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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01464
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/28/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01464
System ID: UF00028308:01464
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





























SANTA CLAUS


HAS


/ ANTONIA ROBINSON I uL, i, P.:.'-,
Gabby Wilson, 7, of Lake City tells Santa Claus what she wants for Christmas during Santa Photo Night
Saturday in Olustee Park.


Music, free photos with Santa, lighting of

Olustee Park mark beginning of festivities


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
With just one push
of a button,
Olustee Park is
now officially lit
for the holidays.
Local musician and conductor
Harry Wuest had the honors of
lighting the park Saturday to kick
off the holiday season.
"It's an honor and a privilege for
everybody to have Harry Wuest
turn on the lights," said City of Lake
City Mayor Stephen Witt.
Wuest led the Gateway City Big
Band in performing musical selec-
tions prior to the lighting.
Also taking place during the eve-
ning was Santa Photo Night
Santa Claus arrived on the Polar
Express, with children able to
receive free photographs with Santa,
an event sponsored by Draivdy
Insurance.
The evening's festivities were
hosted by the Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce.
Community volunteers, including
Church On the Way, helped deco-
rate the park for the lighting.
The lure of Christmas lights
brought Wanda Herring of Lake


Community volunteers decorated OIl
the holiday season.

City to the park. "It's beautiful," she
said. "There are all kinds of colors."
Great music and a visit from Santa
made the evening very enjoyable.
"I like it," she said. "I wasn't
expecting it"
Matthew Brink came to Olustee
Park to have a good time with his
family before they headed back to
North Carolina today, he said. He
and his family are originally from
Lake City and always try to catch
the holiday events.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
ustee Park, which will stay lit through


"It brings a lot of people together
of all walks of life," Brink said.
For Frank Powers, of Lake City,
the music was the best part of the
evening.
"I loved the music," he said.
"Harry Wuest is super. You can't
say enough about him."
The turnout to the festivities was
good, but "I wish it was double,"
Powers said.
UGHTS continued on 3A


Firehouse Subs to open


Planned opening
for the new shop is
February 21, 2011.
By A.C. Gonzalez
Special to the Reporter
A new restaurant founded
by firefighters and supportive
of public safety organizations


is coming to Lake City. With
about 400 locations throughout
the United States and growing,
Firehouse Subs has set its sights
on Lake City.
Preparations to move into the
Village Square Shopping Center
next to US Highway 90 begin in
December, with hopes of being
ready to open by Feb. 21 next
year, said Rick Bringger, franchi-


see and co-owner with his wife,
Wilma.
"People know Firehouse
Subs," Rick Bringger said. "It's
new in Lake City, and this restau-
rant has a different theme. It's
got a family atmosphere."
Rick and Wilma Bringger are
Lake City locals and know the
FIREHOUSE continued on 3A


Photo illustration by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
In this photo illustration, Hannah Lynch (from left), 15, demonstrates a
bullying scene with Brittany Bethea, 16, Meghan Collins, 17, and Amy
Anderson, 17, acting as her high-school tormentors. C6lumbia High stu-
dents used a drama skit last week to educate their peers about the dan-
gers of bullying. 'It's cruel and heartless,' Lynch, who experienced bullying
in elementary school, said. 'My friends were there for me. My teacher
helped me out a lot.'




B ULLYING

Kids cope with its effects,

schools search for answers


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn

Columbia High School
drama students last
week depicted some-
thing many of them,
and their classmates, face on a
daily basis.
It dealt with bullying.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention's
2009 Youth Risk Behavior
Survey, more than 13 percent
of Florida students were bullied
on school property in the 12
months before the survey was
conducted. Almost 7 percent did
not go to school because they felt
unsafe for at least one day, either
at school or traveling there, the
survey said.
According to the CDC 2010
Understanding School Violence
fact sheet, about 32 percent of
students reported that they were
being bullied during the school
year in 2007.
Mike Millikin, Columbia
County's superintendent of
schools, said bullying occurs in
all districts on all types of levels.
"We acknowledge that it goes
on and of course we try to deal
with it proactively," he said.
Bullying is not a new lirob-
lem, said Terry Huddleston, CHS
principal. But it has recently esca-


lated to levels with serious conse-
quences that includes cyberbul-
lying -- bullying via communica-
tion technology, such as social
networking websites or texting
on cell phones.
In most cases at CHS, bullying
happens discreetly between girls
through situations like exclu-
sion, sending negative messages
through body language or rude
glances and stares, Huddleston
said. If a situation elevates to
cyberbullying, it is hard to con-
trol because hundreds of stu-
dents can learn about the situa-
tion simultaneously, he said.
Keith Hatcher, Fort White
High and Middle principal, said
he has seen some instances of
cyberbullying and in confirmed
cases of bullying of any type, it is
boys and girls equally.
Gloria Spivey, district safe
schools coordinator, said the dis-
trict reported six instances of bul-
lying to the Florida Department
of Education in the 2009 to 2010
school year, an old problem that
has been brought to the forefront
because of legislation.
Within recent years, the state
passed legislation addressing
bullying and harassment, man-
dating that every Florida school
district adopt a similar policy to
be state-approved.
BULLYING continued on 3A


Photo illustration by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
This photo illustration shows Shyam Patel (center), 17, being harassed
by Bryant Robinson (left), 17, and Mikey Kirkman, 19. Columbia High
students used a drama skit last week to educate their peers about the
dangers of bullying. 'It's hurting someone's feelings by putting them
down,' Patel said. 'I really don't see (bullying) too often, but I do see a lot
of cyberbullying.'


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


70
Scattered showers 4s
WEATHER, 6A


Opinion ................ 4A


Business .........
Obituaries .......
Advice & Comics .
Puzzles ..........


. IC
. . . 3D
....... 2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
'Shop local for
the holidays.


COMING
TUESDAY
School news and
features.


1 3B t !X









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
1-3-5-28 13 8-10-12-15-21 Afternoon: 2-2-5 Afternoon: 1-1-7-7 15-29-37-40-42-43 8-20-21-32-37 PB4
Evening: 3-9-6 Evening: 3-0-4-8


AROUND FLORIDA



Bereavement fares are high for relatives


FORT LAUDERDALE
ach day, about
15 dead people
fly out of South
Florida, taking
a one-way trip
in a cargo hold to their
final resting place.
During the winter
months, when snowbirds
flock south, the number
of decedents jetting home
tends to increase.
In Palm Beach County,
about 2,600 were flown
home last year, more than
any other county in the
state. Broward was next
with about 1,900 and then
Miami-Dade, with about
1,250.
In all, about 18,80,0
dead people were flown
out of Florida last year,
with about a third tak-
ing off from one of South
Florida's three major air-
ports, according.to Florida
Department of Health
records.
Grieving relatives, mean-
while, find last-minute
airline tickets an expensive
proposition. While some
carriers still offer bereave-
ment fares, overall, the air-
line industry has cut back
on any kind of last-minute
discounted seats.
"We tried everything,
but we really had to pay
to make an urgent flight,"
said Daniella Swanson;
after her aunt died earlier
this month. After checking
with numerous airlines,
Swanson and her brother
paid a combined $535 to
fly one way on Spirit from
Chicago, their hometown,
to Fort Lauderdale for the
funeral. Her aunt, Susan


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter

Finding a great place for a Thanksgiving Feast

Cleopatra Steele stirs up some goodies for the Thanksgiving Feast at LAD Soup Kitchen in
Lake City Thursday. It was the 19th time the kitchen has provided this holiday celebration.


Madori, a Broward School
Board candidate this year,
was cremated in South
Florida and her ashes
were to be shipped back to
Chicago.
Bereavement fares tend
to be steep because they
usually allow flexibility in
scheduling a return trip,
and sometimes they far
exceed full-price tickets.
For instance, to fly from
Fort Lauderdale to New
York on Delta Air Lines
on a recent Tuesday, the
bereavement fare was
$829, which allowed for an
open return trip within 60
days, with the provision
that seats are available


on the requested flight.
Delta's regular fare on that
day would have been $385
if purchased at the last
minute. The same seat,
purchased two weeks in
advance, cost about $160.
"It's not meant to be a
bargain," said Scott Nason,
a Dallas-based aviation
consultant, who added that
most bereavement tickets
cost about 35 percent less
than full fare.
He said carriers can't
afford to provide a "great
deal" to the bereaved.
"The airline has sold most
of its inventory by then
and is expecting to get top
dollar for the remaining


seats."
Most families make no
attempt to fly on the same
plane as their loved one,
but rather seek the lowest
price two or three days in
advance of a flight That
means the relatives might
arrive at the destination
first, because abody must
be prepared for shipment
by a funeral home and
then dropped off at an
airline's cargo center.

Burglar made
brownies first
JACKSONVILLE
- Authorities are search-


ing for a burglar they say
broke into a Jacksonville
home, baked brownies,
surfed the Internet and
took a nap before fleeing
with the homeowner's gun.
Jacksonville sheriff's
deputies say a neighbor
decided to check on the
house Thursday morning
while the homeowner was
out of town. According to
a police report, he walked
inside the house and a
young man pointed a gun
at his face and ran out the
backdoor.
Authorities say the man
broke into the house by
getting inside an unlocked
car parked in the driveway
and activating the garage
door opener.
While there he baked
brownies, surfed sev-
eral Internet pornography
sites, drank some orange
juice and slept in one of
the beds.
Authorities said he also
stole a gun.

Man strikes
deputy with cane
CALLAWAY An 84-
year-old northwest Florida
man has beeh .arrested
after authorities say he hit
a deputy with his cane.
Bay County sheriffs deputies
were called to Calaway Clinic on
Wednesdaynightbecausethe
man was yelling and cursing at
an office manager.
According to a police
report, the office man-
ager asked authorities to
remove the man from the
clinic. Once outside, the
man's rant grew louder.


Authorities warned him to
stop or he would be arrest-
ed. A deputy says the man
then struck him in the
stomach with a cane. He
also allegedly struck the
deputy in the leg as he was
being handcuffed.
The man, who has
not been identified, was
charged with disorderly
conduct and resisting an.
officer. .

USF wins $8
million in grants
TAMPA The
University of South Florida
has won $8 million in fed-
eral grants to help train
public health workers
across the state to respond
to hurricanes, outbreaks of
disease and other threats.
Both five-year grants
are going to USF's College
of Public Health, the only
institution in Florida to
receive either grant.
One grant will bring
USF $4.75 million
from the U.S. Centers
for Disease Control
to develop a Sarasota-
based Preparedness and
Emergency Response
Learning Center.
The second grant, $3.25
million from the Health
and Human Resources
Administration, will sup-
port a Public Health
Training Center.
* At first, the center will
work with state officials to
identify gaps in the train-
ing of state and local pub-
lic health workers.

. Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Yoko Ono, son swap memories


WASHINGTON

connections with his 77-
year-old mother, Yoko Ono
not about the Beatles or
John Lennon but about
her life ii an interview broadcast on
NPR as part of a national oral history
project.
In the interview aired Friday, Ono
recalls meeting her father for the
first time when she was not yet 3
years old. Ono says her mother was
from a very rich family, and it made
her father feel insecure.
Still, Ono says her mother would
send her father to work as a banker
in a chauffeured car. But he would
get out two blocks from his office to
walk so he wouldn't be seen with a
driver.
The 35-year-old Sean Lennon
reveals to his mother that he used
to do the same thing when she sent
him to school in a limo.
Ono says it must be a DNA memo-
ry that led to the same experience.

Willie Nelson charged
with pot.possession
SIERRA BLANCA, Texas A
U.S. Border Patrol spokesman says
country singer Willie Nelson was
charged with marijuana possession
after 6 ounces was found aboard his
tour bus in Texas.
Patrol spokesman Bill Brooks
says the bus pulled into the Sierra
Blanca, Texas, checkpoint about 9
a.m. Friday. Brooks says an officer
smelled pot when a door was opened
and a search turned up marijuana.
Brooks says the Hudspeth County
sheriff was contacted and Nelson
was among three people arrested.
Sheriff Arvin West didn't immedi-
ately return a phone message left at
his home Friday, but he told the El
Paso Times that Nelson claimed the
marijuana was his. The singer was
held briefly a $2,500 bond before
being released.
Nelson spokeswoman Elaine
Schock declined to comment
when contacted via e-mail by The
Associated Press.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Yoko Ono, right, performs alongside her son Sean Lennon dur-
ing the 'Yoko Ono: We Are Plastic Ono Band' concert at the Orpheum Theater in
Los Angeles. Ono and her son, Sean Lennon, were part of a national oral history
project that urged people t6 take time after Thanksgiving for a National Day of
Listening with their friends and loved ones.


Demand hot for Kid
Rock concert tickets
DETROIT Kid Rock always
has been a hot ticket in the Detroit
area, but sales for an upcoming
concert show the country rocker
with hip-hop roots is on fire.
The Detroit News and Detroit
Free Press report Friday that more
than 45,000 tickets for his 40th
birthday bash Jan. 15 at Ford Field
sold out in only 19 minutes.
A limited number of VIP pack-
ages remain at a cost of $300.
A show representative told the
Free Press that a second Ford
Field date will not be added.
Kid Rock's real name is Robert
Ritchie. He grew up in northern
Macomb County's Romeo and
now lives in Oakland County's
Clarkston.
He has sold more than 180,000
tickets over the past 14 months for
shows in the Detroit area.


Report: NY actor says he
killed 'demon' in mom
NEW YORK An actor accused
of hacking his mother to death with a
sword felt like the character Neo from
the movie "The Matrix" "hearing
voices and feeling powerful" before
the attack, he said in a newspaper
interview published Friday.
"I didn't kill her. I killed the
demon inside her," Michael Brea, 31,
told the Daily News from a hospital
prison ward where he was being
held after his arrest on murder and
other charges.
"I just kept cutting her. No one
could stop me. I was doing the work
of God," he told the paper.
Relatives issued a statement
Friday expressing their support for
Brea, whom they called "a compas-
sionate, gentle, intelligent, spiritual
and loving man" in need of help.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Recording executive Berry
Gordy Jr. is 81.
* Former Sen. Gary Hart (D-
Colo.) is 74.
* Singer Randy Newman is
67.
* CBS News correspondent
Susan Spencer is 64.
* Movie director Joe Dante
is 63.


Daily Scrioture


* "Late Show" orchestra
leader Paul Shaffer is 61.
* Actor Ed Harris is 60.
* Former NASA teacher in
space Barbara Morgan is 59.
* Actress S. Epatha
Merkerson is 58.
* Former Homeland Security
Secretary Michael Chertoff
'is 57.


"Let the message of Christ
dwell among you richly as you
teach and admonish one anoth-
er with all wisdom through
psalms, hymns, and songs from
the Spirit, singing to God with
gratitude in your hearts."
Colossians 3:16


Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












LIGHTS: Festivities start with Santa's arrival

Continued From Page 1A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Gateway Big City Band get the crowd in the holiday mood with some
Christmas songs.


This will be Ryan Begay's
second Christmas and his
mother, Peola Lawson,
brought him out to get a pic-
ture with Santa.
"A lot of kids want to meet
Santa," she said.
Lawson enjoyed the sing-
ing from various local artists,
she said. A lot of people came
out to support the evening's
activities.
"It was really fun," she said.
Santa Claus will be avail-
able from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Monday-Saturday until Dec.
23.
Other upcoming holiday
events include Snow Day, the
Christmas Parade and the
Festival of Lights all on Dec.
13.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Harry Wuest counts down to turn on the lights in Olustee
Park and Mayor Stephen Witt waits for the illumination.


BULLYING: Schools look for solutions to an expanding problem

Continued From Page 1A


Columbia County's dis-
trict is in its second year
of honoring its policy a
no-tolerance policy of any
bullying or harassment
act against any employee
or student which was
passed by the school board
two years ago.
The policy defines bul-,
lying and outlines specif-
ic steps on how schools
should investigate an act
and deal with it.
Spivey said once bully-
ing is reported and investi-
gated, parents are notified
and the report is substanti-
ated, the school administra-
tor will determine a conse-
quence based on the. act.
Millikin said some cases
can involve law enforce-
ment if necessary. Hatcher
said if acts of bullying are
repeated, a student can be
referred to the district alter-
nate school or expelled.
Both Hatcher and
Huddleston said they fol-
low the bullying policy's
steps closely.
"It (bullying) is some-
thing that we take very seri-
ously," Spivey said, "and
we are very sure that our
employees are aware of our
policy and we want them to
be very mindful that if this
is going on, it needs to be
reported so that we can do


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Drama student Jack Taylor, played by Chandler Douglas, quietly broods as the taunts from
cheerleaders get to him. In the scene, only one cheerleader has the courage not to partake in
teasing and jeering. Pictured are Douglas (from left), Symone McKnight, 17, Libby Taylor, 16,
Emily Duren, 15, LaSharie Campbell, 18, and Shelby Moore, 18.


something about it."
According to the CDC's
,Violence fact sheet, chil-
dren who bully are more
likely to get into fights, van-
dalize property, skip school
and drop out of school.
Bullying takes a toll on its
victims, said Glenn Hunter,
school board member, and
can effect students' liveli-


FIREHOUSE: Family plan

Continued From Page 1A


hoods and their perfor-
mance in school. Wendy
Cousino, CHS drama teach-
er, said the negative effects
she has seen from bullying
include students dropping
out of school or getting into
physical altercations.
Tackling the issue
through a drama produc-
tion heightens the students'
awareness' of bullying and
its effects, providing stu-
dents a forum on which to
discuss it, Cousino said.
Huddleston said he


wanted a serious produc-
tion performed that would
reach students on the
issue, especially in light of
recent cases of bullying in
the news.
"As adults, we can talk
to them all the time about
it," Huddleston said, "but
the students have a better
chance of teaching their
peers than we do as adults
many times."
Performing plays is just
one way the district is fight-
ing against bullying on a


school level.
At the beginning of each
school year, all district
schools give presentations
to their students on the
no-toleration, nonbullying
policy through mediums
such as character educa-
tion lessons, Spivey said.
Millikin said schools
will teach about bullying
through mini-lessons on
the morning announce-
ments, special assemblies
or special awareness units
or lessons incorporated
into curriculum in an age-
appropriate way.
All district employees
underwent training on how
to recognize bullying and
what to do if they saw bully-
ing on campus, Spivey said.
Posters informing stu-
dents on what bullying is,
not to tolerate it and how to
report it hahg in all school
classrooms and common
areas, Spivey said.
Hunter said now that the
district is working hard on bul-
lying awareness at the school


level, more can possibly be
done to combat the issue, like
awareness with parent groups
and organizations.
"All groups need to begin
to recognize it," he said.
Hatcher said education
on bullying ;s the key to
prevention. Teachers must
be trained to catch' signs
of bullying and students
need to know that it is not
acceptable to bully.,
"It can cause a lot of
issues with not only kids,
but those same kids as they
become adults," he said.
'"They don't forget what
happened to them in high
school, but often it has long-
term effects. And kids need
to know that, they need
to know that what they do
now may often have long-
term effects on someone."
Parents and students
can report bullying anony-
mously by calling 866-295-
7303, texting 386-754-7099
or on the district website's
home page at www.colum-
bia.k12.fl.us.


Tinkn of SelinClme
Charl~ieSark


area well, Rick said. "I sold
insurance for 25 years here
in Lake City," said Rick.
"Selling insurance is entre-
preneurial itself. I wanted
to move to. something dif-
ferent."
This will be the Bringgers'
firstownership of a Firehouse
Subs store, and the first to
ever come to Lake City. "I
love the subs," said Rick
Bringger.
During the remodeling
and construction of the site,
Rick Bringger said he will be
keeping the work he needs
done local to keep money
stimulating Lake City's econ-
omy. "We're going to keep
our contract labor local."
Firehouse Subswasfound-
ed by firefighters Chris and
Robin Sorensen in October
,1994 in Jacksonville. Their
ties -to firefighter tradition
isn't only present in their
corporate name, but their
ties to public safety entities
and the financial support
they offer to fire depart-
ments around the United
States.
Launched in 2005, the
Firehouse Subs Public
Safety Foundation is dedi-
cated to equipping, edu-
cating, and funding public
safety entities. Since its
creation, the foundation
has donated over $2 mil-
lion to the cause, said Chris
Holmes, area representative
for Firehouse Subs.
The ties to firefighting
and firehouses doesn't end
there, either. With creative
names for its subs like the
Hook & Ladder, the roots
of the company can be
seen through all aspects
of its business practices.
"Our subs are huge," Rick
Bringger said. "People have


got to try this Hook &
Ladder sub when they
come in."
Wilma Bringger's sis-
ter, Sandra. Nobles, will
serve as general manager.
Staying true to the family-
owned and operated tradi-
tion that began the fran-
chise in the first place, the
owners are excited to see
the success they predict
will come of this store,
Rick Bringger said.
"It's definitely a casual-
type place here, and we
encourage everybody to
check us out," he said.


