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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01468
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/07/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01468
System ID: UF00028308:01468
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Columbia

Rules
Tigers post 2-0 win


000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


4KC


~.4 Lu>


-.'f


Food
needed
Make donations
at Lake City
Reporter office.


Re


orter


December 7, 2010


www.l~lkecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. 275 0 75 cents


CHS improves to 'B' school


Columbia narrowly
misses 'A' mark; Fort
White gets a'B.'

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High School dumped
the "D" grade that has plagued the
school for five years and improved
its state academic ranking to a strong
"B," officials said Monday.


Columbia High School and Fort
White High School both received
"B" school grades, based to infor-
mation released from Department
of Education Officials Monday
night. The high school grades were
based on Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test scores and several
other factors.
The information was released to
school district officials across the
state at 7 p.m. Monday. Local school
district officials reviewed the infor-


nation in the school district's direc-
tor of curriculum assessment and
accountability office.
According to department of edu-
cation information, Columbia High
School received a total of 1,045
points, while Fort White High School
received a total of 1,016 points.
The Columbia High School grade,
where there is approximately 1,800
students in grades 9-12, was based

FCAT continued on 5A


GWIqNG BLOOD



WHEN IT'S



MOST NEEDED


Donors are
lacking during
holiday season.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON .
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Tis the season of
giving, but the
local LifeSouth
Community
Blood Center
sees a shortage of donors
during the holidays.
"It's harder to get people
to come out if it's cold and
they're busy," said Tony


Hudson, donor recruiter.
"They've got gifts to buy
and places to go."
The ideal goal is 230
donors a week, but num-
bers are about half of that
right now, said Lorrie
Woods, branch manger.
Donations decrease but
the need for blood increas-
es during the holidays.
"It rises due to traffic
accidents and more surger-
ies," Woods said. "More
people are sick wih the flu
and other illnesses."
There is a need for neg-
ative blood types as well


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Randi Croft donor services technician at the LifeSouth
Community Blood Center in Lake City, checks blood types
before placing them in the facility's refrigerator.


as apheresis or platelet
donors, she said.
Any blood donated in
Columbia County stays in
the area, Woods said. What
the blood donors give could
help save someone they


know, or even themselves.
"Sometimes things come
up unexpected," she said.
If any blood is left over it
goes to help in Gainesville.


CRIST continued on 5A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Donor specialist Jennifer Fox prepares to draw blood from Jessica Swartz on Monday. '(This job) is very fulfilling,' Fox said. 'I
get to meet new people everyVday and make a difference in someone else's life.'


Governor-elect

Rick Scott to

visit Lake City


To be a stop on
his 'Let's Get to
Work' Tour.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Florida Governor-elect
Rick Scott plans a visit to
Lake City Wednesday as
part of his "Let's Get to
Work" jobs tour.
Scott is traveling to sev-
eral towns and cities in
Florida as part of the tour
where he reportedly plans
to speak to business lead-
ers about issues they are
facing.
"He's going to be in
St. Augustine earlier
(Wednesday) and then
he's supposed to come
our way," said Tony
Buzzella, Columbia County
Republican executive com-
mittee chairman.
During the Columbia
County Republican
Executive meeting Monday
night, Gayle B. Cannon,
Republican party state com-
mittee woman for Columbia
County, confirmed that


Scott was scheduled to
be in Lake City 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday and take part in
a walking tour through the
downtown area.
As part of the tour Scott
is scheduled to visit Vann
Carpet One, Ward's Jewelry
and Gifts and another local
business,
said. She
said he
is also
expected to
spend afew -
moments
with mem- Scott
bers of
the Columbia County
Republican Executive
Committee as part of
his stroll down Marion
Avenue.
Scott's itinerary for today
has him scheduled to visit
Jacksonville where he will
meet with aviation and aero-
space industry officials.
Scott will leave Lake City
and travel to Miami later
in the day to speak with
representatives from the
International Trade and
Ports' Operations industry.


Frigid temperatures

expected to prevail

through Friday


Temps will drop
below freezing
during the night.
From staff reports
And you thought it
was cold this morning?
Wednesday and Thursday
won't feel much better. .
Dominant high pres-
sure over the middle of the
country is propping open
the door for frigid arctic air
to sweep across the South
and into Florida. Lows in
Lake City are expected
to be in the 30s through
Friday morning, according
to The Weather Channel,
the Lake City Reporter's
weather partner.
While the cold front
brought snow showers to
parts of Tennessee, western
North Carolina and north-
ern Georgia, there is no
chance of snow this week
in Florida. The sunshine
will be the area's saving


grace: Daytime highs are
expected to be in the upper
50s to low 60s through
Friday.
Temperatures are expect-
ed to return to the 70s on
Saturday afternoon.
With' the three-days of
overnight lows falling into
the 20s in Columbia County,
officials were reminding
residents to take care dur-
ing these unusual tempera-
ture dips.
Remember outside
pets and make sure they
have a warm place to sleep.
Water dishes may freeze
overnight, but should thaw
quickly as the sun rises.
Cover fragile tropi-
cal plants or fruit-bearing
shrubs and small trees to
shield them from the cold.
If tropical potted plants
cannot be brought inside,
gather them under a porch
light or a hanging light bulb
WEATHER continued on 5A


City to provide citizen alert system


(EDITOR'S NOTE: This story
was packaged in Sunday's
issue with an incorrect photo.
The information on this impor-
tant public safety item from
the city re-runs today with the
correct photo.)
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Notifying residents and
business owners of impor-
tant information will soon
become easier for the City


of Lake City.
.The city is implement-
ing a citizen alert system
through Everbridge, a com-
pany that specializes in inci-
dent notification systems.
City Council approved fund-
ing the project Nov. 15.
The estimated cost of the
system is around $10,000
per year, said Zack Mears,
information technology
director. Via text messages,
emails and other means,


the system will be able to
notify citizens of natural
disasters, utility service
issues and more.
City Manager Wendell
Johnson was instrumental
in the city looking into the
system, Mears said.
Johnson receives
information from the
International City/County
Management Association
on a daily basis. The asso-
ciation updates him on


technologies and innova-
tions used by various local
governments.
"(A citizen alert system)
was in one I saw a few
months back, and I suggest-
ed to the IT department to
look into it," Johnson said.
The city wanted to imple-
ment such a system in the
past, but it wasn't a feasible
price at first, Mears said.
ALERT continued on 5A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Zack Mears, the director of information technology, looks at
a Citizen Alert System that the City of Lake City is hoping to
adopt soon.


1 0 4 1 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


52
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
Schools .................
Obituaries .............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
LOCAL
Nat King Cole
Christmas.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Suwannee Valley
Food Bank rolls on.


Tuesday,










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


Monday:
Afternoon: 7-1-7
Evening: 7-6-1


Play4) Monday:
Afternoon: 4-9-6-3
Evening: 9-9-7-3


eznatcht.
Sunday:
15-22-29-30-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Winfrey, McCartney join top artists


WASHINGTON

Oprah Winfrey has come
a long way since her
childhood years in a
Mississippi shack and
in public housing with
a poster of The Beatles on her bed-
room wall. Sunday, she was honored
with Paul McCartney, one of the
Beatles she so loved.
Stars from Hollywood, Nashville
and Broadway gathered in the
nation's capital to salute Winfrey,
McCartney and three others
country singer Merle Haggard,
Broadway composer Jerry Herman
and dancer Bill T Jones with the
Kennedy Center Honors. The presi-
dent and first lady Michelle Obama
sat with the honorees and former
Secretary of State Colin Powell.
Julia Roberts opened the show
with a surprise nod to her friend,
Winfrey.
"It's a universal conversation start-
er: Did you see what was on 'Oprah'
today?" Roberts said. "The first time
I heard of a better fitting bra ... or a
fascinating politician named Barack
Obama was on The Oprah Winfrey
Show."'
John Travolta took the stage to
host a mock version of Winfrey's
show with Barbara Walters as his
guest. He recounted a phone call he
got from Winfrey when Hurricane
Katina struck New Orleans. She
told him to fill his plane with medical
supplies and meet her in Louisiana.
"So when Oprah calls, you
answer," he said. "Oprah makes it
exciting to be responsible."

Johnny Cash jumpsuit
gets $50,000 at auction
LOS ANGELES "The Man in
Black" was dressed in blue as he
rehearsed for a 1969 concert at San
Quentin.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama, right, and first lady Michelle Obama, second from right,
with recipients of the 2010 Kennedy Center Honors, from left, producer, television
host and actress Oprah Winfrey, songwriter and musician Paul McCartney, sing
the National Anthem during the 2010 Kennedy Center Honors Gala at the Kennedy
Center in Washington Sunday. At far left in the background is Stedman Graham.


The embroidered blue jumpsuit
that Johnny Cash wore to practice
caused a bidding war during a mem-
orabilia auction Sunday, bringing in
nearly 10 times what was expected.
The suit was expected to sell for
$5,000, but was eventually claimed
for $50,000 by a collector from
Belgium, said Darren Julien, presi-
dent and CEO of Julien's Auctions
in Beverly Hills. He would not name
the buyer.
The auction of 321 lots sold for
over $700,000, nearly twice what was
expected, Julien said Monday.
The late country singer was photo-
graphed in the suit giving a concert
photographer "The Finger."
That photo was used in a 1998
Billboard magazine ad purchased by
Cash's record company to sarcasti-
cally thank Nashville and country
radio after he received a best coun-
try album Grammy for "Unchained."


"Johnny Cash is highly collectible.
He's got global appeal, especially for a
country artist He was the first coun-
try music artist who was collectible.
He set the standard," Julien said.
An international group of fans,
collectors and investors took part in
the auction, by phone or in person,
he said.
A poster announcing Cash's
performance at the prison sold for
$25,000, a 1968 passport for $21,875
and a Martin guitar for $50,000.
A shirt made by Nudie Cohn
and worn by Cash when he was
grand marshal of the American
Bicentennial Grand Parade in 1976
brought in $31,250 and a pair of
Cash's knee-high boots sold for
$21,875.
Cash died in 2003 of complications
from diabetes.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Eli Wallach is 95.
* Linguist and political phi-
lodopher Noam Chomsky is
82.
* Actress Ellen Burstyn is 78.
* Sen. Thad Cochran (R-
Miss.) is 73.
* Baseball Hall of Famer
Johnny Bench is 63.
* Actor-director-producer
James Keach is63.

Daily Scripture


* Country singer Gary Morris
is 62.
* Singer-songwriter Tom
Waits is 61.
* Basketball Hall of Famer
Larry Bird is 54.
* Actress Priscilla Barnes
is 53.
* Former "Tonight Show"
announcer Edd Hall is 52.
* Actor Jeffrey Wright is 45.


"I am the good shepherd; I
know my sheep and my sheep.
know me just as the Father
knows me and I know the
Father and I lay down my life
for the sheep."


-John 10:14-15


Lake City


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau pf Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Cruise ship
rescues rafters

CAPE CANAVERAL
Six people who were res-
cued from a raft at sea by
a Florida-based cruise ship
have been turned over to the
U.S. Coast Guard for ques-
tioning.
The six passengers
arrived in Port Canaveral,
Fla. Monday morning on
the Royal Caribbean ship,
Monarch of the Seas. he
ship returned from a four
day cruise in the Bahamas.
Officials say the raft was
spotted Sunday just west of
Freeport
Authorities didn't immedi-
ately disclose the nationali-
-ties or the conditions of the
six people.

Woman injured
during charity ride

POMPANO BEACH A
female motorcycle passen-
ger has been hurt in a South
Florida charity toy ride.
Florida Highway Patrol
officials say 33-year-old
Lidieth Gil was thrown from
the motorcycle Sunday after
another motorcycle rear
ended her. She was hospi-
talized with serious injuries.
The driver was taken to the
hospital with minor injuries.

Jewish
finds home

PALM BAY A Jewish
congregation in Florida has
found an unlikely home.
Congregation Mateh
Chaim in Palm Bay has
been using the sanctuary
at Riviera United Church of
Christ for its services.
The small congregation
has been struggling to save
enough money for a perma-
nent home.
In the meantime, twice
a month, they gather at
church.
Fifty-eight-year-old mem-


IN- -z m
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Enjoying the Castagna House
Attendees came to share in the holiday spirit and to have fun
as'they toured the Castagna home, which was decorated with
many figurines, models and stuffed characters. Pictured are
Peggy Taylor (from left), Dr. Ron Foreman, Brenda Williams
and Tricia Davis. 'I think this is great,' Williams said. 'She
does a wonderful job.'


ber Harriet May says she's
grown used to the oddity of
it all. She says "a house of
God is a house of God."
The congregation's lead-
ers hope to secure a perma-
nent synagogue in the next
two years.

5 killed when SUV
rolls over on 1-95

PALM COAST Five
adults have died and four
children were injured after
an SUV blew a tire and
flipped over on Interstate
95 near central Florida.
Florida Highway Patrol
officials said driver Hugo
Campos-Leon and his fam-
ily were driving home
to Eustis after a family
reunion in North Carolina
when a back tire blew on
his 1996 Ford Expedition.
He lost control and hit sev-
eral trees before the vehi-.
cle flipped. The 18-year-old
was pronounced dead at
the hospital.
Lt. Bill Leeper said only
two victims were wearing
their seat belts. Several vic-
tims were ejected from the
vehicle.
Leeper said the four chil-
dren were taken to the hos-
pital with non-life-threaten-
ing injuries.


Skateboarder
killed in Miami

MIAMI A teenage skate-
boarder has died after Miami
Police say he was pinned
between two vehicles.
Authorities say a vehi-
cle struck the 14-year-old
Sunday night as he was
skateboarding across the
street The vehicle swerved
and collided with another
vehicle, pinning the teen
between the two.
The teen, who has not
been identified, was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

Scott embarks on
weeklong jobs tour

PENSACOLA
Governor-elect Rick Scott
is kicking off a weeklong
tour of the state focused on
job development.
Scott is making stops
around Florida meeting
with businesspeople and
industry representatives in
hopes of reigniting a slug-
gish jobs market.
He's due to meet Monday
with members of the home-
land security and defense
industry in Pensacola.


