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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01469
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/08/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01469
System ID: UF00028308:01469
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






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Mi~d 000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT
Midc LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORTD=
GAINESVILLE FL 32611 1943






Wednesday, December 8, 2p j|


Food Needed
Make donations
at Lake City Reporter office.
Local, 3A






LReporter


*ter.com


Vol. 136, No. 276 0 75 cents


Jacksonville man arrested in drug sting


Suspect allegedly
tried to buy $13K
worth of cocaine.
From staff reports

A Jacksonville man faces
drug-related charges after
law enforcement authori-


ties said he attempted to Sheriff's Office, the Lake
purchase a large amount City Police Department,
of cocaine during an under- the Florida Department
cover operation. of Law Enforcement and
The arrest was made the Drug Enforcement
Tuesday by the Columbia Administration.
County Multi-Jurisdictional Henry Leon Manns,
Task Force composed 47, 1441 W. State Road,
of representatives from Jacksonville, was charged
the Columbia County with attempted traffick-


ing in cocaine. Manns was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
without bond.
According to the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office, task force detectives
conducted an undercover
operation in Columbia
County where Manns


allegedly attempted to pur-
chase a half kilogram of
cocaine from undercover
officers. He was arrested
after paying the under-
cover officers $13,000 for
the cocaine. Manns was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility.
Sgt. Ed Seifert,


Columbia County Sheriff's
Office public information
officer, said Manns will be
transferred to Jacksonville
in the coming days to
face charges in federal
court. The U.S. Attorneys
Office will be responsible
for prosecuting Manns,
Seifert said.


ARMED TRAINING


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Local law enforcement officers enter the old Boy's Club of Columbia County building during the Active Shooting Response
Training on Tuesday. More than 40 officers participated in exercises developed to test their response if a shooter poses a
threat to innocent bystanders in places like schools, court houses and hospitals.

Scenario sets sights on officers

'neutralizing' school shooting


JASON M. WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Consultant Roy Henderson
loads magazines for the next
group of trainees.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
F our local law
enforcement
officers stood
outside a door
with their hand-
guns drawn, ready to save
as many lives as possible
as they made their way
into an abandoned school
building. Moments after
they entered the build-
ing, bursts of gunfire cut
through the cold winter
air. Minutes later, the
officers emerged from the
building unscathed.
No need to be alarmed.
It was merely a training
session described as a


JASON WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The participants used 9 mm
Ultimate Training Munitions
for their standard-issue Glock
handguns.
"hypothetical situation,"
which required officers to
deal with an active school
shooting.
More than 40 offi-


cers from the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
and Lake City Police
Department took part
Tuesday in an active
shooting training session.
They wore protective
head gear, body armor
and loaded their firearms
with simmunition, a form
of paint and marking bul-
lets.
"This is the culmination
of two months of planning
with the Sheriff's Office,
members of the county as
well as the police depart-
ment on an active shooter
situation," said Capt John
Blanchard, public
TRAINING continued on 3A


Fire strikes Lake City motel


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Fire Department firefighter Shawn .
Henderson (atop ladder) checks for flames during a motel
fire Tuesday night at the Triangle Motel, 2238 E. DuvAl St.
According to Columbia County Fire Chief Tres Adkinson, the
blaze destroyed one room. He said up to 14 residents were
displaced by the blaze, allegedly caused by electrical wiring
problems. No additional details were available at presstime.


Scott's LC visit

to target jobs,


business goals


Governor-elect
expected to meet
LC businessmen.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Governor-elect Rick
Scott's visit to Lake City will
focus on economic devel-
opment and how to create
jobs, a Columbia County
official said Tuesday.
Jim Poole, Columbia


County
Development


Industrial
Authority


executive director, said
hf spoke to members of
Scott'fs transition team and
has been
able to con-
firm Scott's
itinerary in

said Scott
is slated to
Scott be in Lake
City 8 a.m. today and is
expected to participate in a
round-table discussion with
SCOTT continued on 3A


Benefit ride raises

more than $7,000

for Dream Machine


Funds will be used
to buy toys for kids
this Christmas.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Christmas Dream
Machine will have more
than $7,000 to spend on local
children's toys and gifts
- courtesy of Saturday's


Christmas Dream Machine
Toy Ride where motorcy-
clists contributed toys and
money.
According to information
from Cookie Murray, the
event's organizer, the final
tally showed that the motor-
cyclists raised $7,574 dur-
ing Saturday's benefit ride
for the Christmas Dream
BENEFIT continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


50
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles ...........
Around Florida.....


TODAY IN
NATION
Elizabeth
Ed.-. ii. : die:.


COMING
THURSDAY
Coverage of the
1.Jnited .". lun.:heo:n


Community Food Drive


Saturday, December 11, 2010
Carrier Pick Up Day


I


c~ -
LSCS -
tiSp!


See the ad in today's paper for details.


Starting December 1, 2010
Drop off at the Reporter office


1


Mw6 V









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 7-1-6
Evening: 2-9-8


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 4-9-3-0
Evening: 0-5-4-5


Monday:
I ea- 5-26,-28-32-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Mirren gets leadership award


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif
love the smell of estrogen in
the morning."
That's how Katie Couric
opened her keynote address
Tuesday at the Hollywood
Reporter's Power 100 Women in
Entertainment breakfast, an annual
event that brings together some of
the entertainment industry's most
powerful female executives and shot-
callers.
The 19th annual breakfast event,
held at the Beverly Hills Hotel, fea-
tured Couric and Dame Helen Mirren,
who received the Sherry Lansing
Leadership Award.
Halle Berry presented Mirren
with the award in recognition of her
personal and professional integrity,
lauding her fellow Oscar winner as "a
giant talent" and someone who has
"conducted her whole life with such
grace and dignity."
Mirren said that though her parents
were old school her mornm "was con-
vinced that she would personally walk
on the moon before there would be a
female prime minister" they raised
her to strive for economic indepen-
dence in whatever career she chose.
Mirren has worked steadily since
launching her career in the late 1960s,
and Berry said the 65-year-old actress
is single-handedly breaking down
age barriers in Hollywood "because
you ,can age, you can do films that .re
successful and you can still be hot as
hell."

Somers to lead talks
on fountain of youth
LAS VEGAS Former sitcom
star Suzanne Somers is due to lead
a panel at a Las Vegas conference
searching for a new-age fountain of
youth.
The 64-year-old actress is sched-


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor-director Maximilian
Schell is 80.
* Flutist James Galway is 71.
* Singer Jerry Butler is 71.
* Pop musician Bobby Elliott
(The Hollies) is 69.
* Actress Mary Woronov is
67.
* Rock singer-musician
Gregg Allman is 63.
* Actress Kim Basinger is


57.
* Rock musician Phil Collen
(Def Leppard) is 53.
* Country singer Marty
Raybon is 51.
* Actor Wendell Pierce is 47.
* Actress Teri Hatcher is 46.
* Singer Sinead O'Connor
is 44.
* Actor Matthew Laborteaux
is 44.


Daily Scripture



"Jesus said to her, "I am the
resurrection and the life.The
one who believes in me will live,
even though they die."


-John 11:25


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actress Helen' Mirren speaks at the Hollywood Reporter's 'Power 100: Women in
Entertainment Breakfast' Tuesday in Beverly Hills, Calif.


uled to speak at the American
Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine's
18th annual conference Thursday
through Saturday in Las Vegas.
The event is expected to attract
more than 6,000 visitors looking for
answers about how to extend their
lifespan.
The former "Three's Company"
and "Step by Step" star has become
a spokeswoman for alternative medi-
cal treatments.
. She has also frustrated main-
stream doctors by touting bioidenti-
cal hormones and advocating.against
chemotherapy as a cancer treatment

Ex-Sunshine Band
member gets 7 years
NEWARK, Ohio Telling a judge
he was embarrassed, disgusted and
ashamed, a former member of KC
and the Sunshine Band has been


sentenced in Ohio to seven years in
prison for sex charges involving teen
boys.
Bassist and music producer
Richard Finch entered pleas of no
contest in Licking County Common
Pleas Court on Monday to unlawful
sexual conduct with a minor and
several other charges.
His voice breaking, the 56-year-
old Finch apologized to a judge
and the teens, saying he had little
memory of the activities because '
he was impaired by alcohol.
The multiple Gramffiy Award
winner was arrested in March after
police said a boy reported that
he'd had Sexual contact with Finch
at the man's home in Newark in
central Ohio. They said Finch later
admitted he'd had sexual contact
with boys ranging in age from 13
to 17.

. Associated Press


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Fax number ..............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home-delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
listed Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. am. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press, problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-880. vice related credits will be Issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
SLake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
NEWS(circulation@lakecltyreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427 (Tuesday through Sunday)
After 1:00 p.m. 12 Weeks................ $26.32
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com) 24 Weeks..................$48.79
ADVERTISING 52 Weeks..................$83.46
ADVERTISING Rates indude 7% s-lestax.
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417 Mall rates
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks.................. $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks................... $82.80
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks. ;........... $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Cabinet OKs power
plant, land deal

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Charlie Crist and three
other independently elect-
ed statewide officials met
for the final time Tuesday
in their capacity as gover-
nor and the Cabinet
They will, however,
reassemble Thursday in
the form of the Board of
Executive Clemency to con-
sider a pardon for longtime
dead rocker Jim Morrison
along with dozens of other
felons seeking to have civil
rights restored, get reduced
sentences or full pardons.
During an unusually
lengthy meeting that lasted
five hours, the governor
and Cabinet approved a
controversial biomass plant
in Gainesville, approved
the transfer of state lands
in Collier County to the fed-
eral government and even
honored a Labrador retriev-
er named Ace, who was for-
mally retired from the state
Fire Marshal's Office as an
accelerant sniffer.
. After more than an hour
of debate by Gainesville cit-
izens and local officials on
the merits of the biomass
plant, Crist and the Cabinet
unanimously agreed to
support construction of a
100-megawatt, wood-burn-
ing power plant that could
serve 70,000 homes in the
Gainesville area.
Advocates testified
that the plant would help
Gainesville Regional
Utilities diversify Florida's
fuel mix and advance renew-
able energy. Critics argued
it would result in higher
rates and increased green-
house gases. One resident
said trucks delivering wood
to the plant would increase
traffic congestion.
The back-and-forth
clearly frustrated outgoing
Agriculture Commissioner
Charles Bronson, who was
ready to leave it for his suc-
cessors to sort out before


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Governor-elect Rick Scott (left) and Gov. Charlie
Crist react to a question at a news conference Nov.,9 in
Tallahasse. Crist met for the final time with several Cabinet
members Monday.


voting to approve the pro-
posal.

Jail guard gets 25
years for murder

GENEVA A former jail
guard will spend 25 years
in prison for fatally shoot-
ing his live-in girlfriend.
Jeff Lane Thomas plead-
ed no contest to second-
degree murder Monday in
the 2009 death of 37-year-
old Melanie Lee.
Authorities said 46-year-
old Thomas fatally shot Lee
alongside State Road 46 in
central Florida as motorists
drove by. Lee was a state
corrections officer.
Authorities said Thomas
was angry at Lee because
she didn't pick him up from
work on time.
Thomas was seriously
injured by deputies who
responded to the shoot-
ing.

Man in Santa hat
robs bank

JACKSONVILLE -
Authorities are searching
for a man in a Santa hat they
say robbed a Jacksonville
bank and fired a shot into
the ceiling before taking
off.
A frightened pregnant
customer was hospital-


ized as a precaution after
Monday's robbery.
Authorities would not
disclose how-much cash
the robber made off with.