WILSON'S

OUTFITTERS


S ...w ethesaltmeetsourlife. a




]BROWNING,


Large selection of Tervis Tumblers" & Case Knives I


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MEDICINE


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Newnian, ARNP


LAKE CITY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (CRA)
REQUEST FOR CITIZEN VOLUNTEERS TO SERVE ON
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE (CDAC)

THE CITY OF LAKE CITY IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS TO SERVE ON A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
ADVISORY COMMITTEE (CDAC). THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE IS PRESENTLY BEING FORMED TO
CONSIST OF SEVEN (7) MEMBERS AND WILL BE IMPLEMENTED DURING EARLY 2011. APPLICANTS FOR
THIS COMMITTEE MUST BE CITY RESIDENTS AND/OR OPERATE A BUSINESS WITHIN THE CITY
(PREFERABLY WITHIN THE CRA).
PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE SHALL BE:
1. PERIODIC REVIEW OF THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN AND WHEN APPROPRIATE
SUBMIT RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CRA FOR CHANGES.
2. MAKE WRITTEN RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CRA ON PLAN IMPLEMENTATION, INCLUDING
DEVELOPING AN ANNUAL WORK PROGRAM, SETTING PROJECT PRIORITIES, AND
DEVELOPING INCENTIVES TO FURTHER COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT EFFORTS.
3. HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING CITIZEN INPUT RELATED TO THE
REDEVELOPMENT AREA AND TO REPORT SUCH INFORMATION TO THE CRA.
4. EVALUATE AND PROVIDE RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CRA ON THE EXPENDITURE OR USE
OF LOCAL, STATE AND/OR FEDERAL FUNDS FOR REDEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE
REDEVELOPMENT AREA.
ELIGIBLE CITIZENS INTERESTED IN SERVING ON THIS COMMITTEE MAY FIND OUT MORE INFORMATION
OR OBTAIN AN APPLICATION BY CONTACTING:

CITY OF LAKE CITY
JACKIE KITE, CRA ADMINISTRATOR
205 N. MARION AVE.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
(386) 719-5766


Special Interests Include:
Preventive Care/ Physicals
Geriatric Care
Women's Health
Diabetes Management
Most appointments in 24 hours
Most insurances accepted


. .. J --"J. -


OB/ YN
DAINA REEIE ,MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


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* Adolescent Gynecology
a High and Low Risk Obstetrics
* Contraception
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New Patients Welcome
Call today for a
personal appointment:
386-755-0500
449 SE Bayo Drive
Lake City, Florida 32025
www do;nagreenemnd com


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 ,













OPINION


Sunday, November 28, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


Losing faith

in Catholic

Church's

direction

T here's a raging
'debate about the
state of the Catholic
Church in America.
Some Church offi-
cials still cling to the hope
that massive influxes of recent
immigrants will fill the pews
left empty by more educated,
fallen-away parishioners. But
clearly the Church has receded
as a religious and cultural force,
like a steroid-pumped bicep to a
withering muscle.
The New York Times reports
that the Roman Catholic
Diocese of Brooklyn plans to
close two churches, fold six
parishes into three and impose
strict budget constraints on
every one of its 198 parishes.
This comes after a half-dozen
waves of closings and mergers
that left only about half as many
Catholic elementary schools
operating in Brooklyn as there
were in the mid-1990s.
Clear signs point to an
institution on the wane, with
parishes going bankrupt nation-
wide. Those that continue face
a shortage of leaders.
It's tempting to blame the
priest pedophilia scandal and the
Vatican's response to it for the
church's collapse. Georgetown
University's Center for Applied
Research in the Apostolate
reports nationwide 850 parishes
have shut down since 1995. And
the scandal has cost the church
$2 billion in settlements with
more to come.
Is it too late for the Church
to turn around? As long as the
Vatican forces priests to remain
celibate, it will have an ever-
greater shortage of priests in
educated countries. And since
Pope Benedict clearly looks to
the past for spiritual guidance
instead of referring to the past
but simultaneously peering into
the future, people who have
choices will choose to leave.
* Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


W lW OA-A HcoUW llwN I.r ....


Book details this noble


institution that helps kids


Mike Galloway,
President and
CEO of the
Florida United
Methodist
Children's Home, attended the
recent White Springs United
Methodist Church homecoming
to receive the church's generous
donation to the Home and to per-
sonally thank them.
I expressed great interest in
his work so last week he sent me
a copy of the book "Under the
Sheltering Tree: A Brief History
of the Florida United Methodist
Children's Home 1908-2008" by
Stephen T. Hartsfield.
The book quotes the mission
statement of the Home, then
known as The Florida Methodist
Orphanage, as written back in
1908: "Here we propose, by the
help of God and the co-operation
of all good people, to found a
noble Christian institution for the
relief, education, and training of
destitute, fatherless and mother-
less children, who may look to us
for help."
How proud the members of the
White Springs Church and their
pastor, Bill Peeler, must be to so
generously support a children's
home that has such a powerful
mission statement
By the way, in 1932, the
Children's Home, operating on a
shoe-string budget in the middle
of the Great Depression, had
Methodists statewide collect
Octagon Soap coupons which
they redeemed for enough
money to buy a $700 truck, a
$400 kitchen range, and $250 for
band uniforms-lots of money
in those bitterly hard economic
times.

DOCTOR'S VISIT
Dr. Homer Schuttle dropped in
for a visit to our School Museum
three weeks ago. Homer would


LETTER


Morris Williams
Phone: (386) 755-8183
williamsh2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St
Lake City FL 32055
have graduated with the CHS
class of 1950 but his family
moved to Lakeland when he was
in the fourth grade and he gradu-
ated there. He has a sister, Mary
Nell, who would have gradu-
ated with the CHS class of 1947,
and she also graduated from
Lakeland High.
Homer had a good memory
for names and places in his brief
time here. He especially remem-
bered two of his favorite teachers,
Bell Jarrett and Beth Mathis, and
classmates Tommy Ives, Carol
Crabbe and Jimmy Moore.
He flew a B-25 in the Korean
War and during that time had a
profound religious experience
"which stuck". He committed his
life to Christ and later became an
author of Christian literature and
has written some 50 books.
He now resides in the
Blairsville-Hiawassee area in
North Georgia.

HSCT, AGAIN.
Lake City's multi-talented
Lorraine Kirkland, president of
the High Springs Community
Theater (HSCT), announces
that HSCT will be presenting "A
Christmas Carol" December 3-19.
This production will be pre-
sented as a radio-on-stage drama
and is, of course, adapted from
the classic book by Charles
Dickens just in time for
Christmas.


Weekends only- Fridays and
Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays
at 2 p.m.
Once again, Lake City will
be well represented in the play.
Lorraine, Pam Register and
Noah Lindsay will be actors and
Jonathan Morriss is the assistant
director.
Tickets are available at The
Framery on West Baya, (386)
754-2780, and online at highspring-
scommunitytheatercom.
You can be sure that this pro-
duction, like all others before
it, will live up to HSCTs motto
"Come let us entertain you and
you'll have a real good time!"

AN UNCOMMON MAN
Live Oak's J.L McMullan (1914-
2007) was one of North Florida's
most outstanding and lowest
profile community leaders.
He became the nation's young-
est elected Clerk of Circuit when
he was just 22 years old.
Along life's way, he also founded
McMullan's Food Bank, served as
director of the Live Oak Housing
Authority, was a charter member
of the Live Oak Jaycees, and also
an Elk, a Mason, a Kiwanian, and
a lifelong supporter of the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches.
Always preferring to stay in
the background, John Lavelle
McMullan will always stand front
and center in Live Oak commu-
nity history for his life of unself-
ish, dedicated service to those in
need.

MANY DRUMSTICKS
Did you hear about the man
who crossed a turkey with a
centipede? On Thanksgiving
everybody got a drumstick!

U Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


TO THE EDITOR


Nothing Biblical to support world will end next May


n reply to David
Krahrike's letter to the
editor, I agree life is
fast paced and busy but
because of this we cannot
conclude that God will cause the
end of the world to come.
(Krahnke) stated that new
revelation from the Bible today
points to the exact day God will
once again destroy the Earth,
and most of mankind. If the rev-
elation came from God, it is not
a "new revelation." God com-
pleted His revelation through
Jesus, His Son. If received from
any place other than the Bible,
it is false. He states Daniel 12
teaches the final judgment is
exactly 7,000 years from the
flood. I have studied Daniel
12, and it does not indicate the
world will be destroyed exactly
7,000 years from the flood.
Anyone who quotes the Bible
has an obligation to show book,


chapter and verse, and not
expect us to accept his opinion.
I agree, God is merciful,
but disagree that one has to
cry, beg, and beseech Him for
salvation before next May (the
time he says this will all come
to pass). The Bible teaches in
John 3:16 "For God so loved the
world, that He gave His only
begotten Son, that whosoever
believeth in Him should not per-
ish, but have everlasting life."
Jesus, speaking to His apostles,
said in Matthew 28:19-20 "Go ye
therefore, and teach all nations,
baptizing them in the name of
the Father, and of the Son, and
of the Holy Ghost: Teaching
them to observe all things what-
soever I have commanded you:
and, lo, I am with you always,
even unto the end of the world."
Salvation comes through God's
love and our obedience.
Jesus saves all who obey Him


by hearing His word (Rom.
10:17), believing it (Mark
16:16), confessing Him as God's
Son (Rom. 10:9-10), repenting
of their sins (Luke 13:3-5), and
being baptized for the remission
of their sins (Acts 2:38). The
Lord adds all who have obeyed
this gospel to His church (Acts
2:47).
How does Mr. Krahnke know
that Christ will return on May
21, 2011, when 2 Peter 3:10 says
"But the day of the Lord will
come as a thief in the night; in
which the heavens shall pass
away with a great noise, and the
elements shall melt with fervent
heat, the earth also and the
works that are therein shall be
burned up." The end will come
fast. 1 Corinthians 15:52ff. I
haven't found a Scripture yet to
support Mr. Krahnke's theory.
Jewel Higgins
Lake City


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@noatonalpress.com


Senate

GOP nukes

peer's

START


in Congress; one is
Sen. Richard Lugar,
R-Ind.
Since giving up
aspirations to run for presi-
dent, the courtly Hoosier has
devoted himself to making the
world safer by curtailing the
spread of nuclear weapons and
keeping weapons-grade ura-
nium away from terrorists.
During countless hours and
trips to the grimier parts of the
former Soviet Union, he has
worked out nuclear inspections
and gained the confidence of
arms- control experts worldwide.
Now he is as close-as he has
ever been to seeing a major
dream realized ratification of
a new arms control treaty with
Russia And he is very likely to
witness a heartbrealdng failure,
all because of politics.
As the lame-duck Congress
returns from its Thanksgiving
recess, President Obama is
pleading with senators to ratify
the new START (Strategic Arms
Reduction Treaty) arms control
agreement Obama and Russia's
president signed in April.
As with so many other mis-
judgments, Obama failed to
take the case for the treaty to
the American people, and now
shortsighted Republicans are
vowing to block ratification.
They offer flimsy arguments
against it, harkening back
to the old Star Wars missile
defense era and demanding
more "study." But their real
reasons seem to be to build
ever-more nukes and to deny
Obama any successes in order
to try to oust him from office.
Ratification requires a two-
thirds Senate vote and will
be impossible to get without
Republicans. Right now,
Obama doesn't have the votes.
If the lame-duck Senate votes
the treaty down, it probably
is dead a new round of
endless hearings in a more-
obstreperous Republican
Senate would push the can too
far down the road.
Lugar is chastising
Republicans, saying his GOP
caucus is "tied up in a situation
where people don't want to
make choices. No one wants
to be counted." Lugar argues,
correctly, that this is a crucial
vote on a serious national secu-
rity issue and that rejection
would place the nation in peril.
The new treaty won biparti-
san support from the military
and national security estab-
lishments, ding former
secretaries of defense from
both parties. It seemed to be
headed for ratification until
Sen. John Kyl, R-Ariz., unveiled
his secret plan to block nuclear
non-proliferation the more
nukes we have, the better,
even if others have them too.
Kyl, one of those
Republicans advocating less
spending unless it's for some-
thing they want, says $85
billion over 10 years is not
enough for nuclear modern-
ization and billions more are
needed.
It seems obvious the GOP
resistance to arms control is
the opening salvo in an oft-
stated Republican plan to make
Obama a one-term president
no matter the cost. But the
cost is the security and cred-
ibility of all of us.
Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A


I _










Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today pate. All members, friends
and guests are welcome.
Food for Fines Contact 719-5564 or 754-
7227.
The annual Food
for Fines program is
Sunday to Saturday at the Thursday
Columbia County Public Christmas concert
Library. Each single
sealed, non-expired, non- Richardson Middle
perishable item brought School Wolf Pride Band
. to the library will reduce is having its annual
a fine by $1. All items Christmas concert 6:30
collected at the Main p.m. Thursday in the
and West Branch will be Columbia High School
delivered to the Christian auditorium. The RMS Jazz
Service Center in Lake Band, Symphonic Band,
City for local distribution, and Beginners Band and
- Items collected at the Fort Drumline will playsongs
White Branch Library will of the season under the
be distributed at the Fort i re c on er
White food shelf. direction of Sherrod Keen.

Monday Friday
Blood drive Candlelight tour
drive is set for The Lake City Garden
A blood drive is set for Club is hosting the
12 p.m.-6 p.m. Monday at Castagna Christmas
Pizza Boy. Free 14" cheese House Candlelight Tour
pizza for every donor. 6:30- 9:30 p.m. Friday.
Receive a free Gators or The house is located at
Seminoles shirt. 521 NW Old Mill Road.
Admission is $10. Tickets
YEP committee meeting are available at Brown-
Vann Carpet One, Lake
There is a YEP City Florist, Your Hearts
Committee Meeting at Desire or at the residence
noon Monday at Gondolier the evening of the tour.
Italian Restaurant & Save your ticket and come
Pizza. Call the Lake out 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec.
City Columbia County 4 when select Christmas
Chamber of Commerce to d6cor will be sold.
RSVP at 386-752-3690.
HSCT production
Wednesday The High Springs
Public meeting Community Theater
opening of its Radio-on-
Elder Options is having Stage dramatic adaptation
a public meeting at 10 a.m. of Charles Dickens' "A
Wednesday in the Florida Christmas Carol" opens
Farm Bureau Building. Friday. The show runs
The Board of Directors weekends through Dec.
will be reviewing applica- 19. Tickets are available at
tions for organizational The Framery on W. Baya
grants, as well as hearing and at highspringscommu-
appeals from those attend- nitytheatercom. Four local
ing. The building is locat- residents are involved in the
ed at 5700 SW 34th Street, production.
Suite '222, Gainesville.
Contact Cindy Roberts at Saturday
352-378-6649.
Dream Machine Toy
Wednesday Friendship Ride
Luncheon
The 9th Annual
The December Christmas Dream Machine
Friendship Luncheon of Toy Ride is Saturday.
the Lake City Newcomers Registration begins at
and Friends is 11:30 a.m. Regstraton begs at
Wednesday at Costa Del 10:30 a.m. and the toy
Sol, located at 2260 W U.S. ride pulls out at 12 p.m.
Highway 90. There will from the Columbia County
be a $10 gift exchange for Fairgrounds. There will be
those who wish to partici- raffles and live bands, and


all proceeds will go to ben-
efit The Christmas Dream
Machine. Contact Cookie
at 386-362-6529 or Polly at
386-758-9811.

Sunday, Dec. 5
Blood drive
Hungry Howie's Blood
Drive is scheduled from
noon-6 p.m. Dec. 5 at
Hungry Howie's, 857 SW
Main Boulevard. Each
donor will receive a free
small one-topping pizza or
small sub. Call 386438-3415.

Tuesday, Dec. 7
Nat King Cole
Christmas performance
Allan Harris sings a
Nat King Cole Christmas
7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 7 in
the Levy Performing Arts
Center. Tickets are now
on sale. Call 386-754-4340
or e-mail mark.kirby@fgc.
edu.

Volunteer literacy tutor
A volunteer literacy
tutor training workshop
is 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 7 at 308 NW
Columbia Avenue. The
workshop will emphasize
reading strategies, the
writing process, infor-
mal assessments, lesson
planning, and phonics
using the Laubach Way to
Reading method of train-
ing. Call the library's lit-
eracy coordinator, Glennis
Pounds, at 386-758-2111 or
e-mail columbialiteracy@
neflin.org.

Vdnesday Dec. 8
Lake City Newcomers
Regular Monthly
Meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is 11 a.m. Dec. 8 at Quail
Heights Country Club,,
Branford Highway. The
luncheon costs $10. A $10
gift exchange will take
place for those wishing to
participate. All members,
friends, and guests are
welcome. Call 7524552 or
7554051.

Public meeting
Elder Options is having


a public meeting 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 8 in the
Hilton University of Florida
Conference Center. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 1714
SW 34th street, Gainesville.
Contact Cindy Roberts at
352-378-6649.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid
workshop is 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 8 at
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate and
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expands
the opportunities available
with Medicaid Planning.
Call Shana Miller at 386-
755-1977 to register.

Thursday, Dec. 9
Chorus concert
Richardson Middle
School Chorus will have
their annual Christmas
Concert 7 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 9 in the Auditorium.
They will be singing vari-
ous Christmas selections.
The chorus is under
the direction of Christy
Robertson.

Friday, Dec. 10
Class Reunion
Columbia High School
Classes of '49, '50, '51,
'52, and '53 are having a
class reunion 11:30 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 10 at Mason
City Community Center.
Anyone who attended
Columbia High is invited.
Contact Julia Osburn at
386-752-7544 or Morris
Williams at 386-7524710.

Satura, Dec. 11
Pancake Breakfast with
Santa
Pancake Breakfast
with Santa is 8 11 a.m.
Dec. 11 at the Holiday
Inn & Suites. Breakfast
will include pancakes,
bacon, sausage, juice, cof-
fee, and hot chocolate.
There will also be holiday
music. Meals are $7 for
adults and $4 for children
ages 3-12. Proceeds ben-


efit Children's Medical
Services of North Florida.
A collection box for
unwrapped toys will also
be available.

Nutcracker
The Nutcracker Ballet
led by the Gainesville
acclaimed, Dance Alive
group and supplemented
by more than 50 local boys
and girl is 2:30 and 7:30
p.m. Dec. 11 in the Levy
Performing Arts Center.

Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts "The Life
of a Christian Teenager"
at 6:15 p.m. Dec. 11. The
theater is located at 348 N.
Marion Avenue. Call 386-
344-0319.

Holiday happenings
Snow Day, sponsored by
Hopeful Baptist Church,
is 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Dec.
11 in the parking lot next
to Gulf Coast Financial.
The event will feature 30
tohs of snow delivered
along with two bounce
houses, a 26-footdual
lane slide, a rock climb
wall, an obstacle course
and a bungee challenge.
The Festival of Lights will
take place around Olustee
Park throughout the day
and will feature arts and
crafts, food vendors and
live entertainment. The
Christmas parade, present-
ed by the Lake City Rotary
Club, is 6 p.m. Christmas
music will begin after the
parade in Olustee Park
until 9 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 14
Literacy tutor training
Volunteer literacy tutor
training workshop is 5:30
to 8:30 p.m. Dec. 14 at 308
NW Columbia Avenue. The
workshop will emphasize
reading strategies, the
writing process, informal
assessments, lesson plan-
ning, and phonics using the
Laubach Way to Reading
method of training. Call


the Library's Literacy
Coordinator, Glennis
Pounds, at 386-758-2111 or
e-mail columbialiteracy@
neflin.org.

Saturday, Dec. 18
FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City announces a Christmas
party taking place from 6:30
- 10:30 p.m. Dec. 18 at the
Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. Enjoy a night
of culture, dancing, and
entertainment, and possibly
become a member of FACS.
For more information,
contact Bob Gavette at 386-
965-5905.

ONGOING
EVERY DAY
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

EVERY MONDAY
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron
- Civil Air Patrol
The Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron Civil
Air Patrol meets 6:30 to 9
p.m. Monday. For more
information, please call Maj.
Grant Meadows, (386)365-
1341.

EVERY FIRST MONDAY
Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings at 7
p.m. on the first and third
Monday of every month
in the, Classrooms at Lake
City Medical Center. ,
Meetings-are for people
that have had weight loss
surgery, contemplating
surgery or just trying to
lose weight on their own. E-
mail thethinnerme@gmail.
com or call (386) 288-9153
and leave a message.


OBITUARIES


Patricia Diane Peck
Patricia Diane Peck, 64,
of Lake City, passed away
unexpectedly Friday, No-
vember 26, 2010 from com-
plications after an extended
illness. She was born in Elmi-
ra, New York on May 24,
1946, was a graduate of Career
Academy in 1964 in Washing-
ton DC and was a licensed/reg-
istered medical assistant and
phlebotomist. Mrs. Peck also
was a former employee of
Wal-Mart and Dillards. She
was preceded in death by her
father Kenneth Dewey and
granddaughter Brittany Eddy.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Larry of 44 years, son,
Aaron (Carrie) Peck, daughter
Diana (Nile) Eddy, moth-
er, Louisa Dewey, Brothers,
Ken (Marjorie) Dewey, Bob
(Ella) Shelters, 4 grandchil-
dren, aunts, uncles, nieces
and nephews. A memorial
service is planned for Monday,
December 6, 2010 qt 11:00
a.m. at the Pleasant Grove
Methodist Church, SW. State
Road 47. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family have requested
donations. be made to the
Pleasant Grove Methodist
Church in memory of Patricia.
Final arrangements entrusted
to ICS Cremation & Fu-
neral Home. 386-752-3436.
Patsy Ruth Smith
Patsy Ruth Smith, 77, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Fl. passed
away November 25, 2010 at
the Suwannee Valley Care
Center, Lake City, Florida.
Mrs. Smith was a native of Pine


K nobbb
West Vir-
ginia and
had resided
City for the
past twenty
years. She
was of the
B a p t i s t Smith
Faith and
loved gar-
dening and helping with chari-
ties. She was a loving wife,
mother and grandmother. She
is preceded in death by her
husband" of forty-nine years,


Donald Edward Smith and one
daughter, Gail Marie Jervis.
Survivors include two daughters,
Pamela (Richard) Way, Ft. White,
Fl. Lori (Rick) Smith, Mayo, Fl.
Four Sons, Donald Smith, Lake
City, Fl., Richard (Becky) Smith
Merritt Island, Fl., David (Don-
na) Smith and Terry (Tammy)
Smith both of Gadsen, Alabama.
Two Brothers: Bob Webb, Beck-
ley, WV and Dayton Webb, Bull-
head, AZ. Four grandchildren
that she raised, Patricia Cogle,
Dayton VanHolt, Amelia Smith
and Amanda Smith. Twelve
Grandchildren and thirteen


great grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mrs. Smith will be conducted
Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at
11:00 A.M. in the Forest Lawn
Cemetery with the Rev. Terry
Shiver, officiating. The fam-
ily will receive friends Tuesday
November 30, 2010 from 9:00-
10:45 just prior to the service
at the funeral home. Guerry
Funeral Home, Lake City, V1l.
is in charge of arrangements.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Accepting New Patients

Specializing in adult medical care including:
Primary Care Arthritis
High Blood Pressure Backache Evaluation
Heart Disease and Treatment
Lung Disease Full Dizziness,
Gastrointestinal vertigo and balance
High Cholesterol. diagnosis and
Diabetes treatment
Women's Health Optifast' Weight
Headache Evaluation Loss System
and Treatment

Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


WOODSTOVES FIREPLACES SPRKSCREENS
STHE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
I M ph 377-9535 _
811 N. Main St. M-F 9:30-5:30 ..... .. l
Gain.sville Sat. 9:30-4:00


You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.

Your Family


Honoriug

Those WeLove!


CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!

