<%BANNER%>






The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01462
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/26/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01462
System ID: UF00028308:01462
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Not Just Bragging
UF aims to keep winning streak alive.
Sports, I B
000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


Friday, November 26, 2010


i


Perfect Game
Brady's second-half performance
dooms Detroit, 45-24.
Sports, I B


reporter



Irco Vol. 136, No. 266 0 75 cents


Deputy, Lake City man trade gunfire


Shooting occurs
when officers visit
suspect's home.
Staff reports

A Columbia County sher-
iff deputy and a Lake City
man exchanged gunfire


Thursday while officers
were trying to question
the man as a suspect in
a strong-armed robbery in
Suwannee County, officials
said.
The suspect, Matthew
Pugh, 24, of 503 NWApoloa
Drive in Lake City, surren-
dered to county deputies


Robert Sands and Scott
Busby after the exchange
of gunfire. There were no
reported injuries from both
sides.
Pugh was charged with
attempted murder of a law
enforcement officer and is
being held without bond.
According to the sher-


iff's office, Columbia
County officers received a
report from the Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office to
be on the watch for some-
.one involved in an strong-
armed robbery. Columbia
County officers were able
to tentatively match the
description of the person


and vehicle to Pugh.
Sands and Busby went
to question Pugh at his
home on NW Apoloa Drive,
off Lake Jeffery Road in
Columbia County. Upon
their arrival at his home at
about 1 p.m., the suspect
came to the door and fired
a weapon at Sands, who


immediately took cover and
returned fire. The suspect
then surrendered and was
.taken into custody without
further incident.
As a result of the dis-
charge of a firearm, the
county Sheriff's Office
GUNFIRE continued on 3A


GIVING THANKS


Columbia's rate
exceeds state's
79 percent.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The number of students
receiving high school diplo-
mas in the Columbia County
school district is climbing
with every school year.
According to the Florida
Department of Education's
recently released rates,
Columbia County's pub-
lic high school graduation
rate from the 2009 to 2010
school year is at 87 percent,
a 5-percent increase from
the previous year and about
a 24-percent increase from
the 2005 to 2006 school
year.
That graduation fig-
ure is from the National
Governors Association,
which counts graduates as
recipients of standard and
special diplomas. It is one
of three graduation rates
the state currently calcu-
lates and the rate Florida
will transition to for a uni-
form comparison among
the 50 states, said Mike
Millikin, superintendent of
schools.


ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
Helping out at the 10th Annual Thanksgiving Dinner at First Presbyterian Church on Thursday was 'fun,' said Sarah Douglas, 7.


LAD Soup Kitchen serves free dinners


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Serving and
sharing a
Thanksgiving
feast at LAD,
Soup Kitchen
has become a tradition
for Cleopatra Steele,
executive director of the
Suwannee Valley Rescue
Mission.
"I don't do any cook-
ing. I eat here," she said.
'That's what it means to
me. This is my family."
The soup kitchen,
as well as the First
Presbyterian Church and
a local group of Christians
hosted free Thanksgiving
dinners for the commu-
nity Thursday.
This is the 19th year
of LAD Soup Kitchen
hosting its Thanksgiving
Feast, Steele said. The
soup kitchen is an out-
,*


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Andrew Appjeyard receives a slice of pie from Jay Larick
at the Thanksgiving dinner at First Presbyterian Church on


Thursday.
reach of the Suwannee
Valley Rescue Mission.
The special holiday
meal is just a bonus to
what it does on a normal
basis.
'This is not something
we just do today," she
said. "We (feed the com-


munity) everyday, seven
days a week."
Plates were also deliv-
ered to people unable
to make it to the soup
kitchen. Steele anticipated
delivering about 400 by
the end of the day.
People were greeting


them at the door for the
10th Annual Thanksgiving
Dinner at First
Presbyterian Church, said
Edna Reichert, organizer.
"It's been overwhelm-
ing," she said. 'We've
never had this many
people before."
Reichert said she was
excited about the turnout.
Volunteers worked hard
to make the meal from
scratch and everyone was
complimentary about the
food, she said.
"I hope they leave with
a sense of fellowship and
love," Reichert said.
Appearing for the first
time by the intersection
of Highway 90 and Baya
Avenue was a tent offer-
ing a free Thanksgiving
meal.
Representing churches

SOUP continued on 3A


9 fOpinion ................ 4A
79 Obituaries ..............5A
Chance of Showers Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
WEATHER, 2A Around Florida........... 2A


Fort White woman

killed in single-car

crash near Branford


Suwannee EMS
pronounce victim
dead at the scene.
From staff reports
A Fort White woman
died after a crash Tuesday
night in Suwannee County,
according to the Florida
Highway Patrol.
Wendy M. Mosley, 29,
was driving a 1999 Saturn
when the crash occurred at
11 p.m. Tuesday, FHP said.
Suwannee County EMS
personnel. pronounced her
dead at the scene at 7:03
a.m. on Wednesday, more
than eight hours after the
crash. The FHP report
did not indicate what time
the emergency personnel
arrived at the scene.
The report said Mosley
was traveling north on
US-129, four miles east of
Branford, when "the right
side of her car" went off


the road onto the eastern
grassy shoulder. The vehi-
cle traveled 234 feet north
before re-entering the
north travel lane. It contin-
ued traveling 122 feet in a
northwest direction across
both travel lanes of US-129,
rotating in a counter-clock-
wise direction. The car
then left the roadway and
entered onto the western
grassy shoulder, according
to the report. It traveled
48 feet across the grassy
shoulder before impacting
the sloped embankment
with its right side.
The car overturned onto
its roof several times, eject-
ing Mosley, whd was not
wearing a seat belt. The
car stopped upright, fac-
ing southwest in the front
yard of Taberrnacle Baptist
Church, the report said.
Mosley landed face up on
the driver's side of the car.
The report said her family
has been notified.


County graduation

numbers go higher

yearly, officials say


TODAY IN
NATION
V6- Storms slow
holiday travel.


Columbia County's
graduation rate exceeds
the state's 79-percent rate
by 8 percent and is the
highest of its surrounding
counties, Millikin said. He
said the district is thrilled
to have made the accom-
plishments.
Both district high schools
also saw increases in the
2009 to 2010 school year.
Fort White High's gradu-
ation rate increased by
more than 2 percent to 85.63
percent and
Columbia
Hig h s
increased
by more
than 6 per-
cent to
88.64 per-
Millikin cent.
Millikin said the high
schools' numerous pro-
grams, such as the school
band or the new Logistics
Academy, keep students
interested and give them
a reason to strive for suc-
cess.
"We do everything we can
to keep a student motivated
to be successful by offering
a variety of programs at
our two high schools for a
GRADUATION continued on 3A


COMING
SATURDAY
Black Friday
shopping craze.


s s s o=


m


Si-lt.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010


A$H 3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 5-5-8
Evening: 6-5-4


4' Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-6-1-8
Evening: 3-6-4-8


:eziatdi.
-'" Wednesday:
5-7-10-16-19


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Billy Joel gets hips replaced


NEW YORK


Billy Joel is recovering
from double hip-replace-
ment surgery.
Joel spokeswoman
Claire Mercuri told
"People" magazine Wednesday that
the 61-year-old pop star had both
hips replaced last week to correct a
congenital condition.
She said Joel, the Rock and Roll
Hall of Famer responsible for such
hits as "Piano Man," "Uptown Girl"
and "New York State of Mind," is
doing "extremely well."
Joel toured this year and was
recently promoting the documentary
film "The Last Play at Shea." There's
no word on when he plans to per-
form on stage again.

Dark side calls: 'Darth
Vader' costume on sale
LONDON For sale: A chance to
embrace the dark side.
Christie's auction house is selling
an original Darth Vader costume from
the "Star Wars" movie franchise.
The outfit a jet-black helmet,
mask and armor is expected to sell
Thursday for between 160,000 pounds
and 230,000 pounds ($250,000 to
$365,000).
Christie's said the costume is
thought to have been made for "The
Empire Strikes Back," the second
film in George Lucas's sci-fi series,
released in 1980.

Brody: Forced to sue
film producers
LOS ANGELES.-- Adrien Brody
said he was reluctantly forced to sue
the makers of a thriller film because
they failed to-pay his full salary.
U.S. District Judge Dale S. Fischer
on Monday blocked the sale or use


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo., Billy Joel attends the 2010 Songwriters Hall of Fame awards gala
in New York. Joel is recovering from double hip-replacement surgery. Joel spokes-
woman Claire Mercuri told People magazine Wednesday that the 61-year-old pop
star had both hips replaced last week to correct a congenital condition.


of Brody's likeness in "Giallo" until
the Oscar winner's remaining salary
is paid. The judge noted in her ruling
that the actor was likely to prevail in
his $2 million lawsuit against the filnm-
makers.
"At no point did I ever wish to be
involved in a legal dispute, but after
over a year of attempting to resolve
this matter I was left with no other


alternative," Brody disclosed in a state-
ment released to The Associated Press
by his attorney Wednesday.
The picture was shot in 2008 in
Turin, Italy, and Brody is featured
prominently on the DVD's cover.
Brody, 37, won an Oscar in 2003 for
his role in "The Pianist!'

N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Ellen Albertini Dow
is 92.
* Impressionist Rich Little
is 72.
* Singer Tina Turner is 71.
* Pop musician John McVie
is 65.
* Actress Marianne
Muellerleile is 62.
* Actor Scott Jacoby is 54.
* Blues singer-musician

Daily ScriDture


Bernard Allison is 45.
* Country singer-musician
Steve Grisaffe is 45:
* Actress Kristin Bauer is 37.
* Actor Peter Facinelli is 37.
* Actress Tammy Lynn
Michaels Etheridge is 36.
.E Actress Maia Campbell is
34.
0 Country singer Joe Nichols
is 34.


"And whatever you do, whether
in word or deed, do it all in
the name of the Lord Jesus,
giving thanks to God the Father
through him."

Colossians 3:17



Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon.... .754-0419
Circulation ............... 755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATON
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of th keLake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next dayre-delivery or ser
No. 310-880. 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
'to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake 'City, Fla. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
.vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
ADVERTISING 52 Weeks............. $83.46
Director Kathryn Petersoh..754-0417 Rates indude 7% sales tax.
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) Mail rates
12Weeks....... ........ $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks..............$82.80
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks ..................$179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Homosassa
Springs to open

HOMOSASSA SPRINGS
- Manatees that winter
in the coastal waters off
Citrus County will have a
new safe, warm, spring-fed
habitat starting Dec. 3.
That's when Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
will open its gate for the
winter months and wel-
come the wild manatee
population that lives just
outside.
It will be the first time
wild manatees will be able
to reach the main spring
that feeds the Homosassa
River since the gate was
installed under the park's
Long River Bridge in 1980.
Along with the recent
public acquisition of Three
Sisters Springs in Crystal
River, the park gives mana-
tees another warm place
to survive during cold
weather; it also provides
another location where the
public can view wild mana-
tees without entering their
habitat.
At 10 a.m. Dec. 3, offi-
cials from several agencies
will open the gate that sepa-
rates wild manatees that
winter in the area known
as the Homosassa Blue
Waters from the interior of
the state park.
The bowl at Homosassa
Springs has been home to
the park's captive manatee
herd some of which are
recovering from injuries for
about three decades. Every
year, thousands of park
visitors view the manatees
and countless fish from an
underwater observatory
known as the fishbowl, the
park's main attraction.
The fishbowl is direct-
ly above the springs that
feed the river, and that is
where the water is warm-
est. Manatees need the
warmth to survive; hun-
dreds died of cold stress
in last winter's prolonged
frigid weather.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of Tampa's Lowery Park Zoo, Hillsborough County
Fire Rescue, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission carry manatee 'Bartlett' to Tampa Bay in prepa-
ration for release Tuesday in Apollo Beach. The zoo planned
to release a total of three manatees back into the wild.


