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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01463
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/27/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01463
System ID: UF00028308:01463
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Games Begin Again
Thanksgiving holiday is over, teams
start winter seasons in earnest.

000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


LaKe


Saturday, November 27, 2010


-


ia


Tigers Rally
Auburn overcomes 24-0
deficit to edge 'Bama.

Sports, I B


__,j4teporter


www.lakecityreporter.com .s Vol. 136, No. 267 0 75 cents


TWC STAR




PAYS A VISIT.1




TO LAKE CITY


Weather Channel's Cantore comes

to ring the bell for Salvation Army.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
When Jim Cantore's sis-
ter, Carole Dotson of Lake


City, asked him to fill in a
shift as a Salvation Army
bell ringer, he couldn't say
no.
"If Carole says, 'Jump,' I


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Luke Dotson, 6, passed out candy canes while his uncle, Jim
Cantore, rang for donations.


say 'How high?'" he said.
"She's Miss Congeniality.
My sister doesn't have to
do much to get anybody to
do something."
Cantore, a meteorolo-
gist and on-air personality
for The Weather Channel,
was a celebrity bell ringer
for Altrusa International of
Lake City Friday at Publix.
Altrusa has participated
in ringing bells to collect
donations for the Salvation
Army for more than 20
years, said Dotson, the
project organizer. This is
the first year with a celeb-
rity ringer.
"My brother was in town
and I tortured him into
doing it," she said. "We had
an hour shift and needed
to fill it."
The siblings have a
tradition of spending the
holidays together, Cantore
said. This year he brought
his family to see hers in
Lake City.
Her brother comes to
Lake City all the time, but
normally they just enjoy
family activities, such as
visiting O'Leno State Park,


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Jim Cantore, The Weather Channel meteorologist, chats with Alan Reiter of Lake City Friday
at Publix. 'He's one of my favorites,' Reiter said. Cantore was a celebrity bell ringer.


Dotson said. They decided
Wednesday to have him
ring as well.
"It's a little fun for Lake
City," she said.
A lot of people came
during Cantore's shift and
posed for pictures, along
with making donations.
"It's been a busy hour,"
he said. "People have been
really sweet."
The Salvation Army is all
about the less fortunate, he
said. Helping solicit dona-
tions is a good lesson in
giving for adults and chil-
dren.
"The Salvation Army and
other organizations give to
so many," he said. '"This is
the season of giving."
Altrusa will continue
ringing for donations
CANTORE continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Christie Cantore, 17, helps her father, Jim Cantore, solicit
'donations during his shift ringing for the Salvation Army.


'Tis the right season to shop


Crowds flock as
stores open early
for holiday spree.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
"The sales, of course."
That's what Joanne
Marcil of McAlpin said
drew her and her mother,
Suzanne, out to shop at the
Lake City Mall Friday.
The McAlpins joined hun-
dreds of other shoppers on
the hunt for bargains who
flocked to Lake City stores
on Black Friday to begin
their holiday shopping.
"We always start on
Black Friday," Suzanne
Marcil said.
Will Batte, local Belk
store manager, said cus-
tomers came to get deals
on the merchandise. ,
'They're great prices,"
Batte said. "It's really price-
driven. We have lower pric-
es this time of year than
usual to drive customers in
the door."
The crowds came when
the Belk doors opened
at 4 a.m., Batte said, but
business evened out to a
steady stream of customers
throughout the day.


Candy Douglas, store
manager of the Lake City
JCPenney, said JCPenney
experienced a similar situa-
tion after it opened its doors
at 3:30 a.m.
"We got the initial rush,
but it was sort of steady
from there," she said.
Douglas said her store
hired more staff than the
previous year to handle the
influx of shoppers.
Shoppers said the bustle
of people was manageable-


during the Black Friday
shopping.
"I usually avoid it because
of the crowds, but it hasn't
been bad this year," said
Diane Carter of Lake City.
"I think it's pretty busy
compared to the usual
shopping, but not over-
whelming," said Jane
Breeden of Lake City, who
shoe-shopped with her hus-
band, Larry.


SHOP continued on 8A


Photos by LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter

Above: Nancy Munn (cen-
ter) of Lake City checks out
with a line of Black Friday
shoppers behind her in the
JCPenney store at the Lake
City Mall Friday.

Left: Angel Roberts (left), a
JCPenney employee, helps
Lawanna Strickland of Live
Oak shop for a purse in the
store's handbags and acces-
sories department at the Lake
City Mall Friday. Strickland
said she shopped on Black
Friday for the special savings
stores offer at the start of the
holiday shopping season.


Arrest

made in

Georgia

Wanted in
connection to
pair of murders.
A man wanted in con-
nection with the murders
of a pair of women from
Lake City was arrested
Wednesday in the Parkside
area of Savannah, Ga.
Police in Savannah, work-
ing together with U.S. mar-
shals and the Jacksonville
Sheriff's
Office, took .
Stewart, 20,
into custody,
at approxi-
mately' ... I
6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Stewart
Stewart
was being
held on a contempt of court
charge in the Chatham
County Jail.
The bodies of Tashanda
Jones, 20, and Janet Mincey,
33, cousins who had both
used Lake City as their
home address, were found
on a street in Jacksonville
ARREST continued on 3A


1I si 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


-j: c O pinion ................ 4A
; L 'Faith ................... 6A
Clearing Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 3B
WEATHER, 2A Puzzles ................. 2B


.*.~ .l.\j.


TODAY IN
FAITH
Group faces
bleak future.


COMING
SUNDAY
What can be done
to stop bullying










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2010


Friday:.
Afternoon: 2-6-7
Evening: 8-0-6


Friday:
Afternoon: 3-6-0-9
Evening: 9-8-0-3


." Thursday:
6-22-24-26-27


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



First Wills and Kate book published


LONDON

engagement. Now 10
days later the first
book.
'William and Kate: A -
Royal Love Story," by The Sun news-
paper's royal reporter James Clench,
was published in Britain Friday, the
first in a slew of new titles about the
relationship between Prince William
and Kate Middleton that publishers
hope will set cash registers chirping
in the months before their April 29
wedding at Westminster Abbey.
Published by Harper Collins and
The Sun both owned by Rupert
Murdoch's News Corp. the book
is scattered with photos by Arthur
Edwards, the paper's long-serving
royal photographer.
'William and Kate: A Royal Love
Story" due to be published in the
U.S. Dec. 17 is a more reverent
affair than Andrew Morton's 1992
book, "Diana: Her True Story",
which rocked the royal family and
punctured the image of Princess
Diana's and Prince Charles' fairy-
tale romance. It charts the romance
between "the boy who would one
day be king" and "the middle-class
girl who had harbored a crush on
him since her school days."
The book traces "the greatest
love story of the century" from the
couple's first meeting at a university
in Scotland. It claims that William's
nickname for Kate was Babykins,
while she called him Big Willie.
Publication comes just days after
the Nov. 16 engagement announce-
ment and at the start of the lucra-
tive Christmas book-buying season.

Laura Schlessinger
shifts to satellite radio
NEW YORK Talk show host
Laura Schlessinger won't stay away


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Britain's Prince William and his fiancee Kate Middleton are seen
at St. James's Palace in London, after they announced their engagement. Prince
William and Kate Middleton will marry April 29, 2011 in Westminster Abbey, the
historic London church where Princess Diana's funeral was held, royal officials said
Tuesday.


from radio very long only a week-
end, in fact.
Sirius XM Radio said Monday it has
a multiyear deal with Schlessinger to
bring her "Dr. Laura" advice program
to satellite radio in January. Specific
terms were not revealed.
Schlessinger had said she was quit-
ting her syndicated radio program, a
week after she apologized for using
the N-word on the air 11 times while
talking to a black woman, and activists
demanded her ouster.
She ends her traditional radio pro-


gram on Friday, Dec. 31. The follow-
ing Monday, her "Dr. Laura" show
will begin live at 2 p.m. on Sirius
XM. It will air for three hours a day
Monday through Friday.
Schlessinger announced on CNN's
"Larry King Live" Aug. 17 that she
was walking away from her radio
show when her contract ended. The
next day Sirius talk programming
chief Jeremy Coleman called her to
discuss a switch, she said.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor James Avery is 62.
* Academy Award-winning
director Kathryn Bigelow
(Film: "The Hurt Locker") is
59.
* TV host Bill Nye ("Bill Nye,
the Science Guy") is 55.
* Actor William Fichtner is
54.
* Caroline Kennedy is 53.
* Rock musician Charlie


Burchill (Simple Minds) is 51.
0 Actor Fisher Stevens is 47.
0 Actress Robin Givens is
46.
E Actor Michael Vartan is 42.
0 Rapper Skoob (DAS EFX)
is 40.
N Actor Kirk Acevedo is 39.
E Rapper Twista ks 38.
0 Actor Jaleel White is 34.
0 Actress Alison Pill is 25.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid atLake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-.
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED


Daily Scripture


"Therefore, since we are
receiving a kingdom that
cannot be shaken, let us be
thankful, and so worship God
acceptably with reverence and
awe."

Hebrews 12:28



Lake City Reporter


To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks. ...............$48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks.............. $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Congresswoman
to head committee

MIAMI She hung
up on the next president,
Barack Obama. Twice. She
thought it was a prank.
In an expert stroke of
political spin, she imme-
diately sent out a press
release explaining the
apparent snub as a mix-up.
Meet Florida U.S. Rep.
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the
first Cuban-American to
serve in Congress and
the next in line to head
the House Foreign Affairs
Committee.
The phone incident
occurred in late 2008 as
the president-elect reached
out to potentially friendly
Republicans and shortly
after a radio host fooled
Sarah Palin by impersonat-
ing the president of France
on the phone. But it was vin-
tage "Ily," as she is known in
Washington: frank, almost
irreverent, yet imbued with
an underlying seriousness
and political savvy.
It also was a reminder
that Ros-Lehtinen, 58, pres-
ents an increasingly rare
image these days a poli-
tician occasionally willing
to work across the aisle.
The legislator, who was re-
elected with 69 percent of
the vote, is a hawk on for-
eign affairs but breaks with
her party on immigration,
gay rights and other issues
important to the people
she represents -- Cuban-
Americans, gays, a strong
Jewish community.
Under her watch, the com-
mittee is expected to push
for stepped-up sanctions
against North Korea and
Iran, more oversight of the
U.N. and a block on any dia-
logue with Cuba. As a strong
abortion foe, Ros-Lehtinen
also may try to chip away
at the president's executive
order allowing foreign aid
for international groups that
provide information about
abortion services.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo, Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., hugs a sup-
porter during a Memorial Day Ceremony in Miami Beach.


Man sought in
shooting of 6

RUSKIN Hillsborough
Sheriff's officials said find-
ing the gunman who killed
two men and wounded four
others Thanksgiving morn-
ing is a top priority.
Investigators said the
shooter arrived at a home
early Thursday in a green
minivan, asked for some-
one not at the house using
that man's nickname and
opened fire with a .45-cali-
ber weapon before driving
away.
Brothers Sergio and
Juan Guitran died at a
local hospital. Richard
Cantu was shot in the
head and is in extremely
critical condition.
Three others are in sta-
ble condition.
Authorities said they
are working to identify the
suspect. He is described
as a white man in his 30s
or 40s with short bushy
hair, wearing a black T-
shirt with a "sheriff logo"
on the front and the word
"security."
Sheriff's spokesman
Larry McKinnon said
the shirt had generic law
enforcement markings and
appeared to be the type
commonly sold to the pub-
lic. There were no mark-
ings indicating a specific
agency.


Anyone with information
can call Crime Stoppers at
1-800-873-8477. They can
also report anonymously
online at www.crimestop-
perstb.com or text "CSTB"
plus your tip to 274637
(CRIMES).