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
SUNNY CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY


I 52LO H52LO 582 H66WL037 Hl169 LO 44
HI 52 LO HI 52 LO L..8


Pensacola
54 '32


Tallahassee *


Vakd
50
Laki


52 25 ., 2
* G
Panama City -!
57 33


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a
--a
..,f

.-# :


Tuesday


F


51
30
70
46
83 in 1942
27 in 2000

0.00"
0.04"
39.02"
0.42"
46.22"


lp 7p la. 6a
y Wednesday


rcstem tenmpratur "Fed lie" tnwmraire


* Associated Press


dosta
/22 Jacksonville
City, \51/23
V21 2


City Wednesday
Cape Canaveral 57/38/s
SDaytona Beach 53/34/s


ieIl a Ft. Lauderdale
ainesville Daytgna Beach Fort Myers
52/22 5232 Gainesville
54/24 Jacksonville
Orlando Cap. Canaveral Key West
55/32 5/35 Lake City
5532 5 Miami
Tampa7 Naples
57/3 West Palm Beach Ocala
60/36 0 Orlando
.* Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 63/41 Pensacola
61/38 Naples Tallahassee
'60/40 Miami Tampa
KeWest 62/43 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:14 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:14 a.m.
5:30 p.m.

8:57 a.m.
7:29 p.m.
9:42 a.m.
8:28 p.m.


Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan.
13 21 27 4
First Full Last New


On this date in
1740, in early
December two
weeks of mild
and rainy weather
culminated in the
worst flood in
fifty years in the
Lower Connecticut
River Valley. The
SMerrimack River
swelled to its high-
est level.


4

45 iates to lin
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


68/46/pc
63/37/s
54/23/pc
53/28/pc
64/51/pc
52/22/pc
68/46/pc
62/39/pc
56/25/pc
56/34/s
54/36/pc
53/29/pc
51/24/pc
59/35/s
50/23/pc
66/40/pc


Thursday
63/47/s
60/43/s
69/52/s
66/44/s
58/28/s
t5/33/s
68/56/s
58/28/s
70/53/s
64/46/s
58/31/s
61/42/s
60/46/s
56/39/s
57/31/s
64/42/s
56/28/s
68/49/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel,



weather.com


Forecasts, data and graph-
- Ics 2010 Weather Central
w- w LLC, Madison, WIs.
t-, www.weatherpublisher.com


I UZI
Git Connotelo


Q:
c^mzzggmm
|Ica ..-. om


A$H 3.
'*


AROUND FLORIDA


I ............. --l- - -1- - i


- - -------- ------


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


1 1 1 1 1 J
ol 1:









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


White Springs program gets $210,000


From staff reports
WHITE SPRINGS The
White Springs H.O.PE.
After School program has
been awarded a $210,000
grant by the Department of
Education for its mentoring
and student assistance ini-
tiative. The program began
Wednesday.
The Helping Our People
Excel (HOPE): Reaching
Out, Not Out of Reach pro-
gram is a multi-pronged
plan designed to pro-
mote education in White
Springs.
The White Springs pro-
posal identified collabora-
tion with South Hamilton
Elementary and Hamilton
County High as the part-
nership approach to rein-
force curriculum, and to
provide confidence and
proficiency levels in aca-
demics for White Springs
students.
The program will deliver
academic classes, taught
by certified teachers, and
will consist of remedial and
supplemental instruction,


COURTESY PHOTO
White Springs officials Robert Townsend (back row from left),
town manager; WSPD Chief Brookins; Spencer Lofton, coun-
cil member; Israel Smith; Tonja Brown, HOPE chairman (front
row from left); and Helen Miller, mayor, take part in a ribbon
cutting for the newly funded after school program'


along with apprenticeships
to develop new skills to
increase the probability of
gainful employment. Local
business owners and volun-
teer mentors will join voca-
tional instructors to deliver
hands-on learning. In addi-


tion, volunteer mentors will
provide coaching in tennis,
mountain biking and other
recreational pursuits.
"After the success of our
H.O,EE. Summer Youth
Enrichment Program,
under the direction of


Spencer Lofton, we were
besieged with requests
from parents and grandpar-
ents who asked for the pro-
gram to continue through-
out the year," said White
Springs' Mayor Helen
Miller in a prepared state-
ment. "In our search for
funding, I called Kenneth
Pratt, Legislative Advocate
at the Florida League of
Cities, and asked for his
assistance. He directed
us to the DOE Mentoring
and Student Assistance
Initiative program. A team
of volunteers and town
staff prepared our applica-
tion, and Lofton drove the
proposal to Tallahassee on
the last day. Our families
understand the importance
of education, but with the
continuing introduction
of new teaching method-
. ologies and advanced com-
puter technologies, many
parents and guardians feel
ill-equipped to assist their
children with homework
assignments."


Going from bad boy to popular principal


CARLI TEPROFF
The Miami Herald

LAUDERDALE LAKES As a
kid, James Griffin was no stranger to
the principal's office.
A self-proclaimed underachiever,
Griffin liked to talk-and. ... talk back.
He was also known to get into a fight
or two.
"I think I must have been in there
every day," said Griffin.
Almost 20 years later, Griffin is still
going to the principal's office every
day but now it's his office.
"It's a lot. different when you
are in charge," said the principal
of Lauderdale Lakes Middle School.
"It's definitely a role reversal."
And in his role as principal first
at Rock Island Elementary School
in Fort Lauderdale and now at
Lauderdale Lakes Middle he has


caught the eyes of others.
Griffin, 38,. already Broward
County's 2010 Principal of the Year,
was recently named one of three
finalists for. the state's Principal
Achievement Award for, Outstanding
Leadership. The wipnier will be
announced in January.
"His -moral compass is clearly in
the right direction," said Broward
Schools Superintendent Jim Notter.
"He knows and understands the stu-
dents' needs and the communities
from where they come."
Griffin, who grew up in Broward
County, attended Westwood Heights
Elementary School, Riverland
Elementary School and New River
Middle School.
And yes, parents, there's hope yet
for your kids.
Principal Griffin graduated from
Dillard High School with a C aver-


Looking back, he said he knows
he could have done a lot better, but
never really tried, and always ques-
tioned his teachers.
"I never wanted to listen to any-
one," he said. "I wish I would have
realized they were just looking out
for me."
After graduating from high school,
his mother and aunt forced him to go
to college.
Mom admits she had doubts about
her "baby."
"I think I was called to school every
day from the time that boy was in
kindergarten," said Viola Fuller. "I
never in a million years would have
thought he'd be a teacher, let alone a
principal."
He ended up at Bethune-Cookman
College (now University).


City moves stop

signs to help

with traffic flow


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com .

The City of Lake City
Council approved removal
of stop signs on Franklin
Street during its meeting
Monday night. A total of
11 existing stop signs will
be removed. The signs at
the intersection of Franklin
Street and Main Boulevard
and Franklin Street and
Marion Avenue will
remain.
New stop signs will
be placed on Franklin's
cross streets of Alachua
Avenue, Columbia Avenue,
Hernando Avenue,
Calhoun Avenue, Taylor
Avenue, Davis Avenue and
Methodist Terrace.
Several weeks ago Jack
Berry, Lake Shore Hospital
Authority executive direc-
tor, approached the city
about stop sign removal on
Franklin Street, from Main
Boulevard to Northeast
Davis Avenue, said Lake
City Police Chief Argatha
Gilmore.
The Florida Department
of Transportation assisted in
looking into the sigh change.


by conducting a vehicle
count on the streets Nov. 4-
5, Gilmore said.
The count results were:
Davis Avenue north and
south 214 vehicles; Franklin
Street near Davis Avenue
east and west direction 1,048
vehicles; Franklin Street
near Hernando Avenue east
and west 1,056 vehicles; and
Hernando Avenue one way
street northbound 179 vehi-
cles. Franklin Street vehicle
traffic east and west was
a total'of 2,104. -lernando
Avenue and Davis Avenue
north and south vehicle traf-
fic was a total of 393.
The total amount of vehi-
cles within the time period
was 2,497, Gilmore said.,
The Manual on Uniform
Traffic Control Devices is
used as a reference point
for installing or removing-
stop signs. The street with
the least amount of traffic
normally receives stop signs,
according to section 2B.04-
07.
The end result of the
changes will provide eas-
ier access to the hospital
for emergency vehicles,
Gilmore said.


. ,. .. ,. ., ... .., ... f


Li ,, +!4


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Tuesday, December 7, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Let's hope

new jobless

numbers are

aberration

finally, we had a run
of good economic
news, not over-
whelmingly so but
generally positive and
auguring well for the new year.
Consumer confidence is up.
The holiday shopping season is
off to a robust start Wall Street
forecasts that economic growth
and hiring will pick up in the
coming months. A private trade
group survey showed the service
sector expanding for the 11th
straight month and the same
group, the Institute for Supply
Management, reported that its
manufacturing index expanded
for the 16th straight month.
Then came the November
unemployment figures. To call
them "disappointing," as the White
House did, is an understatement
The economy is indisputably grow-
ing, but not in a way that affects
the only economic indicator that
matters to the average person: the
unemployment index.
The jobless rate for November
was 9.8 percent, up from 9.6
percent the month before, and
the highest since April, setting
a dubious new record of 19 con-
secutive months with unemploy-
ment above 9 percent There are
now 15.1 million unemployed
Americans.
That the unemployment rate
might rise was not totally unex-
pected. Even as matters improve,
the rate can rise as idled workers
see prospects brightening and
resume actively looking for work.
But the real shock in the
November figures was that the
economy added only 39,000
jobs. It was especially disappoint-
ing because economists had
expected something like 140,000
to 150,000 news jobs, and revised
figures show that 172,000 jobs
were added in October.
The 39,000 figure looks espe-
cially dismal when we consider
that economists say the economy
has to add jobs at the rate of
300,000 a month to materially
affect the unemployment rate.
For what minimal consolation
it offers, the underemployment
rate held steady at 17 percent
Our job-creating machinery is
stuck in neutral; at least it's not in
reverse.
* Scripps Howard News 'Service


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
SSince 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
c9mmunity-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard .
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


In praise of religious


leaders and progress


This is a column of
praise for religious
leaders. Let me say
from the outset, it
is quite rare for me
to praise leaders of organized
religion. But a group of lead-
ers in Scotland, and the pope
himself, have acted in ways
this past week that will ulti-
mately benefit the human race.
And as I am one who is quick
to criticize when I believe
a religious leader has done
harm, I am also happy to sing
praise where praise is due.
The first incident involves
this week's UN climate change
conference in Cancun, Mexico.'
According to the BBC 'online,
a group of Scotland's Christian
and Islamic leaders is urg-
ing Prime Minister David
Cameron and the UK govern-
ment to do all it can to ensure
progress on limiting climate
change and greenhouse gas
emissions.
The prelates went beyond
that. They called failure to
control climate change a moral
outrage. They urged wealthy
countries to help poorer
nations whose inhabitants are
already suffering the wrath
of rising sea temperatures
and drought in much greater
proportions than are those
of us who are lucky enough
to be living in richer coun-
tries. The BBC reports that
the letter was signed by the
moderator of the Church of
Scotland's General Assembly,
John Christie, the head of
the Roman Catholic Church'
in Scotland, Cardinal Keith
O'Brien, the primus of the
Scottish Episcopal Church,
David Chillingworth, and
Shaykh Ruzwan, a senior fig-
ure in the Islamic community.


LETTERS


TO


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com
The United Nations says 25
million people on the planet
have been forced to migrate
when the territory they pre-
viously inhabited became,
uninhabitable due to climate
change. Most of those people
live along the Bay of Bpngal' or
in recently deser ified lands ifi'
SAfica.But the United NaiOdns'"
also predicts that 200 million
so-called environmental refu-
gees will be forced from their
ancestral lands by mid-century.
At that point, sadly, it wilf have
become a problem even those
who doubt the existence of
man-made climate change can
ignore.
The second incident
involves Pope Benedict XVI
who was interviewed for a
new book about him. The
pope made some amazing
pronouncements in response
to queries about that inter-
view. After a decades-long
opposition to condom use
by the Church, the pope last
week said through a Vatican
spokesman that men and
women may use condoms to
prevent the spread of HIV/
AIDS. This was not a formal
pronouncement, but it was a
sea change in the Vaticah's
attitude toward condom use.
So much so, in fact, that the
Associated Press reported,
"Several orthodox Catholics
said they would only accept
a more formal papal pro-


THE EDITOR


nouncement. Others insisted
that journalists were purpose-
ly misrepresenting Benedict's
comments. Some questioned
whether the papal spokes-
man,.the Rev. Frederico
Lombardi, accurately quoted
the pope." ,
It was a risky, controver-
sial move to some believers.
But as an outsider, I see
it as a brave move by the
pope and his spokesman
to show humanity toward
those unknowingly infected
with HIV/AIDS. Imagine,
for example, the wife who
has, sex with -her husband
not knowing he has i'AIS: -
pr .a, wife wYith AIDS infect .
an unknowing husband. It is
inhumane, if.either knows
he/she is infected, NOT to
use a condom.
At first the pope's com-
ments to a translator were
interpreted to mean that
only male prostitutes could
use condoms in same-gen-
der sexual relations, where
procreation is impossible.
But the spokesman later last
week said that the pope had
been referring to all people
- male, female and trans-
sexual.
Opposition to this position
seems unfathomable that
some would find it perfectly
acceptable to infect an inno-
cent partner within the con-
fines of marriage, or outside
for that matter. So I give huge
credit to Pope Benedict XVI
and his spokesman in this
regard, and hope that from
here on out we will see more
humane doctrines and fewer of
the inhumane variety.
Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


Peace comes with Prince of Peace


I believe along with most
evangelicals that the next
event on God's calendar
will be the translation of
the church (those who
have accepted Christ as their
personal savior). We believe
that this is taught throughout
the scriptures: 1 Corinthians
15:51-58; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-
18; Revelations 4:1, to name a
few. All signs recorded for this
event have been fulfilled. All
other signs are to the Lord's
second coming to earth.
The second coming fakes
place seven years after the
translation of His church. Many
are the signs of His second
coming that will b.e fulfilled after
the church is gone. So, if all the
things that have not been ful-
filled are with us now, then how
close must the translation of the
church be?
Matthew 24, Mark 13, and


Luke 21 teach us many of these
signs. One sign that stands out
to me is found in Luke 21:25:
"And there will be signs in the
sun, in the moon, and in the
stars; and on earth distress of
nations with perplexity, the sea
and waves roaring." Any one
can see today the distress of all
nations. It is amazing that these
words, spoken some 2000 years
ago, could be so literal today.
For thousands of years, man
has sought peace while things
have gotten steadily worse. In
the last century, we have seen
two world wars and one conflict
after another. It was recorded
that the slogan for these world
wars were: '"The war to make
the world safe for democracy,"
and "The war to end all wars."
What irony!
Today, the world is a powder
keg, an armed camp with the
threat of atomic destruction.