755.5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm



V^


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


THHE WEATHER




,. SCT. SCT. SUN AND' MOSTLY'1

SsHOWERS *'SHOWERS I CLOUDS SUNNY:
A0, ,'

HI 70 L0. J HI 76 LHIv2LO


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


67
56
72
48
85 in 1973
29 in 1930


0.00"
0.53"
38.95"
1.93"
45.56"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:07 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:08 a.m.
5:30 p.m.




12:32 p.m.
12:39 a.m.
1:07 p.m.


Nov. Dec. Dec.
28 5 13
Last New First


Dec.
21
Full


MOSTLY
SUNNY



H162LO


M NATIONAL FORECAST: Rain and snow will affect much of the Rockies and the Intermountain
West today. Accumulating snow is expected in the central Rockies into the northern Rockies.
Elsewhere, rain and higher elevation snow are both anticipated in the Pacific Northwest. High
pressure will dominate the weather pattern across the East Coast.









"BEllngs
42,31 .9,14 C
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5 .5/43 6n s.. ,,' S 6S23
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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 84, Stuart. Fla. Low: -130 Grand Forks. N.D.


Saturday Today


i


, 1


Service

Brought to
MOODE : our readers
30nit estobu b

rl, .i. ,:,,-, The Weather
S r,.,.3,rr.:,r. r, Channel.
, r,. rr,. .,.. r ,r


.

weather.comr

Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
1 j LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


6dosa City Monday Tuesday
SJacksonville Cape Canaveral 7- i : '

Tallahassee* Lake City Daytona Beach 7 ,. r : ;*.
I 1, 51 Ft. Lauderdale ._1 1 :r 1 :
Pensaola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 4 :r, 4- :r
E. n3 50 Panama City 1 r Gainesville g J ,:
52 Ocala Jacksonville :., p.i A1 ,
'"Key West :
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City W. .: :
'. , L Cit4 . ...
I Miami a p,:
Tampa Naples i 6 ., .. ', pr ,
,''; ''' "West Palm Beach Ocala '9 6' p '.r. r ,
_.0 r.': Orlando :.. r,, ,4 p,
S* FL Lauderdale Panama City .-l :, I ,
FL Myers :i 72 Pensacola r, ?, 'J. .
S1 ,", Naples Tallahassee r.l T p, .
S*- .-r' Miami Tampa .- :r ,,
S71 Valdosta ; ..,. ;,. 5,
Key West0 W. Palm Beach r I ,


HI/Lo/W
42/26/s
51/20/pc
19/2/c
57/39/s
45/26/s
29/14/sn
59/41/s
28/17/sn
34/15/rs
42/33/s
39/29/pc
61/45/s
47/26/s
55/29/s
39/16/pc
45/34/s
47/31/s
43/30/s
58/34/s
67/57/pc
72/63/sh
46/23/pc


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
45/23/0
37/30/0
56/23/0
14/-2/.04
53/29/0
43/32/0
81/73/0
60/32/0
39/32/0
60/29/0
64/51/0
54/23/0
49/31/0
62/29/0
58/42/0
57/31/0
83/73/0
25/10/0
57/33/0
58/41/0
42/34/0
63/28/0


HI/Lo/W
51/38/s
41/31/s
69/34/s'
-9/-19/c
51/30/s
43/26/s
82/70/s
69/63/c
46/31/s
65/48/s
68/56/pc
59/47/s
52/33/pc
62/46/s
61/45/pc
60/44/s
80/71/sh
41/33/s
63/49/s
67/59/s
46/35/s
62/47/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
49/21/0
70/66/0
44/33/0
68/41/0
34/29/0
42/28/.01
45/37/.06
54/34/0
43/17/0
46/23/0
51/37/0
47/43/.25
49/31/0
27/15/A0
60/28/0
61/46/0
54/48/.43
39/33/0
32/30/.29
74/64/0
71/36/0
48/33/0


HI/Lo/W
48/33/s
75/61/sh
47/33/s
60/42/pc
41/26/S
40/28/pc
42 31 ',h

34/18/sn
34/12/pc
50/28/s
53/31/pc
54/40/s
34/32/sn
67/58/c
58/45/pc
53/41/pc
39/33/pc
26/14/sn
76/64/sh
62/35/pc
47/33/s


* g A
Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday ioeay


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
1: Auckland
BeijIng
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/73/0
34/30/.06
73/62/0
72/59/0
43/23/0
30/23/0
79/68/0
79/57/0
28/19/.31
84/70/0
14/7/0
75/66/0
82/73/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
84/72/pc
34/28/pc
73/57/pc
72/62/s
48/26/s
32/23/pc
72/55/s
78/62/pc
39/31/rs
84/64/pc
12/3/c
77/67/s
85/73/s


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
63/37/0
72/64/0
34/27/0
45/28/0
73/46/0
34/28/.09
32/25/0
73/57/.18
86/72/0
61/59/0
14/12/0
84/75/0
37/30/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
61/40/sh
70/60/pc
36/30/c
48/32/pc
76/48/s
36/32/pc
23/11/pc
78/61/t
80/72/sh
75/53/s
16/11/c
88/75/t
36/27/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan P
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/73/0
55/41/0
s i 82/69/.01
PR 84/70/.01
77/52/0
50/27/0
91/77/0
82/66/0
82/52/0
57/52/0
39/30/0
37/30/.03
34/25/0


Today I
HI/Lo/W
86/74/s
60/50/r
81/74/s
84/75/s
81/57/s
42/30/s
88/76/t
79/66/sh
82/61/pc
61/45/s
39/32/pc
36/30/rs
34/24/c


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-dnzzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstornis, w-windy.


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today! CA iPUS


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, USA
Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties! 11 I


1 Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuahon (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position are
required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes, certain other restrictions apply Property and flood insurance may be required Example a $100,000 loan at 3,99% for 60 months would require 59 monthly
payments of $1842.04 and one final payment of $1787.83, total finance charge of $10,468.19; for a total of payment of $110,468.19 The amount financed is $99,833.00 the APR is 4.072%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate.
2 On loans over $125,000, title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. 3 Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required Mention this ad and we'll waive the $15 new member fee.


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 39/32/0
Albuquerque 50/20/0
Anchorage 21/12/0
Atlanta 52/32/0
Baltimore 45/31/0
Billings 35/25/0
Birmingham 56/28/0
Bismarck 28/4/0
Boise 37/26/.04
Boston 43/33/0
Buffalo 36/29/0
Charleston SC 60/45/0
Charleston WV 39/32/0
Charlotte 54/34/0
Cheyenne 52/24/0
Chicago 34/21/0
Cincinnati 42/36/0
Cleveland 34/31/0
Columbia SC 57/38/0
Dallas 63/30/0
Daytona Beach 68/63/.06
Denver 55/21/0


N U-Aw LENDER
.-. .- ...-,^ LENDER


----------


a~n~s~


I I a a _1 I ~- I I I a


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-04271


i


I


I









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042
ikirby@akecltyreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday. November


28,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHEERLEADING
Columbia Cheer
meeting Tuesday
The Columbia Cheer
Association has its
end-of-the-year
meeting and election set
for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Southside Recreation
Center. The meeting is
open to anyone
interested in little league
cheerleading.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at 965-1377.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons plan
holiday bowl
The Lake City
Falcons semi-pro
football team has a
holiday bowl planned
Dec. 4 at Memorial
Stadium. The Falcons
will be joined by the
Duval Tigers, the North
Florida Vikings and the
First Coast Cardinals.
Games begin at 3 p.m.
Admission is $5 for .
adults, and $3 for seniors
and children older than
10. Practice is under way
for the Falcons. The team
is seeking sponsors.
For details, call Elaine
Ortiz Harden at 292-3039
or (386) 438-5728, or
Luis Santiago at 292-4138.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
soccer at Ed White High,
girls-5:30 p.m., boys-
7:20 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Tuesday
Fort White High
girls soccer at Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee
High; 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Fort White High JV
girls soccer vs. Columbia
High, 5 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High
girls soccer at Williston,
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball at Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. P.K. School,
7 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Columbia
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at St. Francis


Catholic, 2 p.m.


Bulls beat Miami


USF's win in OT
may put Shannon
on the hot seat.

By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI South Florida
never loses in overtime.
And the Bulls' latest great
escape might have Randy
Shannon running out of
time at Miami.
Jerrell Young's intercep-
tion of Jacory Harris with
5 seconds left in regulation
kept Miami from trying a
potentially game-winning
field goal, Demetris Murray
had a 1-yard touchdown run
in the first OT and South
Florida stunned Miami
23-20 on Saturday spark-
ing more speculation about


Shannon's future.
Miami (7-5) finished 3-3 at
home, its worst mark since
1997. In Shannon's four sea-
sons, the Hurricanes are
28-22 overall.
"It's very tough," Miami
fullback Pat Hill said. "Not
everything works how you
want it to work."
That is, unless you're
South Florida, and unless
you're in overtime. The
Bulls have gone past regu-
lation nine times in their
relatively brief football his-
tory and won them all.
Matt Bosher's 38-yard
field goal put Miami up
20-17, but South Florida
answered aided largely
by a play that Bulls coach
Skip Holtz didn't want to
see called.
Holtz yelled into his head-


i 0..









,. '. "' ;
''*.. .;*' ,l^ .' .. ,- ...: :='.:i g ." -, :"-:,' '"''"" '

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set that a crossing route
from quarterback Bobby
Eveld a freshman who
took over for an injured B.J.
Daniels at halftime to
Joel Miller was "stupid."
Whoops. Miller made a
9-yard catch, setting up first-
and-goal at the Miami 1,
and Murray's second score
of the afternoon held up
after a video review to send
the Bulls into a celebratory
frenzy.
"Best call we ever made,"
Holtz said.
South Florida (7-4) clos-
es its regular season at
home next week against
Connecticut.
Miami now will wait
and wonder about its bowl
invitation and likely
about Shannon's job secu-
rity as well.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
South Florida's Demetris Murray scores from the one-yard
line for the overtime win, as Miami's Marcus Forston (99)
makes the stop Saturday in Miami.


~d-.u


(l
I"


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Florida State quarterback Christian Ponder (7) runs through the Florida defense as Justin Trattou (94) and Jelani Jenkins (43) hold on for the tackle.


Seminoles take out six years of frustration


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The day
could not have gone any better for
Florida State.
The 22nd-ranked Seminoles put
the brakes on a six-year losing streak
against archrival Florida with a
31-7 victory Saturday and moments
afterward slipped into next week's
Atlantic Coast Conference champi-
onship game with a big boost from
Maryland.
"This is just a topping to a great
day for us," first-year Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher said. "What
a perfect day for Florida State
football."
Fisher's players were already
celebrating what turned out to be a
relatively easy win over the Gators
and the locker room got even nois-
ier when the verdict came in from
College Park, Md.
'To find out after beating Florida
that you're going to the ACC cham-
pionship game, that's pretty spe-


"We're becoming a factor again in this league
and a factor again in this state."

Jimbo Fisher,
Florida State head coach


cial," Florida State quarterback
Christian Ponder said.
Ponder had already finished his
work, throwing for 221 yards and
three touchdowns in his final game
at home, helping Fisher finish the
regular season 9-3. Ponder connect-
ed with Rodney Smith (39 yards),
Taiwan Easterling (15) and Willie
Haulstead (29) on TD passes.
In his first year as a head
coach at any level, Fisher and the
Seminoles advanced to the ACC
title game for the second time and
first since 2005, when they upset
Virginia. Tech. The 'Noles-will play
the Hokies again with the winner
slated for the Orange Bowl.
Saturday's resounding victory
over Florida also gave the 45-year-
old Fisher a sweep of in-state rivals.


The Seminoles hammered Miami
45-17 last month.
"We're becoming a factor again
in this league and a factor again
in this state." Fisher said. "That
makes us relevant."
The Seminoles (6-2 ACC) put the
game away with a 21-point second
quarter, getting three touchdowns
in just over nine minutes to take a
24-7 halftime lead.
Florida (7-5, 4-4 Southeastern
Conference) capped its worst regu-
lar season under Urban Meyer with
its first loss to FSU since Meyer
took over in Gainesville in L-'I r'.
"Obviously we're down," Meyer
conceded. "I didn't believe we'd be
that far down, but we are."
Meyer's dominance against
Florida State was one of the major


reasons Bobby Bowden was
forced out last season as coach and
Fisher promoted from offensive
coordinator/coach-in-waiting.
The Gators were awful, commit-
ting four turnovers and scoring
only on their opening drive. John
Brantley's 21-yard touchdown to
Robert Clark was set up by Andre
DuBose's 62-yard kickoff return.
Florida had won the last three
in the series by an average of 30
points. The Seminoles' 24-point
winning margin was its largest over
Florida since a 52-17 victory in
1988.
Florida State's 9-3 finish is its
best since 2003, the last time the
Seminoles beat the Gators.
But things had mostly gone
downhill since.
Fisher was elevated to the head
coach two days after last year's
37-10 loss in Gainesville, sending
the 80-year-old Bowden into retire-
ment at least a year before he
FSU continued on 2B


_











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
FSN Coll. of Charleston at North
Carolina
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic,
championship game,Wisconsin vs. Notre
Dame at Orlando
7:30 p.m.
FSN Florida at Florida St.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 76 Classic, championship
game, Virginia Tech vs. UNLV at Anaheim,
Calif.
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC San Diego at Indianapolis
TENNIS
12:30 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP, Barclays World Tour
Finals, championship match, at London
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
FSN -Texas at Sta.ford

Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Virginia at Minnesota
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN San Francisco at Arizona
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Dallas at Carolina

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


T Pct PF PA
0.818 334 266
0.818264 187
0.500 172 208
0.200 213 276

T Pct PF PA
0.600 268 216
0.600220 270
0.500257 198
0.400 244 287

T Pct PF PA
0'.700233 178
0.700 235 165


East
W L
New England 9 2
N.Y. Jets 9 2
Miami 5 5
Buffalo 2 8
South
W L
Indianapolis 6 4
Jacksonville 6 4
Tennessee 5 5
Houston 4 6
North
W L
Baltimore 7 3
Pittsburgh 7 3


Cleveland
Cincinnati


Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


3 7 0.300 192 206
2 9 0.182225 288
West
W L TPct PF PA
6 4 0.600 243 207
5 5 0.500 238 223
5 5 0.500274211
3 7 0.300217 287


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas

Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona
San Francisco


East
W L
7 3
6 4
5 5
3 8
South
W L
8 2
-8 3
7 3
1 9
North
W L
7 3
7 3
3 7
2 9
West
W L
5 5
4 6.
3 7
3 7


T Pct PF PA
0.700 284 226
0.600 253 220
0.500 202 245
0.273 256 301

T Pct PF PA
0.800 256 192
0.727 265 197
0.700209 206
0.100 117 252

T Pct PF PA
0.700 191 146
0.700 252 146
0.300 172 226
0.182258 282

T Pct PF PA
0.500 185 233
0.400 177 198
0.300 188 292
0.300 160 219


Thursday's Games
New England 45, Detroit 24
New Orleans 30, Dallas 27
N.Y. Jets 26, Cincinnati 10
Today's Games
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay atAtlanta, I p.m.
Minnesota atWashington, I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, I p.m.
Carolina at Cleveland, I p:m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Indianapolis,8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 2
Houston at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 5
San Francisco at Green Bay, I p.m.
Denver at Kansas City, I p.m.
Buffalo at Minnesota. I p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, I p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, I p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, I p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
New Orleans at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Carolina at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 6
N.Y. Jets at New England, 8:30 p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Saturday's Games
Atlanta 99, New York 90
Orlando 100,Washington 99
Cleveland 92, Memphis 86
Philadelphia 102, New Jersey 86
Golden State at Iinnesota (n)
Miami at Dallas (n)
Charlotte at Milwaukee (n)
Chicago at Sacramento (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta at Toronto, I p.m.
New York at Detroit, 1:30 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 3 p.m.
Utah at LA. Clippers, 3:30 pm.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 7 p.m.
Portland at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Denver, 8 p.m.
Indiana at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Utah, 9 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Michigan State vs. Tennessee .
Tech, I p.m.
No. I I Missouri vs. Arkansas-Pine
Bluff, 4 p.m.
No. 16 Florida at Florida State,
7:45 p.m.
No. 21 Temple vs. Texas A&M at HP
Field House, Orlando,TBA
No. 25 North Carolina vs. College of
Charleston, 5:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
New Jersey 2, Philadelphia I, SO
Pittsburgh 4, Calgary I
Montreal 3, Buffalo I
Ottawa 3,Toronto 0
Florida atTampa Bay (n)
Dallas at St. Louis (n)
N.Y. Rangers at Nashville (n)
Anaheim at Phoenix (n)
Minnesota at ColorAdo (n)
San Jose at Edmonton (n)
Chicago at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Carolina at Washington, 5 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, S p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


COURTESY PHOTO

Lady Falcons volleyball awards

Lake City Middle School volleybaU's 2010 award winners are (front row, from left):
Tatum Morgan, GPA; Ashley Shoup, GPA and Best Server; Leslie Ann Ronsonet, GPA and
Best Defensive Player; Morgan Hartopp, Captain and Best Setter; ,Kamdyn Kvistad, GPA;
Kyrsten Giebeig, GPA. Back row (from left) are: Grace Harry, Best Offensive Player;
Jara Courson, GPA and Best Offensive Player; Malia Hogue-Pua, Falcon Award;
Hanna Baker, Captain and Best Setter; Jemma Thompson, GPA and Falcon Awards;
Alanis Koberlein, Most Improved.



FSU: FSU headed to ACC title game


Continued From Page 11

wanted.
And while there was no
Bowden on Florida State's
sideline Saturday, there
was also no Tim Tebow
for Florida. Tebow had put
up prolific performances
against Florida State but
his successors all three
of them were ineffective
with Brantley managing to
throw for 52 of Florida's
paltry 64 passing yards.
Florida hadn't lost five
games in a season since
2004, former coach Ron
Zook's last at the school
and it was the first time in
10 years as a head coach
that Urban Meyer has seen
one of his teams lose five
times. It was also the sec-
ond worst beating a Florida
team has suffered under
Meyer, surpassed only by a
31-6 loss to Alabama earlier
this year.
Florida was unable to
overcome its mistakes and
couldn't get its offense
untracked, totaling just 276
yards with Jordan Reed's
74 yards on 13 carries lead-


ing the way.
The Gators drove deep
into Seminoles territoryjust
before half, but the drive
ended with 55 seconds left
when Florida State's Mike
Harris cut in front of the
intended receiver for an
interception at the 7.
Nothing worked for the
Gators, who had three
turnovers in the first half
and were stopped short on
a fake punt.
Meyer gambled on
fourth-and-5 from his own
36 early in the second quar-
ter when Chas Henry was
tackled a yard short of a
first down.
"We didn't coach smart,"
Meyer said.
Ponder lofted a 39-yard
touchdown pass to Smith
on play after the unsuccess-
ful fake punt to give Florida
State a 17-7 lead, just 81 sec-
onds after Lonnie Pryor's
9-yard touchdown run gave
the Seminoles the lead
at 10-7. Dustin Hopkins'
38-yard field goal gave FSU
an early 3-0 lead.


Maryland 38,
No. 21 NC State 31

COLLEGE PARK, Md.
- Danny O'Brien threw
for a career-high 417 yards
and four touchdowns,
all to Torrey Smith, and
Maryland denied No. 21
North Carolina State a
spot in the Atlantic Coast
Conference title game by
defeating the Wolfpack.
Needing a victory, to
win the league's Atlantic
Division, North Carolina
State (8-4, '5-3) scored
touchdowns on its first two
possessions to take a 14-0
lead.
But the Terrapins (8-4,
5-3) rallied behind O'Brien,
whose deft throwing made
up for a running game
that finished with negative
yardage.
North Carolina State
ended up in a second-place
tie with Maryland behind
Florida State, which will
face Virginia Tech in the
championship game on
Dec. 5.


ACROSS 39 Cousin's dad
41 Naturalist John


Answer to Previous Puzzle

C OBIS HIAR R Y
SAVORY EIDI IUIM

s A LLO W^M E Dril
AA N


A L E ODES OARS
FUTURED ECLAIR

SN K E D SES'TIO
G EN SIN HE E
.SAUEED
SIK I FN EARP
P 0 N,CH COLLA
ENSU ES ETHANE
WAITER TI- N G


COURTESY PHOTO

Best in Lake Butler

Lake City's Diamond Extreme 8-under baseball team played in the Lake Butler Fall
Baseball Classic on Nov. 5-7. It was Diamond Extreme's first tournament and the team
was undefeated for the weekend and won first place. Team members are (front row, from left)
Colby Holton, Cole Williams, Mason Gray, Bryant Green, Darren Eubank, Kyler Kernon and
Zac Maxwell. Second row (from left) are Tyler Yaxley, Colby Black, Devin Landry,
Logan Dicks and Ty Wehinger..


Winter Blast runner-up

The Columbia Crushers 10-under softball team placed second in the NSA Winter Blast -
Tournament in Ocala. Team members are (front row, from left) Caroline Lewis,
Shelby Blakenship, Adrianna Saavedra and Whitney Lee. Second row (from left) are
Jolyn Myers, Brandy Wacha, S.K. Lewis, Cris'Deona Beasley, Tiara Carter and
Savannah Blakenship. Back row coaches are head coach Tim Blackwell (left) and
assistant coach Wendy Dohrn.


1 Gibe at
5 Rx monitor
8 Tend the gar-
den
11 Charged parti-
cles
12 Reunion
attendee
14 Turtle-to-be
15 Kitchen acces-
sory
17 Ms. Lupino of
"The Sea Wolf"
18 Gets dirty'
19 Crumpled up
21 Bulrush or cat-
tail
23 Coal deposit
24 Hikers' shel-
ters
27 Fishing gear
29 Vast expanse
.30 Keyring attach-
ment, maybe
34 Imploring
37 tai cocktail
38 Now, to Caesar


43 Adventurer,
often
45 Atom middles
47 Pine cousin
50 Roswell crash-
er
51 Scouring pad
(2 wds.)
54 Natural elev.
55 Basted,
56 Lotion additive
57 Hopper
58 Drop - line
59 Talks on and
on

DOWN


Useful hint
Romances
Gung-ho
Souvenir buy
(hyph.)
Exam option
Washout
From the top


Alpine. moppet
Utah city
By Jove!
Really go
places
Bullfight bravos


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


20 Pastrami sell-
er
22 Soak
24 Sugar amt.
25 Elongated
swimmer
26 Kilt-wearer's
refusal
28 MIT grad
30 Brooch
31 Truck mfr.
32 Film producer
Roach
33 Standoff
35 Indigo plant
36 Coercion
39 Europe-Asia
range
40 Fjord territory
41 Civilian dress
42 Storrs coll.
44 Helen, in
Spain
45 Asleep, as a
foot
46 Big-ticket -
48 Fizzy drink
49 Catch a fish
52 Lamb's parent
53 Guitarist -
Paul


@2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


11-29










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


OUTDOORS


COURTESY PHOTO

Hamilton harvest
Curt Burlingame of Lake City shows off an 8-point buck he
took in Hamilton County on Nov. 21. The deer had a 16-inch
span and weighed 175 pounds.




