict or even divorce, or
maybe just too many miles.
Any of these can leave us
q g discouraged and
ering how in the
world to cope. I think Mary
and Joseph knew a little bit
about that.
"So Joseph also went up
from the town of Nazareth
in Galilee to Judea, to
Bethlehem, the town of
David, because he belonged
to the house and line of
David. He went there to
register with Mary, who
was pledged to be married
to him and was expecting a
child. While they were there,
the time came for the baby
to be born, and she gave
birth to her first-born, a son.
She wrapped him in cloths
and placed him in a man-
ger, because there wds no
room for them in the inn."
Luke 2:4-7
About that first labor
pain, Mary had to be think-
ing, "This is not how it was
supposed to be!"
Those pretty Nativity
scenes we set up each year
are wonderful decorations,
but the real deal was dirty
and smelly!
Instead of a soft, clean
bed, she gave birth on the
floor of a stable. Instead
of her mother and other
women tending to her, she
was alone with Joseph, who
was, no doubt, as over-
whelmed as she was.
But do you remember
those shepherds who came
to see the baby Jesus?
Consider the fact that if
Mary and Joseph had been
anywhere else, they would
have missed it. Shepherds
were not exactly high on
the social ladder, but God
chose them be the first wit-
nesses of the birth of his
Son. Who better to under-
stand the amazing truth
that God had just provided
the perfect "Lamb" that
would one day be the sacri-
fice to take away the sins of
the world?
Could it be that when
we feel like there is no
room for us'someplace, it
is because God has made
room for us somewhere
else?
Try this perspective
when dealing with holiday
plans for your family: If
something causes you to
miss family celebrations,
look around to see where
God is making room for
you.
* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie Land,
director of the Family Life
Ministries of the Lafayette
,Baptist Association.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sister Maria Parousia leads students during a religious studies class at Saint Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother church in
Avondale, Pa. The Latino community of this farming area supports six Spanish-language Masses at five churches each
week. Last year it had the most baptisms about 425 of any parish in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia according to
the Rev. Frank Depman.


Devout Hispanic Catholics


get church in Pennsylvania


By KATHY MATHESON
Associated Press
AVONDALE, Pa.
When the
Rev.
Frank
Depman
came to
this farming area in 1990
to serve Latino Roman
Catholics, he borrowed
space in a church to cel-
ebrate one weekly Mass
in Spanish.
Today, the Latino
community supports
six Spanish-language
Masses at five churches
each week. Last year it
had the most baptisms
- about 425 of any
parish in the Archdiocese
of Philadelphia, Depman
said.
The growth has turned
spiritual life into a series
of logistical challenges
for Latinos as they try to
schedule an increasing
number of liturgies, wed-
dings, funerals, baptisms,
first communions and
quinceaneras rites of
passage similar to Sweet
Sixteens.
Now, with the sup-
port of Cardinal Justin
Rigali and the help of a
generous benefactor, the
community has its own
parish and soon will have
its own 500-seat house of


worship.
"We've never had a
church, so this is just
huge for us," said parish-
ioner Cynthia DeStafney,
37. "It's kind of beyond
words."
Catholic church clos-
ings and parish con-
solidations have become
common in urban areas
that are losing popula-
tion. But semi-rural
Chester County, about
35 miles southwest of
Philadelphia, is one of the
fastest-growing regions in
Pennsylvania.
When Depman arrived
20 years ago, there were
about 1,000 Catholic
Latinos split between
Puerto Ricans and
Mexicans who largely
worked on area mush-
room farms. There are
now about 12,000, nearly
all of Mexican heritage,
with a median age of 18,
Depman said.
The Hispanic com-
munity uses the facili-
ties at five area Catholic
churches, but only when
the buildings are not
occupied by the home
parishioners. That cre-
ates a diaspora and often
gives short shrift to
Hispanic cultural tradi-
tions, Depman said.
The priest described
two hours of removing all


traces of festivities at a
borrowed church in West
Grove immediately after
the feast of Our Lady of
Guadalupe, patron saint
of Mexico. Normally, that
celebration is spread over
several days, he said.
The community's
dilemma caught the atten-
tion of Rocco Abessinio,
CEO of Applied Card
Systems in nearby Glen
Mills. He offered a large
donation to help build
a church, though more
funds are being raised to
add a rectory, social hall
and other amenities.
"I just gave them a
good head start, that's
all," Abessinio said. "I
saw the plight of these
people, they had to use
all these other churches.
... It's a shame they didn't
have their own facilities."
On Oct. 12, Cardinal
Rigali established St.
Rocco Parish, dedicat-
ing it to a 14th-century
religious pilgrim credited
with curing plague vic-
tims in Italy. St. Rocco
shares his name with
both Abessinio and a
church (San Roque) in
Guanajuato, Mexico,
where Depman said
many local parishioners
have roots.
The church is being
built on 18 acres behind


the parish's social ser-
vices center in Avondale.
Plans are to dedicate the
finished building, which
will have a Mexican-style
plaza, during the feast of
St. Rocco in August.
Church officials would
not disclose the project's
cost, but said it prob-
ably would not be under
construction,without
Abessinio's help. Msgr.
Hugh Shields, the archdi-
ocese's vicar for Hispanic
Catholics, called it "a sign
of hope amid difficult
times."
Officials also declined
comment on the previ-
ous legal troubles of
Abessinio's company,
which deals in subprime
credit cards and was sued
by several states over
alleged deceptive business
practices. The suits were
. resolved within the past
few years through financial
settlements, court orders.
or other means.
Depman described
Abessinio as "a generous,
honest and determined
businessman who has
helped the (Hispanic)
community achieve its
dream."
Latinos comprise about
13 percent of the archdio-
cese's 1.5 million members
but represent about a third
of Catholics nationwide.


Fundamentalist
couple convicted
PHILADELPHIA A
fundamentalist Christian
couple who relied on
prayer, not medicine, to
cure their dying toddler
son was convicted Friday of
involuntary manslaughter
and child endangerment.
Herbert and Catherine
Schaible of Philadelphia
face more than a decade in
prison for the January 2009
pneumonia death of 2-year-
old Kent.
"We were careful to make
sure we didn't have their
religion on trial but were
holding them responsible
for their conduct," jury fore-
man Vince Bertolini, 49, told
The Associated Press. "At
the least, they were guilty
of gross negligence, and
(therefore) of involuntary
manslaughter."
The Schaibles, who have
six other children, declined'
to comment as they left the
courthouse to await sentenc-
ing Feb. 2.

Fire suspects
to plead guilty
TYLER, Texas Two
men indicted in a string of
arson fires set at churches
in East Texas have said
they will plead guilty next
week.
The Tyler Morning
Telegraph reported Friday
that 20-year-old Jason
Bourque and 22-year-old
Daniel George McAllister
waived their right to a jury
trial during a hearing in
Tyler on Thursday. They
said they will plead guilty
at a plea hearing scheduled
for Wednesday. Sentencing
is scheduled for Jan. 10.

Church designates
US apparition site
CHAMPION, Wis.
- The Roman Catholic
Church on Wednesday
designated a Wisconsin
spot where an apparition of
the Virgin Mary allegedly
appeared three times to a
Belgian-born nun in 1859
as the only of its kind in
the United States.
The Shrine of Our Lady
of Good Help at Champion,
just east of Green Bay near
Lake Michigan, has long
been a popular destination
for the faithful. But it was
only in the last two years
that the Diocese of Green
Bay undertook the official
process to earn the distinc-
tion that now puts it in
company with renowned
holy apparition sites includ-
ing Lourdes, France;
Guadalupe, Mexico; and
Fatima, Portugal.
* Associated Press


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Women's conference
Birthing the Promise Women's
Conference 2010 is at 10 a.m.
today at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church. Speakers include
Prophetess Tara Williams,
Evangelist Tia Jefferson-Carrol
of West Palm Beach, the Rev.
Angela Anderson of Gainesville
and Minister Michelle Gray of
Alabama. The church is located
at 541 NE Davis Ave. For more
information, contact Shawana at
386-344-0444.

Sunday
Church anniversary
The New Mt. Pisgah A.M.E.
Church holds its 133rd church
anniversary at 10:30 a.m. and 3
p.m. Sunday. The 3 p.m. service
will have the Rev. Charles E.
Graham as guest speaker, who
will be leading the service. The
church is located at 345 NE


Washington St. For more infor-
mation, contact Barbara at 386-
752-4997, or Dot at 386-758-9263.

Christmas musical
A Christmas Musical led by the
Praise Team is 10 a.m. Sunday at
First Presbyterian Church. There
is only one service this Sunday.

Bluegrass gospel band
The Watkins Family Bluegrass
Gospel Band from North Georgia
is performing at 11 a.m. Sunday
at Tabernacle Baptist Church.
A love offering will be collected.
The church is located off of east
Highway 90 just past the S&S
Food store gas station on the
right, heading east toward the
Lake City Airport. The address is
144 SE Montrose Ave. Call Steve
Andrews, 386 961 8130.