Tribe upset over
removal of bones

HOLLYWOOD The
Florida Seminole tribe is
upset over the removal of
remains from an ancient
Native American burial
ground to make way for
the Everglades restoration
project.
Both the Seminole
and Miccosukee tribes
agreed to have archeolo-
gists remove and carefully
re-inter the bones. But it
wasn't until two years later
that they learned how many
were at the site.
The partial remains of
56 men, women and chil-
dren were removed from
the burial ground an
amount significant enough
to make it eligible for listing
on the National Registry of
Historic Places.
The Seminole tribe
is upset and wants all
901 bones and 245 teeth
returned to the original
site.

Associated Press


THE WEATHER


CLEARING PARTLY PARTLY __ CHC OF CHC OF
SKIES CLOUDY SUNNY T-STORMS T-STORMS


HI 66 LO 35 HI 71 LO 1 HI 77 LO HI 78 LO :: HI 69 LO 37


Tallahassee *
66/33
Pensacola "0
60/41 Panama City
62/42


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high.
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
'Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Valdosta
63/35
Lake City,
66/35
Gainesville .
'67/37
Ocala
~0i/A


83
56
72
48
84 in 1973
22 in 1950

0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.85"
45.48"


* JacksonviIle
65/39

Daytona Beach
70 51
n *


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


ml/ u 7 Key West
Oriando Cape Canaveral Lake City
73/54 71/59 Lake City
Tampa Naples
75/58 West Palm Beach Ocala
80/66 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers, 81/69 0 Pensacola
81/62 Naples Tallahassee
81/64 Miami Tampa
S 83/69 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
81/72


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:06 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:07 a.m.
5:30 p.m.


MOON ult
Moonrise today 11:35 p.m. rac
Moonset today 11:56 a.m. for
Moonrise tom. a'
Moonset tom. 12:32 p.m.


Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.
28 5 13 21
Last New First Full



6a On this date in
nday 1988, snow and
high winds created
blizzard conditions
in Minnesota. Winds
gusted to 63 mph at
Windom, and snow-
fall totals ranged
up to 14 inches at
Aitkin. Snow drifts
seven feet high
closed many roads.


4

45 mites to bum
Today's


Ira-violet
diation risk
r the area on
scale from 0
1 -'.


Sunday
4, 66, pc
73/62/c
79/73/sh
81/63/sh
72/53/pc
68/56/pc
82/73/t
71/51/pc
80/71/sh
82/65/sh
73/55/pc
76/61/c
67/54/s
65/54/s
68/49/s
77/64/c
67/46/pc
79/70/sh


Monday
7, 6spc
77/65/pc
81/74/pc
84/65/pc
77/58/pc
74/59/pc
83/73/pc
77/56/pc
82/72/pc
84/67/pc
78/60/pc
80/63/pc
72/62/pc
70/62/t
75/62/pc
82/66/pc
74/56/pc
81/72/pc


An exclusive
service
n to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


S Forecasts, data and graph-
"'- Ics 2010 Weather Central
7. LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com







Oi C0608



J1ggSE


CA$H 3


AROUND FLORIDA


c~E~i~


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


g i UN


MONDAY
^^^^^^^^^HflyH


Am~soraffimm


R~"~;I;Ia


1F~I1~













The annual all-night 7- ..-.


shop-a-thon: Black "/


Friday draws crowds if 7


ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

Bargain shoppers, brav-
ing rain or frigid weather,
crowded the nation's stores
in the wee hours of the
night to get their hands on
deals from TVs to toys on
Black Friday.
Early signs pointed to
bigger crowds at many
stores including Best Buy,
Sears, and Toys R Us for
the traditional start to the
holiday shopping season.
In an encouraging sign
for retailers and for the
economy, more shoppers
appeared to be buying
for themselves than last
year, when such indul-
gences were limited.
Lengthened hours that
pushed some store open-
ings into Thanksgiving also
appeared to pay off.
Toys R Us, which drew
in shoppers with 50 per-
cent discounts on such
toys as Buzz Lightyear and
Barbies, was counting on
getting an extra boost by
opening 24 hours straight,
starting at 10 p.m. on
Thanksgiving.
Brian Dunn, CEO of Best
Buy Co., which started its
holiday TV ads 11 days ear-
lier this year than last year,
reported customer counts
were showing high single-
digit percentage increase
Friday morning compared
last year. He said shoppers
were throwing in items like
Blu-ray players to go with


early morning bargains
that started at 5 a.m.
'Traffic was fast and furi-
ous. We started earlier and
we have more TV (commer-
cials). I think both of these
things helped," Dunn said
in an interview with The
Associated Press. "I do think
there will be more self-gift-
ing this year."
Still, analysts monitoring
stores said many people
were paying with cash and
were focused, doing plenty
of research before ventur-
ing out
"Where there are bar-
gains, there are people
looking to gobble them up,"
said Marshal Cohen, chief
analyst for market research
firm NPD. "The consumer
is still very calculated."
The earlier hours were
an enticement to shoppers
like Jessica Marshburn,
who was armed with a
Rockstar energy drink and
an advertising insert from
a newspaper.
"It's easier this year.
I just stayed up," said
Marshburn, who was at
Washington Square mall in
Tigard, Ore., for its mid-
night opening. Her game
plan? Kohl's, Target, and
Best Buy, as they opened.
She and her friend Cristy
Doering were shopping for
themselves while keeping
their eyes open for deals
that might make good
gifts.
At the Walmart store in
Columbia, Md., customers


came in waves, with a big
rush at midnight when toys
and clothing went on sale
and then another surge just
before cut-rate electronics
were hauled out at 5 a.m.
Parking spots were in short
supply and shopping carts
were even more scarce,
as people stalked the exits
waiting for discarded ones.
The chain averted the
dangers of years past by
keeping its doors open all
night to head off poten-
tial stampedes. Shoppers
instead lined up for tickets
entitling them to heavily
discounted TVs and com-
puters and then camped
out in cordoned-off aisles.
While the system kept
things orderly, some shop-
pers didn't appreciate it.
Kelly Miller was look-
ing to do some marathon
gift shopping, but ended
up buying just a few toys,
including a $4 Candyland
game.
'I might have picked up
more," she said, "if I could have
found what I wanted without
stepping on people lying on the
floor. I got fed up."
Retail analyst Cohen, who
had a team of consultants
monitoring 11 regions, esti-
mated that 15 percent of pur-
chases so far on Friday were
items for the shoppers them-
selves, up from about 9 per-
cent last year on the same
day. On Black Friday 2008,
he estimated it dropped to
about 5 percent. In good
economic times, such pur-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shoppers stream into a Best Buy to take advantage of the store's early opening Friday in


Dartmouth, Mass.

chases run about 26 percent,
Cohen said.
Kevin Jones, a Black
Friday first-timer, was at
Walmart in Columbia, Md.,
to buy a 42-inch Emerson
LCD television for $398 for
his new apartment
'This year, I'm taking care
of me first.I deserve a little
gift," he said.
The fierce battle for shop-
pers' wallets promises sav-
ings for those willing and
able to buy amid an economy
that's still worrying many.
The strong Black Friday
builds on retailers' momen-
tum after a solid start to
November. Shoppers who
can afford it are buying
more nonessentials, like
jewelry and luxury goods.
Still, nearly 15 million are
unemployed, and concerns
about job security cloud
consumer confidence.
Spending may be picking
up but has not returned to
pre-recession levels.
"It's a dogfight between


retail companies," said
Chris Donnelly, a senior
executive in consulting
group Accenture's retail
practice. "This year is the
first time that there's a little
more money in the market-
place so they're being more
aggressive about getting
the last dollar. At the end
of the day, they're going to
outweigh people who are
pulling back."
Many stores pushed
more exclusive deals
online Thursday in a bid
to rope in shoppers before
Black Friday. It apparent-
ly worked. According to
IBM's Coremetrics, online
sales soared 33 percent on
the holiday compared with
Thanksgiving 2009. The
average order was $182.74,
up from $159.81 on last
year's Thanksgiving Day.
Thanksgiving weekend
is huge for retailers. In
recent years, Black Friday
- called that because the
surge of shoppers could


take retailers into prof-
itability, or "the black,"
for the year has been
the busiest shopping day
of the year, according to
data from research firm
ShopperTrak.
.But the retail blitz doesn't
make or break the holiday
season. In fact, shoppers
seem to be procrastinating
more every year, giving
retailers some nail-biting
moments waiting for sales
the last few days before
Christmas.
Retailers do study buying
patterns for the weekend to
discern shoppers' mindset.
This year, that means tak-
ing the measure on their
willingness to spend just a
little bit more.
Last year, the
Thanksgiving shopping
weekend accounted for
12.3 percent of overall
holiday revenue, accord-
ing to ShopperTrak. Black
Friday made up about half
of that.


San Diego drug tunnel had railcar, tons of pot


ELLIOT SPAGAT
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO A sophis-
ticated cross-border tunnel
equipped with a rail sys-
tem, ventilation and fluo-
rescent lighting has been
shut down by U.S. and
Mexican officials the
second discovery of a major
underground drug passage
in San Diego this month,
authorities said Friday.
The tunnel found
Thursday is 2,200 feet long
- more than seven foot-
ball fields and runs from
the kitchen of a home in
Tijuana, Mexico, to two
warehouses in San Diego's
Otay Mesa industrial dis-
trict, said Mike Unzueta,
head of investigations at
U.S. Immigration 'and
Customs Enforcement in
San Diego.
In Mexico, the tunnel's
cinderblock-lined entry
dropped 80 to 90 feet to a
wood-lined floor, Unzueta
said. From the U.S. side,
there was a stairway lead-
ing to a room about 50 feet
underground that was full
of marijuana.
"It's a lot like how the
ancient Egyptians buried


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Thursday photo released by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a task
force agent crouches inside a cross-border tunnel that authorities said was used as an under-,
ground drug passage in San Diego.


the kings and queens,"
Unzueta said.
Authorities seized more
than 20 tons of marijuana.
Unzueta said the tun-
nel discovered Thursday
and another found in early


November are believed to
be the work of Mexico's
Sinaloa cartel, headed by
that country's most-want-
ed drug lord, Joaquin "El
Chapo" Guzman.
"We think ultimately they


are controlled by the same
overall cartel but that the
tunnels were being man-
aged and run independent-
ly by different cells operat-
ing within the same orga-
nization," Unzueta said.


CANTORE: TWC pays visit

Continued From Page 1A


Monday-Friday through
Dec. 23. A local youth min-
istry, Kicking It 4 The King,
is ringing on Saturdays.
The organization's goal is
to jokingly beat the Rotary
Club, which is ringing at
Walmart, Dotson said.
The Salvation Army is


supportive of helping fami-
lies in need, and everyone
is asked to donate, she
said.
"Come give a little bit
every time you can," Dotson
said. "A little bit goes a long
way."


ARREST: For questioning

Continued From Page 1A


just before 6 p.m. Monday.
The van they had been driv-
ing was missing.
According to police
reports, the van -
described as a 2004 red
or burgundy Ford with
license number M107RN
- turned up in Savannah
and was identified by
police. That led to a search


of nearby houses, where
Stewart was found, accord-
ing to reports.



ISEQSS^


The Cantores and the Dotsons worked together to bring in
donations for the Salvation Army. From left Christie Cantore,
Jim Cantore, Luke Dotson and Carole Dotson.





Sewing Machines

,- $4500
d Starting at:


ea .