Tree falls hurt


more hunters


than guns


By DON SHOOPMAN
The Daily Iberian

NEW IBERIA, La. As
you set out to go hunting in
a tree stand in your favorite
deer hunting spot, remem-
ber this sobering news from
the Midwest: Nearly half of
deer hunter injuries are the
result of falls rather than
gunshots.
The American Surgeon
journal recently published
the study by the Ohio State
University Medical Center,'
which examined more than
a decade of Level 1 trauma
center admissions at -two
hospitals in central Ohio.
The study showed falls
from the tree stands are
the leading cause of hunt-
ing related injuries in the
Buckeye State.
Researchers identified
130 patients who suffered
hunting-related injuries.
Fifty percent of injuries
results from falls and 92
percent of the falls were
from tree stands; 29 percent
of the injuries were attrib-
uted to gunshot wounds.
How bad were the
injuries in falls from tree
stands? Dr. Charles Cook,
trauma surgeon and lead
author of the study, noted
the severity was quite high
with 59 percent of the vic-
tims suffering fractures
- 47 percent experienced
lower extremity fractures,
fractures to upper extremi-
ties accounted for 18 per-
cent of the injuries and 18
percent of the victims had
closed head injuries.
Surgery was required
for 81 percent of fall-related
injuries and 8.2 percent of
the victims suffered perma-
nent neurological damage.
The study showed vari-
ables like rain and poor
lighting were more likely


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -
SOBAS


2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
KLANE



CUNBOEI

In

GITSAM
7 ^ ^\^^\ -
__ ^^ ^^ ^/ __ a


to lead to accidents than
drugs or alcohol, which
were involved in less than
10 percent of the cases.
Those small deer stands,
which are positioned 10 to
30 feet above the ground,
are the biggest threat for
hunters in the Midwest and
the South, Cook said.
Hunters need to take tree
stand safety tips to heart
and follow them to avoid
such injuries.
Never carry equipment
while climbing. Use a haul
line to raise or lower gear
and make sure guns are
unloaded and broadheads
covered.
Always use a climbing
belt because most accidents
happen when a hunter is
climbing up or down a tree.
Check permanent tree
stands every year before
hunting in them. Replace
worn or weak lumber.
Read, understand and
follow factory-recommend-
ed practices when installing
commercial stands.
Choose healthy, living
trees when using climbing
devices. Rough-barked tree
such as oak are best.
Never put weight on a
single branch.
Climb higher than the
stand and step down onto
it.
Wear boots with non-
skid soles because steps or
platforms can be slippery in
rain, sleet or snow.
Don't fall asleep. This
is a common cause of acci-
dents.
Never wear a ring,
which can catch tree limbs
and equipment.
-* Remove logs and
upturned branches below
the tree stand.
Carry a whistle to call
for help, a first aid kit, flash-
light and cell phone.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


THE HIGH ROLLER LEFT
THE CASINO WITH A
5MAL-L FORTUNE
BECAUs5E HE --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:T-1
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: LADLE EVENT FINISH BEDECK
SAnswer: What barbed wire is usually used for -
DE-FENCE


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 214; 2. Lori Davis 181;
3. Susie Flick 169. 1. Dess Fennell
242; 2. Mark Koppa 235; 3. Dave
Ward 220.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 573; 2. Gloria Dennis 474;
3. Susie Flick 458. 1. Mark .Koppa
633; 2. Dess Fennell 562; 3. Jim
Lobaugh 533.
High handicap game: 1. Lorie
Niquette 237; 2. Lori Davis 221;
3. (tie) Linda Andrews, Carla Nyssen
213. 1. Dess Fennell 262; 2. Dave
Ward 258;. 3. Michael. Mclnally 252.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 657; 2. Pat Fennell 606;
3. Linda Oliver 605. 1. Mark Koppa
705; 2. Jim Lobaugh 661; 3. Frank
Miller 653.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
175. 1. Tom Sewejkis 194.
(results from Nov. 16)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Lucky Strikers
(37-19); 2. Legal Ladies (33-23);
3. Spare Us (30-26, 544 team aver-
age); 4. Silver Ladies (30-26, 500
team average).
High handicap game: 1. (tie)
Karen Clampett, Charlene Moss 230;
3. Joan Carman 227.
High handicap series: 1. Charlene
Moss 618; 2. (tie) Karen Clampett,
Betty Schneiders 612.
(results from Nov. 23)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(40-16); 2. Farmers (33-23); 3. Razzle
Dazzle (31.5-24.5).


High scratch game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 195; 2. Joanne Denton 181;
3. Betty Brown 180. 1. Ross Meyers
221; 2. Dan Ritter 205; 3. Art Joubert
194.
High scratch series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 512; 2. Betty Brown 452;
3. Bea Purdy 438. 1. Ross Meyers
553; 2. Dan Ritter 530; 3. Art Joubert
529.
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 245; 2. Joanne Denton 235;
3. Cookie Reddick 230. 1. Ross
Meyers 256; 2. Joe Peterson 237;
3. Jim Hawkins 226.
High handicap series: 1. Jeanne
Sireci 620; 2. Janie Posey 611;
3. BeaPurdy603.1. KeithHerbster695;
2. Dan Ritter 620; 3. Art Joubert 616.
(results from Nov. 23)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(40-16); 2. Average Joe's (34.5-21.5);
3. McGhghy's Navy (33-23).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
180; 2. Donna Duncan 178; 3. Kim
Schneiders 172. 1. Bobby Trunnell
241; 2. Mark Moore 223; 3. Matt
Stephan 215.
High scratch series: 1. Liz
Randall 509; 2. Kim Schneiders 467;
3. Heather Ostendorf 437. '1. Mark
Moore 629; 2. Bill Duncan 611;
3. Bobby Trunnell 593.
(results from Nov. 21)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Budweiser
(216-144); 2. Lake City Bowl (215.5-
144.5); 3. Team 8 (212-148).
High scratch game: 1. Zech Strohl
268; 2. Bobby Smith 247; 3. Grant
Spears 246.
High scratch series: 1. Zech Strohi
707; 2. Steve Myers 645; 3. Matt
Stephan 638.


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FLYERS


High handicap game: 1. Zech
Strohl 272; 2. (tie) Zach Daughtry,
Terry Shay 271; 4. Grant Spears 269.
High handicap series: 1. Steve
Myers 762; 2. Zech Strohl 719;
3. Boaty Boatwright 703.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
224.27; 2. Bill Duncan 208.53; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 208.42.
(results from Nov. 15)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Oui Suk
(39-13); 2. Waterbury Builders
(35-17); 3. Incredi-bowls (33-19).
High scratch game: 1. Pat
Gallegos 255; 2. Candace Christie
224; 3. Bridgette Harrelson 220.
1. Frank Howell 252; 2. Mark Rowland
245; 3. Jerry Howd 244.
High scratch series: 1. Pat
Gallegos 626; 2. Candace Christie
624; 3. Bridgette Harrelson 610.
1. Jerry Howd 626; 2. Wally Howard
616; 3. Bryan Taylor 593.
High handicap game: 1. Pat
Gallegos 294; 2. Nina Howd 275;
3. Melody Snipes 252. 1. Jerry Howd
289; 2. Frank Howell 285; 3. Mark
Rowland 277.
High handicap series: 1. Pat
Gallegos 743; 2. Candace Christie
678; 3. Nina Howd 670. 1. Jerry
Howd 761; 2. Bob Feasel 690;
3. Frank Howell 684.
(results from Nov. 12)

Youth leagues
MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Chicken
Alfredo! (112-64); 2. Bobby's Angels
(104-72); 3. Team 2 (86-90).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 200; 2. Sara Sykes 183;
3. Christine Peters 176. 1. Danny


CREDIT CARDS


King 236; 2. (tie) Garrett Shay, Dalton
Coar 210.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 535; 2. Christine Peters 517;
3. Sara Sykes 474. 1. Dalton Coar
599; 2. (tie) Cody Stuart, Danny King
581.
MAJORS
.Tearn Standings: 1. The Odd
Balls (32-12); 2. Noble Team (28-16);
3. Care Bears on Fir (26-18). -
High handicap game: 1. Lauren
Snipes 238; 2. Linden Barney 222;
3. Jennifer Pharis 216. 1. (tie) Chase
Campbell, Brandon Shrum 245;
3. Jay Croft IV 244.
High handicap series: 1. Lauren
Snipes 688; 2. Linden Barney 627;
3. Jennifer Pharis 592. 1. Brandon
Shrum 632; 2. Jacob Wheeler 628;
3. Jordan Salzer 613.
JUNIORS
Team Standings: 1. Spare Time
(28.5-15.5); 2. Spineless Pins (26-18);
3. Team Strike (25.5-18.5).
High handicap game: 1. Bryannah
Billingsley 214; 2. Tiffany Ritch 206;
2. Amanda Schmitt 201. 1. Nick
Kasper 220; 2. Douglas Christensen
215; 3. C.J. Kieckhafer 207.
High handicap series: 1. Bryannah
Billingsley 566; 2. Kaylee Blackstock
558; 2. Amanda Schmitt 534.
1. Douglas Christensen 606; 2. Nick
Kasper 601; 3. Anthony Cohrs 570.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Emily
Wells 155; 2. Biancah Billingsley 143.
1. Eric Anderson 177;'2. Josh Kasper
166; 3. John Wells 164.
High handicap series: 1. Emily
Wells 451; 2. Biancah Billingsley 398.
1. Eric Anderson 515; 2. Josh Kasper
469; 3. Antonio Perez 456.
(results from Nov. 13)


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


----""~"""$~


'N Nalor %Of I IN &W %









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Big Ten ends in three-wa


e


Associated P s

The Bic Ten race won't
officially e decided until
Dec. 5' en the final BCS
standir ,s come out.
No. 5 Wisconsin, how-
ever, left little doubt which
of the three teams that tied
for first would be going to
the Rose Bowl.
The Badgers, No. 8 Ohio
State and No. 11 Michigan
State all'finished 11-1 and
7-1 in conference.

No. 8 Ohio State 37,
Michigan 7
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
Jordan Hall broke the game
open with an 85-yard kick-
off return and No. 8 Ohio
State's defense stymied
high-powered Michigan,
stretching the Buckeyes'
mastery in "The Game" to
seven straight wins.
The Buckeyes (11-1, 7-1)
picked up two celebration
penalties after touchdowns
but had a lot to celebrate: A
share of a record-tying sixth
Big Ten title and, most like-
ly, a Bowl Championship
Series bowl berth.
Terrelle Pryor had two
TD passes and Dan "Boom"
Herron finished with 175
yards on 22 carries.
It was another stumble
for Michigan (7-5, 3-5)
coach Rich Rodriguez, now
0-3 against the Buckeyes
and just 15-21 overall with
the Wolverines.

No. 11 Michigan St. 28,
Penn State 22
STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
- No. 11 Michigan State
has claimed at least a share
of its first Big Ten title
since 1990 after beating
Penn State 28-22 at blustery
Beaver Stadium.
Edwin Baker ran for 118
yards and a touchdown


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michigan State tight end Charlie Gantt (center) catches a touchdown pass in front of Penn
State defender Drew Astorino (28) at Beaver Stadium in State College, Pa., on Saturday.


Saturday and Keshawn
Martin's 35-yard reverse
deep into Penn State terri-
tory set up another early
score for the Spartans
(11-1, 7-1 Big Ten).
Quarterback Kirk
Cousins threw for 152 yards
and two touchdowns to
B.J. Cunningham, and the
defense held off a fourth-
quarter charge by penalty-
prone Penn State (7-5, 4-4).
Matt McGloin threw two
touchdown passes for Penn
State.

No. 5 Wisconsin 70,
Northwestern 23
MADISON, Wis. No.
5 Wisconsin has earned a
share of the Big Ten cham-
pionship with its rout of
Northwestern.
Wisconsin (11-1, 7-1 Big
Ten) will split the confer-
ence title with Ohio State
and Michigan State and
the Badgers appear to
have the inside track on


a Rose Bowl berth, which
will be determined by the
Bowl Championship Series
standings.
Montee Ball rushed for
178 yards and four touch-
downs for the Badgers.
Venric Mark returned a
kickoff 94 yards for a touch-
down for Northwestern
(7-5, 3-5).

No. 12 Arkansas 31,
No. 6 LSU 23
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -
Ryan Mallett threw for 320
yards and three touchdowns
as No. 12 Arkansas made
its case for the school's first
BCS bowl game with a win
over No. 6 LSU.
Mallett finished 13 of
23 passing and had touch-
down passes of 85, 80 and
39 yards for the Razorbacks
(10-2, 6-2 Southeastern
Conference), who won
their sixth straight game
and finished second in the
SEC West.


Mallett now has 60 touch-
down passes in two sea-
sons at Arkansas, and his
39-yarder to Joe Adams on
fourth-and-3 in the fourth
quarter put the Razorbacks
up 28-20.
Jordan Jefferson passed
for 174 yards and ran for 39
for the Tigers (10-2, 6-2).

No. 13 Virginia Tech 37,
Virginia 7
BLACKSBURG, Va.
- Ryan Williams ran for
two touchdowns and No. 13
Virginia Tech won its 10th
consecutive game and sev-
enth in a row over Virginia.
Tyrod Taylor threw for
176 yards and a touchdown
and became the career
passing yardage leader for
the Hokies (10-2, 8-0 ACC)..
Virginia Tech also
became the first team to
finish the regular season
unbeaten in Atlantic Coast
Conference play since
Florida State in 2000.


The game ended a diffi-
cult first season under coach
Mike London for Virginia
(4-8, 1-7). The Cavaliers lost
their final four games and
have now lost 13 straight
games in November.

No. 15 Missouri 35,
Kansas 7
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
- Blaine Gabbert directed
scoring drives on No. 15
Missouri's first two posses-
sions and later scored on
a 1-yard run himself, lead-
ing the Tigers to a victory
over Kansas in the 119th
renewal of college football's
second-oldest rivalry.
De'Vion Moore scored
two touchdowns for the
Tigers (10-2, 6-2 Big 12).
The Jayhawks (3-9, 1-7)
ended a miserable season
in Turner Gill's first year as
head coach and have lost
16 of 19 after opening 2009
with five straight wins.

Minnesota 27,
No. 24 Iowa 24
MINNEAPOLIS -
Duane Bennett's touch-
down run with 4:31 left lift-
ed Minnesota to a victory
over 24th-ranked Iowa, as
the Hawkeyes lost another
fourth-quarter lead and fell
to the rival Gophers for the
first time in four years.
DeLeon Eskridge had 95
yards and a touchdown on
21 carries for Minnesota
(3-9, 2-6 Big Ten).
Freshman Marcus Coker
carried 21 times for 90 yards
for Iowa (7-5, 4-4), which
closed the regular season
with three straight losses of
four points or fewer.

No. 4 TCU 66,
New Mexico 17
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
- Andy Dalton threw three


touchdown passes before
leaving with an elbow inju-
ry and No. 4 TCU capped
its second straight unde-
feated season with a second
consecutive Mountain West
championship.
The next stop for the
BCS-busting Horned Frogs
could very well be the Rose
Bowl.
* TCU (12-0, 8-0 Mountain
West) has been jockeying
with Boise State for a pos-
sible BCS appearance and
got a major boost from
Nevada, which knocked
off the previously unbeaten
Broncos on Friday night to
clear the Frogs an easier
path to Pasadena.
Fullback Luke Shivers
scored twice on short runs
and reserve quarterback
Casey Pachall passed for
one TD and ran for another
as TCU dominated New
Mexico (1-11, 1-7).

No. 23 Utah 17,
BYU 16
SALT LAKE CITY -
Brandon Burton blocked a
last-second field goal to lift
No. 23 Utah to a wild vic-
tory over BYU in their final
game as Mountain West
Conference rivals.
Mitch Payne had already
kicked three field goals
for BYU and was lined.
up for the game-winning
42-yarder.
But Burton came up big
forthe Utes (10-2, 7-1), who
likely are headed to the Las
Vegas Bowl.
BYU (6-6, 5-2) at one
point had a 13-0 lead. But
the Utes came back behind
sophomore quarterback
Jordan Wynn, who had
been benched.
Wynn pulled Utah within
13-10 with a 37-yard touch-
down pass to DeVonte
Chrisopher with 13:46 to
play.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsak@lakectyreportercom


BUSINESS


Sunday, November 28, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


CHAMBER CORNER


Jim Poole


Website

t to attract

investors

in county

he elections
are over and
I would like
to express my
thanks to the
voters of Columbia County
for reauthorizing tax abate-
ment as an incentive for
the County to use when
recruiting business. Tax
- abatement may also be
used by existing companies
that meet the guidelines
according to the Florida
statues.
We also appreciate the
overwhelming vote to
defeat Amendment 4. This
amendment could have
proved to be costly as well
as adding Additional red
tape to completing projects
in Florida. This would have
been a good marketing tool
for other states competing
with Florida on projects.
The economy looks
better at times. We are
starting to see more activ-
ity from possible projects
for the next two years.
WEBSITE continued on 2C


A~ ..~


Why residents should buy local


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
and A.C. GONZALEZ
* arobinson@lakecityreporter.com,
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. com
With the
start
of the
holiday
shopping
season, consumers are
encouraged to look locally
for their next purchase.
"It's really important
that we (shop locally),"
said Dennille Folsom,
Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce executive
director. "It is important
to support the community
we live in."
Holiday shopping is the
most important retail sea-
son for local businesses,
said Peter Francis, owner
of Joye's Gems & Things.
"The holiday shopping
season in general is about
40% of our business," he
said.
Local businesses often
offer products and servic-
es not found elsewhere.
"You've got to impress
your customers," Francis
said. "Make them feel like
that's where they need to
go."
Shopping local supports
the local economy, said
George Ward, owner of
Ward's Jewelry and Gifts.
It's an economic multi-
plier.
"Every dollar spent in
Lake City creates five or
more," he said. "If every-
body is going out of town
spending money, it's a loss
to the local economy."


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
George Ward (left), owner of Ward's Jewelry and Gifts, shows Ashley Davis of Live Oak a Mariana necklace while she
shops in the downtown store Friday. Davis said she shops in local stores to support the area and its business owners. 'You
know the people that you're buying from,' Davis said. 'I think it's great. It helps Lake City and it builds relationships.'


Customers can pos-
sibly get better prices and
service shopping local than
going to a big city, said
Gene Perry, Amygene's
Embroidery Studio owner.
Traveling elsewhere to
shop can waste gas when
the same products are
available locally or can be
ordered.
"I would encourage
people to look local before
they choose to go out of


town," Perry said. "At least,
.check local before going to
the big city."
Local shopping is usually
more convenient for the
community, Folsom said.
"If you're going to spend
money and tax dollars, why
not spend it in your own
community?" she said.
Folsom said she thinks


there will be more of an
increase of shopping local
this year with the addition
of TJMaxx and Big Lots.
"People are really excited
to go check them out," she
said.
All of the customers at
Southern Exposure Salon
and Boutique are local
shoppers, said Danette


O'Neal, owner.
"I think people try to
shop locally, and I really
appreciate that," she said.
The community offers
a variety of businesses for
customers to choose from.
"We should try to patron-
ize as many local business-
es in Lake City as we can,"
she said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424
I.This Thinq Called


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sales of $12 million in
$48 million in 2010. If
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If not, here's what to d
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means that sales quadr
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2007 and 2010, sales g


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Debt turmoil, contagion fears sweep Europe


By BARRY HATTON
Associated Press

LISBON,- Portugal Europe
struggled mightily Friday to keep
the debt crisis from engulfing
country after country. Portugal
passed austerity measures to fend
off the speculative trades push-
ing it toward a bailout and Ireland
rushed to negotiate its own immi-
nent rescue.
As Portugal and Spain insisted
they will not seek outside help,
creating an eery sense of deja-vu
for investors, Europe braced for
what seems inevitable more
expensive bailouts.
The Portuguese Parliament
approved an unpopular debt-reduc-
ing package, including tax hikes
and cuts in pay and welfare ben-
efits. But while that helped to avoid
a sharper deterioration in bond
markets, the sense among analysts
was that the move had only bought
a little time.
Adding to the pressure, Ireland's
major banks were hit with credit
downgrades one to junk bond
status as speculation mounted
that the EU-IMF bailout of Ireland,
to be revealed within days, would
require investors to take losses, a
possibility earlier denied by offi-
cials.
"This confusing 'pea-soup' of
indecision, vacillation and disunity


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Portuguese Prime Minister Jose Socrates (center).gives a thumbs up next to Finance Minister Fernando
Teixeira dos Santos (right) as they leave the parliament after the final approval df the government's 2011 state
budget on Friday in Lisbon. Portugal's Parliament has approved a plan to hike taxes and cut salaries and wel-
fare benefits next year in a bid to reverse waning market confidence in its public finances.


by the EU is beginning to cre-
ate unnecessarily seismic waves
of fear in international bond and
money markets," said David Buik,
markets analyst at BGC Partners.
Yields in fiscally weak eurozone
countries remained near record
highs Friday, stocks slumped


across the board and the 16-nation
euro lost another 0.8 percent on
the day to trade at $1.3241, just off
two-month lows.
Portugal's high debt and low
growth have alarmed investors, but
the government insists it doesn't
require an international rescue


- a line ominously reminiscent
of claims by Greece and Ireland
before their massive rescues.
Analysts say markets need more
reassurance from EU leaders that
the rot can be stopped in Portugal
before spreading to Spain, the con-
tinent's fourth-largest economy


- a scenario that would threat-
en the 16-nation euro currency
itself.
The financial crisis took a step
in that direction this week, as it
increasingly becomes apparent
that bond investors will not be
pacified by austerity measures
but want weak countries' public
finances to be plugged once and
for all. Greece, which accepted
a bailout six months ago, and
Ireland are still far from being
able to return to international
debt markets.
Ireland wallowed in political
turmoil Friday, frightening inves-
tors with the prospect of a power
vacuum even as it must pass its
bailout and austerity plan.
Prime Minister Brian Cowen
saw his hold on power slip another
notch, as his ruling Fianna Fail
party lost a special election for
a long-empty seat in parliament
The winner vowed to force Cowen
from office before he can pass
an emergency 2011 budget being
demanded as part of the interna-
tional rescue.
Dublin still negotiated the final
details of a $113 billion EU-IMF
rescue package, which is expected
to be presented within days. Bonds
yields rose to a new euro-era high
of 9.19 percent, up from 9.02 per-
cent the day before, as investors
dumped Ireland's debt.


WEBSITE: Officials preparing for IDA transition as a county department
Continued From Page 1A


Companies and individuals
are being very conserva-
tive about how they spend
their capital dollars.
They are being extra dil-
igent in making sure that
the location they choose
will prove to be the best
for their investment.
We all know on a per-
sonal basis that we want to
be sure that our own dol-
lars are in the best place to
provide good safe returns
for the near future.


The recent election
resulted in a lot of new
people in leadership posi-
tions at the federal, state
and local levels.
Your IDA staff will
have the opportunity
to provide input on the
direction for economic
development at the state
level through meeting
with representatives from
the new administration.
My position as chair-
man of the Enterprise


Florida Rural/Urban
Working Group, and Gina
Reynolds' position as a
member of the board of
trustees for the Florida
Chamber Foundation rep-
resenting 28 rural coun-
ties provides Columbia
County and our rural
partners a platform to
insure that our message
is heard.
We appreciate the abil-
ity to serve on these com-
mittees to provide feed-


back to those who set the
policies for our future.
The IDA went live
with its new website this
month. The site still has
some tweaking to com-
plete, but I believe that it
will represent our county
well as a tool for recruit-
ing new companies to
Columbia County.
Gina Reynolds has
been instrumental in
working with the website
designer to develop the


new site. You may access
it at www.ccflida.com."
The Columbia County
Board of Commissioners
and the IDA Board and
staff are working on a
transition plan for mak-
ing the IDA a county
department.
The goal is to appear
the same to the outside
client that the IDA will
work with on investing
in Columbia County
while adding additional


checks and balances to
the IDA operation and
relationship with the
County.
The goal is to provide
the best service possible
to a company looking to
make an investment in
Columbia County.
At the same time, the
citizens of Columbia
County will know that
the commission is
involved in an active
role.


I












i


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THEWEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


.9


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

Y NYSE Amex A Nasdaq
7,500.54 -140.54 2,074.83 -29.66 2,534.56 +16.44


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Edenor 12.45 +2.34 +23,1
RFlotekh 4.00 +.73 +22.3
PampaEng 17.49 +3.13 +21.8
JCrew 43.75 +7.26 +19.9
ChinaDigtl 8.50 +1.24 +17.1
MonslrWw 23.18 +3.32 +16.7
Bitauton 13.85 +1.80 +14.9
ChinaMM 2.80 +.36 +14.8
Guess 50.95 +6.40 +14.4
Dycom 12.75 +1.57 +14.0'

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GerovaF rs 26.48 -5.97 -18.4
BcoSantand 9.96 -1.75 -14.9
DexOne n 5.50 -.96 -14.9
TutorPerini 19.06 -3.12 -14.1
ZaleCp 2.81 '-.44 -13.5
ING 9.53 -1.36 -12.5
MahangrT 2.32 -.33 -12.5
GlobalCash 2.47 -.35 -12.4
BcBilVArg 10.32 -1.37 -11.7
DirxDMBull 59.80 -7.67 -11.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cifigrp 11266727 4.11 -.16
BkofAm 5773668 11.12 -.54
S&P500ETF5286734118.80-1.49
FordM 2320486 16.10 -.18
SPDR FndS231883 14.42 -.44
iShEMkts 2624020 44.80-1.71
GenElec 1751824 15.80 -.42
Bklrelnd 1564343 1.44-1.23
iShR2K 1387680 73.22 +.77
RegionsFnl332185 5.25 -.25

Diary
Advanced 1,610
Declined 1,526
New Highs 227
New Lows 54
Total issues 3,181
Unchanged 45
Volume 12,728,377,081


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AlmadnM g 3.83 +1.09 +39.8
L senPapn 7.10 +1.52 +27.2
DenisnMg 3.17 +.60 +23.3
Uranerz 3.85 +.65 +20.3
VimetX 14.43 +2.27 +18.7
LGLGrp 22.50 +3.30 +17.2
EndrHntrs 10.08 +1.26 +14.3
FialdPnt 4.09 +.50 +14.0
PhrmAth 3.67 +.33 +9.9
HeSustM 4.58 +.41 +9.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BovieMed 2.79 -.75 -21.2
CoastD 3.33 -.54 -14.0
Express-1 2.37 -.30 -.11.2
SearchMed 2.66 -.32 -10.7
Ever-Glory 2.06 -.19 -8.4
SinoHub 2.85 -.25 -8.1
PlatGpMet 2.06 -.18 -8.0
EstnLtCap 3.80 -.32 -7.8
GIblScape 2.01 -.17 -7.8
eMagin 4.98 -.38 -7.1

Most Active ($1 or more:
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
CheniereEn186319 6.20 +.04
DenisnMg 163832 3.17 +.60
NovaGldg 134100 14.25 -.35
PhrmAth 132586 3.67 +.33
GrtBasGg 102739 2.70 -.05
Taseko 101998 4.48 -.11
NwGoldg 97929 8.82 -.16
NAPallg 85961 5.59 -.09
Uranerz 85504 3.85 +.65
GoldStrg 85444 4.17 -.17

Diary
Advanced 275
Declined 249
New Highs 26
New Lows 12
Total issues 544
Unchanged 20
Volume 363,812,143


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OptBkH rs 3.46 +1.26 +57.3
eOnComm 3.18 +1.02 +47.2
Apricusrs 3.86 +1.16 +43.0
RDAMicn 17.57 +5.20 +42.0
SodaStrm n41.53 +10.97 +35.9
Vertro rs 6.81 +1.77 +35.1
Affymax 7.56 +1.96 +35.0
MagicSft 6.71 +1.68 +33.4
Inhibitex 2.86 +.70 +32.4
CPIInst 19.31 +4.62 +31.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ZionO&G wt 2.40 -1.03 -30.0
InfoSvcs un 2.41 -.84 -25.8
MELASci 3.87 -1.11 -22.3
MSTISRS11 4.38 -1.21 -21.6
SRISurg 3.65 -.70 -16.1
Sypris 3.16 -.60 -16.0
PrincNtl 3.20 -.60 -15.8
U nte 4.17 -.74 -15.1
FstSouthB 8.10 -1.40 -14.7
Telestone 12.00 -2.07 -14.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cisco 2344017 19.49 -.12
PwShs QQQ213766952.77 +.30
Novell 2021763 5.94 +.35
Microsoft 1994751 25.25 -.44
Intel' 1452378 21.34 +.21
MicronT 1240235 7.63 +.24
BrcdeCm 1079428 5.05 -.70
Oracle 1053504 27.49 -.66
Dell Inc 757794 13.65 -.25
SiriusXM 713529 1.40 +.00

Diary
Advanced 1,444
Declined 1,347
New Highs 275
New Lows 108
Total issues 2,871
Unchanged 80
Volume 5,967,886,275


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg%Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.68 27.93
AutoZone NY .. 259.48
BkofAm NY .04 11.12
Bklrelnd NY 1.04 1.44
BobEvans Nasd .80 32.11
BrcdeCm Nasd ... 5.05
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.35
CSX NY 1.04 61.67
Chevron NY 2.88 82,05
Cisco Nasd ... 19.49
Citigrp NY ... 4.11
CocaCI NY 1.76 64.11
DelMnte NY .36 18.83
Delhaize NY 2.02 70.07
DirFnBear NY 12.54
DrxFBull s NY 21.47
FamilyDIr NY .62 50.67
FordM NY 16.10
GenElec NY .48 15.80
GenMot n NY ... 33.80
HewlettP NY .32 43.20
HomeDp NY .95 31.00
iShJapn NY .16 10.27
iShEMkts NY .59 44.80
iShR2K NY .79 73.22
Intel Nasd .72 21.34
JPMorgCh NY .20 37.50
LVSands NY ... 50.06


-.39 -1.4 -.4
+8.28 +3.3 +64.2
-.54 -4.6-26.2
-1.23 -46.1 -75.9
-.77 -2.3 +10.9
-.70 -12.2 -33.8
-.02 -0.1 -10.3
-.51 -0.8 +27.2
-1.89 -2.3 +6.6
-.12 -0.6 -18.6
-.16 -3.7 +24.2
-.21 -0.3 +12.5
+1.32 +7.5 +66.0
-3.34 -4.5 -8.7
+.76 +6.5 -35.5
-1.54 -6.7 -13.1
+1.83 +3.7 +82.1
-.18 -1.1 +61.0
-.42 -2.6 +4.4
-.46 -1.3 -1.1
+.71 +1.7 -16.1
-.22 -0.7 +7.2
-.22 -2.1 +5.4
-1.71 -3.7 +8.0
+.77 +1.1 +17.3
+.21 +1.0 +4.6
-1,91 -4.8 -9.9
+.67 +1.4+235.1


Name Ex Div
Lowes NY .44
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .56
Novell Nasd
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .33
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.31
SearsHldgs Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FncINY .16
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
22.24 +.15 +0.7 -4.9
12.29 +.14 +1.2 +34.8
78.54 -1.10 -1.4 +25.8
7.63 +.24 +3.2 -27.7
25.25 -.44 -1.7 -17.2
9.01 +.83 +10.1 -27.1
50.78 -.69 -1.3 -3.9
8.00 +.25 +3.2 -23.4
9.55 -.57 -5.6 -25.7
5.94 +.35 +6.3 +43.1
87.65 -.54 -0.6 +7.7
27.49 -.66 -2.4 +12.1
32.55 +.42 +1.3 +22.3
63.90 -.81 -1.3 +5.1
16.49 -.31 -1.8 -9.3
143.14 +2.89 +2.1 +31.9
52.77 +.30 +0.6 +15.3
26.99 +.58 +2.2 -23.0
5.25 -.25 -4.5 -.8
43.88 +.07 +0.2 +6.6
118.80 -1.49 -1.2 +6.6
66.06 +2,31 +3.6 -20.8
37.83 -.24 -0.6 +13.5
3.93 -.08 -2.0 +7.4
14.42 -.44 -2.9 +.1
30.31 -.23 -0.8 +4.0
53.74 -.65 -1.2 +.5
26.65 -.84 -3.1 -1.3


--l Ik


Stock Footnotes: g 'Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred, rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. t = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi
When Issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f= front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume In
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.15 0.13
6-month 0.20 0.19
5-year 1.52 1.50
10-year 2.86 2.87
30-year 4.21 4.24


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0377 1.0190
Britain 1.5602 1.5760
Canada 1.0199 1.0094
Euro .7555 .7481


Japan
Mexico


84.07


83.57


12.4950 12.3720


t, WIt 10030lU 1.0002 LIt o
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


I I


Weekly Dow Jones


I- ________________________________________________


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 11,092.00
1-week change: -111.55 (-1.0%)
11,500 .


11,000- i


10,500o-..


10,000


9,500


-24.97 -142.21 150.91 CLOSED -95.28


MON TUES WED


THUR FRI


^ s ................


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pt Min Init
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCOTotRetls
Vanguard TotStldx
American Funds GrthAmA m
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Fidelity Contra
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m
American Funds IncAmerA m
Vanguard Instldxl
American Funds InvCoAmA m
Vanguard 5001nv
Dodge & Cox IntlStk
Dodge & Cox Stock -
American Funds EurPacGrA m
Vanguard Totlnt d
American Funds WAMutlnvA m
PIMCO TotRetAdm b
Vanguard TotStlAdm
Vanguard 500Adml
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m
American Funds NewPerspA m
American Funds FnlnvA m
American Funds BalA m


PIMCO TotRetA m
American Funds BondA m
Fidelity GrowCo


147,053
65,975
64,096
58,470
58,191
54,945
51,266
50,875
47,546
46,538
41,949
41,481
39,464
39,442
37,596
35,429
35,236
33,155
33,023
32,555
31,383
30,718
29,529
28,985
28,883
27,605
27,227


+8.6/B
+12.0/A
+7.8/E
+4.6/D
+15.5/B
+1.9/E
+8.7/C
+9.3/B
+5.7/E
+9.1/B
+6.9/A
+6.9/C
+2.9/C
+3.3/C
+7.4/B
+8.3/B
+12.1/A
+9.3/B
+12.6/A
+7.2/C
+8.2/C
+8.2/C
+9.3/B
+6.1/E
+8.1/B
+7.3/C
+20.6/A


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
,L 1,000,000
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
* 4.25, 1,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
NL 10,000
3.75 1,000
3.75 ?50
NL 2,500


CA Conservate Alkacaon, Cl -Intermnediate-Tenn Bond, ES -Europe Stod, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign largeO th, FV -Foen
Large VWalue, IH -World Allocaton, LB -Large Blend, LG .are Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Acao, B -dO p ted, M v-
Mi-ap Vaue, SHS -pedaly-tau, WS Wond Sroc, Total Reuirn: Chng in t Vwih diede ds reinvested. Rank: Mow fud pto
othrs wft sane o ;je :Ae intop 2 ,E Ce botom 25%. o Inl Iu: Mm;num$ needed to see in herd. Sees: Moigt-


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ABB Ltd .48 2.5
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.3
AK Steel .20 1.5
AMR ... ...
AT&T Inc 1.68 6.0
AbtLab 1.76 3.8
AberFtc .70 1.4
Accenture .90 2.1.
AMD
Aeropostl ...
Aetna .04 .1
Airgas 1.00 1.6
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .9
Aldlrish
Allstate .80 2.7
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 6.2
AEagleOut .44 2.6
AEP 1.84 *5.1
AmExp .72 1.7
AmTower ...
Anadarko .36 .6
AnalogDev .88 2.5
Annaly 2.60 14.4
ArcelorMit .75 2.4
ArchCoal .40 1.4
ArchDan .60 2.1
ATMOS 1.36 4.5
Avon .88 3.1
BB&TCp .60 2.6
BHP BilILt 1.74 2.1
BakrHu .60 1.2
BcBilVArg .57 5.5
BcoBrades .52 2.6
BcoSantand .80 8.0
BcoSBrasil .33 2.5
BkofAm .04 .4
Bklreind 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .36 1.3
BariPVixrs...
BarrickG .48 1.0
BerkH B s ...
BestBuy .60 1.3
BigLots
BlockHR .60 4.7
Boeing 1.68 2.6
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.28 5.0
CB REllis ... ...
CBS B .20 1.2
CIGNA .04 .1
CSX 1.04 1.7
CVS Care 35 1.1
Camecog .28
Cameron ...
CampSp 1.16 3.4
CapOne .20 .5
Camival .40 1.0
Caterpillar 1.76 2.1
Cemex .43 ...
CntryLink 2.90 6.7
ChesEng .30 1.4
Chevron 2.88 3.5
Chicos .16 1.3
Chimera .69 17.0
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56 .8
Coach .60 1.1
CocaCE .48 1.9
CocaCI 1.76 2.7
ConocPhil 2.20 3.6
ConsolEngy .40 1.0
ConEd 2.38 4.9
ConstellEn .96 3.3
Coming .20 1.1
DCT Indl .28 5.7


... -1.04 +2.5
14 -.32 -17.9
11 -3.10 +11.5
36 -.26 -39.0
... +.38 +11.5
7 -.39 -.4
12 -.60 -13.3
31 +1.34 +39.1
16 -.37 +5.6
5 +.08 -22.0
11 +.76 +18.5
8 -.52 -5.0
21 -5.34 +29.4
22 -.03 +42.1
... -.08 -14.5
... -.21 -18.3
-.28 -73.0
14 -.80 -2.4
59 ... +17.1
13 -.38 +24.1
20 +.65 -.5
13 +.10 +3.0
14 -.48 +4.3
59 -.17 +19.8
36 -.07 +1.8
15 +.68 +13.6
13 +.29 +3.7
24 -2.54 -30.7
39 -.80 +32.6
11 -.45 -6.7
14 +.02 +2.6
19 -.47 -8.7
20 -1.14 -8.0
... -3.12 +8.9
33 -.35 +23.0
.. -1.37 -42.8
-.79 +11.3
-1.75 -39.4
... -.85 -6.0
16 -.54 -26.2-
... -1.23 -75.9
14 -.62 -3.0
... +1.31 -66.4
18 +.78 +28.1
16 -1.01 +21.4
14 +1.21 +13.4
.11 +1.52 +6.7
9 +.21 -43.5
14 +1.21 +19.7
... -.19 -26.9
13 -.40 +1.2
30 +.53 +40.6
27 -.04 +17.1
8 -1.24 +2.7
17 -.51 +27.2
13 +.12 -3.3
... +1.41 +14.4
23 -1.21 +13.6
14 -.51 +1.0
7 -.82 -3.5
17 -.16 +31.8
28 +.16 +47.6
... -.22 -20.2
12 +.07 +18.9
15 -.65 -15.0
10 -1.89 +6.6
19 +.75 -14.0
6 +.04 +4.6
... -.16 +24.2
12 -.91 +49.7
22 +1.42 +53.0
15 -.72 +69.8
20 -.21 +12.5
10 -1.11 +19.1
21 -.66 -15.8
14 -.45 +6.1
1 -.17 -17.5
9 +.28 -6.2
... +.04 -1.6


Name Div YId
DR Horton .15 1.5
DTE 2.24 5.0
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.20 1.6
DelMnte .36 '1.9
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevonE .64 .9
DrxEMBIIs5.68 .6
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBull s ...
DirxSCBull 4.77 .2
DirxLCBear ...
DirxEnBull 5.06 .9
Discover .08 .4
Disney .35 1.0
DomRescs 1.83 4.4
DowChm .60 1.9
DukeEngy .98 5.6
Dynegy rs ...
EMCp ...
ElPasoCp .04 .3
Elan
EldorGid g .05
EmersonEl 1.38 2.5
Exelon 2.10 5.3
ExxonMbl 1.76 2.5
FairchidS ...
FibriaCelu ...
FirstEngy 2.20 6.2
Flotek h ...
Fluor .50 .9
FootLockr .60 3.2
FordM
FMCG 2.00 2.0
FrontierCm .75 8.2
Gafisas .14 1.0
Gannett .16 1.2
Gap .40 1.9
GenGrPrn ...
GenMills s 1.12 3.2
GenMot n ...
GM cvpfB 2.38 4.7
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32 2.7
GoldFLtd .16 1.0
Goldcrp g .36 .8
GoldmanS 1.40 .9
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac
Guess .80 1.6
Hallibrtn .36 1.0
HartfdFn .20 .9
HeclaM
HewlettP .32 .7
HomeDp .95 3.0
Honwillntl 1,21 2.4
HostHotls .04 .2
Humana
Huntsmn .40 2.8
IAMGId g .06 ..
ING
iShGold s ...
iSAstla .81 3.4
iShBraz 2.58 3.4
iSCan .42 1.4
iSh HK .48 2.6
iShJapn .16 1.6
iSh Kor .39 .7
iSMalas .25 1.8
iShMex .75 1.3
iShSing .38 .9
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .68 1.6
iShEMkts .59 1.3
iShB20T 3.83 3.9
iS Eafe 1.38 2.5


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
13 -.45 -8.1 9.99
13 -.61 +3.5 45.10
8 -.36 -59.1 7.37
17 -1.98 +40.5 76.00
16 +1.32 +66.0 18.83
30 +.47 +25.0 14.23
24 -.44 +21.9 18.04
7 -2.26 -3.5 70.94
.. -3.69 +1.8 34.18
-.80 -60.4 19.50
+.76 -35.5 12.54
... -1.54 -13.1 21.47
.. +1.78 +37.9 58.95
+.27 -37.9 10.62
... -2.31 +13.1 44.88
15 +.02 +25.2 18.42
18 -.31 +13.8 36.70
14 ... +7.5 41.84
21 -.42 +13.2 31.29
12 -.09 +1.8 17.52
-.06 -44.2 5.05
27 -.12 +24.2 21.70
10 -.41 +38.7 13.63
-.13 -16.3 5.46
44 -.40 +17.7 16.68
21 -.15 +30.5 55.60
11 -.47 -19.1 39.53
12 -1.31 +1.5 69.23
26 +.74 +38.8 13.87
... -.73 -30.6 15.85
13 -1.02 -24.2 35.23
... +.73 +198.5 4.00
24 -.12 +27.9 57.59
1 +.30 +67.4 18.65
8 -.18 +61.0 16.10
12 -3.88 +22.0 97.92
15 -.07 +16.5 9.10
... -.93 -1T.1 14.38
5 +.15 -13.3 12.88
12 +.20 +.2 20.90
... +1.18 +16.3 16.28
15 ... -.8 35.11
-.46 -1.1 33.80
... -.03 ... 50.47
18 +.02 +2.2 11.60
... -.69 -28.7 12.07
3 -.23 +25.6 16.46
... -.83 +14.2 44.92
9 -8.45 -6.3 158.22
36 -.30 -28.9 10.03
... -.39 -72.7 3.22
17 +6.40 +20.4 50.95
22 -1.45 +21.5 36.56
8 -.80 -2.1 22.77
88 +.22 +42.4 8.80
11 +.71 -16.1 43.20
17 -.22 +7.2 31.00
19 +.35 +27.9 50.13
... +.25 +40.2 16.36
8 +.76 +29.4 56.79
20 +.85 +27.9 14.44
34 -.67 +4.9 16.41
-1.36 -2.9 9.53
+.06 +23.8 13.29
-.97 +3.5 23.65
...-2.45 +.3 74.81
... -.17 +1'1.6 29.38
... -.59 +19.0 18.64
... -.22 +5.4 10.27
...-3.01 +12.3 53.51
... -.31 +29.0 13.70
.. -.79 +20.2. 58.76
-.51 +15.9 13.32
-.13 +7.6 13.95
... -.61 +58.0 26.13
...-1.48 +2.2 43.20
...-1.71 +8.0 44.80
.. +.48 +8.0 97.07
...-2.40 +.2 55.37