The United Nations was held as
the solution of the war problem,
but today instead of uniting the
world for peace, it is divided
more than ever. The only solu-
tion is the Prince of Peace.
The verse goes on to say,
"distress of nations with per-
plexity." To be perplexed is to
be at loss for a way, finding no
solution, being at wit's end.
There is no better word in the
English language to describe
the state of mind of our dip-
lomats and leaders. They are
facing an insoluble dilemma.
Representatives are going back
and forth across the sea with
increased perplexity. I repeat,
there can be no peace until the
return of the Prince of Peace.
Read Luke 21:28, then Acts
16:30-31.
Hugh G. Sherrill
Lake City


Lisa Hoffman
hoffmanl@snhs.com


Blue Alert

proposed

to track

cop killers

"T here are Amber
Alerts to help find
missing children
and Silver Alerts
to locate senior
citizens who wander. Now
three senators want a national
Blue Alert system established
to help apprehend those who
kill or seriously injure law
enforcement personnel.Several
states have set up their own
system to quickly disseminate
information about suspects,
but there is no mechanism to
spread it beyond state lines.
Under the National Blue
Alert Act of 2010, sponsored
by Sens. Ben Cardin, D-Md.;
Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; and
Pat Leahy, D-Vt., alerts would
be transmitted to all local, state
and federal law enforcement
agencies nationwide, the media
and .emergency broadcast
operations.
The senators say setting up
the Blue Alert system would
cost $10 million.
Deaths of police officers
have surged 43 percent this
year, with 87 officers dying in
: the line of duty between Jan.
S1 and June 30, according to
the National Law Enforcement
Officers Memorial Fund.


With the space.shuttle pro-
gram nearing the end of its
road, NASA is offering souve-
nir tchotchkes to schools, col-
leges and universities.
For just $23.40 to cover
the cost of shipping and
handling your school can
become the proud owner of
an official space shuttle heat
shield tile. But you must act
fast; there are only 7,000 tiles
available:
NASA says the purpose is to
preserve the program's history
and inspire the "next genera-'
tion of space explorers, scien-
tists and engineers."
This is the first time the
space .agency has opened its
closets to such a large part of
the public. In the past, NASA
has invited museums, selected
universities and other organi-
zations to apply to be a host of
artifacts from the U.S. space
exploration programs, includ-
ing the shuttle, Hubble Space
Telescope, and the Apollo,
Mercury and Gemini days.
Such lightweight tiles -
which protected the shuttles
from 3,000-degree tempera-
tures on re-entry to Earth's
atmosphere played a tragic
role in the 2003 space shuttle
Columbia disaster, which was
triggered by a failure of the
thermal protection system, of
which tiles were a key compo-
nent.
Schools can apply to receive
a tile at http://gsaxcess.gov/
NBASAWel.htm This once-in-
a-lifetime offer is first-come,
first-served, so don't delay.



Gay rights groups and
individual donors kept their
wallets closed this election
season, donating 58 percent
less overall than the $2 million


they did in 2006, according to
a preliminary campaign spend-
ing analysis by the Center for
Responsive Politics.

E Lisa Hoffman writes
Washington Calling for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


BLOOD

From Page 1A

Donors will be entered
into a drawing for a free
iPad through the month as
an incentive to donate. The
drawing is Dec. 24.
Other incentive items
include a free T-shirt and
red shopping bag. Donors
can also write a greeting
on a stuffed animal, Bo the
Bloodhound, that will go to
patients at a local nursing
home.
To donate, a person
must be at least 17 or
16 with parent's permission
weigh 110 pounds and
show photo identification,
Hudson said. Before donat-
ing eats a regular meal and
drink plenty of water.
"It's a very simple and
easy process," he said.
People everywhere are
feeling a financial strain, but
they can still help the com-
munity by simply donating
blood, Hudson said.
"It's the best gift to give
in life," he said. "You help
save somebody's life. It's an
extraordinary gift."
The bloodmobile will be
set up at Columbia High
School Friday, Snow Day
downtown Saturday, the
Columbia County Extension
office Dec. 13 and the Lake
City VA Medical Center
auditorium Dec. 14 and 15.
The spheresis bus will
also stop around town Dec.
12 19. The process takes
about an hour and a half.
"We have a hard time get-
ting people to come donate
at the center," Woods said.
Visit www.lifesouth.org
for a schedule of stops by
the blood mobile.
"Help the holiday short-
age," she said. "Give the gift
of life."


ALERT

From Page 1A

Technology prices are now
dropping. I
There are periodic times
when the city has emergen-
cy information the public
needs, Johnson said.
City employees now must
go door-to-door to spread
the word, often regarding
utility services, but with
the technology available, it
doesn't make sense to use
that method, he said.
"It's just a matter of time
before most cities have
similar programs," Johnson
said.
Citizens will be able to
register their residence or
business online to receive
the alerts, Mears said.
Multiple people can register
separately.
There are different
delivery paths for people
to receive alerts, such. as
through phone calls, text
message, e-mail or fax, he
said.
Alerts can pertain to not
only weather updates or
boil notices, but a missing
child or wanted suspect on
the loose.
"It's really and efficient
and quick way to deliver a
message," Mears said.
Oncereceivingamessage,
recipients can acknowledge
it, so they don't keep receiv-
ing alerts, he said.
Messages can be sent to
a specific area or citizen
affected by an event, Mears
said. The system also has
the capability to stop and
resend a message with
updated information before
it reaches the entire com-
munity.
Johnson said he thinks
the new citizen alert system
will be beneficial for the
city.
"It's an excellent means
of reaching a large number


of people at a low cost," he
said.
In a matter of weeks the
system will be available to
the public, Johnson said.
There is still some back
end configuration the IT
department has to look into,
Mears said. Once every-
thing is complete, there
will be a campaign to direct
citizens to sign up online for
the system.
"It's very exciting to move
forward," he said.


Assange may surrender to police


JOHN HEILPRIN
and SYLVIA HUI,A
Associated Press


LONDON Julian
Assange's lawyer was arrang-
ing to deliver the WikiLeaks
founder to British police for
questioning in a sex-crimes
investigation of the man who
has angered Washington by
spilling thousands of govern-
ment secrets on the Internet
Lawyer Mark Stephens
told reporters in London that
the Metropolitan Police had
called him to say they had
received an arrest warrant
from Sweden for Assange.
Assange has been staying
at an undisclosed location in
Britain.


"We are in the process
of making arrangements to
meet with police by consent,"
Stephens said Monday, declin-
ing to say when Assange's
interview with police would
take place.
Scotland Yard refused to
comment.
The 39-year-old Australian
is wanted on suspicion of
rape, sexual molestation and
unlawful coercion in Sweden,
and the case could lead to his
extradition. Interpol placed
Assange on its most-wanted
list on Nov. 30 after Sweden
issued an arrest warrant Last
week, Sweden's highest court
upheld the detention order.
Assange has denied the
accusations, which Stephens


has said stem from a "dispute
over consensual but unpro-
tected sex." The lawyer has
said the Swedish investiga-
tion has turned into a "politi-
cal stunt."
The pressure on WikiLeaks
mounted from other quar-
ters Monday: Swiss authori-
ties closed Assange's bank
account, depriving him of
a key fundraising tool. And
WikiLeaks struggled to stay
online despite more hacker
attacks and resistance from
world governments, receiv-
ing help from computer-
savvy advocates who have
set up hundreds of "mirrors"
- or carbon-copy websites
- around the world.


WEATHER: Cold stays

Continued From Page 1A


to create more warmth
from the night air and
possible frost covering.
If your home is not
well insulated, remem-
ber to leave water run-
ning a trickle at any
inside faucets that
touch an outside wall
where the cold weather
could have an impact
in causing the pipes to
freeze.
If your home has an
outside well, consider
wrapping the PVC pipes
where they come out of
the ground. This may
prevent the pipes freez-
ing and bursting.
Electric or kero-


sene space heaters can
be dangerous. Make
sure electric heaters
function properly and
don't overload circuits.
Double-check that ker-
osene heaters are prop-
erly ventilated before
using indoors.
If a fire is built in a
wood stove or fire place,
make sure the chimney
is clean and profes-
sionally maintained to
prevent a chimney fire.
Chimney fires occur
when creosote buildup
from last year's wood
fires ignites in the upper
levels of the chimney.


FCAT: Columbia, Fort White achieve B grades on report

Continued From Page 1A


very hard this year. This
is such a relief to get that
penalty "D" off our back
and earn what we know we
can always do."
The past five years
Columbia High School's
grade was a "D" because
the students in the low-
est performing percentile
failed to show enough aca-
demic growth.
"We just focused on
them," Huddleston said of
the plan to raise the school
grade. "We knew who they
were, we knew what they
did and we grouped them
in intensive math and read-
ing classes, tried to pro-
vide them incentives and
encouraged them. Our
teachers have just worked
incredibly hard with those
students to improve their
scores."
Fort White pleased with
'B' grade
Keith Hatcher, Fort White
High School principal, also
seemed happy with his
school's grade.
"I'm really pleased to have
a "B" this year," he said.
"When our FCAT points
came in we were right on
the borderline and I'm real-


on 50 percent FCAT points
and 50 percent high school
points.
The Fort White High
School grade, where there
is approximately 1,250 stu-
dents in grades 6-12, was
based on 70 percent FCAT
points and 30 percent high
school'points. Fort White
High School, has received
a "B" grade for the past
three years.
"It's been a very long
haul and I'm just very proud
of our teachers, staff mem-
bers and administrators for
just working together and
doing such a great job over
the last four-five years,"
said Terry Huddleston,
Columbia High School prin-
cipal, who noted Columbia
High School narrowly
missed an "A" grade by five
points. "You can teach all
you want, but the students
have to believe they can do
well. I'm extremely proud
of our students for doing
their very best
"There is just such a tre-'
mendous burden lifted off
the shoulders of everybody
at Columbia High School.
We can't relax very long
because we're working.


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ly pleased the high school
points helped us get over the
edge in making a "B"."
Hatcher said it isn't easy
to maintain an above aver-
age grade when the grade
criteria constantly changes.
"What we face every
year, and next year will be
no different, about the time
we focus in on the target,
the target moves," he said.
"Next year we'll have end-
of-course testing we'll have
to worry with and we have
to figure out how they will
figure that into thesschool
grade. We've always been
the kind of school that
steps up to the plate and
takes on the challenge and
I'm confident our people
will do the same thing in
this case."
Mike Millikin, Columbia
School's superintendent,
said school district offi-
cials were thrilled with
both local high school's
grades.
"Obviously we're
thrilled and excited to
,get the good news about
Columbia High School,"
he said. "So many people
for so long have worked
so hard to improve the


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school grade and I just
want to personally thank
the parents and the stu-
dents who worked with
their teachers to earn this
achievement. It's espe-
cially gratifying that the
state finally recognizes
some of the things that
Columbia High and Fort
White High School do so
well and that's counting
the graduation rate and
high number of students
that take advanced place-
ment and dual enrollment
courses in calculating the
school grade. Both our
high schools do an excel-
lent job in those areas and
I think those are impor-
tant measures when rat-
ing any high school."
Kitty McElhAney,
Columbia School District
director of curriculum
assessment and account-


ability, said the data from
the school grades will be
used locally to gauge the
student's performance
at the school and the
improvements at each of
the schools.
She said the school
grades are based multiple
factors and at the high
school level the school
grades are based on the
FCAT testing in ninth-10th
grade reading and math
scores, 10th grade writing
scores and 11th grade sci-
ence test scores.
She said the remaining
portion of the school grade
is based on performance
in advanced placement
courses, performance and
participation in dual-enroll-
ment courses, post-second-
ary readiness, graduation
rates and graduation rates
for at-risk students.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Theater auditions
Actors needed to audition
at 7 p.m. today for the play
Sherlock's Last Case. High
Springs Community Theater
have openings for three
middle to older aged men,
one older woman, and one
younger woman. The pro-
duction is Feb. 11 March
6. Rehearsals will start in
early January at the theater,
located at 130 Northeast 1st
Avenue in High Springs.
Contact Director Jerry Rose
at 352-3788858.

Christmas performance
Allan Harris sings a
Nat King Cole Christmas
7 p.m..today in the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Ticket prices are: $15 for
adults, $14 for seniors
age 55 and over and $13
for Students and Florida
Gateway College staff.
Tickets go on sale Nov. 29.
Call 386-754-4340 or e-mail
mark.kirby@fgc.edu.

Leads Club #1 meeting
The next Columbia
County Chamber Leads
Club #1 meeting is 8 a.m.
today at Holiday Inn &
Suites Lake City. Breakfast
is $6 -pr person. Leads
Clubs are dynamic groups
of Chamber partners
who meet bi-monthly to
exchange business leads
and ideas with fellow busi-
ness professionals. Call
386-752-3690.

Exye-ise class
anie Anderson hosts
a chair exercise program
at 1 p.m. today at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The class will take
place in the Dining Hall
and the center is located at
628 SE Allison Court. For
more information call 386-
755-0235.

Wednesday
Newcomers Monthly
Meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is 11 a.m. Wednesday at
Quail Heights Country
Club, Branford Highway.
The luncheon costs $10. A
$10 gift exchange will take
place for those wishing to
participate. All members,
friends, and guests are
welcome. Call 752-4552 or
755-4051.