The passage found
Thursday is one of the most
advanced to date, with an
entry shaft in Mexico lined
with cinderblocks and a
rail system for drugs to
be carried on a small cart,
Unzueta said.
Three men were arrest-
ed in the United States,
and the Mexican military
raided a ranch in Mexico
and made five arrests in
connection with the tun-
nel, authorities said.
U.S. authorities have
discovered more than 125
clandestine tunnels along
the Mexican border since
the early 1990s, though
many were crude and
incomplete.
U.S. authorities do not
know how long the lat-
est tunnel was operating.
Unzueta said investigators
began to look into sev-
eral warehouses in June
on a tip that emerged
from a large bust of
marijuana, cocaine and
methamphetamine by the


San Bernardino County
Sheriff's Department.
U.S. authorities fol-
lowed a trailer from one
of the warehouses to a
Border Patrol checkpoint
in Temecula, where they
seized 27,600 pounds of
marijuana. The driver,
whose name was not
released, was -arrested,
along with two others who
went to a residence in sub-
urban El Cajon .that had
$13,500 cash inside.
"That (trailer) was liter-
ally filled top to bottom,
front to back," Unzueta
said. "There wasn't any
room for anything else
in that tractor-trailer but
air."
Three tons of marijuana
were found in a "subter-
ranean room" and else-
where in the tunnel on the
U.S. side, authorities said.
Mexican officials seized
four tons of pot at a ranch
in northern Mexico, bring-
ing the total haul to more
than 20 tons.


/ant to Pea' 4 Cnjo, tke

HJo1.dau6Thi y j/ear?


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ing at Peoples. At Peoples State Bank we understand what it
takes to make a business successful in our community. And
success is rarely achieved alone. Let our experienced banking
professionals provide financial solutions to help you grow
your business. With a little financial assistance from Peoples
you can spend less time worrying.aboutyour business financ-
es and more time doing what you do best, running your busi-
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and better banking foryourself. Peoples State Bank. Now
that's banking!


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W US Hwy 90. Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES

STATE BANK


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CjTY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION












OPINION


Saturday, November 27, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
0 P


TH ER
INION


BP's failure

to-properly

assess risks

Like other indepen-
dent investigators
examining the
Deepwater Horizon
disaster, the National
Academy of Engineering is
pointing fingers mostly at
BP joining the emerging
consensus that the oil giant's
errors greatly contributed to
the explosion and subsequent
oil spill.
In an interim report, pre-
pared jointly with the National
Research Council, members
of the academy said BP failed
to properly assess risks and
chose less expensive processes
and equipment that led to the
disaster.
The academy is hardly the
first one to point to those mis-
takes. Its report did not identify
which specific errors may have
caused the explosion at the
rig. But the engineers placed
the responsibility for many of
the missteps squarely on BP's
shoulders.
They cited critical errors by
BP, including changing key
supervisors days before critical
well procedures, choosing to
line the well with fewer barri-
ers against natural gas seep-
age and fewer safety devices
than recommended, declining
important tests that could have
warned of impending danger
and removing heavy drilling
mud prematurely.
The most critical error,
according to members of the
academy, was the misinterpre-
tation of key tests of the well's
pressure just hours before the
April 20 explosion.
So much for BP's self-pro-
claimed "culture of safety."
* Times-Picayune

HIG LIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Nov. 27,
the 331st day of 2010. There
are 34 days left in the year.
In 1701, astronomer
Anders Celsius, inventor of the
Celsius temperature scale, was
born in Uppsala, Sweden.
In 1901, the U.S. Army
War College was established in
Washington, D.C.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Sarah Palin vs.


In 2001, when Bill Clinton
left the White House,
political eyes turned
toward Hillary and her
political future. The
"political book" at the time was
that she had a good shot at
the New York Senate seat she
started running for in 2000, but
that would likely be the end
of the line. Too divisive, too
abrasive, too many missteps
and all that no way could she
win a national election, though
Republicans salivated at the .
prospect of her trying to do so.
By 2008, she was considered
the "inevitable" candidate,
who would have gotten the
Democratic nomination were it
not for someone named Barack
Obama.
No doubt she'll be a serious
contender again. But I think
America's first woman presi-
dent won't just be a Republican,
she'll be a conservative
Republican. Why? Because
whiners don't win, and "femi-
nist" women typically deal in
the politics of resentment.
The leading Republican
woman right now in American
politics is, of course, Sarah
Palin. Her second book,
"America by Heart," was just
released this week. And yes,
she's talked about running for
president.
Today the "political book"
on Sarah Palin, at least from
Republicans (which is what mat-
ters right now), seems to be the
extremes of either "she can't
win (and we don't want her as
president anyway)" to, "she has
to run now."
As a conservative, I appreci-
ate Palin because she radiates
political energy. Yes, some of


Hillary Clinton


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com
her handpicked candidates
lost in the recent election, but
such energy rarely operates
perfectly.
I haven't heard much discus-
sion between the extremes that
for her, patience might be the
ultimate virtue. Sarah Palin not
only doesn't have to run in 2012
- there are potentially very
viable conservative candidates,
and at only 46 years old she has
some 20 years to pick the right
time she would be better
off waiting. No doubt political
operatives with fame and for-
tune in their sights are showing
her now how she can win in the
Iowa caucuses and sail into the
presidency in 2012.
But, again, what's the rush?
There is a way for her to
change her "high negative"
poll numbers, which no one
wants to run or govern with,
without sacrificing anything she
believes in. But it won't happen
overnight. It will happen if she
takes time to grow in stature.
With perhaps a little page from
Hillary Clinton's playbook.
Instead of running this time
around, she could be backing a
successful Republican presiden-
tial candidate in 2012.
As a result, she could win the.
admiration of many Republicans
and conservatives cautious
about her now. If she wants it,


she could be awarded a signifi-
cant Cabinet post.
I'd love to see her shake
things up as secretary of
energy, for instance, where she
would have a platform to speak
about significant policy issues.
Talk about street credentials.
If the Republican candidate
loses in 2012 (not unlikely,
since beating an incumbent
president is extremely difficult)
she's well-placed for four years
later if she follows a path of
learning more about, and speak-
ing in-depth to, major public
policy issues she's passionate
about. And, bringing her energy
to Republican efforts to reshape
the political landscape to create
an opportunity for success for
the GOP in 2016.
Even then, she might decide
for a variety of reasons it's not
the right time. But she'll be
closer to the right time if the
presidency is still something
she wants to pursue.
I do know that Hillary
Clinton didn't run even in 2004
(she may have, of course, had
President Bush not been very
popular in 2002 and 2003.)
Instead, she continued to work
away in the Senate winning new
regard even from those who
didn't agree with her.
Hmmm.
If Sarah Palin takes a similar
path, who knows but we might
see a Sarah Palin and Hillary
Clinton match-up in a few years.
Now, that would be something
worth waiting for!

* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Keep campaign messages positive


Being enrolled this
semester in an
American Politics
course for college,
I've given extra atten-
tion to this year's elections. My
class was asked to identify a
problem or issue with American
political culture, and an issue
which is prevalent to me is the
absurd amount of campaign
postcards in the mail each day.
Considering 10 percent or
less of the adult voting popula-
tion display signs, bumper stick-
ers or (show) any other interest
in elections, I would bet that the
majority of the postcards are
tossed into the trash without


being read.
Many postcards are from
political interest groups, and
the content regarding an oppo-
nent is abhorable.
When one does take the
time to read one of these
cards, it's often headlined with
accusations of a lying or inept
opponent.
To be elected to a leadership
role, one must accept respon-
sibility of honesty and good
taste, and allowing interest
groups to utilize name-calling
and character assassination is
unprofessional and childish.
While I understand the need
to campaign and advertise as a


political candidate, the use of
campaign postcards should be
limited to being sent by candi-
dates.
The messages should
remain positive and revolve
around what the candidate
proves to accomplish if elect-
ed, including facts proving
that the candidate has done
research and is knowledgeable
on the issues to be addressed.
These issues should be
addressed concerning televi-
sion and radio ads as well, but
at least a reduction in post-
cards could save a few trees.
Jim South
Lake City


- 9OIDYTRVL


from breaking.
* Jos6 de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


Jose Pe La Isla
joseisla3@yahoo.com


The man

behind a

Hispanic

tradition


92, may well
be responsible
for starting the
Hispanic political
tradition. Years ago, I became
reacquainted with my godfather
after a quarter-century absence
from this city, and I provided
him a ride to Annunciation
Church, where he officiated
as deacon at the Mass given in
Latin. He didn't drive any more
because of arthritic knees.
On the way, then at breakfast,
and going back to his apart-
ment, he was in deep, meditative
reflection. He talked at length
about JFKs engagement with
a bunch of Mexican Americans
and mariachis in Houston the
night before his fateful trip to
Dallas.
A tailor before World War II,
David had volunteered for army
service after Pearl Harbor. He
was already oriented toward reli-
gion but straddled that personal
space between spiritual contem-
plation and secular yearning.
After the war, he took a job as a
door-to-door salesman and met
regularly with other Hispanic
vets. Like him, they understood
the value of teamwork, of hav-
ing a mission and a plan to get
things done. They were the
ones who, on returning to our
still-segregated society, saw
their home communities with
fresh eyes.
David's idea was that sales-
men like him (mostly of pots
and pans, encyclopedias, baby
albums and insurance) who
went knocking on doors could
help improve the community's
life. As part of his sales pitch, he
asked Hispanic families if their
kids were doing well or even
attending school, and quickly
recognized a pattern. Many
were not enrolling, or failing
because of their shame of not
knowing enough English to
avoid embarrassment.
David Adame, who served
as LULAC's chaplain for many
years, used his gentle organiz-
ing skill to help innovate the
Viva Kennedy! organization
in 1960. It has direct lineage
to Hispanic national political
involvement
The inspired chaplain
planted the idea of having
the President and first lady
Jacqueline Kennedy, who were
planning a visit to Texas, to
invite them to a LULAC event
in Houston, which my godfa-
ther David helped arrange.
The Kennedys came and, capti-
vated by the music and shared
dreams of educational oppor-
tunities for future generations
of Mexican-American children,
stayed longer than anyone
anticipated. It happened that
way on Nov. 21, 1964, the day
before the president's fateful
trip to Dallas.
Today there's no shortage
of individuals angling for ban-
quet-hall recognition of mile-
stones generated by all manner
of Hispanic community activity.
As each plaque is passed out
and statue erected, stories like
those of David Adame should
be brightly highlighted. That's
how the chain of knowledge
that connects simple but pro-
found deeds with the great
events of our times is kept


4A


I I










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2010


Today
Holiday happenings
The kickoff to the Christmas
season begins at 5 p.m. today in
Olustee Park. Activities begin
with holiday music featuring The
Gateway City Big Band and Harry
Wuest as conductor. The lighting
of Olustee Park is at 6:30 p.m.
followed by the arrival of Santa
Claus. Photos with Santa are 7-9
p.m.

Blood drive
A blood drive will be from 11
a.m.-6 p.m. today at Ole Times
Country Buffet. Free buffet to
the first 15 donors and a free
Gators or Seminoles shirt

Sunday
Food for Fines
The annual Food for Fines
program is Sunday to Saturday
at the Columbia County Public
Library. Each single sealed,
non-expired, non-perishable
item brought to the library will
reduce a fine by $1. All items
collected at the Main and West
Branch will be delivered to the
Christian Service Center in Lake
City for local distribution. Items
collected at the Fort White
Branch Library will be distribut-
ed at the Fort White food shelf.

Monday
Blood drive
A blood drive is set for 12
p.m.-6 p.m. Monday at Pizza Boy.
Free 14"'cheese pizza for every
donor. Receive a free Gators or
Seminoles shirt

YEP committee meeting
There is a YEP Committee
Meeting at noon Monday at
Gondolier Italian Restaurant
& Pizza. Call the Lake City
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce to RSVP at 386-752-
3690.

Wednesday
Public meeting
Elder Options is having
a public meeting at 10 a.m.
Wednesday in the Florida Farm
Bureau Building. The Board of
Directors will be reviewing appli-
cations for organizational grants,
as well as hearing appeals from
those attending. The building is
located at 5700 SW 34th Street,


SL
Ir^ SS^^


^. ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter

Christian volunteers share blessings with free dinners
Volunteer Renee Heston of Lake City serves Thanksgiving Day meals osted by a local group of Christians.
The group and the LAD Soup Kitchen hosted free dinners for Lake City residents Thursday.