Name Div YId PE


w ly 1, U
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg
iSR1KG .72 1.3 .. +.03 +10.2 !
iShR2K .79 1.1 ... +.77 +17.3
iShREst 1.88 3.5 +.60 +18.3
IngerRd .28 .7 24 -.08 +14.2 4
IBM 2.60 1.8 13 -1.15 +9.9 1'
Intl Coal ... ... 75 +.44 +93.0
IntlGame .24 1.6 21 -.49 -17.6
IntPap .50 2.0 50 +.32 -6.2 ;
Interpublic ... ... 33 +.03 .+43.6
Invesco .44 2.0 27 -.22 -7.6 2
ItauUnibH .60 2.6 ... -1.30 +2.4
JCrew ... ... 18 +7.26 -2.2
JPMorgCh .20 .5 11 -1.91 -9.9
Jabil .28 1.9 19 -.44 -16.0
JarlusCap .04 .4 15 -.47 -19.4 .
JohnJn 2.16 3.5 13 -1,53 -3.3 6
JohnsnCtl .64 1.7 17 +.42 +36.2
JnprNtwk ... ... 46 -.60 +28.0
KB Home .25 2.3 60 -.36 -20.5 1
Kellogg 1.62 3.3 15 +.50 -7.0
Keycorp .04 .5 ... -.17 +34.8
Kimco .72 4.3 57 +.25 +22.8 1
KingPhrm ... ... 89 +.04 +15.5 1
Kinrossg .10 .6 27 -.04 -3.0 1
Kohls ... ... 16 +2.33 +6.3
Kraft 1.16 3.8 12 -.14 +11.5 "
LDK Solar ... ... 11 -.24 +56.9
LSICorp ... ... 32 +.11 -3.5
LVSands ... ... ... +.67 +235.1 !
LennarA .16 1.1 28 -.52 +17.9
LillyEli 1.96 5.8 8 -.43 -4.6
Limited .60 1.8 18 +.89 +75.4 3


Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg
LincNat .20 .8 11 -.88 -5.0
LloydBkg 1.45 ... ... -.41 +18.0
LyonBas A ... .....+.63 +33.5
MBIA ... ... ... -.18+161.6
MEMC ... ... ... -.05 -12.1
MGM Rsts ... .....+.14 +34.8
Macys .20 .8 17 +.92 +55.1
Manpwl .74 1.3 37 +1.47 +4.6
Manulife g .52 ...... -.83 -22.3
Marathon01.00 3.0 11 -.79 +7.2
MktVGold .11 ...... -.67 +26.8
Marshlls .04 .8 ... -.21 -12.7
Masco .30 2.8 ...-.31 -22.4
MasseyEn .24 .5 ... +.53 +17.9
McDrmlnts ... ... 12 +.64 +48.5
McMoRn ... ...... -1.07 +106.1
MedcoHth ... ... 20 +.05 -5.1
Medtmic .90 2.7 11 -.76 -23.1
Merck 1.52 4.4 18 -.54 -4.8
MetLife .74 2.0 11 -1.11 +6.8
MetroPCS ... ... 21 -.02 +59.8
Monsanto 1.12 1.9 27 +.08 -27.2
MonstrWw ... ... +3.32 +33.2
MorgStan .20 .8 10 -.92 -16.6
Mosaic .20 .3 30 -.25 +16.9'
Motorola ... ... 37 -.29 +.8
NCRCorp ... ... 11 +.20 +31.0
Nabors 95 -.66 -.6
NBkGreece .29 ... ... -.28 -62.7
NatGrid 7.04 6.2 ... -1.38 -7.4
NOilVarco .44 .7 16 -.21 +39.5
NY Times ... ... 10 +.83 -27.1


NewellRub .20 1.2
NewmtM .60 1.0
NextEraEn 2.00 3.9
NiSource .92 5.4
NobleCorp .90 2.6
NokiaCp .56 5.9
Nordstrm .80 1.8
NorflkSo 1.44 2.4
Novartis 1.99 3.6
Nucor 1.44 3.8
OcciPet 1.52 1.7
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 2.54 1.1
Omncre .13 .6
PG&ECp 1.82 3.9
PMI Grp
PNC .40 .7
PPLCorp 1.40 5.5
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .6
Penney .80 2.5
PepsiCo 1.92 3.0
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1,12 3.8
Petrobras 1.12 3.5
Pfizer .72 4.4
PhilipMor 2.56 4.4
Potash .40 .3
PS USDBull... ...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQtQ ...
ProUltSP .43 1.0
ProUShL20 ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUFin rs .09 ...
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProUShCrude..
ProgsvCp 1.16 .8
ProLogis .45 3.4
Prudent 1.15 2.2
PSEG 1.37 4.5
PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS ...
QksilvRes ...
QwestCm .32 4.6
RRI Engy
RadianGrp .01 .1
RadioShk .25 1.3
Raytheon 1.50 3.2
RegionsFn .04 .8
'ReneSola ...
RiteAid ... ...
SpdrDJIA 2.57 2.3
SpdrGold ...
SP Mid 1.54 1.0
S&P500ETF2.31 1.9
SpdrHome .12 .8
SpdrKbwBk .11 .5
SpdrLehHY4.21 10.6
SpdrRetl .57 1.2
SpdrOGEx .20 .4
SpdrMetM .35 .6
Safeway .48 2.1
Saks
Salesforce ...
SandRdge .. .
Sanofi 1.63 5.1
SaraLee .46 3.0
Schlmbrg .84 1.1
Schwab .24 1.6
SemlHTr .55 1.7
SiderNac s .58 3.6
SilvWhtng ...
SouthnCo 1.82 4.8
SwstAirl .02 .1
SwstnEngy ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


13 +.06 +14.2 17.14
14 -1.80 +23.7 58.54
13 -.69 -3.9 50.78
13 -.02 +10.5 17.00
8 -1.74 -15.5 34.39
... -.57 -25.7 9.55
18 +1.64 +16.0 43.61
16 -.54 +16.1 60.84
13 -1.77 +.8 54.87
59 -.42 -19.5 37.54
16 -.54 +7.7 87.65
-.20 -30.4 4.49
... -2.98 +7.7 128.00
60 -1.02 -5.3 22.90
14 -.55 +5.2 46.95
... -.07 +23.4 3.11
8 -2.17 +2.5 54.12
14 -.41 -21.7 25.30
... +.30 +5.3 16.28
24 -.90 +29.0 58.34
24 +.42 +22.3 32.55
16 -.81 +5.1 63.90
22 -.00 -25.8 17.80
.... -1.32 -31.1 29.20
... -1.35 -32.4 32.24
9 -.31 -9.3 16.49
16 -1.03 +22.0 58.78
28 +2.89 +31.9 143.14
+.54 +.6 23.21
... +.58 -23.0 26.99
... +.81 +28.2 76.23
-.19 -34.5 12.48
... -1.02 +11.2 42.54
-.46 -28.2 35.82
... +.78 -21.2 19.09
...-2.64 -2.2 55.08
... -.35 -42.2 14.57
+.67 -35.3 23.48
... +.43 -16.4 10.60
-.54 -10.5 12.22
13 -.11 +14.8 20.65
... -.18 -3.4 13.23
8 -2.24 +3.6 51.54
10 -.13 -7.9 30.63
-.30 -38.0 6.20
... +.14 +29.7 3.80.
26 -.54 -3.7 14.46
50 +.02 +65.1 6.95
-.19 -37.9 3.55
...-.39 -2.5 7.13
11 -.01 -4.1 18.71
8 -.53 -9.8 46.48
-.25 -.8 5.25
... -.16 +96.4 9.35
.. +.04 -37.7 .94
... -1.37 +6.3 110.64
... +.91 +24.0 133.11
... +1.44 +18.4 155.96
... -1.49 +6.6 118.80
... +.03 +3.2 15.59
-.73 +4.6 22.15
.. -.72 +2.3 39.70
.. +1.37 +33.1 47.37
-.39 +17.1 48.25
... -.60 +17.0 60.39
-.14 +6.2 22.62
... +.14 +76.5 11.58
... +9.09 +97.7 145.83
5 +.04 -43.8 5.30
... -2.00 -18.2 32.14
20 -.04 +25.3 15.26
30 -.45 +16.7 75.98
31 -.03 -20.0 15.05
... +.67 +12.8 31.49
... -.85 +.7 16.08
55 +.45+134.0 35.15
15 -.24 +13.5 37.83
25 -.04 +18.4 13.53
21 -2.11 -24.7 36.31


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SprintNex ...
SP Matls 1.05
SP HIthC .58
SP CnSt .77
SP Consum .43
SP Engy 1.00
SPR Fncl .16
SPInds .60
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.27
StdPac
StateStr .04
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TaiwSemi .47
Target 1.00
TataMotors .32
TeckRes g .60
TelNorL 1.65
TenetHith ...
Teradyn ...
Tesoro.
Texinst .52
Textron .08
3M Co 2.10
Tiffany 1.00
TimeWam .85
TollBros ...
Total SA 3.13
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSol s ...
Tycolntl .85
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
USAirwy ...
UnionPac 1.52
UtdContl ...
UPS B 1.88
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ..
US OilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
Vale SA .76
Vale SApf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
VimpelC n .46
Visa .60
Vishaylnt ...
lonage
Walgm .70
WsteMInc 1.26'
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDIghal ...
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20
WmsCos .50
WT India .14
XL Grp .40
Xerox .17
Yamanag .12
YingliGm ...
YumBmds 1.00


-.08 +7.4
-.52 +5.7
-.42 -1.6
-.31 +7.7
+.07 +22.0
-1.08 +9.6
-.44 +.1
-.06 +17.7
-.06 +5.8
-.27 -.5
-.37 -5.3
+.40 +.7
-1.05 -5.0
-.16 -56.0
-.57 +16.2
-.89 -31.1
-.07 -4.4
+.12 +3.7
-.08 -3.8
+.54 +17.5
+3.44 +109.2
-2.07 +37.1
-.25 -32.8
-.16 -21.9
+.72 +17.2
+1.22 +21.0
+.26 +23.6
+.46 +17.3
-.61 +2.1
+2.57 +40.9
-.23 +4.0
-.07 -5.1
-3.04 -21.7
-1.82 -19.7
-1.12 +9.0
+.39 -9.8
-.06 +6.2
+.54 +31.9
-1.28 -1.0
+.62+141.7
-1.34 +41.0
+.24+123.5
-.01 +20.4
-.90 +6.5.
+.13 -39.9
+.75 -8.4
-.52 -14.1
-.12 +17.7
-.79 +9.5
-.57 +15.5
-.01 +16.8
-1.61 +11.2
-.38 +4.1
-.34 +27.5
+.52 -16.6
-1.57 -13.7
+.51 +92.9
-.01 +78.6
-1.08 -8.3
-.30 +3.3
-.15 +11.1
-1.51 -2.0
-.84 -1.3
+.14 +4.3
-.22 -23.5
+.06 -3.7
-.15 +7.5
-.61 +8.6
-1.24 +11.5
-.43 +7.7
+.08 +39.0
-.23 -1.1
-.66 -33.7
-.74 +43.1


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cho %Chg Last


ASML HId .27 .8 -.10 +1.5 34.59
Aastrom rs ... ... ... -.20 -10.7 2.20
ActivsBliz .15 1.3 16 +.08 +5.9 11.76
AdobeSy ... ... 32 -.14 -21.9 28.72
AEtema g ... ... .....+66.0 1.34
Affymax ... ... ... +1.96 -69.4 7.56
AkamaiT ... ... 61 +2.00 +103.4 51.53
AllscriptH ... ... 53 -.23 -13.1 17.57
AlteraCp If .24 .7 17 +2.06 +56.8 35.49
Amazon ... ... 72+12.38 +31.7 177.20
AmCapLtd ... ... 6 -.10+201.2 7.35
Amgen ... ... 11 -1.44 -5.3 53.56
AmkorTIf ... ... 7 +.67 -.3 7.14
Apple Inc ... ... 21 +8.27 +49.5 315.00
ApldMall .28 2.2 18 +.07 -10.1 12.53
Apricusrs ... ... ... +1.16 -9.7 3.86
ArenaPhm ..... .. +.02 -60.3 1.41
ArmHId .12 .6 ... +.12+119.3 18.77
ArtTech ... ... 54 +.01 +31.9 5.95
ArubaNet ... ... ... "+.60+124.6 23.94
Atmel ... ... 41 +.53 +130.8 10.64
Autodesk ... ... 41 +1.43 +38.5 35.20.
AutoData 1.44 3.2 19 +.09 +6.2 45.48
AvanirPhm ... ... ... -.18+124.2 4.26
Baidu s ... ... 94 +.78 +166.0 109.37
BeaconPw ... ... ... +.05 -51.5 .24
BedBath ... ...1 7 +.92 +14.0 44.00
BrigExp ... ... 89 +.65 +89.6 25.69
Broadcom .32 .7 28 +1.81 +42.8 44.95
BrcdeCm ... ... 19 -.70 -33.8 5.05
Bucyrus .10 .1 25 -.15 +58.0 89.05
CAInc .16 .7 16 +.18 +3.9 23.34
CNinsure .26 1.2 19 -.72 +7.7 21.62
Cadence ... ... 14 -.23 +35.1 8.09
Celgene ... ... 31 +.60 +9.9 61.21
CellTher rsh... ... ... -.01 -67.5 .37
CienaCorp ... ... ... +.66 +41.1 15.29
Cirrus .. ... 13 +1.72 +127.9 15.54


Name Div
Cisco
CitzRepB h...
CitrixSys
Clearwire
CognizTech..
Coinstar
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
Compuwre ...
ConvOrg h...
CorinthC
Costco .82
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ..
DishNetwk 2.00
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EgyXXI rs ...
EricsnTel .28
Exelixis
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ...
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .04
Flextm
GT Solar ...
Genzyme ..
GileadSci ..
Google
GreenMtC s...
HarbinElec ..
HaupqDiq ..


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
14 -.12 -18.6 19.49
-.01 -14.8 .59
48 +2.81 +65.2 68.74
-.37 +1.7 6,88
.. 30 +1.01 +46.2 66.25
48 +6.83 +140.2 66.72
1.9 16 -.34 +20.6 20.22
2.0 15 -.26 +20.2 19.13
... 23 +.08 +43.8 10.40
... -.06 -48.7 .34
3 -.47 -68.9 4.28
1.2 23 +.66 +13.6 67.22
36 +4.79 +12.0 63,13
.. 26 +.98+204.0 17.48
33 +.02 +50.4 15.88
... 13 -.25 -4.9 13.65
... ...-1.20 +38.0 36.27
... 25 -.28 +25.5 41.87
9 -.14 -10.1 18.67
... 20 -.29 -10.7 5.20
-.31 -15.7 14.84
.. 16 +.85 +32.4 31.15
-.53 -16.5 14.82
... 47 +.81 +126.4 26.15
2.7 ... -.09 +13.9 10.47
.. +.27 -20.9 5.83
1.1 17 +.16 +2.5 26.37
... 27 -.87 +21.5 52.51
73+12.35+154.9 135.04
.3 ... -.40 +21.6 11.86
21 +.01 -2.7 7.11
8 -.12 +27.5 7.09
.. -.09 +45.3 71.22
... 11 -.98 -14.3 37.10
... 24 -.83 -4.8 590.00
... 74 +7.37 +38.6 37.63
7 -.84 -21.6 16.11
.. +.57 +222.1 2.77


Name Div
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
HumGen
Infinera
IntgDv
Intel .72
Intuit
IsilonSys
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JacklnBox ...
JetBlue
LTXCrdrs ...
Level3 h ...
UbtyMIntA ...
LifeTech ...
LinearTch .92
MELA Sci ...
MagicSft .50
MarvellT ...
Mattel .83
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netflix
NGenBiofh ...
NewsCpA .15
Novell
NuanceCm ..
Nvidia
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -.25 -49.2 2.43
... ... +.43 +14.3 ,16.58
5.3 10 -.18 -17.0 11,40
... ... +.70 -18.6 24.90
-5.1 8.42
.. 41 +.18 +2.0 6.60
3.4 12 +.21 +4.6 21.34
26 +.62 +48.2 45.55
... ... +.04 +392.7 33.80
... 16 -.11 +32.1 7.53
... ... +.31 +49.6 12.34
... 13 -3.32 +1.9 20.05
... 22 +.10 +26.2 6.88
... 21 +.39 +49.8 8.00
... ... -.02 -35.9 .98
... 17 +.06 +44.1 15.62
... 18 +.20 -2.7 50.83
2.8 17 +.78 +7.9 32.96
.. ...-1.11 -62.5 3.87
... 27 +1.68 +193.0 6.71
... 24 -.51 -5.6 19.58
3.2 15 +.63 +28.8 25.73
3.6 36 ... +15.9 23.56
... ... -.16 +80.1 6.05
... 4 +,24 -27.7 7.63
2.5 6 -.44 -17.2 25.25
... 13 -.45 +8.5 21.51
.. 34 -.41 +48.6 51.05
... 72+18.86+248.3 191.90
... ... +.01 -88.6 .09
1.1 14 -.22 +2.0 13.96
... ... +.35 +43.1 5.94
... 15 +1.18 +15.9 18.00
... 38 -.15 -27.2 13.60
12 +.16 -7.3 8.18
'.7 22 -.66 +12.1 27.49
... 20 +.07 -12.8 7.55
.9 59 +.54 +50.8 54.68


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


PacCapB h ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Popular
Power-One..
PwShs QQQ .33
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ...
Regenrn
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
SinusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Solarfun
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StIDynam .30
SunesisPh
SunPowerA ..
Symantec
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .75
TiVo Inc ..
TriQuint
UranmRs ..
UrbanOut ..
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.33
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .64
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


... -.04 -70.8
69 +.22 +29.7
21 +.29 -6.5
41 -.18 -26.0
-.02 +25.2
14 +.29+113.3
... +.30 +15.3
24 -.07 +3.1
17 +.02 +53.2
... +4.16 +19.2
11 +.54 -12.3
... +3.36 +203.1
9 +4.97 +55.1
4 -1.04 -23.6
70 +.00+133.3
35 +1.87 +83.2
22 +.30 +18.0
19 +.57 -10.5
25 +.38 +35.0
22 -.27 -10.9
... +.04 -65.0
28 -.38 -49.6
18 -.24 -5.0
17 -.18 -10.9
11 -.23 +13.6
18 +.11 -9.8
... -.63 -17.9
12 +1.05 +99.7
... +.72 +313.0
24 +1.20 +9.9
... -1.46 +52.1
-1.01 +12.3
20 -.11 +19.6
13 +.35 +9.8
21 -.35 -3.3
... -1.00 +52.0


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AbdAsPac .42
AlexcoR g ...
AlldNevG ...
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ...
AmO&G ...
Anooraq g ...
ArcadiaRs ...
Aurizon g
BarcUBS36...
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs ...
CAMACEn ...
CardiumTh...
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen...
Contango ...
CrSuiHiY .32
Crossh glf ...
Crystallx g ...
DenisnM g...
EndvSilvg ...
Express-1 ...
Fronteer g ...
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ...
GoldResrc .12
GoldStr g ..
GranTrra g ...
GrtBasGg ...
Hyperdyn ..
KodiakOg ...
LibertyAcq...
LibAcq wt ...
LonqweiPI ...


+.01 +10.8
-.03 +84.6
-.40 +73.3
+1.09+264.8
+.13 -50.6
-.10 +127.6
+.12 +43.7
-.01 -43.0
-.33 +62.0
+.40 +4.6
+.53 -8.9
-.08 -8.5
-.03 -51.2
-.01 -28.1
+.04 -24.1
+.25 +37.4
+.04+156.2
-.41 -29.4
-.08 +278.9
-.79 +22.4
+.02 +1.4
+.13+142.1
+.01 -15.8
+.60 +149.6
+.05 +65.9
-.30 +85.2
+.42 +133.8
+.02 -32.1
-.04+166.3
+1.42 +118.0
-.17 +33.7
-.01 +31.2
-.05 +57.9
-.21 +242.5
+.25 +113.5
-.58 +2.5
-.11 +139.1
-.09 +3.3


Name DIv
MadCatzg ...
MagHRes ...
Metalico
MdwGoldg ...
MincoG g ...
Minefnd g ..
NIVS IntT ...
Nevsun g ...
NewEnSys ...
NwGoldg ..
NA Pallg ...
NthnO&G ..
NthgtM g ...
NovaGldg
Oilsands g
OrienPapn
ParaG&S
PhrmAth
PionDrill ...
PlatGpMet ...
PudaCol ...
RareEleg ...
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ...
SinoHub
SulphCo
Taseko
TmsatlPtn ...
TwoHrblnv 1.34
Ur-Energy...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDri ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold ...
WizzardSft ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
6 +.16 +120.0 .77
... ... -.08+292.9 6.09
... 21 -.12 -16.3 4.12
... +.01 -26.4 .64
... +.21 +103.4 1.79
.. -.17 -4.9 9.80
... -.11 -11.6 2.28
.. -.11 +132.9 5.66
... +.53 +11.3 7.88
... ... -.16+142.3 8.82
.. -.09 +59.7 5.59
... 91 +.63 +91.7 22.70
24 ... -4.9 2.93
... ... 35+132.5 14.25
-.01 -61.9 .44
4 +1.52 -32.3 7.10
... ... -.03 +12.4 1.63
+.33 +87.2 3.67
... ... -.01 -11.1 7.02
... ... -.18 -2.8 2.06
... 11 -.62 +73.1 12.72
... ... +.59 +171.4 10.53
... ... -.08 -3.3 1.19
... ... +.24 -5.9 4.43
... ... -.06 +379.2 1.15
... 4 -.25 -28.8 2.85
... ... -.03 -70.9 '20
... ... -.11 +6.2 4.48
... ... -.15 -5.6 3.23
13.7 ... +.13 +.1 9.81
... ... +.26+159.5 1.99
... ... +.65 +196.2 3.85
... ... +.35 +69.0 6.39
... ... -.04 +1.9 1.64
.. 11 +2.27+390.8 14.43
... ... -.18 +15.5 2.83
... ... +.01 -17.9 .28


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Lake City Reporter





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You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com

Dedfns.,


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found
LOST, One Hearing Aid,
Wed, Nov 17th,
in Lake City.
Call 386-497-3443 if found

100 Job
10 Opportunities

04542446
Urgent! Owner Operator
Needed.
Stepdeck/Flatbed
Regional/OTR.
Paid Weekly! 85% of gross;
40% advance.
904-230-4499

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome!!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542465
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for
an Executive Adm. Asst. to
perform detailed administrative
assignments. Requires excellent
computer skills, organizational
and communication skills.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous administrative
experience required. Full
benefits package. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, Fl. 32056 or
email Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542466
Cook, FT, Must have
experience and able to work
weekends and evenings.
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025

05524527
Progressive Logistics Services
needs FT Warehouse
Freighthandlers to load/unload
trucks in Lake City, FL
Apply online at
WWW.PLSUNLOAD.COM.
Background check and
DrugScreem required.


100 Job
1 Opportunities

05524512
HELP WANTED
SALES PERSON
To call on company
convenience stores and private
stores. Help develop new
locations. Must have sales
ability; good driving record
required.Dependable and good
communication skills.
Transportation furnished,
willing to live in Perry, FL
Send resume and income history
to: PO Box 1201 Perry, FL
32348

04542421
HeritageBank of the South,
Lake City, Florida, seeks a part
time TELLER and a Customer
Service Representative in a
branch in Lake City. Job re-
quirements: cash handling
experience, teller experience
desired, excellent customer
service skills, good organiza-
tional skills with the ability to
prioritorize and multi-task,
professional oral and written
communication skills, proficient
computer skills, keen attention
to details and must be friendly
and professional. High school
diploma or equivalent required.
Salary and benefits commensu-
rate with experience. Interested
candidates should forward
resume with salary. history and
requirements to: humanresour-
ces(5eheritagebank.com

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.


120 Medical
120 Employment


05524528
Medical Biller Needed
Several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please e-mail resume to :
admin@nfsc.conmcastbiz.net
or fax 386-755-2169
or mail to: PO Box 3306.
Lake City, FL 32056

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


1 0n Medical
120 Employment

055245291



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's & LPN's
P/T & PRN 1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center

Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke

Master's or Licensed
Therapists
Live Oak, Mayo, Jasper, Starke

Case Manager
Child/Adult
G'Ville/Trenton"
Live Oak/Starke/Lake City

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial/Maintenance
Lake City
Cook
PRN & P/T
Gainesville & Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP


240 Schools &
24 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 11/29/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $40 386-752-0987


REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Frost Free Refrigerator,
White, looks nice, works great
$225 .
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387

Kenmore Washer
White, works great
$125
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387

Whirlpool Dryer,
White, good shape
$125 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387


408 Furniture

COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
(904)704-9377

RECLINER,
TALL & wide beige. Decent
shape. $40.00
386-755,8941


313855-5s


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Services

***SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
,Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
*", COULEGE

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2011
SComputer Science
Teach computer classes on campus.
Must have Master's degree With 18
graduate hours in computer science.
Experience with interactive digital media
to include 2D, 3D modeling, notion
graphics, video, animation or gaming
preferred. Contact Pam Carswdl at 386-
754-4266 or pamela.carswell((.aQc.edu.
*Human Diseases
Evening class and internet class.
Master's degree with 18 graduate hours
in either a health science or medical
field required. For more information or to
apply, contact Tracy Hickman a 386-
754-4324 or tr.cy hickma.n@ngc,edu.
Cuollge apphcation nd eopiesof
rtanscipts rqmlireii. ,.lo frei4fi tra rs l ts
musti be x tbinffed with i translatio i and
evahiation. Applicati n available at
S vG( IhoCi ll d ano ('ls
SVP:M).'Vh A,10 Cttr. lltdt-1m 'ma3m~


Ad is to Appear. Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Turs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice,




Ad Errors-, Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves -the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lalkcityreporter.com


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?





S ironm r .. \ our %kills
.and
S .' positive attitude


.Oppo l. F '
-' --* e Al ...* ^ .\

Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
f a Lake City,. FL 32025
S n L BC 386.754.8562
S-T EiL www.sitel.com EOE


I I


I BUY I



[SELL I


hIFIN IT









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
MTD High Wheel Mower
looks and runs good
$125 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
AVON
Great Gift Ideas
Shop online at
www.youravon.com/vlawton
Physical Therapy Equipment:
Exam/treatment table,
$100.00 MUST SELL
386-752-1652

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728

4 1 Office
61 Equipment
OFFICE FURNITURE
All Wood Computer
Desk $50
386-752-0749
OFFICE FURNITURE
BLACK LEATHER
CHAIRS $20
386-752-0749

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 SWMH, $500 month, $500
security, All appliances included,
Pets negotiable, in Branford area
Call for add info 386-935-3099
3BR/2BA NEWLY renovated
MH on 1/2 ac. private property.
$700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Security dep.
References needed. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

: 640 Mobile Homes "
UflF for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386 758-9824

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
S' 24 $Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386)758-8455


05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month.
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.


710 Unfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale


3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd clik,
386-697-324 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec. -
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
S For Rent
Efficiency apartment, Close to
VA, $430 mo. plus $150.00 sec,
utilities included.No pets.
386-754-9641 or 386-438-4054.
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542444
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

05524428
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
RENTED
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

75 0 Business &
5 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. I
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000

Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


820 Farms &
Acreage

05524423
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Q830 Commercial
Property

2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190


930 Motorcycles

2009 Custom Chopper, 300cc,
low miles, like new,
must sell $2000 obo
386-758-1784


940 Trucks

08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, nerf
bars, stereo. $17,995. 752-8227







950 Cars for Sale

09 Toyota Scion XB, 5 dr.
40k mi. Purchase for about payoff.
About $1,000 under book.
Serviced at LC Toyota. 758-5916

87 Ford Mustang GT, 5 spd.,
28,000 orig miles, adult owned,
runs exc., cobra wheels,
$10,500 OBO 386-963-2271.
94 BUICK LeSabre
Low miles.
Runs great, $2400.00
386-752-0824


W.A TU0. TI


Thursday, December 2nd 10:00am
Property 1 Property 2
65 Acres 57 Acres
Commercial Property Jennings, FL Commercial Property Jasper, FL
* Zoned Comnrda Highway interhange *hel Comm ral Hiilota s.
* 1-75 & FL Hwy. 143 Frontage ghTrffc Illercakge, tyrant & M&tels
* Property Cosists of Pine d mrdwoodm Tbr rlet6poFid
FSelling frinNProperty 2 sofliSOn
Thursday, December 2nd 2:00pm Friday, December 3rd -1000..
473 Acres 44 Acres
Timber& Hnting Land, Glcrist County, FL Clay Co., FL
150 AcesH10 Fened *i Wooded HoBe Sit.
P Flo & Hardwood Timber
Good Deer & Turkey *uGreat Location Off FL Hy. 100 in between
* Great Location N-rH Sp Gaine, Keatoe Hdeighto and Palath, FL
LaW City &AhaLin.IFlI
Broker Participation 2%
Call for Details
800-323-8388
Rowell Realty & Auctions, Inc.
10% Buyer's Premium AU 479, AB 296
wwwRoe Aucin~o


DAY


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.





2008 Toyota Tacom a 2009 C t m9 7 *
4DR, access cab 2009 Custom 1987 Ford
17,250 mi., AT, all power, Chopper 300cc Mustang GT l
Tonneau cover, bedliner, Low miles, like new, 5spd, 28,000 orig. mi, interior
class III hitch, nerf bars, must sell. showroom new, cobra wheels One LOW
AM-FM stereo w/CD, ($2,000 OBO (have orig. wheels)
slidingrear glass. Cal $10,500 OBOp

386-752-8227 386-758-178"4 386-963-2271











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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2010


V? ~-'~


Exam and Necessary X-rays
-,IsI DD ',I , i .i,
Fust-lime ,'* \" '*,;
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Re,. 136 S\IllNGSOFS107
[.Epire% December 30, 2010

www.asnenlakecity


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I iAK C CITY, FL


Rountree
STOYOTA


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 11/30/10


-7


kTesecal-h5iVIIJBU


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Hairdreams Hair Extensions
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a












Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsak@lakecttyreporter'cor


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, November 28, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Hostess

gifts that

live on


gifts during
the holidays
include wine,
candy and fruit
cake. A gift that shares
more warmth of the
season and of yourself
is a live plant that prom-
ises ongoing enjoyment.
Consider offering your
friend a festive plant that
will continue to provide
enjoyment through the
months or years to come.
Traditionally, poinset-
tias are given as gifts and
used as decorations dur-
ing the winter.
There are other alterna-
tive holiday plants that
are worthy of the season,
so why not try something
different this year?
Amaryllis can be pur-
chased as a bulb or a
plant, and will produce
large, beautiful white,
pink, or red flowers.
Amaryllis a popular hol-
iday gift plant because it
can be forced to produce
stunning flowers during
the holiday season.
Once the bloom period
is over, the plant can be
left in its container or
planted outdoors in the
Florida garden.
After becoming estab-
lished in the landscape,
flowers will appear during
the spring.
For more information
on growing amaryllis,
visit http://edis.ifas. ufl.
edu/ep060
Another plant worthy
of a place of honor in
our holiday d6cor is a
rosemary topiary, com-
plete with bows or beads.
These herb plants are not
only good smelling, but
they can be purchased or
trimmed into shapes such
as "mini- trees." Be sure
to save the trimmings for
use in those savory holi-
day dishes.
Rosemary will be equal-
ly as happy growing in a
patio container, landscape
or herb garden after
serving up holiday cheer
indoors.
It should receive full
sun and have well-drained
soil. A light pruning every
other week will stimulate
new growth and keep you
supplied with the cooking
herb.
The Norfolk Island
pine, an excellent "mini-
tree" for indoors, is an
evergreen from the South
Pacific. This pine can
dress up a tabletop, office,
apartment or any small
space where a larger tree
just won't work. Decorate
this little tree for the sea-
son with lightweight bows
Sand ornaments.
Many plants in North
. Florida, including the
Norfolk Island pine, need
winter care to survive.
Check with the UF
Columbia County Master
Gardeners at 752-5384.
about plant overwintering
and freeze protection. '

D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Carolyn Castagna decorates a Christmas tree in preparation for the "Castagna Christmas House Candlelight Tour" event that will take place at 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
on Friday, Dec. 3. It will be held at her home located at 521 NW Old Mill Road. Select items also will be up for sale.





HOST OF CHRISTMAS PAST


Castagna unwraps open house tour for final benefit


By TODD WILSON
twilson@lakecityreporter.com
When Lake
City's holiday-
decorating
legend, Carolyn
Castagna, put
away her thousands of interior
Christmas decorations in 2007, she
reflected on 25 years of hosting
holiday events at her house and
called it a career.
"I packed it up and said, That's
it."' Castagna said. "I really enjoyed
it, and this community got behind
the events and together we raised
a lot of money for worthwhile
causes, but that was the last one.
Twenty-five years was enough."
Through the decades, Castagna
has lent her Christmas decora-
tions, her interior design skills and
her home to host Christmas open
houses. Columbia County residents
have marked these events as can't-
miss socials, purchased tickets and
visited the tours by the hundreds
to help raise money for different
charities in the area.
Castagna has helped generate
hundreds of thousands of dollars
for local charities. Prior events
have raised more than $70,000.
Besides ticket sales, businesses
and individuals also make single
contributions to bolster the events.
This year, there was one addi-
tional charitable cause that would
bring Castagna out of retirement:
The Lake City Garden Club. The
club is attempting to raise money
to refurbish the historic Club
House meeting place at Lake
Isabella on Hernando Avenue.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Elaine Swisher (left) and Genie Norman help to set one of the many decorated
tables within the Castagna home.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Carole Robertson (left) and Carolyn Castagna enjoy some freshly brewed tea
in the Tea Room.


"We need about $70,000 for our
projects at The Club House," said
Lake City Garden Club president
Sandra Foreman. 'We're trying to
raise all we can to help save the


building."
This year's "Castagna Christmas
House Candlelight Tour" event is
set for 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Friday,
Dec. 3, at the home of Jerry and


Carolyn Castagna, 521 Old Mill
Road, Lake City. Admission is $10
with all proceeds going to The
Club House restoration project.
Tickets are available at Vann
Carpet One, Hearts Desire, Lake
City Florist and at the door.
Castagna said this event, for
certain, will be her last Christmas
House tour. To ensure it and to
raise additional funds, on the
Saturday morning following the
open house, she is selling her
collection.
"This is it for real," Castagna
said. "I'm selling all the
decorations."
The sale of the items will be
from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday,
Dec. 4. Items for sale will have
price tags during the open house
tour Friday night. '
"There will be lots of items
to choose from," Foreman said.
"Carolyn's motto for Christmas
decorating is 'more is better.'
She has an amazing collection of
decorations."
The fundraiser Christmas deco-
ration sale will include snow vil-
lage Christmas houses, complete-
ly decorated Christmas trees,
single Christmas ornaments,
hundreds of snowmen, Santas
of all sizes, Christmas pictures,
wreaths, Christmas rugs, Byer's
Choice carolers, Christmas dish-
es, garland and ribbon.
Lake City Garden Club mem-
bers also will be offering holiday
treats for sale and punch will be
served at the event. For more
information on the event, call
Sandra Foreman at (386) 397-
5494.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Rosemary Coleman (from left), Linda Jones and Sandra Foreman raise a toast after helping decorate the Castagna home.


_ I -----~CIII -- -- C I --









2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


Where are they now: Jeff Burt, John Hatcher


'Where are they now"
is a column about former
students of Florida Gateway
College, formerly Lake City
Community College, and
where their life's journey
has taken them since they
left Lake City. The fifth
installment begins with Jeff
Burt.

Jeff graduated from
Branford High
School in Suwannee
County in 1990 and
began attending
Lake City Community
College. He told me he.
didn't know what he was
going to do with his life
but thought the Marine
Corps may be in his
future. At the college,
Jeff took some classes in
criminology where he met
instructor Steve Anderson.
It was in the criminology
class where Anderson
encouraged him to con-
tinue his studies at Florida
State University. He did,
and two years later had
his bachelor's degree from
FSU.


In 1995 Jeff joined
the Tallahassee Police
Department as a patrol
officer. He later served in
the street crimes unit. He
left the police department
in 2000 and took a posi-
tion with the Florida State
Fire Marshal's Office. Jeff
worked in the Live Oak
District office and for the
next eight months and
investigated suspicious
fires,
When a job opened
up with the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement, Jeff applied
and was hired. It was at
FDLE that Jeff became
part of Gov. Jeb Bush's
protection detail. As a
member of this detail,
Jeff traveled with and pro-
tected Gov. Bush all over
the state and the nation,
including trips to the Bush
family vacation home in
Kennebunkport Maine
where he got to meet both
President Bushes. He also
got to attend President
George H.W. Bush's 80th
birthday celebration in


Michael McKee
mike.mckee@fgc.edu
Texas where the former
.president jumped out of an
airplane and skydived. In
the five years that Jeff pro-
tedted the governor, he got
to travel all over the world.
The FDLE detail soon
ended and Jeff moved
on to the Department
of Justice's Bureau
of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives
in Tampa where he is
today. His work is to target
armed felons and crimes
they commit Jeff works
with informants and many
times works undercover to
reduce violent crime'.
Jeff lives in Lakeland
with his wife, Angie, whom
he met while at FSU; and
their three children, Justin,


Olivia and Wyatt. Jeff's
mother and father still live
in Branford and he tries to
come home as frequently
as he can.
Our next graduate
began at the college as
Jeff Burt was leaving, his
name is John Hatcher.
John Hatcher enrolled at
the college in 1993 after-
spending a year work-
ing on the family's Union
County farm. He was inter-
ested in television produc-
tion and took as many
television electives as were
offered while earning his
AA degree.
In 1996, John trans-
ferred to the University of
Florida where he gained
experience working for
the University Athletic
Association. John worked
on sports shows, includ-
ing the Andy Garcia
Show and the Coach
Carol Ross Show. He
also did camera work for
CBS Sports, Fox Sports,
and Sunshine Network
Sports. John graduated
from Florida in 2000 but


continued to work for the
University where he was
involved in a project with
the Warrington School of
Business producing train-
ing videos.
In 2001, John moved to
Delray Beach and took a
job with the News Group,
a company that produced
television segments for
ESPN and Office Depot
John did mostly sound
engineering on Major
League Baseball, Outside
the Lines, Sport Center
and the Coach Jimmy
Johnson Show. In 2003,
he started his own com-
pany called Right Angle
Productions where he
does freelance audio mix-
ing. For the past seven
years, John has become
sought after for his sound
talent. He has worked on
several pilots for Showtime
and for E! Entertainment
and has done sound mix-
ing on the Style Networks
"Who's wedding is it
anyway?" and did work
on season two of the ,
Jersey Shore for MTV.


In 2008, John worked on
a production for WGBH
in Boston called "Simply
Ming" which earned an
Emmy nomination. His
latest project was to work
sound on the TV Series
"Ghost Hunters," which
is airing now. John is
currently spending the
Thanksgiving holidays in
Cancun, Mexico on a proj-
ect he could not tell me
about.
John is single and lives
in Boynton Beach. In
between jobs, John says
he still tries to get home
to Union County as much
as possible to spend time
with his Mom and Dad.
-If you know of someone
who has graduated from
a local high school and
Florida Gateway College
and has a story to share,
please e-mail me at mike.
mckee@fgc.edu or call me
at 386-754-4329.
* Michael Lee is director of '
media and community infor-
mation at Florida Gateway
College. He can be reached
at 386-754-4329.


Queen-to-be Kate Middleton is global media magnet


By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press
L ONDON Are you
ready for your close-
up now, Kate?
When Prince
William popped the
question, he made fiancee Kate
Middleton one of the most-pho-
tographed, most-pursued women
in the world.
Since the announcement
of the couple's engagement,
Middleton dubbed "the
Cinderella of Bucklebury" by
Italy's La Stampa newspaper
- has adorned front pages and
websites around the world, pho-
tographed showing off her ring
and checking out a possible wed-
ding venue, Westminster Abbey.
William is determined she will.
not suffer the hounding experi-
enced by his mother, Princess
Diana. But protecting her may
be difficult in the face of insa-'
tiable media interest
"She's the main event now,"
said Max Clifford, Britain's best-'
known celebrity publicist and
that means Middleton will have
to watch her every step.
"She shouldn't be roller-skat-
ing in hot pants," Clifford said,
referring to a much-reprinted
2008 photo of Middleton look-
ing unsteady on wheels at a
charity disco event. "She's got
to eat, breathe, drink and sleep
'What's good for the royals,
what would be bad for the roy-
als?"'
She may be marrying a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Westminster Abbey in London, is seen in this Sept. 25, 2002 file photo. Prince William and Kate Middleton will
marry April 29 2011, in the Abbey, the historic London church where Princess Diana's funeral was held. Royal
officials say that the couple chose the venue for its beauty, intimacy and historic royal connections, and the' date
because they wanted a spring wedding.


future king, but many British
people say they don't envy
Middleton.
"I feel bad for the poor girl,"
said Kayla Healey, 25, a social
worker from Brighton in south-
ern England. "She's been able
to stay out of the limelight


pretty much the entire time
and now she is going to be
absolutely bombarded."
At least she has a good guide
in William. The 28-year-old
grew up in the public eye, a
handsome royal pinup, and
seems to have coped well.


William appears comfortable in
front of the cameras unlike
his father, Prince Charles,
who is often stiff and point-
edly ignores the gaggle of
royal reporters who cover his
engagements.
But William's ease hides a


deep-seated mistrust, rooted
in the media hounding experi-
enced by his mother, who was
pursued by paparazzi until her
death in a Paris car crash in
1997.
The intense scrutiny
endured by Britain's royals is
partly the reason William wait-
ed so long to ask Middleton to
marry him. In an interview this
week, William said he "wanted
to give her a chance to see in
and to back out if she needed
to before it all got too much."
"I'm trying to learn from les-
sons done in the past," he said.
The rules of the media game
have changed since Diana's
death, for which many hold the
press at least partly respon-
sible. A coroner's inquest con-
cluded that she died because
of "grossly negligent driving"
by her driver, Henri Paul. The
paparazzi were following them.
Since Diana's death the royal
family has become more savvy
- and more willing to go to
court, where the right to pri-
vacy has ben strengthened by
a series of British legal rulings
over the past decade.
Rod Dadak, a privacy expert
with London law firm Lewis
Silkin, said there is a wide-
spread feeling that William
and Kate should be allowed to
"enjoy their engagement with-
out being pursued all the time."
"Of course they are celebri-
ties, but they are entitled to
a private life like anyone else
- up to a point," he said.