Public meeting
Elder Options is having
a public meeting 10 a.m.
Wednesday in the Hilton
University of Florida
Conference Center. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 1714
SW 34th St., Gainesville.
Contact Cindy Roberts at
352-378-6649.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid


TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter

Vintage 1959 Ferrari 250 GT on display

A 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe was a centerpiece of the antique car and tractor show at
Saturday's Christmas on the Square in Live Oak. Thousands attended the day-long event
around the courthouse area in downtown Live Oak.


workshop is 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the
Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate and
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expands
the opportunities available
with Medicaid Planning.
Call Shana Miller, 386-755-
1977 to register.

Dining Hall performance
Watch Pat Dolamore
perform live from 11 -
11:45 a.m. Wednesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The performance
will be taking place in the
Dining Hall, and a game of
Bingo will take place after-
wards at 1 p.m. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Thursday
Business seminar
SCORE is presenting a
free seminar, "Business
Tactics for Tough Times,"
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
Camp Weed, Live Oak.
The speaker is Jerry Ross,
Exececutive Director of
the Disney Entrepreneur
Center. Lunch is $9. RSVP
to the Lake City Chamber
752-3690 or the Suwannee
Chamber 362-3071.

Chorus concert
Richardson Middle
School Chorus will have
their annual Christmas
Concert 7 p.m. Thursday
in the Auditorium. They
will be singing various
Christmas selections. The
chorus is under the direc-
tion of Christy Robertson.

Edward Rutledge
Chapter Meeting
The Edward Rutledge
Chapter DAR is meeting
10:30 a.m. Thursday at
Guangdong Restaurant
inside the Lake City Mall,


2469 US Hwy. 90 W. The
program will be on "Food
Safety." The guest speaker
is Lee M. Cornman from
Tallahassee. Cornman
is currently Assistant
Director of the Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Cdnsumer Services,
Division of Food Safety.
Following the program is a
brief Christmas program.
Dutch treat lunch imme-
diately follow the meet-
ing. Guests are always
welcome. Contact 386-755-
5579 (Lake City area) or
386-362-2180 (Live Oak
area). '

Friday
Class Reunion
Columbia High School
Classes of '49, '50, '51, '52,
and '53 are having a class
reunion 11:30 a.m. Dec. 10
at Mason City Community
Center. Anyone who
attended Columbia High
is invited. Contact Julia
Osburn at 386-752-7544 or
Morris Williams at 386-
752-4710.

Performance and party
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center hosts
Fort White High School's
Chorus performance from
11 11:45 a.m. Friday in'
the Dining Hall. There
will be a client Christmas
tree decorating party from
1 2 p.m. following the
performance. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Crafts Bazaar and
Festival
The annual "Lake City
Holiday Crafts Bazaar &
Festival" is 10 a.m. 6
p.m. Friday at the Lake
City Mall. The event will
feature the "Children's
Section" entertainment,.
live vendor demonstrations
and more. Visit www.lakec-
itybazaar.com.


A Christmas Carol
A performance of the
radio-on-stage dramatic
adaptation of Charles
Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Friday
at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya
and at highspringscommu-
nitytheater.com.

Saturday
AARP meeting
Lake City Chapter of
AARP will meet Saturday,
Saturday at 11 a.m. at the
Lifestyle
Enrichment Center,
628 SE Allison Ct. behind
Baya Pharmacy East. Mr.
John Pierce will surprise
you with our program.
Please bring food for a
covered dish lunch at
noon..

Crafts Bazaar and
Festival
The annual "Lake City
Holiday Crafts Bazaar &
Festival" is 10 a.m. 6
p.m. Saturday at the Lake
City Mall. The event will
feature the "'Children's
Section" entertainment,
live vendor demonstra-
tions and more. Visit www.
lakecitybazaar.com.

Health ministry meeting
The Congregational
Health Ministry follow-up
meeting is 10-11:30 a.m.
Saturday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center
located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court Lake City. Contact
Carolyn Alred 352-281-
1629.

Breakfast with Santa
Pancake Breakfast
with Santa is 8 11 a.m.
Saturday at the Holiday
Inn & Suites. Breakfast
will include pancakes,
bacon, sausage, juice,
coffee, and hot chocolate.


There will also be holiday
music. Meals are $7 for
adults and $4 for children
ages 3-12. Proceeds benefit
Children's Medical Services
of North Florida. A collec-
tion box for unwrapped toys
will also be available.

Nutcracker
The Nutcracker Ballet
is 2:30 and 7:30 p.m.
Saturday in the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Led by the Gainesville
acclaimed Dance Alive
group, the production is
supplemented by more
than 50 local boys and
girls.

Holiday happenings
Snow Day, sponsored by
Hopeful Baptist Church, is
9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Dec. 11 in
the parking lot next to Gulf
Coast Financial. The event
will feature 30 tons of snow
delivered along with two
bounce houses, a 26-foot


dual lane slide, a rock climb
wall, an obstacle course and
a bungee challenge. The
Festival of Lights will take
place around Olustee Park
throughout the day and
will feature arts and crafts,
food vendors and live enter-
tainment The Christmas
parade, presented by the
Lake City Rotary Club, is 6
p.m. Christmas music will
begin after the parade in
Olustee Park until 9 p.m.

Home tours
Altrusa International,
Inc. is sponsoring a tour
of decked out and fes-
tive homes 12 5 p.m.
Saturday. The tour begins
at the Live Oak Garden
Club next to Shands
Hospital on, County Road
136 in Live Oak. Tickets
are $10 and can be pur-
chased in advance. For
more information contact
Marlene Giese at 386-364-
1947.


'7....
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BEXAR COUNTY- Mary Ann W. used Thera-Gesic' on her sore back and was so
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When asked where on her body she got the tattoo, she painlessly ,
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OBITUARIES


Roger McIntosh
Roger McIntosh, 68 of Lake
City, passed away Friday, De-
cember 3, 2010 in the Lake City
Medical Center,
Lake City, Flor-
Ida following a
long illness. The
Miami, Florida
native moved
to Branford in 1969 from Mi-
ami. Mr. McIntosh served in
the US Navy during the Bay of
Pigs. He was the owner of S&R
Painting in Deltona along with
working in the construction field
for most of his life. He was a
member of the Church of God.
Mr. Mcintosh is survived by his
wife of 42 years, Sharon Lowery
McIntosh of Lake City; one son,
BrianRogerandWendyMcIntosh
of Lake City; one sister, Phyllis
and Buddy Davis of Lal. City;
four grandchildren, Sean Brian,
Morgan Lee Ann, Brendan Ga-
ble and Landan Brock McIntosh.
Funeral services will be held
Monday, December 6, 2010


at 2:00 p.m. in the Daniels
Memorial Chapel in the Dan-
iels Funeral Home, Branford,
Florida with Rev. Danny Rob-
erts officiating. Interment will
follow in the Oakgrove Memo-
rial Cemetery, Branford, Florida.
DANIELS FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY, INC., Live
Oak and Brahford, Florida in
charge of all arrangements.

Gloria Pinson
Mrs. Gloria Pinson, 83, of Lake
City, died early monday morn-
ing in The Health Center of Lake
City following an extended ill-
ness. Funeral services for Mrs.
Pinson will be conducted at
11:00 am Wednesday, Decem-
ber 8, 2010 in the chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home. A Full obituary will ap-
pear in a later edition of The
Lake City Reporter. Arrange-
ments are under ti.; direction of
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.


Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Darlene L. Scheper
Mrs. Darlene L. Scheper, 74,
of Lake City, died early Friday
morning, December 3, 2010 at
her residence following a sudden
illness. A native of Wayne Coun-
ty, Iowa, Mrs. Scheper had been
a "snowbird" resident of Lake
City since 1988 having started
spending the winters here with
her husband, Elmer. Following
his death in 1996 Mrs. Scheper
had become a permanent resi-
dent of Lake City residing at the
Casey Jones Campground. Mrs.
Scheper had worked for many
years with various businesses in
Iowa as a book keeper. She helped
in the day to day operation of the
campground for a while as well.
Mrs. Scheper enjoyed NASCAR,
word search puzzles and reading
the Bible. She was a Christian.


Mrs. Scheper is survived by her
sons, Larry McVey, Jr., Garland,,
Texas; Terry McVey, Cofax,
Iowa; Jerry McVey, Grinnell,
Iowa; Joseph McVey, Marshall
Town, Iowa and Daniel McVey
of Eldora, Iowa; her sister, San-
dra Baugh of Bettendorf, Iowa;
dear friends, Mary Riley an
Donnie Rowland both of Lake
City and her to beloved Chinese
pugs, Mollie and Munchie. Four
grandchildren also survive.
Private memorial services for
Mrs. Schepers' family and
friends will be conducted at
the Casey Jones Campground
in January 2011. Cremation ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. MarionAvenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilfimneralhome.com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


Bulletin Board

NE S BO T*UR SC OOL


ON
CAMPUS


Five Points
Elementary
We are proud to announce
that Five Points Elementary
School was awarded the
Educational Alliance grant
for $750. We were able to
receive this grant through
the efforts of R.H. Davis
Oil Company Inc. and Wells
Crossing Exxon in Orange
Park.
The funds will be used
to purchase paper to sup-
port the math and science
curriculum. We also plan
to purchase project boards
to display science projects
and hopefully purchase an
accelerated math scanner.
Our thanks to the people
at R.H. Davis Oil Company
and Exxon/Mobile for
investing in the education
of our children.

Westside Elementary
Westside Elementary
would like to congratu-
late its Second Six Weeks
Writing Winner students.
First-grade winners are
Kayley Brinkley, Ansh
Barot, Joshua Simpson,
Natalia Duarte, Payton
Gainey and Tieler Brannon.
Second-grade winners
are Colby Strickland, Ellie
Hingson, Jacob Roth, Jack
Wright, Nyasha Mashava
and Biancah Billingsley.
Third-grade winners
are Isabella Park, Aidan
Fierbaugh, Victoria
Johnson, Schyler Jerome,
Jordan Teran and Lauren
Wilson.
Fourth-grade winners are
Rashel Avila, Kylie Casazza,
Makaai Gagliano, Emily
Gordon and Alex Waldron.
Fifth-grade winners
are Kaitlan Reagan, Sara
Bethany Pace, Melodie
Marts, Cathleen Towne,
Kerigan Kennon and Alyson
Everette.

Melrose Park
Elementary
Congratulations to our
Melrose Park Senior vol-
unteer. Mary Hodges
has been chosen as the
Columbia County District
Senior Volunteer of the
Year. We are very proud
of Mrs. Hodges and very
proud to have her represent
Melrose Park.
Congratulations to Kay
O'Steen, fourth grade teach-
er. She has been chosen
as the Teacher of the Year.
Susan Borchardt, a parapro-
fessional, was chosen by her
peers as the School Related
Employee of the Year. We
are very proud of O'Steen
and Borchardt for the great
job they do.
On Tuesday, Nov. 23 at
Melrose Park, third-graders
had a Thanksgiving Feast
with turkey and all the trim-
mings. We thought about all
the things we are thankful
for. Some parents and family
were able to attend. We will
be going to the Kennedy
Space Center on Dec. 15
and we have been studying
space and our solar system.
Fifth-grade students are
getting ready for their field
trip to Universal Studios
Dec 17. We will be study-
ing natural disasters. What
a great way to send off the
students for Winter Break.
Up next in math will be frac-
tions and decimals. We are
also working on persuasive
writing. Don't forget about


the Science Fair. Winners
have been announced and
will go on -to the county
competition in January.


COURTESY PHOTO
Fort White Elementary School bee winners
Pictured are Fort White Elementary School's October monthly bee winners. We believe that
all children can learn, behave and be accountable for their behavior. Operating on this belief,
students at Fort White Elementary continually surpass school-wide behavioral expectations.
The behavior bee winners increase each month as the students become more aware of their
behavior, consequences and rewards. October's monthly bee winners are proud as can "bee"
to pose for the picture while buzzing their way to superior behavior.


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C3 89 hoolpagesOUld be dropped
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OI Items for ,.Troy poberts;

Reporter, t."Lake citY,.-
I rober@,l5akec't o'-, \

LThursdays'







SLake City Reporter *
Lake City Reporter


Share
your photos


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Jessica Burns
Age: 10.
Parent Stephanie
Burns.
School and grade:
Fort White Elementary,
fifth grade.
Achievements: A/B
Honor Roll.
What clubs or orga-
nizations do you belong
to? Awana and softball.
What do you like best
about school? Learning
new things, having nice
teachers, and being with


What would you like
to do when you com-
plete your education?
Behavioral Analyst with the
FBI
Teachers' comments:
Jessica is a lovely young
lady with a great deal of
intelligence and a wonderful
personality.
Principal's comments:
We wish that we had many
students with Jessica's tal-
ents. She is an excellent role
model
Student's comments
about honor. I feel really


www.lakecityreporter.com


For Life Insurance
Go With "
Someone You Know
John Burns, III Mary H. Sumi mera
Agent Financial Services Rep.