State and federal officials
have talked for years about
opening the spring to wild
manatees. Those efforts
got a boost in 2006 when
a dredge project took place
to deepen the area just out-
side the park so manatees
could swim right up to the
gate.


year-old Shakespeare was
killed April 6 or 7, 2009.
Authorities said the man was
buried on a property that
had been bought by Moore
and listed in the name of
her boyfriend, according to
county records.

inOtice O ( child


vid e rele d svivr lawsuit

Evidence released survivor lawsuit


in lottery case

TAMPA-Gruesomepho-
tos of the mummified body
of a slain Florida lottery win-
ner are among mountains of
evidence released this week
by the Hillsborough County
State Attorney's office.
More than 20 discs con-
taining photos, videos and
other documents were
released in the case against
Dorice "DeeDee" Moore,
who is charged with first-
degree murder in the death
of Abraham Shakespeare of
Lakeland.
Moore was indicted by a
grand jury in March after
Shakespeare's body was dis-
covered last January. The
remains were found buried
under a five-foot deep con-
crete slab behind a home in
Plant City, a rural town east
of Tampa.
Detectives said the 43-


TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Supreme Court has
reinstated a wrongful death
lawsuit filed on behalf of an
out-of-wedlock child whose
biological father commit-
ted suicide in Palm Beach
County.
The justices Thursday
rejected arguments by a
psychiatrist and hospital to
disallow the suit because
at conception and birth the
child's mother was married
to another man who should
be considered the father
although they were sepa-
rated.
The family of the biologi-
cal father, Shea Daniels,
alleges Dr. Jonathan
Greenfield and St. Mary's
Medical Center negligently
discharged Daniels after
he'd been assessed as pos-
sibly suicidal.


* Associated Press


THE WEATHER

.7' M= M 28SNA


CHANCE MOSTLY cr. PARTLY PARTLY CHANCE
CASHOWERS SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY SHOWERS


HI 179L049 HI 67 LO 39 HI72L048 HI 77L0 53 HI 78L0 53
111 4 FIER m,1 .


Pensacola
66/42


Tadlahassee *
77/48
* 9
Panama City
74/46


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high.
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


a Friday p


SValdosta
7746
*/46 Jacksonville
Lake City, "80/51i
79/49
Gainesville Daytona Be
'"-,80/54 8l61
S' Ocala S
'IrA


83
50
72
49
85' in 1955
20 in 1970

0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.77"
45.40"


7p t 6a
aturdayI


F romcastled Imperanture Feels ie tmpratire


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.,

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


On this date in
1896, snow and
high winds hit the
Northern Plains
and the Upper
Mississippi Valley
with a Thanksgivii
Day blizzard across
North Dakota. Th
temperature at
Pokegama Dam,
Mich. plunged to
degrees below ze


ach


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Saturday
73/61/c
71/55/pc
81/70/pc
82/62/pc
68/41/pc
66/43/s
82/74/t
67/39/pc
82/69/pc
82/64/pc
70/44/pc
75/58/pc
64/48/s
62/43/s
65/41/s
77/58/pc
64/39/s
80/67/pc


Sunday
75/65/pc
74/63/s
80/72/pc
82/63/pc
72/51/pc
69/53/pc
83/73/t
72/48/pc
81/71/pc
83/66/pc
74/52/pc
78/62/pc
66/58/s
66/55/s
69/53/s
78/63/pc
71/51/s
80/70/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


7:05 a.m:
5:30 p.m.
7:06 a.m.
5:30 p.m.

10:30 p.m.
11:17 a.m.
11:35 p.m.
11:56 a.m.


2

60 nite st bu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Forecasts, data and graph-
S' Ics 2010 Weather Central
S-- 1 LLC, Madison, Wis.
*' www.weatherpubllsher.com





Get CGnnected
ng
,SS
e


lam all
I ^^^^^^^^^^


AROUND FLORIDA


; 55 0n Key West
Ordando Cape Canaveral Key West
83/62 81/62 Lake City
SMiami
Tampa,,a Naples
80/05 West Palm Beach Ocala
82/65 0* Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers, 82/68 0 Pensacola
82/65 Naples Tallahassee
81/65 Miami Tampa
81,/68 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach


Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.
28 5 13 21
Last New First Full


-~--- - --- -~II


----


---- --


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


* iimii.iiiimiiiiiiiimimiiiimi


ffIjMION


'LAKE. CITY ALMANAC


Ig~i~


45
,ro.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010


FHP names Alabama man killed in 1-75 traffic crash


From staff report

The Florida Highway Patrol
has released the identity of the
Alabama man who was killed
during a traffic crash on 1-75
Wednesday.
FHP said Romam John Winfrey,
48, of Hanceville, Ala. was pro-
nounced dead at the scene by
Columbia County EMS.


Winfrey was headed north in
a 2003 Dodge Ram 3500 on the
center lane of 1-75, according to
FHP reports. A tractor trailer
driven by Miriam Maria Arango,
41, of Ft. Myers was also headed
north in the outside lane of 1-75.
For unknown reasons, Winfrey
moved to the right partially onto
the outside lane and hit the left
side of Arango's box-type semi


trailer. The right side of his truck
slid and scraped down Arango's
left side, and she braked rapidly
and steered to the right onto I-
75's outside emergency lane.
Winfrey continued heading
north a short distance before
veering to the right toward the
northeast direction. He traveled
off the roadway onto 1-75's north
grassy shoulder.


Winfrey continued traveling
northeast and struck the interstate
boundary fence. He went through
the interstate boundary fence onto
Sefner Court, a county dirt road,
then across onto its north dirt and
grassy right-of-way. Winfrey contin-
ued traveling northeast and began
to rotate clockwise. He struck a
wire fence which was parallel to
the north right-of-way edge. His


left side tires began scooping and
pushing dirt, causing a tripping
action to the truck, which went
airborne and began to horizontally
rotate in a clockwise direction.
The truck stopped on its right
side facing south on a private cow
pasture.
FHP was assisted in the inves-
tigation by the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.


ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
Bobby Rucker of Lake City slices ham to be served at a Thanksgiving meal hosted by a local
group of Christians.


Continued From Page 1A
from Lake City, Jasper,
Live Oak and Fort White,
the group of Christians
combined to host the meal,
said Chris Hall, one of
the organizers. Hosting a
Thanksgiving Day meal
had been discussed for a
year and a half.
"A lot of people are
alone or don't have the
resources to cook a meal,"
he said.
The group was prepared
to feed 300 people, includ-
ing delivering meals to
those who were shut-in,
Hall said. After this first
Thanksgiving dinner, they
hope to make it a regular
tradition.
Reaching out to the
community is something
Christians are commanded
to do in the Bible, which'is
a practice missing some-
times in church, he said.
"We didn't want to con-
tinue to sit in a church
building," Hall said. "We
wanted to get out and act"
People in need would
be in bad shape without
groups and churches feed-
ing the community on
Thanksgiving Day, said
Ronnie Fleming of Lake


year's


blessings


ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
Amanda Edenfield, left, serves Keynbresha Maeweather, 13, as
Cassandra Aymond and Doris Campbell fix other plates at LAD
Soup Kitchen Thursday.


City.
"They would have
nowhere to eat and
nowhere to go," he said.
Fleming came to the
soup kitchen for his
Thanksgiving meal.
"It was lovely," he said.
"I love it."
LAD Soup Kitchen and
First Presbyterian had
more than 30 volunteers
from various churches
helping serve meals, Also
there were about 100 vol-


unteers serving at the tent.
This was the first
year she helped serve
at First Presbyterian for
Thanksgiving, said Rita
Temple of Lake City.
"I think it is a remark-
able thing to do for the
needy or people who can't
cook," she said.
Temple said she plans
to help again in future
years.
"It's wonderful to help
in some way," she said.


Thanksgiving sales bring


shoppers and grumbles


By MAE ANDERSON
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK Not all
Americans tucked into
turkey with their families
on Thanksgiving. Some
were out shopping, hitting
sales ahead of the crowds
expected Friday.
After a year of cautious
spending and worry over
an uncertain economy and
high unemployment, more
stores this year extended
hours into Thanksgiving
Day, a day when stores are
traditionally closed.
Many grumble about
the relentless march of
commercialism creeping
into the holiday. But at
least some shoppers took
the bait.
While crowds appeared
relatively light compared
with the weekend ahead,
the extended hours drew
in overseas visitors, those
who have to work Friday
and some who couldn't
resist a good deal.
Sears, Kmart and some
Sports Authority, Gap, Old
Navy and Banana Republic
stores were among those
open Thursday.
At an Old Navy in
Lutherville, Md., Brenda
Tarver, 65, a retired postal
employee from Baltimore,
was dragged out of the
house by her daughters,
but was finding good deals
on clothing.
'"They've got good pric-
es and a variety of items. A
lot of things are 50 percent
off," she said.
Willy Gerelbest, 45, a
counselor from Brooklyn,
was shopping at Kmart in
New York for sneakers on
sale for $9.99.
"I saw the advertising
and just wanted to check it
out," he said. "'Tomorrow I
have to work."


David Friedman, presi-
dent of marketing for
Sears Holdings Corp. said
the decision to open 7 a.m.-
noon on Thanksgiving
Day stemmed from posi-
tive response to a simi-
lar "early Black Friday"
sale in November, as-
well as success with
Kmart, which Sears also
owns and has been open
on Thanksgiving for 19
years.
Workers will earn holi-
day pay and still be home
in time for a Thanksgiving
meal, Friedman said.
At the Sears store at
the Mall of America in
Bloomington, Minn., the
largest U.S. shopping and
entertainment complex,
sales were fueled by a
charity walk at the mall.
The walk and a
good sale drew Helen
Schultz, of White Bear
Lake, Minn. She bought a
19-inch RCA LCD HDTV
for $129.99, saving $70.
But she said wouldn't have
bought it Thursday if she
hadn't been there for the
charity walk.
"I don't think shop-
ping should be done on
Thanksgiving," Schultz
said. "But they need to
make money."
Toys R Us CEO Jerry
Storch said the company
decided to open at 10 p.m.
Thanksgiving Day because
reaction was so positive
to the stores' midnight
opening last year. Before
that, stores opened at 5
a.m. on Friday. He expects
brisk sales of hot toys like
Santa-ma-jig, a green and
red singing doll.
"Customers lined up at
8 p.m. on last year. They
wanted us to open earlier,"
he said.
A similar promotional
blitz greeted online shop-


pers Thursday, though
the holiday isn't a bonanza
there, either.
Last year, consumers
spent about $300 million
online on Thanksgiving,
compared with $887 mil-
lion on Cyber Monday,
according to comScore.
According to Akamai
Technologies, which
tracks traffic to 270 retail
sites, traffic peaked at 11
a.m. and was up about 14
percent from Wednesday.
Early data from
Coremetrics, an IBM
company, from early after-
noon showed that online
Thanksgiving Day sales
were up about 10 percent
over Thanksgiving a year
ago. The average order
size was down 18 percent
from a year ago to $130.50,
but that figures was get-
ting bigger as the day
went on.
John Thompson, senior
vice president and general
manager of Best Buy Inc.'s
website, said this year the
company. reached out to
its frequent online shop-
pers and gave them early
access to deals.
"Thanksgiving Day is a
day when we are seeing
more and more consumers
choose online as a place to
begin their research and
actually transact," he said.
With nearly 15 million
unemployed in the U.S.,
some store workers were
grateful for the holiday
pay or extra time off that
comes with working on a
holiday.
Bryce Humerick, 21, of
Towson, Md., a sales asso-
ciate at the Old Navy store
in Lutherville, said he was
happy to be making time-
and-a-half.
"I don't mind," he said.
"My Thanksgiving dinner
isn't until later."


GRADUATION: Dropout rate goes down


Continued From Page 1A

student to become a part
of," he said.
The district's dropout
rate decreased from 0.7
percent in the 2008 to 2009
school year to 0.6 percent
in the 2009 to 2010 school
year and is lower than the
state's 2 percent dropout
rate.
Millikin noted that the
district works to identify


struggling students when
they enter 9th grade so it
can aid them on their track
to graduation.
"Once someone falls
behind or drops out of
school, it is very difficult to
get them back on schedule
to graduate on time," he
said.
While the district
tends to focus heavily on


Florida's Comprehensive
Assessment Test, Millikin
said, its main priority is
outputting students that
graduate with a diploma,
marketable skills and the
foundation necessary to
continue on to careers or
higher education.
"Really what the school
district is about is the end
product," he said.


GUNFIRE: None injured in shooting


Continued From Page 1A
will conduct an internal
investigation. According to
agency protocols and pro-
cedures, Sands has been
placed on paid administra-
tive leave while the investi-


gation takes place.
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office is working
closely with the Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office in
the robbery investigation


and the events that fol-
lowed.