Friday
Christmas musical drama
Wesley Memorial United


Methodist Church is presenting a
Christmas story of family, friend-
ship, forgiveness and faith 7 p.m.
Friday, 4 p.m. Saturday and 6
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 19. The church
is located at 1272 SW McFarlane
next to Summers Elementary
School. There is no charge and
the community is invited.

Sunday, Dec. 19
Christmas Play
The production of Searching
For "Christ"mas is at 6 p.m. Dec.
19 at First Full Gospel Church.
Admission is free to this play. The
church is located at the corner
of Washington Street and Jones
Way. For more information call
386-365-4501.

Christmas Cantata
A'Christmas Cantata led by the
Christmas Choir and instrumen-
tal soloists is 10 a.m. Dec. 19 at
First Presbyterian Church. There
is only one service this Sunday.


Friday, Dec. 24
Christmas pageant
A Christmas pageant led by the
Praise Team and Joy Singers is 7
p.m. Dec. 24 at First Presbyterian
Church. A Christmas Eve Service
of Lessons and Carols led by the
Chancel Choir and the Chancel
Bell Ringers is 10 p.m.

Spirit of Christ service
A Christmas Eve service with
Eucharist is 5 p.m. at Spirit of
Christ Lutheran Church. Light
refreshments to follow at 6 p.m.
Contact 386-752-3807.
Submit Church Notes items
in writing no later than 5 p.m.
Monday the week prior to an
event by e-mail to arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com, fax to (386)
752-9400 or drop-off at 180 E.
Duval St., Lake City. Call (386)
754-0425 with questions. Church
Notes run as space is available
each Saturday.


Saturday, December


6A










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010 7/


ThA.U(Mate CoKeetio

We are more connected

than ever before;
communication is a basic


e


Each time we come to God
in prayer we can expect

to connect with Him, our
source of all that is wise

and good. Keeping in touch
with Him through prayer can

have an incredible impact on
our lives! As we worship this

week, may we remember
to thank God for the divine
communication of prayer,

thie ultimate connection.


Saturday
2 Peter


Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com
I


M North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
i Jobber




Ho Inc.
"Quality ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week.
1036 E. Dual St. Lake Cit FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat. iresh Produce!
I can d Al ins, th iu h (S n, eneh nth'
P ,llhpplan J4 1;

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A .
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
'Wedneday Ser-i e 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
.493 N V ValVreJJeifry Rrd
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed, Fam. Bible Study 7:00OPM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S' 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave., 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OULIVETrMISSIONARYBAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will &Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. *752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
Sunday Worship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM


AWANA
Evening Worship
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation)
Children's Ministry
Youth Worship
Prayer Meeting


Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8121/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

^--.-


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:
Bible Study .9:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
EveningWorship 6:15PM
Wednesday;
AWANA 5:45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 6:15 PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274.
SundaySchool 10AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANM CATHOUC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court- *.-14 u
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass -, 15'AM 10:31i.AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.'755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM

NEW HORIZON
church of Christ
Directions & Times 755-1320
Jack Exum,r., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen* 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SundayWorship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon:The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music. Dr. Alfonso Levy
S r- -v


.-. -.,


need and we expect it to b

i instant. Consider another,
more unearthly form of

communication.. .prayer.


No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


-.Z" -'
^^-" 'j
& iss, -.


--qw


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MorningWorship
Contemporary Service 8:30AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488
WESLEYMEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane* 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Nurseri priroded
Pralitise Wurhip f.li'1PM
AWI.A 'i.xi9.,' I t'ed 110PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
it V we.sleymitrn Cam
WAIERIOWs CONGREGAIIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U S. 90q run 'an o toie: ri. ei iin IluAry
Indridiii'inMOlDnira
Sunday .Sichool 9:45AM
Sun.Wot,'hip IlAM&6PM
Wed, Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Suridi \or')hip 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Yuthl Minnrry. Lnildrreni Mini' ry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Service 10:00AM
NURSERYPROVIDED
Pastor Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE loriet waVy : NE 'ashirignwn it.
uinddy S:h,.l 101111i AM
M.rningW\%irship 11:00AM
Earigelisnrc Srerice 6:00 PM
'Ouuli Seraies wednedjv. 7:00PM
Mid-ner Servite tednedai 7:00PM
-or infk, all 'y, ."s E r ',,nt ef.i:.n.r
Pal:wr. Rev Sian Eli

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left, *755-2525
Lead Pastor Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move",
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones '752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First a.d Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3.00 PM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIAEVANGELICA
APOSENTO ALTO
17077 25th Rd- L/CFL 32055
Service Fri: 7:00PM, Sun: 1:00PM
Arturo Suarez* 386-754-1836
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 11:0OAM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church- Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM


752-1293!


Toa. -inthsChrc iretoy alA55540


CClay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440






DAY ON"



Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemounti Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday







%ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
I ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSIUAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
Heating & Air Condioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


4 n. 752-2308 m
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST* LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
'stret 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residenti:d & mninilerc.d
755-6142







To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Sunday Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah 2 Peter
35.1-10 55.1-13 56.1-8 60.1-22 1.1-21


Friday
2 Peter


2.1-22 3.1-18


5:30 PM
6:00 PM

5PM
6PM
6:00 PM
6:00 PM


Call










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010


With Obama, Clinton urges Dems to back tax deal


By BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent

WASHIN .ON Bill Clinton
implored Democrats to back
the tax-cut deal that President
Barack 0' ama negotiated with
Republic, .s as the former presi-
dent m; .e a surprise appearance
with Obama in the White House
briefing room Friday and later
took over the podium.
"I don't believe there is a bet-
ter deal out there," Clinton told
reporters who'd been summoned
at a moment's notice to see the
former chief executive back the
current one. Clinton and Obama
had just finished a private meet-
ing in the Oval Office.
Obama said it was a "ter-
rific meeting" and then yielded
to Clinton. The voluble former
president took center stage, and
Obama left part-way through his
remarks, saying he had holiday
parties to attend. Clinton not only
provided an economic tutorial but
riffed on several topics, including
the need for the Senate to ratify a
U.S.-Russia nuclear treaty.
"Both sides are going to have
to eat some things they don't
like," Clinton told reporters about
the tax deal. "We don't want to
slip back into a recession. We've
got to keep this thing going and
accelerate its pace. I think this is
the best available option."
The pact would extend cuts in
income tax rates for all earners
that would otherwise expire next
month, renew long-term jobless
benefits and trim Social Security
taxes for one year. A number of
liberal Democrats say it gives
away too much to Republicans,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama looks on as former President Bill Clinton speaks in the briefing room of the White


House in Washington Friday.

and a provision that's particu-
larly irksome to Democrats cuts
estate taxes for the wealthiest
Americans.
Nonetheless the measure
appears headed for Senate approv-
al after negotiators added a few
relatively modest sweeteners to
promote ethanol and other forms
of alternative energy. It's unclear
whether House Democrats, who
are most opposed, will be able to
demand changes that go much
further.


Clinton gave the package his
full-throated endorsement, even
while noting that he opposes the
extension of upper-income tax
cuts though he himself will
benefit from it.
"I personally believe this is a
good deal and the best he could
have gotten under the circum-
stances," Clinton said, urging fel-
low Democrats to support it.
"If I was in office now, I would
have done what-the president has
done," he said.


Clinton, whose focus on the
economy helped get him elected
in 1992, said he spends about an
hour a day studying up on it and
trying to figure out what to do
about it. He said the proposal to
trim Social Security taxes is the
"single most effective tax cut" to
support economic activity and cre-
ate jobs. "I expect it to lower the
unemployment rate and keep us
going," he said.
"In my opinion, this is a good
bill and I hope that my fellow


Democrats will support it," Clinton
said. "I think this is a much, much
better agreement than would be
reached were we to wait until
January."
Republicans, newly emboldened
after an election that next year
will put the GOP in charge of the
House and trim the Democratic
majority in the Senate, stood unit-
ed against Obama's insistence that
the tax rates be kept in place only
for those earning up to $250,000
a year. Republicans and some
Democrats argued. that the eco-
nomic climate would not support
higher taxes and urged that the
rates be extended for all.
In announcing the agreement,
Obama said he wanted to reach a
deal before the year-end deadline
because a political stalemate or
drawn-out fight between the two
parties would hurt the economic
recovery that is under way.
Clinton, who was ,confronted
with similar circumstances after
the congressional elections two
years into his first term, said he
agreed with Obama's -rationale.
The former president also urged
the parties to "row" together.
."After the '94 election I,said that
the American people, in their infi-
nite wisdom, had put us both in the
same boat, so we're going to either
row or sink," he said. "And I want
us to row."
He said Republicans and
Democrats both have to accept
the message voters sent in the
last election, which is that they
want the president and lawmakers
from the opposing party to com-
promise.
"Everybody's got to give a little,"
Clinton said.