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'I, Robot' inspires students INVESTING

to win nation's science prize
j- ^KF-1r


JESSICA GRESKO
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A pair of high school
students inspired by the science fiction
movie "I, Robot" and another who studied
star formation took home $100,000 grand
prizes Monday in a competition honoring
the nation's top math and science stu-
dents.
The Siemens Competition announced
the winners of its college scholarships
during a ceremony at George Washington
University.
Benjamin Clark of Lancaster, Penn., won
the top individual prize for his research
on binary stars which, unlike the sun,
have companions. The 15-year-old plans to
major in physics or astrophysics.
Akash Krishnan and Matthew Fernandez
of Portland, Ore., won the team prize for
their work on speech recognition technol-
ogy. They developed a computer algorithm
that can detect a speaker's emotion better
than current technology and will split the
$100,000 team prize.
Krishnan, 16, and Fernandez, 17,
watched "I, Robot," while taking a break
from trying to come up with a project idea.
The movie featured a robot that could
detect when its user was stressed, and
they decided to try to improve on the exist-
ing technology.
Their algorithm has a 60 percent accu-
racy rate, compared with about 40 percent
for a previous system. They say their
work could be used to improve computer
automated phone systems, helping, for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Benjamin Clark, 15, of Lancaster, Pa., heads to
the stage as it is announced he won the individ-
ual grand prize in the Siemens Competition in
Math, Science & Technology Monday at George
Washington University in Washington.
example, to tell if a caller was becoming
irate.
"You could automatically redirect them
to a actual human person, so that you
could handle those kI'-d of angry people
better," Krishnan said.
The teens are also working to develop a
wristwatch-like device that would display
colors or happy and sad faces to help
autistic children identify and interpret
other people's emotions.
Krishnan plans to study computer sci-
ence and electrical and mechanical engi-
neering in college, while Fernandez plans
to study engineering and computer sci-
ence.
Six individual students and six teams
of students competed in Washington
after winning regional competitions in
November. They presented their research
to a panel of judges Sunday. -


Robert Woodard
Financial Advisor


148 North Marion Ave Downtown,
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
oberl.woodard@'edwaidjones.corn
wwW.edwardjones.com


'1O0 OFF
ANY OFFICE VISIT
WITH THIS AD
S Laura Cohen D.V.M.
High Springs Animal Hospital
17925 NW 441 High Springs
I (386) 454-1001
Hrs: M,W,F 7am-6pm
Sat ?am-2pm T, Th 7am-7pm


Young pianist captures

international competition


LARAMIE, Wyo. A
9-year-old Laramie boy is
proving to be quite the pia-
nist
James Wilson is a student
of University of Wyoming
music professor Theresa
Bogard, who says Wilson
is probably the most gift-
ed young child she's ever
taught.


Wilson will play at the
biggest venue of his young
musical career on Tuesday,
when he performs at the
John E Kennedy Center
for the Performing Arts in
Washington, D.C.
He recently won the
Peewee Division of the
Asian American Music
Society's 2010 Woodwind,


Piano, String and Voice
International Competition.
The competition was open
to musicians from around
the world.
The Laramie Boomerang
reports that James moved
to Laramie about a year
and a half ago from Tokyo,
where he started taking
piano lessons.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I


B
Tf
rc
lq,









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY. DECEMBER 7, 2010


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrest but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven gu Ity.

Mo day, Nov. 29
Colambia County
Sheriff's Office
Lavaughn Morris
Jr., no age given, 4518
Richardson Road, grand
theft and dealing in stolen
property.
Raymond David Davis,
51, 152 NW Colvin Avenue,
warrant: Dealing in stolen
property.
Ricky L. Holland,
26, 12910 U.S. Highway
90 Wayne Frier Mobile
Home Park, Live Oak,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of possession of more
than 20 grams of canna-
bis (two counts), driving
while license suspended/
revoked and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Roy Christopher
Barry, 29, 835 NW
Caretree Court, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of third-
degree grand theft and
possession of controlled
substance.
Lake City
Police Department
Jessie Duane Queen,
no age given, 375 NW
Bascom Norris Drive,
resisting arrest without
violence, possession of
controlled substance
(cocaine) and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Department it of
Probation and Parole
Charles Fenwick, no
age given, 209 NE Diana
Terrace, violation of proba-
tion on original charges
of failure to comply with
sexual offender registra-
tion law.

Tuesday, Nov. 30
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Steven Wayne
Baldwin, 42, 243 SW
Zierke Road, burglary of


conveyance and grand
theft.
Corey Walter Dortly,
18, 322 NE Bickel Drive,
robbery and warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of battery.
Jontavius Shae
Monroe, 22, 1201 N.
Orient Road, Tampa, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of felo-
ny fleeing police officer.
Lake City
Police Department
Debbie A. McCumber,
no age given, 704 NE
Cheshire Lane, warrant:
State violation of probation
and third-degree grand
theft.
James Wesley
Mahaffey, no age given,
1007 SE Putnam Street,
robbery.

Wednesday, Dec. 1
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Robert Shane Moody,
35, 7334 NE Jacksonville
Road, Ocala, warrant:
Failure to appear at viola-
tion of probation hearing
on original charge of
felony fleeing police officer
in high speed chase.
m George Edward
Townsend, 45, 6716 SW
54th Trail, Lake Butler,
possession of firearm by
convicted felon, possession
of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
m Zachariah Chandler
Murray, 18, 439 SE Lillian
Loop, burglary and dealing
in stolen property.

Thursday, Dec. 2
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Shannon Tori Chiarini,
25, 252 SW McKinney
Road, possession of con-
. trolled substance without
prescription and posses-
sion of less than 20 grams
of marijuana.
n Mindy Lynette Dortly,
20, 137 SE Bark Court,
warrant: Sale or delivery of
controlled substance, pos-
session of controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell or
deliver, violation of proba-


tion on original charge of
driving while license sus-
pended/revoked.
Joshua Micheal
Hutchins, 19, 134 NW
Honey Suckle Way, driving
while license suspended/
revoked (six offense) and
possession of drug para-
phernalia.
La Nayia Dawn
Mahaffey, 28, 796 SE
Monroe Street, warrant:
Robbery, aggravated bat-
tery with a deadly weapon
and failure to appear on
original charge of failure to
comply with no valid driv-
ers license.
Brandon Shawn Pass,
18, 147 SW Camel Glen,
burglary of dwelling, crimi-
nal mischief, assault and
resisting arrest without
violence.
m Ronald Lee Rust, 36,
220 NE Ernest Green
Glen, burglary of an unoc-
cupied structure (two
counts), grand theft and
dealing in stolen property.
Donald Frank
Waldron, 23, 198 NE
Laverne Street, burglary
of an unoccupied structure
(two counts), grand theft
and dealing in stolen prop-
erty.
m Robert Blaine
Waldron, 20, 198 NE
Laverne Street, burglary
of an unoccupied structure
(two counts), grand theft,
dealing in stolen property,
violation of probation on
original charges of bur-
glary of an unoccupied
structure, third-degree
grand theft, trafficking in
stolen property and pos-
session of cocaine.
Bradley Charles Blom,
44, 13823 29th Road, pos-
session of cocaine and
possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Florida Highway
Patrol
Troy Tamakia "Unk"
Harris, 34, 473 Highway
27, Georgetown, GA, war-
rant: Failure to appear
for charges of aggravated
fleeing/eluding police and
reckless driving.

From staff reports


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'Nat King Cole Christmas'


tonight at Levy Arts Center


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn

A nationally acclaimed singer is bring-
ing a special Christmas concert to Lake
City, paying tribute to Nat King Cole in the
hopes of uniting audiences of all types.
Allan Harris will perform his holiday
show, "Allan Harris Sings a Nat King Cole
Christmas," at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Florida
Gateway College's Levy Performing Arts
Center. The concert is the third in the 2010
to 2011 Lyceum Series programs offered
by the college.
"He's a great performer with a beautiful
voice," said Mark Kirby, FGC coordinator
for community cultural resources. "I'm
hoping to pack the house with this."
Harris' concert is a blend of his vocal
ability and Cole's works, Kirby said.
"He combines Nat King Cole's artistry
with his own huge talent, and it's just a ter-
rific evening of song," Kirby said.
Holiday numbers such as "Silent Night,"
"Baby, It's Cold Outside," and "Chestnuts
Roasting on an Open Fire" also known
as "The Christmas Song" will be includ-
ed in the show.
Harris said he performs the show
because of his love for Cole's musical style
and the impact Cole's music had on the
world, transcending boundaries of race
and adversity.
"It's for good will and I feel we need
this now more than ever, especially in our
country," Harris said.
The songs bring the audience together
and are familiar, Harris said, usually caus-
ing members of the audience to- recall


Courtesy photo
Allan Harris will perform a Nat King Cole
Christmas tonight at the Levy Arts Center.

memories of Cole's music.
"When I sing his songs, people go to that
place, that place of tranquility," he said.
"And they start to embrace each other. I
love that. That's what I live for. There's no
better joy for a performer than to look out
upon a sea of faces and see everyone smil-
ing back at you and recognizing songs that
bring a wonderful moment to their life."
Harris said he will deliver the songs as
Cole would have with no affectations.
"I'm just basically singing songs that
allow people to fall in love with Christmas,"
he said. "I let my voice caress the audi-
ence."
Tickets are $15 for adults, $14 for seniors
age 55 and up and $13 for all students and
FGC staff.
Call the Levy Performing Arts Center
box office at (386) 754-4340 or e-mail Kirby
at mark.kirby@fgc. edu.
Dinner will be served in the college's
Lobo Caf6 prior to the performance, but
reservations are required. Call (888) 845-
0925 or (386) 438-5440.


All rooms 300sq max per room. LR, PR combo count as 2 rooms. Not valid with any other offer. Residential only. Offer expires 12/31/10





Lets Fill It UPI


Supporting the Food Bank of Suwannee Valley

Starting December 1, 2010
Bring Your Food Items to the Reporter Office.
located at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City
Monday through Fridays, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m.


On Saturday, December 11th
Carrier Food Pick Up Day
To participate, simply leave a bag of non-perishable foods at
your Reporter paper tube or the end of your driveway Friday night.
No glass containers.
Your Lake City Reporter carrier will pick it up while
delivering your Saturday paper.


Hl Us F3 ill Th e -T uc


CashDonat] .ions
^^make cheks payble to


Place a collection box in your place of business for donation and you will
be recognized with other business donors in the Lake City Reporter.


B .vA e6 W B i SY O


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter corn CURRENTS Magazine

For additional
information and to /
participate, please call

752-1293


ARREST REPORTS


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Call for additional special offers or visit www.baywayservices.biz


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


VlSA-









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Tuesday, December 7, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
CHS SOFTBALL
Player/parent
meeting Monday
Columbia High softball
has a mandatory player
and parent meeting for
those interested in trying
out for the 2011 team at
6:30 p.m. Monday in the
CHS cafeteria.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
League offered
at Richardson
The Columbia County
Recreation Department
is sponsoring a free
after-school basketball
league for boys and girls
ages 10-18. Registration
continues from 3-5 p.m.
today and Wednesday at
Richardson Community
Center. Permission slips
must be signed by parent
or guardian.
For details, call Adee
Framer or Lynda Elliott
at 754-7095 after 3 p.m.
YOUTH VOLLEYBALL
Fusion tryouts
set for Saturday
The North Florida
Fusion volleyball
program for girls ages
10-18 has tryouts set for
2-4 p.m. Saturday at the
Fort White High gym.
Interested players need
to bring a copy of
a recent physical and a
$25 tryout fee.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.
CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
planned Monday
Columbia High's
soccer program has a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. Monday at
Moe's Southwest Grill on
U.S. Highway 90 west.
For details, call
365-1877.
* From staff reports

GAMES


Today
Fort White High
boys soccer at Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
soccer at Suwannee Fe
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Middleburg
High (CYSA), 7 p.m.
(JV-5)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Middleburg
(CYSA), 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Fort White
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
Fort White High boys
soccer at Newberry High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Wolfson High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High-girls
basketball at Branford
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
soccer at Ridgeview High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Newton, three foils get


Heisman Trophy call


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Quarterback Cameron Newton (2) speaks to the fans after
Auburn defeated South Carolina, 56-17, in the Southeastern
Conference Championship game Saturday in Atlanta.


James, Luck and
Moore will make
trip to NewYork.
By JOHN MARSHALL
Associated Press
Auburn quarterback
Cam Newton and Oregon
running back LaMichael
James, two of the nation's
most dynamic players, will
meet in the national cham-
pionship game next month.
First, a stop in New
York.
Newton and James
were named finalists for
the Heisman Trophy on
Monday, and will be joined
by Stanford's Andrew
Luck and Kellen Moore of
Boise State for Saturday's
announcement in Times
Square.
Newton overcame a
pay-to-play scandal with
a superb season on the
field, piling up nearly 4,000
combined yards and 49


CHS downs


Lady Tigers soccer
bounces back
after tournament.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's girls
soccer team rebounded
from a tough weekend
tournament draw to beat
Hamilton County High, 2-0,
at home on Monday.
The Lady Tigers scored
early in the first half when
Michaela Burton centered
a ball from the right side.
The Hamilton County keep-
er bumped one CHS threat,
but Heather Rountree was
in position on the back side
to score the goal.
Columbia's insurance
goal came in the 53rd
minute. Christy Everett
passed a ball from the left
side that cleared all the
defenders and Lucie Faris
was waiting to put it in.
Columbia peppered the
Trojans' goal with several
shots in the first half.
Burton had three .shots
on goal early in the second
half, but came up empty.
"We passed the ball real-
ly well," CHS head coach
Ashley Brown said. "We
just played three games in
the tournament with one
day of rest, so they were
probably a little sore. I was
really pleased overall."
Columbia (6-8-1) plays
Middleburg High at 7 p.m.
today at the CYSA fields.


touchdowns in leading the
top-ranked Tigers into the
Jan. 10 national champion-
ship game.
James and the Ducks will
be there waiting for them
in the desert after he piled
up more yards and touch-
downs than anyone else in
FBS, helping the second-
ranked Ducks into their
first national title game.
"Since I was a young boy,
playing the game of football
has been a pure joy and
this season has been a very
special one for my team-
mates and for me," Newton
said in a statement. "I know
as a' team we're excited to
get back on the field on
January 10 against a great
Oregon team."
Newton is the front-
runner, but the big question
is whether voters will look
past the scandal involving
his father.
Newton was unparalleled
on the field.
He threw for 2,589 yards


Trojans


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Michaela Burton (28) passes during the Buchholz High game on Nov. 16.


and 28 touchdowns while
running for 1,409 yards and
20 more scores adding
another on a reception -
to join Florida quarterback
and 2007 Heisman Trophy
winner Tim Tebow and
Nevada's Colin Kaepernick
(this season) as the only
FBS players to have 20
touchdowns rushing and
passing in a season.
In his final regular-
season game, he threw.
four TD passes and scored
two more on the ground in
Auburn's 56-17 rout of 18th-
ranked South Carolina that
earned Auburn the SEC
championship and a shot at
its first national title since
1957.
The knock against
Newton is the shenanigans
by his father, Cecil.
The elder Newton was
accused of working with the
owner of a scouting service
to get up to $180,009 for his
HEISMAN continued on 2B


Patriots

routing

Jets

New England
leading 38-3 in
fourth quarter.
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
Tom Brady threw
three touchdown passes
in the first three quar-
ters, giving him 251 in
his career, and the New
England Patriots scored
on their first four posses-
sions against the Jets on
Monday night en route
to a 38-3 lead over New
York.
With the lead in the
AFC East at stake, Brady
hit Deion Branch for a
25-yard catch-and-run on
a fourth-and-3 with a min-
ute left in the first quar-
ter. On the next drive,
Brandon Tate leaped to
grab a high ball in the
corner, barely landing his
feet in the end zone for a
4-yard TD that gave the
*Patriots a 24-3 lead.
Brady added an 18-yard
pass to Wes Welker in the
third quarter to move into
a tie with former Patriot
Drew Bledsoe for 13th
on the career touchdown
list.
Brady completed 19 for
26 passes for 318 yards
through three quarters.
Welker had seven catches
for 80 yards; Branch had
three catches for 64 yards.