9 bicyclists die
since midsummer

TAMPA Nine bicy-
clists have died .in the
Tampa Bay area since
midsummer, and bike lane
advocates said drivers and
cyclists must coexist safe-
ly.
In some of the recent
cases, police determined
the cyclist was at fault and
didn't have the right of way.
In others, they found the
motorist had violated a law.
Many times, authorities
said, both parties shared
the blame.
Alan Snel, a Tampa resi-
dent and the director of the
South West Florida Bicycle
United Dealers, said roads
in the area weren't designed
to handle bicycle traffic.
The St. Petersburg Times
reported Monday that no
state in the nation has more
bicycle crash fatalities than
Florida. The Sunshine State
led the nation in the num-
ber of bicyclists killed with
125 in 2008, which is the
most recent year national
data is available.


THE WEATHER


PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY SHOWERS
CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY

*1' MT 'i .," o s id 'm \v


Valdosta
46/24
Tallahassee Lake City.
48 25 50,22
* Gainesville *
.Panima City '52/25
50/32 Ocala
"53/2


Tam p *
60/39,'


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
57 35 Gainesville
a Jacksonville
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
59/37 59/41 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
65/45 *, Orlando
Ft Lauderdale. Panama City
'er., 66/49 0 Pensacola
3 Naples Tallahassee
61/44 Miami Tampa
Key West 6/50 Valdosta
64/56 : W. Palm Beach
64/560


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


*


Pensacola
51/28


lacksonvile
F. 119 7


City Thursday
Cape Canaveral 64,47, s


Friday
68,51/s
68. 50.I s
74,60/s
73/49/s
66/41/pq
65/41/pc
70/59/s
66/39/pc
74/60/s
71/53/s
68/43/s
71/50/s
62/44/s
62/49/pc
62/34/s
70/52/s
62/32/s
73/56/s


61.; 45., PC
70, 53, 4n
69,44.'pc
58/31/s
56/32/s
66/53/pc
56/28/s
70/54/sh
66/45/sh
'60/33/s
62/43/pc
55/37/s
57/36/s
56/27/s
65/42/s
55/27/s
68/48/sh


Ft. My
64/4


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


52
29
69
46
86 in 1978
20 in 1937

0.00"
0.04"
39.02"
0.50"
46.30"


7:14 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:15 a.m.
5:31 p.m.

9:42 a.m.
8:28 p.m.
10:21 a.m.
9:25 p.m.


4
MOOIWE
45minbtestlbun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

A.,


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.corn


Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan.
13 21 27 4
First Full Last New


Forecasts, data and graph-
S Ics 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.comn


Wednesdayy 77p Tursday







S-Frecastaltwemtt *Fae teub raee


Rilmy


IX I


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


12 TUS Ely


KE'CITYALMANAC


r~scsESZ1.


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Newspaper seeks more donations for food drive


From staff reports

The Lake City Reporter's Third
Annual Community Food Drive
continues to accept dona-
tions of non-perishable
food items needed
to fight hunger in
Columbia County,
The Community
Food Drive, created
in 2008 by the news-
paper, targets the time
frame between Thanksgiving and
Christmas when food supplies
are scarce, but demand from
needy families reaches some of


the highest levels of the year. All
food collected is donated to the
Food Bank of Suwannee Valley
and earmarked for Columbia
County agencies serving
local residents.
"Donations have
picked up this
week, but we still

.. meet our goal," said
Lake City Reporter
Publisher Todd Wilson. "We
understand that times are tight
for everyone, but many people in
our community go to bed hungry


every night It's hard to imag-
ine a child fighting hunger at
Christmastime.
"We're counting our blessings
and trying to offset some of these
challenges. And we're asking our
readers to assist by donating a
few canned goods."
Non-perishable food items can
be dropped off through Friday at
the Lake City Reporter office, 180
E. Duval St, during normal busi-
ness hours. Canned goods and
dry goods are needed, but please
no glass containers.
"It's the perfect time of year to
have the food drive," said Scott


Elkins, director of the Food Bank
of Suwannee Valley. "We need the
food."
Newspaper subscribers also
are asked to leave a bag of
canned goods or dry goods near
the newspaper delivery tube or
at the end of their driveway on
Friday evening, so their newspa-
per carrier can collect it Saturday
morning for the food drive's final
push.
"Locally, this is the worst
year yet in terms of families in
need," Scott Elkins, Food Bank of
Suwannee Valley director, said.
The Food Bank of the


Suwannee Valley is a subsidiary
of Catholic Charities. Its office in
Lake City serves 36 agencies in
four counties that assist people in
need. Of those agencies, 12 are
in Columbia County. The Food
Bank only supplies other agen-
cies, not individuals. Elkins said
all of the food collected during the
Lake City Reporter's Community
Food Drive would be earmarked
only for the agencies serving
Columbia County residents.
For more information on the
Lake City Reporter's Third Annual
Community Food Drive, call
(386) 752-1293.


Woman arrested for allegedly stealing drugs from LCMC


From staff reports

A Lake City woman faces
multiple charges after
police said she attempted to
steal drugs from Lake City
Medical Center and then
allegedly battered a police
officer who was attempting
to arrest her.
According to information
released from the police
department Tuesday after-
noon, Christen Marie


Cardenas; 26, 550 SW
Suwannee Downs Drive,
was charged with battery
on a law
enforce-
ment
officer,
criminal
mischief,
grandtheft,
S resisting
Cardenas an officer
with violence and breach
of peace in connection


with the incident She was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility.
Her bond amount was not
released as of presstime.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
officer Brian Bruenger was
dispatched to Lake City
Medical Center, 1050 NW
Commerce Blvd., around
4:12 a.m. Monday, in refer-
ence to a patient stealing
drugs.


When Bruenger arrived,
he reportedly found
Cardenas yelling at hospi-
tal staff.
Members of the hos-
pital staff told Bruenger
that Cardenas was left in
an exam room unattended
and when staff members
returned, they allegedly
noticed that the medication
cart had been broken into.
Reports said Cardenas
was confronted about the


theft and began to yell. The
hospital staff then called
for police. Bruenger report-
edly asked Cardenas for
her identification and when
she opened her purse, he
noticed multiple medical
supplies in the purse. He
seized the purse and its
contents as evidence.
However, Cardenas
reportedly then attempted
to snatch the purse away
from him and began to


kick Bruenger and the hos-
pital staff. Cardenas was
secured with assistance
from two other police offi-
cers, Sgt. Marshall Sova
and Juan Cruz.
Cardenas was then taken
to the Columbia County
Detention Facility and pro-
cessed.
The medical supplies
were inventoried and
returned to the hospital
staff, reports said.


Santa wants your letters


From staff reports

There is still time to sub-
mit letters to Santa Claus.
The Lake City Reporter
is collecting letters from
local children until 4 p.m.
Friday.
Children of all ages can
write their Christmas wish
lists and messages for Santa
to see.


Santa's elves are collect-
ing the letters nightly from
the mailbox in the Lake City
Reporter office. .
Letters will be published
in a special section Dec.
19.
Drop off letters at the
office, located at 180 E.
Duval St, fax to 386-752-
9400 or e-mail classified@
lakecityreporter.com. 4


TRAINING: Officers hone pistol skills


Continued From Page 1A
information officer of
the Lake City Police
Department
Blanchard said the
county has a program
that provides money for
training each year. In the
past, the funding has been
used for HAZMAT training
or hurricane prepared-
ness, but this year the
funding, coursed through
the Columbia County
Emergency Management
Agency, was used for the
active-shooter training.
Officials devised a sce-
nario: An active shooter
would be at a school.
The former Boys Club
School site on Lake Jeffery
Road was used for the
training session, which
lasted about six hours.
"It's just to show that as
the phone call comes in, if
we have an active shooter
at a school, how officers
on the street are going to
respond and work together
to try and neutralize or
contain the situation,"
Blanchard said.
As part of the session,
officers used simulated
ammunition, which were
fired from their service pis-
tols as they went through
the building to "neutralize"
the situation.


JASON WALKER/Lake City Reporter
An officer reloads a handgun as a group of trainees prepare to
undergo a shooting simulation Tuesday.


The early morning por-
tion of the training allowed
officers to learn about
building-entry techniques.
In the afternoon session,
officers took part in a
role-playing simulation
and entered the building
in four-per'son squads to
engage an active shooter.
Instructors from a pri-
' vate company and the
Jacksonville Sheriff's
Office SWAT team led the
training sessions.
Sgt. Ed Seifert,
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office public information
officer, said it's important


to have a joint "situational
exercise" so officers from
both agencies can work
together.
"This is a joint exercise
because we are a small com-
munity and if we do have an
active shooter in any situ-
ation, school or business,
we're going to respond en
masse from both agencies,"
he said. "We all have differ-
ent skill sets that we bring
to the table, so it's important
that we're operating on the
same page, out the same
play book, so there are no
surprises when we respond
to a.situation."


SCOTT: Will consult business owners
Continued From Page 1A


local business representa-
tives from Columbia and
Suwannee counties.
The meeting is sched-
uled to take place at
Hunter Panels, where
representatives from
Hunter Panels, O'Neal
Roofing, Cochran Forest,
Live Oak Pest, Columbia
Technologies, Anderson
Columbia, Rob Cathcart
Insurance, Columbia Grain
and Enterprise Florida will
discuss a variety of busi-
ness-related topics.
At around 9 a.m. Scott is
scheduled to take a tour of
the Hunter Panels facility.
Poole said at 9:30 a.m.
Scott is scheduled to visit
the staff at Brown Carpet
One before heading north
on Marion Avenue and
visiting Ward's Jewelry.
He's expected to finish
his tour of local business-


es by visiting Chasteen's
Restaurant.
Scott is slated to leave
town around 11:15 a.m.
as he heads to Miami for
another engagement
"He's not scheduled to
speak to the public dur-
ing his visit, he's just
going to be visiting and if
he sees people he'll talk
with them," Poole said.
."He wants to be known
as the jobs governor and
he's committed to helping
create 700,000 new jobs
in Florida. This visit is
focused more on the busi-
nesses more so than on
speaking engagements."
Poole said Scott will be
ii the area aslung busi-"
ness owners for their input
on what he can do for them
to help them create jobs.
'"That's the purpose of
the round-table discus-


sion and the walk through
downtown," he said.
Scott's visit to. the area
is part of his "Let's Get
to Work" jobs tour and
he spoke to local officials
about coming to the area
weeks ago.
About three weeks ago,
Poole and Gina Reynolds,
Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority deputy direc-
tor, were invited to par-
ticipate in a meeting with
Scott's transition team to
discuss economic devel-
opment issues around the
state.
"He said he was going
to make a trip across
"Florida t8 get input from
businesses of all types
and at that point we asked
him to include Lake City/
Columbia County," Poole
said.


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Lucretia Faye
Muliord
DOB: 2/7/80
Height: 5' 2"
Weight: 135 Ibs.
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Hazel
Wanted For: Passing A
Worthless Check


Addle Elaine
Smith
DOB: 2/17/85
Height: 5' 3"- Weight: 130 lbs.
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Wanted For: 2 Cases VOP
Possession of Controlled
Substance


WANTED AS OF 12/16/10
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
P F COLUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


immunity '%ncerts Of Lake City Presents
At Levy Performing Arts Center Florida Gateway College


BENEFIT: Riders also contribute toys
From Page 1A


Machine. The Christmas
Dream Machine provides
toys and clothes to disad-
vantaged children meeting
the organization's criteria.
Murray said the fund-
raising goal for this year's
event was $5,000 and she
was pleased the motorcy-
clists were able to surpass
the fundraising goal.
"We did really good," she
said. "I was really surprised
with the economy. It shows
people are willing to help
people who are in need."
Mealy Jenkins, Christmas
Dream Machine director,
said the donations from
Saturday will help the orga-
nization support the children
who haven't been chosen.
She said the money that
is donated will go towards
buying toys or clothes for


older children in the pro- contributed more than
gram. 500 new, unwrapped toys
During Saturday's ben- to the Christmas Dream
efit ride, motorcyclists also Machine.