Judge rules against Miller

in Alaska senatorial race


By BECKY BOHRER
Associated Press

JUNEAU, Alaska A
judge on Friday ruled
against Republican Joe
Miller's lawsuit challeng-
ing how Alaska counted
write-in votes for rival
Lisa Murkowski in their
Senate race, delivering a-
crushing blow to the tea
party-backed candidate's
longshot legal fight.
Judge William Carey's
ruling all but ends Miller's
hopes of getting relief
in state court. Miller
can appeal to the state
Supreme Court, and his
spokesman said he was
mulling the option, but
Carey cited past decisions
by the high court in his
ruling.
The judge said his deci-
sion to throw out Miller's
lawsuit wouldn't take
effect until Tuesday to
allow time for an appeal.
Miller spokesman
Randy DeSoto said there
are still outstanding issues
"in terms of wanting to
get a true and accurate
count, and we don't feel
like we're there yet."
Murkowski called on
Miller to concede, telling
The Associated Press:
"It's time to end this. It's
time to say that the elec-
tion is over."
The ruling marks a vic-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alaska Republican Senate
candidate Joe Miller ges-
tures in Juneau, Alaska.
tory for Murkowski, who
sought to become the first
U.S. Senate candidate since
1954 to win as a write-in.
Senators are scheduled to
be sworn in Jan. 5, and the
legal dispute has thrown
into doubt whether some-
one from this race will be
included. Murkowski's
attorneys have argued
that her seniority is at risk
if she isn't sworn in then.
Miller's attorneys had
asked Carey to strictly
enforce a state law call-
ing for write-in ballots to
have the oval filled in, and
either the candidate's last
name or the name as it
appears on the declaration
of candidacy written in.


Miller argued the state
shouldn'thave used discre-
tion in determining voter
intent when tallying bal-
lots for Murkowski. The
state relied on case law
in doing so and allowed
for ballots with misspell-
ings to be counted toward
Murkowski's total.
"If the legislature intend-
ed that the candidate's
name be spelled per-
fectly in order to count,"
Carey wrote in his much
anticipated ruling, "then
the statute would have
included such a restrictive
requirement."
Unofficial results showed
Murkowski ahead by 10,328
votes and still in the lead
by 2,169 votes even when
excluding votes challenged
by Miller's campaign. Carey.
said whatever interpretation
he made would not change
the outcome of the race,
that "Murkowski has won
by over 2,000 unchallenged
votes."
Murkowski ran an
unprecedented write-in
campaign after losing the
GOP primary to Miller. She
focused heavily on educat-
ing voters on how to cast a
write-in ballot for her, and
she emerged with a wide
lead after a tedious, week-
long count of ballots that
was overseen by observ-
ers for both Miller and
Murkowski.


Smart says she's thrilled

after jury's guilty verdict


By JENNIFER DOBNER
Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY Elizabeth Smart
waited more than eight years for the
word she heard Friday. "Guilty," the
court clerk said, after a federal jury
deliberated five hours to convict street
preacher Brian David Mitchell of snatch-
ing Smart from her bed, at knifepoint
in the dead of night, and forcing sex on
her while he held her captive for nine
months.
Smart smiled as the verdict was read,
while a bedraggled, bearded Mitchell sat at
the defense table, singing hymns with his
hands before his chest, as if in prayer.
"I hope that not only is this an example
that justice can be served in America,
but that it is possible to move on after
something terrible has happened," Smart
said, after she walked arm-in-arm with her
mother through a crush of media.
It was a dramatic end to a tale that


captured the nation's attention sihce she
disappeared in June 2002: A 14-year-old
girl mysteriously taken from her home, the
intense search and her eventual discovery
walking Salt Lake City's streets with her
captors.
Smart, now 23, flew back from her
Mormon mission in Paris to take the stand,
and recount her "nine months of hell."
"The beginning and the end of this story
is attributable to a woman with extraordi-
nary courage and extraordinary determi-
nation, and that's Elizabeth Smart," federal
prosecutor Carlie Christensen said outside
the courthouse.
"She did it with candor and clarity and a
truthfulness that I think moved all of us,"
she said.
Smart described in excruciating detail
how she woke up one night to the feel of a
cold, jagged knife at her throat and being
whisked away by Mitchell to his camp in
the foothills near the family's Salt Lake
City home.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates answers questions from reporters on board his plane
returning to the United States on Friday, shortly after departing from Abu Dhabi. Gates said
the military should not begin preparing troops for a possible repeal of the ban on gay service
until Congress takes action.


Foes of 'don't ask, don't tell'

say fight for repeal not over


By ANNE FLAHERTY
Associated Press
' WASHINGTON -
Advocates of a bill that
would overturn the mili-
tary's "don't ask, don't tell"
policy say their fight for
repeal this year is far from
over despite failing to pass
the Senate with only days
left in the lame-duck ses-
sion.
Senate Republicans
on Thursday blocked the
legislation, which would
have lifted the military's
17-year-old ban on openly
gay troops. The measure
was tucked into a broad-
er defense policy bill and
had passed the House last
spring.
It failed in a 57-40 test
vote, falling three votes
short of the 60 needed to
advance.
GOP senators mostly
united in defeating the
measure on procedural
grounds, insisting that the
Senate vote on tax cuts first.
Maine Sen. Susan Collins
was the only Republican to
support moving to debate
the bill.
Collins and Sen. Joe
Lieberman are now pushing
standalone legislation they
insist could be considered
before the Senate's target
adjournment next week.
Its prospects are uncertain,
although Reid indicated he
was open to bringing it up
before the holiday break.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) Sen. Mark Udall (D-Colo.)
and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) speak at a news confer-
ence following the defeat of a cloture motion of the Defense
Authorization Bill containing repeal of the 'Don't Ask, Don't
Tell' provision on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday.


If passed, the bill still
would require House
approval, with time grow-
ing short.
"We've got at least 60
votes, so we're going to
keep up the fight," said
Lieberman, an indepen-
dent from Connecticut.
"But we're not kidding our-
selves, this is not going to
be easy."
House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi promised to do what
she could to get repeal leg-
islation on the president's
desk by the end of the year.
"An army of allies stands
ready in the House to pass a
standalone repeal of the dis-
criminatory policy once the
Senate acts," she said in a
statement issued Thursday.


The White House on
Friday appeared to embrace
that approach.
"The president remains
committed to seeing
this repeal done before
Congress leaves town this
year," said press secre-
tary Robert Gibbs. "And I
think there could be legis-
lative vehicles that start in
the House as a stand-alone
that can withstand proce-
dural hurdles and put the
Senate on the record on
an up-or-down vote that
would repeal 'don't ask,
don't tell.'"
If the repeal push in
Congress fails, gay rights
advocates say they will
shift their focus back to
the White House.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@iakeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, December I I, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

The


short


list
When it
comes
to hiring
a new
coach
in Gainesville, there
shouldn't be many
surprises. After all, the
University of Florida is
one of the premiere jobs
in all of college football.
Here's a few potential
replacements:
Dan Mullen The
link here is obvious.
Mullen is a Meyer guy
who had been with the
coach dating back to
his days at Utah before
turning a struggling
Mississippi State team -
into a Gator Bowl
contender. Mullen's
offense would flow
perfectly into Gainesville
as he was the originator
of it under Meyer. Still,
I don't think Mullen will
be the coach when the
search is concluded.
Charlie Strong
Again, the link is
obvious. Strong left
a year ago to coach
Louisville and took a
team that hadn't reached
a bowl in four years to
the postseason. Strong
has ties dating back to
Florida before Meyer
arrived and helped
coach two national
championship teams.
The one thing working
against Strong is that
he just got his first head
coaching job a year
ago, and it'd be hard to
imagine him coming
back only a year later.
Chris Peterson
Much like Meyer,
Peterson has outgrown
his current title. Boise
State isn't a bad program,
but he may have reached
his full potential. If
Peterson truly covets
competing for national
championships, he'd be
better served to compete
in the SEC rather than
the WAC. Peterson's
offense would be optimal
for fans that became
spoiled by the Steve
Spurrier teams of the
'90s. Still, there's another'
name out there that could
beat him to the punch.
Bob Stoops We've
all heard this name
before at Florida. It
seems like every time
the Gators have a
vacancy, Stoops' name
comes up. He's got ties
dating back to his days
as defensive coordinator
under Spurrier and has
a resume big enough to
fill this job. In the past,
Stoops has turned down
the job, but the rumor
has it that he was ready
to accept it this time last
year. Don't be shocked if
Stoops returns to Florida
with the dismantling of
the Big 12. In the end,
I don't think Stoops
can turn down his last
chance to coach in the
premier college football
conference.
U Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Indians can't


keep pace in


home loss


Fort White falls
night after 4-0
Newberry win.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High had to take the
good with the bad coming
off a 4-0'victory against
Newberry High on the
road Thursday. The Indians
couldn't come away with
a win in the second half of
back-to-back game, falling
7-1 against Lafayette High
at Arrowhead Stadium on
Friday.
"It was ugly," coach Pete
Blanchard said. "We just
didn't play that well after
playing really good the


night before. We ran out
of gas."
Fort White's only
goal came when Matt
Waddington scored off a
corner kick down 4-0, three
minutes into the second
half.
Brandon Sharpe had not
allowed a goal during the
week entering Friday's con-
test,
Against Newberry, how-
ever, the Indians were much
more efficient.
Brandon Moulton
and Trevor Stout both
turned into two-goal
performances.
The Indianstryto regroup
over the weekend before
heading to Suwannee High
to take on the Bulldogs at
7 p.m. Monday.


