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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01470
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/09/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01470
System ID: UF00028308:01470
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




















Reporter


Thursday, December 9, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. 276 E 75 cents


Scott talks job growth


Visits Lake City
businesses as
part of tour.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityrepor ter. com
Gov.-elect Rick Scott
spent three hours in Lake
City Wednesday hosting a
discussion with local indus-
trial managers and visiting
downtown businesses dur-
ing a stop on his pre-inaugu-
ration tour of Florida.
After a private round-
table discussion with sev-
eral industrial managers at
Hunter Panels and a tour
of the facility, Scott head-
ed to the downtown Lake
City area where he visit-
ed the Columbia County
Republican Executive
Committee office, ,Vann
Carpet One, Ward's Jewelry
and Gifts and then spoke to
the owners of Chasteen's
Restaurant before he
grabbed a hot chocolate
drink and headed to the air-
port and flew to Miami.
The Lake City visit was
the third day of his "Let's
'Get to Work" jobs tour,
which is scheduled to last
five days.
Scott said during his trip
to Lake City, he learned that
people in the area are pro-
business, receptive to state
marketing and possess the
positive attitude needed to
make sure the area contin-
ues to grow.
"Looking at the people
I talked to this morning,
they are absolutely com-
mitted to making sure this
part of the state continues
to grow," Scott said. "They
know they have to work
with business people; they'
know they need a gover-
nor that's going to go out
and make phone calls, who
visits with them to get com-
panies to move here and I'm
going to clearly do that."
Columbia County is one
of the most rural areas Scott
is scheduled to visit on the
tour. He said he recognizes
the importance of growth in
those areas.
"Columbia County is a
more rural area, but it's an
area that should grow very
rapidly," Scott said. 'They've
had a lot of success here.
You've got locations along
the highways, which is very
helpful. One of the greatest
things besides location of


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida Gov.-elect Rick Scott speaks with Emmie and Robert Chasteen, owners of Chasteen's restaurant, while touring local businesses in Lake City on
Wednesday. Scott spent three hours talking with residents and business owners.


Gov.-elect impressive' to local residents


JASON WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Industrial Development Authority Executive Director Jim Poole (center left)


SCOTT continued on 5A escorts Rick Scott through downtown Lake City.


Scott walks
downtown, talks
with locals.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
People who met Gov.-
elect Rick Scott in Lake
City Wednesday described
him as determined to cre-
ate jobs in Florida, but per-
sonable and eager to listen
to their concerns.
During his visit, Scott
spoke with several resi-
dents. Many of the people
whom he met described
him as "impressive" and
knowledgeable about small
business concerns in rural
Florida.
"We felt honored that he
stopped at our business and
we wish him a lot of luck,"
said Emmie Chasteen,
co-owner of Chasteen's
Restaurant. "We didn't dis-
cuss business issues. We


just enjoyed a little non-
political type conversa-
tion."
During his stroll along
Marion Avenue, Scott also
visited Ward's Jewelry and
Gifts where he talked to
the store's owner, George
Ward.
Ward, a Lake City City
Council member, said Scott
was interested in his busi-
ness and knowledgeable
about buying jewelry.
"He was interested to
know what my trend line
was and I told him my busi-
ness has actually been up
through this depressed
economy," Ward said. "I
told him we had changed
our product mix some,
tried to attract other clients
and customers. He was
very knowledgeable about
what was going on and I
was very impressed with
him. I'm pleased he would
WALK continued on 5A


United Way seeks

more public help .

Campaign aims community.
to hit $685,000 'The campaign is going
o it p$65000, well, but not great," said
2010-2011 target. Mike McKee, general cam-
paign chairman and United
By ANTONIA ROBINSON Way board of director's -


arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
United Way of Suwannee
Valley won't reach its
2010-2011 campaign goal
of $685,000 unless it gets
more support from the

CALL US:
I (386) 752-129
SUBSCRIBE
1111 THE REPORT
Voice: 755-54
Fax: 752-94


president-elect. Officials
gave an update during the
final campaign report lun-
cheon Wednesday. The lun-
cheon was sponsored by
UNITED continued on 5A


93 57
TO
TER: Partly Cloudy
45
oo00 WEATHER, 2A


JASON M. WALKER/Lae C Pere-
Mike Bel!e, 29, will be the new
executive director of the CARC
Advocate for Citizens with
Disabilities starting Jan. 4.
replacing Carol Jewett.

O pinion ......
c ^- y i Obituaries ...
U Advice & Comic
Puzzles .......
Around Florida.


CARC names executive director


New leader served
with Homeless
Services Network.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Mike Belle was
announced as the new
executive director of the
CARC Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities,
Inc., Wednesday at the
United Way of Suwannee
Valley Luncheon. He starts


.......... 4A
.......... 5A
:s ....... 4B
. . . . . 2B
. ....... . 2A


Jan. 4.
"It's a very large respon-
sibility and it's such an
important service to pro-
vide that I feel very hum-
bled by that task." he said.
Current Executive
Director Carol Jewett is
retiring Jan. 20 after 21
years of service.
Belle came with wonder-
ful recommendations from
various community leaders,
Jewett said. He is very pas-
sionate, enthusiastic and
dedicated.

TODAY II
8 -" HEALTH
Doctors testing
L&beating heart


He has been an active par-
ticipate with the Homeless
Services Network of
Suwannee Valley, which
functions as a committee of
United Way. Belle was pre-
viously the district aide for
former State Rep. Debbie
Boyd.
One of his goals for the
CARC is to make sure
everyone and their family
affected by a disability look
to the organization to offer
CARC continued on 5A

Nl COMING
FRIDAY
rg Local holiday events
s. this weekend.


ViAy


aIiC











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY. DECEMBER 9, 2010


Celebrity Birthdays


3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 5-1-5
Evening: NA


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-0-1-9
Evening: NA


Tuesday:
1-7-15-25-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Winfrey denies she's gay

NEW YORK I --


O prah Winfrey said she's
not a lesbian, not even a
little bit
Her long personal and
professional connection
with Gayle King has sparked rumors
that they are gay, but Winfrey denied
it in an upcoming interview with
ABC's Barbara Walters.
"I'm not even kind of a lesbian,"
Winfrey said.
Persistent gossip to the contrary
annoys her, she said, explaining that,
if it were true, "Why would you want
to hide it? That is not the way I run
my life."
Asked to describe her relationship
with King, Winfrey called her "the
mother I never had, the sister every-
body would want. She is the friend
that everybody deserves." Winfrey's
eyes moisten and her voice chokes
as she adds, "I don't know a better
person."
Winfrey will end her daytime
talk show next spring and, on Jan.
1, is launching a cable channel, the
Oprah Winfrey Network.
That new venture has given her
moments of panic.
"I would wake up in the middle of
the night literally like clutching my
chest, like, 'What have I done?'" she
told Walters.
"A Barbara Walters Special:
Oprah, The Next Chapter" will air
Thursday at 9 p.m. Eastern.

UK royals Wills and Kate
to get marital advice
LONDON Prince William and
fiancee Kate Middleton have another
chore on their must-do pre-wedding
list Sit down with priests to think
about the vows they will make.
: The couple are expected to meet
krchbiisip of Canterbury Rowan


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo taken Nov. 19 in Chicago shows talk-show host Oprah Winfrey
announcing her book club selections. Winfrey denied being gay in an upcoming
interview with Barbara Walters.


Williams and Bishop of London
Richard Chartres before they
marry April 29, palace officials said
Wednesday. Both clergy will be
involved in the wedding ceremony,
London's Westminster Abbey.
"It's customary for a priest to
meet with the couple before their
wedding," said Maria Papworth,
Williams' spokeswoman.
These marriage preparation
sessions include discussions on
how to handle marital disagree-
ments and how to prepare for the
changes, brought on by parent-
hood. Meetings often take place ir
groups, but talks for the soon-to-b
royal couple will be private and
strictly confidential.
The marriage of William's parent
Prince Charles and Princess Diana,
ended in divorce. St. James Palace
would not comment on whether the
also received similar attention, but
it is normal practice for a Church ol
England wedding.


Fans remember John
Lennon 30 years later

at NEW YORK-- John Lennon's
fans celebrated his life Wednesday
by visiting Strawberry Fields, the
Central Park garden dedicated in
his honor, while a newly released
interview he gave shortly before
his death showed he was optimistic
about his future.
On the 30th anniversary of
Lennon's murder outside his
Manhattan apartment building,
admirers played his music nearby at
Strawberry Fields and placed flow-
ers on a mosaic named for his song
"Imagine."
The steady stream of visitors repre-
Ssented the range of people who love
Lennon, from tlose who watched his
career unfold as it happened to those
who know only! his music.
f 6* Associated Fess


* Actor Kirk Douglas is 94.
* Actor Dick Van Patten is
82.
* Actor-writer Buck Henry
is 80.
* Actress Dame Judi Dench
Sis 76.
SActor Beau Bridges is 69.
SFootball Hall-of-Famer Dick
Butkus :s 68.
SActor Michael Nouri is 65.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twison@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cridsak@leakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


* Former Sen. Thomas
Daschle (D-S.D.) is 63.
* World Golf Hall of Famer
Tom Kite is 61.
* Actor Michael Dorn is 58.
* Actor John Malkovich is
57.
* Country singer Sylvia is 54.
* Singer Donny Osmond is
53.
* Actor Joe Lando is 49.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should )e completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. 26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

In Wednesday's edition of the Lake City Reporter, the Vann
Carpet One business was incorrectly identified.


. Luncheon focuses on ways THE WEATHER

to stay fit and avoid cancer E


By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.com

Park the car in the furthest possible
spot from the store, power walk between
stores in the mall when shopping or take
a walk instead of a nap after eating holi-
day dinners.
Creative tips such as these, presented
at a special luncheon Wednesday, were
just a few ideas on how physical fitness
and proper diet can improve health and
reduce the risk of cancer.
Nearly 20 members of the community
gathered at Quail Heights Country Club
for a "Lunch & Learn" program on the
topic hosted by the American Cancer
Society and the Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce.
Guest speakers at the event were


Jeriann Gonzales, chief clinical dieti-
tian at Lake City Medical Center, and
Jackie Lewis, personal trainer and fitness
instructor ht Anytime Fitness in Lake
City.
Gonzales shared the latest recommen-
dations and research on how diet can
either reduce or increase risk for certain
types of cancer, such as avoiding dietary
supplements for cancer prevention and
how garlic is currently under study for
its ability to reduce cancer risk.
'The key is just eating a good, bal-
anced diet and trying to stay up to date
with the research," Gonzales said.
Lewis said regular exercise can assist
in cancer prevention and encouraged
guests to implement healthy eating and
physical activity into their daily life-
styles.