Ethan and Candace DePratter ofBlountstown are pleased to
announce the birth of their daughter, Cadance Rylan DePratter,
born October 19, 2010. at 2:32 PM at Gulf Coast Medical Center.
Cadance weighed 9 pounds 6.2 ounces, and was 21 1/4 inches long.
Paternal grandparents are Clint and Ann Pittman of Fort White and
Rusty and Cori DePratter of Lake City. Maternal grandparents are
Kieth and Lisa Edenfield of Panama City and Andy and odi Bailey
of Bristol.


~-


Cadance Rylan DePratter


Join at the door, or website, or Lake City Chamber of Commerce f
THREE remaining live programs: $50/Adult or $5/Student K-12! I^^f

MEMBERS must arrive by 1:50 or 6:50 PM for GUARANTEED EARLY SEATING
Limited seating single tickets are available at Lake City Chamber of Commerce
and at the door one hour before show (seating at 2:10 ad 7:10 pm):
$18/Adult or $5/Student K-12, and FREE standby for FGC students w/current ID
Visit www.communitvconcerts.info or call (386) 466-8999

Early Next Year ,

THE DIAMONDS 9.. 2:30:pm Sat Jan 22
The real Diamonds revisitttc "r.nu oiy ,N op.hertageriom'athe 50's- 80'S,
singing their biggest hits, I\ke Lt 1 n .iols Fal.1i love," and "The Stroll"


JOHN DAVIDSON .. 2:30 pm Sun Feb13
The real John Davldson star of TV, film, and Broadway entertains with vocals, humorous
stories, & banjo. -He prodded .13 alburiaind appears af major Las Vegas showrooms.


DI


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Wednesday, December 8, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Obama

needs to

overcome

one factor


D during the first
half of his term in
office, President
Barack Obama
has done virtu-
ally nothing to eliminate the
severe partisanship he prom-
ised to curb. He certainly
wasn't helped by Democratic
members of Congress, who
often acted as if there were no
Republicans in attendance.
If anything, Obama and
other Democrat leaders made
'it clear they intended to run
roughshod over Republicans
- and, for that matter, moder-
ates in their own party.
And they often did.
Now, Obama claims he has
seen the light. On Election
Day nearly a month ago,
Americans "did not vote for
unyielding partisanship," the
president noted.
His comment came after
what could be the start of
something big a meeting
among Obama and leading
members of Congress from
both parties. Initial reports
were that those in attendance
discussed their differences
openly and frankly. At one
point, Obama and lawmak-
ers dismissed their aides and
talked privately for more than
half an hour.
Afterward, both the presi-
dent and Republican leaders
expressed optimism about
compromise to address seri-
ous issues, including the econ-
omy. Obama pledged to hold
more similar meetings.
If he and Democrat leaders
such as House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi and Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid are serious
about cooperating, the meet-
ing indeed could signal prog-
ress in addressing the issues.
But there is evidence Pelosi
and Reid aim to curb any ten-
dencies Obama has toward
cooperation and compromise.
If the president is serious
about working with both par-
ties, he will need to overcome
the Pelosi-Reid factor.
E Parkersburg (W. Va.)
News & Sentinel

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
,Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Is Christmas out of Christianity?


(ne of the early "
skirmishes in
this year's War
on Christmas
occurred last week
at the college where I work. A
hapless functionary in Student
Services used the institutional
e-mail system to invite all staff
and faculty to the annual light-
ing of the 'Tree." A mid-level
administrator took umbrage,
noting that it used to be a
"Christmas Tree," then last year
it was a "Holiday Tree," and,
now look; it's just a 'Tree."
Others joined the fray, declar-
ing that we've lost sight of
the "reason for the season."
Some planned to set up minia-
ture trees in their offices and
asserted that they would not
be cowed by political correct-
ness into calling them anything,
other than "Christmas Trees."
The debate flared briefly then
fizzled, one of dozens or hun-
dreds that occur annually in the
run-up to Christmas ... I mean,
the "holidays."
One wonders why this divi-
sive debate persists year after
year, since the issue's syllogistic
logic ought to be inescapable:
Constitutionally our govern-
ment is forbidden to be in the
business of establishing or pro-
moting any religion and certain-
ly not one religion over another;
institutions like my college, the
county courthouse, the state
capital, and public schools are
all tax-supported government
entities; therefore, they should
not sponsor displays, rituals,
and celebrations that promote
Christianity, even though it is,
by far, the majority religion in
this country.
But the debate can never be
this logical. Few things have
more capacity to stoke the emo-


LETTER


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmar.edu


tions than religion, and few
institutions bring out more old-
fashioned tribalism and exclu-
sivity. The urge to privilege
one's own religion over others
is, for many people, irresistible.
And the flip side of a prefer-
ence for one's own religion is
defensiveness arid hypersen-
sitivity to imagined threats.
Despite the American Civil
Liberties Union's occasional
attempts to thwart unconstitu-
tional breaches of the barrier
between church and state, there
really is no War on Christmas.
Nevertheless, an Internet
search for "War on Christmas"
will produce at least 79,000
hits, including links to web-
sites like "Defend Christmas"
(defendchristmas.com), which
are devoted to ... defending
Christmas. Words like "siege"
and "attack" are common on
these sites, and they promote
a sense of jeopardy that sur-
rounds believers at every turn.
Defensiveness and indig-
nation are encouraged. And
since the best defense is a
good offense, many Christmas-
defenders harbor an aggres-
sive agenda that includes the
privileging of Christmas (and,
therefore, Christianity) at pub-
lic functions and eventually,
at best, the re-establishment
of Christian prayers in public
schools. In fact, this may be a
large part of what Tea Partiers
mean when they say they want


to "take back our country."
But this approach ignores
a great deal about Christmas,
including its pagan origins and
our founding Puritans' deep
abhorrence of the holiday,
which they rejected as Romish
popery. It also ignores the
strains of Christianity like
the fundamentalist sect of my
youth that are uncomfortable
with the dubious origins and
questionable doctrinal back-
ground of Christmas.
Mostly, though, the effort
to return Christmas to the
public sphere ignores the fact
that, like it or not, we are an
increasingly diverse nation that
is made up of people of many
religions or no religion, at all.
'In spite of their overwhelming
numbers, Christians don't have
.the right to commandeer a pub-
lic endorsement of their own
way of getting to Heaven at the
expense of other religions.
Besides, how good is
Christmas for Christianity?
It's supposed to be the season
of peace and goodwill, but in
modern America Christmas is
largely about acquisition, con-
sumption, gluttony, ostentation,
excess, and pride. It's often
inconsistent with the version of
Christianity that privileges the
spiritual over the material, self-
effacement and humility over
pride, and simplicity over con-
spicuous consumption.
In fact, Christmas isn't
essential to Christianity, at all.
Christians might serve their
religion better with fewer
attempts to push its celebration
into the public sphere, celebrat-
ing it, instead, in its most apt
setting, the quiet confines of the
human heart Happy Holidays!
John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


TO THE EDITOR


Why not lower pay
of legislators as well?
I've read that the government
is working on fixing the deficit.
They are going to put a freeze
on the federal workers pay, but
not the Congressional represen-
tatives. Why not lower their pay
by 10 percent in 2011 also and
show the American people that
the government is serious about
lowering the deficit?
There is also talk about rais-


ing the tax on gasoline to help
reduce the deficit What hap-
pened to no tax increase on the
middle and lower classes? The
proposed increase would be
over $60 a month in my home
or an increased tax of about
$750 a year. How is this a good
idea?
There's also talk of raising
the retirement age. If two mil-
lion 66-year-olds retire, wouldn't
that open jobs for two million
unemployed workers who are
getting unemployment? I don't


understand how raising the
retirement age helps at all.
The budget can be balanced.
First, stop spending; second,
get the money back that was
loaned (TARP); third, help the
small business industry by mak-
ing money available so they
can hire workers; and fourth,
reward those that are working,
and help those that can and
want to work find jobs.
Irv Crowetz
Lake City


Dan K.Thomasson


Wanted:

Someone

to show

leadership

WASHINGTON
Most Americans
outside the
Capital Beltway
and his Harlem
congressional
district couldn't care less about
the decline and fall of Rep.
Charlie Rangel, who was cen-
sured recently for ethics viola-
tions including some personal
income tax oversights. To them
he is just more proof about the
correctness of the old adage
about corrupting power.
It's not like he is the first chair-
man of the tax-writing House Ways
and Means Committee to fall from
grace. Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois
went to jail and before him Wilbur
Mills of Arkansas was forced to
step down because of a scandal
involving a stripper and an acute
problem with alcohol. At one point,
all three men were considered
among the most important mem-.
bers of Congress.
What Americans obviously are
interested in is for someone to
take the leadership in what more
and more looks like a failed insti-
tution a legislature so political-
ly and ideologically divided that
all the things everyone knows
should be done seem never to
get that way. Right this instant
what they care about is whether
they will have a tax increase
come January or be favored
with extension of the decreases
adopted during the George W.
Bush administration and due to
expire next month. So what if the
small percentage of those earn-
ing more than $250,000 annually
is included in the largess? They
just want theirs. Politics prob-
ably will dictate an extension for
everyone.
The concerns of millions of
those out of work are even more
immediate. They just want an
extension of their unemployment
benefits so that the Christmas
season won't be a sequel to a
Nightmare on Elm Street They
want answers to the persistent
weak economy and their real
estate problems and the stubborn
jobless rate. Under the circum-
stances, they don't give two hoots
about much else, especially not
the irresponsible political jockey-
ing and philosophical blathering
that seems more aimed at 2012
than in accomplishing any major
solutions.
Angry voters made it clear at
the polls last month that they
wanted something done to
restore their faith in government
"Listen to us," they fairly shouted
in restoring Republicans to con-
trol of the House and cutting
into the Democrats' hold on the
Senate. But the next two weeks
of a lame duck session are crucial
to demonstrating to "the people"
that their elected representatives
got the message and that such
a showing would be a nice step
into a new, more civil relationship
between the parties. Detente is
not a bad word.
Meanwhile, it is too bad about
Charlie Rangel's fall from grace.
But any sympathy for the often-
flamboyant congressman has
been muted by his own intran-
sigence and the fact he should
have been forewarned about the
dangers of power. The real scan-
dal here is the inability of your
friendly lawmakers to become
statesmen. The new crop of the
"people's choices" are expected
to do something about resolving
the thorniest of issues and have


in advance said they mean busi-
ness.
EMDan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010


Elizabeth Edwards dies at 61


MIKE BAKER and NEDRA PICKLER
Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Elizabeth
Edwards, who closely advised her
husband in two bids for the presiden-
cy and advocated for health care even
as her own health and marriage pub-
licly crumbled, died Tuesday after
a six-year struggle with cancer. She
was 61.
She died at her North Carolina
home surrounded by her three
children, siblings, friends and her
estranged husband, John, the family
said.
'Today we have lost the comfort
of Elizabeth's presence but, she
remains the heart of this family," the
family said in a statement "We love
her and will never know anyone more
inspiring or full of life. On behalf of
Elizabeth we want to express our
gratitude to the thousands of kin-.
dred spirits who moved and inspired
her along the way. Your support and
prayers touched our entire family."
She was first diagnosed with breast
cancer in 2004, in the final days of
her husband's vice presidential cam-
paign. The Democratic John Kerry-
John Edwards ticket lost to incum-
bent President George W. Bush.
John Edwards launched a second
bid for the White House in 2007, and
the Edwardses decided to continue
even after doctors told Elizabeth that
her cancer had spread. He lost the
nomination to Barack Obama.
The couple separated in January
after he admitted fathering a child
with a campaign videographer.
Elizabeth Edwards had focused in
recent years on advocating health
care reform, often wondering aloud
about the plight of those who faced
the same of kind of physical struggles
she did but without her personal
wealth.
She had also shared with the public
the most intimate struggles of her
bouts with cancer, writing and speak-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 1, 2008 file photo, Democratic presidential hopeful former Sen. John
Edwards, D-N.C. (right) and wife, Elizabeth, arrive at a campaign rally in Ames,
Iowa. A family friend on Tuesday said Elizabeth Edwards had died. She was 61.