District


Columbia part of
new three-team
district in 2011.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Nothing is settled when
it comes to the 2011 foot-
-ball redistricting, but
Columbia High got a sneak
peak at what the new year
may bring with the foot-
ball calendar. As it stands,
Columbia would only have
three district games with
some familiar foes.
Columbia would make
up part of the new District
3-6A field that would also
include Tallahassee's Leon
High, Middleburg High
and current district oppo-
nent Ridgeview High. Other
* notable teams that would
be involved in the 6A field
are Gainesville, Niceville
and St. Augustine, among
others.
"It looks like a good dis-
trict with the Tallahassee
school and a couple of
Jacksonville schools,"
Columbia head coach Craig
Howard said. "The problem
is its not locked in stone
yet, because so many teams
will petition for a new dis-
trict due to travel."
Howard envisions more
changes for the newly
formed District 3-6A when


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Zach Gaskins (16) blocks a defender from getting to the ball in a game against
Lafayette High School on Friday.


to


stick?


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School head football coach Craig Howard speaks to a member of the media for an interview after winning the
-Old Oak in Bucket trophy against Suwannee High School on Nov. 12.


the next set of realignment
is unveiled.
"There will probably be
another go-around on this,"


Howard said. "I think it will If these teams start to peti-
change. There will be some tion to get into another dis-
change still. It's all based on trict due to a travel problem
what goes on in Gainesville. with a team that's 300 miles


away, our district will prob-
ably change."
CHS continued on 3B


Moore, from

small town to

Heisman finalist


Boise State QB
has taken unlikely
road to big time.
By TIM BOOTH
Associated Press
Kellen Moore's child-
hood coaches remember
him spending his free
time scouring the Internet
for any information about
offensive game plans.
He played video games,
not only trying to make the
sweetest spin moves but
also with an eye toward how
the plays were designed,
different formations and
what options might be open
against a certain defense.


"He always loved watch-
ing film and studying foot-
ball," his father Tom Moore
said in 2008.
By the time he was a
freshman in high school,
Moore was already calling
his own plays.
Even coming from little
Prosser, Wash., the record-
setting Boise State quarter-
back seemed destined to be
great.
But a finalist for the
Heisman Trophy?
"Yeah, I don't know if any-
body knew he was going to
be this special," Boise State
coach Chris Petersen said.
When Moore arrives in
MOORE continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore (center) arrives for the Home Depot ESPNU College
Football Awards on Thursday in Lake Buena Vista.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010


Gymnasts from Bard
Gymnastics will be doing
cartwheels for charity at
the Lake City Mall from
2-4 p.m. Dec. 18 to raise
money for, the Christian
Service Center in Lake
City.
Each gymnast, who
competes at Bard, will
be seeking sponsors and
every dollar raised will be
matched for the
center. Sponsors may
pledge money per
cartwheel or make a
one-time donation. Checks
can be made to the
Christian Service Center
and the donation is tax
deductible. The public is
invited to come out and
watch the cartwheel-a-thon.
For details, call Bard
Gymnastics at 752-1710.

YOUTH VOLLEYBALL

Fusion tryouts at

Fort White today

The North Florida
Fusion volleyball program
for girls ages 10-18 has
tryouts set for 2-4 p.m.
today at the Fort White
High gym. Interested
players need to bring a
copy of a recent physical
and a $25 tryout fee.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOXING
9:30 p.m.
HBO Junior welterweights, Victor
Ortiz (28-2-1) vs. Lamont Peterson
(28-1 -0); champion Amir Khan (23-1 -0) vs.
Marcos Maidana (29-1-0). for WBA super
lightweight title, at Las Vegas
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN NCAA, FCS, playoffs,
quarterfinals,Villanova at Appalachian St.
2 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC NCAA, FCS,
Southwestern Athletic Conference,
championship game, Alabama St. vs. Texas
Southern, at Birmingham,Ala.
2030 p.m.
CBS -Army vs. Navy, at Philadelphia
8 p.m.
ESPN HeismanTrophy Presentation,
at NewYork
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Alfred
Dunhill Championship, third round, at
Mpumalanga, South Africa (same-day
tape)
4 p.m.
NBC Shark Shootout, second
round, at Naples (same-day tape)
6:30 p.m.
TGC Ladies European Tour, Dubai
Ladies Masters, final round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
CBS Saint Louis at Duke
12:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Auburn vs. Rutgers, at
Pittsburgh
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 -Wisconsin at Marquette
3:15 p.m.
ESPN Tennessee vs. Pittsburgh, at
Pittsburgh (Consol Energy Center)
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 -Washington at Texas A&M
5:15 p.m.
ESPN Indiana at Kentucky
6:30, p.m.
ESPN2 Colorado St. vs. Kansas, at
Kansas City, Mo.
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Gonzaga at Notre Dame
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
WGN Minnesota at Chicago
RODEO
10:30 p.m.
ESPN2 PRCA, National Finals,
championship round, at Las Vegas
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Manchester'
City at West Ham

FOOTBALL

College awards

Maxwell Award
(Best all-around player)
Cam Newton,Auburn, QB
Chuck BednarikTrophy
(Best defensive player)
Patrick Peterson, LSU
Outland Trophy
(Best interior lineman)
Gabe Carimi,Wisconsin, OT
Davey O'Brien National
Quarterback Award
(Best Quarterback)
Cam Newton,Auburn
Doak Walker Award
(Best running back)
LaMichael James, Oregon
Fred BiletnikoffAward
(Best wide receiver)
Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State
Jim Thorpe Award
(Best defensive back)


GYMNASTICS


Patrick Peterson, LSU
Lou Groza Collegiate
(Place-kicker award)
Dan Bailey, Oklahoma State
Ray Guy Award
(Best punter)
Chas Henry, Florida

The Home Depot
Coach of the Year Award
Gene ChizikAuburn
Disney's Wide World of Sports
Spirit Award
D.J.Williams,Arkansas
NCFAA Contribution to College
Football Award
Lee Corso, former coach and
commentator

College games

Today
Army (6-5) at Navy (8-3), 2:30 p.m.
SWAC Championship, Alabama St.
(7-4) at Texas Southern (8-3) at
Birmingham.Ala., 2 p.m.

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


Jacksonville
Indianapolis
Houston
Tennessee


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


East
W L
10. 2
9 3
6 6
2 10
South
W L
7 5
7 6
5 7
5 8
North
W L
9 3
8 4
5 7
2 10
West
W L
8 4
6 6
6 6
3 9


T Pct PF PA
0.833 379 269
0.750 267 232
0.500215 238
0.167243 333

T Pct PF PA
0.583 257 300
0.538 347 318
0.417288 321
0.385 291 265

T Pct PF PA
0.750 267 191
0.667 260 201
0.417229 239
0.167255 322

T Pct PF PA
0.667 295 237
0.500 283 269
0.500 323 253
0.250256 333


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas


Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
St. Louis
San Francisco
Arizona


East
W L TPct PF PA
8 4 0.667 308 247
8 4 0.667344 281
5 7 0.417222 293
4 8 0.333 294 336
South
W L TPct PF PA
10 2 0.833304 233
9 3 0.750 299 227
7 5 0.583243 251
1 II 0.083 154 307
North
W L TPct PF PA
9 3 0.750246 192
8 4 0.667303 182
5 7 0.417227253
2 10 0.167278 306
West
W L TPct PF PA
S6 6 0.500 240 289
6 6 0.500232 237
4 8 0.333 203 259
3 9 0.250 200 338


Thursday's Game
Indianapolis 30,Tennessee 28
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Buffalo, I p.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, I p.m.
Oakland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, I p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Miami at N.Y.Jets, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game



BRIEFS

CHS SOFTBALL


Baltimore at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 16
San Francisco at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 19
Kansas City at St. Louis, I p.m.
Washington at Dallas, I p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 20
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Memphis at LA. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Boston at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Miami at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Denver at NewYork. 12 p.m.
New Orleans at Philadelphia, 12 p.m.
LA. Lakers at New Jersey, I p.m.
Portland at San Antonio, 3:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Orlando at LA. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. Saint Louis, Noon
No. 3 Pittsburgh vs. No. II Tennessee,
3:15 p.m.
No. 4 Kansas vs. Colorado State,
6:30 p.m.
No. 5 Kansas State at Loyola of
Chicago, 4 p.m.
No. 7 Michigan State vs. Oakland, Mich.'
at The Palace of Auburn Hills, 12:30 p.m.
No. 8 Syracuse vs. Colgate, 7 p.m.
No. 14 San Diego State vs. San Diego,
10 p.m.
No. IS5 Missouri vs. Presbyterian,
5 p.m.
No. 17 Kentucky vs. Indiana, 5:15 p.m.
No. 18 BYU vs.Arizona, 6 p.m.
No. 19 Purdue vs. North Florida,
6:30 p.m.
No. 20 UNLV at No. 24 Louisville,
Noon
No. 21 Washington at Texas A&M,
4:30 p.m.
No. 22 Minnesota vs. Eastern Kentucky,
I p.m.
No. 23 Notre Dame vs. Gonzaga,
8:30 p.m.
No. 25 Texas vs.Texas State,4 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Philadelphia at Boston, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Detroit at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Washington, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Florida at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay atVancouver, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Anaheim, 8 p.m.


Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday at
Moe's Southwest Grill.
For details, call 365-1877.

YOUTH BASKETBALL

Sign-up ongoing
at Boys Club

Registration for the Boys
Club's basketball program
continues through Dec. 17.
Girls and boys ages 6-14
are eligible. Cost is $40.
For details, call 752-4184.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Columbia softball has a
mandatory meeting at
6:30 p.m. Monday in the
CHS cafeteria.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.

CHS SOCCER

Moe's Night

planned Tuesday

Columbia soccer has a



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I TOSOY I i


LENZOZ

_ ^ 1- ___ _' ^


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: THEIR

(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: DOWDY GRIMY IMPEND BROKEN
Answer: What the down-and-out handyman did when
he needed cash "WIRED" FOR MONEY


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Carla
Nyssen 204; 2. Lori Davis 188;
3. Mary Lobaugh 184. 1. Luke Milton
233; 2. Tom Sewejkis 227; 3. (tie)
Zech Strohl, Michael Mclnally 222.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 511; 2. Carla Nyssen 466;
3. Debbie Walters 452. 1. Zech Strohl
648; 2. Tom Sewejkis 635; 3. Luke
Milton 577.
High handicap game: 1. Pat Frazier
232; 2. (tie) Joyce Hooper, Lori Davis,
Staci Greaves 228; 5. Brandy Watson
225. 1. Luke Milton 259; 2. Michael
Mclnally 258; 3. Mark Rowland 248.
High handicap series: 1. Carla
Nyssen 646; 2. Terry Wayne 634;
3. Amanda Meng 618. 1. Zech Strohl
708; 2. Tom Sewejkis 671; 3. George
Walters 659.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
175. 1. Tom Sewejkis 196.
(results from Nov. 30)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Lucky Strikers
(41-23); 2. Legal Ladies (37-27, 576
average); 3. Spare Us (37-27,. 547
average).
High handicap game: 1. Sandra
Peterson 247; 2. Iva "Jean" Dukes
233; 3. Betty Carmichael 229.
High handicap series: 1. Karen
Gardner 619; 2. (tie) Betty Carmichael,
Betty Schneiders 615.


BOWLING

(results from Dec. 7)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(42-22); 2. Farmers (41-23); 3. Pink
Panthers (37-27).
High scratch game: 1. Betty Brown
204; 2. Janet Nash 169; 3. Yvonne
Finley 164. 1. Art Joubert 242; 2. Art
Joubert 232; 3. Dan Ritter 227.
High scratch series: 1. Betty Brown
520; 2. Jeanne Sireci 446; 3. Janet
Nash 435. 1. Art Joubert 649; 2. Dan
Ritter 593; 3. Johnnie Croft 525.
High handicap game: 1. Betty
Brown 250; 2. Cookie Reddick 226;
3. Sandra Johns 215. 1. Art Joubert
270; 2. (tie) Johnnie Croft, John Quinn
238.
High handicap series: 1. Janet
Nash 639; 2. Jeanne Sireci 629;
3. Amy Musselwhite 598. 1. Dan Ritter
680; 2. Rick Yates 608; 3. (tie) Keith
Herbster, Ray Denton 604.
(results from Dec. 7)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(42-22); 2. Team #1 (38-26, 30,012
pins); 3. Average Joe's (38-26, 29,824
pins).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 193; 2. Norma Yeingst 191;
3. Angela Pond 181. 1. A.J. Dariano
236; 2. Matt Stephan 234; 3. Carl
McGhghy 227.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yeingst 552; 2. Gloria Dennis 487;
3. Linda Sutton 470. 1. Matt Stephan
657; 2. Carl McGhghy 637; 3. Mark
Moore 626.
(results from Dec. 5)


MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Team 8 (254.5-
165.5); 2. Fullhouse (246-174); 3. Lake
City Bowl (239.5-180.5).
High scratch game: 1. Bryan Taylor
266; 2. David Adel 260; 3. (tie) Zech
Strohl, J.J. Hilbert 257.
High scratch series: 1. Zech Strohl
715; 2. David Adel 677; 3. Roger
Webb 667.
High handicap game: 1. Bryan
Taylor 290; 2. Bob Shrum 279;
3. David Adel 267.
High handicap series: 1. Tanner
Wayne 744; 2. Bob Shrum 737;
3. Roger Webb 724.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
222.28; 2. Zech Strohl 213.3; 3. Brian
Meek 207.05.
(results from Nov. 29)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Garrblers
(36-20); 2. Golden Niners (35-21);
3. Wild Things (31-25).
High handicap game: 1. Joanne
Denton 231; 2. (tie) Louise Atwood,
Ruth Lott 226. 1. Vernon Black 251;
2. George Mulligan 242; 3. Dan Ritter
231.
High handicap series: 1. Debbie
Walters 628; 2. Bea Purdy 619;
3. Shirley Highsmith 615. 1. Lee
Evert 660; 2. Thom Evert 653; 3. Lee
McKinney 651.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
150.92; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 149.79;
3. Bea Purdy 149.74. 1. David Duncan
185; 2. Bill Dolly 182.48; 3. George
Mulligan 181.31.
(results from Dec. 2)


COURTESY PHOTO

Falcon Invitational today

Lake City Middle School's wrestling team won the Green Cove Springs Cougar Growl
tournament on Dec. 4, besting nine other teams. The Falcon Invitational wrestling
tournament is today at the school gym. Team members are (front row, from left) mat girls
Callie Winston, Sarah Ward, Mathison Milligan, Brandy Britt and Maddie Kennon. Second
row (from left) are Zach Mitchell, Cody Waldron, Dylan Beckelheimer, Dustin Regar,
Cole Horton, Hunter Wortman, Witt Register, Christian Little, Alec Norton, Shawn Ziegaus,
Hunter Bullard, and Jordan Daniels. Third row (from left) are coach Kevin Warner, coach
Jason Langston, Christian Collins, Dylan Bullard, Marcus Ziegler, Kaleb Warner,
Ben Kuykendall, Dylan Regar, Brandon Mattox, Bryson Britt, Tim Mallard, Lucas Bradley,
Josh Walker, Mariaun Dallas, Brandon Little, Bennie Harper and coach Allen Worley.


Surfs f- rms o Il


ACROSS

1 Shirt or blouse
4 Prune off
7 Feed the hogs
11 Phone co.
12 Treaty
13 John Dickson'

14 Concert per-
formers
16 A gemstone
17 Percentage
18 Leafs out
19 Type of cookie
20 Edge
21 Seize forcibly
24 Genghis'
grandson
27 Yo!
28 Revise
30 St. -'s fire
32 Fabric measure
34 Blissful spot
36 June
honoree
37 Like some
crystal
39 Kudu cousin


41 Sales agent
42 Carpet pile
43 John, in
Germany
45 Tried
to persuade
48 Sherpa's sight-
ing
49 Galloped off (2
wds.)
52 Tailor's need
53 Confirm'
54 "Down
under" bird
55 Twinge
56 Pit stop
purchase
57 Aunt or bro.