Food drive contributions needed


From staff reports

The Lake City Reporter's
Third Annual Community
Food Drive continues to
accept donations of non-
perishable food items
needed to fight hunger in
Columbia County.
Donated food items can
be dropped off at the Lake
City Reporter office through
Friday. Monetary donations
are welcome. Checks should
be made payable to Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley
and dropped off at the Lake
City Reporter office.
'To those who already
have donated food items
and cash donations, we say
a heartfelt 'thank you,'"
said Lake City Reporter
Publisher Todd Wilson.
"There are still a couple
days left in this year's food
drive and we need the help
of our readers to meet our
goal. There are people in
our county who will be
hungry on Christmas and
the Food Bank has more
pressure on it than ever to
meet the challenge. We're
asking people to give what
they can to help those less
fortunate."


The Community Food
Drive, created in 2008
by the newspaper, tar-
gets the time frame
between Thanksgiving and
Christmas when food sup-
plies are scarce, but demand
from needy families reach-
es some of the highest lev-
els of the year. All food
collected is donated to the
Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley and earmarked for
Columbia County agencies
serving local residents.
Non-perishable food
items can be dropped off
through Friday at the Lake
City Reporter office, 180 E.
Duval St., during normal
business hours. Canned
goods and dry goods are
needed, but please no glass
containers.
"It's the perfect time
of year to have the food
drive," said Scott Elkins,
director of the Food Bank
of Suwannee Valley. "We


need the food."
Newspaper subscribers
also are asked to leave a
bag of canned goods or dry
goods near the newspaper
delivery tube or at the end
of their driveway on Friday
evening, so their newspa-
per carrier can collect it
Saturday morning for the
food drive's final push.
"Locally, this is the worst
year yet in terms of families
in need," Scott Elkins, Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley
director, said.
The Food Bank of the
Suwannee Valley is a sub-
sidiary of Catholic Charities.
Its office in Lake City serves
36 agencies in four counties
that assist people in need.
Of those agencies, 12 are in
Columbia County. The, Food
Bank only supplies other
agencies, not individuals.
Elkins said all of the food col-
lected during the Lake City
Reporter's Community Food
Drive would be earmarked
only for the agencies serving
Columbia County residents.
For more information
on the Lake City Reporter's
Third Annual Community
Food Drive, call (386) 752-
1293.


PARTLY
A CLOUDY


HI 57 LO 31


MOSTLY
3 SUNNY


HI 47 LO 19


R'OAFRCS MAP for Tus. I: I:mbr


Psa5333ca
53/33


Tallahassee.
S54/27

Palama City
53/32


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total ,
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


53/
Lake
57/
Ga'
5


54
23
69
46
87 in 1951
24 in 1959

0.00"
0.04"
39.02"
0.58"
46.38"


Friday
70.158.'s
69/54/pc.
76/65/s
73/50/s
67/41/pc
64/40/pc
69/56/s
66/36/pc
76/64/s
73/54/s
69/43/pc
72/52/s
60/43/s
59/40/pc
62/38/s
71/54/s
60/38/s
75/60/s


Saturday
72/58/s
73/55/pc
78/68/s
78/61/s
70/51/pc
68/51/pc
72/63/pc
70/47/pc
79/67/sh
77/60/s
72/51/pc
75/55/s
65/56/s
65/51/pc
65/56/pc
74/60/s
66/52/t
78/66/sh


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


Dec.
13
First


I WE .I R-E1U Ii


hu rsday


7p Wday


-I FM 1ldws ain1


0
Dec.
21
Full


7:15 a.m.
5:31 p.m.
7:16 a.m.
5:31 p.m.

10:21 am.
9:25 p.m.
10:55 am.
10:20 p.m.


Dec. Jan.
27 4
Last New


On this date in
1917, a severe win-
ter storm struck the
Ohio Valley and the
Great Lakes Region.
It produced 25
inches of snow and
wind gusts to 78
mph at Buffalo, N.Y.
The storm produced
26 inches of snow
at Vevay, Ind.


3


Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Is 2010 Weather Central
L rMU. Madison, Wi.
www.weatherpubllsier.com


Daily Scripture



"Jesus answered, "I am the
way and the truth and the life.
No one comes to the Father
except through me."


John 14:6


osta
27 *Jacksonvle City
/27 / JdIl Cape Canaveral
eCity 56/38 Daytona Beach
a31 B Ft. Lauderdale
inesvile Da a Beach Fort Myers
i8/35 6149 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
59/37 0
/7 Odrando CaCamaveral Key West
63/46 64/53 Lake City
Miami
pa-e Naples
61/42, West Palm Beach Ocala
67/54 *: Orlando
S Ft. Lauderde Panama City
It. Myes,. 69/58 Pensacola
64/43 Naples Tallahassee
65/49 Mani .Tampa
K 69/57 Valdosta
Key656* :-; W. Palm Beach
65/56


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


110 FRIDHIn


LAKE CRY ALMANAC


ww~aeI trpreco


-T*Fu bae .p'td


b"y4.







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY. DECEMBER 9. 2010


GOV.-ELECT RICK SCOTT VISITS
Gov.-elect Rick Scot talks with local business people.
Photos by JISON MATTHEW WALKER
bke City Reporter


Gov.-elect Rick Scott (second from right) visits the Vann Carpet One store during his 'bt's
Get to Work' jobs tour. Pictured are Paul Vann (from left), Marc Vann and Columbia Conty
Industrial Development Authority Executive Director Jim Poole.


Scott introduces himself to members of the Columbia County Republican Executive
Committee during a stop at party headquarters in downtown Lake City.


George Ward (left) speaks with Scott during his visit to Ward's Jewelry and Gifts.


Scott answers questions during an interview with members of the media on Wednesday.


They get the You get the credit.

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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














OPINION


Thursday, December 9. 2010


www.lakecityrepoter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


GOP gets

deal on

Bush-era

tax cuts

So much for all that
talk about fiscal dis-
cipline and attacking
the federal budget
deficit.
The first round of Bush-era
tax cuts, passed in 2001, took
one year to demolish a painfully
worked-out balanced budget
agreement and end a four-year
run of budget surpluses. Aided
by the cost of two wars that the
Bush administration financed
entirely by borrowing and the
Obama administration still does
- and a spendthrift GOP-run
Congress, the government has
been awash in red ink ever since.
And it will be for at least
two more years, thanks to a
deal President Obama cut with
congressional Republicans on
extending those tax cuts. It
doesn't even make a token wave
at the deficit
The Bush-era tax cuts were set
to expire at midnight this Dec.
31, itself a Republican budget
gimmick to make the cuts seem
more affordable than they were
and mask their impact on the
national debt.
Letting those tax cuts expire
on schedule, the White House
says, would have hit the typi-
cal working family with a tax
increase of $3,000, not a terribly
good idea during a recession.
But during the 2008 campaign
and repeatedly since, Obama
advocated the much more justifi-
able course of allowing the tax
cuts to lapse on the top 2 percent
of taxpayers, individuals making.
more than $200,000 a year and
households earning more than
$250,000. Doing so would have
put a $700 billion dent in federal
deficits over the next 10 years.
This deal on tax cuts is set
to expire at the end of 2012,
which means the whole battle
will have to be refought in the
hothouse atmosphere of an
election year. The two-year
extension of the Bush cuts will
add $700 billion to $900 billion
to the national debt.
Let's hope the Chinese have
the money to pay for all this,
because we don't

N Scripps Howard News Service
Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Memo to Obama on audacity


MEMO TO: President
Obama
RE: The Arts and Crafts
of Being President

ering presidents is
enough to leave any
watchful observer
convinced he has
seen it all when it comes to the
arts and crafts that makes good
presidents great And mediocre
presidents bad.
Yet after covering the making
and shaping of nine presiden-
cies as a work-in-progress, I
sure was fooled. Because, dur-
ing Campaign 2008, I never
met anyone who was more
convinced than I was that you
would be an excellent president
This was not just an audacity
of hope. It was a hard-reasoned
conclusion, forged not just from
reading presidential history but
covering the insiders and writ-
ing so many first cuts at it
Well, it has taken me awhile
to free myself from the trap of
confusing inside with insight.
But from your new tax cut com-
promise, this much now seems
clear: You just don't seem very
good at the art and craft of
being president.
The good news is that, while
this reality is unmistakable, it is
still reversible. Here's my plan
for springing you from the same
trap that makes people who are
inside think they are imbued
with insight.
First, have you watched folks
of a certain generation discover
when reading that things that
aren't clear up close quickly
become clearer by holding
the reading at arm's length?
So begin by holding your own
Obama Presidency at arms
length. Try getting a reading
on your latest.tax-cut extension
deal with Republicans.
You are right in saying it
would have been morally and


Martin Schran
mortin.schram@gmail.com
economically wrong (bt not
politically wrong) to allw tax
cuts expire this month or the
struggling middle claswork-
ers and to allow unempgyment
benefits to end for the esper-
ate jobless Americans. ill of
which Republicans thrftened
to do if you refused to eep the
Bush tax cuts for the r'hest
Americans.
But your leadershipask
was to first be sure tha the
middle-class, cul-de-saisubur-
ban Americans who vced for
you in 2008 but voted against
Democrats last monthelt the
due rage at what Repulicans
were willing to do to thm just
to keep tax cuts for thiwealthi-
est. Move early, give yourself
time to make real vote hap-
pen -let the consequences of
Republican policy become clear
- before rescuing th middle
class and jobless.
America never felt te out-
rage. And you, as theibleader,
failed to lead by assurig they
did.
Consequences are cucial
levers of leadership ard you
haven't mastered the rt and
craft of wielding themHave
you ever listened to th LBJ
Tapes? President Lynon
Johnson's taped telepbne
conversations show hn as the
master of persuasion rough
ego stroking, arm-twidng
and deal making. Andike
you, he had problemsiot just
with Republicans but Hllow
Democrats both sathern


conservatives and liberals.
Now fast-forward to this
week: '
GOP Tax Cut Position 1:
Charles Dickens couldn't have
created a colder, crueler charac-
ter than Republicans carved for
themselves by threatening to
cutoff unemployment insurance
and hold middle class tax cuts
hostage just so the richest
can continue getting tax cuts to
pay their country club dues. But
you never forced them to take
their position legislatively and
face the outcry of Americans
they stabbed in the back.
GOP Tax Cut Position 2:
You also failed to take preven-
tive action to stop Republicans
from diverting through dema-
goguery; they always defined
the top tax bracket as small
business owners who, if their
tax break ended, would have to
fire employees. All you needed
to do was to end their distortion
was exempt top bracket legiti-
mate small business owners
from the expiration of their tax
cut Or alternatively, guarantee
small businesses tax breaks
that more than make up the dif-
ference.
Estate Tax Breaks That
Only Benefits Millionaires and
Billionaires: These tax cuts for
estates worth millions had van-
ished from everyone's screens
when suddenly you stunned
your own allies by resuscitating
it in your compromise. You left
your most loyal supporters with
the impression you got little or
nothing for it in return.
Your supporters never doubt-
ed your vision. They just hope
you have the audacity to lead
from strength.

N Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Sheriff's Office didn't
provide traffic detail
I would like to address this
letter to the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office, which has
. always supported the riders for
the Dream Machine Christmas
run.
I could not understand why
you could not provide traffic
detail for our ride this year. We


all try to support ou'commu-
nity and provide for hose who
have less than we hwe, and I
would think the Sheiffs depart-
ment would want to to the
same. I am just thariful that no
one was injured thisSaturday,
and that all went we without
your support
I would however ke to thank
the Florida HighwayPatrol,
the Columbia Count Fire


Department and the Lake City
Police Department for their
cooperation at the start of the
ride.
I would also like to thank all
the residents for their patience
during our ride.
To those of you who had no
patience, happy holidays just
the same.
Steven R. Shaw
Lake City


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com


Christmas

trees give

evergreen

stories


I f you listen closely -
not just with your ears,
but with all your senses,
and especially with your..
heart a Christmas
tree will tell you a story about :
the people who give it a home..
But it won't be told with
words.
Christmas trees speak in
their own tongues with branch-
es and needles, ornaments and.:
lights, memories and hopes
and dreams. It's an uncom-
mon language, spoken only at
Christmas, but it's not so hard
to understand.
Here's an example.
Standing in my sister-in-law's
living room is one of the finest'
Christmas trees I've ever seen.
Ceiling-tall, fragrant and green,.,
it is perfectly shaped, and so
full that Santa and all his elves
could barely reach around it
But there it stands, no lights,.
no decorations, bare as the
day it was cut Why? Because
rpy sister-in-law, bless her, has;:-
been spending all her time
moving her aging parents to a.
facility nearby, where she can :
see them more often and make.
sure they will get all the help
they need:.
Somehow my sister-in-law
will get that tree decorated
in time for Christmas, even
if she has to stay up all night
Christmas Eve.
Here's another example.
The Christmas when I was 9, "
my family fell on hard times, '
even harder than our usual,
and my mother announced
that Santa would be arriving a
bit late.
"How late?" I asked.
"Maybe by spring," she said.:,
My stepfather cut down a
scraggly pine in the woods.
We covered it with lights and
strings of popcorn and chains
of paper snowflakes that I
made all by myself, though
I let my brothers think they
helped.
I wish you could have seen
it We left it up long past New
Year's. It told a story I've never
forgotten: Christmas is not an
abundance of gifts; it's the gift
of an abundant heart
I recently had an e-mail from
a reader we'll call Karen.
"Last year," Karen wrote,
"we spent all our hours at the
hospital, because my hus-
band had a malignant brain
tumor. We ate cafeteria food
on Christmas Day in a snow-
storm. We went through radia-
tion and chemo ... I say 'we'
because it takes a family to get
you through it"
This year, Karen said, her
husband is in remission. He
still needs a great deal of
care, but they decided to get a
puppy.
My daughter and her hus-
band, who were married last
spring, will have a tree that
tells a story of a life just begun:
My youngest and his wife,
who welcomed their first child
a few months ago, recently
sent me a photo that's almost
identical to a memory I have
cherished for more than 30
years: That of a baby, sitting
on his daddy's knee, watching
him play "Silent Night" on the
piano.
I've known a lot of
Christmas trees. Each told a
different story.
What story will your tree
tell?

Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.

!"


4A













_ WALK: Residents express excitement


Continued From Page 1A
take the time to visit a small
town like Lake City. If he
goes in with a little bit of
knowledge about what is
actually happening on the
ground in Florida, I think it
will be good for all of us."
Cindi Boatright, an
employee at the Brady &
Zasada attorneys' office,
was one of several Columbia
tinCounty residents who took
advantage of the opportu-
nity to shake hands and
meet the next governor of
the state.
"I think this is cool
because it's history in Lake
City in the making," she
said. "This is my hometown
GINA REYNOLDS/Speaal to the Reporter it's where we're from,
Hunter Panels worker Bobby Roberts (left) and plant manager Greg Ridilla speak with Florida and .how many times does
Gov.-elect Rick Scott during a tour of the Lake City manufacturer on Wednesday. the next governor come to


SCOT: Incoming executive aims for job growth
Continued From Page 1A


your hometown and talk
to you. It was important to
meet him because of the
history part of this. I think
it's cool that he's coming to
the hometown businesses
of Lake City."
Gayle Cannon,
Republican State Committee
Woman for Columbia
County, also visited with
Scott during his visit
"We were really excited,"
she said. "As far as I'm con-
cerned Rick Scott coming
to Lake City is a big deal."
Marc Vann and members
of his staff at Vann Carpet
One also-spoke with Scott.
He said he and his staff
were proud they had the
opportunity for Scott to
come to their business.


"It was impressive to me
that he's very conscious
of what's going on as far
as economically and in the
construction industry, and
the type of business we
have and the concerns and
problems with job losses,"
Vann said. "He told us that
one of his main goals is
to get people interested in
coming back to Florida and
see Florida start growing
again."


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this community is the peo-
ple. The attitude of people
here is they want this part
of the state to grow and
they work hard to make
that happen and they've
had a lot of success.
"My job is to make sure
I continue to help them do
that."
Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority Executive
Director Jim Poole sug-


gested Scott visit the area
after a meeting last month
and was excited to see the
governor elect accept the
invitation.
"I think the exciting
thing about Scott being in
Lake City and Columbia
County is that he's made a
commitment to job creation
being his number one goal
once he is governor," Poole
said.
Poole said Scott has told


Columbia County officials
he will be involved with
the communities that
are interested in bring-
ing in the 700,000 jobs
Scott promised during
his campaign.
"I think that now when
we call him, he's going
to think of seeing famil-
iar faces," Poole said.
"When he talks to a com-
pany on our behalf he's
going to say, 'I've been


to Lake City. I've been
to Columbia County and
I know their people and
I've met their business
people and I know what
it's like.' He's got a hands
on approach now on
helping us in the future
and I think the great-
est accomplishment of all
is that we personalized
Columbia County/Lake
City with the new gover-
nor of Florida."


FutureNow visits local schools


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter.com

FutureNow is a high-
energy school assembly
program using live music,
drama and real-life sto-
ries to impact and moti-
vate young people to make
correct choices, and since
2001 the organization has
done just that at more than
150 schools.
FutureNow visited Lake.
City this week, reaching
the children at Richardson
Middle, Lake City Middle
and Columbia County High


CARC
From Page 1A
immediate support and
resources, he said.
"My deepest hope is
that the CARC can become
a household name in
Columbia County," Belle
said. "I want to make
sure every single person
knows what the CARC is
about."


Schools. Hal Chaffee, event
promoter for FutureNow,
said there will be a presen-
tation open to the general
public at 7 p.m. today in
the Columbia High School
gym.
."The people of
FutureNow are passionate
about what they do," said
Chaffee. "I love working in
that atmosphere, with, oth-
e'rs who have all that ener-
gy-.to help young, people...
It's very fulfilling."
Chaffee said FutureNow
works to 'cut through the
confusion caused by the


media and in every day life,
and shows teenagers and
our youth in general the
truth about what it is to
make right choices and live
a more fulfilling life.
FutureNow also works
with existing organiza-
tions, helping youth have
role models in place and
ready to help. Chaffee said,
"We work with a lot of dif-
ferent organizations 'like
the,.Drug-Free Coalition,
the sheriff's department,
local churches, SWAT, and
other family organizations,
to provide a net for these


young people to fall back
on after the presentation."
FutureNow plans on
impacting every teenager
in the community, and help-
ing mold the future leaders
of our society and commu-
nity, said Chaffee.
The event today is free of
charge and there will even
be chances to win prizes
during the presentation.
'"We-eally want everyone
to come out (tonight) and.
experience a most unfor-
gettable presentation, of an
unforgettable message,"
Chaffee said.


UNITED: Financial goals targeted


Continued From Page 1A
Corrections Corporation
of America.
Money booked and actu-
ally on hand is $342,000
or 50 percent of the cam-
paign goal, he said. With
outstanding projections,
or money pledged, the
amount increases to more
than $507,000, 74 percent.


The booked and out-
standing projections along
with money raised in the
community as well as out-
side is estimated at more
than $554,000 or 81 per-
cent of the goal.
"The 81 percent is usu-
ally what we end up with
unless there's some great


benefactor," McKee said.
United Way serves
more than 20 agencies
in Hamilton, Columbia,
Suwannee and Lafayette
counties. PCS Phosphate
employees exceeded their
goal of $175,000 and also
made an opportunity quilt
to raise more money.


OBITUARIES


Retha Estelle Nettles
Mrs. Retha Estelle Nettles, 88,
of Jacksonville, Florida, died
early Wednesday morning in
the Shands at Jacksonville Hos-
pital. Funeral arrangements are
tentatively set for 11:00 A.M.
Monday, December 13, 2010
in the chapel of the Dees-Par-
rish Family Funeral Home. In-
terment will follow in the Oak
Grove Cemetery in Union Coun-
ty, Florida. The family is set to
receive friends for one hour
prior to the service at the funeral
home. A full obituary will follow
in Friday's edition of the Lake
City Reporter. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 South
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 386-752-1234 Pleasesign
the online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Irene Payne Porter
Mrs. Irene Payne Porter, 92, of
Lake City. died late Tuesday eve-
ning, December 7, 2010 in the
Haven Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley following a brief illness.
Born in Lake City on October
5, 1918, Mrs. Porter was the
daughter of the late John Wes-
ley and Annie Roberts Payne Jr..
Mrs. Porter worked for several
years as a Bell South telephone
switchboard operator but spent
most of her life as a homemak-
er. She was a longtime member
of the Bethel United Method-
ist Church and was an active
member of the United Method-
ist Women's group. Mrs. Porter
was preceded in death by her
beloved husband "Red" Porter.
She is survived by her daughter,
Donna K. Hyde and her hus-


band Dennis of Lake City; her
grandson Kevin Hyde (Jamie)
of Fayetteville, North Carolina;
and her three great-grandchil-
dren, who were the light of her
life, Danae, Naomi and Por-
ter Hyde all of Fayetteville,
North Carolina. Her niece, Liz
Home (Leo) of Lake City and
several nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Porter
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
on Saturday, December 11, 2010
in the Bethel United Methodist


Church with Rev. Melanie Fier-
baugh officiating assisted by Rev.
Ken Hamilton. Interment will
follow in Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens. The family will receive
friends at the funeral home from
5:00-7:00 P.M. Friday evening.
In lieu of flowers the family re-
quests that memorial donations
be made to the Robert Cares
Fund % Bethel United Methodist
Church, 4843 S. US HWY 441,
Lake City, FL 32025 or to the
Haven Hospice of the Suwannee


Valley, 6037 US HWY 90 West,
Lake City, FL 32055. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


GARDEN ACCENTS MAKE


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY. DECEMBER 9. 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY. DECEMBER 9. 2010


Parent's dilemma: Should

you insure your children?