Schreiber, Allen

take first place in

Tiger Invitational


Columbia girls
basketball, Lady
Indians soccer fall.
From staff reports

Columbia High ywres-
tling produced two indi-
vidual winners in its Tiger
Invitational tournament on
Saturday.
Lincoln High won the
team competition with
127 points, followed by


Lowndes (103), Gainesville
(63), Suwannee (49),
Columbia (48), Bradford
(48), Rickards (32) and
Yulee (23) high schools.
Columbia's Cole
Schreiber went 4-0 for the
tournament and won the
103-pound weight class.
Monterance Allen went
4-1 and tied for first on the
189-pound weight class.
Edriech Ross (2-2 at 112
PREP continued on 3B


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Cole Schreiber (top) works to turn his Suwannee High opponent during the
Tiger Invitational wrestling tournament in Lake City on Saturday. Schreiber went 4-0 during
the meet and won the 103-pound weight class. Lincoln High won the team competition.












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Memphis vs. Kansas, at New
York
ESPN2 Georgia at Georgia Tech
9 p.m.
ESPN Michigan St. vs. Syracuse, at
NewYork
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Buffalo at Boston
RODEO
10 p.m.
ESPN2 PRCA, National Finals, sixth
round, at Las Vegas
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Valencia (Spain) at Manchester United
(England)
8 p.m..
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Tottenham Hotspur (England) at Twente
(Netherlands) (same-day tape)

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Sunday's Games
Green Bay 34, San Francisco 16
Kansas City 10, Denver 6,
Minnesota 38, Buffalo 14
Jacksonville 17,Tennessee 6
Cleveland 13, Miami 10
Chicago 24, Detroit 20
N.Y. Giants 31,Washington 7
New Orleans 34, Cincinnati 30
Oakland 28, San Diego 13
Seattle 31, Carolina 14
St. Louis 19,Arizona 6
Atlanta 28,Tampa Bay 24
Dallas 38, Indianapolis 35, OT
Pittsburgh 13, Baltimore 10
Monday's Game
N.Y. Jets at New England (n) ,
Thursday's Game
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 12
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, I p.m.
Tampa Bay atWashington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Buffalo, I p.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, I p.m.
Oakland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, I p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Chicago, 4:1 5 p.m.
Miami at N.Y.jets, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 13
Baltimore at Houston, 8:30 p.m.

AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through


Dec. 4, total points based on 25 points for
a first-place vote through one point for a
25th-place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
I.Auburn (36) 13-0 1,473 2
2. Oregon (23) 12-0 1,462 I
3.TCU (I) 12-0 1,379 3
4.Wisconsin 11-1 1,289 4
5.Stanford I -I 1,283 5
6. Ohio St. 11-I 1,179 6
7. Michigan St. 11I-I 1,101 7
8.Arkansas 10-2 1,085 8
9. Oklahoma 11-2 976 10
10.BoiseSt. 11-1 932 9
11I.LSU 10-2 863 II
12.VirginiaTech 11-2 817 12
13. Nevada 12-1 759 14
14. Missouri 10-2 705 IS
15.Alabama 9-3 628 17
16. Oklahoma St. 10-2 622 16
17. Nebraska 10-3 608 13
18.TexasA&M 9-3 601 19
19. South Carolina 9-4 332 18
20.Utah 10-2 312 21
21. Mississippi St. 8-4 288 22
22.WestVirginia 9-3 283 23
23. Florida St. 9-4 188 20
24. Hawaii 10-3 111 25
25. Connecticut 8-4 74 -
Others receiving votes: UCF 63,
Maryland 30, Tulsa 18, Navy I I, Miami
(Ohio) 8, N. Illinois 7, San Diego St. 6,
Fresno St. 2, Pittsburgh 2, Air Force I,
Iowa I, N.C. State I.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Monday's Games
Indiana 124,Toronto 100
Atlanta 80, Orlando 74
NewYork 121, Minnesota 114
Miami 88, Milwaukee 78
Chicago 99, Oklahoma City 90
Memphis at Utah (n)
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
New Jersey at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 10 p.m.
Washington at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Denver at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Toronto at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Miami at Utah, 9 p.m.
Washington at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
LA. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25
The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes 'in parentheses, records
through Dec. 5, total points and last
week's ranking.


I. Duke (65)


Record Pts Pvs
8-0 1,625 I


2. Ohio St.
3. Pittsburgh
4. Kansas
5. Kansas St.
6. Connecticut
7. Michigan St.
8.Syracuse
9. Georgetown
10. Baylor
I I.Tennessee
12.Villanova
13. Memphis
14. San Diego St.
I 5. Missouri
16. Illinois
17. Kentucky
18. BYU
19.Purdue
20. UNLV
21.Washington
22. Minnesota
23. Notre Dame
24. Louisville
25.Texas


6-0
9-0
7-0
7-1
7-0
6-2
8-0
8-0
6-0
6-0
6-1
7-0
7-0
6-1
8-1
5-2
8-0
7-1
' 8-0
5-2
7-1
8-0
6-0
6-2


Others receiving votes: Florida 72,
Vanderbilt 52, North Carolina 43,Arizona
38, UCF 28, Cleveland St. 13, Gonzaga 9,
Texas A&M 9, Cincinnati 6, Northwestern
6, Saint Mary's, Calif. 5, Temple 3,Wichita
St. 3.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 4 Kansas vs. No. 13 Memphis at
Madison Square Garden, 7 p.m.
No.7 Michigan State vs. No.8 Syracuse
at Madison Square Garden, 9 p.m.
No. 19 Purdue atValparaiso, 9 p.m.

BASEBALL

Veteran Hall of Fame
.12 of 16 votes needed for election
Pat Gillick (13 votes, 81.25 percent);
Marvin Miller (I I votes, 68.75 percent);
Dave Concepcion (8 votes, 50 percent).
Ted Simmons,Vida Blue, Steve Garvey,
Ron Guidry, Tommy John, Billy Martin,
Al Oliver, Rusty Staub and George
Steinbrenner each received fewer than
eight votes.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Monday's Games
Toronto 5,Washington 4, SO
Columbus 3, Dallas 2, SO
Pittsburgh 2, New Jersey I
Atlanta 3, Nashville 2, OT
San Jose 5, Detroit 2
Today's Games
Buffalo at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
San Jose at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim atVancouver, 10 p.m.


Bowers wins Bronko Nagurski Trophy


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- Amid his year of
tragedy, Clemson defen-
sive end Da'Quan Bowers
slimmed down, got serious
about football and had a
breakout season.
Bowers was honored for
his dominance Monday
night with the Bronko
Nagurski Trophy as the
nation's top defensive play-
er, an award he wishes he


could share with his father
and his mentor.
Playing with a heavy heart
following the deaths this
year of his father, Dennis,
and close friend Gaines
Adams of the Chicago Bears,
Bowers burst onto the scene
after two mediocre years.
The 6-foot-4, '275-pound
junior leads the nation with
15' sacks and his 25 tackles
for a loss rank second in the
country.
Bowers, one of the


nation's top recruits com
ing out of high school, had
managed only four sack
in his first two college sea
sons.
"He's excelled in ever
area," Clemson coach Dab
Swinney said. "He's had t
overcome some persona
tragedy and has still bee
able to stay focused. He'
become the inspirational
leader of our team. To se
him being honored is really
heartwarming for me."


1-
d
as
a-


By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS The
Indianapolis Colts still
control their own playoff
destiny. Barely.
How much longer they'll
be in control depends on
how fast they can get things
fixed.
With Peyton Manning
mired in the worst slump
of his pro career and the
Colts reeling from a rare
three-game losing streak,
Indy's regular playoff
booking is now in jeopardy.
Even the usually optimistic
Jim Caldwell admits time is
running out.
"At some point in time,
the opportunities diminish
and so we have to take
advantage of it," the Colts
coach said Monday.
For the Colts (6-6), there
is no time to waste.
Indy has already seen
its league-record streak
of seven consecutive .12-
win seasons end, and one
more loss would snap the
league's longest active
streak of 10-win seasons
and playoff appearances at
eight straight
A loss Thursday night,
at Tennessee, would hand
the Colts their fourth four-
game losing streak of the
Manning era two of
them came when he was
a rookie.
And the one guy most
believe could get the Colts
out of this funk, Manning,
is the same guy who has
put them in it
Manning has thrown 11
interceptions in the past
three weeks, a career-high
over that span.
And he's thrown 12 TD
passes in that stretch, too
eight to teammates, four
to defensive players.
"He is the mostfrustrated
guy in America right now,"
former Colts coach Tony
Dungy said on NBC after
Sunday's loss to Dallas.
"He is not used to making
mistakes that cost his team
games. What is happening


ACROSS


y
o
Lo
al
n
s
al
e
ly


HEISMAN: Would be Auburn's third
Continued From Page 1B


son to play for at Mississippi
State while the quarterback
was being recruited out of
junior college last year.
The NCAA cleared Cam,
saying neither he nor
Auburn knew anything
about it, but Heisman voters
might be leery of another
Reggie Bush-type situation.
The 2005 Heisman winner
from USC gave back his tro-
phy earlier this year and his
school was hit with heavy
sanctions after a four-year
NCAA investigation deter-
mined he was ineligible
that season for receiving
improper benefits.
If Newton does win it,
he'll join Bo Jackson (1985)
and Pat Sullivan (1971) as
Heisman Trophy winners
at Auburn.
"I'm very honored apd
blessed to be named a final-
ist for the Heisman Trophy
with some other outstand-
ing players," said Newton,
who was playing at a Texas
junior college just a year
ago. "Like I've said, this is
not an individual honor, but
a team honor. I wouldn't be
in this position without my
great teammates, coaches
and the Auburn family."
If voters steer away
from Newton, James could
swoop in and become the
first Oregon player to win


college football's most pres-
tigious individual award.
James was the main cog
in Oregon's nearly point-
a-minute offense, forcing
teams to key on him while
the rest of his talented
teammates ran all over the
field.
Oregon led the nation in
scoring at nearly 50 points
per game and was second in
total yards, just a few tenths
behind Oklahoma State at
537 yards per game.
Even with the extra atten-
tion, James led the nation
with 1,682 yards and 21
touchdowns, and his 152
yards per game was nearly
10 more than Connecticut's
Jordan Todman in second.
He closed out the regu-
lar season by gaining 134
yards in Oregon's 37-20
win over rival Oregon State
on Saturday that clinched
the school's first trip to the
national title game.
Luck was second fiddle
to Washington's Heisman,
hopeful Jake Locker to open
the season, but quickly
established himself as the
Pac-10's best quarterback.
The 6-foot-4 junior won a
lopsided battle over Locker
and his Huskies early in
the season and guided the
fifth-ranked Cardinal to
one of the best seasons in


school history. A projected
top NFL pick, Luck threw
for over 3,000 yards and 28
touchdowns with just seven
interceptions while complet-
ing 70 percent of his passes
for an 11-1 team that earned
an Orange Bowl berth.
Moore wasn't much of
a Heisman hopeful early
in the season, but quick-
ly played his way into the
picture while leading the
Broncos to the cusp of a
BCS bowl berth.
The junior was second
in the nation in passer effi-,
ciency, throwing for over
3,500 yards with 33 TDs
and five interceptions,
but his chances took a hit
with a loss to Nevada that
knocked Boise State out of
BCS contention.
Alabama's Mark Ingram,
the 2009 Heisman Trophy
winner, wasn't much of a
factor in his bid to repeat.
The bruising running
back missed the first two
games after offseason knee
surgery and wasn't nearly
as dynamic as a year ago,
rushing for 816 yards, half
his total from a year ago.
His team also had its repeat
national title hopes fizzle
with an early-season loss
to South Carolina and later
losses to LSU and Newton's
Tigers.