Discovery hopes series


on beer has the hops

By DAVID BAUDER "Compared to world-class wines,
AP Television Writer a world-class beer has all

NEW YORK The star the complexity and
of Discovery Channel's food-compatibility of wine
new series "Brew Masters" at half the price."
says people in his craft beer
industry are "proudly pro- Sam Calagione
miscuous." Founder
With their products, he Dogfish Head Brewery
means.
"We encourage beer
drinkers to check out their brands like Budweiser Maine, he started Dogfish
competitors' beers," said took over the market. Head in Delaware because
Sam Calagione, founder of Many beer drinkers try the that's where his wife was
the Dogfish Head Brewery small brands to support from and it was one of only
in Delaware, as he sat at local companies, and it's eight states-without a small
a restaurant table with a a recession-friendly drink, brewery.
nearly drained pint of a Calagione said. Dogfish, which makes
Brooklyn-made lager in "Compared to world- more than two dozen
front of him. class wines, a world-class brands, specializes in re-
Discovery is hoping that beer has all the complex- creating beers thought lost
the same public food fasci- ity and food-compatibility to history, the recipes often
nation that "Cake Boss" and of wine at half the price," uncovered through archae-
similar series have tapped he said. logical expeditions. Its
into will spill over into the The "brew master" was Jiahu brand, which features
craft brewing industry. Its a college student in New rice and sake yeast, comes
"Brew Masters" series pre- York who worked as a bar- from a recipe in China that
mieres today, at 10 p.m. tender and became fasci- is 10,000 years old, he said.
Craft brewing is a nated with the product. He A beverage needs water,
growth industry in the went to the only store in yeast, hops and barley to
United States, its existence Manhattan that sold home- fit the definition of beer.
something of a "back to brewing materials at the After that, the ingredients
the future" development time and began making his are wide open. Dogfish has
for an industry dominated own beer. used tomatoes, saffron,
for many years by local After an apprenticeship mussels and many other
brewers before ubiquitous at a brewery in Portland, foods in its beers.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Backseat driver is turning


husband into nervous wreck


DEAR ABBY: My wife
is a back-seat driver who
seems to get more anxious
every time we go anywhere
together. She tells me to slow
down, which lights to watch,
which lane I should be in,
which cars are braking, which
ones are speeding, where the
semi-trucks are if she thinks
they're getting too close, and
how to drive in various weath-
er conditions. Shell move her
foot to an imaginary brake on
the passenger side, squirm
in her seat and hang onto the
handle above the passenger
door while I'm doing my best
to concentrate on my driving.
It's very distracting.
My wife is not willing
to drive when we're going
somewhere, although I have
offered to let her. She also
refuses to sit back and relax
because you can't control
another person's driving. If I
ignore her, she becomes irri-
tated and says I'm not paying
attention to her concerns. I
have never had a serious ac-
cident and have had none in
the past 15 years. What can
I do about this? DRIVEN
CRAZY IN WISCONSIN
DEAR DRIVEN: For
openers, slow down! When
a passenger hangs onto the
handle above the door, slams
on an imaginary brake and
scrunches back in the pas-
senger seat, it means you're
approaching the car ahead of


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

you too fast and the person is
bracing for impact.
.Next, make clear to your
wife before you pull out of the
driveway that what she has
been doing is distracting to
the point that instead of avert-
ing an accident, she could
very well cause one so it's
important she leave the driv-
ing to the driver. If she is still
uncomfortable, she should
either sit in the back seat or
the two of you should drive
separately.
DEAR ABBY: I have four
granddaughters ranging in
age from 8 months to 9 years.
What can we do to help them
become confident, self-as-
sured women? GRAND-
MA LINDA IN SHELBY,
ALA.
DEAR GRANDMA LIN-
DA: Spend time with them,
listen to them, and let them
know you love them and they
are important to you.
DEAR ABBY: I am the
mother of the groom. My
husband and I are hosting


the wedding rehearsal dinner.
The bride's mother informed
me that she is going to have a
slide show of the bride's and
groom's baby pictures at the
dinner.
What do you think of this
practice? I thought she should
have at least asked my permis-
sion. I did tell her I was not a
fan of the idea because I was
at a wedding reception where
it was done and the comments
from 'the guests were not
complimentary. Please com-
ment TASTEFUL MOM
IN NEW YORK
DEARTASTEFULMOM:
I think showing the bride's
and groom's baby pictures at
the rehearsal dinner would
be rather sweet. I'm sure they
will elicit many "Awws" and
"Weren't they cute!" And the
guests will be limited -to the
bridal party and out-of-town
guests, a smaller crowd than
would attend the wedding re-
ception.
Because your in-law-to-be
won't be able to get her hands
on photos of your son without
your cooperation, select some
you like and share them. If
you don't, it will cause hard
feelings. And yes, she should
have asked permission. Chalk
up the fact that she didn't to
her excitement and a desire to
contribute.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Go over everything you
will need for work, an inter-
view or anything that has to do
with your professional future.
You have to be prepared if
you want to make a life-alter-
ing change. A geographical
location can make a huge dif-
ference. Love is on the rise.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Think outside the box.
Check out new interests.
There is-plenty you can do to
prepare for the new year. Posi-
tive thought and positive ac-
tion will bring positive results.
Set your goals high. *-****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Not everyone is on
your side. Don't share your
thoughts and plans. Opposi-
tion is prevalent and can lead
to arguments regarding deals,
legal matters, settlements or
financial debts. Have a second-
ary plan ready. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Talks will pay off. Raise
your appeal and reputation by
adapting to change and recog-
nizing the potential that exists.
Getting together with friends,
relatives or neighbors will help
you realize you are not.alone,


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
no matter what the situation.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You may hurt someone's feel-
ings, leading to a dispute that
can alter your plans. Children
or activities that include all
ages will be hectic but will
bring about a decision that en-
hances your position with the
people you care about most.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Participate in activities
you feel passionate about. A le-
gal matter or deal you are em-
barking on will cause anxiety.
Disputing what's being done
will not get you any closer to
an agreement. Listen to what's
being offered and respond dip-
lomatically. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Taking part in commu-
nity events or volunteering
your services will lead to fabu-
lous introductions. The people
you meet will enrich your life
and increase your knowledge.
Don't let an incident develop-
ing in your professional life
ruin your day. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Eachlter in the cipher n t phesteands for another.
Today's clue: K equals P
"EMTA JRRDMT MA J N NMNR D R WDIJ
G V NMMZ FODEO RFJ J KR G-FGP UOJ
XDNU GTX WJGY JR UOJ RBNAGEJ
VNDLOUJN GTX EWJGNJN." -
Z MO GTXGR LGTXOD
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A critic is someone who never actually boas to the
battle, yet who afterwards comes out shooting the wounded." Tyne Daly
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-29


21): Responding to what's be-
ing said or offered will allow
you to stay in the game and
make professional gains. Give
yourself time to formulate what
will work best for you. Becom-
ing the go-to person will make
you a valuable asset. 2 stars
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Take care of your
Sown interests. The changes
going on within your personal
circle may be disconcert-
ing but, as long as you know
where you belong and how
you can make the most of your
situation, you have nothing to
fear. With change comes new
beginnings and adventure.
**
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. -19):. Put more effort
into the deals you are trying to
get off the ground. The talks
you have with serious-minded
people will give you a better
idea of what's required to get
things moving. Don't let ties to
your past stop you from.mak-
ing the best and the right deci-
sion now. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): It will be a waste
of time arguing with someone
who is determined to do things
a different way. Compromise
and get along in order to-get
the most accomplished. A re-
lationship with someone you
have known for some time can
change if you discuss beliefs,
attitudes and intentions. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Keep your thoughts to
yourself. Impulsive responses
will lead to a loss of friendship.
Go over your personal papers.
You have options and should
utilize your skills in order to
pursue an old dream. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


HAVING ASPIRATIONS By Clive Probert / Edited by Will Shortz 1112 31 4- 5161718190 10 I 112 |13 14 |15 16 17


Across
1 Judge's no-no
5 Like some
responsibilities
10 German-born
tennis star
Tommy
14 Start of "A Visit
From St.
Nicholas"
18 Spree
19 "The Bad News
Bears" actress
20 Film character
who actually
does not'say
"Play it again,
Sam"
21 "Take it easy!"
22 Robbers' gain
23 "Winnie-the-
Pooh" character
24 Signal for a
.programmer's
jump
25 One side in the
1973 Paris Peace
Accords
26 Macho guys like
their pie cold?
30 Second
31 Some dates
32 "___ Day Will
Come" (1963 #1
hit)
33 You might play
something by
this
34 Ignore
37 Potential cause
of a food recall
39 Name often
followed by a
number
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656, -
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


41 Bad actor's 92 Put the dentures
philosophy?- aside while
47 "__ doubt but, gardening?
they were fain o' 98 ___ Park, Queens
either : Burns 99 News show
48 Org. with the assemblage
motto "For the 100 Eye parts
benefit of all" 101 Disco fan on
49 Fair-hiring inits. "The Simpsons"
50 Kim Jong-il, for 104 Reed in music
one 105 Shiites or
53 James or Jackie Sunnis
of Hollywood 106 View from
56 Carrier with a Catania
*frequent flier
program called 108 Starboard food
program called
EuroBonus fish?
59 It may be snowy 116 Contest
or spotted 117 Away from the
61 Emmy-winning storm
actress de 118 What a beatnik
Matteo beats
62 Johnny ___ 119 Kind of theater
63 Concerns of 120 Not so tied up
middle-aged 121 Sail problem
guys in lower 122 Maine college
Louisiana? 123 [sigh]
67 Cute124 of the
71 Org. for electing Storm Country"
candidates
candidates125 Lawn starters
72 Whales, at times
126 Wear away
73 Lengthy military 127 Vetoes
sign-up?
76 Cpl.'s inferior
77 Presidential Down
straw poll city 1 Atom modeler
78 Bauxite, e.g. 2 "Dies ___"
79 Place for 3 Content of la mar
mounted antlers, 4 Course outlines
maybe 5 Out of one's mind,
80 Club Meds, e.g. in a way, with
84 Way in "up"
87 Conductors of 6 Vacuous
many exams, for 7 Hawk
short" 8 "Were I the Moor,
89 R.E.M.'s "The I would not be
Love" ___"
91 Chit 9 Loud ringing


10 It's symbolized
by caviar and
Champagne
11 Athol Fugard's
"A Lesson From

12 1930s film pooch
13 Portuguese-
speaking island
off the African
coast
14 Like some spicy
food
15 Pain result
16 Honolulu's ___
Stadium
17 More cunning
21 Very religious
27 Bearing
28 Chaucer piece
29 Actor Dennis
34 Diminutive
suffix
35 List ender
36 "Get hence":
I Kings 17:3
37 Replies from the
hard of hearing
38 Stop
40 Give due credit
42 Not. smooth
43 Result of some
time in a bed?
44 Cry of delight
45 Scrub over
46 Seine tributary
51 Nostradamus, for
one
52 Soviet news
group
54 One who takes
people in
55 A Lennon
57 Xanadu river
58 Sobersided
60 Back talk
63 "Alas"


64 Part of a Molibre
play
65 Snag
66 Huggies
competitor
67 Quick-like
68 Item in a music
producer's in-
box
69 Cricket units
70 MGM symbol
74 Bordeaux, e.g.
75 Benjamin
80 Old touring car


81 Fair attraction
82 Feature of much
ancient Roman
statuary
83 Goes after
85 Artist's
workplace
86 Gain access, in a
way
88 Roman square
90 Org. with a 2004-
05 lockout.
93 Chewy treats
94 Apiece


95 1976 rescue site
96 Go after
97 Dodge
101 Give a raw deal
102 Third planet
from le soleil
103 Impulses
105 Hogan
contemporary
106 Pushed, with
."on"
107 "___ were the
days"


109 Streets of
Quebec
110 Fleischmann's
product
111 Surf sound
112 Word after
bang, break or
buimp
113 Letters of faux
modesty
114 Title for Helen
Mirren
115 Couples no
more


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
BETAISA ICIR|EN PISIHIAIWIS CIB|S


PIAISISIEIDI RIOIAIDIE10OIOAIT


A 0 AIR ABC MAN

F I REWATERF|IRREHAZARD

INUNDATE BRA GARDEN

B A, IA v ION A K A E K||E YIE
MOI BUCKNAKEDBUCKEYE
ASSN ATO MUD BRIT
B I GWHEELOFBIGCH EES E
REDI DNA SIX HULL
IRE ACTI MORE ENMASSE
DEADWOODDEADDUCK HEX
AA VIE A PA A P RTA
TR A SHCANWETRASHTALK

AXL BLUECRABBLUEGRASS
M IA AVENUE LEONALEWI S
PEW TESTED ESTD ERECT


6 2 4 5


8 9 6


3 1. 6 9


19 3 4 2


6 3 8 9


2 1 3


8 7 5


2 6 1 7


S 4 3


Z 9 C V78 L 6 9 L


- 8 LE 6 9 L 9 1


L 9 6 ZL 9 8 16t


SL1 9 LZ 6V178 9


6 L 9 8 L 7 Z 9


8 Z 9 9 L 6 L

L 8 V 6 9 8 9 L 6



9 6 L 9 8 LZ 78


9E81t7Z9L6


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


OIVIEIR


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


The Paw-fect HOLIDAY for PETS


Seasonal tips

for pet parents

FAMILY FEATURES
This holiday season, share seasonal celebrations
and traditions with the entire family, including
four-legged family members. According to a
national PetSmart survey, 72 percent of pet
parents include their pet in holiday festivities.
"The holidays are about being with our loved ones and
that includes our pets, too," said PetSmart Veterinarian and Pet
Care Expert Dr. Robyn Jaynes. "Whether it's including yQur
pet in a family photo, taking them on a family trip or giving
that perfect holiday gift or treat, it's important for pet parents
to consider the unique behaviors of each and every pet."
As families everywhere kick off the season, PetSmart has a
few simple tips to help pet parents make it a safe and enjoy-
able time for their pets. L


Put Up Pet-Friendly Decor
Keep your pet's safety in mind and help furry friends steer clear of
dangerous decorations.
Holiday lights mean extra electrical cords and plugs. For pets,
these items are tempting "chew toys." Taking extra time to tape
down or cover cords will help prevent shocks, burns or more
serious injuries.
Christmas trees are sure to attract a pet's attention. Secure
Christmas trees to keep them from toppling over if a pet should
try to climb them, use them as a scratching post or simply bump
into them.
Forgo small ornaments, especially balls, bells and tinsel that are
attractive to pets but deadly if consumed.
Traveling With Furry Friends
Many families travel at this time of year. Whether pet parents are tak-
ing their pets along or leaving them at home, it's important to make
sure their pets are safe and comfortable.
Pet parents who board their pets should look for facilities that
are clean and have friendly, responsive staff and strict policies
on health and safety issues.
If pets are included in a family's travel plans, many resources
can help you find hotels that accommodate pets. Visit
www.petswelcome.com for more information.
Many products are available to keep pets safe in the car,
including harnesses and barriers that secure pets in the back
of the vehicle.


Help Pets Get Camera-Ready
Just like the rest of the family, pets need to look their best for the
holiday photo or the traditional shot on Santa's lap. Try these tips to
prepare your pet:,
Help your pets look their best with a pre-photo bath.
m For pets that enjoy dressing up, holiday outfits such as a
reindeer or Santa costume, cable knit sweater, elf hat or jingle
bell collar are festive.
Having treats or special toys on-hand can keep pets from getting
anxious while in line and also help them behave during the photo.
To find out when and where you can have your pet's photo taken
with Santa Claws, visit www.petsmart.com.
Keep Pets Calm and Comfortable
The holiday season can be hectic for pets with the hustle and bustle
of parties, travel and family dinners. To ease pet stress, pet parents
should be mindful of the following:
m Pets may not understand why their usually quiet home is filled
with people and noise. Provide pets with a quiet place to retreat.
Pet parents often think they're "treating" their pets with table
scraps from their-holiday meals. The danger, say PetSmart
veterinarians, is that dogs can become seriously ill from human
foods because they do not have the same digestive system or
nutritional needs as people.
For the most part, pets' should stay indoors during the cold winter
months. Some dogs may not adjust as well to the cold weather,
so pet parents may consider sweaters to keep their pets warm.


The Best Gifts for Four-Legged Family Members


With an estimated 71.4 million pet-
filled homes in the U.S., many pet
parents will be searching for the
perfect pel gift this holiday. .eas:n
PetSmart offer special to' s, uteari
and other greai gifts that 1ill make
your pet waag their tails ith joi
This year"' mu-i-have gifts iar
Chance and Lucky -
The adorable holiday
collection includes ,tuffed
animals ornament.. slippers,
boxed cards or gift cards
which are perfect to celebrate
the holiday season and supp.or
a good cause, too. Teid percent
of all purchases will be
donated to PetSmart Charities
to save the lives ,,f homeilI.
pets. The collection ranges
from $5 to $20. ..


Ten percent of all Chance and Lucky sales go
homeless pets through PetSmart Charities.


Fisher-Price Inspired by classic
Fisher-Price icons, the whimsical toys
ir for dogs feature items such as the
Xylobone, Chatter Pup Telebone and
Ruff-a-Stack. Available in two sizes -
small ($7.99) and large ($11.99).
a Martha Stewart Holiday Collection -
The holiday Nordice Fair Isle sweater
from the exclusive Martha Stewart Pets
collection keeps your four-legged family
members cozy during the cold winter
months. Available for just $19.99.
SStockings for Dogs and Cats-.
PetSmart's classic hobdaN value pack
S sockings are filled %ith artassortment
of toys for cats and dogs. Pet parents
,aW can pick a theme that matches their pet's
personality, such as the merry pink
to save ;' gingerbread-man or the classic red and
green reindeer. Price ranges from $4.99
to $}19.99.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424




































































THAT ONE RETIRES
AT THE END OF THE
MONTH.


EXCUSE ME,BUT IF yoO'RE. SHOPPIN&- FOR U5By'/,
go WILL iTITHESE PRNTRS- HE
TOSSED THEM ON THE. FLOOR -'OL)
TOSS THEM IN THE
i WAt. RiND VO.LR -,
-EK 4 To _WEAR'.
,\GRT 3T OF THEC !
"DR .R-


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2010


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


GARFIELD/ by Jim Davis


,P ;FO eRl


THOSE THREE ARE
CONTRACTORS. I
DIDN'T RENEW THEIR
CONTRACTS.
C. c


- 7


f


qp-


















'HIS MYSTERIOUS BRIDE HAD
REPORTEDLY COME FROM
THE WESTERN HILLS. HER FAMLiY
HISTORY IS UNKNOWN IN
CAMELOT, THUS SHE WAS
AN ODD CHOICE FOR A
STA TUS-SEEKER SUCH AS
DRACO.


'FURTHERMORE, THIS WIFE,
CALLED MALDUBH, SEEMS
TO CARRY THE CHILL OF WILD
PLACES ABOUT HER. IT IS NOT
UNFAIR TO SAY SHE UNNERVES
PEOPLE.


a A
WAli/VZZ II


.K.1 U
Py-,- .-I


F, 'I
ROW 15 51E )O, hNG R 5kE D.DN'T b5,,
K-~,' -- UT S5RE 5OUNbED
I/ ,, \ JUST FNE!


TiE BDli LIOSER


S I -1- .



























































HAGAR THE HORRIBLE/ by Dik Browne


IN ri* f0f1le,AJ, AtoIsM ? /NRR19P
COL5PLE q4A 6TRoNo, OWAN riC,
PA IoNArE F FLIAf6...
\ Yw M


Tr4E6 FeWIHuS6, /A TIMf,
I ARE REPLACEPe YSOM6rAN6
( yvioe sUtLEt...


B.C./ by Mastroianni & Hart


(4
4~4l


Di. by Caors yndte


SHOE/ by Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins
MDAME100000 MADAME ZOO C
CALLING...I'DLIKETO /S- I 15 THERE ANY
PEAK TO SOMEONE ON I ELLO? At
Tupr rnTix-grs/im:' I i-MIrf'fJ'^wB r j I


LOOK... IF YOU WON'T SPEAK
TO ME, WILL YOU AT LEAST
SEND ME A SIGN?

( ____


1Y JHEANN 'O-JoH MAiRSHAL=-


2010 King Features Syndicate Inc. World Rights Reserved.
SEE?! IT HAS TO GEEZ. LOUISE!
00 WITH THE CUSTOMERS NEED
ANGLE OF THE LESSONS JUST TO
WRIST/ OPERATE THAT
.peD! MONSTER!T-1


www.blondie.com


Mort Walker's

beetle

bailey


CAN YOU URE.I JUST TYPE IN
DOTHAT THE COORDINATES


------- ---------------
@2010 John L. Hart FLP [

SOiKY W LE FFA,





----


~fC~d~




















































CLOSE TO HOME/ by John McPherson


"WILL YOU STOP REFERRING TO ME AS
THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION?"


"YOU'LL HAVE TO USE THE DIALS, LEROY ..
THERE'S NO REMOTE."


"ANY REAL DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MARRIAGE
AND THE FIERY PITS OF HELL?"


"WILL YOU STOP WHISPERING ABOUT WHO'S BREAKING UP
WITH WHOM AND WHO USED TO BE MARRIED TO SO-AND-0SO."


FRANK, I4T M f THE ':
FI19T TO WISH YOU
MERRY CHRISTMAS! "
R1HE'S A cARD.

THANK5, eRIV. ks
HAPPY HOLIDAYS!









SI O ThTves / Dl by UFS, Iw comlcs.com E-nal:ThaveOne@S olcom


GET FUZZY/ by Darby Conley


1 WISH I \ So
CoULP ENTER po
THIS AGILITY IT.
CoNTE-T. IT
LooKs So
FUN...





I PIp EVEKRTHIN To
ENOte I'D WIM THAT
A E'. I MAY HAVE 5004
UMCOMFORTA.BLE. I MAY
HAVE COMPROMISED MY
VALUES, B5T I VIP WHAT 1
HAP ToT-o To WIN.


LOOK AT THe Ws
IN THESE PICTURES,
THef'E ALL, LIKE,
FPROFEIOAL RERAIE-,
V' EMBARAS : /
IMseLF,. /-


WOW. \OR, I
WHmrT I 9t1N'T
OU Do EVEN
WITH TIHE MAKE
500? IT CWT
Cf TtiE

.|6


SATCHEL, LET
Me TELLUo)O
A SToFT. oNCE
UfoN A TIME,
I WAMTeD
To NETE- A
CAT SHOW,


Tie CANDT
CoKK I WAS
USIN6 ASA
FALSE TOOTH
FELL oUT
WHEMN TE
JUDGE
CAME Sf.


IUTT WAKA NOT
CHA AC4TER- ReALT.
EU\LPIt4C 1 HAD
=IlegtNce To STEAL
i$150 )To
PAY THE
ENTWPNCE FEE.


TH-S 15YOUR
CHRISTMAS
CARD/1. IT DON'T
RfALI.Y EM IN
TH0 SPIRIT OF
THI HOLIDAYS.

5 U0L IT IS---
S "PCK THI



\ -


'SO 'cRE OH,
'CAiNG LtI NO,I
WAS ALL WANT-
AboUT THE ED
EXIPR/- THE
eNcE? $500oo

k -. -/Pie


So AKE (ou GooD LORD, No.
SwNI 1 JUST NIP IN
SHOULD JUST AND TAKi The
TY (W BLUE R fAON
HARDEST 9 WHILE ALL TIHE
NERPLTUAERS
ARE RUMNINI
TIKoUH TUEWS.


FOXTROT/ by Bill Amend


UT YOU DIN'T 0MNO,I DI (TT.
ANDW NOW You foofE M( HNR UP
KEGitT IT LIKs A CHIA PET
VRtMY cf AND PFU CN THE
(OUK LIFE? stIGesT RE15 I
CoULP F ND. I
PIP IT, SATCHEL.


-~ II'-I




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