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken on Oct. 18, UCLA cardiologist Daniel Cruz (right) and Younghwa Chang,
R.N., perform a heart biopsy on Andrea Ybarra, a recent beating-heart transplant patient, at
the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. The transplant was part of a proce-
dure where the donor heart is placed into a special box that feeds it blood and keeps it warm
and beating outside the body.


UCLA doctors testing warm,

beating hearts in transplant


By AUCIA CHANG
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES -
Andrea Ybarra's donated
heart was beating rhythmi-
cally by the time she awoke
from the grogginess of her
surgery.
Lub-dub. Lub-dub. Lub-
dub. In fact, it was warm
and pumping even before
doctors transplanted it.
Ybarra belongs to a
small group of people who
have had a "beating heart"
transplant, a, experimen-
tal operation that's mostly
been done in Europe. The
donor heart is placed into
a special box that feeds it
blood and keeps it warm
and ticking outside the
body.
"I felt peaceful when I
woke up. I wasn't scared,"
recalled the 40-year-old from
a Los Angeles suburb who
suffers from lupus. "It felt
like the heart was a part of
me all the time."
Despite advances in heart
transplantation, the way
hearts are moved around
the United States and most
places remains low-tech.
A team of doctors and
organ recovery specialists
stuffs an off-the-shelf picnic
cooler with ice and jets off
at odd hours to a donor hos-
pital where a heart from a
brain-dead patient awaits.
They inject a chemical to
stop the organ and preserve
it in the ice chest for the trip
home.
Once a heart is harvest-
ed, it's a race against time.
A heart can stay fresh in
the cooler for 4 to 6 hours


before it starts to deterio-
rate. Because of this con-
straint, doctors can't travel
too far to heart-hunt.
It's been done this way
for more than four decades,
ever since the first U.S. heart
transplant was performed on
Dec. 6, 1967.
Research has shown that
the longer it takes to remove
a heart and transplant it, the
greater the patient's chance
of death or heart disease.
But what if a heart could
beat on its own after removal
from a cadaver?
It may sound a bit maca-
bre, more like an Edgar
Allan Poe story. The new
high-tech heart box circu-
lates blood from the donor to
the heart so that it continues
throbbing while in transit
from hospital to hospital.
Based on some success.
overseas, the University of
California, Los Angeles is
currently heading an experi-
ment along with several


other schools that compares
the safety and effectiveness
of the new preservation
method versus the standard
cooler.
If the new technology suc-
ceeds in preserving hearts
longer, it could change the
field, experts say.
No longer will patients be
limited by location. Doctors
could make cross-country
heart runs without worry-
ing about how long it takes.
Hearts are now given first
to people on the waiting
list who live near where
the donor is hospitalized. If
there's no match, then the
circle widens until a recipi-
ent is found.
"The rush factor will be
taken out. I can go all the
way to the West Coast to
get a heart," said Dr. Bruce
Rosengard of Massachusetts
General Hospital, who
performed the first beat-
ing heart transplant iu the
United Kingdom in 2006.


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EAR DR.
GOTT: I have
a 6-year-old
daughter.
In the past,


I decided not to have
health insurance for her
or myself.
This is because we
eat healthy and exer-
cise. When we get sick,
we eat even healthier
and drink lots of tea anc
get lots of rest instead
of going to the doctor.
However, she is at
the age where I worry
about her breaking an
arm or injuring her
teeth or something.
I don't want to pay
$350 a month and up
for full coverage when
I will use only the acci-
dent portion of the cov-
erage. I know they offer
accident-only coverage.
Do you think this is
a good idea and do you
know which ones are
good?
Or am I better off put-
ting $200 a month into a
savings account in case
she has an accident?
DEAR READER: I
personally know a num-
ber of people who "self-
insure," meaning that
they put a specific dollar
amount away each week
or month in case of an
accident.
They have been doing
it successfully for many
years. However, coupled
with this practice is the
knowledge that they are
reasonably well off and
can cover a minor catas-
trophe, should it strike.
If you are in that cat-
egory, this is worth con-
sidering.
Some schools have acci-
dent-insurance programs
available for a minimal
amount of money. The


ON HEALTH






Dr. Peter Gott


cost is in the vicinity of
$50 each school year.
They can offer the bar-
gain price because they
work on the odds of
most children remain-
ing accident-free, owing
to close supervision;
however, should a child
fall from a play gym and
break an arm or loosen
an adult tooth, he or she
would have the coverage.
This, too, is an option.
While $200 a month is
a lot to put aside, it adds
up to only $2,400 a year
at a time when she can
be playing kickball with
other children, chasing
someone across a piece
- of equipment at the local
park or dashing into the
street for a ball when a
car is coming.
Accidents do happen,
and they're expensive.
One catastrophe (and
they never come at a
good time) can wipe out
several years worth of
savings. But, that said,
the money in the bank
is far better than no fall-
back at all.
If you can handle the
lesser issues, there is
catastrophic insurance
coverage offered with
relatively low premi-
ums.
For example, you
might have a policy that
picks up 100 percent of
her expenses after you
are out of pocket $2,500
or $5,000. Maybe a
combination of the $200


Lets Fill It Up!
















S Supporting the Food Bank of Spwannee Valley

Starting December 1, 2010
Bring Your Food Items to the Reporter Office.
located at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City
Monday through Fridays, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m.


On Saturday, December 11th
Carrier Food Pick Up Day
To participate, simply leave a bag of non-perishable foods at
your Reporter paper tube or the end of your driveway Friday night.
No glass containers.
Your Lake City Reporter carrier will pick it up while
delivering your Saturday paper.


Place a collection box in your place of business for donation and you will
be recognized with other business donors in the Lake City Reporter.




Lake City Reporter
lakectyreporter.comn CURRENTS Magazine

For addition al .r s ill
information and to. Il
participate, please call "

752-1293


0'Ish Donations


Cing All.[ Businesses!-i-~
HelpTUs FllTheTrucidfB


Page Editor. Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


monthly savings and
a catastrophic plan is
appropriate.
Keep in mind that we
don't know what will
happen tomorrow, next
week or beyond that.
Even if you read your
horoscope, get up on
the right side of the
bed, eat well, exercise,
and think your crystal
ball has all the answers,
accidents and sickness
can strike.
It's difficult to be pre-
pared and more difficult
not to be.
So my answer is to
comparison shop for
rates.
Begin with your com-
puter or local phone
directory. Jot down the
names of three or four
well-known insurance
companies. Call them,
and explain your situa-,
tion. Ask for rates.
There is no commit-
ment, so don't feel any
pressure from anyone
on the other end of the
line. Some companies
may have better ideas
and new affordable
packages.
Ask about deduct-
ibles, noncovered
illness, pre-existing
conditions, immuniza-
tion, dental coverage
and anything else that
comes to mind.Had
you begun when your
daughter was born,
you would have about
$14,400 in that savings
account.
Good luck.
* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author
of the book "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Diet," avail-
able at most chain and
independent bookstores,
and the recently published
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Cookbook."


' f' ,-*i
^^/> i
A.t sp, ^ :









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
rkjrbaW keciy/rv!ep-orrer-rr


SPORTS


Thursday, December 9, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Sign-up ongoing
at Boys Club
Registration for the
Boys Club of Columbia
County's basketball
program continues
through Dec. 17. Girls
and boys ages 6-14 are
eligible. Cost is $40.
For details, call
752-4184.
CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night set
for Tuesday
Columbia High's
soccer program has a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday at
Moe's Southwest Grill on
U.S. Highway 90 west.
The program will receive
a percentage of the sales.
For details, call
365-1877.
YOUTH VOLLEYBALL
Fusion tryouts
set for Saturday
The North Florida
Fusion volleyball
program for girls ages
10-18 has tryouts set
for 2-4 p.m. Saturday
at the Fort White High
gym. Interested players
need to bring a copy of a
recent physical and a
$25 tryout fee.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.
CHS SOFTBALL
Player/parent
meeting Monday
Columbia High softball
-has a mandatory player
and parent meeting for
those interested in trying
out for the 2011 team at
6:30 p.m. Monday in the
CHS cafeteria.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High boys
soccer at NewberrylHigh,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Wolfson High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Chiles High,
2 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball at Branford
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
soccer at Ridgeview High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Chiles High,
10a.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball at Bishop
Kenny High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Monday
Fort White High girls
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
soccer at Wolfson High,
7:20 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.


(JV-6)


Jefferson still


believes in


hoops' squad


Columbia travels
to Lee High at
7:30 p.m. Friday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
It's been five days since
Columbia High's overtime
loss to Terry Parker and
the Tigers are itching to get
back on the court.
Columbia is 1-3 undernew
coach Horace Jefferson, but
he's not discouraged by the
Tigers' play early this sea-
son. Jefferson believes that
the Tigers have good things
ahead of them, beginning
Friday against Lee High..
"After four games, we're
1-3 and that's probably


This


Meyer steps down
as Gators' head
football coach.
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE After
the worst season of his
career, Urban Meyer is
stepping down at Florida,
giving up one of the pre-
mier jobs in college football
for the second time.
The 46-year-old led
Florida to two national
titles but began to show the
strain of his high-profile job
when he briefly resigned
last December, citing health
concerns, but returned the
next day.
He had been hospitalized
with chest pains after the
Gators lost to Alabama in
last season's Southeastern
.Conference. championship
game.
This time he said his
health was not a factor in
his decision.
"At this time in my life,
however, I fully grasp the
sacrifices my 24/7 profes-
sion has demanded of me,
and I know it is time to
put my focus on my fam-
ily and life away from the
field. The decision to step
down was a difficult one,"
he said. "But, after spend-
ing more than two decades
motivating and celebrating
the young men I've been
so proud to coach, I relish
the opportunity to cheer for
my three terrific kids as Un
Uni
MEYER continued on 3B Sta


where we should be even
though we had a chance to
win against Terry Parker,"
Jefferson said. "We could
easily be 2-2, but as it is,
we're 1-3. We've shown the
signs of a young team. I'm
not panicking. I've seen
some positive things."
Jefferson believes that the
team, made up of primarily
underclassmen, is headed
in the right direction.
"We're just growing,"
Jefferson said. "Are we fur-
ther along than I thought
we would be? At this point,
yes. By not having a true
point guard, I think we've
had some good things come
out of our sophomores."
CHS continued on 3B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Marquez Marshall attempts to pass to one of his teammates against Terry
Parker High at Richardson Community Center on Saturday.


time,


it's


real


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
diversity of Florida head coach Urban Meyer (top) looks on with Steve Addazio during the Gators' 31-7 loss against Florida
ate University Nov. 27 in Tallahassee.