0,111,40111,
EI3 A
I *B *.. .~mfBI


HALLOWS 1 (PG-13) (1250) 410 730 1045
UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13)
(1210 235) 500 740 1025
MEGAMIND IN REALD 3D EVENT
PRICING (PG) (1200 220) 440 700 935
l[lmmzii a ,if jrf ,if i I.H , iEj[ a


SOUP: Group shares


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












OPINION


Friday, November 26, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Why it's a

day to be

thankful

Once a year, we
Americans set
aside a day
for the feast of
Thanksgiving. It's
worth remembering to whom
and for what we are thankful.
First and foremost, we owe a
debt beyond measure to those
who, in every generation since
America's founding, have put
their lives on the line to keep the
rest of us safe within our borders
and our homes. At this moment,
such men-and women are far
away, fighting an enemy whose
goal is to make us submit to
them, their laws and their author-
ity. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini,
leader of Iran's Islamist revolu-
tion, put it succinctly: "People
cannot be made obedient except
with the sword!"
We can argue about the best
strategy for defeating these
sworn enemies of America and
the West, of Christians, Jews,
Hindus, Buddhists and moderate
Muslims. But we should not still
be debating whether to attempt
to appease this enemy; whether
we can make ourselves inoffen-
sive to them; whether this con-
flict is our fault,-at least as much
as theirs.
Nor should we still be describ-
ing this conflict as "overseas
contingency operations" against
"violent extremists"- phrases
that cloud meaning and obscure
understanding. The simple truth:
Just as Nazism arose from within
Germany, and Communism from
within Russia, today radical and
bellicose ideologies, regimes,
movements and organizations
have arisen from within Iran,
Saudi Arabia and other Islamic
countries.
"It is not Bush's war, and it
is not Obama's war," Lt. Gen.
John E Kelly, a U.S. Marine who
fought in Iraq and lost a son in
Afghanistan, told the Semper
Fi Society. "It is our war and we
can't run away from it"
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libd Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


US falling behind in airline


security and traffic safety


More than six
years after
Congress
ordered pilots to
have their pho-
tos on their pilot certificates for
security reasons, the Federal
Aviation Administration has
finally begun the process of
issuing such a regulation.
The FAA issued a proposal
Nov. 19 to phase in a photo
requirement over the next
three to four years.
Pilots already must carry a
government ID with a photo,
but the current faceless certifi-
cate itself could be easily coun-
terfeited and used for nefari-
ous purposes by terrorists or
other evildoers.
Along with the photo,
Congress also mandated that
the certificates be made of
plastic and include a hologram.
The FAA's inaction
has drawn criticism from
Congress, with Rep. John
Mica, R-Fla., recently calling,
the agency guilty of "an incred-
ible level of incompetence."
For its part, the FAA says
there was no particular
urgency because of an array of
security protections already in
place.
The public has until Feb. 17
to weigh in on the proposed
FAA rule.
The government's speed in
processing security clearances
appears to have dramatically
increased, according to Senate
testimony last week.


LETTERS TO

Conservatives visit
state legislature
More than 100 people
representing at least 40 Tea
Parties, 9-12 Projects and
other conservative groups met
in the Senate Office Building
in Tallahassee on Tuesday,
Nov. 16 as the new Legislature
was being sworn in. The main .
purpose of the summit was to
allow legislators to meet the
organizers of our groups so
they will understand that the
Florida Tea Party Network is
here for the duration, engaged,
watching, and will be back in
Tallahassee often.
We were visited by at least
one-fourth of the Florida
Senate, including incom-
ing Senate President Mike
Haridopolos. Several represen-
tatives, including our newly
elected representative for
District 11, Elizabeth Porter,
also visited during the day.
The overwhelming theme
given by our legislators was
'that they want us to stay
involved, watch what they are
doing, give them the support
they need when they have
a difficult issue to vote on,
and give them input on what
we think are the pertinent
issues to deal with. Elizabeth


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffman@shns.com


After the 9/11 attacks, the
demand for clearances of
prospective personnel.mush-
roomed and the depth of the
attendant investigations grew.
That demand overwhelmed
the work force in charge of
conducting the probes.
As a result, astronomical
backlogs developed at one
point, estimates were that the
Department of Defense had
a backup of 500,000 and
the time to complete an initial
investigation for a top-secret
clearance took an average of
392 days.
An Office of Management
and Budget official before the
Senate Homeland Security
federal workforce subcommit-
tee a week ago Tuesday (Nov.
16) said that 90 percent of
clearance determinations are
completed in 53 days, which
is a 74 percent improvement
over the worst delays. Acting
OMB Director Jeffrey Zients
said the backlog is also gone.
. The U.S. has fallen far
behind Europe and Australia


THE EDITOR

Porter told us that her door
would always be open for us
to address issues with her.
Corey Baker, assistant to Sen.
Haridopolus, spoke to us for a
few minutes on the issues fac-
ing the Legislature when they
go into session in March. They
are facing a $2.5 billion deficit.
Florida's budget is currently
$70 billion, with $30 billion of
that being Medicaid and other
welfare programs. We current-
ly have three million people on
Medicaid; once the new health-
care bill gets implemented,
this number will increase to
five million. He told us that he
wants to be a liaison to keep
us informed on what is hap-
pening in Tallahassee.
Discussions were held
throughout the day on the
pertinent issues: SB550,
the Mandatory Septic Tank
Inspection Law; Stopping the
Sun Rail/High Speed Rail
Project;.the Florida Real ID
Law; and the EPA Numeric
Nutrient Content Law. Henry
Kelley informed us that the
EPA had delayed implementing
this law for 15 months. Also,
while we were there, the Florida
Legislature voted to delay imple-
mentation of SB550 (Mandatory
Septic Tank Inspection) until
July, 2011. There is talk of


in reducing traffic fatalities
and injuries, according to a
new report by the National
Research Council.
A committee of U.S. safety
experts compared traffic safe-
ty in high-income countries
around the world and found
substantial drops in fatal
road accidents between 1995
and 2009. In that time, for
instance, France's fatalities
fell 52 percent; the United
Kingdom's toll dropped 38
percent; Australia's fell 25
percent. In the U.S., fatalities
went down just 19 percent.
The researchers attributed
the gap to stricter standards
in road design and traffic
management, and tougher
enforcement df laws on
speeding, helmet, seat-belt,
and alcohol and drug use.
Frequent roadway sobri-
ety checks and automatic
speed-limit enforcement by
speed cameras or detectors
are far more common in the
countries with large fatality
drops, the study found. If the
standards were applied in the
U.S., they could save as many
as 5,000 traffic deaths a year,
the researchers estimated.
In all, there were 33,808
U.S. roadway fatalities in
2009.
* E-mail Lisa Hoffman at hoff-
manl@shns.com.


repealing this law when they go
into regular session in March.
Each group had the opportu-
nity to tell about the things they
are doing in their local area to
get information out to the public
in an effort to get more people
involved. We adjourned at 5 p.m.
with renewed energy for the
challenges that still face us. We
encourage everyone to become
more involved, find a local group
that you can join forces with, and
make an effort to inform your
family and friends of the issues
that will affect them and other
Floridians.
Sharon Higgins
Lake City

Thanks for helping
with senior luncheon
Minister Luvisa Walker of
Refuge Restoration Ministries
Inc. would like to thank all
those who contributed toward
the Thanksgiving luncheon
for the senior citizens of
Lake City Wednesday, Nov.
17. The Women's Club on
Martin Luther King, and spe-
cial thanks (goes) to Christ
Central Ministry and all the
volunteers who helped serve.
Minister Luvisa Walker
Lake City


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com

So what

happened

to the turkey

that ran away?

As a child, my wife,.'
Priscilla, learned a'
little ditty that she:
now sings every
Thanksgiving. Day..
It is called: "A Turkey Ran
Away." It is not clear whether
she sings this for tradition's
sake or as an encouragement
to me.
When I heard this song for:,
the first time as a newcomer to .
these shores, I assumed that
everybody in America grew up
singing "A Turkey Ran Away"
in elementary school. To my
astonishment, I discovered
that none of my colleagues at
work had ever heard of it
That's a real shame, because
the lyrics have a pleasing
newspaper-like brevity to
them:

"A turkey ran away
Upon Thanksgiving Day
He said, They'll make a roast
of me
If I decide to stay.'"

Well, if you can't trust some-
one named Priscilla to be an
authority on Thanksgiving,
who can you depend on?
After all, hers is an antique
name in fact, a woman
named Priscilla sailed on the
Mayflower. However, I doubt
she was related otherwise
we would have heard of a
Pilgrim lady organizing tennis
games on the deck.
Perhaps my Priscilla knows
"A Turkey Ran Away" because
it is a regional ditty, sung by '
children only in the turkey-cen-
tric parts of the country, such
as where my wife grew up out-
side New York City.
It's certainly a pity that "A
Turkey Ran Away" isn't better
known, because Thanksgiving-
has only a few songs while
Christmas has a stocking's
full. Maybe some could be bor-
rowed and updated: "Deck the,
halls with plates of drumsticks,
tra-la-la and stuffing." On
second thought, it is probably
better to popularize "A Turkey
Ran Away."
My wife's turkey song, after
all, is a little anthem of hope.
The turkey ran away! He beat
the system! The industrial-
agricultural machine couldn't
stuff him! Surely anybody with
a sporting instinct can appreci-
ate this.
I realize that most of you
have only just now been intro-'
duced to the turkey that ran
away, but I have always won-
dered how the turkey did after
that The song offers no clue.
To honor the holiday, I offer.
some possible scenarios:
The turkey went to the
airport, where he was made
to do the pat-down shuffle.
Although he said "gobble, gob-
ble," this was the most polite
thing anybody had said to the
TSA agents all day, so they let
him through without touch-
ing his junk. Then he took a .
flight to Florida, where he was
assumed to be just another old
guy with a waddle.
The turkey was elected to
Congress. Of course he was.
The turkey, being obese,
camped in a fast-food restau-
rant, where he blended into
the crowd.
The turkey was invited
to be a guest on the Glenn
Beck show. Nobody noticed
anything out of the ordinary.
However, the chalkboard gave
the turkey allergies.
Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


4A


LE A RA 10NS











Page Editor: Ci. Risak, 754-0427LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Matching Funds Drive
The Christian Service
Center is having its
Matching Funds Drive
until Dec. 31. All dona-
tions will be doubled by
local sponsors. Mark your
check "Matching Funds"
and mail to Christian
Service Center, PO Box
2285 Lake City, FL, 32056.
Call 755-1770.

Saturday
Holiday happenings
The kickoff to the
Christmas season begins at
5 p.m. Saturday in Olustee
Park. Activities begin with
holiday music featuring The


Gateway City Big Band and
Harry Wuest as conduc-
tor. The lighting of Olustee
Park is at 6:30 p.m. followed
by the arrival of Santa
Claus. Photos with Santa
are 7-9 p.m.

Blood drive
A blood drive will
be from 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Saturday at Ole Times
Country Buffet. Free buf-
fet to the first 15 donors
and a free Gators or
Seminoles shirt.

Sunday
Food for Fines
The annual Food for
Fines program is Nov.
28-Dec. 4 at the Columbia
County Public Library.
Each single sealed, non-'
expired, non-perishable
item brought to the library
will reduce a fine by $1. AILt
items collected at the Main
and West Branch will be
delivered to the Christian
Service Center in Lake
City for local distribution.
Items collected at the Fort
White Branch Library will
be distributed at the Fort
White food shelf.


Monday
Blood drive
A blood drive is set for
12 p.m.-6 p.m. Monday at
Pizza Boy. Free 14" cheese
pizza for every donor.
Receive a free Gators or
Seminoles shirt.

YEP committee meeting
There is a YEP
Committee Meeting at
noon Monday at Gondolier
Italian Restaurant &
Pizza. Call the Lake
City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce to
RSVP at 386-752-3690

Wednesday
Public meeting
Elder Options is having
a public meeting at 10 a.m.
Wednesday in the Florida
Farm Bureau Building.
The Board of Directors
will be reviewing applica-
tions for organizational
grants, as well as hearing
appeals from those attend-
ing. The building is locat-
ed at 5700 SW 34th Street,
Suite 222, Gainesville.
Contact Cindy Roberts at
352-378-6649.


Wednesday Friendship
Luncheon
The December
Friendship Luncheon of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11:30 a.m.
Dec. 1 at Costa Del Sol,
located at 2260 W U.S.
Highway 90. There will
be a $10 gift exchange for
those who wish to partici-
pate. All members, friends
and guests are welcome.
Contact 719-5564 or 754-
7227. *

Thursday
Christmas concert
Richardson Middle
School Wolf Pride Band
is having its annual
Christmas concert 6:30
p.m. Thursday in the
Columbia High School
auditorium. The RMS Jazz
Band, Symphonic Band,
and Beginners Band and
Drumline will play songs
of the season under the
direction of Sherrod Keen.