1 Mo. with no
holidays
4 Gush forth
8 Fly catchers
12 Diamond stat
13 Bear in the sky
14 Tingle
15 E-mail
server
16 Oaf
17 Not we
18 Fragrant fir
20 Goose liver
delicacy
22 Romanov title
23 Homer's
instrument
25 Bard's teen
29 Play it by -
31 Gym org.
34 Doctrine
35 Four-star
review
36 Darkness
37 "Most Wanted"
org.
38 Author Haley


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning reacts after
throwing an interception against the Dallas Cowboys in the
first quarter of the game in Indianapolis on Sunday.


recently because of a
concussion.
There's no guarantee
any of those three will play
against the Titans, either.
With the rash of inju-
ries and the ugly numbers,
the Colts have, predictably,
lost four of their last five
and seen their domination
of the AFC South put in
peril.
Yet, with three of the final
four games against division
foes, the Colts still have a
chance.
A sweep would likely
give Indy a seventh AFC
South crown in eight years.
Losing any of the three
could keep the defend-
ing AFC-ehamps home in
January.
Here's the scenario:
The Jets and Patriots
each have two losses head-
ing into Monday night's
game with one of them pro-
jected to be the AFC's top
wild-card seed.
The other wild-card


39 Stretchy ban-
dage
40 Chartered
42 Drifter
44 Say "yeth"
47 New Year's
Eve word
49 Meadow flower
51 Black bird
53 Retired
55 Debtor's note
56 Pocket bread
57 Wise one
58 News
channel
59 Toe the line
60 Old-time oath
61 Hurricane cen-
ter

DOWN

1 Bedouin
2 Convoy chaser
(hyph.)
3 Fish organs
4 Outback maker
5 High-school
dance


ing ourselves."
Can the Colts fix the
problems in time?
Having a road trip on an
already short week won't
help this week.
Caldwell acknowledged
that instead of spending
Monday on the practice
field making corrections,
players, who took Monday
off, will have to make those
fixes in their head.
And, of course, if
Manning starts playing like
the only four-time MVP in
league history instead of
the mistake-prone quar-
terback of the last three
weeks, the Colts could turn
things around quickly.
At least-that's the hope.
"It's pretty simple. All
we have to do is look at
what we do at this time of
year," Caldwell said. "We
have to be able to string
four together in order to
get that done. I don't think
there's anything more plain
than that"


Answer to Previous Puzzle

V NIN RAS
HEED ARA AERO
FLOE CITADELS
SNACK S IGLOO
THY ILE

A REE COE R CE





B A ER LA HER
0V ERSEAS IRAN


A CTS OH SEED


That, in Tijuana
Buckle, as lum-
ber
Clever
Heavenly
Prior to yr. 1


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 110 111 I


11 Bashful
19 Emcee Pat
21 Mi. above sea
level
24 Roof overhang
26 Biology sub-
ject
27 Library ID
28 Give off heat
30 Dr. Morgan of
the comics
31 Singer Sumac
32 A lot
33 Flue deposit
35 AM or FM
40 Prez after
Jimmy
41 Missed a syl-
lable
43 Side road
45 Cut the cake
46 Shaggy flower
48 Pave the way
49 Former Chevy
50 Fix a piano
51 Navy
noncom
52 Barbecue tid-
bit
54 Purse or tote


12-7 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Colts struggling



behind Manning


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421















BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES


Rk
I.Auburn I
2. Oregon 2
3.TCU 3
4. Stanford 5
5.W'consin 4
6. Ohio St. 6
7. O'ahoma 9
8.Arkansas 8
9. M'igan St.7
10. LSU II
I I. Boise St. 10
12. Missouri 13
13.Va.Tech 12
14. Okla.St. 15
15. Nevada 14
16.Alabama 16
17.TexA&M 18
18. N'braska 17
19.Utah 19
20. S. Car. 20
21. Miss. St. 22
22.W.Va. 21
23. FSU 23
24. Hawaii 24
25. UCF 25


Harris
Pts
2809
2773
2613
2421
2443
2293
1926
1992
2104
1625
1800
1368
1623
1232
1302
1155
1077
1136
685
631
500
519
274
191
190


Pct
.9856
.9730
.9168
.8495
.8572
.8046
.6758
.6989
.7382
.5702
.6316
.4800
.5695
.4323
.4568
.4053
.3779
.3986
.2404
.2214
.1754
.1821
.0961
.0670
.0667


USA Today
Pts
1437
1450
1348
1239
1276
1200
1008
1008
1104
826
914
712
900
718
640
521
542
607
375
345
255
261
156
98
143


Pct
.9742
.983 I
.9139
.8400
.8651 I
.8136
.6834
.6834
.7485
.5600
.6197
.4827
.6102
.4868
.4339
.3532
.3675
.4115
.2542
.2339.
.1729
.1769
.1058
.0664
.0969


Computer
Rk Pct
I 1.000
2 .960
3 .900
5 .820
8 .690
9 .680
4 .830
6 .800
II .590
7 .720
12 .580
10 .620
18 .330
13 .550
16 .410
14 .540
15 .500
17 .370
t19 .270
t19 .270
21 .200
24 .040
22 .140
23 .100
28 .000


BCS


At Jacksonville
Michigan (7-5) vs. Missis
(8-4), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU (12-0) vs. Wiscon
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Connecticut (8-4) vs.
(I I-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 3
Orange Bowl


Avg
.9866
.9720
.9102
.8365
.8041
.7660
.7297
.7274
.6922
.6167
.6104
.5276
.5032
.4897
.4336
.4328
.4151
.3934
.2549
.2418
.1828
.1330
.1140
.0778
.0545


12
15
14
17
16
18
13
20
19
22
24
21
NR
NR







ssippi State



isin (11-1),



Oklahoma


At Miami
Stanford (11-1) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 4
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State (I I-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 7
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Jan. 8
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6),
Noon (ESPN)
Jan. 9
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada
(12-1), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.10
BCS National Championship
At Glendale,Ariz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.22
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Jan. 29
At Mobile, Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m., (NFLN)
Feb. 5
At San Antonio,
Texas vs.The Nation All-Star Challenge,
2 p.m.


Bethel, Minn. (12-1) at Mount Union
(13-0), Noon
Wisconsin-Whitewater (13-0)" at
Wesley (12-0), I p.m.

NAIA
Championship
Saturday
At Barron Stadium
Rome, Ga.
Sioux Falls (13-0) vs. Carroll, Mont.
(13-0), 4:30 p.m.


U -


Dec.18
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
UTEP (6-6) vs. BYU (6-6), 2 p.m.
(ESPN)
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois (10-3) vs. Fresno
State (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Ohio (8-4) vs. Troy (7-5), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec.21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
Louisville (6-6) vs. Southern Mississippi
(8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Utah (10-2) vs. Boise State (11-I),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 23
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State '(8-4) vs. Navy (8-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec.24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida
International (6-6), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 27
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs.Air Force (8-4),
5 p.m. (ESPN2)
Dec. 28
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 10 p.m.
(ESPN)
Dec.29
Military Bowl
At Washington"
East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)


NCAA playoffs

FCS
Quarterfinals
Friday
New Hampshire (8-4) at Delaware
(10-2), 8 p.m.
Saturday
Villanova (8-4) at Appalachian State
(10-2), Noon
Georgia Southern (9-4) at Wofford
(10-2), 2 p.m.


Texas Bowl
At Houston
Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State
(10-2), 9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec.30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth,Texas
SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (10-3) vs. Washington (6-6),
10 p.m. (ESPN)
Dec. 31
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida
(7-5), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida
State (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. I
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech
(7-5), Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Michigan State (I I-1) vs.Alabama (9-3),
I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa.
Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5),
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl


North Dakota State (9-4) at Eastern
Washington (10-2), 3:30 p.m.
DIVISION II
Semifinals
Sunday
Shepherd (12-1) at Delta State
(10-3), 2 p.m.
Northwest Missouri State (12-1) at
Minnesota-Duluth (13-0), 6 p.m.
DIVISION III
Semifinals
Saturday


ASSOCIATED PRESS
San Diego Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers (left) talks with Denver Broncos quarterback
Tim Tebow after an NFL game Nov. 22 in San Diego.



Broncos fire McDaniel


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
The Denver Broncos want-
ed Josh McDaniels to bring
the New England Patriots'
winning ways with him to
the Rocky Mountains when
they hired Bill Belichick's
brash, young disciple. 22
months ago.
What they got instead
was the ash-gray hoodie
and their very own video-
taping scandal to go with
a pile of losses and per-
sonnel blunders that cost
him his job not even half-
way through his four-year
contract.
McDaniels was fired
Monday in the midst of the
franchise's worst skid in
four decades.
Before he was fired,
McDaniels said he was ret-
icent to turn to raw rookie
quarterback Tim Tebow
even though the Broncos
had been eliminated from
contention with a 10-6 loss
at Kansas City, their sev-
enth loss in eight games.
Running backs coach
Eric Studesville will serve
as interim coach for the
final month, succeeding
McDaniels, 34, whose
hiring by team owner Pat
Bowlen in January 2009
is now viewed as a big
mistake.
"My decision to relieve
Josh McDaniels as head
coach was not taken
lightly. I will always be
appreciative of his passion,
enthusiasm and hard
work, and I thank him for
his efforts," Bowlen said
in a statement after firing
McDaniels with two years
left on his contract.

- - U


'Dandy Don' dead at 72 CONSUMER ALERT:
HIP REPLACEMENT RECALL I
Associated Press was known, was 72. 1-800-474-7576
Meredith played for the .. ......--.. .
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. Cowboys from 1960-1968, DePuy Orthopaedics ASR XL Acetabular System
- Don Meredith, the for- becoming the starting quar- and the ASR Hip Resurfacing Systems have been I
mer Dallas Cowboys quar- terback in 1965. recalled and are associated with pain, infections,
terback who served as a He retired unexpectedly fractures, dislocation, and the loosening of parts.
folksy foil for Howard Cosell before the 1969 season and I CDL is a aonal,rto-forri. f, r(, r. ,,,,. ,sumr .rp ,'f a
on ABC's "Monday Night just two years later joined ..
Football" and helped carve Keith Iackson and sell L. ~ "-" -"


out the niche for colorful
ex-athlete broadcasters, has
died. "Dandy Don," as he


in the broadcast booth as
part of the "Monday Night
Football" crew.


PREP: Soccer tonight


Continued From Page 1B

pounds), Daniel Devers (3-2
at 160) and Joe Fields (202
at 171) were third-place fin-
ishers, and Chris Polbus
(2-3 at 285) placed fourth.
Other Tigers competing
were Rashawn Jones (0-3
at 135), Ryan Collins (0-4 at
145), William Walker (1-3 at
152) and Deonte Crumitie
(0-5 at 215).
CHS will wrestle in a tour-
nament at Chiles High in
Tallahassee at 2 p.m. Friday
and 10 a.m. Saturday.

Lady Tiger basketball

Columbia's girls bas-
ketball team lost, 71-46, at
Ridgeview High on Friday.
Shaiqua Henry poured
in 22 points for the Lady
Tigers to lead all scorers.


Shamyra Howard and
Simone Williamson each
scored five points. Mariah
Harrington scored four
points, with three points
for both Briya McGuire and
Ariel Dorsey, and two points
apiece for Justice Campbell
and Marnae Gaskins.
Columbia (1-5) hosts
Fort White High at
7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Lady Indians soccer

Fort White's girls soc-
cer team lost at St. Francis
Catholic High on Saturday,
6-0.
Fort White (3-4-3, 2-2-
1) starts a stretch of three
district 5-3A road games
against Suwannee High at
7 p.m. today.


In Loving Memory

You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.


Your Family


Honorig


Those We Love!


CALL Mary or Bridget

TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!


755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm





64tv/
1&rw0W


"In the end, I was not
satisfied with the results
and the direction this team
was headed. The decision
to make a .change was
extrenfely difficult but one
that needed to be made
for this organization and
our fans," Bowlen added.
"Everyone, myself includ-
ed, is accountable for our
disappointing season and is
now responsible for restor-
ing the culture of winning
that has been established
by this franchise. Our
entire organization is com-
pletely focused on return-
ing to the level of prosper-
ity that our fans expect and
deserve from the Denver
Broncos."
Players didn't know of
McDaniels' firing when
they left team headquar-
ters after a conditioning
run ended at 3 p.m. Shortly
after that, McDaniels was
called into Bowlen's office
and fired. McDaniels then
met with his assistants.
He didn't return a mes-
sage left by the AP seeking
comment.
The rest of his staff,
including McDaniels'
brother, .Ben, who tutors
the quarterbacks, will stay
on for the final four games.
At his weekly news con-
ference four hours before
he was let go, McDaniels
reiterated that he wasn't
focused on his job being in


jeopardy.
"I'm not worried about
that. I'm going to coach
as hard as I can because
that is my job and that's
somebody else's decision,"
McDaniels said.
Studesville and chief
operating officer Jc-, Ellis
will meet with the media
today. There vas no word
on whether McDaniels
would hold a farewell news
conference.
McDaniels becomes the
third coach fired during
the season. The Dallas
Cowboys fired Wade
Phillips andpromotedJason
Garrett to interim coach,
and the Minnesota Vikings
fired Brad Childress and
promoted Leslie Frazier to
replace him.
The two new coaches
have a combined 5-1 record
since taking over.
"I am very apprecia-
tive of the trust that
Mr. Bowlen and the entire
Denver Broncos organiza-
tion have shown in me,"
Studesville said in a state-
ment. "Although the cir-
cumstances that this oppor-
tunity resulted from, are
unfortunate, I am excited
to lead this football team.
We have a great group of
players and coaches who
are committed to finishing
the season on a promising
note and making our fans
proud of this team."


,FO IER TOIM OiiR ,W




E FLORIDA
PREPAID
COLLEGE PLANS



VIft M'I II'l AP 1I lPA LD.COM
01R CALL SOh0--2"GIRAD (47AU).