Indians soccer teams go

in opposite directions


Fort White beats
Hamilton County
8-0 on Tuesday.
Associated Press

Fort White's soccer
teams were on the opposite
end of mercy-rule decisions
Tuesday.
The Fort White boys
beat host Hamilton County
High, 8-0, while the Lady
Indians fell by the same
score at Suwannee High.


Trevor Stout had a
hat trick for the Indians.
Brandon PBrooks and Reno
Marmon each scored two
goals and Ricardo Barrera
had one.
"They are a young team
and we played quite well,"
coach Pete Blanchard said.
"We played as a team and
unselfishly made the extra
pass. We need to build on
this win and carry it into our
match today at Newberry."
Fort White (2-7, 1-2) plays
the Panthers in a District 5-


3A game at 6 p.m. today in
Newberry.
The Lady Indians
fell to 3-5-3 (2-3-1) with
the district loss. Next
up is Santa Fe High at
7 p.m. Monday in Alachua.
More on web
Due to an early dead-
line, more stories will be
published on our website.
Please visit www.lakecityre-
porter com for more infor-
mation.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Ricardo Barrera wins possession against
Columbia High on Nov. 9.










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour. Alfred
Dunhill Championship, first round, at
Mpumalanga. South Africa (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC Ladies European Tour, Dubai
Ladies Masters, second round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Kent St.at Florida
9 p.m.
ESPN Butler at Xavier or
Georgetown at Temple
ESPN2 Butler at Xavier or
Georgetown at Temple
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m,
TNT Boston at Philadelphia
10:30 p.m.
TNT Orlando at Portland
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NFL Indianapolis at Tennessee
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Florida at Washington
RODEO
10 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC PRCA, National,
Finals, eighth round, at Las Vegas

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF I
w England 10 2 0.833379 2
Jets 9 3 0.750 267 2:
ml 6 6 0.5002152:
alo 2 10 0.167243 3:
South
W L T Pct PF I
sonville 7 5 0.583 257 31
anapolis 6 6 0.500317 2
uston 5 7 0.41728832
nessee 5 7 0.417263 2:
North


W L
9 3
8 4
5 7
2 10
West
W L
8 4
6 6
6 6
3 9


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


PA
69
32
38
33
PA
300
90
21
35


T Pct PF PA
0.750 267 191
0.667 260201
0.417 229 239
0.167255 322
TPct PF PA
0.667295 237
0.500 283 269
0.500323 253
0.250256 333


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas

Adanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


W L
8 4
8 4
5 7
4 8
South
W L
10 2
9 3
7 5
1 I I
North
W L
9 3
8 4
5 7
2 10
West
W L


TPct PF PA
0.667 308 247
0.667 344 281
0.417222 293
0.333 294 336
TPct PF PA
0.833 304 233
0.750 299 227
0.583243 251
0.083 154 307
TPct PF PA
0.750246 192
0.667 303 182
0.417 227 253
0.167 278 306
TPct PF PA


Seattle 6 6 0.500 240 289
St. Louis 6 6 0.500 232 237
San Francisco 4 8 0.333 203 259
Arizona 3 9 0.250200 338
Today's Game
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Buffalo, I p.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, I p.m.
Oakland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Adanta at Carolina, I p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Baltimore at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 16
San Francisco at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 19
Kansas City at St. Louis, I p.m.
Washington at Dallas, I p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 20
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Boston at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando It Portland, 10:30 p.m.


Friday's Games
Charlotte at Indiana. 7 pm.
Denver at Toronto, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Washington. 7 p.
LA Lakers at Chicago 8 pLm.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8 pLm.
Oldahoma City at New Orleans. 8 pmr.
Houston at Milwaukee. 830 p-m.
Atlanta at San Antonio. 830 p.m-
Portland at Phoenix. 9 pJm.
Orlando at Utah. 9 p.m.
Miami at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. IUPUI, 7 p.m
No. 9 Georgetown at Temple. 9 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
Shark Shootout
Site: Naples
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort.
Tiburon Golf Club (7,288 yards, par 72).
Purse: $3 million. Winners' shares:
$375,0000 each.
Television: Golf Channel '(Friday,
3-6 p.m., 8-11 p.m.;.Saturday, midnight-
3 a.m.) and NBC (Saturday, 4-6 p.m.;
Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Format: Two-player teams. Friday,
modified alternate shot; Saturday, best
ball; Sunday, scramble. *
Teams: Matt Kuchar-Greg Norman,
Jerry Kelly-Steve Stricker. Justin Leonard-
Scott Verplank, Mark Calcavecchia-Jeff
Overton, Dustin Johnson-lan Poulter,
Chris DiMarco-Anthony Kim, Darren
Clarke-Graeme McDowell, David Duval-
Davis Love III, Jason Day-Rory Sabbatini,
K.J. Chol-Mike Weir, Fred Funk-Kenny
Perry, Rickie Fowler-Bubba Watson.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia atToronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10:30 1.m.
Friday's Games -
Montreal at Detroit, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Edmonton, 9 p.m..
Calgary at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


Sje, USA still feuding


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

THOUSAND OAKS,
Calif. Europe was 1 up
when three of its top players
decided not join the PGA
Tour next year. America
went all square by voting
one of its own as rookie of
the year over a European
who had a superior season.
Never mind that the
Ryder Cup ended two
months ago,
All that's missing from
this USA vs. Europe match
are lilac sweaters and leaky
rain suits.
Taunts played out in the
media have been build-
ing in recent weeks over
who has the better player
(Europe), who won more
majors (Europe) and which
tour has more top 10 play-
ers in the world (Europe).
Now it's reached the point
of arguing over who's more
fun on Twitter (Europe
again, in a landslide).
It all started when Lee
Westwood moved to the top
of the world ranking. This
was cause for celebration
in Europe, which had gone
nearly two decades with-
out being able to claim the
No. 1 player. And it was



Favre

unsure if

he'll play
Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- Brett Favre says he is still
unsure if his injured throw-
ing shoulder will allow him
to play on Sunday against
the New York Giants. The
Minnesota Vikings quarter-
back hopes to make a deci-
sion by Friday.
Favre did not practice
Wednesday as the Vikings
started preparing for the
Giants. He sprained the SC
joint in his right shoulder
on a crushing hit by Bills
linebacker Arthur Moats.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rory Mcllroy of Northern
Ireland tees off during the
Chevron World Challenge
golf tournament at Sherwood
Country Club in Thousand
Oaks, Calif., on Saturday.

cause for confusion in
America, which has never
bothered to understand
how the ranking works or
what it means (Hint It's not
about the majors).
Rory McIlroy caused
more high-fives among the
European press ahem,



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
THALC I


supporters when he
said he would not renew
his PGA Tour membership.
Westwood never had any
intention ofjoining, and PGA
champion Martin Kaymer
also decided against it.
This was billed as
McIlroy snubbing his nose
at America.
Not true, the kid said.
"The media, especially
the European and British
media, have blown it up,"
McIlroy said at the Chevron
World Challenge. "They
made it sound like 'Rory
snubs America.' That's not
what I wanted to do. I just
figured it was not quite
the right time for me. But
there's no doubt I'll join the
tour again at some point"
"Snub" took on a more
realistic meaning when the
PGA Tour announced its
rookie of the year.
The award went to 21-
year-old Rickie Fowler, who
did a lot of terrific things as
a rookie, but winning wasn't
one of them. Fowler was
twice a runner-up and was
picked for the Ryder Cup
team, where he won the
last four holes of his singles
match to earn a halve and
enhance his reputation as
an explosive player.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


REENOC E
I I
So WHO THEY
O T MARRIED TT .
CHERAB
SNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: T ]
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: OPERA PEACE SNAPPY COUPLE
Answer: What the astronauts explored when they got
to the moon A SPACE PLACE


Yo! Stallone joins Tyson,


Chavez in Hall of Fame


By JOHN KEKIS
Associated Press

CANASTOTA, N.Y. -
"Yo, Adrian! I did it'"
That was one of the
more famous lines from the
"Rocky" movie series that
not only made Sylvester
Stallone what he is today,
but also captured boxing's
heart for decades.
On Tuesday, Stallone
was rewarded. He, in fact,
"did itf"
The actor, who penned
the script about an under-
dogboxerfromPhiladelphia
named Rocky Balboa, was
named along with Iron
Mike Tyson and Julio Cesar
Chavez, among others
to the 12-member 2011
class for induction into the
International Boxing Hall
of Fame and Museum.
"Rocky" was released in
1976, and was nominated
for 10 Academy Awards,
winning best picture, best
director and best film
editing.
Stallone also wrote five
other movies based on the
Rocky Balboa character and
in 2006, was awarded the
Boxing Writers Association
of America award for
"Lifetime Cinematic
Achievement in Boxing."
While Stallone delivered
goosebumps, Tyson deliv-
ered plain, old bumps (and
bruises) during his career.
The self-proclaimed
"baddest man on the plan-
et" won his first 19 profes-
sional bouts by knockout,
12 in the first round. On
the November 1986 night
that he knocked out WBC
champion Trevor Berbick
for a piece of the heavy-
weight title, a man who
had watched Tyson learn
the sweet science in Cus
D'Amato's gym in Catskill,
NiY. said he figured Tyson
would end up in an electric
chair one day.
"I am honored," Tyson
said. "The sport of boxing
has given me so much, and
it is truly a blessing to be
acknowledged alongside
other historical boxing leg-
ends because they paved
the way for me, as I hope I


ACROSS


1 Quaked
6 Younger son
11 Dough, slangi-
ly
12 Lower in pres-
tige
13 Bullish trend
15 Mountain tops
16 Without
result
18 Derby or fedo-
ra
19 Rec-room gear
21 "Ulalume" poet
22 Naked
23 Wild guess
25 Petroleum
28 Hack
30 Santa -winds
31 CEO degree
32 Dues payer, for
short
33 Oty.
35 Go formal
37 Salt meas.
38 Superman's
girl


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Dec. 3, 2005, file photo shows Sylvester Stallone
raising a glove during filming for "Rocky Balboa," before the
Jermain Taylor-Bernard Hopkins world middleweight
championship bout in Las Vegas. Stallone was selected
Tuesday for induction into the International Boxing Hall of
Fame and Museum.


have inspired others i4 this
great sport."
Tyson electrified boxing
with his devastating.punch-
ing power and crude off-
the-cuff remarks.
Tyson won the WBA title
with a 12-round decision
over James Smith in 1987
and unified the titles later
in the year with a 12-round
victory over IBF champion
TonyTucker. Tyson defend-
ed the unified titles in vic-
tories over Larry Holmes,
Tony Tubbs, Frank Bruno
and Carl Williams, then
stopped Michael Spinks to
earn universal recognition
as champion in 1988.
Tyson suffered a stun-
ning 10th-round knockout
loss to James "Buster"
Douglas on Feb. 11, 1990,
in Tokyo.