ing about the pain of losing her hair,
the efforts to assure her children
about their mother's future and the
questions that lingered about how
many days she had left to live.
President Barack Obama said
he spoke to John Edwards and
the Edwardses' daughter, Cate, on
Tuesday afternoon to offer condo-
lences.
"In her life, Elizabeth Edwards.
knew tragedy and pain," Obama said
in a statement. "Many others would
have turned inward; many others in
the face of such adversity would have
given up. But through all that she
endured, Elizabeth revealed a kind
of fortitude and grace that will long
remain a source of inspiration."
The president called her a tena-
cious advocate for fixing the health
care system and fighting poverty.
"Our country has benefited from the
voice she gave to the cause of build-
ing a society that lifts up all those left
behind," Obama said.
Elizabeth Edwards and her family
had informed the public that she had


weeks, if not days, left when they
announced on Monday that doctors
had told her that further treatment
would do no good. Ever the public
figure, Edwards thanked supporters
on her Facebook page.
'"The days of our lives, for all of us,
are numbered," she wrote. "We know
that. And yes, there are certainly
times when we aren't able to muster
as much strength and patience as we
would like. It's called being human.
But I have found that in the simple act
of living with hope, and in the daily
effort to have a positive impact in the
world, the days I do have are made all
the more meaningful and precious.
And for that I am grateful."
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton, one of John Edwards' rivals
for the Democratic nomination in
2008, said the country "has lost a
passionate advocate for building a
more humane and just society," while
the Edwardses' family and friends
"have lost so much more a loving
mother, constant guardian and wise
counselor."


US: WikiLeaks has hurt foreign relations


ANNE FLAHERTY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Foreign powers are pulling
back from their dealings
with the U.S. government
since hundreds of classified
diplomatic cables wound
up on the Internet, State
and Defense department
officials said Tuesday.
The document dump
by WikiLeaks included
detailed and blunt exchang-
es between foreign and
U.S. officials on such politi-
cally sensitive matters as
a top-secret U.S. bombing
campaign in Yemen.
The Obama administra-
tion has decried the release
of the classified documents
as criminal, and refuted
'assertions by anti-war
WilkiLeaks. founder Julian
Assange ,that he should
enjoy the same free-speech
protections given to media
organizations.
Spokesmen for the
Pentagon and State
Department declined to
provide detailed evidence
that U.S. foreign relations
had been harmed by the
massive leak, including
what countries might be
limiting their contact
Both cited recent
exchanges with foreign
officials that suggested
some had suddenly grown
reluctant to trust the U.S.
with their secrets.
"We have already seen
some indications of meet-
ings that used to involve
several diplomats and now
involve fewer diplomats,"
said State Department
spokesman P.J. Crowley.
"We're conscious of at
least one meeting where
it was requested that note-
books be left outside the
ioom," Crowley told report-
ers.
Similar comments were
made by the Defense
Department, where spokes-
man Col. Dave Lapan
said the military had seen
foreign contacts pullingg
back" and that "generally,
there has been a retrench-
ment."
"Believing that the U.S.
is not good at keeping
secrets and having secrets
out there certainly changed
things," Lapan said.
Last week, Defense
Secretary Robert Gates
predicted that any damage


would be fairly modest and
that other countries were
unlikely to cut ties with the
U.S. because of the secu-
rity infraction.
"The fact is governments
deal with the United States
because it's in their inter-
est, not because they like
us, not because they trust
us and not because they
think we can keep secrets,"
Gates said.
Other "governments
deal with us because they
fear us, some because they
respect us, most because
they need us," Gates said.
Crowley said the extent
of the damage remains
to be seen. The State
Department expects the
disclosure will complicate
U.S. diplomatic efforts
"for a period of'time" and
that the reaction will vary
"country by country, gov-
ernment by government,"
he said.
"Obviously, it will be
something that we will be
watching to see if particu-
lar diplomats are frozen out
in countries depending on
their pique over what has
been revealed," he said.
WikiLeaks evoked the
ire of the U.S. government
last spring when it posted
a gritty war video taken by
Army helicopters showing
troops gunning down two
unarmed Reuters journal-
ists. Since then, the orga-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2006 file photo, U.S. military guards walk within Camp
Delta military-run prison. The classified diplomatic cables
released by online whistle-blower WikiLeaks cited documents
showing the U.S. used hardline tactics to win approval from
countries to accept freed detainees from Guantanamo Bay.

nization has leaked some
400,000 classified war
files from Iraq and 76,000
from Afghanistan that mili-
tary officials say included Thomas E. Humphreys
names of U.S. informants Thomas E. Humphreys, 86, died
and other information that peacefully at home, on Thursday
could put people's lives at 'November 25, 2010 after a long
risk. drawn-out illness He was born
The latest leak involved in Sissonville, West Virgi'ia to
The latest leak involved the late Eldridge .
private diplomatic cables C. and Sister P.
that included frank U.S. B. Humphreys. -
assessments of foreign Mr. Humphreys '. '*
nations and their leaders. served faithfully
Afgha Pres nt H i ag a Aviation Engineer in the
Afghan President Hamid. United States Navy. His naval
Karzai, for example, was career started in 1941 and in the
described as turning a 80's went on to retire from Civil
blind eye to corruption Service. He moved to Columbia
and releasing suspected County five years ago from Or-
ange Park to be cared for by his
drug dealers because of daughter and her family. He was a
their powerful connec-
tions.


Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,FA
Board Certified Internal Med
Board Certified Critical Ca
Allison B. Baris, A.R.N


NEWS BRIEFS


Chewing tobacco
maker settles

NEW HAVEN, Conn.
- The maker of Skoal and
Copenhagen smokeless
tobacco has agreed to pay
$5 million to the family of
a man who died of mouth
cancer in what is believed to
be the first wrongful-death
settlement won from a chew-
ing tobacco company.
A legal expert said the case
could open the door for more
lawsuits against makers of
chewing tobacco, an industry
that drew fewer legal battles
during the 1990s than ciga-
rette manufacturers.'
U.S. Smokeless Tobacco
Co. will pay the award to
the family of Bobby Hill of
Canton, N.C., who began
chewing tobacco at 13. He
died in 2003 at 42.
Attorney Antonio Ponvert
In, who represented Hill's
relatives, told The Associated
Press about the agreement
Tuesday. Regulatory docu-
ments confirmed the deal.
PonvertandMarkGottlieb,
director of the Tobacco
Products Liability Project at
Northeastern University in
Boston, both said the Hill
family settlement is the first
case of its kind.

Court weighs gay
marriage ban

SAN FRANCISCO A
line. of questioning at an
appeals court hearing over
California's gay marriage
ban suggested the three
judges could issue a decision
that would legalize same-sex
marriage in that state but
leave intact bans in other
western states under the
court's jurisdiction.
The 9th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals heard
nearly three hours of argu-
ments Monday during
a televised hearing that
reached a nationwide audi-
ence anxious for a final
decision on whether voter-
approved Proposition 8
and similar same-sex mar-
riage bans violate the U.S.
Constitution.
The judges appeared
troubled over whether they
could recognize marriage
as a civil right for all same-
sex couples or only those
in states that already grant
gays the rights of marriage
without the title.
Theodore Olson who
argued a portion of the case
on behalf of the two same-


OBITUARIES

former member of the First Bap-
tist Church of Jacksonville and
a Master Mason at Westconnett
Lodge No. 297. In his spare time
he enjoyed the outdoors, walking,
watching sports, and spending
time with this family and friends.
He is preceded in death by his
brothers Dayton and Richard
(Code) and his sister -Wilma.
Survivors include his daugh-
ter, Diana (Rick) Viens of Lake
City, Florida; son Richard Hum-
phreys, sister; Judy (John) King
and Frieda Thomas, of West
Virginia. Grandchildren, Julio
and Taylor Viens, Bridget Hum-
phreys (Oscar Moreno), Eric
Humphreys, Tessa Humphreys
and Great Granddaughter Na-


sex couples who sued to
overturn Proposition 8 and
persuaded a lower court to
strike it down said deny-
ing gays the right to wed
constitutes discrimination
that cannot be justified under
any circumstances.

Businessman gives
up $625 million
NEW YORK A 97-
year-old Boston-area apparel
entrepreneur agreed
Tuesday to forfeit $625
million to be distributed to
cheated investors in jailed
Bernard Madoffs historic
Ponzi scheme, authorities
revealed.
The U.S. government said
in papers filed in federal
court in Manhattan that
Massachusetts business-
man and philanthropist Carl
Shapiro, one of the first
investors in Madoffs invest-
ment business and a long-
time Madoff friend, entered
the forfeiture deal along
with his partners.
The government said
proceeds of the settlement
with Shapiro would be dis-
tributed to Madoff investors.
The papers said Shapiro
held an account in his name
with Madoffs investment
business since 1961 and
had controlled accounts for
others from time to time.
Madoff started his invest-
ment business in 1959.

Prosecution rests
in 1975 AIM trial

RAPID CITY, S.D. The
prosecution has rested its case
in the trial of a man accused of
shooting an American Indian
Movement activist in late 1975
and leaving her to die. ,
John Graham is charged
with shooting Annie Mae
Aquash and leaving her to die
on South Dakota's Pine Ridge
reservation in a case.that has
become synonymous with
AIM's often-violent clashes
with federal agents during the
1970s.
Prosecution witnesses testi-
fied Graham and two other
AIM activists, Arlo Looking
Cloud and Theda Clark, kid-
napped and killed Aquash
because they believed she
was a government informant
Looking Cloud, who is serv-
ing a life sentence for his role
in Aquash's death, told jurors
Monday and Tuesday that he
saw Graham shoot her.
N Associated Press


talynn Moreno. The Veins' fam-
ily would like to extend their
gratitude to Barbara Tucker
with Senior Services and all the
staff of Haven Hospice, Thank
you all for all the TLC you
showed my father and myself.
Private family services
will be held at a later date.
GATEWAY FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 US
Hwy 441 South, Lake City,
Florida 32025 386-752-1954


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 8, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Newcomers Monthly
Meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is 11 a.m. today at Quail
Heights Country Club,
Branford Highway. The
luncheon costs $10. A $10
gift exchange will take
place for those wishing to
participate. All members,
friends, and guests are
welcome. Call 752-4552 or
755-4051.

Public meeting
Elder Options is hav-
ing a public meeting 10
a.m. today in the Hilton
University of Florida
Conference Center. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 1714
SW 34th St., Gainesville.
Contact Cindy Roberts at
352-378-6649.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 1:30 p.m. today at
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
CourL. leresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate and
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expands
the opportunities available
with Medicaid Planning.
Call Shana Miller, 386-755-
1977 to register.

biinbag Hall performance
Watch Pat Dolamore
perform live from 11
11:45 a.m. today at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The performance
will be taking place in the
Dining Hall, and a game of
Bingo will take place after-
wards at 1 p.m. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Thursday
Business seminar
SCORE is presenting a
free seminar, "Business
Tactics for Tough Times,"
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
Camp Weed, Live Oak.
The speaker is Jerry Ross,
Exececutive Director of
the Disney Entrepreneur
Center. Lunch is $9. RSVP
to the Lake City Chamber
752-3690 or the Suwannee
Chamber 362-3071.

Chorus concert
Richardson Middle
School Chorus will have
their annual Christmas
Concert 7 p.m. Thursday
in the Auditorium. They
will be singing various
Christmas selections. The
chorus is under the direc-
tion of Christy Robertson.

Edward Rutledge
Chapter Meeting
The Edward Rufledge
Chapter DAR is meeting
10:30 a.m. Thursday at
Guangdong Restaurant
inside the Lake City Mall,
2469 US Hwy. 90W. The
program will be on "Food
afety." The guest speaker
is Lee M. Cornman from
Tallahassee. Cornman
is currently Assistant
Director of the Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services,
Division of Food Safety.
Following the program is a
brief Christmas program.
Dutch treat lunch imme-
diately follow the meeting.
Guests are always welcome.
Contact 386-755-5579 (Lake
City area) or 386-362-2180


(Live Oak area).

Friday
Class Reunion
Columbia High School
Classes of '49,'50, '51, '52,
and '53 are having a class


-L^^^^^^ -t -


p.m. Dec. 12 at the Lake
City Mall. The event will
feature the "Children's
Section" entertainment,
live vendor demonstrations
and more. Visit www.lakec-
itybazaarcom.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 2 p.m. Sunday
at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets are available at
The Framery on West
Baya and at highspring-
scommunitytheatercom.


Tuesday


TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter
Shopping night at the
Christmas on the Square with music, dancing Attic


Dance troupes, youth performing groups and live musical acts entertained crowds during
Saturday's Christmas on the Square in Live Oak. The one-day event saw part of the down-
town area around the courthouse hosting hundreds of vendors. A crowd of thousands of visi-


tors attended the annual event

reunion 11:30 a.m. Dec. 10
at Mason City Community
Center. Anyone who
attended Columbia High
is invited. Contact Julia
Osburn at 386-752-7544 or
Morris Williams at 386-
752-4710.

Performance and party
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center hosts
Fort White High School's
Chorus performance from
11 11:45 a.m. Friday in
the Dining Hall. There
will be a client Christmas
tree decorating party from
1 2 p.m. following the
performance. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Crafts Bazaar and
Festival
The annual "Lake City
Holiday Crafts Bazaar &
Festival" is 10 a.m. 6
p.m. Friday at the Lake
City Mall. The event will
feature the "Children's
Section" entertainment,
live vendor demonstrations
and more. Visit www.lakec-
itybazaar.com.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Friday
at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets are available at
The Framery on West
Baya and at highspring-
scommunitytheater com.

Saturday
AARP meeting
Lake City Chapter of
AARP will meet at 11 a.m.
Saturday at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Ct. behind Baya
Pharmacy East. Mr. John
Pierce will surprise you
with our program. Please
bring food for a covered
dish lunch at noon.

Crafts Bazaar and
Festival
The annual "Lake City
Holiday Crafts Bazaar &
Festival" is 10 a.m. 6
p.m. Saturday at the Lake
City Mall. The event will
feature the "Children's
Section" entertainment,
live vendor demonstra-
tions and more. Visit www.
lakecitybazaar comn.

Health ministry meeting
The Congregational
Health Ministry follow-up
meeting is 10-11:30 a.m.
Saturday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center located
at 628 S.E. Allison Court
Lake City. Contact Carolyn
Alred 352-281-1629.

Breakfast with Santa
Pancake Breakfast


with Santa is 8 11 a.m.
Saturday at the Holiday
Inn & Suites. Breakfast
will include pancakes,
bacon, sausage, juice, cof-
fee, and hot chocolate.
There will also be holiday
music. Meals are $7 for
adults and $4 for children
ages 3-12. Proceeds benefit
Children's Medical Services
of North Florida. A collec-
tion box for unwrapped toys
will also be available.

Nutcracker
The Nutcracker Ballet
is 2:30 and 7:30 p.m.
Saturday in the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Led by the Gainesville
acclaimed Dance Alive
group, the production is
supplemented by more
than 50 local boys and
girls.

Holiday happenings
Snow Day, sponsored by
Hopeful Baptist Church, is
9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Dec. 11 in
the parking lot next to Gulf
Coast Financial. The event
will feature 30 tons of snow
delivered along with two
bounce houses, a 26-foot
dual lane slide, a rock climb
wall, an obstacle course and
a bungee challenge. The
Festival of Lights will take
place around Olustee Park
throughout the day and
will feature arts and crafts,
food vendors and live enter-
tainment The Christmas
parade, presented by the
Lake City Rotary Club, is 6
p.m. Christmas music will
begin after the parade in
Olustee Park until 9 p.m.

Home tours
Altrusa International,
Inc., is sponsoring a tour
of decked out and fes-
tive homes 12 5 p.m.
Saturday. The tour begins
at the Live Oak Garden
Club next to Shands


Hospital on County Road
136 in Live Oak. Tickets
are $10 and can be pur-
chased in advance. For
more information contact
Marlene Giese at 386-364-
1947.
t
Wreath laying ceremony
Wreaths Across America
of Lake City honors the
fallen with a Wreath-lay-
ing Ceremony at 12 p.m.
Saturday at the Columbia
County Veterans'
Memorial located in
Olustee Park. Legion Post
#57 and the Columbia
High School JROTC Color
Guard will conduct the
ceremony. Visit www.
wreathsacrossamerica.
com for more information
on the Wreaths Across
:America project.

Blank-Fest
The Third Annual
Blank-Fest is Saturday
at RockStar Lounge.
Admission is one blanket
per person, and the blan-
kets will go to the United
Way to be distributed to
the local homeless. Several
bands will perform during
the event.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Saturday
at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya
and at highspringscommu-
nitytheater com.

Sunday
Crafts Bazaar and
Festival
The annual "Lake City
Holiday Crafts Bazaar
& Festival" is 12 5


Don't Miss

The Deadline!


Call
Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!

755-5440 or

755-5441
Between 8am & 5pm

* h4ky


Kids' Holiday Shopping
Night at the Attic is 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday at
the Haven Hospice Attic
Resale Store, 1077 US
Hwy. 90 W., Suite 120. The
event gives children in
need the opportunity to
purchase specially-priced
gifts for family members
using "Attic Bucks."
Festivities will include
gift wrapping, photos with
Santa, punch and cookies
- all free of charge. There
will also be door prizes
and special drawings. All
children must be accom-
panied by an adult The
event is open to the public.
Call 386-752-0230 or go to
havenhospice.org.

Wednesday,
December 15


Tickets are available at
The Framery on West
Baya and at highspring-
scommunitytheater com.

Saturday, Dec. 18
FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of
Lake City announces a
Christmas party taking
place from 6:30 10:30
p.m. Dec. 18 at the
Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. Enjoy a night
of culture, dancing and
entertainment, and pos-
sibly become a member of
FACS. For more informa-
tion, contact Bob Gavette
at 386-965-5905.

Pancake breakfast
The RCC/AMN Inc. is
having a pancake break-
fast 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Dec.
18 at the Richardson
Community Center. The
tickets are $5 and the
breakfast will consist
of pancakes, Nettle's
sausage, grits, eggs and
orange juice. All proceeds
will benefit the 14 and
under and 12 and under
boys basketball teams. To
make a donation or for
more information contact
Mario Coppock or Nicole
Smith at 386-754-7096.

Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts '"he Life
of a Christian Teenager"
at 6:15 p.m. Dec. 18. The
theater is located at 348 N.
Marion Avenue. Call 386-
344-0319.


Enrollment and Dinner Flapjack breakfast


SHINE is holding open
enrollment from 12:30
- 4 p.m. Dec. 15 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The R.O.T.C. will
also be holding a dinner
at 6:30 p.m. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Friday,
December 17
Cultural Presentation
A cultural presenta-
tion at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center at 1-
p.m. on Dec. 17 in the
Reading Room. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Dec.
17 at the High Springs
Community Theater.


A Relay For Life fund-
raising flapjack breakfast
is 8 10 a.m. Dec. 18 at
Applebee's. The meal will ';
include pancakes', scram-: .
bled eggs, homefries,
bacon, sausage, juices,
coffee and tea all you can
eat Tickets are $10. Of
. the proceeds, $7 will go to
Relay for Life.

Gift wrapping
Sevepro is hosting a gift
wrapping fundraiser from
8 am. 1 p.m. Dec. 18 at
Lowes. Donations will be
accepted. Money raised will
go toward Relay For Life.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Dec.
18 at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets are available at
The Framery on West
Baya and at highspring-
scommunitytheater'com.


SThank you.


The Suwannee Valley Rescue would

like to take this opportunity to

thank all the volunteers for your

support during the 19th Annual

Thanksgiving Feast. We appreciate

all your donations, financial

contributions, and your time

during this celebration of

thanksgiving to the community.

Special thanks go to Eddie and

Donna Anderson, Daniel Crapps,

Marilyn Tyre, and Royer Pierson.

Their continued support and

generosity is greatly appreciated.

Suwannee Valley Rescue Mission


A


Dr. C. J. Steele, CEO


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


4






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Story ideas?

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Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jokeatyreporter.com


SPORTS


Wednesday, December 8, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Final sign-up for
county league
The Columbia County
Recreation Department
is sponsoring a free
after-school basketball
league for boys and girls
ages 10-18 (as of Sept. 1).
The three age groups are
10-12, 13-15 and 16-18.
Final registration is.
3-5 p.m. today at
Richardson Community
Center. Permission slips
must be signed by parent
or guardian.
For details, call Adee
Framer or Lynda Elliott
at 754-7095 after 3 p.m.
YOUTH VOLLEYBALL
Fusion tryouts
set for Saturday
The North Florida
Fusion volleyball
program for girls ages
10-18 has tryouts set
for 2-4 p.m. Saturday
at the Fort White High
gym. Interested players
need to bring a copy of a
recent physical and a $25
tryout fee.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.
CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
planned Monday
Columbia High's
soccer program has a
Moe's Night fundraiser -
from 5-8 p.m. Monday at
Moe's Solthwest Grill on .
U.S. Highway 90 west
The program will receive
a percentage of the sales.
For details, call
365-1877.
N From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Fort White
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
Fort White High boys
soccer at Newberry High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Wolfson High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Chiles High,
2 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball at Branford
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
soccer at Ridgeview
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Chiles High,
10a.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball at Bishop
Kenny High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Monday
Fort White High girls
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
soccer at Wolfson High,
7:20 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.


(JV-6)


Going nil


Lady Tigers
battle Broncos in
scoreless outing.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
In the end the score
remained the same as it was
in the beginning. Columbia
High battled Middleburg
High to a scoreless 0-0,
tie at the CYSA fields on
Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers soccer
team went to 6-8-2 after the


game.
"I felt we worked hard
and passed the ball well,
and we had some shots on
goal that we couldn't finish,"
Lady Tigers' coach Ashley
Brown said. "Brittany
Bethea's injury really hurt,
and that's our fourth player
we've lost to injury this sea-
son,"
The Lady Tigers will
have to overcome the inju-
ry bug as play continues
on Thursday. Columbia
travels to Wolfson High at
7:30 p.m.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Michaela Burton (28) intercepts the ball from Alicia Smith (4) during a game
against Buchholz on Nov. 16.