Suite 222, Gainesville. Contact
Cindy Roberts at 352-378-6649.

Wednesday Friendship
Luncheon
The December Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends is
11:30 a.m. Wednesday at Costa
Del Sol, located at 2260 W U.S.
Highway 90. There will be a
$10 gift exchange for those who
wish to participate. All members,
friends and guests are welcome.
Contact 719-5564 or 754-7227.

Thursday
Christmas concert
Richardson Middle School
Wolf Pride Band is having its
annual Christmas concert 6:30
p.m. Thursday in the Columbia
High School auditorium. The
RMS Jazz Band, Symphonic
Band, and Beginners Band and
Drumline will play songs of the
season under the direction of
Sherrod Keen.

Friday
Candlelight tour
The Lake City Garden Club is
hosting the Castagna Christmas


House Candlelight Tour 6:30-
9:30 p.m. Friday. The house
is located at 521 NW Old Mill
Road. Admission is $10. Tickets
are available at Brown-Vann
Carpet One, Lake City Florist,
Your Hearts Desire or at the res-
idence the evening of the tour.
Save your ticket and come out 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 4 when select
Christmas d6cor will be sold.

HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater opening of its Radio-on-
Stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" opens Friday. The show
runs weekends through Dec.
19. Tickets are available at The
Framery on W. Baya and at high-
springscommunitytheater.com.
Four local residents are involved
in the production.

Saturday, Dec. 4
Dream Machine Toy Ride
The 9th Annual Christmas
Dream Machine Toy Ride is
Dec. 4. Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. and the toy ride pulls
out at 12 p.m. from the Columbia
County Fairgrounds. There will
be raffles and live bands, and
all proceeds will go to benefit


The Christmas Dream Machine.
Contact Cookie at 386-362-6529
or Polly at 386-758-9811.

Sunday, Dec. 5
Blood drive
Hungry Howie's Blood Drive is
scheduled from noon-6 p.m. Dec.
5 at Hungry Howie's, 857 SW
Main Boulevard. Each donor will
receive a free small one-topping
pizza or small sub. Call 386438-
3415.

Tuesday, Dec. 7
Nat King Cole Christmas
performance
Allan Harris sings a Nat King
Cole Christmas 7 p.m. Dec. 7
in the Levy Performing Arts
Center. Tickets go on sale Nov.
29. Call 386-754-4340 or e-mail
mark.kirby@fgc.edu.

Volunteer literacy tutor
A volunteer literacy tutor
training workshop is 5:30-8:30
p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 7 at 308 NW
Columbia Avenue. The work-
shop will emphasize reading
strategies, the writing process,
informal assessments, lesson
planning, and phonics using the


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


BRIEFS

Obama injured in basketball game
WASHINGTON The White House 4has identified
the person whose elbow injured President Barack
Obama during a pickup game of basketball on Friday.
His name is Rey Decerega and he works for the
Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute.
The White House also released a statement from
Decerega, who says he enjoys playing basketball with
Obama and is sure the president will be back out on
the court again soon.
Obama needed 12 stitches in his upper lip after
being hit by Decerega's elbow during the game.

US: Wikileaks release 'irresponsible'
WASHINGTON The Obama administration on
Friday condemned as "irresponsible" the expected
release of classified diplomatic cables by the Wikileaks
website and warned it will endanger "lives and inter-
ests."
State Department spokesman PJ. Crowley said U.S.
diplomats were continuing the process of warning gov-
ernments around the world about what might be in the
documents. Many fear the cables will embarrass the
United States and its allies and reveal sensitive details of
how the U.S. conducts relations with other countries.
"We are all bracing for what may be coming and con-
demn WikiLeaks for the release of classified material,"
he said. "It will place lives and interests at risk. It is irre-
sponsible." The release of hundreds of thousands of State
Department cables is expected this weekend, although
WikiLeaks has not been specific about the timing. The
cables are thought to include private, candid assessments
of foreign leaders and governments and could erode
trust in the U.S. as a diplomatic partner.

GOP leaders push social issues
TOPEKA, Kan. Although fixing the economy is
the top priority, Republicans who won greater control
of state governments in this month's election are
considering how to pursue action on a range of social
issues, including abortion, gun rights and even divorce
laws.
Incoming GOP governors and legislative leaders
across the nation insist they intend to focus initially on
fiscal measures to spur the economy, cut spending and
address state budget problems.
* Associated Press


Defiant NKorea fires artillery shots


By FOSTER KLUG
and LEE JIN-MAN
Associated Press

YEONPYEONG
ISLAND, South Korea -
A defiant flash of North
Korean artillery within
sight of the island that it
attacked this week sent a
warning signal to Seoul and
Washington: The North is
not backing down.
The apparent military
drill Friday came as the top
U.S. commander in South
Korea toured Yeonpyeong
island to survey the wreck-
age from the rain of artil-
lery three days earlier. As
a U.S. nuclear-powered air-
craft carrier headed toward
the Yellow Sea for exer-


cises next week with South
Korea, the North warned
that the joint maneuvers will
push the Korean peninsula
to the "brink of war."
South Korea's govern-
ment, meanwhile, struggled
to recoup from the surprise
attacks that killed four
people, including two civil-
ians, and forced its belea-
guered defense minister to
resign Thursday. President
Lee Myung-bak on Friday
named a former chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to
the post
Tensions have soared
between the Koreas since
the North's strike Tuesday
destroyed large parts of
Yeonpyeong in a major esca-
lation of their sporadic skir-


mishes along the disputed
sea border.
The attack eight
months after a torpedo sank
a South Korean warship, kill-
ing 46 sailors has laid
bare Seoul's weaknesses in
defense 60 years after the
Korean War. Lee has ordered
reinforcements for the 4,000
troops on Yeonpyeong
and four other Yellow Sea
islands, as well as top-level
weaponry and upgraded
rules of engagement


The heightened animosity
between the Koreas comes
as the North undergoes a
delicate transition of power
from leader Kim Jong Il to
his young, inexperienced
son Kim Jong Un, who is in
his late 20s and is expected
to eventually succeed his ail-
ing father.
Washington 'and Seoul
have pressed China to use
its influence on Pyongyang
to ease tensions amid wor-
ries of all-out war.


IAshiee b


Constance May Dziedzic
Mrs. Constance May Dziedzic,
92, of Lake City, Florida, passed
away, Tuesday November 23,
2010 at Haven Hospice of Su-
wannee Valley following an ex-
tended illness. Mrs. Dziedzic was
born September 29, 1918 in Jack.-
sonville, Florida, and has lived in
Lake City for the past seven years
after moving from Cuyahoga
Falls, Ohio. She worked as a
waitress and enjoyed playing
cards and doing crafts in her
spare time. Mrs. Dziedzic loved
to cook and was a devoted wife,
mother, and grandmother who
enjoyed spending time with her
family, especially her grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in death
by her husband, Louis Dziedzic,
and a brother, Nicholas Davis.
She is also survived by one son,
Ronal David and wife Patty, of
Lake City, Five grandchildren,


Ronnie, James, Douglas, Tracie
and Thomas. Six great-grand-
children and numerous other rel-
atives and friends also survive.
A memorial service for Mrs.
Dziedzic will be held at 6:30PM
Tuesday November 30, 2010 at
Christ Central Ministries in Lake
City, Florida. The family will
receive friends one hour prior to
the service. Interment will take
place in St. Hedwig Cemetery in
Dearborn, Ml. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Haven
Hospice of Suwannee Valley. Ar-
rangements are under the care of
JOE. P. BURNS FUNERAL
HOME of Mayo. 386-294-2658
You may sign the guestbook at
www.joepburnsfuneralhome. coin

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.

Laubach Way to Reading method
of training. Call the library's
literacy coordinator, Glennis
Pounds, at 386-758-2111 or e-mail
columbialiteracy@neflin.org.

Wednesday, Dec. 8
Lake City Newcomers
Regular Monthly Meeting
The regular monthly meeting
of the Lake City Newcomers and
Friends is 11 a.m. Dec. 8 at Quail
Heights Country Club, Branford
Highway. The luncheon costs
$10. A $10 gift exchange will
take place for those wishing
to participate. All members,
friends, and guests are welcome.
Call 752-4552 or 755-4051.

Public meeting
Elder Options is having a
public meeting 10 a.m. Dec. 8 in
the Hilton University of Florida
Conference Center. The Board
of Directors will be review-
ing applications for organiza-
tional grants, as well as hearing
appeals from those attending.
The building is located at 1714
SW 34th street, Gainesville.
Contact Cindy Roberts at 352-
378-6649.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid workshop is
1:30 p.m. Dec. 8 at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center, 628 S.E.
Allison Court. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law Center
for Estate and Legacy Planning
will expel the myths and
expands the opportunities avail-
able with Medicaid Planning.
Call Shana Miller at 386-755-1977.
to register.

Thursday, Dec. 9
Chorus concert
Richardson Middle School
Chorus will have their annual
Christmas Concert 7 p.m. Dec. 9
in the Auditorium. They will be
singing various Christmas selec-
tions. The chorus is under the
direction of Christy Robertson.

Friday, Dec. 10
Class Reunion
Columbia High School Classes
of '49, '50, '51, '52, and '53 are
having a class reunion 11:30
a.m. Dec. 10 at Mason City
Community Center. Anyone
who attended Columbia High is
invited. Contact Julia Osburn at
386-752-7544 or Morris Williams
at 386-7524710.


OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












FAITH


Saturday, November 27, 2010 v


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Angie Land
angieland3@windstream.net

Becoming

Christ's

effective

witnesses

'"Then Boaz announced to
the elders and all the people,
Today you are witnesses that
I have bought from Naomi
all the property ofElimelech,
Kilion and Mahlon. I have
also acquired Ruth the
Moabitess, Mahlon's widow,
as my wife, in order to main-
tain the name of the dead
with his property, so that his
name will not disappear from
among his family or from the
town records. Today you are
witnesses!' Then the elders
and all those at the gate said,
'We are witnesses.... '"
(Ruth 4:9-11 a)
Look up the word
"witness" in
Webster's dic-
tionary and you
will find a slew
of definitions: One that gives
evidence; one who testifies
in a cause; one asked to be
present at a transaction so
as to be able to testify to it
having taken place; one who
has personal knowledge of
something; something serv-
ing as evidence or proof.
These meanings certainly
coincide with our story, as
Boaz has called everyone
present to be a witness and
provide proof of the transac-
tion that has just taken place.
He has redeemed Naomi's
property and made Ruth his
wife!
Don't miss the interesting
way the elders and all those
at the gate respond to Boaz
when he declares them to
be witnesses. Instead of just
agreeing or saying yes, they
repeat back to him, "We are
witnesses." In the original
Hebrew language, the word
for witness is derived from
a root word meaning, "to
repeat" In a sense, when we
bear witness to something,
we are simply to repeat what
was said or what has hap-
pened.
The religious commu-
nity is often guilty of taking
what God intended to be
simple and making it much
more difficult Jesus calls
all believers to be His wit-
fnesses in Acts 1:7, and so
we rightly promote "witness-
ing" to those who have yet
to be introduced to Christ
However, we often proceed
to give a 10-step plan of how
and what to say. Having
learned many of these meth-
ods myself, I suppose there
is benefit in having a more
thorough understanding of
such things. Still, I can't help
but believe that God's simple
way of presenting His Son
to the world is much more
effective.
Not unlike Boaz's wit-
nesses, as believers, we can
offer personal evidence and
proof of a redemptive transac-
tion: When Jesus Christ, our
kinsman-redeemer, redeemed
our life through his death on
the cross, and the fact that He
continues that process daily.
Simply by repeating to oth-
ers what we have personally
experienced and know to be
true, we offer the most effec-
tive witness and one worth
repeating.

* Heart Matters is a
weekly column written by
Angie Land, director of the
Family Life Ministries of the
Lafayette Baptist Association,
where she teaches bible
studies, leads marriage and
family conferences.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 17 photo, a building with teal-colored tiles is seen on the compound of the Intercessors of the Lamb, in Omaha, Neb. For more than two
decades, the group of Catholics lived there as hermits, gave up their possessions to live in poverty and pray for man's sins.



Omaha religious group faces


bleak future without church


By TIMBERLY ROSS
Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb.

of Roman Catholics
secluded themselves
on a sprawling, wood-
ed compound in the Ponca Hills
north of Omaha. They lived as
hermits, giving up their families,
jobs and possessions to live in
poverty and pray for man's sins.
Known as the Intercessors of
the Lamb, the band of penniless
men and women took prayer
requests from around the world
and raked in millions of dollars
through religious gatherings and
the sale of books and tapes by
founder Nadine Brown.
But in mid-October, the
Archdiocese of Omaha
denounced the group, sending
a bus to the compound to whisk
away 50 or so members to a
retreat 70 miles away. Catholics
were warned to disregard
Brown's teachings and stop fund-
ing her group amid claims the
group's finances were misman-
aged and Brown intimidated its
members, who live with few pos-
sessions other than the robes she
gives them.
The path that led to the
archdiocese's serious move to
"suppress" the group is disputed.
Archdiocese officials said Brown
resigned voluntarily after it raised
issues with the way the group
was being run. Brown claims she
was forced out and escorted off


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In mid-October, the Catholic Church denounced the group of Catholics
known as the Intercessors of the Lamb, sending a bus to this compound to
whisk away 50 or so members to a retreat 70 miles away.


the group's property by authori-
ties.
To religious scholars, the
dispute typifies the fragile rela-
tionships between the mainline
church and offshoot groups that
take it in uncomfortable direc-
tions. The church's split with
the .Intercessors known in
Catholic circles as "suppression"
- is more about control over the
group's form and function, the
scholars say.
Suppression is typically
reserved for floundering parishes
and inactive church groups, but is
occasionally used to silence way-
ward organizations.


Lawrence Cunningham, theol-
ogy professor at the University
of Notre Dame in South Bend,
Ind., said that as church-affiliated
groups grow in size, Catholic
leaders become increasingly
concerned that their mission is in
keeping with church teachings.
"They're always worried about
a group becoming a cult," he said.
Brown, 80, has denied any
wrongdoing. Messages left for
her at the Intercessors' office
have not been returned, and
no one else there has made
themselves available for com-
ment. Brown lives at the gated
compound with 10 or so member


who've stayed loyal to her.
Access to the property is
restricted, and the rolling land-
scape and trees make it difficult
to see activity there. Several of
the buildings have teal and white
accents, matching the colors of
the Intercessors robes.
Intercessors was registered
in Nebraska as a religious non-
profit in 1980, with Brown as its
founder. She had left the St. Paul,
Minn., sisterhood that's now
known as the Contemplatives of
the Good Shepherd to form the
group, which became affiliated
with the Catholic Church in 1992.
Intercessors' 2008 tax return,
filed last November, shqws the
group had almost $4 million in
revenue, mostly from its retreats
and conferences, and nearly $1.9
million in expenses. Its net assets
at the end of 2008 was listed as
more than $6 million.
Online records kept by the
Douglas County property assessor
show the Intercessors owns at least
86 acres in Ponca Hills that have
been acquired piecemeal over the
years. The records show the group
bought or otherwise acquired at
least $3.3 million in property since
1993. A few of the smaller proper-
ties near the main compound were
recently put up for sale.
Letters from Brown on the
Intercessors website say she's
never strayed from the Catholic
Church's teachings or been dis-
obedient. She vows in the letters to
carry on the Intercessors' prayer
mission. A plea for donations is
also included.


CHURCH NOTES


Sunday
Matron/Mission Program
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church is celebrating its Annual
Matron/Mission program 3:30
p.m. Sunday. Trisheka Nelson
of Shiloh will be the speaker.
The church is located at 948 SE
Aberdeen St. The Rev. Dr. Dwight
Pollock is pastor.

Worship Service
An evening of praise and wor-
ship is 6 p.m. Sunday at Parkview
Baptist Church. Special guests
Phil Cross & Crossing will be
leading the night in worship
music and a love offering will
be collected. Parkview Baptist
Church is located at 268 NW
Lake Jeffery Road.

Church Revival
Wellborn Church of God will
begin a four day long revival


10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. on Sunday,
and at 7 p.m. Nov. 29 Dec. 1.
Special speaker Marilyn Weeks
will be bringing the Word, as well
as prayer for the sick and needy.
All are invited to bring friends
and family to Wellborn Church of
God located at 3330 US Hwy 90.
For more information contact the
church at 386-963-4988.

Saturday, Dec. 4
Neighborhood Yard Sale
Shiloh Baptist Church is hav-
ing a Neighborhood Yard Sale
8 a.m. Dec. 4. Booth rentals are
$15. Contact Pastor Earl at 386-
454-4978 or www.myshilohbaptist.
com. The church is located at 173
SW Shiloh Street, US Hwy. 27,
Fort White.

Church Play
Performances of '"The
Promise of Christmas" are 2


p.m. Dec. 4 and 6 p.m. Dec. 5 at
Parkview Baptist Church. The
Music Ministry will present this
Christmas story. The church is
located at 268 NW Lake Jeffery
Road.

Every Tuesday
Support group
Greater Visions Support Group
hosts a faith-based addictions
support group at 7 p.m. every
Tuesday in the fellowship hall of
Christ Central Ministries, 217 SW
Duval Ave. The group provides
spiritual and emotional support
in a non-judgmental setting. Call
755-2525.

Free Biblical counseling
Free Biblical counseling is avail-
able at Hopeful Baptist Church.
Many are struggling with problems
including marital, financial, com-
munication, emotional, spiritual
and addiction. To make an appoint-


ment, call (386) 7524135 between
8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Every Thursday
English and literacy classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes provided
by Columbia County School
District's.Career and Adult
Education Program is from 5:30
to 8 p.m. every Thursday at
Unity of God Ministries, Inc. in
Wellborn. Activities for children
will be provided. Call (386) 755-
8190. The church is located at
12270 County Road 137.
Submit Church Notes items
in writing no later than 5 p.m.
Monday the week prior to an
event by e-mail to arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com, fax to (386)
752-9400 or drop-off at 180 E.
Duval St., Lake City. Call (386)
754-0425 with questions. Church
Notes run as space is available
each Saturday.


6A









LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2010


Tph'p


4 n this season of Advent, the four Sundays before

Christmas, we celebrate an old truth, the coming

of Christ. As we light a new candle on the traditional
Advent wreath each week, we are reminded anew
to prepare for the arrival of something momentous.

Reflecting on an event that happened so long ago

can reveal to us a new understanding of how to live

our lives today. Prepare for Christmas in advance

this Advent; attend your house of worship weekly.
------.---^ > - .. ...... ............. .

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Matthew Psalm Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah Revelation Revelation
24.29-51 8 12.1-6 25.1-12 65.17-25 21.1-27 22.1-21

Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights.














To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

7 'upercenter

"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
IUS 90 WEST 755-242

GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
Jobber




lol y ecbi. inC.
"Quality ,work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all things Ihrough Christ which stcnglhencth me"
'Phlllpplans 4"13
To Advertise in

this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A '
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SWMcFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:OOPM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday) W ibhibp 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednsdy Eie. Service 7PM
Pasior Larr) E. Sweai
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave. 386-752-2860
Sur. Bible Study ) 4'1 W
Sun Wourhip HI AM .s 6PM
Wed Prayer Mig/Bible Srudy 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt
FIRSM BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunda-v Bible Srud, 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
r'ed 6 '()PM Prdver Service, &
Cluldrens Mmitry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
ReL Siephen Ahrenr Pit,[r
OLIVET MISSIONARYBAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MomingWorship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God'sWord, Will &Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake JefferyRd. 752-0681
Like Ciry. Fcotidd i 55
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
SundayWorship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM
AWANA '5 11 F'M
FveningWorthip 6:00 PM


Wed Eve. Schedule
Family Supper 'Resen'.inon
Children' MmN.irbtoy
YouthWorship
Prayer Meering


5PM
6PM
6:00 PM
6:00 PM


Thursday Evening Schedule St 8/21/08
Parkeww Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael AK Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441,
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor. Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive *755-5553
Sunday:
Bible Study 9:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
EveningWorship 6:15PM
Wednesday:


AWANA
Prayer & Bible Srud,


5:45PM
6:15 PM.


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. '.752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman
THEVINEYARD
A Southern Baptist Church
2091 SW Main Blvd. '623-0026
SundayWdrship 10:00AM
Where Jesus is Preached
and i'ca .rif ppi lpiijte
Pastor, Bo Hammock

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
SundayMass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English) "
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. '755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7PM

NEW HORIZON
church of Christ
Directions & Times 755-1320
Jack Exumjr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.*'752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"ShockYouth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stl'almesepis330@bellsouth,net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
I 12 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave,
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MNIrriinogWorhjp
Co:riempiraer Siervicr 1:tl.
Traditional Service. 11:00AM
Plugrri mppiirrunirne available in all
dateis fur all Aiig
For a joniplete schedule
Loniacitchurth office ai
752 4-188
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNiTED
1272 SW VMcFdIlane *7'*2-3513
\djtaeni' Siumnmers chanoll
Nliridd\ bi.h :,0.1l 9 IJ,IAM
Worship 8-.0,& ItiiIo.AM
jNuerv pr...%i6d
Praise &Worship 6:00PM
A.v.A\'.A sartr'. i t il. 0PI'M
Pastor: The Rev. I. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.corn
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

LAKE CITYCHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH .
629 SWBaya Drive .752-0670
Sunday Contemporary 9:00AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
Traditional Service '11:00AM
NURSERYPROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NEWashington St.
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service -Wednesday 7 ti PM
For info call 755-3408# Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
SundayMorning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left.' 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH :
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 PM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R, Pingel
IGLESIA EVANGEULICA
APOSENTO ALTO
17077 25th Rd- L/C FL 32055
'Service Fri: 7:00PM, Sun: 1:00PM
ArturoSuarez' 386-754-1836
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM.
A Full Gospel Church-Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday. 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM


No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance

IfL
"1 -




.& .


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Call





752-1293!


Toavriei hsCuc iectory I a ll 75-540


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register j_
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FP, 32055 Closed Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
,,, .oB Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley President


PRuL 752-2308 ti
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST *LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



iLAKE CITY
At. 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

'"-, .1" ;
2. 0,<
1,,e j^


ilay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
.this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 27, 2010


SHOP: 'Black Friday' shopping deals draw crowds looking for bargains

Continued From Page 1A


In addition to the sales,
shoppers said they liked
to shop on Black Friday
for a chance to spend time
together.
Susan Moffitt of Fort
Lauderdale said she came


to Lake City to visit her
family for Thanksgiving
and to .shop with them the
day after, a tradition they
hold to each year.
"Just being together is
fun," Moffitt said.


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Mother and daughter Suzanne Marcil (left) and Joanne Marcil
of McAlpin try to pick out a matching hat and scarf for holiday
gifts in the JCPenney store at the Lake City Mall Friday. The
Black Friday shopping crowd is in the spirit of the holiday
season, Suzanne Marcil said. 'It's crowded, but it creates an
atmosphere,' she said.


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Jane Breeden (left) and Larry Breeden check the size of a tennis shoe on sale at Belk at the Lake City.Mall Friday. The
Breeden's joined the crowd of people who shopped in search of 'Black Friday' sales at Lake City stores the day after
Thanksgiving.


US-Mexico project identifies


border- crossing victims


NAFEESA SYEED
Associated Press

WASHINGTON-
Lorenia Ton visits the
morgues of southern
Arizona searching for clues
among the unclaimed bod-
ies and belongings of peo-
ple who tried to cross the
desert. I
Sometimes it's a phone
number written inside pan-
tiegs, or a piece of paper,
sewn into a backpack.
Other times there are fam-
ily photos, images of saints,
or love letters.
"Sometimes we cannot
find anything," says Ton,
whose job at the Mexican
consulate in Tucson
involves helping identify
the remains and return
them to Mexico.
To confirm the IDs, the
consulate sends DNA sam-
ples to Bode Technology
Group Inc., a private lab
in Lorton, Va., outside
Washington, as part of a
project that has brought
closure to dozens of fami-
lies and countless relatives
on both sides of the dan-
gerous border.
During one trip in April,
Ton came across a body
recently discovered by a
hunter. Found with the
dead man were his tennis
shoes, a belt, a couple of
dollars and pesos, a wallet,
a baseball cap and voter
identification card. Ton had
a name: Agustin Gutierrez
Ortiz, 34.
Jesus Gutierrez Ortiz,
37, who lives in Bradley


Beach, N.J., described his
brother as a hardworking
father of two who left their
hardscrabble town of La
Natividad in the state of
Oaxaca to help his family.
He reported the younger
Gutierrez Ortiz missing to
Mexican authorities in June
2009, and Bode confirmed
the worst a year later.
"I always asked God
that he, be alive, but in my
heart I felt that he was dead
because he was in the des-
ert," Gutierrez Ortiz says
in Spanish. "If I could have
flown into the desert ... to
look for him I would have."
The lab has made at least
47 positive identifications
since the program began a
couple of years ago. Many
other cases are pending as
the number of people who
try to cross the border ille-
gally has grown.
The number of deaths
along the border hit a peak
of 492 in 2005 and had been
declining, according to
U.S. Customs and Border
Protection. But last year,
the agency recorded 422
deaths, up from 390 the
previous year. Most deaths
are attributed to the heat.
As of Aug. 31, the most
recent figures available,
there had been 332 deaths
this year.
But those numbers only
tally the deaths that border
patrol officers come across.
That doesn't include count-
less other bodies found
by local law enforcement
agencies, immigrant rights
organizations, ranchers


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sarah Bettinger, a Senior DNA Analyst I at Bode Technology,
extracts DNA from ground bone samples from Mexico at the
lab in Arlington, Va., on Tuesday,.Oct. 12.


and other passers-by.
The bodies that Bode
receives mainly come
from Arizona. In that state,
deaths of illegal immigrants
rose over the summer,
despite many who thought
the state's new law crack-
ing down on immigration
would send people else-
where along the border.
The remains are found
along known routes used
by migrants. Some remains
have been in the desert a
year or more, leaving the
bodies mummified or mere
bones. Others are more
recent.
Back in Mexico, fami-
lies enter their loved ones
into a vast missing persons
database, which includes
details such as people's
clothes, dental records and
whether they had tattoos.
If officials find a name
with the bodies, they run
it through the database. If


the body is still recogniz-
able, Ton sends a photo to
the family. If the body is not
too decomposed, officials
can run the fingerprints
with U.S. border authori-
ties and see whether that
person had been deported
before. Based on those
leads, the consulate makes
presumptive identifications.
It's Ton's job to contact the
relatives.
"The first thing is they
start crying, sometimes
they scream, sometimes
they hang up on me," she
says. "I have to try again."
Sarah Bettinger, a
senior DNA analyst at
Bode, wears goggles,
gloves and a mask when
she sands the outside of
the bone samples to clean
the surface. From there,
she pulverizes the bone
into a powder and then
extracts genetic material
to create a profile.


Cops, soldiers


trade fire with


gunmen in Rio


JULIANA BARBASSA
Associated Press

RIO DE JANEIRO
- Brazilian soldiers and
police exchanged gunfire
with drug-gang members
holed up in a massive slum
complex Friday, but stood
their ground, trapping the
traffickers inside.
About 800 troops are supa-
porting a huge police offen-
sive at the Alemao complex
of shantytowns, an operation
that came just a day after
police took control of a near-
by slum that also had been a
gang stronghold.
Authorities are not pub-
licizing their plans, but
it appears an invasion of
Alemao, one of Rio's most
dangerous slums, was immi-
nent
'This is not the moment
to circumvent risks, but rath-
er to confront risks," said
Brazilian Defense Minister
Nelson Jobim, who traveled
to Rio to meet with the state's
governor and top security
officials.
Military spokesman Enio
Zanan said soldiers had been
taking fire from drug-gang
members hiding in the large
complex. He earlier told The
Associated Press the troops
were not returning the fire,
saying it would endanger
"innocent people in the com-
munity."
AP Television News video,
however, showed at least one
soldier firing on the slum,


and the newspaper 0 Globo
reported heavy exchanges
of gunfire between troops
and drug gang members.
Zanan did not return calls
for comment Friday night
A man who answered the
phone at the army's west-
ern Rio headquarters said
he could not confirm the
involvement of troops in the
fighting.
Zanan earlier said the con-
frontation had no set time or
date to end and the troops
were ready to stand constant
guard as long as needed.
Among those wounded
Friday was the chief Brazil
photographer for the Reuters
news agency, Paulo Whitaker.
Reuters said he suffered a
non-life-threatening bullet
wound in the shoulder. The
source of the shot was not
immediately clear.
Federal and state police
officers, meanwhile, con-
ducted door-to-dooi. search-
es and patrols within the Vila
Cruzeiro slum near Alemao.
The area was taken by offi-
cers Thursday afternoon
during a five-hour operation
using armored vehicles and
assault rifles.
After police armored cars
had their tires blown out by
gangs or were stymied by
burning tires, police relied
on military armored person-
nel carriers equipped with
caterpillar treads to roll over
or push aside barriers and
enter the fortified shanty-
town.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Saturday, November 27, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE







Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

Newton

made

his case

with Iron
I f i isn't Cam, it's a
sham. That's how I
feel about Auburn
quarterback Cam
Newton and the
Heisman trophy.
The Heisman favorite
had every reason to bow
out against Alabama in the
Tigers' come-from-behind,
28-27, win against last
years' national champions.
You can look at the
numbers all you want, but
that's not going to tell the
entire story of this game.
What Newton brought to
the table was something
more than that. Newton
brought heart.
Quarterbacks are the
unquestionable leaders
of football teams. When a
team gets down, it looks to
its leader for motivation.
Even down 24-0, Newton
didn't let Auburn fade
away.
Instead, Newton
threw the first of three
touchdown passes
beginning with 5:20 left
in the second quarter and
kept Auburn's national-
championship hopes alive.
When Alabama took
away his running ability,
Newton proved he could
do it with his arm, but his
performance was much
more than that. It was the
kind of showing that make
legends.
Auburn hasn't had that
kind of player since Bo
Jackson, but you can bet
that the War-Eagle faithful
will be talking about
Newton's performance
many years from now.
I
It's funny how one game
can change perception.
Just ask Bobby Bowden.
Bowden's teams noticably
went downhill during the
end of his tenure at Florida
State, but make no mistake
about what pushed him out
the door.
At the end, Bowden
couldn't get past Florida.
The legend was 0-5 against
Urban Meyer and lost to
Ron Zook during his final
year with the Gators. Don't
think that those losses had
a lot to do with Bowden
being forced out? You don't
have to take my word for
it. Just ask Bobby about his
meeting with the Florida
State chancellor the week
after his final loss to the
Gators.
Much like Bowden,
Florida seems to be trying
to push John Brantley
out the door. Brantley
simply hasn't lived up to
expectations this season at
Florida after a combined
24-2 record with Tim
Tebow the previous two
seasons.
Brantley can do a lot to
erase a year that has seen
the Gators struggle with
a convincing win against
Florida State. If he's not
able to do that, remember
what happened to Bowden.

FSU 24, Florida 21


* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Newton leads


Auburn to


comeback win


Tigers rally from
24-0 deficit to
beat Tide, 28-27.
By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
Cam Newton threw
for three touchdowns and
ran for another, leading
* No. 2 Auburn back from a
24-point deficit Friday for
a stunning 28-27 victory
over No. 9 Alabama that
kept the Tigers on course
for a shot at the national
championship.
Auburn (12-0, 8-0
Southeastern Conference)
trailed 21-0 before it even


Teams return
to action after
Thanksgiving.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Teams from Columbia
County will try to make
up for lost time from the
Thanksgiving holiday
as there are 18 games
packed between Monday
and Friday.
The highlight of the
week comes on Friday
when Columbia High and
Fort White square off on
the hardcourt. Both teams
enter coming off losses.
Columbia opened the
season against perennial
favorite, Gainesville High,
in a 71-45 defeat, while
the Indians fell against
Suwannee High in a 54-49
contest in District 5-3A on
Tuesday.
The game marks the
middle of a three-game
stretch for the Tigers as
Columbia's basketball
team will take on Suwa-
nnee High on Thursday
and Terry Parker at
6:30 p.m. Saturday.
Fort White opens
the week at Santa Fe on
Tuesday and also plays at
Union on Thursday before
Friday's county clash.
On the girl's side of
things, the Lady Indians


picked up a first down, and
Alabama (9-3, 5-3) had a
314-2 lead in total yards at
one point in the first half.
But Newton, with the
signature performance in
what has become a season
of controversy, rallied the
Tigers for a victory that
left the crowd of more than
101,000 in stunned disbe-
lief when it was over. He
threw scoring passes of 36
yards to Emory Blake, 70
yards to Terrell Zachery
and, finally, a 7-yarder to
Philip Lutzenkirchen with
11:55 remaining that gave
Auburn its first lead of the
day.
AUBURN continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn quarterback Cameron Newton celebrates after their 28-27 win over Alabama in an
NCAA college football game at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Friday,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Drew Waller (4) and Bryce McCarthy (14) attempt to win a ball against Fort White High earlier this season.


lead off the week with
back-to-back home games
against Madison County
High at 7 p.m. Monday
and Suwannee at 7 p.m.
Tuesday. Fort White's girls
wrap the week in a road
contest against district con-


tender Newberry High at 7
p.m.. Friday.
The Lady Tigers get a
taste of Gainesville to open
the week in a home game
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. It's
back-to-back road games
for Columbia to round out


the week as the Lady Tigers
hit the road to take on
Suwannee and Ridgeview
high schools on Thursday
and Friday.
The soccer fields will
also get their fair share of
work this week. Columbia


has a double-header with
the boys and girls travel-
ing to Ed White High on
Monday. Play begins at
5:30 p.m. with the girls and
the boys game will follow
GAMES continued on 2B


a_7c
Ponder lacking

Florida win in


QB resume


Seminoles look
to end Gators
winning streak.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE With
some help, No. 22 Florida
State can accomplish two
huge goals Saturday.
The Seminoles will try
to snap a six-game losing
streak against rival Florida
and if things break right
in College Park, Md., they
can also earn a trip to the
Atlantic Coast Conference


championship game.
Florida State was in the
same position two years l
ago, but got hammered by
the Gators at home and
received no help from
Maryland, which failed to
beat Boston College and
give the Seminoles a back-
door entry into the ACC
title game. '
It's been a lot longer
though since Florida State
defeated the Gators, who
have won a pair of national
titles since last losing to
the Seminoles in 2003 on
Florida r
CATORS continued on 2B season.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
running back Jeff Demps (left) breaks into open field against South Florida earlier this


- -- I I I










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ABC National coverage, Michigan
at Ohio State
ESPN Boston College at Syracuse
ESPN2 Michigan State at Penn
State
12:30 p.m.
FSN Missouri vs. Kansas, at Kansas
City, Mo.
2 p.m.
NBC Bayou Classic, Grambling vs.
Southern, at New Orleans
3:30 p.m.
ABC Northwestern at Wisconsin
or Florida at Florida State
CBS National coverage, LSU vs.
Arkansas, at Little Rock, Ark.
ESPN Northwestern at Wisconsin
or Florida at Florida State
ESPN2 N.C. State at Maryland
4 p.m.
VERSUS -TCU at New Mexico
7 p.m.
ESPN2 South Carolina at Clemson
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Oregon St. at Stanford
7:45 p.m.
ESPN Georgia Tech at Georgia
8 p.m.
FSN Houston at Texas Tech
8:07 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Oklahoma
at Oklahoma State or Notre Dame at
Southern Cal
GOLF
3 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
World Championship, final round, at
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4 p.m.
FSN Duke vs. Oregon, at Portland,
Ore.
6 p.m.
FSN Southern Cal at Nebraska
10:30 p.m.
ESPN2 -- Arizona vs. Kansas, at Las
Vegas
NBA BASKETBALL
10 p.m.
WGN Chicago at Sacramento
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Aston Villa
vs.Arsenal, at Birmingham, England
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Noon
VERSUS Playoffs, championship
game, Las Vegas vs. Florida, at Omaha,
Neb.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Thursday's Games
New England 45, Detroit 24'
New Orleans 30, Dallas 27
N.Y. Jets 26, Cincinnati 10


Sunday's Games
Green Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, I p.m.
Carolina at Cleveland, I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, .Nov. 29
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Friday
No. I Oregon vs. No. 20 Arizona (n)
No.2Auburn 28, No.9Alabama 27
No. 3 Boise State at No. 19 Nevada
(n)
No. 16 Nebraska 45, Colorado 17'
Today
No. 4 TCU at New Mexico, 4 p.m.
No. 5 Wisconsin vs. Northwestern,
3:30 p.m.
No. 6 LSU at No. 12 Arkansas, 3:30
p.m.
No. 7 Stanford vs. Oregon State, 7:30
p.m.
No. 8 Ohio State vs. Michigan, Noon.
No. 10 Oklahoma State vs. No. 14
Oklahoma. 8 p.m.
No. II Michigan State at Penn State,
Noon.
No. 13.VirginiaTech vs.Virginia, Noon.
No. 15 Missouri vs. Kansas, Saturday.
No. 18 South Carolina at Clemson,
7 p.m.
No. 21 North Carolina State at
Maryland, 3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Florida State vs. Florida, 3:30
p.m.
No. 23 Utah vs. BYU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 24 Iowa at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Mississippi State at Mississippi,
7 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR/
ASIAN TOUR
Dubai World Championship
Site: Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Jumeirah Golf Estates, Earth
Course (7,675 yards, par 72).
Purse: $7.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.25 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 3-8 a.m., 10 a.m.-6 p.m., 6:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
LPGATOUR
Next event: LPGA Tour Championship,
Dec. 2-5, Grand Cypress Golf Club,
Orlando.
Online: http://www.lpga.com

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule


Thursday's Games
Atlanta I 16,Washington 96
L.A. Clippers 100, Sacramento 82
Today's Games
Atlanta at New York, I p.m.
Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Minnesota. 8 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at Toronto, I p.m.
NewYork at Detroit, 1:30 p.m.
Utah at LA. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 4 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 7 p.m.
Portland at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Denver, 8 p.m.
Indiana at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Friday's Games
Calgary 3, Philadelphia 2, SO
Carolina 3, Boston 0
N.Y. Islanders 2, New Jersey 0
Pittsburgh 2, Ottawa I
Minnesota 5, Nashville 2 ,
Chicago at Anaheim (n)
Tampa Bay at Washington (n)
Detroit at Columbus (n)
Toronto at Buffalo (n)
Montreal at Atlanta (n)
N.Y. Rangers at Florida (n)
St. Louis at Dallas (n)
San Jose atVancouver (n)
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia at New Jersey, I p.m.
Calgary at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Carolina atWashington, 5 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 5 p.m.

TENNIS

Barclays ATP World
Tour Finals Results

Group A
Round-Robin
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Tomas
Berdych (6), Czech Republic, 7-6 (3), 6-1.
Doubles
Group B
Round-Robin
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Oliver
Marach (5), Austria, def. Daniel Nestor,
Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (2), Serbia,
6-0, 1-6, 10-6 tiebreak.


GATORS: To use three-QB system


Continued From Page 11

a last-minute, 52-yard des-
peration heave from Chris
Rix to EK. Sam.
First-year Seminoles
coach Jimbo Fisher would
love to cap off his inaugural
regular season with a vic-
tory.
"This is another step for
us to learn to play in these
kinds of games," Fisher
said. "When you're learning
to compete with those folks,
it means you're taking steps
in the right direction."
The Seminoles (8-3,
6-2) are a 21A-point favorite
- a year after being a four-
touchdown underdog at
Gainesville. They lost that
game by 27.
"They feel like they can
do anything with this new
coach that they have,"
Florida defensive tackle
Terron Sanders said. "We're
just trying to keep the tradi-
tion alive around here win-
ning games."
Florida (7-4, 4-4
Southeastern Conference)



GAMES
Continued From Page 1B

at 7:20 p.m. Columbia will
round out the week with
the Capital City Invitational
in Tallahassee beginning
Friday.
Fort White's boys soccer
team begins play at home
against Taylor County at
7 p.m. Monday. It's one
of three home games for
the Indians this week.
Fort White plays host
to Suwannee at 7 p.m.
Tuesday and P.K Yonge at
7 p.m. Friday.
The Lady Indians have
two road contests this
week. Fort White begins
play at Oak Hall High at
6 p.m. Tuesday and travels
to Williston High at 6 p.m.
Thursday.


could finish off its otherwise
disappointing season with a
record seventh straight win
in this series that started in
1958. The Gators also won
six straight games in the
series between 1981 and
1986.
"It would do a lot to
make this season a success
with everything thafs hap-
pened," conceded Florida
coach Urban Meyer, who
has never seen one of his
teams lose five games in
his 10-year career as a head
coach.
Meyer is likely to use
three quarterbacks in a bid
to keep the streak going.
John Brantley, a conven-
tional dropback passer,
is expected to start with
backups Trey Burton and
Jordan Reed, both strong
runners ala Tim Tebow, will
see significant action.
Three-year starter
Christian Ponder closes
out his Florida State home
career.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. Z
LALED i


Ponder, who started
two years ago on a rainy
Tallahassee night when
Tebow manhandled the
Seminoles 45-15, missed
last year's game with a
shoulder injury while
backup EJ Manuel ran
things in a third straight
lopsided loss that acceler-
ated Fisher's move into the
job held for 34 years by
Bobby Bowden.
Ponder hasn't enjoyed
the type of season envi-
sioned for him by school
officials who cranked up
a preseason Heisman pro-
motion that died quickly
and he's never beat the
Gators. Ponder has
completed nearly 62 per-
cent of his passes for
1,817 yards and 17 touch-
downs this season and
will finish in the top five at
Florida State in career
completions and pass-
ing yardage, but won't be
in the top 10 in winning
percentage.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


q N i '- .-,
WHAT BARIBED
_z WIRF 15 USUAL-LY
DEKBEC U5EPE FOR.
S-1 -- 1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: f --
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: RAPID POACH ALKALI BARROW
I Answer: For some, an unpopular way of making
money HARD WORK


West Virginia comes


out of brawl with


35-10 win against Pitt


By ALAN ROBINSON
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH -
Brandon Hogan's inter-
ception and fumble recov-
ery led to touchdowns in
the first half, Geno Smith
threw two scoring passes
to Tavon Austin after half-
time and West Virginia
upset Backyard Brawl rival
Pittsburgh for the second
straight season, winning -
35-10 on Friday.
Pittsburgh (6-5, 4-2 in Big
East) had a clear path to the
conference title and an auto-
matic BCS bowl bid, only
to fumble it away with four
turnovers that repeatedly
gave West Virginia's offense
excellent field position.
The Mountaineers (8-3,
4-2) were seemingly out
of BCS contention follow-
ing successive losses to
Syracuse and Connecticut.
Now, they can play in a
major bowl likely, the
Fiesta if they beat
Rutgers on Dec. 4 and ASSOCIATED PRESS
Connecticut (6-4, 3-2) loses West Virginia wide receiver Tavon Austin (1) goes up and
to Cincinnati (4-6, 2-3) on makes a touchdown catch in front of Pittsburgh cornerback
Saturday or South Florida Ricky Gary (26) during the third quarter of an NCAA college
(6-4, 3-3), also on Dec. 4. football game, Friday in Pittsburgh. West Virginia won 35-10.



AUBURN: Newton throws 3 TD passes


Continued From Page 1E
It held up, keeping the
Tigers perfect heading to
next week's SEC champi-
onship game against South
Carolina. If Auburn wins
that one, the reward will
certainly be a spot in the
national title game.
Newton also had a 1-yard
TD run, and this may be the
.performance that locks up
the Heisman Trophy if
allegations that his father
sought a huge payout for
the quarterback to sign
out of junior college don't
weigh too heavily on the
voters' minds.
Certainly on the field,
Newton has no peer.
It's unlikely that anyone
in the country could lead


ACROSS

1 Ears of corn
5 "Dirty -"
10 Appetizing
12 Seance holder
13 Retired tennis
pro
14 Glamorous
15 Movie frames
16 Khndfsysem
18 Santa--winds
19 Permitted
23 Mamie's man
26 Lyric poem
27 Paddle
cousins
30 Upcoming
32 Cream-filled
pastry
34 Wound around
35 Looks after (2
wds.)
36 Valley
37 9-digit ID
38 Start of a bray
39 Browned
42 Tackle a slope
45 Good times


a team back from such a
daunting deficit at Bryant-
Denny Stadium, where
Alabama had won 20 in
a row. Newton didn't do
much on the ground, rush-
ing for just 39 yards and
enduring plenty of big hits
in the backfield, including
four sacks.
. But Newton showed he's
no slouch with his arm,
either, completing 13 of 20
for 216 yards.
The improbable come-
back wouldn't have been
possible without some
help from Alabama. Last
year's Heisman winner,
Mark Ingram, fumbled
the ball away at the end
of a long run just when it


46 Doc Holliday's
friend
50 Rain gear
53 Cleric's wear
55 Happens next
56 Flammable gas
57 Creek or river
58 Metallic sound


DOWN


1 Hamster's
home
2 Cameo shape
3 nova
4 Almost-grads
5 Witch's curse
6 Hubbub
7 Moreno or
Rudner
8 Bankrupt'
9 Nonprofit org.
10 Cul-de- -
11 Gave in
12 Pet plea
17 Miler Sebastian
20 Ochoa of golf
!1 Time of the
mammals


looked like the Tide was
about to blow the Tigers
all the lray back to the
Plains.
Another fumble, this pne
coughed up by quarterback
Greg McElroy after a big
hit by Nick Fairley and
recovered by Fairley cost
the Tide another scoring
chance deep in Auburn ter-
ritory near the end of the
first half.
Alabama still led 24-7
going to the locker room,
but yet another miscue
probably hurt the Tide
most of all. On Auburn's
second play of the second
half, Newton threw a deep
pass for Zachery down the
sideline.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

D A S GLEA
D NU T R A DO

A S YRIDI DE N

E SS TODA YBRE D
LA E GAID LAME
PLUNGER C V .1IC
ALN .N.RVANA
So LD REBA GE L
O WS FA DED EM S
J F AL E
YOGURT IL L E T
AB SES NIPES
K IL '--GENRE


22 Roy Rogers'
wife
23 Maybes
24 --fu
25 Footnote abbr.
(2 wds.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


28 Headstrong
29 Building lot
31 Luau strum-
mers
32 Flower oil
33 Lobster eggs
37 R-V connector
40 "The X-Files"
fodder
41 City in India
42 Gush forth
43 Hawaiian cof-
fee
44 Scholarly org.
47 Novelist Paton
48 Pushed the
doorbell
.49 Before, in
combos
51 Prompter's
hint
52 That woman
54 Slugger Mel


11-27 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY,, NOVEMBER 27, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
IVE BEEN GOING CRAZY TRYING
TO FIGURE OUT WHAT
ETO GIVE REALLY?
you P2FOR -
CHRISTMAS <


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Mom who lost daughter's iPod

should replace it posthaste


DEAR ABBY: I'm 13,
and about six months ago my
mom confiscated my iPod
because I misbehaved. When
it was time to get my iPod
back, my mom couldn't find
it. We have been searching
everywhere in the house for
it but it's gone.
My iPod is very important
to me because almost every
cent I earned went into buy-
ing the music and applica-
tions. The amount of money I
spent is greater than the cost
of the iPod itself. I asked my
mother to buy me a new one
to replace the one she lost,
but she said it was my fault
that it was taken away, and
she could not keep track of
where it was.
I think it is unfair that my
mom lost something I spent
so much on. Who is respon-
sible for buying a new one?
- MUSIC-STARVED IN
OLYMPIA, WASH.
DEAR MUSIC-
STARVED: Good parents
model responsible behavior
for their children; that's how
children learn. You misbe-
haved and you were punished
for it If the agreement was
that you would get your iPod
back, and your mother lost
it, then she should replace it
- including the money you
invested in loading it. She
should be ashamed of herself
for trying to weasel out of it.
DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend, "Ethan," and I have
graduated from a prestigious


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
four-year university. We have
stable incomes and bright fu-
tures ahead of us, and we're
planning and saving for a
wedding within the next two
years.
The problem is, we feel
like oddballs in our group
of friends ostracized and
shunned. They feel our level
of commitment is too great for
our ages and that it's wrong
to want to marry so young.
My friends constantly say
bad things about Ethan, and
I'm tired of defending our re-
lationship. Is there something
wrong with being committed?
What can I say to my friends
the next time they put down
my relationship? YOUNG
BUT SERIOUS IN SAN
DIEGO
DEAR YOUNG BUT
SERIOUS: You and Ethan
are out of school. Planning a
wedding in two years doesn't
appear to be rushing into
anything. You do not have to
"defend" your relationship to
anyone.
Tell your friends you feel
lucky to have found "the one"
so early, and that you wish
them luck in their own searc-


es. Tell them that when they
put Ethan down, it shows a
lack of respect for your judg-
ment. And start looking for
other couples with whom to
socialize so you're not so de-
pendent upon this group. If
they are uncomfortable with
the idea of including a "com-
mitted couple" in their circle,
then you and Ethan may have
outgrown them.
DEAR ABBY: I wear col-
ored contact lenses that make
my blue eyes appear much
more defined. When I wear
blue clothing it makes my
eyes stand out even more.
Many people comment on
my eye color, but I find ques-
tions such as "Are they real?"
or "They must be contacts"
to be rude. I would never ask
someone with nice hair if it
was dyed or a wig.
Have you any suggestions
on what I should say in re-
sponse to these comments?
- VERY BLUE-EYED IN
INDIANAPOLIS
DEAR VERY BLUE-
EYED: What the people
are conveying through their
questions and comments is
that you are not fooling any-
body. Because your natural
eye color is blue and you are
wearing contact lenses, an-
swer yes to both questions.
However, you do not need to
elaborate further.
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


WREM TheFY STA.TreD EOIL-INGC
hnHarE AT.co AD .






wwwJohnHartStudios.com -- 9


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You will not
please everyone but the
people you do please will
watch your back and ward
off any opposition that chal-
lenges you. Focus on what
you know, who you know
and how you can best uti-
lize your skills to achieve
your goals. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't be fooled
by someone trying to take
advantage of you. Emotion-
al tactics will cost you finan-
cially and personally. Talks
may not appear to go that
well but, in the end, your
point will be heard. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Your insight into
new trends will grab some-
one's interest, leading to a
proposal. A partnership will
only work if ground rules
are set Failing to maintain
equality will lead to an ar-
gument that dissolves the
relationship. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Give more
thought to your future,
your professional direction
and how you see your life
unfolding. You need to have
a game plan if you want to
close this year on a high
note. Don't leave anything
to chance. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Plan to have a stel-
lar time with friends, fam-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

ily or anyone else whose
company you enjoy. You
can take on a challenge and
step into the limelight with
confidence. Love is looking
good and your popularity is
mounting. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't hide the way
you feel but prepare to deal
with the consequences of
being honest. Face the peo-
ple who are dragging you
down so you can head into
the new year clear of the
negative in your life. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Lend a helping hand
to those less fortunate. You
will learn a valuable lesson
from the people you meet.
Preparation will help you
deal with the changes tak-
ing place. There are many
ways to turn your talents
into cash. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Someone is like-
ly to push you to the limit
when it comes to work,
commitment and comple-
tion. Don't let this take
away from an important
creative or social venue
you want to attend. You can
make time for everything if
you are organized and call
upon someone to help. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Travel


should be on your agenda.
You will change your view
regarding your current per-
sonal life situation and rela-
tionships. Prepare to make
a change that may disrupt
your life momentarily. In
the end, you will achieve
peace of mind. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Keep your
whereabouts and financial
concerns a secret. The less
you let others know, the eas-
ier it will be to get what you
want Listening to what oth-
ers have to contribute will
be exactly what you. need
to hear to make some deci-
sions of your own. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You'll be ready
to get involved in new ven-
tures and business partner-
ships, or personal relation-
ships, if you are single.
Opportunities will develop
if you are generous with
your time and willing to of-
fer your ideas, help, kind-
ness and understanding.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): If you are too
pushy or aggressive, you
can expect to get the same
in return. Bide your time
and let your charm lead
the way. You want to en-
tice people, not push them
away. Impulsive reactions
will make you appear un-
stable. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: C equals B
"V OBGSGO GR RMDPMEP JLM EPZPB
V OSKVYYT FMPR SM SLP CVSSYP,
TPS JLM VNSPBJVBIR OMDPR MKS
R LMMSGEF SLP J M KE I PI." STEP
I V Y T
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Life doesn't offer you promises whatsoever so it's
very easy to become, 'Whatever happened to...?' Morgan Freeman
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-27


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I'M THINKING OF LETTING YOU
BROWSE THROUGH ALL THE
TOOLS I'VE BORROWED -THAT
FROM YOU AND CHOOSE SOUNDS
WHICH ONE YOU WANT PRETTY
k RETURNED CHEESY





1?- 7


SUIT WAIT! DOES THAT
YOURSELF INCLUDE POWER
TOOLS?!


e-14


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK 2 ERNEST


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY,, NOVEMBER 27,2010


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER















mmn~
IHBUY.


I E L L. I T


I tF~IND 14


Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2010


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


----ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


010 Announcements








020 Lost & Found
LOST, One Hearing Aid,
Wed, Nov 17th,
in Lake City.
CalH 386-497-3443 if found
100 Job
100 Opportunities
04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, 0/0'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542465
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for
an Executive Adm. Asst. to
perform detailed administrative
assignments. Requires excellent
computer skills, organizational
and communication skills.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous administrative
experience required. Full
benefits package. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, Fl. 32056 or
email Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542466
Cook, FT, Must have
experience and able to work
weekends and evenings.
Apply Bayi Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, FI 32025

05524512
HELP WANTED
SALES PERSON
To call on company
convenience stores and private
stores. Help develop new
locations. Must have sales
ability; good driving record
required.Dependable and good
communication skills.
Transportation furnished,
willing to live in Perry, FL
Send resume and income history
to: PO Box 1201 Perry, FL
32348

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412

120 Medical
Employment

05524528
Medical Biller Needed
Several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please e-mail resume to :
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax 386-755-2169
or mail to: PO Box 3306,
Lake City, FL 32056

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


141 Babysitters
Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or P/T,
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 11/29/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $40 386-752-0987
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external


parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Frost Free Refrigerator,
White, looks nice, works great
$225
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Kenmore Washer
White, works great
$125
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Whirlpool Dryer,
White, good shape
$125 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387

408 Furniture
COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
(904)704-9377
RECLINER,
TALL & wide beige. Decent
shape. $40.00
386-755-8941

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
MTD High Wheel Mower
looks and runs good
$125 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri. &
Sat., (8-4). 247-240R CR 49R,
247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
Multi Family Fri Sun. 8am.
Comer of Lake Montgomery.&
Alamo. Appli., elec., hswares,
Christmas, auto, tools, clothes,
sewing mach. wheels/tires, furn.






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
AVON
Great Gift Ideas
Shop online at
www.youravon.com/vlawton
Physical Therapy Equipment:
Exam/treatment table,
$100.00 MUST SELL
386-752-1652

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver:
Call 386-965-3728

461 Office
Equipment
OFFICE FURNITURE
All Wood Computer
Desk $50
386-752-0749 .
OFFICE FURNITURE
BLACK LEATHER
CHAIRS $20
386-752-0749

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 SWMH, $500 month, $500
security, All appliances included.
Pets negotiable, in Branford area
Call for add info 386-935-3099
3BR/2BA NEWLY renovated
MH on 172 ac. private property.
$700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Security dep.
References needed. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114


63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
)5524443
S $Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
1 (386) 758-8455

05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX.
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.


A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 .
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-324 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
I V For Rent
Efficiency apartment, Close to
VA, $430 mo. plus $150.00 sec,
utilities included.No pets.
386-754-9641 or 386-438-4054.
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

f730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


04542444
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

05524428
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
.miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances.
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123


730 Unfurnished
J7 Home For Rent
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
RENTED
.Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Very Clean 2br/lba. in own.
298 SW Miller Terr. CH/A, Shed.
$650.mo. Ist.mo. & security.
Call Vick 386-623-6401
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

75O Business&
50 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale

5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
ldo down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo "
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

82Q Farms &
O V Acreage

05524423
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwncrFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


830 Commercial
8 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

930 Motorcycles

2009 Custom Chopper, 300cc,
low miles, like new,
must sell $2000 obo
386-758-1784

940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, neff
bars, stereo. $17,995. 752-8227






950 Cars for Sale

"09 Toyota Scion XB, 5 dr.
40k mi. Purchase for about payoff.
About $1,000 under book.
Serviced at LC Toyota. 758-5916

1999 Chrysler Concorde LXI,
leather interior, automatic,
gold in color, tinted windows
386-984-0770


950 Cars for Sale

87 Ford Mustang GT, 5 spd.,
28,000 orig miles, adult owned,
runs exc., cobra wheels,
$10,500 OBO 386-963-2271
94 BUICK LeSabre
Low miles.
Runs great, $2400.00
386-752-0824







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890


Q H I I X B E F FJ W T

U E A T U D Y F S H S

B B C S I U V B A Q U

E R E Q D C N I Y H C

U A P K G U X I L Y L W

V F 0 H F M 0 E G L S E


B I G V N

Lake City
Reporter's
popular weekly
word search is
a great way to
get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
week at a price
any business
can afford.


Conlneted Wwndyt


Connected .. www.lakecityreporter.com

40 SiX0sp ---l


10


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for.you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and w6 will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.





2008 Toyota Tacoma
4DR, access cab. 2009 Custom 1987 Ford 2009 Toyota Scion
17,250 mi., AT, all power, Chopper 300cc Mustang GT XB
Tonneau cover, bedliner. L6w miles, like new, 5spd, 28,000 orig. mi, interior 5DR, 40,000 mi., purchase for
class III hitch, nerf bars, must sell. showroom new, cobra wheels payoff about $1,000 under book.
AM-FM stereo w/CD, $2,000 OBO (have orig. wheels) Serviced at Lake City Toyota.
sliding rear glass. $10,00oo OBO
$17,995 Call Call
Call cil call 386-758-5916
386-752-8227 386-758-1784 386-963-2271


A+ EveCare

E
E N i Eyeglasses
.: Contacls
.- ,.- Exams
Sunglasses





555-5555


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