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state universities and state colleges Impose fees not covered by the Prepaid Plan. The
Florida College Investment Plan is a college savings plan and is not guaranteed. Returns
will fluctuate: you could lose all or part of your funds. Read the Investment Plan Disclosure
Statement before investing. This ad does not offer financial or other advice; consult your
own advisors.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

RICLY


2010 Tribune Media Sertices, Inc







GOIMESed




FLEMSY "
7~ 17 1
____ ^__1 /


THE _CLOWNS
TURN P THE
SKATING SHOW
INTO THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: MUSTY BOWER FORBID NOUGAT
I Answer: What happened when the dresses went on
sale? IT WAS "GOOD BUY"


COLLEGE BOWL GAMES


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
IS YOUR MILK FRESH AND OELIVEREO
FROM AN ORGANIC
DAIRV? IT'S FRESH
ENOUGH, I




--p-F7
r-71.7111


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Woman with broken fingers

deserves friend's helping hand


DEAR ABBY: "Hand-ed a
Challenge" (Oct. 28) was vis-
iting her friend "Rosemary"
when one of "Hand-ed's"
sons accidentally slammed
a car door on Rosemary's
hand, breaking two fingers.
Rosemary, a massage thera-
pist, asked to be reimbursed
for lost wages because of the
mishap and you agreed.
Abby, I find Rosemary's
request absurd. Kids play.
Accidents happen, and peo-
ple think they deserve cash
for it. Sending the boy to
help Rosemary with chores
would have been a given,
but not after she demanded
money.
"Hand-ed" should tell
her "friend" that asking for
money to save a friendship
is extortion. I cannot imag-
ine one single friend of mine
who would not accept the
injury with a certain amount
of grace. "Hand-ed" needs to
find more laid-back friends.
- WINDY IN MASSA-
CHUSEITS
DEAR WINDY: Thank
you for offering a different
perspective. While I received
varied responses from read-
ers, most agreed with me
that "Hand-ed" is responsi-
ble for the damage her sons
had caused. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: Your ad-
vice to "Hand-ed" was on
target. As a teacher for many
years, I know the difference
between what is ordinary
mischief and what is a more
serious matter. Anyone old


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
enough to think of hiding
behind a car door and open-
ing it from the outside is old
enough to know better. As
long as his parents fail to
recognize this, continue to
make excuses for him and
allow him to avoid the con-
sequences of his behavior,
he'll continue to misbehave
and will not be welcome in
anyone's home. ANNE
IN TEXAS
DEAR ABBY: If "Hand-
ed" and her husband have
homeowner's or renter's in-
surance, their child is insured
under the policy. "Hand-ed"
should inform her insurance
company of the accident and
ask the company to pay for
these damages. Having the
carrier indemnify the in-
sured for this type of unfore-
seen accident is the reason
for paying an insurance pre-
mium. AN ATTORNEY
IN RUTLAND, VT.
DEAR ABBY: As par-
ents, we are responsible not
only for our own actions,
but also the actions of our
children, who are rarely
wise enough to predict the
outcome of their poor judg-


ments. A true friend would
have made certain all as-
pects of the results stem-
ming from the "unfortunate
accident" were completely
covered before ending the
visit. This would include
assisting with errands or
household chores, monetary
reimbursement for medical
charges incurred and lost
wages, so the injured person
would not lose sleep over the
pain or worry about how to
approach requesting assis-
tance. JUDY IN COAL
VALLEY, ILL.
DEAR ABBY: I empa-
thize with "Hand-ed" when
she said "accidents happen,'"
but to say the accident could:
have happened whether her
boys were there or not is a
cop-out. I taught my sons to
be mindful of other people's
property. The fact that they
got so close to Rosemary's
car as to open the door
shows a lack of respect for
her property.
I had a friend who was
a massage therapist. Her
hands were her livelihood.
Not only does Rosemary
have to wait for her fingers
to heal, it will take time for
her fingers to regain all their
strength. I 'hope "Hand-ed"
sees the error of her ways.
and will try to make amends
with her friend. RUTH IN
CALIFORNIA
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Concentrate on
the lesson, not the experi-
ence, and detach yourself
emotionally. Discipline and
gauging your time care-
fully will be required. Put
serious consideration and
thought into every move
you make. **
TAURUS .(April 20-
May 20): A chance to po-
sitiofi yourself for a job that
interests you is possible.
Someone you know will put
in a good word and a recom-
mendation. Change is head-
ing your way. *****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): There will be
plenty of pressure to deal
with if you leave your per-
sonal paperwork unfin-
ished. You will not be able
to move forward and may
even be penalized. A sud-
den loss will leave you in a
vulnerable position. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Make sure you
hold up your end of any
partnerships you are in-
volved in. Socializing with
peers or enjoying a little
festive spirit at work .will
help you build a closer rela-
tionship to people you work
alongside. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You may not feel like
working but it's important
to stay on top of your tasks.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

You may face problems with
someone you love or live
with if you don't take care
of your share of the chores.
A burden that will cause
emotional upset must be
taken care of immediately.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You have plenty of op-
tions. Making alterations at
home will turn out superbly
and will bring you closer
to your family or lover. A
social gathering with fel-
low workers will allow you
insight. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-
Oct. 22): Don't let anyone
guilt you into thinking you
should do more. The pace
will be hectic and, in order
td do things well, you have
to stay focused and stick to
the basics. A good idea you
want to share with friends
or your lover will pay off.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Someone who
meant a lot to you in the
past will surface, making
you rethink your direction
and geographical location.
A lot can change in a very
short period of time. Be
ready to take action at the
first opportunity. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Take on
a challenge and you will
show everyone how well
you work under pressure.
Expect to face a problem
regarding your home,
family or residence. Fin-
ish whatever needs doing
before the year comes to a
close. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Sort through
matters that need to be
cleared up quickly. Your in-
sight will guide you regard-
ing your work and how you
can turn something you
want to do into a profitable
endeavor. There is no time
to waste. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): The more you of-
fer to help a cause or those
in need, the better you will
feel about who you are and-
what you represent. You
can stabilize your life if you
interact with people with
something to offer you in
return. Hard work will pay
off. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You may face
an explosive situation if
you aren't willing to back
down and rethink how you
should proceed. Back off
and give everyone time
to calm down. A promise
made to someone you re-
gard highly will be recipro-
cated. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos.
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: A equals B
"TDTLVABFV WGBJZ MABPY RTMLH
KM LA B L... Y KLB P E K YKXZ YLM ET FV
YKTLT JMZ YKXZ MUMCXGE
M UT LX S MG KTL B XZU FX LTSY B L
UXSKMTH AMV
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I have been with God and I've been with the devil; I
seized the hand of God." Freed Chilean miner Mario Sepulveda
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-7


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


OKAY, WHAT ABOUT YOUR YHAPPV
EGGS? ARE THEY FROM WHAT?
HAPPV, FREE-RANE


HOW ABOUT SIGNING THIS AFFIDAVIT
FOR MY WIFE STATING
THAT I ASKAO SURE! 00
> ABOUT A YOU WANT
HEALTHY YOUR USUAL
BREAKFAST? BI) BISCUITSS AND
SAUSAGE
^^- 1 6 GAY


I WP FALLING ASLLEf EXPAND I PREAM
r-v/ ABOUT FOOD.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7,2010




* I I I


Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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personal merchandise totalling 1 or less.
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One Item pw ad 1 0
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One item per ad 16 |
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S personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
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4 One Item pe ad Eah additional
4ines 6 daysline $1.65
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,00 or less.
Each item must include a price.
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41 ines 4 5O
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Icldi Iz Slims Eatti addioa l lpe i.65


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month.... '92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will' require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.corp





Ad is to Appea Call by: Fax/Emall.by:
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice,




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
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ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lalieeityreporter.coni


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-262-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT
DANIEL HARRIS A/K/A ROBERT
D. HARRIS
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Robert Daniel Harris a/k/a Robert D.
Harris, deceased, whose date of
death was October 3, 2010, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is November 30,
2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/" Roberta D. Harris
7023 Round Leaf Drive
Jacksonville, FL 32258
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/: John J. Kendron
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar Number 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Fax (386) 755-1336
05524515
November 30, 2010
December 7, 2010
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the -undersigned, ..being:. duly.
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of FOOD
SERVICE EQUIPMENT REPAIRS
AND INSTALLATION, LLC at
1295 SW BOSTON TER.., FORT
WHITE, FL., 32038
Contact Phone Number: 386-365-
7564 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: JAMES M DIEHL
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ James M. Diehl
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 3 day of December, A.D. 2010.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04542613
December 7, 2010

We will sell the following units at
Community Self Storage 814 SW
State Road 247/Branford Hwy., De-
cember 14, 2010 at 9:00 A.M.
WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY
386-961-9926
BRANDY ANDERSON H-5
Household goods *
VIRGIL A. WILSON F-4
Household goods
LYNDON J. RAINBOLT W-1
Household goods
BREANNA LEE C-18
Household goods
LESTER JENKINS K-14
Household goods
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REFUSE ALL BIDS.
04542448
November 30, 2010
December 7, 2010

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Services
*** SPECIAL***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-538-CA
CAROLYN E. NORRIS as Trustee
of the CAROLYN E. NORRIS REV-
OCABLE LIVING TRUST, Dated
November 28, 2006,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KIMBERLEY LYNN WATERS,
UNKNOWN SPOUSES OF KIM-
BERLEY LYNN WATERS, IF
ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that,
pursuant to a Final Judgment entered
\in the above styled cause and num-
bered case, which is a foreclosure
suit, I, P. DeWitt Cason as Clerk of
the Circuit Court, will sell the prop-
erty situated in Columbia County,
Florida, described as:
Lots 3, 4 AND 5, SUWANNEE
HIGHLANDS UNIT II, a subdivi-
sion according to the plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 5, Page 9 of the
public records of Columbia County,
Florida, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder for cash, except that
the Plaintiff under said Final Judg-
ment is permitted to deposit less than
the amount bid, in Courtroom 1 of
the Columbia County Courthouse, in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., on
the 29th day of December, 2010.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
[NOTE: In accordance with Rule
2.065, Florida rules of Judicial Ad-
ministration, please be advised as
follows "If you are a person with a
disability who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact Court
Administrator, 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055, Tele-
phone: 386-758-2163, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
Notice or pleading. If you are hear-
ing impaired, please call 1-800-955-'
8771.]
DATED this 23rd day of November,
2010.
P. DeWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Terry McDavid
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, Florida 32056
386-752-1896
05524524
November 30, 2010
December 7, 2010


020 Lost & Found

10 month old Golden Retriever
female found on Hwy 41 North.
Please contact Erma.
386-719-9643

LOST DOG: from McFarlane
and Laurel Lane. Missing since
11/27. 651b, solid black male lab.
2 collars. 386-623-3951
LOST: Flat type cell phone in a
red zipper eye glass case.
Lost in Lake City or Branford.
Please call 386-935-0366
MISSING SIAMESE Cat. Blue
eyes, short tail, black face. Near
Miltons Country store on N 441.
Last seen 11/22. 386-984-8329


070 Rewards

$500 Reward, Information leading
to the arrest of items stolen on
Nov 14-19, 2010. 386-288-6280
(Blazer, Golf Cart & 4 Wheeler)

to Job
100 Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-


FREE WORKPLACE
2 Full Time hair stylist wanted.
Preferably with established
clientele. Please call
386-288-2743 for more info.


100 Opportunities

04542583
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627: Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

04542605
Receptionist /Ward Clerk
And
Laundry /Housekeeping
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Receptionist/Ward Clerk, and
the part time position of
Laundry/Housekeeping
attendant. Competitive Salary
and Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon ,*
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE


120 Medical
120 Employment

*04542594
RN/LPN
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
weekend positions of RN/LPN
8 and 16 hour shifts available
C.N.A. 3-11 Shift
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center.
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EQE.

04542611
Dietary Assistant
/Dietary Aide
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Dietary Assistant and part time
position of Dietary Aide.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05524555
eSuwuann
Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time


Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Free to good home,
Orange & White, Female
10 week old Kitten
386-288-2504 or 386-288-4481
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


S Livestock &
330 Supplies
6 yr old reg Quarter Horse,dark
bay, trained for barrels, needs
more attn, professionally trained 4
months ago $800 386-288-9245

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170.

408 Furniture
Beautiful butcher-block
7-pc. dining set, incl.
Glass top asking
$400 386-365-0478
QUEEN SIZE sleeper couch,.
Very good cond.
$50.00
386-365-0478
ROCKER RECLINER
Very good.cond.
$50.00
386-365-0478


Sectional: 3-pc. comer set
with 2 built-in recliners.
Very good cond. $100.00
386-365-0478

416 Sporting Goods
Bowflex Treadclimber TC1000,
$600 obo,
slightly used
386-984-1044

420 Wanted to.Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vanis.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
S, All Yard Sale, Ads
Mulrt Pte-PaId.


440 Miscellaneous
BEAUTIFUL WEDDING
Dress by St. Patrick. size 12
(runs small) Was $700.
Sell for $350. 386-719-2198
DECORATED WEDDING
ARCH $100.00
386-719-2198
386-288-7101

4 0A Good Things
450 to Eat
.The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
$575 monthly,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3BR/2BA Double wide. Lg.
Rooms. $750 a month. 1st month
and security. Please call
386-365-1243 or 386-965-7534.
3BR/2BA NEWLY renovated
MH on 1/2 ac. private property.
$700.most. 1st. mo.+ Security dep.
References needed. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. References req'd.
. $475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

A64 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547
710 Unfurnished Apt.
10 U For Rent
5524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1,2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Cal 386-867-1212 for details.
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & iBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Fully Furnished Clean 2br/1.5ba
Owned by non-smoker. Washer &
Dryer, Microwave, TV.
$600. mo 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
7I30 Home For Rent
1/1 Cottage, pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
05524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
2/1 House, near West Side Elem.
$700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649


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730 Unfurnished
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LAKE CITY
2Br/1Ba, 768 sqft. $525.mo.
3Br/2Ba, 1,064 sqft. $625 mo
2Br, IBa, 700 sqft, $495 mo
2Br/lBa, 896 sqft, $695 mo
2Br/IBa, 720sqft, $650mo
3Br/1.5Ba, 1,278sqft, $795mo
2Br/lBa, Mobile Home $495mo
3Br/1Ba, 960sqft, $750.mo
FT. WHITE
4Br/3Ba, 1,536 sqft, $725
MADISON COUNTY
2Br/1Ba 700 sq ft., $450. mo
INNINGS
3Br/2Ba 1293 sqft, $695mo
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
www.NorthFloridaHome-
andLand.com


2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bednnrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $850 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
RENTED
House for rent everything new.
4/2 plus study w/carport great
location $1100 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10 /US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Very Clean 2br/lba. in own.
298 SW Miller Terr. CH/A, Shed.
$650.mo. Ist.mo. & security.
Call Vick 386-623-6401

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill.Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED

805 Lots for Sale r


law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or,$468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830t Commercial
830v Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

940 Trucks,
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, neff
bars; stereo. $16,995. 752-8227






951 Recreational
5i Vehicles
'07 Dutchmen Lite,
25' T.T. xlt. cond., 10' s/o, tow
with 1/2 ton. $12,995 obo.
386-754-2769.

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2001 Oldsmobile Sillouette.
Runs and looks good. Needs TLC.
$1,500. Call for more info.
386-344-2107


a iN -


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440





. Ak g


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.





n0R T t Ta ma - -- -


FoUMreDea- s al MryorBidge

at U 3875-44


*>..to never miss a day's
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To subscribe call
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Lake City Reporter


CCULiNTING
EC cati
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ee2l.I.


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but we thought our
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