Friday, Dec. 3

Candlelight tour
The Lake City Garden
Club is hosting the


Castagna Christmas
House Candlelight Tour
6:30- 9:30 p.m. Dec. 3.
The house is located at
521 NW Old Mill Road.
Admission is $10. Tickets
are available at Brown-
Vann Carpet One, Lake
City Florist, Your Hearts
Desire or at the residence
the evening of the tour.
Save your ticket and come
out 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Dec.
4 when select Christmas
d6cor will be sold.

HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater
opening of its Radio-on-
Stage dramatic adaptation
of Charles Dickens' "A
Christmas Carol" opens
Dec. 3. The show runs
weekends through Dec.
19. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya
and at highspringscommu-
nitytheater.com. Four local
residents are involved in
the production.

Saturday, Dec. 4
Dream Machine Toy
Ride
The 9th Annual
Christmas Dream


Machine Toy Ride is Dec.
4. Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. and the toy
ride pulls out at 12 p.m.
from the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. There will be
raffles and live bands, and
all proceeds will go to ben-
efit The Christmas Dream
Machine. Contact Cookie
at 386-3.62-6529 or Polly at
386-758-9811.

Sunday, Dec. 5

Blood drive
Hungry Howie's Blood
Drive is scheduled from
noon-6 p.m. Dec. 5 at
Hungry Howie's, 857 SW
Main Boulevard. Each
donor will receive a free
small one-topping pizza or
small sub. Call 386438-3415.

Tuesday, Dec. 7

Nat King Cole
Christmas performance.
Allan Harris sings a
Nat King Cole Christmas
7 p.m. Dec. 7 in the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Tickets go on sale Nov. 29.
Call 386-754-4340 or e-mail
mark.kirby@fgc.edu.


OBITUARIES


Dorothy Lucille Williams

Mrs. Dorothy Lucille Williams,
90, of Lake City died early
Monday morning, November
22, 2010 in the Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley 'follow-
ing an extended illness. A native
of Live Oak, Florida Mrs. Wil-
liams had been a resident of Lake
City since 1955 having moved
here from Perry Florida Mrs.
Williams was a homemaker and
was of the Baptist faith. In her
spare time, Mrs. Williams en-
joyed tending to her flowers. She
was preceded in death by her
husband, Walter Clayton "W.C."
Williams, a daughter, Dorothy
Beasley and a son, Ray Williams.
Mrs. Williams is survived by
her sons, Billy Williams (Patri-
cia); Lamar Williams (Kathy);
J.C. "James" Williams all of
Lake City; a daughter, Martha
Jane Williams of Lake City; two
brothers, Lorenzo Clemmons of
Polk City, Florida; and William
"Bud" Clemmons of Gasport,
New York; and three sisters, Lela
Mae Bronson of Clermont, Flor-
ida; Margaret Aheran and Kath-
leen Mullis both of Cochran,
Georgia. Fifteen grandchildren
and numerous great and great-
great grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mrs. Williams will be conducted
at 1:00 P.M. on Saturday, No-
vember 27, 2010 in the Live
Oak Cemetery in Live Oak,
Florida with Rev. Leo Bronson
officiating. Interment will im-
mediately follow. The family
will receive friends from 10:00
A.M until Noon on Saturday
in the Chapel of the Dees-Par-
rish Family Funeral Home. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave. Lake
City FL 32025 (386)752-
1234 Please sign the on-line
family, guestbook at par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Jack Richard Hood

Mr. Jack Richard Hood, 85, of


Lake City, died peacefully early
Wednesday morning, Novem-
ber 24, 2010 at his residence
surrounded by his family. Mr.
Hood had been a resident of
Lake City since 1968 having
moved here from Ashland,
Kentucky. He was the son of
the late Jason and Margaret Ison
Hood and joined what was then
the Army Air Force at the age
of eighteen. Mr. Hood served
honorably as a tail gunner on a
B-17G "Flying Fortress" with
the 34th Bomber Group of the
8th Army Air Force and par-
ticipated in thirty five bombing
attacks on enemy installations in
occupied Germany. Following
that successful tour of duty and
the American Victory in W.W.
II Mr. Hood re-enlisted into the
newly formed United States Air
Force and served for a total of
twenty years including being
stationed in Japan during the
Korean conflict. After retiring
he worked for a short time with
the U.S. Postal Service and then
began another twenty year ca-
reer as a microwave technician
and communications specialist
with AT&T. Following his re-
tirement from AT&T Mr. Hood
served as a volunteer for the
Civil Air Patrol and as a Crime
Scene Tech in the Investiga-
tions Unit of the C.C.S.O. under
Sheriff Tom Trammell's admin-
istration. In his spare time, Mr.
Hood enjoyed his model trains,
billiards, was an avid bowler
and was a technological wizard.
Mr. Hood was a member of



SHangOn
a minute_,

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup ; il Ir , i',l
hi lies Last


the Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church. He was preceded in
death by his first wife, Hettie
Simmons Hood and a son, Jack
Richard Hood, Jr.
Mr. Hood is survived by his
wife of fourteen years, Raelene
"Bonnie" Hood; three daugh-
ters, Margo Haworth (Pres-
ton) of Sanford, Florida; Patty
Middleton (Scott) of Lake City,
Florida and Tammie Horrell
(Sean) of Niceville, Florida; his
two half brothers, Eldon Thomp-
son and Warren Hood both of
Ashland, Kentucky; his nine
grandchildren, Chris Umstead,
Caleb Umstead, Jay Middleton,
Brian Haworth, Jason Haworth,
Adam Haworth, Patrick Horrell,
Keenan Horrell and Sara Horrell
and his six great grandchildren,
Ethan Umstead, Trace Umstead,
Evan Umstead, Kye Umstead, Eli
Umstead and Miley Middleton.
Funeral services for Mr. Hood
will be conducted at 4:00 P.M.
on Friday, November 26, 2010
in the chapel of the Dees-Par-
rish Family Funeral Home with
Reverend Bruce Alkire offici-
ating. The family will receive
friends for one hour prior to
the service in the chapel. Inter-
ment services will be private.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. MarionAvenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com


Janet Michelle Mincey

Ms. Janet Michelle Mincey,
age 33 resident of Lake City,
departed this life Monday,
Nov. 22, 2010, in Jackson-
ville, Fla. Born in Gainesville,
Fla., she was the daughter of
Mr. Johnnie and Mrs. An-
nie Hostick. She attended the
public schools of Columbia
County and was a member of
the Columbia High School
Class of 1996. She leaves to
mourn hr passing her parents,
Johnnie and Annie Hostick;
six devoted sisters, Sharon L.
Robinson (Johnnie), Treesa
Williams (David), Virginia
Jenkins (C.J.), Valecia Hatchet
(Alex), Racine Thomas (Jack)
and Dorothy Wiley (Sam);
brothers Johnnie L. Hostick
II (deceased), Johnny L. Ho-
stick, Jr. (Lashonda), James
Taylor (Valerie), Joe Taylor;
a host of nieces, nephews,
aunts, uncles, cousins, other
relatives and friends also sur-
vive. Funeral services for Ja-
net Michelle Mincey will be at
1 p.m.m Saturday, Nov. 27 at
the Columbia County School
Board Auditorium, 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Fla.,
with Elder Willie J. Lucus of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
in Garden of Rest Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
Friday, Nov. 26 at COOPER
FUNERAL HOME CHAPEL
from 7 until 8 p.m. Arrange-
ments entrusted to COOPER


FUNERAL HOME, 251 N.E.
Washington Street, Lake City,
Fla. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010


Storms, not airport security, slow holiday travel


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Truckers pull over at a chain up station along Interstate 70 east of Copper Mountain,
Colo. Adverse weather conditions put the chain law into affect over the mountain passes
including Vail Pass and at the Eisenhower Tunnel on Wednesday.


By JAMES MacPHERSON
Associated Press
BISMARCK, N.D. A
planned boycott of airport
security scanners was a
bust, but holiday travelers
in the western U.S. had to
contend with a chaotic mix
of snow, sleet and ice.
The powerful storm
system closed roads
and delayed flights from
Anchorage to Salt Lake
City, and promised to bring
messy wintery weather
to much of the Dakotas
on Thanksgiving Day.
Freezing rain glazed roads
across the Midwest, and at
least three traffic deaths in
Iowa were blamed on the
weather.
But the cascading delays
and monumental lines that
many feared would result at
airports from the so-called
National Opt-Out Day didn't
materialize Wednesday, one
of the busiest travel days of
the year.
The loosely organized


1


Internet campaign encour-
aged travelers to protest
new security screening by
boycotting body scanners
that can see through peo-
ple's clothing and insisting
on the more time consum-
ing pat-downs. But few pas-
sengers seemed to heed
the call.
"It was a day at the
beach, a box of choco-
lates," Greg Hancock, 61,
said after going through a
body scanner Wednesday
at the Phoenix airport. He
was sent through the scan-
ner after a golf ball marker
set off the metal detector.
His wife, Marti Hancock,
58, said that ever since she
was in the air on Sept. 11,
2001, and feared there was
a bomb on her plane, she
has been fully supportive
of stringent security: "If
that's what you have to do
to keep us safe, that's what
you have to do."
Some protesters showed
up, including one man
seen walking around the


BRIEFS


3 teens rescued after 50 days adrift
WELLINGTON, New Zealand Three teens who
have been missing in the South Pacific for 50 days and
were already eulogized in a memorial service have
been found alive by a New Zealand fishing boat.
The boys two 15-year-olds and a 14-year-old dis-
appeared while attempting to row between two islands
in the New Zealand territory of Tokelau in early October
and were given up for dead after an extensive search
involving New Zealand's air force.
Their craft had drifted 800 miles to a desolate part of
the Pacific northeast of Fiji, when the crew of a tuna boat
saw them frantically waving for help on Wednesday after-
noon.
"All they could say was 'thank you very much for stop-
ping,"' Tai Fredricsen, first mate of the San Nikuna, said.
The boys, Samuel Pelesa and Filo Filo, both 15, and
Edward Nasau, 14, will be taken to a hospital in the Fiji
capital of Suva on Friday.
The rescue came not a moment too soon: Fredricsen
said they had begun to drink sea water because it hadn't
rained in the past few nights.
.He said that the boys survived by catching fish and
eating a seagull that had landed on their boat.

Obama: Help make tomorrow better
WASHINGTON Saying America has a history of
doing what it takes to make a better tomorrow, President
Barack Obama is calling on a country climbing out of its
worst economic slump in decades to summon that spirit
again this holiday season.
'This is not the hardest Thanksgiving America
has ever faced. But as long as many members of our
American family are hurting, we've got to look out
for one another," Obama said in his weekly radio and
Internet address, released for Thanksgiving.
"As long as many of our sons and daughters and hus-
bands and wives are at war, we've got to support their
mission and honor their service," Obama added. "And as
long as many of our friends and neighbors are looking
for work, we've got to do everything we can to accelerate
this recovery and keep our economy moving forward."

South Korea's defense chief resigns
YEONPYEONG ISLAND, South Korea South
Korea's president ordered more troops to a front-line
island and dumped his defense minister Thursday as the
country grappled with lapses in its response to a deadly
North Korean artillery strike.
In scenes reminiscent of the Korean War 60 years ago,
dazed residents of Yeonpyeong island foraged through
blackened rubble for pieces of their lives and lugged
their possessions down eerily deserted streets strewn
with bent metal after Tuesday's hail of artillery. The
barrage darkened skies, set off fierce blazes, killed four
South Koreans and raised fears of an escalation that
could lead to full-scale war.
* Associated Press


.1 -


llJUST [iliE N-
EX iliTE hNE
WNORJS SI
M A~i IT i


don't Wait until

I's Too Late!
CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!

755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm



^^


8th


Annual


NORTH HOME
FhORIDA IOW



&PATIO SHOW


tI .iI


., .-i u ',F, ._ -,.
.. C ,. r ^ ,- : ,,.


Call now to take advantage of this once-a-year
opportunity to showcase your business and

meet thousands of potential clients!


Call TODAY to reserve

your booth (386) 344-7592



FREE TO THE PUBLIC

Where local people can connect with

local businesses to improve their homes.


Columbia County Fairgrounds


2 BIG DAYS!
Saturday, March 5th Sunday, March 6th


9 a.m. 5 p.m.


10 a.m. 4 p.m.