Soccer standoff


Tigers score first,
but Middleburg
ties game, 1-1.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High couldn't
find enough room to dis-
tance itself from visiting
Middleburg High as the
two district foes battled to a
1-1 tie at CYSA Tuesday.
The two teams were
scoreless after the first half
of play, but Columbia found
the scoreboard first.
Cody Beadles converted
After, a corner kidckwith an,
assist from Nick Tuttle to
break the tie.
Middleburg converted
only minutes later, however,
and the teams were tied
1-1.
Columbia had a chance
to win it late in the game
off a penalty kick, but the
Tigers couldn't convert.
"It wasn't what we want-
ed, but we've got to learn'
to finish," Columbia coach
Trevor Tyler said. '"We had
our chances to put them
away, but couldn't come
through. There wasn't one
play that makes the game.
We did control the posses-
sion with otir midfield most
of the game, but we have to
finish the ball."
Columbia is 7-2-1 after
the game with their first tie
of the season.
The Tigers take the
next two days off before
returning to the field in a
district contest at Ridgeview
High at 7:30 p.m. on
Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake& City Reporter
Columbia High's Nick Tuttle (17) battles with Fort White's Anthony Fuller (11) as they drive
down the field during a game on Nov. 9.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oregon running back LaMichael James (21) runs the ball in
for a score as Oregon State cornerback James Dockery (4)
defends Saturday in Corvallis, Ore.


Lady

Indians

fall to

Santa Fe

Fort White hosts
Williston High at
7:30 p.m. today.

From staff reports

Fort White High's girls
basketball team lost, 51-
18, at Santa Fe High on
Monday.
It was a District 5-3A
game and the Lady Raiders
(4-2) completed a season
sweep over Forjt..Y ,,it
Da'Leecia Armstrong led
Fort White-with nine points.
Sarah Stringfellow scored
four points, with two points
apiece from Kayshenique
Cook and Krystin Strawder,
and a free throw from
Catherine Trisch.
Fort White plays at
Columbia High at 6:30 p.m.
today.

Fort White basketball
. Coming off its win over
Columbia, Fort White's
boys basketball will have its
hands full when Williston
High visits today. Tipoff
is 7:30 p.m. for -the varsity
game.
The Red Devils are
defending champions in
District 5-3A and coming
off a postseason run that
carried them to the state
final four. Pine Crest High
knocked off Williston,
77-63, in the semifinal,
before falling to Rickards
High in the final.


RB James honored by


awards, but wants title


Oregon's star
could bring home
Heisman Saturday.
By ANNE M. PETERSON
Associated Press
Standing shoeless in a
hallway while all around his
Oregon teammates cele-
brated clinching their trip to
the national championship,
running back LaMichael
James was asked for the
umpteenth time how he
felt about all the individual
accolades coming his way.
James bore a here-we-go-
again grin.
"I can't think about that,
man," he said. "We've still
got one more game."
This has become a man-
tra for James, who has tried
to deflect the national atten-
tion that has increased with
each carry this season -
even though he's constantly


asked about it
The small, yet speedy
sophomore is among
the four finalists for the
Heisman Trophy, the only
running back joining a trio
of quarterbacks: Auburn's
Cam Newton, Stanford's
Andrew Luck and Boise
State's Kellen Moore.
James is also one of three
finalists for both the Doak
Walker Award honoring the
nation's top running back
and the Walter Camp player
of the year award.
While he's flattered by
the recognition, James said
he hasn't really considered
the Heisman as a goal.
And for now he's focused
on Auburn, the team the
Ducks will face in the
national championship on
Jan. 10.
"It's never been some-
thing that's even been on
my mind, I can honestly
say that. I just never think


about it," he said at a recent
news conference. "Winning
the national championship,
that's the main goal. I've
always thought about that I
always wanted to be the guy
holding up the little ball and
giving it a kiss and all that
good stuff."
At 5-foot-9 and 185
pounds, James has been
compared to former
Heisman winner and NFL
great Barry Sanders. He
made a splash last year as a
redshirt freshman by neces-
sity after senior LeGarrette
Blount was suspended for
punching a Boise State
player in the aftermath 'of
the season opener.
James ran for a Pac-10
freshman-record 1,546
yards and was named the
league's freshman of the
year.
, This season, James is the
nation's leading rusher with
1,682 yards.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010


SCOREBOARD


GOLF REPORTS


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC Ladies European Tour. Dubai
Ladies Masters, first round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Seton Hall vs. Arkansas, at
Louisville, Ky.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Bradley at Duke
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Notre Dame vs. Kentucky, at
Louisville, Ky.
II p.m.
FSN Gonzaga at Washington St.
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Denver at Boston
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS San Jose at Philadelphia
RODEO
10 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC PRCA, National
Finals, seventh round, at Las Vegas

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
New England 10 2 0.833 379 269
N.Y .Jets 9 3 0.750267 232
Miami 6 6 0.500215 238
Buffalo 2 10 0.167243 333
South
W L TPct PF PA
Jacksonville 7 5 0.583 257 300
Indianapolis 6 6 0.500317 290
Houston 5 7 0.417288 321
Tennessee 5 7 0.417263 235
North
W L TPct PF PA
Pittsburgh 9 3 0.750267 191
Baltimore 8 4 0.667 260 201
Cleveland 5 7 0.417229 239
Cincinnati 2 10' 0.167255 322
West
W L TPct PF PA
Kansas City 8 4 0.667295 237
Oakland 6 6 0.500283 269
San Diego 6 6 0.500323 253
Denver 3 9 0.250256 333
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas

Adtlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota


East
W L
8 4
8 4
5 7
4 8
South
W L
10 2
9 3
7 5
I II
North
W L
9 3
8 4
5 7


T Pct PF PA
0.667 308 247
0.667344 281
0.417 222 293
0.333 294 336

T Pct PF PA
0.833 304 233
0.750 299 227
0.583 243 251
0.083 154 307
TPct PF PA
0.750246 192
0.667 303 182
0.417 227 253


Detroit 2 10 0.167278 306
West
W L TPct PF PA
Seattle 6 6 0.500 240 289
St. Louis 6 6 0.500232 237
San Francisco 4 8 0.333 203 259
Arizona 3 9 0.250 200 338
Monday's Game
N.Y. Jets at New England (n)
Thursday's Game
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota. I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Buffalo, I p.m.
Green Bay at.Detroit, I p.m.
Oakland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, I p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Miami at N.Y.Jets, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 13
Baltimore at Houston, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Tuesday's Games
Atlanta 116, New Jersey 101
Charlotte 100, Denver 98
Philadelphia 117, Cleveland 97
Golden State at Dallas (n)
Detroit at Houston (n)
Phoenix at Portland (n)
Washington at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Denver at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Toronto at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Miami at Utah, 9 p.m.
Washington at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Boston at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. Bradley, 9 p.m.
No. 3 Pittsburgh vs. Delaware State,
7 p.m.
No. 6 Connecticut vs. Fairleigh
Dickinson, 7:30 p.m.
No. 12 Villanova at Pennsylvania,
7 p.m. .
No. 14 San Diego State at California,
10:30 p.m..
No. 15 Missouri vs.Vanderbilt, 9 p.m.
No. 16 Illinois vs. Oakland, Mich.,
8 p.m.
No. 17 Kentucky vs. No. 23 Notre
Dame,.9:30 p.m. .. ..
No. 18 BYU vs.Vermont at Glens Falls
(N.Y.) Civic Center, 7 p.m.
No. 20 UNLV vs. Boise State at
Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, 10 p.m.
No. 22 Minnesota at Saint Joseph's,


7 p.m.
No. 24 Louisville vs. San Francisco,
7 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
Shark Shootout
Site: Naples
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort,
Tiburon Golf Club (7.288 yards, par 72).
Purse: $3 million. Winners' shares:
$375,0000 each.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday,
3-6 p.m., 8-1 I p.m.; Saturday, midnight-
3 a.m.) and NBC (Saturday. 4-6 p.m.;
Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Format: Two-player teams. Friday,
modified alternate shot; Saturday, best
ball; Sunday, scramble.
Teams: Matt Kuchar-Greg Norman,
Jerry Kelly-Steve Stricker, Justin Leonard-
Scott Verplank, Mark Calcavecchia-Jeff
Overton, Dustin Johnson-lan Poulter,
Chris DiMarco-Anthony Kim, Darren
Clarke-Graeme McDowell, David Duval-
Davis Love III, Jason Day-Rory Sabbatini.
K.J. Choi-Mike Weir, Fred Funk-Kenny
Perry, Rickie Fowler-Bubba Watson.
Online: http://www.thesharkshootout.
com
PGA Tour site: http://www.pgatour.com
PGATOUR OF AUSTRALIA
Australian PGA Championship
Site: Coolum,Australia.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Hyatt Regency Coolum
(6,714 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.48 million. Winner's share:
$266,800.
Television: None.
Online: http://pgotour.com.au
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR/
SUNSHINE TOUR
Alfred Dunhill Championship
Site: Malelane, South Africa.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Leopard Creek Golf Club
(7,249 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.33 million. Winner's share:
$210,980.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 9:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.). '
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
Sunshine Tour site: http://www.sunshi
netour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
San Jose at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


Toys For Tots event Saturday


The MGA-LGA Toys
For Tots tournament is
Saturday.
The tournament is open
to all members and partici-
pants are asked to bring a
toy, which will be delivered
to the Dream Machine.
Format is three-person
scramble with gross and
net winners.
Entryfeeis $40. Breakfast
begins at 8:30 a.m. with a
shotgun start at 10 a.m.
Call the pro shop at


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

752-3339 to register.
Wednesday Blitz winners
from Dec. 1:
A Division Jim Evans
+2, first; Don Horn -2,
second; Chet Carter -3,
third;
B Division--JackTuggle
-2, first; Randy Heavrin
-3, second; Bruce Park -4,


third;
C Division Richard
Skipper and Ronnie Ash +4,
tied for first; Larry Boone
+2, third.
There were six skins
winners, led by Evans with
two. Keith Hudson, Todd
Carter, Tammy Gainey and
Heavrin each had one. The
pot hole carried over.
Jack Tuggle posted +4 to
win the Top of the Hill on
Nov. 29. Gerald Smithy was
second at +3.


Good Old Boys' medalist fight


The Good Old Boys' real COUNTRY CLUB
battle this week was for at LAKE CITY
medalist honors. Ed Goff
Mark Risk (39-37-76), Ed Goff
Howard Whitaker (38-38-
76), Stan Woolbert (37-'in an 11-7 win over Jerry
39-76) and Dan Stephens West, Joe Persons, Terry
(38-38-76) kept waiting for Mick and Hibbard.
the winning putt to fall but West posted 37 for a nine-
finally settled into a four- hole win on the back. Witt's
man tie for first place. 37 took the front side by
Ed Snow and Merle two strokes over Mick.
Hibbard both carded 78s to Dwight Rhodes (+4)
finish as runners-up. rolled in three bird-
In team play, Jim Bell, ies for the early lead in
Bobby Simmons, Nick Wednesday's blitz, but fell
Whitehurst and Risk took prey to two late birdies by
match one by one point Jonathan Allen who took
over Eli Witt, Carl Wilson, the win at +6. Keith Shaw
Jim Stevens and Woolbert. settled for third with +3.
In match two, Mike In skins play, Buddy Slay
Spencer, Whitaker -and shared a three-way split
Stephens had little trouble with Allen and Rhodes. The


pot hole carried over for
the third week.
The LGA allowed players
to throw out scores on their
worst two holes in a full
handicap match.
Sally Rivers made the
best of her 16 net holes to
finish with 60 strokes for a
one-shot win over Roberta
Whitaker.
Dave Mehl combined
steady play with two bird-
ies for +7 and first place in
the Saturday blitz.
Dennis Crawford pock-
eted three winners in the
skins game. Terry Hunter
and Mehl each had one
winner.
The best ball tournament
this weekend opens with an
8 a.m. shotgun start.


Mcllroy won't be full time in 2011


Associated Press

Rory McIlroy was sur-
prised to learn that despite
fulfilling his PGA Tour obli-
gations this .year, by not
taking up membership in
2011 he will only be able
to play 10 tournaments.
The Players Championship
would not count toward
that number if he chooses
to play.
Even more peculiar was
the conversation he said
he had with Commissioner
Tim Finchem over the
weekend.
Fincheni was at the
Chevron World Challenge


to announce the PGA Tour
awards and meet with the
players. By the sound of it,
he said the kind of things
he usually does only it
took on a funny meaning to
McIlroy.
"I had a conversation with
Tim yesterday (Saturday)
and he said, 'Is there any-
thing we can do for you?
We're always happy to see
you over here playing,"'
McIlroy said with a smile.
His response?
"I said, 'Thank you very
much,"' he said with a
laugh. "Look, I'm happy
playing 10 or 11. I would
like to play some events -


I'd like to play Bay Hill, but
it just doesn't really work.
Phoenix is one I would
quite like to play."
Instead, he will play
the. Honda Classic
(between World Golf
Championships), defend
his title at Quail Hollow
and play the Memorial. The
other seven are majors and
WGCs.
As for The Players
Championship?
"Undecided," McIlroy said.
There have been reports
he doesn't like the TPC
Sawgrass, although Mcllroy
said it's more about the
schedule.


COURTESY PHOTO

Running at Disney
Local runners competed at the AAU Cross Country National Championships at Disney Wide
World of Sports in Orlando on Saturday. Local runners on Team Florida Youth Girls'
fourth-place team were Abby Williams, Ashlyn Martin, Nicole Morse, Shannon Evans,
Sydni Jones and Ashley Jones. Bridget Morse competed on Team Florida Bantam Girls.
LEFT: Local members of the Team Florida Midget Girls's third-place team are Taylor Seay
(from left), Jillian Morse, Samantha Ziegaus and Emma Tucker. RIGHT: Timothy Pierce, 13,
competed on the Youth Boys Team Florida National Championship.


Wannstedt

out after

6 seasons

at Pitt
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Dave
Wannstedt is out as Pitt
football coach following
a disappointing season in
which the Panthers were
big favorites to win a weak
Big East Conference, only
to finish 7-5 and qualify for
a minor bowl.
Pitt announced that
the former Bears and
Dolphins coach was step-
ping down, under pressure,
from athletic director Steve
Pederson.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

PAROE E
--|


@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
ACEEP



PAPNYS E



PULCEO


WHAT THE ASTRO-
NAUTS EXPLOREt2
WHEN THEY GOT
TO THE MOON,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: A(I IIII
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: LYRIC GIVEN EGOISM MYSELF
I Answer: The clowns turned the skating show into
this ICE "FOLLIES"


1
6
12 (

14

15 I
16 I

17
18
19
21

23-

26 P
27
28 E
30
31

32
i
33 F
35
35 M


ACROSS 37 Magna -
laude
Flaky 38 War horse
Tropical fruit 39 Coast Guard
Columbus' off.
goal 40 Depot info
Passed the 41 Make a mis-
buck judgment
Divide in two 42 Mouse alert
Magic lamp 43 Suffix
dwellers for forfeit
Frat letter 44 Uncertain pos-
Admiral's org. sibilities
Family MDs 46 Shuttle's desti-
Cowboy nation
Maynard 48 Sales
- be an pitches
honor! 51 In a tidy man-
Pigment ner
'- -Hur" 55 Give chase to
Eagle's lair 56 Diploma
Wrath 57 Rock
Hobby tumbler stones
ender 58 Wear the
Church read- crown


ng
Farm
machine
Wheel track


DOWN

1 Tip of a pen


Answer to Previous Puzzle

AU G SPEEW WEBS
RBI URSA I TCH
AOL BOOR THEY
BALSAM PATE


J UY RBEAR
Y MCA IM RAVE


A E RENT D
0OBO LIS
S YNE VIOLE T
CROW ABED I OU
PITA S AGE CN N
OBEY EGAD E YE


One, in combos
QB
objectives
Rows of seats
Ugh!
Air rifle (2 wds.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

12 13 14


books


7 Pub pints
8 Au pairs
9 "How --
doing?"
10 Born as
11 Magazine
fillers
13 Tends the fur-
nace
19 Whirl around
20 Kitchen gad-
get
22 Main course
24 Shipping
inquiry
25 Add water
26 Claims
27 Finch or robin
28 Two-BR units
29 Madame
Bovary
34 Most uncanny
36 Thoughtless
42 Winding
curves
43 Custom
45 Furnace duct
47 Crystal gazer
48 Hot spring
49 Jowly canine
50 401(k) cousin
52 Half of hex-
53 Journey stage
54 Ginza
money


12-8 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421






LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010 3B
1


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010



Food Bank's aim is to leave no one hungry


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com

food to help alleviate
hunger is the focus
of the Food Bank of
Suwannee Valley
The food bank opened
in August 2004 and serves
Columbia, Hamilton, Suwannee
and Union counties, said Scott
Elkins, manager.
"United Way decided there
was a need in the area for a food
bank and did the ground work to
get it started," he said. "Catholic
Charities came on as our sponsor
organization and has continued
since then."
Almost every food bank in
the state has a sponsor orga-
nization which offers guidance
and support, Elkins said. Catholic
Charities helps with its financial
needs and provides volunteers.
Elkins is the only employee,
but several volunteers also help
with food distribution duties.
The Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley is the smallest food bank
in the state but has increased its
annual output every year since
opening, Elkins said.
Distribution was more than
118,000 pounds the first year, he
said. It increased to more than
600,000 pounds in 2009 and will
be about 625,000 for 2010.
Donations for the food bank are
received privately and through
corporations, Elkins said.
Partners in Lake City includ-
ing Publix, Food Lion, Target
Distribution Center and Winn-
Dixie give items they cannot
use regularly.
Local businesses and organiza-
tions such as the Lake City


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Scott Elkins, the Food Bank of Suwannee Valley manager, is seen with pallets of donated food. 'We're a source of food for four counties,' Elkins said. 'I
get the sense of satisfaction from knowing that we are at least trying to make a difference in someone's life so no child goes to bed hungry.'


Reporter, Kiwanis Club and Post
Office host canned food drives
to benefit the food bank.
"We're very appreciative of all
our local partners with the food
bank," Elkins said.
Donations also come from
other food banks in the state.
"We just go to these food banks
and find out what their inventory
levels are and they send food,"
he said.
All donations benefit local
agencies. Clients of the food


bank include Catholic Charities,
Christian Service Center, the
Florida Sheriff's Boys Ranch and
churches that have emergency
food pantries.
The economy has been terrible
for the last few years, Elkins said.
People that used to be donors
have turned into clients of the food
bank.
The Lake City Reporter is spon-
soring its Third Annual Community
Food Drive to benefit the Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley. Non-per-


ishable food items can be dropped
off through Friday at the Lake City
Reporter office, 180 E. Duval St,
or subscribers can leave bags of
items near the newspaper delivery
tube or'at the end of their driveway
on Friday evening for carriers to
collect Saturday.
The Lake City Reporter has
always been a good partner with
the food bank, Elkins said. The
paper informs the public of its
own food drive as well as others
in the community.


'We really appreciate the Lake
City Reporter's assistance," he
said. '"The Lake City Reporter
knows the needs of the commu-
nity because it reports on them."
The Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley is located at 772 E. Duval
St. It is open 9 a.m. 3 p.m.
Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-12
p.m. Friday. The number is 386-
755-5683 and fax is 386-752-1300.
"We look forward to the time
when there won't be a need for a
food bank," Elkins said.


Let's Fill It Up!


Supporting the Food Bank of Suwannee Valley

Starting December 1, 2010
Bring Your Food Items to the Reporter Office.
located at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City
Monday through Fridays, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m.

On Saturday, December 11th
Carrier Food Pick Up Day
To participate, simply leave a bag of non-perishable foods at
your Reporter paper tube or the end of your driveway Friday night.
No glass containers.
Your Lake City Reporter carrier will pick it up while
delivering your Saturday paper.


Caln AllB -sss

Plae acllectionlboxineyo r upl c kfbsns! frdnto adyuwl


For all
Cash Donations
make checks payable to
Food Bank of
,Suwannee Valley-


Place a collection box in your place of business for donation and you will
be recognized with other business donors in the Lake City Reporter.

Don .'t -VeA BOX?'W B gO


Lake City Reporter
lakecltyreporter.com 0 CT IRRENTS Magazine

For additional
information and to
participate, please call '


tlaL I( cl.,rel .r

.g, pItp
^XSS--^^Kq _


1'


752-1293








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010


DILBERT
I INVENTED A DRUG
THAT MAKES PEOPLE DO
STUPID THINGS. THEN I
DIPPED THIS DART
IN IT.


-I


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


I DON'T KNOLWJ JHY
I DID IT. THERE'S NO
LEGITIMATE USE FOR P,
THIS SORT OF THING.
8 1

8 ./


OLw. I'LL NEED A
GALLON FORP,
THE WEEKEND.
AND REMEMBER
TO BREATHE
THE FUMES
AGAIN.


~


sign up for a date with me.
What should I do about this?
- CONTENT BACHELOR
IN MISSOURI


that occur in August. As the
summer winds down, angry
turns to weepy and sullen.
She mentions "moving back


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Look beyond
what's currently happen-
ing around you for a truer'
sense of where you should
be and what you should
be doing. The trials and
tribulations you've experi-
enced lately have been dif-
ficult, but' recognizing that
change is required is half
the battle. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): There is so
much good you can do for
the sake of those less for-
tunate or for family and
friends who seem lost or.
are in need of encourage-
ment. Love is in the stars,
so make a passionate and
caring move. *****
GEMINI (May21-June
20): Deal with paperwork
before the end of the year.
Don't let unexpected disap-
pointment stop you from.
following through with your
plans. Be your own driving
force if you want to make
things happen. ***-
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Romance is
highlighted -and a little im-
promptu dinner for two or
meeting at your local hang-
out will bring its rewards.
An investment you make
now will pay off in the fu-
q ture. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Your efforts and atten-
tion to detail will not go un-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

noticed. Adding a little flair
t6 your work will set you
apart from the competition.
If you work hard now, you
can enjoy the end of year
festivities;, knowing. you
have done your best. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Turn your day into a
family affair. Decorate your
home or to attend an event
that gets you into the spirit
of the season. Offer to help
someone you know who
is faced with too much to
handle alone. Tell some-
one special how you feel.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Listen, observe and
consider how you should re-
spond before you say some-
thing you will live to regret
Revisit goals you never ful-
filled. You may be able to
incorporate the things that
used to be important'to you
into your future. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): An impromptu
change will catch others by
surprise, giving you a good
lead and a healthy position
that will be difficult for any
competition you face to de-
feat. Lean heavily on your
creative imagination and
drive to see you through.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Reach deep
into your past to figure out
what you should do next
Reconnect with people you
may have hurt or wronged
in the past and make
amends. Moving toward
the new year without all the
extra baggage will ensure
you make the most of new
possibilities. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't be
afraid to change your mind
or your direction. See.
what's available and how
you can instigate the best
possible deal. A new look
at an old idea, coupled with
your.skills, looks like a pos-
itive route to take. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Rely on your
own experience and you
will give an accurate as-
sessment of a situation
you see someone you care
about going through. You
can stabilize your own life
by distancing yourself from
people who are a bad influ-
ence. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't leave
anything pertaining to your
personal or professional
work undone. A little ro-
mance late in the day will
lead to a promise you've
been longing to hear. A
partnership opportunity
has potential. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals W
"INVCDYX CNVHNF V CAY YA YRN


D LVP DBVYDA B."


"VF WFWVC,


YRNIN DF V PINVY KALVB MNRDBJ


N HN IX DJ DAY."


- GARB CNBBAB


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Everybody knows about Pearl Harbor... through this
tragedy there was this amazing American heroism." Director Michael Bay
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-8


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
WHY AREYOO SO I kLOEkIEE HIWMGtR
Lmt=,i CHnAFL'C DRF- ESS eHEHARSfAL,
-^-PINv, I SRNISlD-HOWCflN
I iD T S- Bn DKPESS
nNOTRR < E |EH 5HL?" -
DE-TNTION. l o NOwOt/'S
^ WEARING M
Df~ess!
.0~


CLASSIC PEANUTS


PEOPLE ALWAq5 EXPECT
MOATOFaWO l.iHAVE
NATUWALL'LYCOqHAil


L^*-^^'q -*;-[ ^C' ^t


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DEAR ABBY


Senior still enjoying sex


feels no desire to brag
DEAR ABBY: I am an .. for good," "I hate it here,"
80-year-old woman, happily "Quit your job and take less
married for 51 years. The money."
other day, my hairdresser Abby, I have a great job,
(in her 20s) asked me about and have told Louise to fly
my sex life with my hus- home as often as she wants.
band! I feel this is a private This scenario repeats each
matter and none of her busi- Abigail Van Buren summer and increases in
ness, but I didn't want to intensity. I know I'm going
sound rude. Can you think www.dearabby.com to wake up one day and not
of a snappy answer to such a DEAR CONTENT have a wife, because it seems
personal question? STILL BACHELOR: Take the bull her only solution is to move
IN LOVE WITH MY HUS- by the horns and do what back.
BAND you should have done in the I didn't like anything
DEAR STILL IN LOVE: beginning. Tell your boss about the state we came
Your hairdresser appears to firmly that you are happy as a from and was glad to leave.
have been sniffing too much single person, that when you I moved there for my first
hairspray, which has addled decide to settle down you wife and lost out on 14 years
her judgment The response won't need anyone's help, of things I loved to do. I'm
to her impertinent question and you want the matchmak- bitter about it to this day. I'm
should have been to say with ing stopped. To say that what happier here. I have no an-
a smile, "Honey, you'll just your boss has done is inap- swer to this problem that is
have to wait until you're our propriate is an understate- acceptable to Louise. Please
age and find out for your- ment. And if it doesn't stop, help. MY WIFE OR MY
self." it is unwelcome conduct of LIFE INTEXAS
DEAR ABBY: I am a a sexual nature and could DEAR WIFE/LIFE: If
happily single 22-year-old qualify as harassment. ever I heard of a couple who
male. My boss, who is happi- DEAR ABBY: "Louise" needed mediation services,
ly married, is extremely en- and I have been married it's you and Louise. Whether
thusiastic about finding me three years. We met in an- the answer to your problems
a woman. He is aware that other state and I relocated is divorce, or Louise living
I am OK with being single,' to take a job. I proposed to part of the year near her
but he feels it is his duty to Louise after the move, and grandchildren, is something
find me a girlfriend, she accepted knowing this only the two of you can ne-
At first, it was only would be where we live. gotiate- if it's even economi-
slightly irritating. However, Every summer my life call feasible. If you love
this matchmaker game has becomes hell. Louise gets each other enough, you can
gotten out, of hand. It has angry about the smallest work out a compromise, and
escalated into him printing things and picks fights fre- that's what I'm hoping you
up fliers with my photo on quently. This is in advance of can do in a caring way and
them, inviting women to al the randki.ds' birthdavs without anger.










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only. '
4 lines, one month....s92.00O
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Includes an additional $2.00 per,
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
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East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your.copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





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only the charge for the ad space
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Should further information be
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.likecitvrcportcr.comi


[PersonalMerchandisel


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.


020 Lost & Found
LOST: Flat type cell phone in a
red zipper eye glass case.
Lost in Lake City or Branford.
Please call 386-935-0366


070 Rewards

$500 Reward, Information leading
to the arrest of items stolen on
Nov 14-19, 2010. 386-288-6280
(Blazer, Golf Cart & 4 Wheeler)

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/0'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome!!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

2 Full Time hair stylist wanted.
Preferably with established
clientele. Please call
386-288-2743 for more info.
Jr & High school
Math teacher needed.
Please fax resumes to:
386-758-3018

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
/ 1l. COLLEGE
fo..e.. ta .'I V (.on...... co... .
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2011
Pharmacology
Masters degree in nursing or
pharmacology and at least two years of
experience required.
*Nutrition
Master's degree in nursing or dietary and
at least two years of experience required.
Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or
mai4.J.4Qe9@ngcedju.
College application and copies o transcriptss
required. All foreign transcripts muvnt be
subminled with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at \ c
E (i( isa .ccrcdedb b I Southeirn s-.a..ion or tollcges and
"Mch lI
V P'AD'lc-A. C.'oll gc6 in Fidu-c o & I npleomcm


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
Instructor to teach and assist the
EMS Coordinator and Executive
Director of Public Service Programs
in various aspects of program
development, planning and
implementation of the EMT-Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs, as well as
Firefighter programs. He/she
maintains a close relationship with
clinical sites and part-time faculty,
and assists in program expansion and
student recruitment; also assists
Coordinator In maintaining state and
national program accreditation.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Master's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field, or Master's,degree with 18
graduate hours in the emergency
medical services or closely related
field. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS,
ABILITIES REQUIRED: Paramedic
certification either at the state or
national level (must have FlorIda state
license within six months of hire).
Four years experience as a
paramedic with an ALS provider.
Must have two years experience (full
or part-time) teaching EMS. Must be
able to establish and maintain
effective working relationships with.
others. Knowledge of EMS
equipment. DESIRABLE
QUALIFICATIONS: Minimum three
years teaching experience at the
technical school or community college
level. ACLS, PALS, and PHTLS
Instructor certification. Experience
with program accreditation process.
Experience with American Heart
Association accreditation and
credentialing. Fire/rescue experience.
Knowledge of firefighter equipment
and certification.,
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 12/17110
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrt fac.edu
FroC is occreditd by the Commisioo on Collegs of
he Southern AssciaEtion of Colleges and Schools.
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Eduootios and
Fmosovmstnnt


Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


100 Job
Opportunities

04542583
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, FI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

04542605
Receptionist /Ward Clerk
And
Laundry /Housekeeping
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Receptionist/Ward Clerk, and
the part time position of
Laundry/Housekeeping
attendant. Competitive Salary
and Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

04542624



SYSTEMS
ADMINISTRATOR
Provides technical support for
enterprise network operations.
Functions include configuration,
implementations, and
maintenance of computer
network systefmsis
Requires at leas 3 yrs. wk
experience. MSCE or other
network certifications preferred.
Hands-on knowledge of
personal computers, servers,
networking technology, and user
support is required.
Competitive annual salary with
Excellent Benefits
SEND/EMAIL APPLICATION:
Edward Blodgett
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
itjobs@youthranches.org
EOE/DFWP

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service. is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE


12 n Medical
120 Employment

04542352
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted part time.ARRT &
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

05524555

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988


120 ^Medical
120 IEmployment

04542594
RN/LPN
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
weekend positions of RN/LPN
8 and 16 hour shifts available
C.N.A. 3-11 Shift
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center.
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

04542611
Dietary Assistant
/Dietary Aide
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Dietary Assistant and part time
position of Dietary Aide.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE


130 Part Time

Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
AKC BOSTON Terrier.
6 mo old. Female, red & white.
All shots current. $500
386-867-4335
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lib
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
CKC MINIATURE PINSCHER
Black & Tan, tail docked, health
certificate, ready 12/24, $400,
$50 deposit to hold 386-438-3229
or 386-497-1469. '
Free to good home,
Orange & White, Female
10 week old Kitten
386-288-2504 or 386-288-4481
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by .Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
6 yr old reg Quarter Horse,dark
bay, trained for barrels, needs
more attn, professionally trained 4
months ago $800 386-288-9245
Baby Pigs for sale
Ready Now!
$50 each
386-965-2215
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fumrn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


403 Auctions

ESTATE AUCTION
Friday, December 10th 6:30 PM
High Springs, FL, Hwy. 27 N.
auctionzip.com
Gold/Diamond jewelry, coins,
furniture., glassware,model 12
Winchester,Mossburg 22,
12 ga D.B. Rabbitear, 10% B.P.
Red Williams AU437/AB270
386-454-4991


416 Sp~orting Goods
Bowflex Treadclimber TC1000,
$600 obo,
slightly used
386-984-1044
FOR SALE: Over 100 year old
antique double barreled
shotgun with rabbit ears.
Call 386-438-5697


420 'Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


450 Good Things
to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420


460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-75? 642' ,A
2/2 (full baths), S/W, -abre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3 bdrm/2bath MI, N of town,
$575 monthly,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3BR/2BA Double wide. Lg.
Rooms. $750 a month. 1st month
and security, Please call
386-365-1243 or 386-965-7534.
4/2 MH on 3.5 acres in Ft White
on secluded private property, den,
laundry rm, all appliances includ-
ed, CH/A $800 month w/$500 Sec
386-292-07.15 or 386-754-6970
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
Garbage incl.References req'd.
$475.mo $475.dep, 386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/I BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
640 .Mobile Homes
4 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524587
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210


65n Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent


Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt. carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?







S -positive attitude






Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
G o Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
Sh EL www.sitel.com EOE


0)5524443---------
2444 $Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455


FIND lii


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 3$6-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage. W/D
hook up, $520 month.
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-212 for details.
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up. CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542599






LAKE CITY
2Br/lBa, 768 sqft. $525.mo.
3Br/2Ba, 1,064 sqft. $625 mo
2Br, IBa, 700 sqft, $495 mo
2Br- 1Ba.* 9h sqft, $695 mo
2Br/lBa,.720sqft, $650mo
3Br/1.5Ba, 1,278sqft, $795mo
2Br/1Ba, Mobile Home $495mo
3Br/lBa, 960sqft, $750.mo
FT. WHITE
4Br/3Ba, 1,536 sqft, $725
MADISON COUNTY
2Br/lBa'- 700 sq ft., $450. mo
JENNINGS
3Br/2Ba 1293 sqft, $695mo
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
www.NorthFloridaHome-
andLand.com
tEraER .mATW

05524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage, pool access.no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2/1 House, near Elementary
SSchool. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town. *
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $850 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard, ,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
RENTED
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
House for rent everything new.
4/2 plus study w/carport great
location $1100 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283


Classified Department: 755-5440








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 8, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
I-10 /US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba. $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782


810 Home for Sale
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence. large utility room.
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced. S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
820 Farms &
2&U Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Hatf to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
^830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. anto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover,-bedliner, hitch, neff
bars, stereQ;"$16,995. 752-8227
951 *Recreational
. '951 Vehicles
'07 ,utchmen Lite,
25' T.T. 7dt. cond., 10' s/o, tow
with 1/2 ton. $12,995 obo.
386-754-2769.
Q952, Vans & Sport
97 -Util. Vehicles
2001 Oldsmobile Sillouette.
Runs and looks good. Needs TLC.
$1,500'.. Call for more info.
386-344-2107


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If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
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. j3 In Print


2009 Toyota Scion O 20 e
XB 2007 Dutchmen Lite
5DR, 40,000 mi. purchase 25' T.T xlt. cond., 10' s/o,
for payoff $1,000 under book.
Serviced at Lake City Toyota. $12,995 OBO

386-758-5916 Call 1 P
386-965-7146 386-754-2769 1 Low Price!]

For Mo'Tre Dtals al ay rBrde
^^^^^^at 38-755-5440^^^^^


S large Pita awilh (hee<.e & 7 o 0Ing0
BDUy Une Pizza lageGreeknaladUIOrderol
G et U ne B ' A" o e


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w.ul~~S mai^o -
^^lIl ,?I oi -0


Rountree
^ TOYOTA

,, Service
90


I Rotate i Includes up to 5 quarts
Balance il and Filter I
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Plus tax & supplies
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