40 Dries out, as
wood
41 Wildebeest
42 FedEx
vehicle
43 Fell with an
axe
46 University of
Oregon city
48 Sign up for
classes
50 Ohio city
54 "Broom Hilda"
cartoonist
55 News
summary
56 Kind of bear
57 Acrobat pro-
ducer

DOWN

1 Dallas campus
2 Short
flight
3 Thunder Bay
prov.
4 Artists'
lifeworks


Chavez's trademark was
the knockout The three-
division champion regis-
tered 88 before retiring five
years ago with a profes-
sional record of 107-6-2.
Russian-born Kostya
Tszyu, a junior welter-
weight champion, also
was selected along with
Mexican trainer Ignacio
"Nacho" Beristain, and ref-
eree Joe Cortez.
Posthumous honorees to
be enshrined include: ban-
'tiiweight Memphis Pal
Moore, light heavyweight,
champion Jack Root, and
middleweight Dave Shade
in the old-timer category;
British heavyweight John
Gully in the pioneer catego-
ry; promoter A.E Bettinson;
and former BBC broadcast-
er Harry Carpenter.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

NUTTY BAN7A N"A
INDIES BLAMED
BI S ECT G E N


GPS K EN ITID
D YE E bE A R I
R RE ISA L
BA'LER R UT CU
STEED E NNS ET
E'RR EE K URE
IrS ISS
SPELS NEATLY
PU SU E DE-GRE
AGTE S R El


5 Actress
Sedgwick
6 Filmdom's
Grant
7 "Honest" prez
8 100-meter event


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9 Como-
usted?
10 Quiz
14 Pinches off
15 Just washed
17 Jotting down
19 Areas between
hills
20 Muscle spasm
22 Cellar, briefly
24 Harmful
25 Rolex rival
26 "Ghosts"
writer
27 Young lady
29 "2001" com-
puter
34 Ski slope
bump
36 Frayed
39 Bird-feeder
treat
43 Fiber plant
44 Popular one-
named singer
45 Small bird
46 Movie lioness
47 Mrs. Nick
Charles
49 California fort
51 Kind of sys-
tem
52 Bit of paint
53 Unfold,
in poetry


2010 by UFS, Inc.


Nev
N.Y
Buff

Jack
India
Hou
Tenn


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY DECEMBER 9. 2010


Newton had unusual


journey to Heisman


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. -
Auburn wasn't even look-
ing for a quarterback when
the Tigers happened upon
Cam Newton at a little
junior college in Texas.
Tigers assistant coach
Curtis Luper made a
recruiting trip to little Blinn
College in Texas about a
year ago looking at wide
receiver Dexter Ransom,
not a passer.
"We were not even going
to take a quarterback,"
offensive coordinator Gus
Malzahn said. "Coach
Luper went down and said,
'You've got to take a look at
this quarterback.' It just so
happened one of our guys
was leaving and it opened
up a spot I went down
there and checked him out
and started doing home-
work on film and checking
out his background. It was
probably within a month
of signing day when we
actually started recruiting
him.
"I'd never even heard of
him. I didn't even know
who he was."
They didn't get Ransom;
he signed with Arizona.
What the Tigers did get
was a meteoric rise to
national prominence with
the Heisman favorite, an
SEC championship and a
shot at the BCS title in.
Glendale, Ariz., against
Oregon on Jan. 10.
Newton is one of four
Heisman finalists, join-
- ing Oregon running back
LaMichael James, Boise
State quarterback Kellen
Moore and Stanford quar-
terback Andrew Luck.
He's widely regarded
as a decisive favorite after
a season when neither
Southeastern Conference
defenses nor an NCAA
investigation slowed him
down. Newton is also a
finalist for the Maxwell
Award, which goes to col-
lege football's best player,
and the Davey O'Brien
Award for the top quarter-
back.
The 6-foot-6, 250-pound
Newton played the final
four games amid a barrage
of reports that his father
was involved in a pay-for-
play scheme during his
recruiting at Mississippi
State, and even academic
cheating during his stay at
Florida.
The eligibility ques-
tion, at least, was resolved
in a flurry leading up to
the SEC title game. The
NCAA said Cecil Newton
did indeed dangle his
son's services for dollars
at Mississippi State, but
that neither Newton nor
Auburn apparently knew
about it.
Newton's eligibility was
restored after a one-day
suspension by Adburn,
but the NCAA's ruling
has been widely criticized


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 4, file photo, Auburn quarterback Cameron
Newton (2) reacts near the end of the Southeastern
Conference Championship NCAA college football game
against South Carolina at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.
Newton is arhong the four finalists for the Heisman Trophy.


as opening the door for
abuse.
In conjunction with the
ruling, Auburn announced
Cecil Newton's access to
university sports would
be limited. Auburn hasn't
released the specifics of
those restrictions but TV
cameras repeatedly showed
Newton's mother, Jackie,
without her husband in the
stands at the SEC champi-
onship game in his home-
town of Atlanta.
Auburn spokesman Kirk
Sampson said Cecil Newton
was invited to attend by
the Heisman Trust and is
expected to be there. His
attorney did not respond to
a phone message:
As polarizing as the pay-
for-play scandal was off the
field, Cam Newton's on
the-field play has been just
as mesmerizing.
Newton and Nevada's
Colin Kaepernick joined
Tim Tebow this season
as the only Football Bowl
Subdivision players to have
20 touchdowns both rush-
ing and passing, account-
ing for 49 TDs.
He was the SEC's lead-
ing rusher with 1,409 yards
- easily a league record
for quarterbacks and
he also led the nation in
pass efficiency, completing
67.1 percent of his passes
for 2,589 yards. Newton
passed for 28 touchdowns
and was intercepted just
six times while also catch-
ing a TD pass.
Newton has mostly
deflected questions about


the Heisman when he's
allowed to speak to the
media at all which has
been seldom since the alle-
gations surfaced.
"I really don't like to talk
about individual awards
with me, because with-
out that team, without the
coaching staff having faith
in me ... without those
guys I wouldn't be where
I am right now," he said
after the SEC champion-
ship game. "I'm going to
leave that up to the voters
and we, just wait and see
what happens."
Newton did reflect on
his improbable rise: "365
days ago from this date
I was at Blinn College,
winning a junior college
national championship. It's
a wonder what God can do
in a person's life, in such
quick fashion."
Coach Gene Chizik
didn't declare his quar-
terback a shoo-in for the
Heisman, but delivers high
praise.
"I don't make these
decisions, obviously, but
the people that are if they
look at the body of work,
I don't know how he can't
be considered very highly
and possibly the winner of
the Heisman," said Chizik,
a former Texas defensive
coordinator. "I don't make
that call. In my 25 years
of doing this, he is the
best player I have been
around and I have been
around some great ones.
A bunch of them are still
playing."


CHS: Tisdale stepping up in role


Continued From Page 11

In particular, Jefferson
is pleased with some of
the play of his young
guys coming off the
bench.
"The other night, I think
Monte Tisdale surfaced,"
he said. "I think hell be
a huge asset. I see good
things happening. He's
generated some energy for
us. I think he has earned
more minutes because of
that."
What makes Tisdale a
threat on the court?
"He's just so tough defen-
sively," Jefferson said. "His
offense is a little down, but
we've only played a few
games. He understands
his role. He plays such
intense defense and he's
been the one that has sur-
faced."
Jefferson believes
Tisdale could be a role
player, but notes that if


the Tigers are to take the
next step its going to be on
the shoulders of Marquez
Marshall.
"If I can get Marshall
to play with the intensity
that Solomon Poole (of
Terry Parker) played with,
he'd be off the chain,"
Jefferson said. "I don't
think he plays with that
intensity. Marshall can
rise. I just don't think he
plays with the intensity he
needs to play with right
now."
Jefferson wasn't down-
ing his players ability, but
pointing out that he has
the ability to be a next-level
player.
"I thought the other
night, defensively, he
played tremendous on
Poole, but we need that
effort every night, not just
because you're playing
your buddy. I think he's


very capable of becom-
ing a dominant player in
the district. He must play
every possession with that.
intensity.. That's with all
the kids, but he's athletic
enough to take us to the
next level."
Jefferson is hoping to
see that intensity starting
Friday against Lee in a dis-
trict contest.
"We're playing in
Jacksonville so that
should be a story in itself,"
Jefferson said. "We're just
country boys trying to
win in the big city. Right
now, they have not won a
game, and they're pretty
young like we are. Last
year, they were 25-5,
however, they graduated
a lot of players. It should
make for a pretty interest-
ing matchup, but we've
got to play better each
game."


Dec. 18
New Mexico Bowl
At AJbuquerque
UTEP (6-6) vs. BYU (6-6). 2 p.n
(ESPN)
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois (10-3) vs. Fresno
State (8-4). 5:30 pm (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Ohio (8-4) vs. Troy (7-5). 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec. 21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
Louisville (6-6) vs. Southern Mississippi
(8-4). 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Utah (10-2) vs. Boise State (11-1).
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 23
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State (8-4) vs. Navy (8-3).
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3). 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida
International (6-6), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec.27
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4),
5 p.m. (ESPN2)
Dec. 28
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), 6:3Q p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
At Tempe,Ariz.
Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 10 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec.29
Military Bowl
AtWashington
East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)


Texas Bowl
At Houston
Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State
(10-2). 9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth,Texas
SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx. N.Y.
Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville.Tenn.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6). 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (10-3) vs. Washington (6-6),
10 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 3 I
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida
(7-5), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas.
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Puberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida
State (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. I '
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech
(7-5), Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Michigan State (I I -1) vs.Alabama (9-3),
I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5),
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl


At Jacksonville
Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State
(8-4). 1:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena. Calif.
TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (I1-1).
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma
(I I-2).8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (11-2).
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 4
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State (I 1-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2).
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At MobileAla.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6). 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 7
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2).
8 p.m. (FOX)
Jan. 8
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6),
Noon (ESPN)
Jan. 9
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada
(12-I). 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 10
BCS National Championship
At Glendale,Ariz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon '12-0),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. .2
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p....
Jan. 29
At MobileAla.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m., (NFLN)
Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs.The NationAIIl-Star Challenge,
2 p.m. *


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mississippi State football coach Dan Mullen looks for the official's ruling during their NCAA
college football game against Mississippi in Oxford, Miss., Saturday. Mullen is on the short
list of possible candidates to replace Meyer as head coach of Florida after serving as Meyer's
offensive coordinator during two national championships.


MEYER: Resigns after 7-5 campaign


Continued From Page 11

they compete in their own
respective sports."
AOL FanHouse first
reported the resignation,
which Meyer said he made
yesterday
"The world of college
football will miss Urban,"
Seattle Seahawks coach
Pete Carroll said on a con-
ference call. "He did a great
job coaching at Florida. He
had major personal issues
and health issues a year
ago, and I'm sure that he
did everything he could to
fight it off. Now he's mak-
ing decisions that are prob-
ably exactly what he needs
to be doing.... He brought a
lot of excitement to Florida
football, the SEC and all
that. Everybody's going to
miss him."
Meyer was hired by away
from Utah by Florida after
he led the Utes to an unde-
feated season.
In his second season
in Gainesville, he led the
Gators' to their third nation-
al championship. Two sea-
sons later he won another.
A bid for a third national
championship fell short
in 2009, and the day after
Christmas Meyer surpris-
ingly announced that he
was giving up the job.
Just like now, he said he
wanted to spend more time
with his family, though he
also said that he had health
concerns.
Less than 24 hours later,
he changed his mind and
decided to instead take a'
leave of absence.
He was diagnosed with


esophageal spasms and was
taking prescription medica-
tion to treat it.
The leave of absence
eventually turned into some
extended vacation time.
Meyer scaled back in
January he didn't go
on the road recruiting
- but still worked steadily
through national signing
day. He returned for spring
practice in March, but man-
aged to take significant time
off before and after.
He went to Hawaii with
his wife, traveled to Rome
and saw the Pope, took a
trip to Israel, visited the
Masters golf tournament
with his daughter and took
in a Tampa Bay Rays base-
ball game.
He said it was the first off-
season in which he stepped
away for days at a time.
But this season he had
to replace Tim Tebow and
several other stars who had
gone on to the NFL, and the
Gators struggled mightily.
Florida finished 7-5, the
worst record of Meyer's 10-
year head coaching career,
which began at Bowling
Green, and the first time the
Gators had lost five regular-
season games since 1988.
The season ended with an
embarrassing 31-7 victory to
Florida State, Meyer's first
loss to the rival Seminoles.
After that game, Meyer
vowed to fix the Gators'
problems.
"I can assure'you we are
going to rebuild this thing
and build it up the right way
and do it right," Meyer said.


"Obviously we are down a
little bit. I didn't believe
we'd be that far down, but
we are. How do you build a
program up? You build it up
with tough players, tough
coaches and you have got
to play better."
Meyer's staff had also
undergone significant
changes in the past few sea-
sons, with both his offen-
sive and defensive coordi-
nators from the champion-
ship teams moving on to
become head coaches.
Dan Mullen, who had
been Meyer's quarter-
backs coach since his days
at Bowling Green, went
to Mississippi State after
Florida won the '08 cham-
pionship.
After last season, defen-
sive coordinator Charlie
Strong left for Louisville.
Offense has always
been Meyer's specialty, his
spread-option had produced
some of the most potent
attacks in college football
throughout his career.
But the Gators ranked
10th in the SEC in offense
this season and offensive
coordinator Steve Addazio,
another longtime Meyer
assistant, had come under
fire for the problems.
Despite this season's
struggles, Meyer's resume
is one of the most impres-
sive in college football.
He is 103-23 (.817) over-
all, the best winning per-
centage among active major
college coaches with at least
10 seasons, and 64-15 (.810)
at Florida.


COLLEGE BOWL GAMES


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-042


_ m w









4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


Wlv 15 T'IS ALARM BECAUSE WHEN YOU HIT THE SNOOZE I FOUND 7THE PERECT CHRISTMAS
CLOCK ON SALE? I'S KIND OF BUTTON, A DILL INSTRUCTOR PRESENT FOR YOU T~tIS YEAR, DEAR!
ANNONG -, STARTS SCREAMING /'"
SAT YOU TO HIT THE
GROUNou I CANT
RUNNINWAIT!


/- I
40, _


12,


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


"HAWAII FIVf-O"I5 gACKI.27

"+' SHOULD CALL 1
SIT IHANwAI

S TWlO POINT-O"
-. -:- V,.%


DEAR ABBY


Son's gal pal is eating up all

of his mother's goodwill


DEARABBY. My son-Den-
nis" is divorcing for the third
time. He has primary custody
of his oldest two children and
shared custody of the younger
two. He is an excellent father.
I have stayed with him in
his large home to help with the
kids. I supplement their grocer-
ies with things we enjoy. Dennis
has a female friend he confides
in. He insists they are platonic,
but she has told me she hopes
to win him over.
This woman has a hard time
making ends meet, but always
has money for pedicures and
out-of-town football games. She
spends many days and nights
with Dennis, showering there,
eating his food and using his
laundry facilities. I resent that
she is eating or taking home
the food I buy for the children.
Am I being selfish? My husband
and I live on a fixed income and
must be careful with our money.
Any suggestions? WARY IN
MINNESOTA
DEAR WARY: I do have
one. Because you resent the
idea that your son's lady friend
may be helping herself to the
goodies you are providing for
your son and grandchildren,
and because it is causing you fi-
nancial strain, STOP DOING IT.
Or bring with you only what you
and the children can consume
during your visit
DEAR ABBY: Thank you
for publishing my letter (Oct.
27) about Mindy, the dying
woman who was celebrating all
occasions and holidays early.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
I would like to add a poignant
postscript to the original story.
During Mindy's battle with
cancer, she and her husband
Bill were friendly with another
couple who, sadly, were also
battling cancer. In this case, it
was the husband who had, at a
young age, developed the dis-
ease.
Near the end of her life, Min-
dy asked her adult daughter to
try and create a relationship be-
tween Bill and Helen, the wife
who had lost her husband. A
few months after Mindy passed,
her daughter suggested to her
father that he call Helen just
to chat He did, and after some
time their friendship evolved
into a serious relationship. They
are being married in the next
few months.
Mindy must have instinc-
tively known that the losses the
remaining spouses had suffered
would never be understood ex-
cept by someone else who had
experienced such pain. What
a selfless person she was! -
RABBI ALBERT SLOMOV-

DEAR RABBI SLOMOV-
IZ: Indeed she was. And I wish
Bill and Helen a lifetime of hap-


piness together.
DEAR ABBY: My 27-year-
old daughter and two grandsons
(ages 5 and 6) moved in with me
more than a year ago. "Lori" is
a good mom, but it upsets me
when I wake up at night and dis-
cover that she's not home. She
will leave a note saying she's
with this person or that and will
be home by midnight or 1 a.m.
It infuriates me when she
leaves the boys alone with me
without informing me in ad-
vance. We argue constantly
about this, but she continues to
do it I am ready to call the po-
lice or to file a report with DSS.
Lori says I am home anyway, so
what's the harm? Please help me
with this. HOME ALONE
WITH THE KIDS WHILE
MOM'S OUT PARTYING
DEAR HOME ALONE
WITH THE KIDS: Your
daughter's behavior is extreme-
ly disrespectful to the mother
who took her in. Nothing will
change until you draw the line
-and tell her that the home she
and her boys are living in is
yours not hers and you
expect her to live by your rules,
the first of which is giving you
the courtesy of asking whether
YOU might like the evening out
before she plans one for herself.
You are both adults, and you
deserve to be consulted. If she
won't comply, she should make
other living arrangements.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Choose your
words carefully and or you
will have to compromise.
Stay focused on what's
important Optimism will
attract positive people.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Keep your emo-
tions in check. Don't let
someone you work with up-
set you or make you feel de-
feated. You have lots to offer
and being a little outspoken
won't hurt your position.
Opportunities are available
if you put in the effort **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Have a little fun with
friends. Don't take anyone
too seriously. Keep mov-
ing forward with. creative
endeavors and dedicate a
little time to a cause you be-
lieve in. Get ready to throw
out the old and bring in the
new. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Finish anything
you've left undone. Don't be'
surprised by the response
you get from someone jeal-
ous of your talent and popu-
larity. Keep an open mind.
Socializing with colleagues
will position you well for
any job openings in the hew
year. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You may have to re-
structure who does what if


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

you want to make sure that
you don'tfall behind athome
or at work. Mixing business
with pleasure will enable
you to accomplish the most,
as long as you don't make a
fuss or complain. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Socializing with
friends, peers and people
who share your interests will
lead to an interesting oppor-
tunity for travel, learning or
getting involved in a brand
new venture. Don't let your
heart rule your head. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take each step of
whatever you are working
on and do your very best
Someone hard to please will
scrutinize you. Rely on your
past experience to help you
do what's right Discipline
and hard work will pay off.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Offer helpful sug-
gestions, using diplomacy,
if you want to avoid a falling
out with someone you care
about Focus on having fun.
Getting back to your roots
or making plans with people
you don't see often will help
you recall life goals and how
to reach them. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll come


up with an interesting
moneymaking plan if you
discuss your skills and the.
services you think you can
offer. Before putting any
money into your plan, test
the market on a small scale.
Look at the facts and decide
what action will bring the
.highest rewards. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll have
plenty to be thankful for and
some interesting deals will
show promise and prosperi-
ty. A leadership position will
be offered because of your
past performance. Greater
responsibility will pay off
but will cost you personally
and emotionally. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): It may be dif-
ficult to hold back the way
you feel. Don't let a mistake
cost you financially or emo-
tionally. Offer what you can
to help out but don't feel
you have to match what ev-
eryone else is giving. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't be afraid
to change your mind or
make an unexpected diver-
sion that will catch others
off guard. Your spontaneity
will get others to respond
to your requests. If you are
willing to delegate work, you
will be successful. *.**


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos -
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals J
"ZGTP KJMKWJ UODTI UO G U
XJKNJRRDMT DR RMZJUODTL PMB
SBRU OGYJ UM WDYJ FDUO FOJT
PMB LJU M W X J N, VBU DU'R TMU."
UM Z V M R W J P

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Reality leaves a lot to the imagination." "As usual,
there is a great woman behind every idiot." John Lennon
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-9


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ThMOYao EVENING?
^ VE-&,THRT'S
SFINE. I'LL
..................0


"Min
...................


TV NELJSROOM 8
I THINK IT WOULD
I INVENTED A DRUG MAKE A GOOD STORY
THAT SWITCHES OFF FOR YOUR SCIENCE
TLHEC r(ATIM'S-A BITI TYr' SSEGMENT.


OR LJE COULD DRUG-
DART CELEBRITIES AND
FILM WHAT HAPPENS.


TwJas 12-9












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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 10-272-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEE EDWARD YOUNG,
a/k/a LEE E. YOUNG,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of LEE
EDWARD YOUNG a/k/a LEE E.
YOUNGS, deceased, File No. 10-
272-CP, by the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32055; that the total cash value of
the estate is $3,000.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
NAME:
ADDRESS:
Edward Youngs
1584 Northfield Lane
Lafayette, CO 80026
John Youngs
8521 Bald Eagle Lane
Wilmington, NC 28411
William Youngs
PO Box 67
Steuben, ME 04680
Charles Youngs
422 Gorham Lane
Boyce, VA 22620
Kathy Carpenter
4506 S 950 W
Riverdale, Utah 84405
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of
the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is December 9, 2010
Attorney for person giving notice:
/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No 052454
Person giving notice:
/s/ William Youngs
PO Box 67
Steuben, ME 04680
05524575
December 9, 16, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000798
DIVISION
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION
Plaintiff,
vs.
LAURIE A RENEGAR A/K/A
LAURIE A SCHULTZ, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure .dated November
30, 2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000798 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, is the Plaintiff and
LAURIE A RENEGAR A/K/A
LAURIE A SCHULTZ; TRAVIS M
RENEGAR, are the Defendants, The
Clerk of the Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 29th day of De-
cember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 18 OF SOUTHLAND SUBDI-
VISION, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 47 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1990 SOUT
HS NO 60161163Z, WHICH IS
PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO
THE LANDS ABOVE DESCRI-
BED AND, AS SUCH, IS DEEMED
TO BE A FIXTURE AND A PART
OF THE REAL ESTATE.
A/K/A 188 SW PEACH GLEN,
HIGH SPRINGS FL 32643


LOST: Flat type cell phone in a
red zipper eye glass case.
Lost in Lake City or Branford.
Please call 386-935-0366

070 Rewards
$500 Reward, Information leading
to the arrest of items stolen on
Nov 14-19, 2010. 386-288-6280
(Blazer, Golf Cart & 4 Wheeler)
100 Job
100 Opportunities
2 Full Time hair stylist wanted.
Preferably with established
clientele. Please call
386-288-2743 for more info.
05524599
LUBE TECH WANTED
Apply @ Rountree-Moore
Chevrolet
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
Ask For: Jimbo Pegnetter


Legal

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale. if any. oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on December 1. 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ P.A. Perry
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion at 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days
before your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7
days; if you are hearing or voice im-
paired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09117891 CENDANT-FHA
05524572
December 9, 16, 2010


010 Announcements








020 Lost & Found


12A0 Medical
120 Employment

04542594
RN/LPN
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
weekend positions of RN/LPN
8 and 16 hour shifts available
C.N.A. 3-11 Shift
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Heakhcare and Rehabilitation
Center.
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE


Member Service Manager
Suwannee Valley Electric Coop., Inc. (SVEC) has
an opening for the position of Member Services
Manager. This is a full-time position responsible
for managing the Member Services Department.
A minimum of 6 years customer service with su-
pervisory experience required. Applications and
job descriptions may be picked up at the SVEC
administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak
or reviewed on www.svec-coop.com. Applica-
tions should be turned in, to attention Vicky, at
the above address, mailed to PO Box 160, Live
Oak, FL 32064 or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.
com. The deadline for accepting applications
is Wednesday, December 22, 2010. SVEC is an
equal opportunity employer.

Suwannee
Valley
E electric
Cooperative



Do you enjoy working

with children?

Are you interested in a

teaching career?

We will pay 100% of your FCCPC* clasems,
books and fies to become certified

Seeking several Individuols for
Full-Time INFANT.TODDLER TEACHING POSITIONS
In Cotumbio and Hamlon Count&s.

Ex.lent starting pay from $7.96 to $8.65 per hour,
Paid Holidays, Vocation. Sik Loove plus oddl benefits
Reid: Official HS/GED karnucri
dOC 40 Howr, FCCPC */CDA

APPLY at Suwannee Valley 4Cs TODAYI

236 SW Collueba Ave. Lake Ciy, or
843 SW Mary Mac S.n Ut Oak

OrCALL Anne Marie at 754-2222 x110
i-M -...b& miso,4<,- arg- Fax (3 4) 754-2220
IFCCPC -o o o Chid Cre fNocawd Caicate
*CDA4i3 Isa pnere Azocft
Bodglioud scraweings ore mequed belor on ofoer maoy be ode.,
Svwonnere Valey 4Cs is an ECE ord a drugre wvr .e.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge.
Health and Life Insurance
available. Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs. O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY !!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542605
Receptionist /Ward Clerk
And
Laundry /Housekeeping
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Receptionist/Ward Clerk, and
the part time position of
Laundry/Housekeeping
attendant. Competitive Salary
and Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colbum Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

Jr & High school
Math teacher needed.
Please fax resumes to:
386-758-3018


Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars. Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


12 o Medical
120 Employment


Dietary Assistant
/Dietary Aide
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Dietary Assistant and part time
position of Dietary Aide.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05524555
SS.wannizi
Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time
Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

240 Schools &
Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
AKC BOSTON Terrier.
6 moold. Female, red & white.
All shots current: $500
386-867-4335
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
CKC MINIATURE PINSCHER
Black & Tan, tail docked, health
certificate, ready 12/24, $400,
$50 deposit to hold 386-438-3229
or 386-497-1469.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
6 yr old reg Quarter Horse,dark
bay, trained for barrels, needs
more attn, professionally trained 4
months ago $800 386-288-9245
Baby Pigs for sale
Ready Now!
$50 each
386-965-2215
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

403 Auctions
ESTATE AUCTION
Friday, December 10th 6:30 PM
High Springs, FL Hwy. 27 N.
auctionzip.com
Gold/Diamond jewelry, coins,
furniture., glasswaremodel 12
Winchester,Mossburg 22,
12 ga D.B. Rabbitear, 10% B.P.
Red Williams AU437/AB270
386-454-4991

416 Sporting Goods
Bowflex Treadclimber TC1000,
$600 obo,
slightly used
386-984-1044
FOR SALE: Over 100 year old
antique double barreled
shotgun with rabbit ears.
Call 386-438-5697

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &


05524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD.
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455


IBUYI


^SELL


lfFINDI4T


430 Garage Sales
Mamouth Sale. Man)' Christmas
items incl. stuffed toys, dolls, etc.
Crafts, hshold, videos CDs/DVDs.
Everything imaginable. 626 SW
Chapel Hill St off McFarlane






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Three Family ,Sat morning only
loads of DVD's & games, baby
items/clothes, gas powered four
wheeler, Polaris Ranger 4 x 4.
Lake Jeffery Rd to Old Mill Rd
left, then right on Auburn,
2nd to last house on left

440 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: APEX DVD Player
w/Remote. Also, 5 DVD Movies
Please Call 386-438-5293 between
noon and 6pm $100. for all

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420.

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
.$575 monthly,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3BR/1.5 BA
IJnfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142
3BR/2BA Double wide. Lg.
Rooms. $750 a month. 1st month
and security. Please call
386-365-1243 or 386-965-7534.
4/2 MH on 3.5 acres in Ft White
on secluded private property, den,
laundry rm, all appliances includ-
ed, CH/A $800 month w/$500 Sec
386-292-0715 or 386-754-6970
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
4Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

6 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524587
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500- 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210


0 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7I1 For Rent










LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


THURSDAY. DECEMBER 9. 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


'710 Unfurnished Apt. Unfurnished
710 For Rent 730 Home For Rent


SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1. 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
Sww.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/l bath. I car garage. W/D
hook up. $520 month,
no pet, I month sec.
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage.
ea-st side of town.
1st. last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Duplex w/garage spacious. 2/1.
1300(X) sq ft. W/D hook up. CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available.
1 & 2 bedroom units.
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted. monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
2 J For Rent
Fully Furnished Clean 2br/1.5ba
Owned by non-smoker. Washer &
Dryer, Microwave, TV.
$600. mo 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

f730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542599





LAKE CITY
2Br/IBa, 768 sqft. $525.mo.
3Br/2Ba, 1,064 sqft. $625 mo
2Br, IBa, 700 sqft, $495 mo
2Br/lBa, 896 sqft, $695 mo
2Br/lBa, 720sqft, $650mo
3Br/1.5Ba, 1,278sqft, $795mo
2Br/lBa, Mobile Home $495mo
3Br/lBa, 960sqft, $750.mo
FT. WHITE
4Br/3Ba, 1,536 sqft, $725
MADISON COUNTY
2Br/lBa 700 sq ft., $450. mo
J.ENNINGS
3Br/2Ba 1293 sqft, $695mo,
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
www.NorthFloridaHome-
andLand.com


05524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364
1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2/1 House, near Elementary
School. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private. $1200 per mo. plus
deposit. 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2. CH/A.all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport. $850 mo. \st,
last &sec. 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666


3/2,Brick Home. big back yard.
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwyv & CR 242.
386-965-0276
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
RENTED
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home. fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land Ca
386-935-0824
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch. all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10XUS 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
-0I /US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
I +Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805. Lots for Sale


5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free .
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. 'of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
82o Farms &
O2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFiriancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
t830 Commercial
3 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, nerf
bars, stereo. $16,995. 752-8227

CO~M~I'jON UYSl
AND SAVEA I~t*CK!!
FO m tRNET1 aK!


Contact us

at the paper.






: LASSIFREDADS--
- 386-755-


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALl OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


5ITRONIC ADS SENDLTO
adsjlakecityreporter.cWn




ILiakeCityReport e



log.l FlrG55


II


IA

1g10
FO OL


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your pd for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2009 Toyota Scion 2008 Toyota Tacoma
2009 Toyota Scion 4DR. access cab.
XB 17,250 mi., AT, all power,
5DR, 40,000 mi., purchase Tonneau cover, bedliner,
for payoff S1,000 under book. class III hitch, nerf bars,
Serviced at Lake City Toyota. AM-FM stereo w/CD,
Call $16,995
386-758-5916 Call
386-965-7146 386-752-8227


In Print,

& Online

One Low

Price!


ForMoe etil CllMay r-rige

at36-5-54


ADVERTISE YOUR

Job Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter

Classifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo

For just pennies a day.

Call today,

755-5440.
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