Co-Sponsored by:

Lake City Reporter LNS TATE
lakecityreporter.com CURRFNTS m.iigazin .... ,'- .'. '.
i ti. rotarycluboflakecity.comi


Salt Lake City airport in a
skimpy, Speedo-style bath-
ing suit. At other airports,
they carried signs denounc-
ing the Transportation
Security Administration's
screening methods as
unnecessarily intrusive and
embarrassing.
By most accounts,
though, the lines moved
smoothly, and there was no
more or less congestion at
major U.S. airports than in
previous years on the day
before Thanksgiving.
"I would go so far as to
say that National Opt-Out
Day was a big bust," said
Genevieve Shaw Brown, a
spokeswoman for the travel
company Travelocity.
Some travelers who opted
for the ground said they did
so in part because of antici-
pated headaches at airports,
but they were delayed any-
way by the weather. Early-
season snowstorms buried
Seattle, and shut down high-
ways for a time in Idaho,
Wyoming and Utah.


1 LII I~CIIIIPI~


~---r~--1111 I c-


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirb@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, November 26, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


THE SPORTS FAN


Brady's 4 TDs lift Patriots

to 45-24 win over Lions


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirbaky@oecityreportercom

Playoffs

second

round

are today
The second
round of the
state football
playoffs are
today and there
is no more impressive
bracket than the Class 2B
north.
The north regional finals
feature Bolles at Trinity
Catholic and Pensacola
Catholic at Taylor County.
All four teams are 11-
0, though Catholic is
technically 7-4 after having
to forfeit games because of
an ineligible player.
District 4-4A playoff
representatives Ed White
and Ridgeview were both
shut out in the first round.
The Commanders (8-3)
lost to Wakulla, while
the Panthers (4-7) fell at
Lincoln.
Of the head coaches
with ties to Columbia High,
two took teams to the
playoffs.
Danny Green's. Orange
Park team won District
1-6A and Frank Beasley's
Dunnellon team won
District 6-3A.
Orange Park (7-4)
rebounded from a 1-3
start and won a 29-28
squeaker over Mainland in
the opening round of the
playoffs. The Raiders host
DeLand in today's regional
semifinals.
Dunnellon was 9-1,
but ran into a Vanguard
buzzsaw in round one and
lost 28-0. Vanguard travels
to North Marion today in a
5-3A rematch.
After several seasons
at East Gadsden, Scott
Anderson surfaced at
Escambia and led the
Gators to a 5-5 record.
Bobby Johns moved from
Baker County to Milton
and the Panthers went 1-9.
Johns welcomed Fort
White to Milton, where the
Indians spent the night on
their trip to Pensacola.
Fort White had a
run-through at the school
and the team's quarterback
club fixed a meal for the
Indians.

Volleyball wrapped
up with Berkeley Prep
(Tampa) winning state
in Class 3A over North
Broward Prep (Coconut
Creek), 3-1, and East Lake
(Tarpon Springs) winning
in Class 5A over Martin
County (Stuart), 3-0.
District 5-3A champion
Santa Fe advance past.
the first round with a 3-1
win over Crystal River,
then lost in straight sets
to Trinity Catholic, which
beat Fort White in the first
round.
District 4-5A champion
Buchholz and runner-up
Gainesville were both
eliminated by Leon.
Buchholz beat Lincoln in
the first round.
Other state champions
were Plant (6A), Cardinal
Gibbons (4A), First
Academy (2A) and Warner
Christian (1A).

U Tim Kirby is sports editor
the Lake City Reporter.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) signals
a timeout in the second quarter of an NFL football game
with the Detroit Lions, Thursday, in Detroit. New England
won 45-24.


Second-half
performance
dooms Detroit.
By LARRY LAGE
Associated Press
DETROIT Tom
Brady's perfect game was
much too much for the
Detroit Lions.
Brady threw a season-
high four touchdown
passes, all in the second
half, and the New England
Patriots routed Detroit 45-
24 on Thursday.
He was 21 of 27 for 341
yards -just short of season
high with no intercep-
tions, giving him a perfect
quarterback rating of 158.3.
Brady became the first to
have a perfect passer rating


this season with a minimum
of five attempts, according
to STATS, LLC.
It was Brady's second
perfect QB rating. His first
was Oct. 21, 2007, when he
threw a career-high six TDs
in a win over the Miami
Dolphins.
Brady threw a go-ahead
touchdown to Deion Branch
early in the fourth quarter
after connecting with him
on a 79-yard pass to tie the.
game at 24-all. Wes Welker's
second TD reception sealed
the victory with 6:42 left,
putting the Patriots ahead
38-24.
The Patriots (9-2) moved
a half-game ahead of the
AFC East rival New York
Jets for the NFL's best
record after trailing by 11
points late in the first half.


Detroit (2-9) ended up
not being.more competitive
than it had been in its pre-
vious six showcase games
- losing those by an aver-
age of 23.2 points.
Benjarvus Green-Ellis
ran for two TDs, the second
capping the scoring with
3:14 left that led to sev-
eral pushing and shoving
matches with the frustrated
Lions.
Shaun Hill was 26 of 46
for 285 yards with one TD
- a score to Calvin Johnson
at the end of the first quar-
ter that put the Lions up
7-3 and two interceptions
to rookie cornerback Devin
McCourty.
Maurice Morris ran for
two TDs, matching his
PATRIOTS continued on 2B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's boys basketball team is (front row, from left) Cornelius Montgomery (manager), Javonta6 Foster, Ricky McCormick, Anthony Harden,
Monte Tisdale, Nigel Atkinson, Tyrone Dye, Markem Gaskins and Ramon Perry (manager). Back row (from left) are coach Horace Jefferson, assistant
coach Gary Brown, Marcus Amerson, Shaq Johnson, Laremy Tunsil, David Morse, Taylor Viens, Morris Marshall, assistant coach Varian Coppock and
assistant coach Joey O'Neal.


Jefferson sees big things ahead


Tigers drop
opening game
71-45 to GHS.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Despite a 71-45 loss in.
his first game as Columbia
High's boys basketball
coach, Horace Jefferson
believes that the Tigers will
contend this season.
The coach wasn't down


on his team after Gainesville
hit six 3-point shots in the
first quarter during the
Hurricanes' 26-point win.
"It may sound kind of
crazy, but it wasn't an
ugly 26-point difference,"
Jefferson said. "We have
work to do, but we're going
to be alright down the
road."
Columbia was led by
Morris Marshall, who was
the only Tiger in double-
digits with his 10 point out-


ing.
Marcus Amerson had
a solid night with eight
points and a trio of Tigers
scored seven points includ-
ing Javonta6 Foster, David
Morse and Nigel Atkinson.
Gainesville was led by
Matt Jackson, who dropped
in 21 points.
"We had quality play out
of our guards, but we have
to find a way to get Laremy
(Tunsil) the ball inside,"
Jefferson said. "Once we


teach them how to make
low-post entries, it will
change the dynamic of this
team. We're not a perim-
eter-scoring team, and we
didn't find a way to get easy
baskets."
Of course,. Jefferson
was also impressed with
Gainesville's ability to
shoot the 3-point shot, as
the Hurricanes dropped in
10 for the game.
"They surprised me with
their shooting ability," he


said. "I knew they were
quick, but they also 'shot
the ball well. I'm not going
to say that we played that
bad, but we need to get
better. They just played
extremely well."
The Tigers will have
more than a week between
games as the Tigers don't
play again until Dec 2.
Columbia will be on the
road against rival Suwannee
High at 7:30 p.m. trying to
rebound.


Florida, FSU seek

more than just

bragging rights


UF looks to keep
series winning
streak alive.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE There
are no national champion-
ship implications. There
are no Heisman Trophy
candidates. There are no
fired or soon-to-be-retired
coaches on either sideline.
Without question, the
Florida-Florida State series-
has less intrigue and fewer
story lines than it's had in
recent years.
The four-loss Gators
don't have Tim Tebow
and are far removed from
championship contention.
The three-loss Seminoles
are still in the Atlantic
Coast Conference title
hunt, but have no control
over their fate. So what
does Saturday's game in


Tallahassee mean?
Almost everything.
The Gators (7-4) have
a chance to extend their
winning streak to seven in
the storied rivalry, tighten
their stranglehold on the
Sunshine State and maybe
even get to a New Year's
Day bowl. The No. 22
Seminoles (8-3) can stop
the losing skid, get several
seniors their first victory
over Florida and give first-
year coach Jimbo Fisher a
signature win that would
go a long way toward get-
ting the once-proud pro-
gram back to national
prominence.
"It's another step, it's
another challenge, it's
another thing we have to
accomplish, it's another
thing that we have to get
ready to understand how
to do," Fisher said.
It might be time, too.
RIVALRY continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 30, file photo, Florida kicker Chas Henry (17) celebrates with teammates after
kicking the game-winning field goal in overtime of an NCAA college football game against
Georgia in Jacksonville.


- I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
II a.m.
ESPN2 Louisville at Rutgers
Noon
ABC -WestVirginia at Pittsburgh
2:30 p.m.
CBS Auburn at Alabama
3:30 p.m.
ABC Colorado at Nebraska
FSN UCLA at Arizona St.
7 p.m.
ESPN -Arizona at Oregon
10:15 p.m.
ESPN Boise St. at Nevada
GOLF
3 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
World Championship, third round, at
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Old Spice Classic, semifinal,
teams TBD, at Orlando, Fla.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN 76 Classic, second round,
teams TBD, at Anaheim, Calif.
ESPN2 Preseason NIT, third place
game, at NewYork
5 p.m.
ESPN Preseason NIT, champion-
ship game, teams TBD, at NewYork
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic, semifinal,
teams TBD, at Orlando. Fla.
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Houston at Charlotte
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Golden State at Memphis
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Noon
VERSUS Playoffs, championship
game, teams TBD, at Omaha, Neb.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA


New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


9 2
8 2
5 5
2 8
South


0.818 334 266
0.800 238 177
0.500 172 208
0.200 213 276


W L TPct PF PA
Indianapolis 6 4 0.600268 216
Jacksonville 6 4 0.600 220 270
Tennessee 5 5 0.500257 198
Houston 4 6 0.400 244 287
North


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


W L
7 3
7 3
3 7
2 8
West
W L
6 4
5 5
5 5
3 7


TPct PF PA
0.700233 178
0.700235 165
0.300 192 206
0.200215 262

T Pct PF PA
0.600243 207
0.500 238 223
0.500274 21'1
0.300 217 287


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas


Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona
San Francisco


East
W L
7 3
6 4
5 5
3 7
South
W L
8 2
7 3
7 3
1 9
North
W L
7 3
7 3
3 7
2 9
West
W L
5 5
4 6
3 7
3 7


T Pct PF PA
0.700 284 226
0.600 253 220
0.500 202 245
0.300229 271

TPct PF PA
0.800256 192
0.700235 170
0.700 209 206
0.100 I117 252

T Pct PF PA
0.700 191 146
0.700252 146
0.300 172 226
0.182 258 282

T Pct PF PA
0.500 185 233
0.400177 198
0.300 188 292
0.300 160 219


Today's Games
New England 45, Detroit 24
New Orleans 30, Dallas 27
Cincinnati at N.Y.Jets (n)


Sunday's Games
Green Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Minnesota atWashington, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, I p.m.
Carolina at Cleveland, I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
St Louis at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 29
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Today
No. I Oregon vs. No. 20 Arizona,
7 p.m.
No.2Aubum at No.9Alabama, 230 p.m.
No. 3 Boise State at No. 19 Nevada,
10:15 p.m.
No. 16 Nebraska vs. Colorado, 3:30 p.m.
Saturday
No.4TCU at New Mexico, 4 p.m.
No. 5 Wisconsin vs. Northwestern,
3:30 p.m.
No. 6 LSU at No. 12 Arkansas, 3:30
p.m.
No. 7 Stanford vs. Oregon State, 7:30
p.m.
No. 8 Ohio State vs. Michigan, Noon.
No. 10 Oklahoma State vs. No. 14
Oklahoma, 8 p.m.
No. I I Michigan State at Penn State,
Noon.
No. 13 Virginia Tech vs.Virginia, Noon.
No. IS5 Missouri vs. Kansas, Saturday.
No. 18 South Carolina at Clemson,
7 p.m.
No. 21 North Carolina State at
Maryland, 3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Florida State vs. Florida, 3:30
p.m.
No. 23 Utah vs. BYU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 24 Iowa at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 M ssippi State at Mississippi,
7 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGA EUROPEAN TOUR/
ASIAN TOUR
Dubal World Championship
Site: Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Jumeirah Golf Estates, Earth
Course (7,675 yards, par 72).
Purse: $7.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.25 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 3-8 a.m., 10 a.m:-6 p.m., 6:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
LPGATOUR
Next event LPGATour Championship,
Dec. 2-5, Grand Cypress Golf Club,
Orlando.
Online: httpJ/www.lpga.com

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston II 4 .733 -
NewYork 8 8 .500 3h
Toronto 6 9 .400 5
New Jersey 5 10 .333 6
Philadelphia 3 12 .200 8
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando 10 4 .714 -
Atlanta 8 7 .533 2'h
Miami 8 7 .533 2%'
Washington 5 8 .385 4k
Charlotte 5 10 .333 5%'
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 8 5 .615 -
Indiana 7 6 .538 I
Cleveland 6 8 .429 2%'
Milwaukee 5 9 .357 3h
Detroit 5 10 .333 4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 13 I .929 -
New Orleans II 3 .786 2
Dallas 10 4 .714 3


Memphis 6 9 .400 7h
Houston 4 10 .286 9
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Utah 11 5 .688 -
Oklahoma City 10 5 .667 '/
Denver 8 6 .571 2
Portland 8 6 .571 2
Minnesota 4 12 .250 7
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 13 2 .867 -
Golden State 7 8 .467 6
Phoenix 7 8 .467 6
Sacramento 4 9 .308 8
L.A. Clippers 2 13 .133 II

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
New York 99, Charlotte 95
Cleveland 83, Milwaukee 81
Toronto 106, Philadelphia 90
Boston 89, New Jersey 83
Orlando 104, Miami 95
Memphis 105, Detroit 84
San Antonio 113, Minnesota 109,.OT
Dallas I1l, Oklahoma City 103
Houston I 1, Golden State 101
Chicago 123,Phoenix 115,20T
Utah 105, New Orleans 87
Thursday's Games
Washington at Atlanta (n)
Sacramento at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Houston at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Denver, 9 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Portland, 10 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
Carolina at Boston, 12 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Calgary at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Nashville at Minnesota, 2 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Adtlanta, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m.