DOWN

1 Knock gently


Geti. www.lakecityreporter.com

.,. Lake City
Reporter




Answer to Previous Puzzle


STIY I CE PEIP
ORE MOOS CELL
BAA AURA ODIEIL
SPHAGNUM RATADI

NN
VET BERLE
FLEE R.IATA
EAU W YO OLDEN


Z ORRO TEN IDA
HO11ODADK HASH

PA WN MACARONI
HILO OMAR MIB
E VES SIT E I K E
WET DEN TEX


2 Elevator guy
3 Nile god 7 Qualm
4 Hologram 8 Speak
maker highly of
5 Harvest Moon 9 Planets or
mo. moons
6 Qt. parts 10 Apply a jimmy


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


12-11


12 Steal
software
15 Catches a
crook
18 Type of over-
alls
20 Sitar kin
21 How come?
22 Not bogus
23 Bronte hero-
ine Jane -
24 Notorious
buccaneer
25 Swit co-star
.26 "- Old
Cow Hand"
29 Far down
31 Weird
33 Sock-mending
35 Closer
38 Moines
40 Links org.
42 Renoir models
43 Jealous god-
dess
44 Like - of
bricks
46 Ornamental
pitcher
47 Woman
of rank
48 Puppy plaint
49 Dust cloth
50 Eggs, in biolo-
gy
51 "Westworld"
name


2010 by UFS, Inc.


Cartwheels for Player/parent

charity event set meeting Monday


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY. DECEMBER 11, 2010


Army looks to end Navy dominance


By JOHN KEKIS
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Rich
Ellerson is sponsoring a
cadet from Slovenia at West
Point, and Thanksgiving
only validated what Army's
second-year coach has long
known.
"His family came to visit.
It was only their second time
in the country," Ellerson
said. "Only the dad speaks
a little bit of English. They
don't know football from
third base. They'd never
been to West Point before,
and they drive through the
Thayer Gate. By the time
they get to our house, they
don't know anything about
football, but they know we
better beat Navy."
"All they had to do was
drive down the street and
look at the front of every-
body's house," Ellerson con-
tinued. "They're not sure
what the heck that means,
but they know we better
beat Navy. Our guys have
clearly grown up with that"
Have they ever. And it's
been a little too painful for
far too long at West Point.
The programs meet on
SaturdayatLincolnFinancial
Field in yet another install-
ment of this proud rivalry,
and none of these Black
Knights has experienced
the exhilaration of beating
Navy. The Midshipmen, in
fact, have defeated Army
eight straight times and
hold a 54-49-7 advantage in


the series. Last year, Navy
won, 17-3.
, But you wouldn't know it
by listening to Army. The
Black Knights (6-5), after
all, are bowl bound for the
first time in 14 years, and as
a result, they are brimming
with confidence.
"We're a better team (than
last year)," senior defensive
end Josh McNary said. 'We
will redeem ourselves. We
will win. There is no next time
for us. It's the last game."
Give credit to McNary,
who has 27/2 sacks and 48/2
tackles for loss in his career,
both program bests at West
Point, for having the right
mindset. But it's going to
take more than words to
right this ship.
Navy's streak is the lon-
gest in the series by either
academy, and began with
a 58-12 rout in 2002. The
scores that followed aren't
pretty, either: 34-6, 42-13,
42-23, 26-14, 38-3, 34-0 and
the aforementioned 17-3.
"Clearly, this (beating
Navy) is something that's
been missing in their time
here, something that they
can't wait for another oppor-
tunity to right the balance
sheet, if you will," Ellerson
said. "Eight is enough."
Take. a closer look, and
it's even more impressive.
The Middies (8-3) have
surrendered just six points
over the last three games
and have not allowed a
touchdown since the fourth
quarter of the 2006 game.


Ouch!
"We talk about it all the
time," Navy senior corner-
back Kevin Edwards said.
"That's what we live for, not
giving up points. If we can
go this week and not give
up a touchdown again, I
think that would make the
win even sweeter."
It looms as a more diffi-
cult task this time, though.
In less than two years,
Ellerson has transformed
Army into a winner again.
For the first time in 14 years,
the Navy game won't end the
season for the Black Knights,
who will play SMU in the
Armed Forces Bowl in Dallas
on Dec. 30. Navy also will play
in the postseason, against San
Diego State in the Poinsettia
Bowl on Dec. 23.
A year ago, Army led Navy
3-0 at halftime and the Black
Knights forced three fumbles
and limited the Midshipmen
to 191 yards of total offense.
This year, as they try to build
off that, sophomore quarter-
back Trent Steelman has the
experience of playing two full
years as the Army starter.
Also, the Black Knights are
healthy after a long layoff.
And maybe, just maybe,
Navy is susceptible this
year. Despite the heroics of
quarterback Ricky Dobbs
- he has rushed for 40
touchdowns over. the last
two years, an NCAA quar-
terback record over con-
secutive seasons Navy's
service-academy suprema-
cy ended this year.


In this Oct. 30 file photo, Army defensive end Josh
Military Institute in West Point, N.Y.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
McNary follows the action against Virginia


Streak! Favre in


question yet again


By JON KRAWCZYNSKI
Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- Brett Favre still hasn't
been able to throw a prop-
.er pass in practice, and
the Minnesota Vikings still
haven't given up hope their
quarterback will extend his
NFL record for consecu-
tive starts against the New
York Giants on Sunday.
Favre did minimal work
in practice Friday for the
first time all week, making
a few soft tosses to test out
the sprained SC joint in his
throwing shoulder. He is
listed as questionable on
the injury report and will
be a game-time decision
on whether he will make
his 298th straight regular-
season start.
Interim coach Leslie
Frazier said Favre wanted
to test out his throwing
motion more than anything
on Friday and that the 41-
year-old will have to show
the team he can make all
the throws during a pre-
game workout Sunday to
get clearance to play.
"We would have to see
him make some of the
throws he'd have to make
in the game, and he under-
stands that," Frazier said.
"So, we'll take a look on
Sunday morning and see."
Favre was unavailable to
reporters Friday, but said
earlier this week he does
not want to compromise
the Vikings' ability to beat
the Giants in order to keep
his streak alive, no matter
how much pride he takes
in the achievement.
Frazier also said the only
way Favre will play is if he
can protect himself, make
all the throws and play the
entire game. Giving him a
snap or two at the begin-
ning of the game to keep
the streak going is not an
option. The team is still
considering giving Favre a
painkilling injection to help
him through it
Receiver Percy Harvin
is listed as doubtful with
migraines that have kept
him away from the team
facility for more than
a week, including last
weekend's game against
Buffalo.
"It's going to be touch-
and-go," Frazier said.
"We're going to talk again


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre watches
practice at the Vikings NFL football training facility in Eden
Prairie, Minn. Wednesday.


(Friday). But it's going to
be very, very difficult to
get him up to speed. But
we'll see."
Left guard Steve
Hutchinson (broken right
thumb), defensive end
Ray Edwards (sprained
right ankle) and third-
string quarterback Joe
Webb (hamstring) all are
listed as questionable.
Cornerback Chris Cook
(knees) and safety Tyrell
Johnson (knee) are out.
Favre was injured on
the third play against
Buffalo last Sunday when
Bills linebacker Arthur
Moats blindsided him and
drove him into the turf.
He watched the rest of the
game from sideline and did
not practice Wednesday or
Thursday.
"The type of guy he is,
the only (way he's not)
on the field is if the sky's
falling," Vikings tight end
Visanthe Shiancoe said.
The Giants (8-4) boast
one of the best defenses in
football and are tied with
the Packers for the league
lead in sacks.
If Favre cannot play,
Tarvaris Jackson will start.


He completed 15 of 22
passes for 187 yards with
two touchdowns and three
interceptions in the 38-14
victory over the Bills last
weekend. Jackson said he
got almost all of the reps
in practice this week and
is ready to go if Favre can't
make it.
"I'm ready to play,"
Jackson said. "Regardless
of what happens, I'm ready
to play football."
Jackson was a second-
round draft pick in 2006
and former coach Brad
Childress tried to groom
him as the quarterback of
the future. But inconsis-
tent play led the Vikings
to bring in Favre last yeqr
and coax him back in
August for one more sea-
son.
"I mean this whole situa-
tion has been a difficult sit-
uation," said Jackson, in the
final year of his contract.
"I'm not going to even sit
here and act like it hasn't.
It's been a difficult situa-
tion, but I just try to make
the best out of it.It's a privi-
lege to be in this league
and I'm not promised
anything."


MOORE: A rare non-BCS contender
Continued From Page IB


New York for Saturday's
Heisman Trophy presenta-
tion, he'll enter a rarified
fraternity of finalists from
non-Bowl Championship
Series schools. Since BYU's
Ty Detmer won the honor
in 1990. only seven players
from outside the big six
conferences in college foot-
ball have even finished ih
the top five in Heisman vot-
ing, the last being Hawaii's
Colt Brennan, who was
third in 2007.
Moore will become the
second Boise State player
to finish in the top 10 of the
voting, joining Ian Johnson
in 2006.
"It's amazing, you go
from little old Prosser and
before you know it you're
having the opportunity to
go to .New York for really
the greatest possible award
in college football," Moore
said this week. "It's amaz-
ing how a few years can
provide so many opportuni-


ties."
While most of the focus
this year has centered on
Heisman favorite Cam
Newton, Moore has effi-
ciently put together another
remarkable year that by the
end will likely surpass his
nearly flawless sophomore
season in almost every cat-
egory.
In 12 games, Moore
has thrown for 3,506
yards, 33 touchdowns and
only five interceptions.
While he doesn't lead the
country in any one
category, Moore ranks
in the top 10 in six dif-
ferent categories ahead
of Newton and Stanford's
Andrew Luck in five of the
six.
The only passing stat
where Moore trails Newton:
pass efficiency rating.
Newton is at 188.16. Moore
is at 185.0.
"Every time I put the tape
on, even when I watch him


play, I. go 'Wow, I forgot
about that,"' Petersen said.
'There's obviously some
smart football people that
are watching and voting on
these things. If everyone
got our game -film and was
watching him with a fine-
toothed comb they'd be
even mpre impressed."
With a year to go, Moore
already owns most of the
Boise State record books.
He's the school's all-time
leader in yards passing
(10,528), completions (803),
touchdown passes (97) and
200-yard passing games
(33).
It would take a dramat-
ic final year for Moore to
approach Timmy Chang's
NCAA record of 17,072
yards passing, but there is
a more impressive record
that Moore could own by
the end of his senior sea-
son: Colt McCoy's NCAA
record of 45 victories as a
starter.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The four Heisman Trophy finalists, Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore (from left), Stanford
quarterback Andrew Luck, Auburn quarterback Cam Newton and Oregon running back
LaMichael James, pose for a photo with the Heisman Trophy during a news conference on
Friday, in New York.


CHS: Howard sees potential changes


Continued From Page 1B
That's just one of the
potential problems Howard
sees with the new align-
ment.
'The other problem is
you see six or seven teams
in some districts and this
is a smaller one," he said.
"In some ways that can be
a good thing, because you
don't have to win as many
games to 'win a district
championship. The prob-
lem is you have to schedule
six or seven teams out of
the district."


If the new district sticks,
Howard believes Columbia
will try to pair up with some
familiar foes for the non-dis-
trict schedule.
"We have to find teams
that are able to come," he
said. "We'd want to play
the teams from Gainesville,
because they're similar pro-
grams that aren't far away.
You always want some kind
of game that's of great fan
interest as well. I'd be happy
with the district, but I wish
it was a little bigger."


Howard said he won't
have much control over
the final say based on the
FHSAA's plan.
"As a head coach, I have
no control over this," he
said. "I just sit back and see
who we're going to play. I've
got to be patient, and the
players have to be patient.
Ultimately, the district
determines your playoffs. I
hope the final thing will be
resolved in January."
Until then, the Tigers will
simply wait.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BLONDIE
WHAT 00 SAY WE DON'T EXCHANGE
CHRISTMAS 1GFTS THIS YEAR?
SOUNDS
1 .OKAYTO
ME...

L


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
P/I YolV /IVIT p o Gg:E, popE Yo y
HACAR AVP poV'r 96AR
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SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Time isn't right for two best

friends to become a couple


DEAR ABBY: I am a 23-
year-old woman and my best
friend is a guy, "Trevor." After
hearing him call me "Sweetie"
and say he's smitten with me
and crazy about me, I mus-
tered up the courage to talk
with him about taking our
friendship to the next level
- dating. Trevor responded
that his emotions are in a
"blender" right now and that
he doesn't want to deal with
them. He said he doesn't
want to make promises in the
future he can't keep. He also
said he loves me and wants to
continue to be best friends.
I know in my heart that it
would be beautiful if Trevor
just gave us a chance. I'm
ready to date him. In fact,
we already act like a couple.
My friends say I should give
up on him, but isn't a solid
relationship built on a strong
base of friendship? Should we
remain best friends? MAD
ABOUT HIM IN WASH-
INGTON STATE
DEAR MAD ABOUT
HIM: The answer to both
your questions is yes. How-
ever, best friends are free to
date others and that seems
to be what Trevor would
prefer right now: no commit-
ments. Loving someone and
being IN love with someone
are not the same. And while
Trevor's emotions are "in a
blender," he is clear that he
wants his freedom. You have
my sympathy.
DEAR ABBY: I have been


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
divorced for almost a year and
am the mother of two daugh-
ters. I am dating two very nice
men, and I have been open
and honest with both of them
about not wanting a serious
relationship right now. They
both understand. The prob-
lem is my sister seems to feel
that I need to make a commit-
ment to one of them because
if I don't, I will be viewed as
a "player." She hasn't spoken
to me in weeks because of this
"issue."
Is it wrong of me to date
more than one man at a time.
even if I am absolutely honest
with them about it? I am not
ready to settle down, and I en-
joy dating both of them. How
do I handle this with my sis-
ter? NOT PLAYING FOR
KEEPS
DEAR NOT PLAYING
FOR KEEPS: The way to
"handle" her is to ignore the
silence and 'not allow her to
push your buttons. By giving
you the silent treatment, your
sister is attempting to control
your life. You are an adult,
and you should not allow your
sister however well-mean-
ing she may be to pressure


DEAR ABBY: Today I wit-
nessed two incidents of appar-
ently well-meaning parents
swatting their small children's
behinds in public, no less.
I cannot believe in these en-
lightened times this is still
considered acceptable by oth-
erwise intelligent people.
As an elementary school
teacher, I can tell which chil-
dren have been subjected to
physical discipline at home.
They seem more fearful and
angry and are more likely to
hit another child because chil-
dren learn through mimicry.
In school or in public, a child
who swats another child is lia-
ble to be lectured on bullying,
sued or even arrested. Hitting
someone other than your own
child is called "assault" in le-
gal terms.
Any degree of swatting
may seem effective because
it gets the child's attention in
the moment, but in the long
run, it is counterproductive.
I believe all high schools
should offer mandatory child-
rearing classes for both gen-
ders to break this harmful
cycle, and to teach more ef-
fective forms of discipline. -
ANY CHILD'S TEACHER
DEAR ANY CHILD'S
TEACHER: I agree with you
100 percent!

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Strive for se-
curity and be cautious of
anyone who pries. Expect
someone to try to bully you
and be ready to walk away
if you don't like what's be-
ing said or the direction
in which a conversation is
heading. Protect your as-
sets and your reputation.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Planning a trip
that will bring you closer
to old friends and family
should be in the works. A
chance to spend time with
someone you find mentally
stimulating will spark your
imagination, enabling you
to come up with a profitable
idea. Love is in the stars.

GEMINI '(May 21-
June 20): Put your money
into a good, safe, solid in-
vestment. Taking care of
property or buying and
selling something of value
will turn out well. Getting
together with someone in
order to cut your overhead
makes 'good sense and
should be considered. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): A job interview
or something you apply
for looks promising. Don't
sell yourself short; dig in
and learn what you need
to know. Changes at home
look positive and will bring
about a new way of living


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

that suits your Crablike na-
ture. *****
LEO- (July 23-Aug.
22): Put time, effort and
money into your surround-
ings, home and family. You
may face opposition from
someone you love if you
don't include him or her
in your plans. Don't over-
spend on costly trips or
luxury items. Keep things
simple. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Get together with old
friends, lovers or relatives
you don't get to see often.
It's time to revisit old ideas
and plans. Socialize, take
on a challenge or do a little
networking and you will
make worthwhile connec-
tions. ***
UBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You may feel weighed
down by the responsibili-
ties threatening you or your
position. Quiet time that al-
lows you to consider differ-
ent ways to handle what you
face will pay off. Believe in
yourself and your abilities.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Get back to your
roots and reconnect with
people you found interest-
ing in the past. A move may
be necessary to follow a
dream you have yet to ful-
fill. Think outside the box.


Romance is in the stars.
**
SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Discipline
and hard work will be need-
ed. A change at home will
catch you by surprise and
make you rethink-the strat-
egy you were planning to
use. Take a serious look at
what it will cost you to walk
away from a bad situation.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Be the lead-
er. Mixing business with
pleasure will bring you
in contact with someone
who can contribute to your
world. Don't let someone
from your past lead you
astray or convince you to
do something that will get
you in trouble. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Concentrate on
stabilizing your ,financial
future. An innovative idea
can turn into a moneymak-
ing prospect if you start off
small. Participate in a chari-
table event ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): If you can
imagine it, you can make it
happen. You will be inspired
by the people around you.
An interesting proposal
will capture your interest
and get you thinking about
forming a group that can
undertake such a venture.
A romantic evening should
be planned. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals U
"TZ LAYZ KA V A I Z GAK UF MBGCBGS
KNZ WZDMZLK WZDJAG UHK UF
. VZXDGBGS KA JZZ XG BYWZDMZLK


WZDJAG WZDMZLKVF."


- XGSZVBGX


R A V B Z
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It is a loss for us not to have Tom (Bosley) with us
anymore... he was a very genuine individual." Angela Lansbury
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-11


CLASSIC PEANUTS


S(DONE! DEAL?'
o DEAL!.
NoTRicK
o NO TRICKS!
6 0


5BOV, IS HE OH GREAT! NOW
GONNA FEEL I HAVE TO GET
LIKE A JERK SOMETHING REALLY
WHEN HE SEES FABULOUS FO0
WHAT I SOUGHT'-o THA
HIM THIS SNEAK
YEAR!


S'./~~ ~~~ --- __ --r

^;^-^.mi .


EML












Classified Department: 755-5440


IU-I
F!IND IT


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


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erre to the accounting depart-
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Advertising copy is subject to
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or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
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for that portion of the advertisement
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omission of advertisements ordered
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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Plio u 1and Online
www1 ;: ; *'" ';r'-'rl'ci l


010 Announcements









100 Opportunities

04542450
CDLA OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, 0/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542646




Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches, Inc.
Accounts Payable Coordinator
This position is responsible for
the timely and accurate
processing of account payable
transactions, with additional
responsibilities related to fixed
asset management.
High school diploma or GED
with two years accounting
experience. Associate Degree in
accounting or business is
preferred. College accounting
courses may be substituted for
experience. High level of PC
software knowledge required.
$10.00 PER HOUR
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
Ed Leon
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranch
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-2429
EOE/DFWP

04542664
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colbum Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524599
LUBE TECH WANTED
Apply @ Rountree-Moore
Chevrolet
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
Ask For: Jimbo Pegnetter

Jr & High school
Math teacher needed.
Please fax resumes to:
386-758-3018







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Services


*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05524604
Administrative Assistant
Reports directly to controller,
needs to be proficient in Micro-
soft Office. Duties include
answering incoming calls,
general office and clerical, filing
and problem solving. Proficien-
cy in accounting is a plus.
Excellent working environment,
fast paced, growing company.
Apply via fax (386) 755-5170
or email to Barry@
Travel CountryRV.com.
We are a Drug Free Workplace

1 Temporary Farm Worker
needed. Workers will attend to
Horses, including administering
vaccinations & medications.
Employment dates of 01/16/11 -,
11/16/11. 3 Month Experience
Required. Wage of $9.7 1/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to non
commuting workers. Transporta-
tion & subsistence reimbursed
when 50% of contract is met.
Apply for this job at the nearest
One Stop Center in your area and
reference Job Order #KY0414442.
Marula Park Stud-Lexington, KY
1 Temporary Farm Worker
needed. Workers will attend to
Horses, including administering
vaccinations & medications.
Employment dates of 01/16/11 -
11/16/11. 3 Month Experience
Required. Wage of $9.7 1/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to non
commuting workers. Transporta-
tion & subsistence reimbursed
when 50% of contract is met.
Apply for this job at the nearest
One Stop Center in your area and
reference Job Order #KY0414435.
Zent Farms - Lexington, KY

120 Medical
) Employment

04542611
Dietary Assistant
/Dietary Aide
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Dietary Assistant and part time
position of Dietary Aide.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05524555

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time
Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

240 Schools.&
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


310 Pets & Supplies
AKC BOSTON Terrier.
6 mo old. Female, red & white.
All shots current. $500
386-867-4335
AKC English Bull Dog Puppies,
assorted colors, health certs,males
& females Call for additional info
386-754-1359
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
Beautiful neutered 6 mo old
Orange Tiger Cat, vaccinations
complete, good home needed
386-755-8561
CKC MINIATURE PINSCHER
Black & Tan, tail docked, health
certificate, ready 12/24, $400,
$50 deposit to hold 386-438-3229
or 386-497-1469.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies
6 yr old reg Quarter Horse,dark
bay, trained for barrels, needs
more attn, professionally trained 4
months ago $800 386-288-9245
Baby Pigs for sale
Ready Now!
$50 each
386-965-2215
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Washer and Dryer
$250.
Dryer almost new.
386-623-2848

404 Baby Items
Baby Crib, converts to toddler bed,
large drawer under bed,
dresser attaches to end of bed,
$300 obo 386-688-0334

408 Furniture
Lift Recliner. Blue, electric.
Used only 1 month, like new.
Paid $1,400 asking $700.
386-752-8013
RED MICROFIBER
couch & recliner. $150.
386-752-8996 or
918-822-7233
TWIN SIZE captains bed.
Solid wood.
$100.00
386-752-8996 or 918-822-7233

416 Sporting Goods
XL Glider System,
nearly new, folding,
$70 obo
386-365-5967

420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Huge indoor! Fishing, tools, gift
items/bags,deco, 8a-? Fri/Sat,lp-?
Suri, comer of Pinemount/252 &
137, follow signs 386-590-4085


430 Garage Sales .
Mamouth Sale. Many Christmas
items incl. stuffed toys, dolls, etc.
Crafts, hshold, videos CDs/DVDs.
Everything imaginable. 626 SW
Chapel Hill St off McFarlane






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat Only 8 ?,
Moving Sale Great Prices!
Branford Hwy to Troy Rd to Mt
Carmel Rd, follow signs
Sat only, 8-12, new kitchen items,
clothes, wind chimes,a little bit of
everything, 570 SW Quail Heights
Terrace, off Branford Hwy
Sat/Sun, 8a-5p, 1000+ books
(from 1850's to new), fum,
XBox/games, guitars,
678 SE St Johns St

440 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: APEX DVD Player
w/Remote. Also, 5 DVD Movies
Please Call 386-438-5293 between
noon and 6pm $100. for all

450 Good Things
Sto Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished:
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600:month,
386-623-2203 or 386-423-5410
2BR/2BA MH CHR/A;
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3 bd/3 bth MH, on approx 1 acre
of private property, 5 miles out
Pinemount Rd., $600 mon + dep,
call Debi 352-317-0995
3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142
3BR/2BA Double wide. Lg.
Rooms. $750 a month. 1st month
and security. Please call
386-365-1243 or 386-965-7534.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes vater & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very.Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


~630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
-w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524587
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210

Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547
710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
D5524443
i4+ $Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washeridryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


2008 Toyota Tacoma
4DR, access cab. 2007 Dutchmen Lite
17,250 mi., AT, all power, 2007 Dutchmen Lite
Tonneau cover, bedliner, 25'TT x cond.,10' s/o
class III hitch, nerf bars,
AM-FM stereo w/CD,
$1,995 $12,995 OBO
$16,995
Call Call
386-752-8227 386-754-2769

For gre- tilsCal May o
Brdgt t 8-755544


Member Service Manager
Suwannee Valley Electric Coop., Inc. (SVEC) has
an opening for the position of Member Services
Manager. This is a full-time position responsible
for managing the Member Services Department.
A minimum of 6 years customer service with su-
pervisory experience required. Applications and
job descriptions may be picked up at the SVEC
administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak
or reviewed on www.svec-coop.com. Applica-
tions should be turned in, to attention Vicky, at
the above address, mailed to PO Box 160, Live
Oak, FL 32064 or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.
com. The deadline for accepting applications
is Wednesday, December 22, 2010. SVEC is an
equal opportunity employer.

G Suwannee
Valley

Electric
Cooperative











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. DECEMBER 11, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


SUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542599





LAKE CITY
2Br/lBa, 768 sqft. $525.mo.
3Br/2Ba, 1,064 sqft. $625 mo
2Br, 1Ba, 700 sqft, $495 mo
2Br/lBa, 896 sqft, $695 mo
2Br/1Ba, 720sqft, $650mo
3Br/1.5Ba, 1,278sqft, $795mo
2Br/lBa, Mobile Home $495mo
3Br/1Ba, 960sqft, $750.mo
FT. WHITE
4Br/3Ba, 1,536 sqft, $725
MADISON COUNTY
2Br/1Ba 700 sq ft., $450. mo
JIENNINGS
3Br/2Ba 1293 sqft, $695mo
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
www.NorthFloridaHome-
andLand.com


05524430
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

05524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int, tax deduc.,'
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364
2 story comfortable home. Lg yard
w/trees, 4 br/2 ba, big rec. rm, liv-
ing rm, family rm, kitchen, utility
rm storage rm, sun rm, and a cov-
ered patio on back. $800 a mo +
sec dep. NO PETS. 386-365-1566
2/1 House, near Elementary
School. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per-month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
I-10 /US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

0750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-


formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592


810 Home for Sale
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room.
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www suwanneevallevnroperties.com


950 Cars for Sale
2005 PT Cruiser Touring Edition
PS/PW/PM. white. 55. 500
miles,Auto. Cruise Control. AC
$7900 386-965-8656

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2001 Chevy Astro Van.
new trans.. new AC. good tires.
runs great. clean.great work van
S2200 obo. 386-984-0572


..--V---- REPORTER Classifieds
820 Acreage In Print and On Line

05524425 www.lakecityreporter.com
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.cpm


940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, nerf
bars, stereo. $16,995. 752-8227


ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only



4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS 1

(386) 755-5440


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