TENNIS

Barclays ATP World
Tour Finals Results

Singles
Group B
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def.
Robin Soderling (4). Sweden, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Andy Murray (5), Britain, beat David
Ferrer (7), Spain, 6-2, 6-2.
Standings: x-Federer 3-0 (sets 6-0),
x-Murray 2-1 (4-2), Soderling 1-2 (2-4),
Ferrer 0-3 (0-6).
Group A
Standings: Rafael Nadal 2-0 (4-1),
Tomas Berdych I -1 (2-2), Novak Djokovic
I-I (2-2),Andy Roddick 0-2 (I-4).

Doubles
Group A
Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United
States, def. Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic,
and Leander Paes (3), India, 6-3, 6-4.
Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin
Matkowski (6), Poland, def.Jurgen Melzer,
Austria, and Philipp Petzschner (8),
Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (7).
Standings: x-Fyrstenberg-Matkowski
3-0 (6-1), x-Bryarf-Bryan 2-1 (5-2),
Melzer-Petzschner 1-2 (2-5), Dlouhy-
Paes 0-3 (I-6).
Group B
Standings: Daniel Nestor-Nenad
Zimonjic 2-0 (4-0), Mahesh Bhupathi-
Max Mirnyi 1-1 (2-2), Wesley Moodie-
Dick Norman 1-1 (2-2), Lukas Kubot-
Oliver Marach 0-2 (0-4).


PATRIOTS: Smith costs Lions game


Continued From Page 1B

total in two seasons in
Detroit Morris' first score
put Detroit ahead 14-3
with 5:58 left in the first
half.
Green-Ellis' 15-yard TD
pulled the Patriots within
four with 45 seconds left
in the second quarter,
then they allowed Detroit
to drive for a lead-padding
field goal to end the first
half.
The Lions looked like
they finally might put
together a good showing
on Thanksgiving day, forc-
ing New England to punt
on its first drive of the sec-'
ond half.
But Detroit began to fall
apartwhen Hill underthrew
Johnson on the ensuing
possession and McCourty
picked off the pass and
returned it 23 yards to set
up Brady's game-tying pass
to Welker.
Morris put the Lions
ahead again midway
through the third quar-
ter, but the lead didn't last
long.
Brady found Branch,
who was wide open, and he


ran circles around Alphonso
Smith on a 79-yard score
that was his longest
pass of the year 22 seconds
later.
Branch beat Smith on his



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I DRAIP I


next TD with 13:45 left in
the first half, sending the
cornerback to the bench
in a move that was made
much too late to help the
Lions.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


k A I I FOR 5OME, AN
UNPOPULAR WAY
ROBRAW OF MAKING MONEY.
--Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: L I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: WHINE BONES EXCITE KINGLY
Answer: When she bought another pillbox hat, her
husband said it was "SICKENING"


SCOREBOARD


ACROSS


1 Brainstorms
6 Twinkle
11 Baker's dozen
13 Godfather por-
trayer
14 Claim
15 Broken in, as a
horse
16 -tzu ("Tao"
author)
17 Hindu mantras
18 Slalom run
21 Morning show
23 Lipstick color
26 Shellac resin
27 Hoople exple-
tive
28 Glittery fabric
29 Plumber's
friend
31 Kind of duty
32 Cul-de-sac
33 Bliss, to a
Buddhist
35 Convinced
36 "Fancy" singer
37 Thicken


GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
soccer at Ed White High,
girls-5:30 p.m., boys-
7:20 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs.. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Tuesday
M Fort White High girls
soccer at Oak Hall School,
6 p.m.
. Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 1
Fort White High JV
girls soccer vs. Columbia
High, 5 p.m.
Dec. 2
Fort White High
girls soccer at Williston,
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Union County
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 3
Columbia High soccer
at Capital City Invitational,
TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. RK. School,
7 p.m.
Fort White High .girls
basketball at Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Columbia
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys.
basketball at Fort White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 4
M Columbia High soccer
at Capital City Invitational,
TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at St. Francis
Catholic, 2 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Terry Parker
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


By CHARLES ODUM
Associated Press

ATLANTA Georgia
and Georgia Tech could
have left their punters
home one year ago.
In an oddity, neitherteam
punted in the Bulldogs' 30-
24 win in Atlanta last year.
GeorgiaTech coach Paul
Johnson might not mind if
the punters remain on the
sidelines again in Saturday
night's game in Athens.
That would be one way to
negate Georgia's apparent
advantage in some special
teams matchups.
Georgia punter Drew
Butler, the 2009 Ray
Guy Award winner as
the nation's top punter,
is'" having another stand-
out season as part of the
Bulldogs' overall strong
special teams. Blair Walsh
again ranks among the
nation's top kickers.
GeorgiaTech also boasts
a strong kicker, Scott Blair,
but has dealt with season-
long issues on other areas
of its special teams.
Blair is having an all-
star caliber season. He


38 Cries of pair
39 Washed-out
40 911 responder
41 Skippy rival
42 Malt brew
44 Dairy-case buy
47 Birdseed
51 Cheapens
52 Takes
potshots
53 Chieftain's
plaids
54 Kind

DOWN

1 Ms. Lupino of
"High Sierra"
2 and don't's
3 Printer's mea-
sures
4 "The Valley of
Horses" author
5 Game plan
6 Dirty
7 Young chaps
8 Bring to a finish
9 American
humorist


has made 15 of 17 field
goals and took over punt-
ing duties for the Yellow
Jackets in last week's
home win over Duke.
The Yellow Jackets have
struggled in other areas.
They rank 91st in the
nation on punt returns and
115th in net punting.
Johnson attempted to
compensate for the poor
average of only 6.2 yards
on punt returns last week
against Duke. The attempt
to devote more blockers
to the return only opened
the door for Blue Devils
punter Alex King to run 16
yards for a first down.
"That was our fault,"
Johnson said of the
scheme installed by coach-
es. "We were trying to
borrow from Peter to pay
Paul. We haven't had very
good punt returns.... That
was a scheme thing all the
way."
Georgia Tech's good
news on special teams was
Blair.
In his first game punt-
ing since 2008, the senior
averaged 46 yards on two
punts.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BIL TIER HALO


ACCLAIMS L OAD
SAHARA PALMS
PODS DASH




ETA BRE LOTB
A RE M R S YEL
HERO BEAR YOU
P WAHEW DE P T
ETA D I M
RE AI I TT BR



A^HL L s~o|NI S T NT


10 Wk. starter
12 Second banana
13 Wide
18 Texas town (2
wds.)
19 Yellowish


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11-26


20 Racing shells
22 Mended
23 Maraud
24 Grammy-win-
ning rapper
25 Window stick-
er,
28 Actress Tyler
30 Jarrett of
NASCAR
31 Holding gently
34 Steel girders
(hyph.)
36 Floating plat-
forms
39 Puts in a kiln
41 Fair and
impartial
43 Wiesel or
Ducommun
44 Talk, talk, talk
45 Geisha's
accessory
46 Cowpoke's
sweetie
48 Med. staffer
49 Always, to
Poe
50 Mao--tung


@ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 16, file photo, Georgia Tech running back
Anthony Allen (18) runs for a touchdown as Middle
Tennessee linebacker Darin Davis (59) falls to the turf
during the third quarter of an NCAA college football game
in Atlanta.


Georgia relies


on special teams


against Tech


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













Big 12 farewell felt in NFL locker rooms, too


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Denver Broncos tailback
Correll Buckhalter is going
to have to find a new smack-
talking partner to replace
teammate Daniel Graham.
Their alma maters meet
Friday when Colorado visits
Nebraska in the last Big 12
game for both schools, and
they're not scheduled to
meet again anytime soon.
Graham's Buffaloes are
bolting to the Pac-12 and
Buckhalter's Cornhuskers
are heading to the Big Ten
next year, ending the rivalry
after 69 games unless or
until they play each other
down the road in a non-con-
ference game. The schools
played six games early last
century before beginning
their run of annual meet-
ings in 1948.
So, Graham will have
to turn his trash talk on
teammates who went to


maybe USC or UCLA, and
Buckhalter will have to find
somebody from Michigan
State or Minnesota to razz.
'"Well, I can smack talk
against them I guess, but
it's not the same doing it
with guys that 1 played
against," Buckhalter said
with a laugh. "It's a little
different."
While the series has
been close lately with
Colorado winning four
times in the last nine years,
it was lopsided during Tom
Osborne's time. He lost to
the Buffs just three times
in 23 years.
Overall, the Huskers
lead the series 48-18-2,
though the Buffaloes have
had their moments like in
2001, when they whipped
Nebraska 62-36 to knock
the Cornhuskers out of
the top spot in the BCS
standings and pave the way
for Colorado's only Big 12
title.
Like Buckhalter, Broncos


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 5, 2009, file photo, Nebraska's Ndamukong Suh
(93) rushes against a Florida Atlantic in Lincoln, Neb. Former
Texas quarterback Vince Young, former Nebraska defensive
tackle Ndamukong Suh and Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops are
the top honorees on The Associated Press' all-time, all-Big 12
team.


offensive linemen Russ
Hochstein went to college
in Lincoln, Neb., but he was
hesitant to discuss his feel-
ings with a reporter this


week.
"I don't want to get into a
war of words with Graham,"
he said. "I'm excited and I
hope they win."


Buckhalter and Graham
said they were both sorry
to see their schools leave
the Big 12 and for the annu-
al rivalry game played on
the day after Thanksgiving
to end.
"Every year, we always
looked forward to that big
game, the rival game and
hopefully we can end it off
with a blast this Friday,"
Graham said. "Nebraska
was our rival game and
there's still trash-talking
with me and Russ and
Buck. We all remember
those games, the years that
I was there it was always a
close game."
After Friday, all they'll
have are the memories.
"Yeah it is a bummer,"
Graham said. "Every
year, I think both teams
always looked forward to
that game. It. was always
a big game and it "was
always played the day after
Thanksgiving. Everybody's
watching. So, just thatwhole


atmosphere, it's going to be
a hard loss."
That one thing he and
Buckhalter can agree on.
"Yeah, I don't even know
who the rivalries are going
to be with once they go to
the Big Ten," Buckhalter
said.
Graham said it's going
to be strange watching the
Buffs in a new conference.
"I think next year, the first
year, is going to be weird,
just not seeing any Big 12
schools. That's the only
thing I've known is the Big
Eight, Big 12,1 I didn't play in
the Big Eight, but you know
just growing up watching so
it's going to be real different
just seeing all of the Pac-10
schools," he said.
Buckhalter feels the
same about having to turn
his attention to the likes of
Wisconsin and Ohio State.
"Seeing them play a
whole new conference is
going to be different," he
said.


Bucs and Bears can


prove their mettle--


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

Seems like the
Buccaneers and Bears
have few believers despite
their 7-3 records. They get
to prove themselves as
playoff contenders or
reveal themselves as pre-
tenders on Sunday.

Philadelphia (7-3) at
Chicago (7-3)
While the Bears attempt
to justify their record, the
Eagles try to live up to
the high standard Michael
Vick, DeSean Jackson and
LeSean McCoy have set
recently. Philadelphia's
explosiveness 112
points in three straight
wins, at least 26 points in
each ,of its victories this
season and video-game
pace have made the Eagles
a tough challenge for any
defense. Even Chicago's
third-ranked unit.

Tampa Bay (7-3) at
Baltimore (7-3)
The Bucs' wins have
come against teams cur-
rently with losing records
the Rams at 4-6 have the
bestrecord of those victims.
The defeats were to top-tier
opponents Pittsburgh, New
Orleans and Atlanta. So it's
time to put up for Tampa
Bay if it's serious about
making the postseason.

Green Bay (7-3) at
Atlanta (8-2)
Already being pegged as
a potential NFC title game
matchup, the league's hot-
test teams face off. Each
has won four straight and
the Falcons are nearly
invincible in the Georgia
Dome since QB Matt Ryan
became the starter in 2008.
Ryan is 18-1 there, with 14
consecutive wins.

San Diego (5-5) at
Indianapolis (6-4)
If San Diego truly has
begun its charge to the
top of the AFC West, then
the banged-up Colts will
have a formidable foe. The
Chargers have won three
in a row all against los-
ing teams behind the
sensational passing of
Philip Rivers, who could
get back top receiver
Vincent Jackson.

Kansas City (6-4) at
Seattle (5-5)
Few venues are as diffi-
cult as Qwest Field, where
the Seahawks are 3-1, the
only defeat coming to the
Giants when Seattle was
hamstrung by injuries.
With four home games
remaining, the Seahawks
have to be favored in the
weak NFC West, especially


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back LeGarrette Blount
(27) runs against San Francisco 49ers linebacker Parys
Haralson (98) in the first quarter of an NFL football game,
Sunday in San Francisco.
if they can find a running Minnesota (3-7) at
game. Washington (5-5)


Pittsburgh (7-3) at
Buffalo (2-8)
Give Buffalo credit
for not quitting after los-
ing every game in the
first half of the schedule.'
The two victories were
against weaklings Detroit
and Cincinnati, and now
the Bills really step up in
class.

Jacksonville (6-4) at
N.Y. Giants (6-4)
New York might be call-
ing Amani Toomer out
of retirement to bolster
a receiving corps minus
leaders Steve Smith and
Hakeem Nicks. Look for
the Giants to concentrate
on the run with reinstated
starter Brandon Jacobs;
Ahmad Bradshaw's fum-
bling problems got him
demoted.

Miami (5-5) at Oakland
(5-5)
Chad Henne could
be back at quarterback
in Oakland, where the
Dolphins have enjoyed
recent trips, winning four
in a row. Indeed, Miami
is 4-1 on the road in 2010,
but has struggled at home
and was manhandled by
Chicago last week.

Tennessee (5-5) at
Houston (4-6)
With Vince Young out
of the mix for the rest
of the season, if not for-
ever in Tennessee, the
Titans turn to rookie
Rusty Smith to keep
their playoff hopes alive.
Fortunately for Smith,
Houston's secondary is a
sieve, and he always has
Chris Johnson to hand the
ball to.


Wonder if the Vikings
will get the same kind of
boost from a coach's firing
as the Cowboys did. Leslie
Frazier makes his debut as
their head man after Brad
Childress was fired, and
he plans to let Brett Favre
continue his record start-
ing string. Frazier would
be wise to focus more
of the offense on Adrian
Peterson.

St. Louis (4-6) at
Denver (3-7)
Since beginning 2009
with a six-game winning
streak, the Broncos are 5-
15 under Josh McDaniels.
Some of the defeats have
been embarrassing,
including to division rivals
Oakland and San Diego.
But there also was a 49-29
romp past Kansas City in
Denver's last home game.

San Francisco (3-7) at
Arizona (3-7)
Months ago, this looked
like a juicy prime-time
matchup. Considered pre-
season front-runners for
the NFC West title, which
the Cardinals won the
last two years, both teams
have crashed in a plague of
miscommunications, bad
quarterbacking and late-
game problems.

Carolina (1-9) at
Cleveland (3-7)
The Browns have played
well for a month, even
though they have suffered
key injuries, and they get
back QB Jake Delhomme
just in time to step in for
Colt McCoy (left ankle).
Delhomme faces the team
he guided to one Super
Bowl and another NFC
championship game.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Bert Reed (right) and Josh Gehres celebrate a touchdown by Reed against
Maryland during the second half of an NCAA college football game Saturdayin College Park,
Md. Florida State won 30-16.


RIVALRY: Seminoles overdue for win
Continued From Page 1B


The Seminoles are cer-
tainly overdue in a series
that used to be one of
the most anticipated in
the country. They lost to
Florida' in fired coach Ron
Zook's final game in 2004
- that one came on a day
the Seminoles named their
field after longtime coach
Bobby Bowden and
haven't beaten Meyer in
five tries.
Fisher took over after
Bowden was forced to
step down at the end of
last season and could have
the Seminoles playing for
a championship in his first
year something Bowden,
Steve Spurrier, Zook and
Meyer failed to do in their
first seasons. Florida State
has no control over that,
though.
The Seminoles need
Maryland to beat North
Carolina State to clinch the
Atlantic Division and a spot
in the league title game
against No. 13 Virginia
Tech next weekend.
It would be Florida State's
first berth in the ACC title
game since 2005.
A win against the Gators
might be even more impor-
tant. It sure would be for
those seniors who are win-
less against their in-state
rival.
"The biggest goal was to
win the state of Florida, and
obviously we beat Miami,


so to beat Florida would be
big," quarterback Christian
Ponder said. "Us seniors,
or anyone on the team,
hasn't experienced a win
over Florida and this is our
last time as seniors to do it.
It would be pretty big for
us, but it's not going to be
easy."
The Gators want nothing
more than to extend Florida
State's series misery, espe-
cially in Tallahassee.
A victory would give
Florida wins against its three
biggest rivals -Tennessee,
Georgia and Florida State
- and improve Meyer's
record in those games to
17-1. It also probably would
lock the Gators into a New
Year's Day bowl, possibly
the Outback but more like-
ly the Gator.
"One of the biggest
games of my career, espe-
cially this season," defen-
sive tackle Terron Sanders
said. "Don't want to be the
team to lose to this team
under Coach Meyer, that's
for sure. Don't want to be
the first one, so it has a
lot of meaning to me. We
want to go out strong, win
this game and get a better
bowl game. We all know it's
important. He doesn't really
have to say much."
A win also would do
wonders for Florida's confi-
dence after an up-and-down
season in which players


struggled, coaches were
criticized and fans have
become increasingly frus-
trated with every failed dive
play. So the Gators have
a chance to silence some
critics, and maybe more
important to Meyer, make
headway on the recruiting
trail.
"There are a lot of guys
on the fence right now,"
Meyer said.
Recruiting means little
to the guys on the field,
though.
"I think if you were to
ask 99 percent of the team,
it's about pride," Sanders
said. "Yeah, we want to get
to a better bowl game. But
for the most part, it's about
pride. Nobody wants to
lose, especially last game of
the season and with it being
a big-time rival like this."
The streak makes the
game even more enticing.
"They've won a bunch of
games in a row and we have
to get back in this rivalry
and make it very competi-
tive," Fisher said. "Florida
has always been a signifi-
cant player in the national
title hunt and for champi-
onships, just like Florida
State was for many years.
When you're learning to
compete with those folks, it
means you're taking steps
in the right direction to get
back to where you want to
go."


LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










4B

DILBERT


BOB IS THE DIRECTOR
OF PURCHASING. HE'S
HERE TO DESCRIBE OUR
NEW PROCUREMENT
PROCESS.


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &


OUR SYSTEM DIVIDES
PRODUCTS INTO TWO
CATEGORIES: THINGS
YOU DON'T WANT, AND
THINGS YOU'RE NOT
ALLOWED TO BUY.


BABY BLUES
P24 STOP-'M )' T l? N I lWGK'lo I, 8OT A
/ Pop &e N A ,



j.e o| "


BLONDIE
MR. B., CAN YOU THINK
OF ANYTHING TASTIER
THAN A LEFTOVER rHAT.'S A
TURKEY SANDWICH? GOO
QUESTION,
.. ELMOo
s, 3.


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


IT'S MY WAY OF
SAYING THANKS FOR
LUBING YOUR SUV
WITH MY DEAD
ANCESTORS.


COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415'


DEAR ABBY


Mother does a slow burn

picking up smokers' trash


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I returned to our
hometown and bought a
bungalow in a cute older
neighborhood. The homes
are close together, separat-
ed by a single driveway.
Our neighbors on both
sides of us are smokers.
They smoke on their front
porches and flick their smol-
dering butts onto the drive-
way and yard. The ground
is littered with them, which
my two toddlers want to
put into their mouths every
time they go outside. Often
I'll go out with a bag and
collect the butts, but it's.
annoying having to pick up
someone's easily discarded
trash particularly trash
that has been in someone's
mouth.
My neighbors are pretty
rough, and I'm afraid a con-
frontation could result in an
escalation of the problem.
Should I continue gather-
ing up the butts and keep
my mouth shut? Or should
I just "butt out"? BOTH-
ERED IN MISSOURI
DEAR BOTHERED: If
you are concerned about
a hostile reaction from
your neighbors, do not ap-
proach them particularly
if you're afraid that doing
so could become confron-
tational. Instead, plant
hedges or bushes between
your property and theirs,
and have your children play
under your supervision


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
- in the backyard.
DEAR ABBY: My mom
has three sisters, two of
whom I am very close to
and love dearly. The prob-
lem is the third sister, "Aunt
Sandy." She had a falling out
with Mom a few years ago
and is now considered the
black sheep of the family.
At my grandmother's
funeral, I had the chance to
sit and talk with her, and I
didn't feel I was doing any-
thing wrong. However, my
mom told me later she was
"hurt" because I had talked
to Aunt Sandy knowing the
family is upset with her.
Mom said she'd appreci-
ate it if I didn't do it again.
I tried to explain that the
way she feels about her sis-
ter shouldn't have anything
to do with our relationship,
but Mom refuses to un-
derstand. I want a connec-
tion with my Aunt Sandy
without hurting my mom.
Please help. WE'RE
STILL RELATED
DEAR STILL RELAT-
ED: I wish you had told
me in more detail why your
mother is angry with Sandy,


and why the rest of the fam-
ily is cooperating in isolat-
ing her. However, you are
an adult. Whom you choose
to befriend is your busi-
ness, not your mother's. If
you wish to pursue a rela-
tionship with Aunt Sandy,
you are free to do so. And if
you don't want your mother
to be "hurt," don't discuss it
with her.
DEAR ABBY: I was
walking to lunch a few days
ago and approached the
entrance of a restaurant a
couple of seconds after a
man approaching from the
opposite direction. He was
a gentleman and held the
door for me. I said thank
you and walked inside.
Even though he was
there first, I wound up in
front of him in a long line.
Are there rules of etiquette
for this? I felt a little awk-
ward essentially cutting in
line after he was so chiv-
alrous. NICOLE IN
DENVER
DEAR NICOLE: There
is no rule of etiquette that
dictates it, but you could
have offered the gentle-
man a chance to be in line
in front of you. However, if
you did, he might have ex-
tended his chivalry further
and refused.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Chances to in-
vest in something that can
bring joy or financial gain
are within reach. Make ar-
rangements for time with
someone you love or, if
you're single, participate
in a social event that aligns
you with potential partners.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Give and take will
be required if you want to
maintain balance at home.
Don't let emotions get out
of hand. Spend your time
fixing up your residence or
preparing for end of year
festivities. Information you
discover will influence a de-
cision you must make. **
GEMINI (May21 -June
20): Involvement with the
wrong group will cause dis-
agreements. Do not allow
anyone to take advantage of
you. Focus on home, family
and the people who have
always supported you and
your interests. Networking
at functions will increase
your professional opportu-
nities. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You can come
up with interesting alter-
natives regarding your vo-
cation and money-making
ability. Listen to what some-
one with experience has to
say. There is plenty of op-
portunity but be willing to
incorporate change into the
way you do things. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You have more con-
trol than you realize and
should be looking for ways
to take advantage of every
situation that comes along.
Your outspoken approach
will sway people you talk
with to see things your way.
Leave some time for ro-
mance. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Keep your business
and personal life separate.
Problems at home are ap-
parent if you can't agree on
the budget changes that are
needed. A change of plans
will lead to a blowout that
can cause isolation. ***
SLIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Getting rid of the clut-
ter in your life will serve a
purpose. Focus on friends,
neighbors and travel plans.
Getting together with peo-
ple who share your inter-
ests will lead to important
professional information.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't put up
with anyone trying to make
you feel bad or guilty. In-
stead, spend time with peo-
ple who help you to gener-
ate the most, not the least.
Sharing your ideas will lead
to changes that will en-
hance projects you have in
the works. **


SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): If you are
prepared to state facts, fig-
ures and intentions, it will
be difficult for anyone to
deny you the right to keep
moving forward. You will
win a settlement or tender
but the cost may include
the loss of a friendship.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Someone
from your past will cause
problems for you. Do not
reopen a relationship that
you walked away from long
ago. It is not in your best in-
terest to get involved with
anyone secretly. If you feel
guilty or uncertain, it's best
to take a pass. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put everything
you've got into moneymak-
ing ideas, investments or
plans. You can raise your
income, change your posi-
tion or set yourself up for a
bright new start. Put your
plans for next year in mo-
tion now. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You may want
to back down and let others
take the stage for a moment.
Listen carefully to what's
being revealed and you will
have a much better idea
how to position yourself for
success. A job opening will
help you change the way
you live. Greater income is
heading your way. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals B
"VOLW TYWDF'Z YLLWX BYA
HXYRODWD MCJZDYWNWX DY OZ'D
NWXB WJDB ZY SWKYRW,
M CJ ZW N WX CJ H HW FWT ZY . ?' "
RYXUJF LXWWRJF
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Keep your eyes open to your mercies. The man who
forgets to be thankful has fallen asleep in life." Robert Louis Stevenson
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-26


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


I'VE NEVER HAD ONE OF
THOSE 5EFOPRE
YOU'RE MESSING
WITH ME, AREN'T ._



..... .- ..
I, -f p'


WAIT! I'LL BET ( I SUPPOSE I
YOU'VE NEVER COULD TRY
SHAO ANY ( IT NEXT YEAR,
LEFTOVER ELMO
TURKEY BEFORE,
M'/E ",'OU


-ju
AP Q 5


. I .6


7 ,


CLASSIC PEANUTS










Classified Department: 755-5440


IEm


FsIND'--


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


One Item per ad additional
|4 lines 6 days ne S ;*25,"oi j
'** F







...... .1
S One Item per ad '7
4 lines 6 days l a ]d) tIOn
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Spersonal merchandise tolalino $500 or less.





One item per ad
4 lines 6 days Eah ahddtimdl



line $1.45
Rate applies to private individuals soiling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or loss.
Each aem must Include a price.
SThis l a non-refundable rate. Y




one item per ad dd x a
4 lines 6 fd u Each addtnal



Sle lines .ay 45
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S2500 or less.



Each tem must Include a price.
Th|iOn i S ad on -efundaberate.


a 6dd i ti h tional








4 lines 1750
3 days $
includes 2 Signs tf l h d,i,,n|li n in1



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....192.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoAppear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon, 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Man., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am Fi, 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri, 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated,

I Print 0 ,O ( lifil
WWW.'... ** .


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-02-DP
B. D., DOB: 9/24/2008
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Brian Jolmson
Address Unknown
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
clerk of court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on DECEMBER 8,
2010, at 10 A.M., for a Termination
of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT********
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 9th day of No-
vember 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Trish Brewington
Deputy Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In accord-
ance with the Americans With Disa-
bilities Act, if you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
04542322
November 12, 19, 26, 2010
December 3, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-563-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, f/k/a
COLUMBIA COUNTY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALLIED INVESTMENT GROUP,
INC., a Florida corporation; DAN-
IEL M. MAGSTADT, a/k/a DAN
MAGSTADT; EMILY MAG-
STADT; and ASAP PLUMBING
OF GAINESVILLE, INC., a Florida
corporation,
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the. fol-
lowing described real property:
Lots 1, 2, 5, 6, 7 and 8, Block 8, Ru-
by Park, according to the map or plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2,
Page 112, of the public records of
COLUMBIA County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of the
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated November 23, 2010, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
January 5, 2011, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS mu hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lie & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Services

*** SPECIAL***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.

Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

23rd day of November, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. SCIPPIO
Deputy Clerk
04542461
November 26, 2010
December 3, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-325-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, f/k/a
COLUMBIA COUNTY BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
MELINDA J. BAUMGARDNER
and BELA B. SZOCS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
SEE SCHEDULE "A" ATTACHED
HERETO.
SCHEDULE "A" TO NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE COLUMBIA BANK
vs. BAUMGARDNER, et al
PART OF LOT 5, MAGNOLIA
ACRES, AN UNRECORDED SUB-
DIVISION:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER, OF SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 15
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE S.
00 DEG. 57 MIN. 54 SEC. E.,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID SECTION 36, 728.67 FEET;
THENCE S. 88 DEG. 22 MIN. 19
SEC. W., 1911.68 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
S 00 DEG. 47 MIN. 35 SEC. E.
349.02 FEET, THENCE S. 88 DEG.
21 MIN. 34 SEC. W., 636.06 FEET,
THENCE N. 00 DEG. 47 MIN. 35
SEC. W., 349.16 FEET; THENCE N
88 DEG. 22 MIN. 19 SEC., E.,
636.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH AND SUB-
JECT TO AN INGRESS AND
EGRESS EASEMENT MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
A STRIP OF LAND 60 FEET IN
WIDTH BEING 30 FEET EACH
SIDE OF A CENTER LINE DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 15
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE S.
00 DEG. 57. MIN. 54 SEC. E.,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID SECTION 36, 42.00 FEET
TO THE SOUTH LINE OF CY-
PRESS LAKE ROAD; THENCE S.
87 DEG. 36 MIN. 44 SEC. W.,
ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE,
469.58 FEET; THENCE N. 88 DEG.
27 MIN. 37 SEC. W., ALONG
SAID SOUTH LINE, 167.21 FEET;
THENCE S. 88 DEG. 09 MIN. 24
SEC. W., ALONG SAID SOUTH
LINE 636.47 FEET; THENCE S. 88
DEG. 45 MIN. 01 SEC. W.,
ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE,
636.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, THENCE S. 00 DEG.
47 MIN. 35 SEC. E., 2072.60 FEET
TO THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 13
AND THE POINT OF TERMINA-
TION.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated November 23, 2010, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
January 5, 2011, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
23rd day of November, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By /s/: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04542464
November 26, 2010
December 3, 2010


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

LOST, One Hearing Aid,
Wed, Nov 17th,
in Lake City.
Call 386-497-3443 if found

1n0 Job
100 Opportunities

04542412
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.


100 Opportunities

04542450(
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY !!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

045-12454
CCSS, Inc, is accepting
applications for PT CNA &'
Housekeepers. Must have CPR,
First Aid training. Dependable
transportation. Level II
background screen & drug test
required. Apply in person
628 SE Allison Ct.
Lake City, FL EOE

04542465
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for
an Executive Adm. Asst. to
performdetailed administrative
assignments. Requires excellent
computer skills, organizational
and communication skills.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous administrative
experience required. Full
benefits package. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, Fl. 32056 or
email Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542466
Cook, FT, Must have
experience and able to work
weekends and evenings.
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025

05524512
HELP WANTED
SALES PERSON
To call on company
convenience stores and private

locations. Must have sales
ability; good driving record
required.Dependable and good
communication skills.
Transportation furnished.,
willing to live in Perry, FL
Send resume and income history
to: PO Box 1201 Perry, FL
32348

34 Temp Farm Workers &
Laborers needed 12/20/10 -
8/10/11. Job duties include:
planting, thinning, pruning,
cultivating, harvesting, & packing
peaches. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. All tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
for non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $9.1.1/hr. Worksites in
Aiken, Saluda, & Edgefield Co's
SC. Applicants should report or
send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & reference job # 491090.
Dixie Belle Peach Farms -
Ward, SC
200 Temp Farm Workers &
Laborers needed 12/20/10 -
10/20/11. Job duties include:
planting, thinning, pruning,
cultivating, harvesting, & packing
peaches. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. All tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
for non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $9.11/hr. Worksites in
Aiken, Saluda, & Edgefield Co's
SC. Applicants should report or
send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & reference job # 491123.
Titan Peach Farms, Inc. Ridge
Springs, SC

1 Medical
120 Employment

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


141 Babysitters

Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or P/T,
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

240 Schools &
240 Education

015452248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 11/29/10

* Phleb'otomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/l

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingeservices.com


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


310 Pets & Supplies

Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $40 386-752-0987
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


408 Furniture

COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
(904)704-9377
RECLINER,
TALL & wide beige. Decent
shape. $40.00
386-755-8941


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri. &
Sat., (8-4). 247-240R CR 49R,
247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
Multi Family Fri Sun. 8am.
Comer of Lake Montgomery.&
Alamo. Appli., elec., hswares,
Christmas, auto, tools, clothes,
sewing mach. wheels/tires, furn.






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

AVON
Great Gift Ideas
Shop online at
www.youravon.com/vlawton
Physical Therapy Equipment:
Exam/treatment table,
$100.00 MUST SELL
386-752-1652

450 Good Things
Sto Eat

Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420


460 Firewood

Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728

1 Office
461 Equipment

OFFICE FURNITURE
All Wood Computer
Desk $50
386-752-0749
OFFICE FURNITURE
BLACK LEATHER
CHAIRS $20
386-752-0749

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 SWMH, $500 month, $500
security, All appliances included,
Pets negotiable, in Branford area
Call for add info 386-935-3099
3BR/2BA NEWLY renovated
MH on 1/2 ac. private property.
$700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Security dep.
References needed. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.,
White Contact 386-623-2465


or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent







Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-8687-1833,386-590-0642


a Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824

7T 0 Unfurnished Apt.
7/1 y For Rent
5524443
S $Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421 ..
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up. CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-324 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent

Efficiency apartment, Close to
VA, $430 mo. plus $150.00 sec.
utilities included.No pets.
386-754-9641 or 386-438-4054.
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

(4542444
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious .
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

05524428
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba.. new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int.
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit. 386-752-9303, No Pets
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo: $1.500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,


Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
I- 10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


Box 5549, Gainesville, FlI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace


Ow








6B
730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Very Clean 2br/lba. in own.
298 SW Miller Terr. CH/A, Shed.
$650.mo. Ist.mo. & security.
Call Vick 386-623-6401
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &'
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720
750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
SAcreage
05524423
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
830 Commercial
8 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr 386-867-1190

930 Motorcycles
2009 Custom Chopper, 300cc,
low miles, like new,
must sell $2000 obo
386-758-1784

940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, neff
bars, stereo. $17,995. 752-8227




950 Cars for Sale
09 Toyota Scion XB, 5 dr.
40k mi. Purchase for about payoff.
About $1,000 under book.
Serviced at LC Toyota. 758-5916


1999 Chrysler Concorde LXI,
leather interior, automatic,
gold in color, tinted windows
386-984-0770
87 Ford Mustang GT, 5 spd.,
28,000 orig miles, adult owned,
runs exc., cobra wheels,
$10,500 OBO 386-963-2271
94 BUICK LeSabre
Low miles.
Runs great, $2400.00
386-752-0824
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440
ryIn In n~t


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010


Lake City Reporter


yoXX


Classified Department: 755-5440


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
' If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2008 Toyota Tacoma
4DR, access cab.
17,250 mi., AT, all power,
Tonneau cover, bedliner,
class III hitch, nerf bars,
AM-FM stereo w/CD,
sliding rear glass.
$17,995
Call
386-752-8227


2009 Custom
Chopper 300cc
Low miles, like new,
must sell.
$2,000 OBO
Call
386-758-1784


1987 Ford
Mustang GT
5spd, 28,000 orig. mi, interior
showroom-new, cobra wheels
(have orig. wheels)
$10,500 OBO
Call
386-963-2271


In Print,
& Online
One Low
Price!


ForMoe etil Cal ar oBidge
at 38-75-44


7


Sbusifes


I C


A


L E


M


M


Q


A


I I X


A


I U


SN


U


A


V F


H






-H
CNJ


0


r-I


G


A


L Y


Tr~ L


L


I G


Lake


V


City


Reporter's

popular weekly


word search

a great way


is

to


get attention


with


a fun new


puzzle every


week


at a


price


any business

can afford.


jo3

View


~hin4S


A+ EyeCare


S" ~Eyeglasses

,-- Contacts


Exams


Sunglasses


555-5555


I


For more information call (386) 755-5440

Dead13.ne is Wednesday at 4pm


You'll Ind it bere! I


.,Mdlm


see


I


--~




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM