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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01461
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/25/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01461
System ID: UF00028308:01461
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








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Lake City Reporter



Thursday, November 25, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 265 0 75 cents


Tourism group earns $35,000 grant

Money will help members. The announce- for our come here to see the area,
three counties ment of the grant award marketing plus we want to reach out
was made Wednesday efforts," to areas like The Villages,
develop tourism, by Michelle Dennard, on s a id- do some advertising in
behalf of the Governor's H a r v ey South Florida, and it also
From staff reports Office of Tourism, Trade Campbell, allows us to have booths at ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
and Economic Develop Columbia trade and vacation shows Truck crash leads to fatality
The Suwannee River ment (OTTED). C o u nty Campbell throughout the region."
Valley Marketing Group The purpose of the grant Tourist Dennard praised the An Alabama man died in a wreck on Interstate 75 Wednesday
has earned a $35,000 state- is to provide support for Development Council exec- quality of Campbell's afternoon, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. The wreck
sponsored regional tourism rural communities attempt- utive director. Campbell is grant application, which occurred in the northbound lane of 1-75 when a Dodge pickup
grant ing to establish and sustain director of the SRVMG. was based on the review driven by the victim collided with a semi tractor trailer, then
The SRVMG is a tri- regional economic or tour- 'The Suwannee Valley and recommendation of left the roadway, crossed a dirt outer road and overturned into
county tourism promotion ism development activities, focus marks a coopera- the grant application by lefTheradacuose adinu teurcrada d overu
organization consisting It will be used primarily for tive effort," Campbell said. Enterprise Flirida, Inc. a field. The wreck occurred near the Tuetenuggee Road over-
of Suwannee, Columbia marketing and advertising. "Our marketing plans call pass of 1-75 and Southwest Bedenbaugh Lane. FHP did not
and Hamilton County "This is a great boost for us having press trips TOURISM continued on 3A release the victim's name and an investigation continues.




It's time for the holidays!

Former band was invited to play with Santa will be
leader will flip the everaltopandslofthe there for all the
l hes era, including orchestras kd tose
switch for lights. conducted by Sammy kids to see.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comr
Flipping the
switch to light
up Olustee Park
will be symbolic
for Harry Wuest
of Lake City and in honor
of his late wife, Margaret.
'"This is my first year
without my wife," he said.
"It will be different I'm
turning them on for her."
The official lighting of
Olustee Park is 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, and Wuest is this
year's illuminator.
"I've been practicing," he
said. "I have sore thumbs."
Wuest is also conducting
the Gateway City Big Band
in playing holiday music at
5 p.m., prior to flipping the
switch.
The event is sponsored
by the Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce to usher the
community into the holi-
day spirit, said Dennille
Folsom, executive director.
"The park looks great,"
she said. "Everybody loves
it"
Wuest started his career
in music by forming the
Caravan of Swing Band,
which performed in the
Queens area of New York
City.
Within a few years he


Kaye, Benny Goodman and
Vaughn Monroe.
He went on to conduct
for performers such as
Rosemary Clooney, Anita
Bryan and Jack Benny.
Wuest was known as
the first Top of the World
band leader at Walt Disney
World, a position he held
for seven years before .
retiring to Lake City in the
early 1980s.
Turning on the lights is
an honor for Wuest.
"I'm pleased that they
want me to do it," he said.
"It's something the mayor
does, so for an hour I'll feel
like the mayor."
The Chamber feels great
about hosting the holiday
activities, Folsom said.
"It's a community activ-
ity for everybody, regard-
less of their age, to look
at the Christmas lights
and tree and to see the
joy Santa brings to all chil-
dren, young and old," she
said.
Wuest said he and his
wife used to come out and
decorate the park for the
holidays. The evening will
have something for every-
one.
"It's a nice tradition," he
said. "The band is good
and it's nice to see the
park. It's a pretty sight at
night"


FILE PHOTOS/ Lake City Reporter
Children can come sit on Santa's lap and share their Christmas wish list as well as receive a
free photo.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Santa Claus is officially com-
ing to town this weekend for
photo opportunities with all
the good little girls and boys.
The annual Santa Photo
Night is. at 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday in Olustee Park.
This is the first year the
Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce has
hosted the event
The big man himself will
arrive on the Polar Express
and hear wish lists from chil-
dren in the community, said
Dennille Folsom, Chamber
executive director. Children
visitors will line up to see
Santa in his house, which was
donated by Lark's Portable
Buildings.
Drawdy Insurance also
made a donation allowing
all children to receive a free
photograph with Santa during
the event, she said. The pho-
tos' will be printed on a nice
Christmas card.
Candy canes, donated by
Caring HandsAnimal Hospital,
will also be provided to each
child.
Santa Claus will be available
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday-
Saturday after the event Photo
night will be the only opportu-
nity for a free picture.


Police find missing


vehicle in Jax pond


Unidentified
human remains
found inside.
From staff reports
A missing vehicle belong-
ing to a Lake City man who
vanished more than four
years ago turned up in a
Jacksonville pond Tuesday,
according to the Lake City
Police Department
The 1993 turquoise-col-
ored Saturn belonged to
Francis Lester Watson, 72,
of Lake City. Watson and


his vehicle were reported
missing from his Lake
City residence on March
13, 2006. The Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office discovered
the vehicle in a pond next
to Mandarin High School
in Jacksonville. Lake City
Police Department officials
confirmed the vehicle was
Watson's missing car.
Human remains were
found inside the car, but
have not been identified,
according to JSO, the lead
agency investigating the
discovery.


In 2006, Watson van-
ished without a trace.
LCPD said there have
been no other leads in the
four years since Watson's
disappearance.
JSO is conducting its
own investigation into the
evidence it recovered at
the scene, reports said.
Anyone having infor-
mation about this inci-
dent or others can con-
tact the Lake City Police
Departnient anonymously
on the TIP line at (386)
719-2068.


This turkey gets an official presidential pardon



-p M President Barack
Obama stands with
National Turkey
Federation Chairman
Yubert Envia, and
daughters Malia
Obama and Sasha
Obama (obscured),
as he pardons
Apple, the National
Thanksgiving Turkey,
Wednesday, dur-
ing a ceremony in
... the Rose Garden of
the White House in
.... Washington.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400
r-SEsaaFfSZEs


81 57
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
Health..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
HEALTH
Anti-AIDS
group hails drug.


COMING
FRIDAY
Kitchens serve up
food for the holidays.





ASSUOCIAltU PKtSS


~~a;ru~i~c~~~









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010


layA4) Wednesday:
Afternoon: 1-3-4-5


Tuesday:
Z-' 1-5-12-14-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



A boy for Travolta and Preston


LOS ANGELES
J Ohn Travolta and Kelly
Preston will have a new guest
at their Thanksgiving table.
A publicist says the couple
welcomed a baby boy
Tuesday in Florida. They named
their new son Benjamin.
The eight-pound, three-ounce boy
was born at an undisclosed Florida
hospital.
Spokeswoman Samantha Mast
said in a statement late Tuesday that
the couple and their daughter, Ella
Bleu, "are ecstatic and very happy
about the newest member of the
family." The statement says Preston
and baby Benjamin "are healthy and
doing beautifully."
This is the third child for Travolta
and Preston, who were married in
1991. Their eldest child, son Jett,
died last year at age 16.

Rapper DMX scheduled
to appear in court
PHOENIX Rapper Earl
Simmons, otherwise known as
DMX, is headed to a court hearing
Wednesday morning in Phoenix.
The Maricopa County Superior
Court says Simmons is due to
appear for a probation revocation
arraignment before a court commis-
sioner.
Court documents released Friday
allege the 39-year-old performer
used cocaine and OxyContin, failed
to submit to drug testing, and drove
on a suspended license.
Simmons was arrested last
Thursday by Maricopa County pro-
bation officers and was being held
without bond in the county jail.
His attorney, Glenn Allen, said he
had been working with his client and
probation officials and expected the
arrest.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A March 25 file photo shows Kelly Preston (right), a cast member in 'The Last
' Song,' with her husband John Travolta at the premiere of the film in Los Angeles.
Travolta's and Preston's publicist said the couple had a baby boy Tuesday in
Florida.


Randy Quaid says
Canada saved his life
VANCOUVER, British Columbia
- Randy Quaid said if it weren't for
Canada's refugee system, he and his
wife would be dead.
The actor made the comment
Tuesday as he entered his immigra-
tion and refugee board hearing in
Vancouver, where he and his wife Evi
were picked up last month on an out-
standing warrant in the United States.
The pair quickly claimed refugee
status and their hearings have been
conducted amid their bizarre claims
of being hunted by what they call
"Hollywood star whackers."
They say many of their friends


have died under mysterious circum-
stances and believe they could be
next on the hit list. Quaid is hoping
to convince Canada's Immigration
and Refugee board that he and his
wife are targeted by Hollywood kill-
ers and thereby accomplish what
no other American has ever done in
Canada: Gain refugee status.
"I feel good. If it wasn't for
Canada's refugee laws my wife and
I would be dead," Quaid said before
he entered court.
Quaid and his wife remain fugi-
tives from a California court after the
couple failed to appear last week for
their arraignment on felony vandal-
ism charges for the fourth time.

M Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Noel Neill is 90.
* Playwright Murray Schisgal
is 84.
* Actress Kathryn Crosby
is 77.
* Actor Matt Clark is 74.
* Actor Christopher Riordan
is 73.
* Singer Percy Sledge is 70.
* Pro Football Hall of Fame
coach Joe Gibbs is 70.

Daily Scripture


* Author, actor and econo-
mist Ben Stein is 66.
* Actor John Larroquette is
63.
* Retired MLB All-Star Bucky
Dent is 59.
* Singer Amy Grant is 50.
* Rock singer-musician Tim
Armstrong is 45.
* Singer Stacy Lattisaw is
44.


"So then, just as you received
Christ Jesus as Lord, continue
to live your lives in him, rooted
and built up in him, strength-
ened in the faith as you were
taught, and overflowing with
thankfulness."
Colossians 2:6-7


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks................. $48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks............... $41.40
24 Weeks ......... ...... $82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Vets learn how to
investigate crimes

GAINESVILLE When
federal investigators work-
ing the Michael Vick dog-
fighting case needed some-
one to dig up and analyze
the remains of eight pit bulls
buried on the football star's
Virginia property, they sum-
moned Melinda Merck.
The nation's top forensic
veterinarian, Merck was one
of the few specialists trained
in processing crime scenes
involving animals. Her job
at the American Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty
to Animals involves help-
ing prosecutors build court
cases, and she saw there
weren't nearly enough vets
and other professionals with
those skills.
The 46-year-old Merck is
trying to change that, co-
founding a first-of-its-kind
veterinary forensic science
training program at the
University of Florida. She
and scientists from the uni-
versity's renowned human
forensics lab are sharing
their expertise with animal-
cruelty investigators, police
and veterinarians who come
from around the world.
Demand for forensic vet-
erinarians has been growing
as many states have tough-
ened their animal cruelty
laws. And law enforcement
agencies nationwide have
increasingly recognized that
those who abuse animals are
likely to eventually commit
crimes against people.
Hands-on seminars teach
participants crime-scene
processing and the preser-
vation of evidence in cases
of animal abuse and neglect
such .as those involving
puppy mills, dogfighting and
animal hoarding. Elements
include exhuming remains,
analyzing hair, fibers and
blood splatter, and even how
insect life cycles and plant
growth can yield clues about
an animal's death.
"With animal cruelty,


THE WEATHER


UN'Mli


PARTLY CHANCE MOSTLY MOSTLY
CLOUDY -STORMS SUNNY SUNNY


HI 81LO 57 H178L048 H170L039 H171L046


FOEATO i 25
Pre h4MUtindy nWa lo


In this Nov. 11 photo, Diane Robinson of the American
Humane Association marks and photographs details of a
staged crime scene during a veterinary forensics seminar at
the University of Florida in Gainesville.


there are usually no wit-
nesses or reluctant wit-
nesses and certainly the
victims can't testify, even if
they're alive," Merck said.
. "So they're always evidence-
based cases."
Partnership between the
ASPCA and the university's
William R Maples Center
for Forensic Medicine, the
program has already trained
around 200 people, mostly
through two- and three-day
sessions. A certification pro-
gramn in the subject for the
university students is in the
works.

State approves
65 school grants

TALLAHASSEE State
education officials have
approved 65 local applica-
tions for shares of Florida's
$700 million "Race to the
Top" grant
Applications from 62
school districts and three
laboratory schools were
submitted Monday to
the U.S. Department of
Education for further
approval.
The stimulus grants will
fund innovative approach-
es for improving schools
including teacher pay plans


linked to student perfor-
mance.

Body parts belong
to same victim

FORT LAUDERDALE
- Police say the body parts
found scattered across
Broward County are those
of the same male victim.
Fort Lauderdale police
and the Broward Sheriff's
Office are investigating the
man's death. Investigators
believe he was killed
between Oct. 31 and Nov.
4.
But authorities still don't
know the man's identity and
are asking for the public's
help. He wore thick pre-
scription eyeglasses and a
pair of gray New Balance
sneakers, size ten.
Police say testing con-
firmed that the man's head
found in a bucket in Dania
Beach has the same DNA
as other parts found in Fort
Lauderdale. The bucketwas
filled with concrete. The
container with the man's
cut up body was also filled
with concrete in an effort
to sink it. It was found float-
ing in a waterway.


Valdosta
81/60


Tallahassee
79/62 ,....,
Pensacola / 7/
77/65 Pxfma Cht
78/65


Lake City,
81/57
- Gainesville
Oca81/58


Tam
83/


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82
52
72
49
86 in 1948
25 in 1925


0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.69"
45.32"


*


Jacksonville
80 59


Datona Beach
8'63


City Friday
Cape Canaveral 80 641 c


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


2/ 61 KeWest
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
83/62 80/65 Lake City
Miami
'", Naples
"6 West Palm Beach Ocala
82/70 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers: 82/71 0 Pensacola
84/65 Naples Tallahassee
83/68 Miaini Tampa
Key West 83/70 Valdosta
81/73 *' W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:04 a.m.
5:31 p.m.
7:05 a.m.
5:30 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 9:25 p.m.
Moonset today 10:34 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 10:30 p.m.
Moonset tom. 11:17 a.m.


Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.
28 5 13 21
Last New First Full


J7qas lp 7p lay 6a
Thursday dda







Fam tantmtin t *Wtw nla


N Associated Press


On this date in
1983, the "Great
Thanksgiving
Weekend Blizzard"
hit Denver, Colo.
The storm produced
21.5 inches of snow
in 37 hours, closing
Stapleton Airport for
24 hours. The snow
and wind closed
interstate highways
around Denver.


5

30 dles to bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


83, 60, L
81/69/pc
83/65/t
80/53/pc
81/50/sh
84/73/pc
78/48/sh
83/69/pc
81/66/pc
81/55/pc
83/62/t
70/46/r
67/36/sh
73/43/r
80/62/t
74/43/r
81/66/pc


Saturday
75 55 sn
74, 48, pc
82/67/pc
80/61/pc
71/42/pc
69/44/pc
83/73/t
70/39/pc
82/67/pc
80/63/pc
73/44/pc
75/52/pc
67/47/s
59/39/s
65/36/s
74/57/pc
65/36/s
80/66/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
S- LLC Madison, Wis.
3~ www.weatherpubllsher.comn


O~ Connect~


tAH3. Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-9-8


AROUND FLORIDA


1I!IL T R


~~~"~~~C"~-~~~~l-"ll"~l-~LL--l~L------ ---


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010


Lake City business owner


named Woman of the Year


From staff reports

Earline Parker, owner
of Principle Publisher
in Lake City, has been
named Woman of the Year
2010-2011 by the National
Association of Professional
Women.
The choice was based
upon career development
and accomplishments as
a shoe buyer for a large
wholesale merchandise
corporation at the early age
of 19. Later, she with her
husband developed a group
of 11 shoe stores along the
southern tier of Wisconsin.
He found locations and
managed leasing arrange-
ments; she managed a
sales staff of 66 employ-
ees and was the buyer and
responsible for selection of
all inventory items.
"Knowing the quality and
talent within this national
organization, I feel particu-
larly honored to be cho-
sen Woman of the Year for
2010-2011," Parker said.
After 20 years in the
successful retail shoe
business, they decided to
retire and move to Florida.
Earline moved to Florida,
but didn't retire. Her avoca-
tion had been as a certified
teacher of Equitation at a
stable with a contract to
teach this regimen for the
Physical Ed Department of
the Univei sity of Wisconsin,
thus they chose Ocala as
their destination. She was
looking forward to locating
a position as a teacher of


equitation
only to
discover
that Ocala
had a
number
of horse
farms but
they were
mostly


Parker


dedicated to the racing
industry, not gaited show
horses.
After the hurly-burly of
the retail business, retire-
ment was boring. When
she suggested to the IDA
of Marion County that they
might want to do more
than have lunch, she was
invited to become a volun-
teer to help the Industrial
Development Committee at
the Chamber of Commerce
in Marion County. When
the United Way needed a
new Executive Director,
she was recommended for
the job. In two years, she
increased the campaign
from $77K, to $335K for
Marion County.
The National United Way
referred her to Manatee
United Way. She increased
the campaign from $416K
to over $1 million in five
years plus another $396,000
during the last three years
of her tenure. During her
tenure she designed and
raised the funds without a
capital fund drive to build a
headquarters building val-
ued at $510,000 with only
a $45,000 mortgaged to be
paid by renting office space
planned for in the building


design to pay the remain-
ing amount owed as well as
maintenance for the build-
ing.
During her tenure at the
United Way she enrolled in
a program of Tax Sheltered
Annuities to allow all
employees in the organiza-
tion to build a retirement
account she also referred
so many Agency Directors
to the program that the
President of the firm offer-
ing the program suggested
that when she decided to
retire from the United Way
she contact him. She retired
again starting a new career.
She was imminently suc-
cessful and it was moved to
North Florida to open five
counties which she did.
After moving to Lake
City she realized that the
United Way needed help.
She volunteered to Chair a
Planning Committee. From
this start she agreed to act
as the Executive Director
for a salary commiserate
with their funding and
began to build the organi-
zation.
She raised the campaign
from $186K to $595K in
five years and retired when
the United Way campaign
could afford to pay a quali-
fied Executive Director.
She agreed to chair
a branch of SCORE of
Suwannee Valley which
provides free business
counseling to entrepre-
neurs in business or start-
ing a business. She initi-
ated three business infor-


nation workshops each
year with marketing to
secure a viable audience
for each workshop. Parker
personally counseled 500
clients on-line from as far
away as India. SCORE's
achievements as a branch
of Gainesville allowed them
to become a chapter after
six months and Parker has
been chair of the organiza-
tion four of its seven years.
By 2008, the SCORE
organization had grown
to 23 members and had
served over a thousand
clients. When her fourth
term was coming to an
end, Parker started a sub-
sidy publishing company,
Principle Publisher, to pub-
lish books written by local
authors. The company is
growing and with a website
and is expanding beyond
Florida for writer interest
and the sales of published
works. She has published
the work of nine differ-
ent authors and is work-
ing with clients as far away
as Thomasville, Ga., and
Overland Park, Kan.
The National Association
of Professional Women
recognizes an outstanding
member each year as the
Woman of the Year, atnd
based on the body of her
career accomplish-ments
with pleasure named
Earline Parker of Lake
City, Fla., for the honor of
NAWP Award as Woman of
the Year for 2010-2011.


North Korea shelling killed 4, gutted homes


HYUNG-JIN KIM and
KWANG-TAE KIM
Associated Press
INCHEON, South Korea
- As they left behind gut-
ted homes, scorched trees
and rubble-strewn streets,


residents of the tiny South
Korean island shelled by
North Korea told harrow-
ing tales Wednesday of
fiery destruction and nar-
row escapes.
Ann Ahe-ja, one of hun-
dreds of exhausted evac-


uees from Yeonpyeong
island arriving in the port
of Incheon on a rescue
ship, said Tuesday's artil-
lery barrage that killed
four people two of them
civilians had caught her
by surprise.


"Over my head, a pine
tree was broken and burn-
ing," Ann told AP Television
News. "So I thought 'Oh,
this is not another exercise.
It is a war.' I decided to run.
And I did."


TOURISM: Grant helps
Continued From Page 1A


"All of those who have
contributed to and participat-
ed in the organization's activ-
ities are to be commended
for its many accomplish-
ments," Dennard said. "I
want to extend my personal
congratulations for this
award, as well as offer my
best wishes for the contin-
ued success of your tourism
development efforts."
Campbell expressed
appreciation to the
County Commissions
and Tourist Development
Councils (TDCs) in each of
the three participating coun-
ties.
"Everyone pitched in to
help put together a high
quality application on behalf
of the region. The County
Commissioners and TDCs
were all great in helping us
get approval of the interlocal
agreement and bylaws for
the Suwannee River Valley
Marketing Group," Campbell
said.
The Columbia County


John A Kasak CLU CPCU, Agent
904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy
Lake City, FL 32025
Bus: 386-752-7521


TDC was the lead organi-
zation for the grant applica-
tion and Campbell praised
its staff for perserverance
and the pride taken in sub-
mitting an extremely impres-
sive marketing plan.
"Paulette Lord in our office
serves as Marketing Director
and she compiled and seg-
mentalized an impressive plan
which includes press trips,
our new vacation guide, sales
missions, consumer shows,
military travel shows, social
media and websites, along
with promotions. Paulette
deserves a lot of the credit
for our winning this grant,"
Campbell said.
The Suwannee River Valley
Marketing Group will be eligi-
ble to apply for additional fund-
ing on an annual basis and is
one of seven rural regional
marketing groups currently
being funded by OTIED.
"Ifwe do our job, there's no
reason we can't get this every
year," Campbell said. "Its a
renewable grant"


That's turkey talk for "Dig in."
There's no better time to
thank you for your continued
business. Happy Thanksgiving
to you and your family.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there?


StatrmeFarmo

o._,58 .State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL


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CAMPUS

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Join today!
Visit us or call
754-9088 and press 5.

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Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!5
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CAMPUS Good Faith Estimate. Other ,ji .1, ,pi, .. ,-' 1 2-,J .-...-.i: -..,.:. ,, ,,i, ..i ,.. .. i'. -i", 1 ,..- '..'.'. to qualify for the CAMPUS Free Checking Account, you must be signed up fore-Statements Up to 30 free CAMPUS PAY transactions per month 3 Credit
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0524


^^^^T^^s the^ Semon...^^^^^^^^^^^


Cout o CMPU t hlp you wrapit up!^^


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~













OPINION


Thursday, November 25, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com 4A


O
0 P


THEIR
INION


Pope's


stance


reflects


reality

paque as it is, Pope
Benedict XVI's
statement that con-
dom use might be
justified to prevent
the transmission of AIDS is a
significant development. His fel-
low bishops, especially those in
Africa, should feel liberated to
apply the pope's observation to
a public health effort that has
been hampered by the Vatican's
dogmatism.
As his critics point out, the
pope's comments in a newly
published book of interviews
- fell short of endorsing wide-
spread use of prophylactics to
prevent the transmission of
AIDS and other diseases, and
they certainly didn't question
the church's opposition to con-
traception. But they contrast
dramatically with his insistence
last year that society "can't
resolve (the AIDS epidemic)
with the distribution of condoms.
On the contrary, it increases the
problem." No amount of spin by
church officials can disguise that
change.
The pope's actual words were
characteristically elliptical. The
pope's example of a male prosti-
tute is peculiar, suggesting that
AIDS is a gay disease or that it is
found only on society's fringes.
In fact, in sub-Saharan Africa, for
example, AIDS is widely trans-
mitted through heterosexual
intercourse, including sex inside
marriage. He also seems to be
saying that condom use is more
acceptable when it's the first
step on the road to abstinence or
marriage. The HIV virus doesn't
make such distinctions. It isn't
only in "this or that case" that
condoms protect against the
transmission of disease.
Ifs unrealistic to expect this
conservative pope to modify ,
the church's strictures against
birth control or to stop press-
ing for abstinence. But we hope
Benedict's words reflect his rec-
ognition that common sense, and
Christian charity, require a more
compassionate approach than the
church has offered in the past
Los Angeles Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.


BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Anger on airport patdowns takes off


SWASHINGTON
That trip
to grandma's
house for
Thanksgiving
this year has lost a lot of its
charm, especially if you happen
to be the unlucky person who
accidentally sets off an airport
alarm or for some other often
innocuous reason faces either a
full body scan or, heaven forbid,
the dreaded pat-down.
The hands-on inspection
initiated by Homeland Security
seems to have turned the annual
pilgrimage to dine with family
and friends into a passionate
debate in which a majority of
Americans would like to baste
the Transportation Security
Administration rather than the
turkey. As the nation's biggest
travel week of the year began,
polls showed that 55 percent of
Americans found offensive the
touchy-feely inspection of their
bodies prescribed as a means
of terrorism prevention. The
government, they made clear,
had gone too far, the underwear
bomber notwithstanding. On the
other hand, a significant majority
said they had no problem with
the full-body scanners now being
deployed in major airports.
For their part, TSA chief John
Pistole and his boss Homeland
Security Secretary Janet
Napolitano seemed to spend
more time the.past 10 days trying
to defend the new policy against
threats of suit, protests, and
criticism from Capitol Hill and at
least one fellow Cabinet member,
including State Secretary Hillary
Clinton, than in carrying out their
other duties as the first line of
anti-terrorist defense. Clinton,
as everyone in the world includ-
ing the terrorists must know by

LETTERS TO

Healthy Kids service
needs nourishment
As of July 20, myself and my
son moved to Fort White. I am
on disability and my son is also
on medication.
I went to apply for medicare
and healthy kids. At the end of
July, three weeks later, my insur-
ance was all set No word from
Healthy Kids, so I called, called,
called, and they don't answer
the phone. It just says sorry, all
the lines are busy, please try
later and hangs up.
Finally I got through, and
employees said they never
received any application. So I go
there again to fill out a second
one. In the meantime, my son's
medications cost $178 monthly.
At the end of August, 'call
again and again. A woman on the
phone says they have no applica-
tion for my son. Unbelievable.
She says she will send me an
application, with a return enve-
lope with her name, and she will
get right on it That was the end
of September. On Nov. 5, I mailed
her back her application that I
received on Nov. 4.
Now, on Nov. 18, she finally


Dan K.Thomasson
now said she wouldn't want to be
patted down, either. Napolitano,
however, said she had undergone
the procedure at least twice and
had no problem with what critics
have labeled a form of govern-
mental sexual assault.
The pat-down policy itself
raises serious questions about
the judgment of those who
devised it on justifications that
included unspecified intelligence
about possible looming attacks
on U.S. airliners comparable to
those of the failed attempt to use
exploding undershorts to down a
jetliner over Detroit last year and
the recent discovery of bombs
mailed to the United States from
Yemen, indicatifig airliners were
still a prime target Everyone
from the White House to the low-
est functionary in Napolitano's
department had to know what an
uproar rubbing a passenger's pri-
vates would cause even with shrill
warnings of the terrorist specter
hanging over us and even if only
3 percent of those flying ever
have to undergo it Ift's a media
dream and television has lost no,
time showing the actual process
in graphic detail.
There has to be a better way.
And of course there is. The two
versions of the body scanner
are quicker and far less inva-
sive despite unproven claims of
dangerous radiation potential
from one of them. In that case,
scientists have certified its safety.

THE EDITOR

returned my call after I left her
five messages.
Well, guess what? She
never received my application,
addressed to her.
What is wrong with this state?
Now she is going to mail me
another application, which I will
mail back to her, certified, with
signature only. Since I've been
here, my son's needs have cost
me $890, none of which they will
refund to me. There is a serious
problem with this state's assis-
tance.
Ann Knowles
Fort White

Search scriptures
to see the signs
The coming again of the
Lord Jesus Christ is called that
"Blessed Hope." For when He
comes agaip for His church,
it will be a most joyous event
for His people. Every believer
therefore should search the
scriptures to see the signs of
this blessed event.
While we are definitely
warned against setting dates, we
are also told to not be ignorant
of the signs of His return. We


Neither of the versions reveals
much beyond a featureless
body with only something that
shouldn't be there highlighted.
There is no way those being
scanned can be identified, and the
images are immediately wiped
out It is painless and quick, and
the government should require
it when inspectors have reason
to suspect"something is wrong
- no if, ands or buts if the pas-
senger wants to fly.
The complete invulnerability
of air transportation to terrorism
is probably not achievable. But
in fairness to TSA and other first-
line defenders, they have been
under enormous pressure to
reach that goal against a faceless
enemy that is constantly devising
new methods to foil them, some
of which are taxingly ingenious.
At the same time, Americans
have taken in stride the ever-
increasing intrusion on their
persons by their government,
realizing it was necessary. They
have taken off their coats, their
shoes, their belts, their glasses
without much complaint This
time, however, the possibility that
they could be subjected to a truly
undignified procedure was too
much.
Meeting with reporters the
other day, Pistole was seriously
asked whether the next step
would be for everyone men,
women and children to strip
down to their underwear because
they are getting close to that now.
He indicated with a straight face
that isn't likely. Those who use air
transportation often also may be
pleased to know that he ruled out
the search of body cavities. All is
not lost then.
Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


know that there are more than
20 verses in the New Testament
alone referring to this event
Almost every book deals with
it to some degree, but the 24th
chapter of Matthew is among
the most complete on the sub-
ject. In Matthew 24:3, the dis-
ciples ask Jesus, 'Tell us when
shall these things be and what
shall be the sign of thy coming
and the end of the world?"
The 24th chapter of Matthew
was not written to the unbeliev-
er, but to the believer. The first
sign is found in Verse 4 of this
chapter. And Jesus answered
and said unto them, 'Take heed
that no man deceive you." It
seems to be first on the list of
concerns and signs of the com-
ing again of our Lord. This same
warning is recorded in Mark
13:5-6 and Luke 21:8.
The last days will be charac-
terized by the multiplication of
false doctrines and deceptive
cults. How significant is this
warning in the light of the amaz-
ing increase of new sects and
cults and isms. No matter how
fanatical or satanic these are,
people still follow them.
Hugh G. Sherrill Jr.
Lake City


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmaoil.com


It's time

to profile

terrorists

EW YORK- As
Americans fly this
Thanksgiving holi-
day, critics of new
security measures
are arriving at airports in kilts.
Subsequent patdowns will be
quite enhanced, indeed.
Preflight screening has
moved from safety to comedy.
Before it devolves into tragedy,
airline employees and govern-
ment officials should start pro-
filing terrorists. America must
focus its finite capabilities on
those who crave the destruc-
tion of planes and the people
who ride them.
How would that profile look?
Today's threat comes almost
exclusively from militant-
Islamic males between about
ages 18 and 35 who hail from
the Middle East and pre-
dominantly Muslim African
and south-Asian nations. This
profile was not drawn by anti-
Muslim bigots, nervous Jews
or paranoid Southern Baptists.
The terrorists themselves cre-
ated this profile. Aviation has
obsessed them for years.
"Bring down their airplanes,"
demanded Sheik Omar Abdel
Rahman, who inspired the 1993
World Trade Center attack.
"Slaughter them on land, sea
and air."
"Any time you hit Kennedy,
it is the most hurtful thing to
the United States," said Russell
Defreitas, a Muslim who tar-
geted fuel tanks at New York's
JFK International Airport. 'To.
hit John E Kennedy, wow," he
said on surveillance tapes.
"They love John E Kennedy
like he's the man.... If you hit
that, this whole country will be
in mourning. You can kill the
man twice."
Those who plot rather than
prevent jet explosions usually
meet this profile. The Sept.
11 hijackers fit it perfectly. So
did Ramzi bin al-Shibh, who
was arrested while conspir-
ing to crash airliners into
London's Heathrow Airport.
The airborne Christmas Day.
underwear bomber was a
young Nigerian male, and the
so-called Shoe Bomber was a
young, male Muslim convert
Had security personnel at
Newark, Dulles or Boston
Logan Airports profiled terror-
ists, they might have stopped
the 9/11 hijackers. If so, al-
Qaida's 2,980 victims would be
feasting on turkey.
Should anyone named
Mustafa be waterboarded
beside the first-class lounge?
No. However, if he is between
about 18 and 35 and from the
Middle East or a predominant-
ly Muslim country, it might
be wise to ask him a few extra
questions, carefully peruse his
papers, and perhaps inspect
him and his possessions.
Terrorist profiling recalls
police deployment of limited
resources. If the NYPD sought
a Mafia hit man who was about
to whack someone, it most likely
would not hunt him in Harlem. If
the LAPD wanted an especially
brutal Crip, Malibu might not be
the first place to track him.
While officials need to respect
the rights of innocents who fit
this profile, passengers also have
an overarching right to land at
their destinations intact

New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
SRevolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


I- I









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Thursday
Thanksgiving feast
Lad Soup Kitchen is
hosting its 15th Annual
Community Thanksgiving
Feast from 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
today. The kitchen is locat-
ed at 127 NE Escambia St

Thanksgiving dinner
The 10 Annual
Thanksgiving Day
Dinner is 11:30 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m. today in the
Fellowship Hall of the
First Presbyterian Church.
The church is located at
697 SW Baya Drive. The
menu will include'fresh
baked turkey with gravy,
cranberry sauce, mashed
potatoes, sweet potatoes,
green beans, rolls, coffee
or tea, pumpkin pie or
carrot cake. There is no
charge for the dinner. Call
752-0670.


Saturday
Park lighting set
The kickoff to the
Christmas season begins at
5 p.m. Saturday in Olustee
Park. Activities begin with
holiday music featuring The
Gateway City Big Band and
Harry Wuest as conduc-
tor. The lighting of Olustee
Park is at 6:30 p.m. followed
by the arrival of Santa
Claus. Photos with Santa
are from 7-9 p.m.

Blood drive
A blood drive is at Ole
Times Country Buffet 11
a.m. 6 p.m. Saturday.
Free buffet to the first 15
donors and a free Gators
or Seminoles shirt.

Sunday
Food for Fines
The annual Food for


Fines program is Sunday
through Saturday at the
Columbia County Public
Library. Each one sealed,
non-expired, non-perish-
able item brought to the
library will reduce a fine
by $1. All items collected
at the Main and West
Branch will be delivered
to the Christian Service
Center in Lake City for
local distribution. Items
collected at the Fort White
Branch Library will be dis-
tributed at the Fort White
food shelf.

Monday
Blood drive
A blood drive is at
Pizza Boy 12 p.m.- 6 p.m.
Monday. Each donor will
receive a free 14" cheese
pizza.

YEP committee meeting
There is a YEP


Committee Meeting noon
Monday at Gondolier
Italian Restaurant &
Pizza. Call the Lake
City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce to
RSVP at 386-752-3690.

Wednesday, Dec. 1
Public meeting
Elder Options is having
a public meeting 10 a.m.
Dec. 1 in the Florida Farm
Bureau Building. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 5700
SW 34th Street, Suite 222,
Gainesville. Contact Cindy
Roberts at 352-378-6649.

Friendship Luncheon
The December
Friendship Luncheon of


the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11:30 a.m.
Dec. 1 at Costa Del Sol, locat-
ed at 2260 W U.S. Highway
90. There will be a $10 gift
exchange for those who wish
to participate. All members,
friends and guests are wel-
come. Contact 719-5564 or
754-7227.

Thursday, Dec. 2
Christmas concert
Richardson Middle
School Wolf Pride Band
is having its annual
Christmas concert
6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 in the
Columbia High School
auditorium. The RMS
Jazz Band, Symphonic
Band, Beginners Band and
Drumline will play songs
of the season under the
direction of Sherrod Keen.

Friday, Dec. 3
Candlelight tour


The Lake City Garden
Club is hosting the
Castagna Christmas
House Candlelight Tour
6:30- 9:30 p.m. Dec. 3.
The house is located at
521 NW Old Mill Road.
Admission is $10. Tickets
are available at Brown-
Vann Carpet One, Lake
City Florist, Your Hearts
Desire or at the residence
the evening of the tour.
Save your ticket and come
out 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Dec.
4 when select Christmas
d6cor will be sold.

HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater
opening of its Radio-on-
Stage dramatic adaptation
of Charles Dickens' "A
Christmas Carol" opens
Dec. 3. The show runs
weekends through Dec. 19.
Tickets are available at high-
springscommunitytheater


OBITUARIES


Abraham Graham
Mr. Abraham Graham, 75, of
Lake City expired Saturday
November 20, 2010 in the V.A.
Medical Cen-
ter after an ex-
tended illness.
He was born
on September
13, 1935 to the
late Julius Os-
born and Ollie
Mae Graham
in Dowling Park q.uie
, Florida. The A a t
family moved
to Lake City in : 7
1942, and made it
their permanent home. Abraham
grew up a quiet and gentle young
man, with a love for all sports.
He graduated from Richardson
High School in 1954. Because
of values instilled in him by his
parents, and his own sense of
patriotism, Abraham enlisted in
the United States Navy in 1955,
where he served for maiy years.
Always a very compassionate
man, Abraham was interested in a
variety of local and global issues,
and was an avid reader. One of his
proudest moments came in 2008,
when he was able to vote for,
and see Barack Obama become
President of the United States.
Abraham leaves to cherish his
memory a loving daughter, Ms.
Shiremeasha Crusaw of Gaines-
ville, Florida, two dedicated
sisters, Mrs. Evelyn Joyner of
Pompano Beach, Florida and
Mrs. Doris Tooten of Live Oak,
Florida, a loving and devoted
brother, Mr. Alfonso Graham of
Lake City, Florida, three beloved
generations of nieces, neph-
ews and a host of dear friends.
Funeral services will be held
Saturday November 27, 2010 at
11:00 A.M. at the Lee's Temple
True Church of God in Unity,
639 N.E. Annie Mattox Street,
Sammie L. Daniels, pastor. Inter-
ment will follow in the Garden
of Rest Cemetery with Military
Honors. Visitation for family
and friends will be from 6-8 P.M.
Friday at the funeral home.
MIZELL FUNERAL HOME
365 N.W. Washington Street,
Lake City is in charge of ar-
rangements. Ph.# (386)752-3166
E-mail: rudolmize@aol.com.
Please sign the guest register
www. mizellfuneralhome. corn

Jack Richard Hood
Mr. Jack Richard Hood, 85, of
Lake City, died peacefully early
Wednesday morning, November
24, 2010 at his residence sur-
rounded by his family. Mr. Hood
had been a resident of Lake City
since 1968 having moved here
from Ashland, Kentucky. He
was the son of the late Jason
and Margaret Ison Hood and
joined what was then the Army
Air Force at the age of eighteen.
Mr. Hood served honorably as a
tail gunner on a B-17G "Flying
Fortress" with the 34th Bomber
Group of the 8th Army Air Force
and participated in thirty five
bombing attacks on enemy in-
stallations in occupied Germany.
Following that successful tour of
duty and the American Victory
in W.W. II Mr. Hood re-enlisted
into the newly formed United
States Air Force and served for
a total of twenty years including
being stationed in Japan during
the Korean conflict. After retir-
ing he worked for a short time
with the U.S. Postal Service and
then began another twenty year
career as a microwave techni-
cian and communications spe-
cialist with AT&T. Following his
retirement from AT&T Mr. Hood
served as a volunteer for the
Civil Air Patrol and as a Crime
Scene Tech in the Investiga-
tions Unit of the C.C.S.O. under
Sheriff Tom Trammell's admin-
istration. In his spare time, Mr.
Hood enjoyed his model trains,
billiards, was an avid bowler and
was a technological wizard. Mr.
Hood was a member of the Our
Redeemer Lutheran Church. He


was preceded in death by his first
wife, Hettie Simmons Hood and
a son, Jack Richard Hood, Jr..
Mr. Hood is survived by his
wife of fourteen years, Raelene
"Bonnie" Hood; three daugh-
ters, Margo Haworth (Pres-
ton) of Sanford, Florida; Patty
Middleton (Scott) of Lake City,
Florida and Tammie Horrell
(Sean) of Niceville, Florida; his
two half brothers, Eldon Thomp-
son and Warren Hood both of
Ashland, Kentucky; his nine
grandchildren, Chris Umstead,
Caleb Umstead, Jay Middleton,
Brian Haworth, Jason Haworth,
Adam Haworth, Patrick Horrell,
Keenan Horrell and Sara Horrell
and his six great grandchildren,
Ethan Umstead, Trace Umstead,
Evan Umstead, Kye Umstead, Eli
Umstead and Miley Middleton.
Funeral services for Mr. Hood
will be conducted at 4:00 P.M.
on Friday, November 26, 2010
in the chapel of the Dees-Par-
rish Family Funeral Home with
Reverend Bruce Alkire offici-
ating. The family will receive
.friends for one hour prior to
the service in the chapel. Inter-
ment services will be private.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. MarionAvenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Grace Lee Jones'
Grace Lee Jones. age 96 resident
of Lake City, Florida (Bethel
Community) passed away Fri-
day, Novem-
ber 19, 2010
at Guardian u
Care Center
terminating an
extended ill-
ness. Born in "
Lake City Co- r
lumbia Coun-
ty, she was the daughter of Mr.
Simon and Mrs. Julia Choice
Glenn and the widow of the
late Mr. Horace Jones, Sr.
Mrs. Jones was pioneer citi-
zen and life long resident of
the Bethel Community and was
Sa member of Bethel A.M.E.
where she served on the Mis-
sionary and Stewardess Board.
She leaves to mourn her pass-
ing one son, Horace Jones, Jr.,
one sister, Mrs. Alice Brady,
,one daughter preceded her
in death, Parthenia Johnson;
twelve grandchildren; twenty
seven great grandchildren;
twenty seven great great grand-
children; one great great great


grandchild; a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, other rela-
tives and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Grace
Lee Jones, will be 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, November 27, 2010
at Bethel A.M.E. Church with
Rev. James Houston, pastor,
officiating. Interment will fol-
low in Bethel Cemetery. The
family will receive friends on
Friday, November 26, 2010 at
Cooper Funeral Home, Chapel
from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.
Arrangements by COOPER
FUNERAL HOME, 251 N.E.
Washington St. Lake City, Flor-
ida. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.

Ardris Delano Paige
Ardris Delano Paige met his un-
timely death November 16, 2010
and went home to be with his
Lord. Ardris
was born Oc-
tober 13, 1967
to the parent-
age of Barbara
Paige and Lar-
ry White. He
was educated
in the Baker
County School System. He
was a Certified Electrician, Be-
havioral Program Specialist at
Northeast Florida State Hospi-
tal, Macclenny, FL. and Sergeant
First Class in the United States
Army Reserves. Ardris was an
ardent lover of sports, especially
football and basketball; enjoyed
participating in games and was
very competitive. As Laris said
"he and Chris are starting on the
best team ever, God's Team".
Raised in a Christian home, Ar-
dris knew and loved the Lord
and his life epitomized such. He
was a faithful member of Faith
Bible Church, shepherded by
Pastor Videll Williams. He was
very active serving as Usher,
. Deacon and in the Drama Min-
istry. Ardris was a God-fearing
man who loved and cared dearly
for his family and friends. He
was one of the "Sobeat'um".
brothers along with Laris and
Gordon. Ardris "Buck" Paige
was loved unconditionally by his
wife (his true love) of 24 years
Trease, his children and family.
Left to cherish fond memories:
his wife, Trease Paige; children,
LaTrese Farmer, Delano, Ardre,
Marquis, Daytrell and Andrea;
grandson, Jayceon; parents,
Barbara Paige and Larry White;
brothers and sisters, Gordon,
Rod, Eleanor, Lorenzo, Kelli;
other relatives and friends.
The Homegoing Celebration


will be held 11:00 A.M. Sat-
urday, November 27, 2010
at First Baptist Church. Glen
St. Mary, Florida. Pastor Vi-
dell Williams, officiating.
Visitation with the family will be
from 6 8:00 P.M. Friday, No-
vember 26, 2010 at Faith Bible
Church, Sanderson, Florida.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street. Lake
City, Florida (386) 752-4366.
"The Caring Professionals"

David Craig Stamper
David Craig Stamper, 46, a
resident of Lake City, Florida
passed away Wednesday No-"
vember 24, 2010 at his home:
Mr. Stamper was a native and
lifelong resident of Lake City,
Florida and is the son of the
late David Robert "Bobby"
Stamper. He was a Baptist
and had been employed with
the Mobil Home Industry.


Survivors include his mother:
Carol Gibbs Boyette, Lake City,
Florida. One sister: Stepha-
nie Haley, Lake City, Flori-
da One Uncle, Jackie Gibbs
and a host of other relatives.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted Monday, Novem-
ber 29,2010 at 11:00A.M. inthe
Forest Lawn Memorial Cemetery
with the Rev. Dale Tomlinson,
officiating. The family will re-


ceive friends Sunday November
28, 2010. from 5:00-7:00 P.M.
at the funeral home. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 SW
Main Blvd. Lake City, Fl. 32025.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


HEALTH


THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 25, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a May 2006 file photo, Gilead Sciences Inc. Chief Executive John Martin holds a Truvada
pill bottle in a lab in Foster City, Calif. Scientists have an exciting breakthrough in the fight
against AIDS. Daily doses of Truvada, a pill already used to treat infection with HIV, the virus
that causes the disease, helped prevent healthy gay men from catching it through sex with an
infected partner.



Anti-AIDS groups hail


drug, worry over cost


By MARCUS WOHLSEN
Associated Press.

SAN FRANCISCO -
AIDS prevention advocates
are hailing a pill newly
shown to protect against
HIV as a great tool for dis-
ease prevention.
But they caution that no
urug alone can address
social factors blamed for
the persistence of the epi-
demic. And they say con-
cerns remain about who
will pay for the costly treat-
ment.
A study released Tuesday
showed that daily doses
of a drug called Truvada,
already used to treat HIV
infection, cut the risk of
new infections among
healthy gay men.
Kyriell Noon of the San
Francisco-based Stop AIDS
Project said any addition to
the HIV prevention safety
net is good news. But he
said factors, such as lack
of access to education and
health care that contribute
to higher infection rates, do
not evaporate when a prom-
ising drug comes along.
Truvada, which costs
$5,000 to $14,000 a year in
the United States, will do
little to halt HIV's spread
if the only way to get it is
to pay out of pocket, Noon
said.
'The history of the HIV
epidemic in this country
has been a story of dis-
parities," he said. "I would
hate to see this new excit-
ing breakthrough enhance
those disparities."
Noon's group was among
those that helped recruit
participants for the study in
San Francisco, which has
more than one new HIV


infection every day, accord-
ing to the city's Department
of Public Health.
The overall study
involved about 2,500 men
at high risk of HIV infection
in Peru, Ecuador, Brazil,
South Africa, Thailand and
the United States (San
Francisco and Boston).
Dr. Susan Buchbinder,
director of the San Francisco
health department's HIV
research section, called the
findings on the drug a "tre-
mendous step forward."
But she took pains to point
out that among the sev-
eral HIV prevention stud-
ies she has overseen, this
latest had especially strict
requirements for making
sure participants stayed on
track.
Men taking Truvada had
to commit to monthly medi-
cal visits and received exten-
sive counseling, including
reminders about the impor-
tance of condoms. Such
reminders seemed to have
worked: During the study,
risky sex among men tak-
ing Truvada declined.
But concern exists that
in the real world, some
men will see Truvada as a
license to be promiscuous
and shed precautions such
as condoms. A follow-up


study will track participants
who remain on the drug to
see if that happens.
Advocates say that
regardless, such wor-
ries are why just handing
out the drug will not be
enough.
"Our goal is to try to
combine prevention inter-
ventions," Buchbinder said.
"It's not about just popping
a pill every day."
Yet for many healthy
gay men, the question of
whether to take a daily
dose of Truvada will like-
ly become an important
issue.
Public health officials
say they are working on
defining who falls into the
highest risk groups who
would benefit most from
the drug.
But Jason Meier, 32, has
already made up his mind.
The self-described single,
sexually active gay man
from Birmingham, Ala.,
said he would ask his doc-
tor for the drug.
Meier, a student affairs
staffer at The University of
Alabama at Birmingham,
said that taking one pill
a day before contracting
HIV is better than taking
multiple pills after becom-
ing infected.


O EYE CENTER of North Florida
General Eye Care & Surgery


Eyete

Cwm

CftonSufny
Dotbacao


i ] Timing for medical tests


GOTT: I'm
a 49-year-old
female. I have
given birth
to three children ages 19
to 24. There is no known
history of ovarian or
breast cancer in my fam-
ily. My brother and I both
had-our thyroid glands
removed due to cancer-
ous tumors.
For the last 25 years,
I have had annual PAP
smears and vaginal/anal
exams, with great results.
Last month I went to my
internist for an annual
physical. This was the
fourth year I have seen
him. He's done my gyne-
cological exams and
PAPs. This year he said
that regulations have
changed and because I
have had three succes-
sive normal PAPs, I do
not need one for three
more years. I questioned
whether this was due
to new research or new
regulations. He said "new
regulations." I told him I
wanted one anyway. My
insurance will pay, and
I'm not concerned about
the cost if the procedure
isn't covered. I am con-
cerned about cancer.
So he had me undress
and put on a gown. When
he came back to the
exam room he pulled up
the "regulation" on his
computer to show me,
saying there was no need
to do the exam. I was
dumbfounded and agreed.
My research has told me
that passing on the PAP
is OK but that I should


I'~I\
'~K \k

N
I,.. .


ON HEALTH

Lr.L




Dr. Peter Gott

have a vaginal and anal
exam to look for ovarian
cancer, which he did not
do. Nor did he do a breast
exam. He just told me
that I should perform self
breast exams.
Should I go to an OB/
GYN for a proper exam or
do you agree with him?
DEAR READER: I
don't know what you
had done as part of your
annual exam or what it
cost, but it appears to me
some things might have
been left out. He didn't
perform a breast exam.
Did he check your blood
pressure, do an EKG,
listen to your heart, talk
about the importance of
a colonoscopy in the near
future, coordinate pos-
sible necessary lab work
or X-rays and ask relevant
questions about your past
medical history?
Pap tests and pelvic
exams are an important
part of an examination for
women because they can
detect cancer and other
abnormalities that could
lead to cancer of the cer-
vix. If abnormalities can
be detected early, they
can be treated earlier,
before cancer has had
time to develop.
Of the 55 million PAP


tests performed every
year in the United States,
approximately 3.5 million
of them are abnormal and
require follow-up. While
not all testing is accurate,
false positives (as well as
false negatives) can be
reported. About half of
the false negative reports
are because of inadequate
specimen collection. The
other half occurs because
of misinterpretation on
the part of the individual
examining the specimen.
Newer methods being
instituted have made it
easier to collect and ana-
lyze.
Digital rectal exams are
done to check for poten-
tial problems in the pelvic
area, uterus, ovaries,
lower abdomen, vaginal
bleeding, pelvic pain and
more.
Recommendations have
been modified. Some peo-
ple may look on this fact
as favorable, while others
are concerned because of
potential consequences
for waiting. If you feel
strongly that you want
specific testing performed
and your physician has
voted against it, the
answer is to find a gyne-
cologist who is willing to
do what you want even
if this means paying out
of pocket.
Dr. Peter Gott is a.retired
physician and the author
of the book "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Suqar Diet" avail-
able at most cnain and
independent bookstores,
and the recently published
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Cookbook.".-


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I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY NC. E.MEER 25, 2010


Economic data reveal hint of consumer merriness


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer
WASHI, &TON -
Americans are earning and
spending more, companies
are shedding fewer work-
ers and hopes are rising for
the economy as the holiday
shopping season starts.
Still, with businesses
spending less on manufac-
tured goods and new-home
sales near their lowest
level in 47 years. consum-
ers alone might not be able
to invigorate the economy
and drive down unemploy-
ment.
All told, government data
released the day before
Thanksgiving suggest
an improving economic
picture. But it is increas-
ingly dependent on the
consumer, even with U.S.
companies having reported


record profits in the July-
September quarter.
"Households are spend-
ing more, and that may
signal they are starting to
feel better about economic
conditions," said econo-
mist Joel Naroff of Naroff
Economic Advisors. "It is
the consumer that holds
the key to the recovery and
it looks like households are
starting to turn the lock."
On Wall Street, the most-
ly encouraging news on the
economy buoyed stocks.
The Dow Jones industri-
al average closed up 150
points.
Many retailers depend on
the holiday shopping sea-
son to make their year. The
November-December shop-
ping season can account for
up to 40 percent of retailers'
revenue and profits.
Consumers boosted


spending 0.4 percent in
October, up from a 0.3 per-
cent increase in September.
the Commerce Department
reported Wednesday.
Many are benefiting
from thicker paychecks.
Americans' incomes rose 0.5
percent in October, pulled
up by a 0.6 percent rise in
wages and salaries. That was
after incomes didn't grow at
all in September.
At the same time, the
pace of layoffs is slow-
ing. Initial jobless claims
dropped by 34,000 to a sea-
sonally adjusted 407,000 in
the week ending Nov. 20,
the Labor Department said.
Applications have fallen in
four of the past six weeks.
Last week's figure was
the lowest since July 2008
and the first time that claims
have fallen below 425,000
since then.


y-pI'


A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A FedEx employee sorts packages next to his truck Tuesday in New York. The holiday sea-
son is the busiest of the year for the Memphis-based delivery company. Americans loosened
the grips on their wallets and spent more last month, a hopeful sign as shoppers head into
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.. i-' -I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


1
'
T
J











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jlakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday. November 25. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


LADIES OUTLOOK


Antonia Robinson
Phone:(386) 754-0425
orobinson@lakecityreportercom

One

tradition

can end

There is one
thing I am not
thankful for
this and every
Thanksgiving:
football.
I absolutely dislike
having to watch it all day
and weekend. No one
except die-hard sports fans
should be subjected to
such torture.
There, I said it.
Unfortunately, I have
a father who believes
otherwise. To him
watching football on
Thanksgiving Day is as
much a tradition as eating
turkey.
And it doesn't end on
Thanksgiving. Football
games are watched the
entire weekend.
The tradition has yet to
be broken in my parents'
house.
Thanksgiving football
has been the bane of my
existence since early
childhood.
My parents thought one
television was sufficient for
the household while I was
growing up. Quite naturally
on Thanksgiving Day it
was tuned into one football
game after the other.
Sure, I don't mind one
game, but three is just
overkill on Thanksgiving
Day. Then having to watch
it through the weekend is
even worse.
I always tried to plead
my case to daddy.
Do the Detroit Lions and
Dallas Cowboys ever take
a break from playing on
Thanksgiving?
Must I watch hour after
hour of players pushing the
pigskin?
What about the holiday
movies and shows I want to
watch?
It all fell on deaf ears.
And so I endured my
torture.
Then the minute I
went off to college, TVs
appeared in every room.
I would be free from the
Thanksgiving football
madness, or so I
thought
For some reason it
didn't matter. All the TVs
still ended up focused on
football.
There is no escaping the
madness.
Perhaps it wouldn't be
so bad watching the games
if my daddy didn't yell at
the TV. Nevermind the
coaches and players can't
hear him.
Or if we spaced out
game watching then all
the football would be
acceptable. One game
here, followed by a holiday
movie there. ...I could live
with that.
But now ift's just nonstop
football.
It drives me crazy.
What's even crazier is I
know today I will yet again
sit in front of the TV and
watch three football games
back to back with my
family.
Now family togetherness
is something I can be
thankful for.
Antonia Robinson staff
writer for the Lake City
Reporter.


Shopping


can wait: It's


football time


Post-turkey
games pack out
weekend slate.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
The Christmas shop-
ping can wait. Instead of
Black Friday, the day after
Thanksgiving should be
called BCS Friday.
The top three teams
in the country No. 1
Oregon, No. 2 Auburn and
No. 3 Boise State face
ranked conference foes in a
triple-header bursting with
BCS implications.
Auburn starts the foot-
ball feast when it takes on
No. 9 Alabama in the big-
gest Iron Bowl in years.
A rivalry that never lacks
for intensity and is usually
heavy on intrigue is loaded
with high stakes and sub-


plots this season .
On the field, it's the.
first time since 1994 that .
the Iron Bowl features
two top-10 teams.
The last two seasons,
it was Alabama trying
to stay undefeated and
Auburn trying to play h .
spoiler. Now, Auburn
(11-0) is just a couple of d
wins away from playing in
the BCS national champi-
onship game and this
Tide (9-2) team is still
hoping to land a major
bowl bid.
Then there's Camgate. ASSOCIATED PRESS
TheNCAAislookinginto Florida's Jordan Reed (11) breaks a tackle made by Jabari Fletcher (54) and Patrick Blalock
the recruitment of Auburn (34) to score a touchdown in a game against Appalachian State at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in
star quarterback Cam Gainesville on Saturday.
Newton after allegations by
Mississippi State boosters online. Wrecking Crew keeps 19%) at No. 1 Oregon
that his father asked for The picks: Longhorns home for Calwasjustaspeedbump
money to send his son to TODAY holidays ... TEXAS A&M for Ducks ... OREGON
play for that school., No. 17 Texas A&M 24-13. 48-21.
As for the presents, don't (minus 3) at Texas Friday .
C-I. I.Pi UKSfliII$tA dJU 3JBl


worry, you can always shop


The Aggies'


new No. 20 Arizona (plus


Big steps for Barber


Lake City native
receivesspecial
golf invitation.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Blayne Barber
hasn't hit
the big time
yet, but
he's getting.
closer. The Auburn
sophomore was one of
16 players invited to a
special practice session
that will help determine
the 2011 Walker Cup
team.
The Walker Cup is
the amateur equivalent
of the PGA tour's Ryder
cup which pits the
top American golfers
against the greatest from
Europe. Barber hasn't
been selected to compete
on the Walker Cup team
yet, but this is a step
toward that dream.
"It's pretty awesome
just to be chosen for this
practice session," Barber
said. "It's an opportunity
just to be considered. I
haven't made it yet, and
the team will consist of
10 guys. Most of those

BARBER continued on 3B


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City native Blayne Barber competes in a golf tournament for Auburn University at Old Memorial golf course in Tampa
earlier this year. Barber received an invitation to a special practice session for the Walker Cup in January.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida quarterback rolls out while looking for an open receiver during the
Gators' 48-10 win against Appalachian State at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville
Saturday.


Brantley, Ponder

fall short of lofty

expectations


Players continue
to get support off
the field of play.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Florida's John Brantley and
Florida State's Christian
Ponder are getting plenty
of support, at least off the
field.
Coaches and teammates
defend the quarterbacks
at every turn. The Gators
(7-4) insist their offensive
problems aren't Brantley's
fault, pointing to dropped


passes, poor protection
and a slowed running
game. The Seminoles (8-3)
believe Ponder's drop-off
is exaggerated, saying his
increased win total is all
that matters.
This much is certain:
Neither quarterback has
lived up to expectations.
Brantley was supposed
to replace former Heisman
Trophy winner Tim Tebow
and keep Florida in the
.national championship pic-
ture. Ponder was supposed
to emerge as a Heisman
candidate and lead Florida
GATORS continued on 3B


Il


oc nt nue on











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25. 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN -Texas A&M at Texas
GOLF
3 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
World Championship, second round, at
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic, first
round, Boston College vs. Texas A&M, at
Orlando.
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic, first
round, Wisconsin vs. Manhattan, at
Orlando.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 76 Classic, first round,
DePaul vs. Oklahoma St., at Anaheim,
Calif.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic, first
round, Georgia vs. Notre Dame, at
Orlando, Fla.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic, first
round, Temple vs. California, at Orlando,
Fla.
I 1:30 p.m.
ESPN2 76 Classic, first round,Tulsa
vs. UNLV, atAnaheim, Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT -Washington at Atlanta
10:30 p.m.
TNT Sacramento at LA. Clippers
NFL FOOTBALL
12:30 p.m.
CBS New England at Detroit
4:15 p.m.
FOX New Orleans at Dallas
8:20 p.m.
NFLN Cincinnati at N.Y. Jets,
Friday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
II a.m.
ESPN2 Louisville at Rutgers
Noon
ABC -WestVirginia at Pittsburgh
2:30 p.m.
CBS -Auburn at Alabama'
3:30 p.m.
ABC Colorado at Nebraska
FSN UCLA at Arizona St.
7 p.m.
ESPN -Arizona at Oregon -
10:15 p.m.
ESPN Boise St. at Nevada
GOLF
3 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
World Championship, third round, at
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Old Spice Classic, semifinal,
teams TBD, at Orlando, Fla.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN 76 Classic, second round,
teams TBD, at Anaheim, Calif.
ESPN2 Preseason NIT, third place
game, at NewYork
5 p.m.
ESPN Preseason NIT, champion-
ship game, teams TBD, at New York
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic, semifinal,
teams TBD, at Orlando, Fla.
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Houston at Charlotte
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Golden State at Memphis
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Noon
VERSUS Playoffs, championship
game, teams TBD, at Omaha, Neb.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


Ne'
N.Y.
'flia
Buf


Ind
Jack
Ten
Ho


Balt
Pitt
Cle


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF P
w England 8 2 0.800289 2-
Y.Jets 8 2 0.800238 17
ami 5 5 0.500172 2
falo 2 .8 0.200213 2
South
W L T Pct PF I
ianapolis 6 4 0.600268 2
ksonville 6 4 0.600220 27
nnessee 5 5 0.500257 I'
uston 4 6 0.400 244 21
North
W L TPct PF I
timore 7 3 0.700233 1
sburgh 7 3 0.700235 1
eveland 3 7 0.300 192 2C


PA
42
77
08
76

PA
16
70
98
87

PA
78
65
06


Cincinnati 2 8 0.200215 262
West
W L TPct PF PA
Kansas City 6 4 0.600 243 207
Oakland 5 5 0.500 238 223
San Diego 5 5 0.500 274 211
Denver 3 7 0.300217E287
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas


Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona
San Francisco


East
W L
7 3
6 4
5 5
3 7
South
W L
8 2
7 3
7 3
1 9
North
W L
7 3
7 3
3 7
2 8
West
W L
5 5
4 6
3 7
3 7


T Pct PF PA
0.700 284 226
0.600 253 220
0.500 202 245
0.300229 271

T Pct PF PA
0.800256 192
0.700235 170
0.700 209 206
0.100 117 252

T Pct PF PA
0.700 191 146
0.700252 146
0.300 172 226
0.200 234 237

T Pct PF PA
0.500 185 233
0.400 177 198
0.300 188 292
0.300 160 219


Today's Games
New England at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Green Bay atAtlanta, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Minnesota atWashington, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, I p.m.
Carolina at Cleveland, I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 29
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Thursday
No. 17 Texas A&M at Texas, 8. p.m.
Friday
No. I Oregon vs. No. 20 Arizona,
7 p.m.
No. 2Auburn at No.9Alabama.230 p.m.
No. 3 Boise State at No. 19 Nevada,
10:15 p.m.
No. 16 Nebraska vs. Colorado, 3:30 p.m.
Saturday
No.4 TCU at New Mexico, 4 p.m.
No. 5 Wisconsin vs. Northwestern,
3:30 p.m.
No. 6 LSU at No. 12 Arkansas, 3:30
p.m.
No. 7 Stanford vs. Oregon State, 7:30
p.m.
No. 8 Ohio State vs. Michigan, Noon.
No. 10 Oklahoma State vs. No. 14
Oklahoma, 8 p.m.
No. II Michigan State at Penn State,
Noon.
No. 13 Virginia Tech vs.Virginia, Noon.
No. 15 Missouri vs. Kansas, Saturday.
No. 18 South Carolina at Clemson,
7 p.m.
No. 21 North Carolina State at
Maryland, 3:30 p.r.
No. 22 Florida State vs. Florida, 3:30
p.m.
No. 23 Utah vs. BYU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 24 Iowa at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Mississippi State at Mississippi,
7 p.m.

AP Top 25

The.Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
.Nov. 20, total points and prior ranking:
Record Pts Pv
I.Oregon (37) 10-0 1,467 I
2.Auburn (13) 11-0 1,430 2
3. Boise St. (10) 10-0 1,394 3
4.TCU 11-0 1,340 4
5.Wisconsin 10-1 1,197 6
6. LSU 10-1 1,192 5
7.Stanford 10-1 1,181 7
8. Ohio St. 10-1 1,086 8
9.Alabama 9-2 972 10
10. Oklahoma St. 10-1 959 12
I I. Michigan St. 10-1 929 II
12.Arkansas 9-2 860 13
13.VirginiaTech 9-2 722 14
14. Oklahoma 9-2 652 16
15. Missouri 9-2 638 15
16. Nebraska 9-2 611 9
17.TexasA&M 8-3 575 18
18. South Carolina 8-3 560 17
19. Nevada 10-1 440 19
20. Arizona 7-3 270 23
21.N.C.State 8-3 240 -
22. Florida St. 8-3 233 -


23. Utah 9-2 213 25
24. Iowa 7-4 101 21
25. Mississippi St. 7-4 95 22
Others receiving votes: N. Illinois 72,
West Virginia 26.Tulsa 12, Hawaii 7, Navy
7, Florida 4, Miami 4, UCF 4, Southern
Miss. 3, Penn St. 2, Ohio I, Oregon St. I.

GOLF

Golf week

PGA EUROPEAN TOUR/
ASIAN TOUR
Dubai World Championship
Site: Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Jumeirah Golf Estates, Earth
Course (7,675 yards, par 72).
' Purse: $7.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.25 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 3-8 a.m., 10 a.m.-6 p.m., 6:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
LPGATOUR
Next event: LPGATour Championship,
Dec. 2-5, Grand Cypress Golf Club,
Orlando.
Online: http://www.lpgo.com


BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 10 4 .714 -
New York 7 8 .467 3h
New Jersey 5 9 .357 5
Toronto 5 9 .357 5
Philadelphia 3 II .214 7
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando 9 4 .692 -
Miami 8 6 .571 I'h
Atlanta 8' 7 .533 2
Washington 5 8 .385 4
Charlotte 5 9 .357 4'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 7 5 .583 -
Indiana 7 6 .538 'h
Cleveland 5 8 .385 2h
Milwaukee 5 8 .385 2'k
Detroit 5 9 .357 3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 12 I .923 -
New Orleans 11 2 .846 I
Dallas 9 4 .692 3
Memphis 5 9 .357 7'h
Houston 3 10 .231 9
Northwest Division


Oklahoma City
Utah


Denver
Portland
Minnesota
Pa

L.A. Lakers
Golden State
Phoenix
Sacramento
L.A. Clippers


pacific 0


W L Pct
10 4 .714
10 5 .667
8 6 .571
8 6 .571
4 II .267
Division
W L Pct
13 2 .867
7 7 .500
7 7 .500
4 9 .308
2 13 .133


NBA schedule
Tuesday's Games
Indiana i 00, Cleveland 89
New Jersey 107, Atlanta 101, OT
Washington 116, Philadelphia 114, OT
New York 110, Charlotte 107
Dallas 88, Detroit 84
L.A. Lakers 98, Chicago 91
Today's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers,
10:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Colorado at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Friday's Games
Carolina at Boston, 12 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Calgary at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Nashville at Minnesota, 2 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 7:30 p.m. ,
St Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
San Jose atVancouver, 10 p.m.


ACR wraps season with win


From staff reports

The ACR Hunnies fin-
ished the season with a
98-93 victory over the Fort
Myers Derby Girls Saturday
at Skating Palace.
"I think it was a very
tough bout for the girls and
myself," said Justin Taylor,
Hunnies coach. "It was very
back and forth and competi-
tive."
The Hunnies played with
just nine players compared
to Fort Myer's 14.
The bout was more fast


paced than the Hunnies are
used to, he said. The team
is used to controlling the
pack.
Teamwork was a strength
for the Hunnies when they
needed to make a play,
Taylor said. But the team
needs to work on respond-
ing to each other a lot fast-
er.
Inexperienced refereeing
hurt their game, said Mike
Hendershot, Derby Girls
coach. Some calls made
were questionable.
But the Hunnies played


well with less players and
were good at blocking, he
said.
"We didn't show up,"
Hendershot said.
Kelly Baucom was named
MVP Jammer and Rachel
Sumja was named MVP
Blocker for the Hunnies.
Jaclyn Koc was named
MVP Jammer and Kelsey
Johns MVP Blocker for the
Derby Girls.
The next home bout for
the ACR Hunnies is Feb.
19 against the Jacksonville
Rollergirls


Jacobs back as Giants No. 1


Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. Brandon Jacobs is
once again the New York
Giants' No. 1 running back.
Frustrated with Ahmad
Bradshaw's inability to hold


the ball, coachTomCoughlin
demoted Bradshaw and
gave Jacobs the starting job
for Sunday's game against
the Jacksonville Jaguars.
For his part, Jacobs didn't
know what to make of the
promotion.


'To me this is just a tem-
porary thing," the six-year
veteran said. "I think people
are making a little too much
out of it. We know what
Ahmad brings to this foot-
ball team with his carries
and hard work."


SCOREBOARD


1

4
8
12)
13
14
15
171

18
19
21

23
24

27


ACROSS 43 Proficient
45 - move on!
Puppeteer 47 Pocket change
Baird 49 Folk rocker
Row of seats Bonnie
Moon ring 51 Propped up
Yoko 55 Cultivate the
She, in Seville soil
Livy's route 56 zero
Praises .58 Jazzy James
Take 59 Raised, as
on cargo racehorses
Vast desert 60 Shot from
Glove parts Sampras
Herds of 61 Lentil dish of
whales India
Race off 62 William and
Zoo heavy- Harry, to
weight Charles
Give an audi- 63 High explosive


ence to
29 Still exist
30 Red planet
32 Bark
36 Medal recipient
38 Forest animal
40 "- Light Up
My Life"
41 Sigh of relief


Patriots' Brady


questionable


for Lions game


GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
soccer at Ed White High,
girls-5:30 p.m., boys-
7:20 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Tuesday
Fort White High girls
soccer at Oak Hall School,
6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 1
Fort White High JV
girls soccer vs. Columbia
High, 5 p.m.
Dec. 2
Fort White High
girls soccer at Williston,
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) -
Fort White High boys
basketball at Union County
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 3
Columbia High soccer
at Capital City Invitational,
TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. P.K. School,
7 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Columbia
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 4
Columbia High soccer
at Capital City Invitational,
TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at St. Francis
Catholic, 2 p.m.


GYLINK
7- I


Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
Tom Brady was listed as
questionable for the New
England Patriots game on
Thanksgiving Day against
the Detroit Lions after
missing a walkthrough
practice Wednesday.
Brady also sat out
Tuesday's only full work-
out of the week with a foot
injury after participating on
a limited basis in a walk-
through on Monday. A
questionable listing means
a player has a 50-50 chance
of playing in a game.
With just three days
'between Sunday's 31-28
win over the Indianapolis
Colts and Thursday's
game, the Patriots cut back
on their physical work.
Brady also was listed
with a shoulder injury, as
he has been every week in
recent seasons.
The quarterback took
one day off from practice
during the weeks leading
to the team's previous two
games. Both times, how-
ever, he was listed as prob-
able. Brady played well in
both games, victories over




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. E

INHEW I


WHEN SHE BOUGHT
ANOTHER PILL-OX
HAT, HtEP HUS5 ANP
5AIP IT WAS --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BALKY AWFUL PEPTIC FAMOUS
I Answer: What the cowboy ended up with at the rodeo
A FEW "BUCKS"


Answer to Previous Puzzle

WOOD SEA COMB
YIPE HEW OBOE
ONES ALLSPICE
K NEADS TIES
R YE DEE
I ONI EM H
PAIT.E IOIB (



UN AR TA Y SLIT
RK IE IUMICPS
KN RU B


PI TS ZIZE I CE S
TOA MAD DRAG
UBS P RY YURT


DOWN


Jungle snakes
Pizarro foe
- Ness mon-
ster
London cafe
Epic by Homer


6 Horror-film
street
7 Coarse file
8 Everest con-
queror
9 Molecule parts


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com.


10 Pet shop buy
11 California fort
16 Reindeer
herder
20 Oklahoma
town
22 Cunning
24 Disdainful
snort
25 Fury
26 capital
28 NASA coun-
terpart
31 Civil War prez
33 Hurricane cen-
ter
34 Prune off
35 Deposit
37 Most
favorable
39 Exerts disci-
pline on
42 Sombrero
44 Begin a hand
45 Persona non

46 Peopled plan-
et
48 Peer Gynt cre-
ator
50 Indent keys
52 Sect
53 Jacket style
54 Red ink
55 Nourished
57 Male sib


11-25 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


the Pittsburgh Steelers
and Indianapolis, and
showed no signs of being
hurt. He walked without
a limp in the locker room
Tuesday.
The only other quar-
terback-on the Patriots is
Brian Hoyer. He spent all
last season with the team
after being signed as a
rookie free agent out of
Michigan State. In seven
games, he has completed
19 of 29 passes with no
touchdowns and one inter-
ception, including 0 for 2
with an interception in two
games this season.
Brady has started every
game beginning with last
year's opener after suffering
a season-ending knee injury
in the first game of 2008.
The Patriots (8-2) list six
other players as question-
able for Thursday's game
at Detroit: guard Stephen
Neal (shoulder), corner-
back Jonathan Wilhite
(hip), defensive tackle
Mike Wright (neck/con-
cussion), running back
Fred Taylor (toe), nose
tackle Myron Pryor (back)
and safety Jarrad Page
(calf).

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY NOVEMBER 25, 2010


A year after scandal, Woods tries to move on


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia
- The dark sedan backed
into a spot next to the club-
house at the Australian
Masters, trunk open, wait-
ing to whisk Tiger Woods
to the airport. Lingering
behind the car was a friend
who was still wrestling
with divided loyalties to
Woods and his former wife.
They approached
each other, awkwardly at
first, then shared a quick
embrace and quiet words.
W6ods believes he finally
is ready to move on after
a self-destructive year that
cost him his marriage,
his mystique, millions in
endorsements and, lastly,
his No. 1 ranking.
What remains are rela-
tionships to repair, along
with his golf game.
Still to come is
Thanksgiving.
"I think it's going to
be great," Woods said in
an interview with The
Associated Press. "I'm
going to be with my fam-
ily. My mom is going to be
there. We're going to have a
great Thanksgiving. We've
turned the corner, turned
the page, and ift's time to
move forward."
He was not playing
dumb.
Woods realizes the public
might forever connect him


and Thanksgiving with per-
haps one of the most shock-
ing downfalls in sports.
It started with the
National Enquirer story of
an affair with a nightclub
hostess. Then came the
still mysterious, middle-
of-the-night accident Nov.
27 when he drove his SUV
over a fire hydrant and
crashed into a tree beyond
his driveway. His wife
tended to him in the street,
the back windows of the
Cadillac Escalade bashed
out with a golf club.
On the 911 call was the
chilling voice of his mother
as she cried out, "What hap-
pened?"
One year later, that
remains a relevant ques-
tion.
No one really knew much
about Woods except that he
dominated golf like no. one
had before. Within weeks,
everyone knew too much.
He was caught in a stun-
ning web of infidelity, each
indiscretion played out in
public through voicemails,
celebrity magazines, TV
talk shows and even "sex-
ting" on a porn star's web-
site. He became a regular in
the National Enquirer. He
was on front pages every-
where, long after the major
championship season was
over.
Woods had spent 14
years carefully cultivat-
ing an. impeccable image


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 19 file photo, Tiger Woods pauses during a news
conference, in Ponte Vedra Beach. Woods believes he finally
is ready to move on after a self-destructive year that cost him
his marriage, his mystique, millions in endorsements and,
lastly, his No. 1 ranking.


that brought him world-
wide fame. Just like that,
he went from being uni-
versally revered to roundly
ridiculed.
"That's fine, totally fine,"
Woods said in Australia,
leaning forward on a leather
sofa, elbows resting on his


knees. "I made my share of
mistakes. People can look at
that as what not to do, and if
they choose to make fun of
it, that's fine. I can't control
that. All I know is that I can
only control myself.
"And at that point in my
life," he said, "I wasn't even


able to do that"

At a gala dinner in the
Crowns Tower, the same
hotel where the nightclub
hostess was spotted a year
earlier, Woods shared the
stage with Shane Warne,
known as the Tiger Woods
of Australian cricket, on and
off the pitch.
Warne built his legend as
a wicked leg spinner and
a prolific womanizer.
"I think we've got a little
bit in common," Warne said
with a smile, pausing for
effect. "I love golf, too."
Woods flashed an easy
smile, breaking the brief
tension in the room, and
the audience quickly burst
into laughter. It was the first
time Woods has laughed
publicly about such an
embarrassing episode in
his life, perhaps a sign that
he had indeed turned the
corner.
On the golf course? Not
quite.
With two eagles on
the last four holes of the
Australian Masters, he at
least managed fourth place,
as good as he did all year.
For the first time in his
career, Woods didn't win a
single trophy. Instead, he
shot the highest 36-hole
score of his career when
he missed the cut at Quail
Hollow, and the highest
72-hole score of his career
when he nearly finished last


at Firestone.
In so many ways, it was
a year no one could have
predicted.
"Frenetic would be a
word that comes to mind,"
said Mark Steinberg, his
agent at IMG.
Steinberg was in
California when he received
word thatWoods had been in
an accident He was aware of
the National Enquirer story
that had been released the
day before Thanksgiving,
and he was about to learn
of an Us Weekly magazine
story involving a cocktail
waitress, and a voicemail
from Woods suggesting his
wife was onto them.
For three months, that
voicemail was the only time
the public heard Woods
speak.
As his world was implod-
ing, he only spoke through
statements released on his
website first a "situation"
that was embarrassing,
then "transgressions" he
regretted with "all my
heart." No one saw him.
No one even knew where
he was.
Every expert in public
relations and crisis manage-
ment had a field day, blast-
ing his managemern- team
for keeping him in hiding
as rumors and innuendo
filled the void.
A year later, Steinberg
isn't convinced it was mis-
handled.


PICKS: Florida over Florida State
Continued From Page 1B


No. 2 Auburn (plus
4%) at No. 9 Alabama
Only the NCAA can stop
Cam ... AUBURN 31-27.
No. 3 Boise State
(minus 14) at No. 19
Nevada
A victory will likely get
Broncos past TCU in BCS
standings ... BOISE STATE
45-24.
Colorado (plus 17) at
No. 16 Nebraska
Deep breaths, Bo.
Find your happy place ...
NEBRASKA 35-14.
West Virginia (plus
21h) at Pittsburgh
The Big East has to have
a champion. It's in the rules
... WVU20-16.
Saturday
No. 4 TCU (minus
44) at New Mexico
Horned Frogs could
win by 100 and it probably
won't matter ... TCU 62-10.
Northwestern
(plus 23%') at No. 5
Wisconsin
Badgers running game
powered by best offen-
sive line in country ....
WISCONSIN 48-21.
No. 6 LSU (plus 31)
at No. 12 Arkansas
Razorbacks still thinking
BCS, too ... ARKANSAS


28-21.
Oregon State (plus
14), at No. 7 Stanford
Beavers have won seven
of last nine meetings ...
STANFORD 41-17.
Michigan (plus 17) at
No. 8 Ohio State
Buckeyes go for seven
straight against Wolverines
... OHIO STATE 45-21.
No. 14 Oklahoma
(plus 2') at No. 10
Oklahoma State
Sooners win plus
A&M win causes three-
way tie in Big 12 South;
BCS standings break it
... OKLAHOMA STATE
35-30.
No. 11 Michigan State
(minus 1) at Penn State
Spartans have been
living on edge ... PENN
STATE 23-17.
Virginia (plus 231) at
No. 13 Virginia Tech
Hokies have won six
straight meetings ...
VIRGINIA TECH 35-10.
No. 15 Missouri
(minus 24'k) vs. Kansas
at Kansas City, Mo.
Tigers still alive in Big
12 North if Nebraska loss-
es ... MISSOURI 48-10
No. 18 South Carolina
(minus 3) at Clemson


Tigers have not lost two
straight to Gamecocks
since 1970 ... SOUTH
CAROLINA 31-23.
No. 21 North Carolina
State (minus 2%) at
Maryland
Wolfpack are victory
away from first ACC title
game ... MARYLAND
28-21.
Florida (plus 2%) at
No. 22 Florida State
Gators have never lost to
'Noles under Urban Meyer
... FLORIDA STATE 28-17.
BYU (plus 9) at No.
23 Utah
The last Holy War as
Mountain West Conference
rivals ... UTAH 28-23.
No. 24 Iowa (plus
15%') at Minnesota
Floyd of Rosedale stays
with Hawkeyes ... IOWA
42-14
No. 22 Mississippi
State (plus 211) at
Mississippi
'Home team has won six
straight and 10 of 11 Egg
Bowls ... OLE MISS 28-24.
Notre Dame (no line)
at Southern California
QB Matt Barkley ques-
tionable; Trojans have won
eight straight in series ...
NOTRE DAME 31-24.


GATORS: QB getting most of blame


Continued From Page li
State back to national
prominence.
Instead, they're squar-
ing off Saturday in one of
the rivals' least meaningful
matchups in years.
Sure, Florida's six-
game winning streak
in the series is at stake,
along with bowl destina-
tions, bragging rights and
recruiting battles. But the
most significant number
on the scoreboard at Doak
Campbell Stadium will be
the result of the North
Carolina State-Maryland.
game.
The quarterbacks, as
usual, -get much of the
blame.
Brantley has thrown for
more than 200 yards only
four times this season.
He has eight touchdown
passes, eight interceptions
and he's been sacked so
often that his shattered
confidence seems to be a
bigger problem than his
bruised ribs, sore shoul-
der and sprained thumb.
"You've got to forget
about it," Brantley said. "If
you let that hang over to


the next week then you're
going to be distracted.
You're going to be think-
ing about that way too
much than your task at
hand that day at practice
or that opponent. You've
just got to keep moving
forward."
Brantley has completed
62 percent of his passes
for 1,968 yards. His prob-
lems have been evident
from the season opener.
Receivers Carl Moore and
Deonte Thompson have
been unreliable, the senior-
laden offensive line has
been a disappointment and
Florida's coaching staff
failed to tweak the spread
offense to suit Brantley's
strengths.
Compounding the
issues, running back Jeff
Demps has been ham-
pered most of the year
by a foot injury. Backups
Emmanuel Moody and
Mike Gillislee also missed
time with injuries.
"I see a lot of guys get-
ting down on Johnny this
year, but it's a team game,"
Moody said. '"The offen-


sive line has to protect
him, the running backs
have to be able to make
plays in the run game, the
receivers have to get open.
We can't just focus on one
player and think that he's
doing bad just because
they see the statistics or
the results.
"We have to see the
thing as a whole and see
what every person on the
field is doing."
What happens when the
Gators'can't run?
"It kind of messes it all
up," Brantley said.
Ponder has gotten more
help from his running
game, but his receiving
corps has been a problem
all season.
Jarmon Fortson, pegged
to be a big-play threat, was
dismissed from the team in
August. Without him, Bert
Reed, Taiwan Easterling
and Willie Haulstead have
been fairly pedestrian.
Reed tends to drop passes
in key situations, Easterling
struggles to get open and
Haulstead is dealing with a
concussion.


COURTESY PHOTO
Auburn golfer Blayne Barber competes in a tournament earlier this season.


BARBER: Moving in right direction


Continued From Page 1E

10 guys come from this.
It's a good step in the right
direction."
Jim Holtgrieve will
captain this year's team
after helping America win
three Walker Cup titles
during his playing career.
Barber doesn't know much
about Holtgrieve yet, but
is looking forward to the
opportunity to meet him.
"I haven't met him in
person yet, but I've talked
to him and he seems
really nice," Barber said.
"He played on five or six
Walker Cup teams in the
70s and 80s."
The practice session will
take place Jan. 4-7 at the
Old Memorial golf course
in Tampa. Barber has
limited experience playing
the course.
"I played there last
semester, but I didn't
have my best round," he
said. "It's an exclusive
course and pretty
secluded. I didn't play
that well though. In fact,
it's probably the worst
I played. It was a good
learning week for me, and
the course is scoreable."
There was a reason
for Barber's struggles at
the course, however, as
the Lake City native was
going through a swing
adjustment during the
tournament.
"I feel that it has slowly
improved," he said. "I
am learning more about
my swing, and becoming
more comfortable with it


My short game continues
to improve, and I think it
will come together well.
Everything is moving in
the right direction."
Of course having his
swing coach serve as his
college coach has helped
in perfecting his swing. It's
also the reason that Barber
made the switch from
playing with the Golden
Knights of Central Florida
to becoming an Auburn
Tiger.
"Having coach Clinard
is convenient, because I
trust in him," Barber said.
"He's great in general,
and knows a lot about the
swing. He's been able to
work with good players,
and we worked well
together at UCE I trust
him with my game, and
he's certainly been a big
part of my success."
Clinard learned from
one of the best, Hank
Haney, during his years
living in Orlando. Haney is
the world famous teacher
who had his own show on
the Golf Channel. Though
he wasn't able to fix the
likes of Charles Barkley's
swing on the show, Haney
also served as a coach for
Tiger Woods.
"He worked with Haney
for eight year," Barber said.
"He's learned a lot from
the guys that he worked
with, mainly Tiger Woods.
He really knows the game
and he's got a wisdom
from that."
Barber's goal for the


last two years has been to
use that wisdom toward
making the Walker Cup
team. The realization that
this may come true has set
in, and Barber continues to
work toward that goal.
"It may sound cliche,
but I'm just taking it day
by day and continue to
try to get better. It's easy
to say, but it's hard to do.
It's in the forefront of my
mind, just trying to work
on the little things. It's
great to get invited, so that
at least I'm considered, -
but I definitely hope to get
picked."
The No. 20 amateur
in the world according
to golfweek.com has no
intentions of making the
jump from the amateur
ranks to the professional
level at this time.
"First I want to
graduate," he said. 'That's
taken a lot of time and
effort, and I have no
intentions of leaving early. I
only have about a year and
a half left, but after that
we'll see."
Until then, Barber
continues to focus on
his amateur events, but
doesn't rule out the
possibility of playing in a
PGA tournament through a
sponsor's exemption.
"I'll be playing
throughout the summer
tours, and maybe I can get
to the point I could win a
sponsor's exemption if I
do well," Barber said. "It
certainly could happen."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT
BOB, DIRECTOR OF
PURCHASING
I REQUESTED AN
ETHERNET SWITCH
AND YOU SENT ME
A BOX OF
PENCILS.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


.rBVE BeE cARg,,6, 7"R~Ey' FOR YEA49s
AWP o'TNAEP YOUR APVICE//


DEAR ABBY


Teen fears job prospects are

deflated by her four piercings


DEAR ABBY: I am a
teenage girl about to start
looking for my first job. I
have four facial piercings
and I feel they may be detri-
mental to finding one.
I have researched ef-
fective ways of hiding my
choices in jewelry. My
question is, during an inter-
view, is it OK to ask about
a company's policy on pierc-
ings? My mother thinks I
shouldn't, but I feel it might
be a good idea to be upfront
about the way I Taking the
piercings out is not an op-
tion. I have invested too
much time, energy, money
and pain. The fact that I can
keep my piercings clean and
healthy should speak for
my level of responsibility.
I would love some advice,
Abby. BEJEWELED IN
OTTAWA
DEAR BEJEWELED:
Many businesses and com-
panies have strict codes that
cover how they want their
employees to look while
representing them. Regard-
less of how clean you keep
your body jewelry, if you
don't fit their "brand" im-
age, you will not qualify.
Because you have too
much invested in your pierc-
ings to remove them, my
advice is to interview with
companies that are involved
in the arts, fashion, media
and Internet technology.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
They cater to a younger,
more liberal demographic,
and you will be free to be
more yourself than have to
project a corDEAR ABBY:
My question has to do with
gift giving and receiving. My
mother-in-law has a stan-
dard reaction after she is
given a gift She scrunches
up her face and starts yell-
ing, "I thought I told you no
gifties." It's not a polite, "I
wish you hadn't spent your
money on me." She then
proceeds to open the pack-
age and starts complaining
about the tape, ribbons, etc.,
her standard comments be-
ing, "Do you have any tape
left at your house?" or, "I
know who wrapped this
one!" directed at me. Then
she says, "What am I sup-
posed to do with this?" or
some other put-down.
I have found myself of-
fering gifts at other times
of the year something to
keep her warm or that she
needs always unwrapped
and casually delivered.
My question is, "What's


wrong with me?" "NO
GIFTIES" IN GRAHAM,
WASH.
DEAR "NO GIFTIES":
What's "wrong" with you is
you're a glutton for punish-
ment This year, take your
mother-in-law at her word
and "surprise" 'her by giv-
ing her what she has said
she wanted all these years:
nothing. Then she'll be
speechless.
DEAR ABBY: I have
been dating "Ronald" ex-
clusively for eight months.
I invited him to our family
Thanksgiving dinner and
he accepted, but then he de-
cided to go to his brother's
instead. (They invited him
two weeks after I had asked
him.)
Shouldn't couples be
together for the holidays,
or am I asking too much?
Ronald has met my parents,
but I have yet to meet any of
his family. Is this a sign that
he just doesn't care? DIS-
APPOINTED IN MICHI-
GAN
DEAR DISAPPOINT-
ED: Let me put it this
way: It's a sign that Ronald
doesn't care as much as you
do.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Your personal life must
get top priority. Dealing with
children's or seniors' prob-
lems will give you greater
perspective regarding your
own life. A relationship will
suffer if you don't share your
thoughts. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Keeping a secret will
add to the excitement when
the surprise is revealed. You
can make a valuable contact
at an institution or govern-
ment agency, enlightening
you with regard to your own
personal situation. Altera-
tions at home will ease your
financial stress. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't make promises
you cannotkeep. Taking part
in functions that bring you in
contact with interesting peo-
ple who share your interests
could cause personal prob-..
lems. Someone with whom
you are in partnership will
need to be included. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You may feel as if
you are being forced out of
an intolerable situation. In
retrospect, you will see that
you have been done a favor.
New opportunities are with-
in reach, so be sure to take
advantage of what's avail-
able. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't worry too much about
what others do, say or think.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Plan your own entertain-,
ment and hobbies. You are
the leader and, regardless of
anything else, you will be the
one to make final decisions
and carry on down the path
you have chosen. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You may feel the need
to put a little pressure on
some of the people in your
life who are letting you
down. A financial situation
will take a turn for the worse
if, you have trouble getting
along with someone who
owes you or can influence
your income. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): You can't change what
others do or think but you
can conduct your own busi-
ness so that your reputation
is enhanced and strong ties
are built with people who
can help you advance. Ex-
pect someone jealous of
your skills to try and make
you look bad. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Spend time doing
something you'll enjoy or
making improvements that
will boost your ego and your
confidence. It will help your
attitude and lead to an inter-
esting alteration with regard
to the way you live your life.
-*-**-**


SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Decorate
your home or make a move.
Whatever you do to enhance
your living space will pay off,
even if it initially is difficult
to accomplish. Don't let your
temper stand between you
and someone with your best
interests at heart. ***-
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't give in to
emotional blackmail. Keep
your thoughts and plans out
in the open so no one can ac-
cuse you of being secretive.
A problem with a partner will
prevail if you cannot come to
an agreement regarding a
family situation. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Align yourself
with the people you have
worked with before and dis-
cuss future projects. Once
you see how much interest
you get, you can schedule
your time suitably. A rela-
tionship can benefit you
mentally, financially and le-
gally if you make a commit-
ment from the heart ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Youll be errat-
ic and unpredictable. Impul-
sive decisions may appear
to be what you want at the
moment but, given time, you
will realize you may have
made a big mistake. Back-
track quickly and don't hesi-
tate to apologize. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals C
"PZZW FAHD ZFZJ AWZG KA FAHD
YZDLBZJ. KNZ YXG TNA MADSZKJ KA
UZ KNXGPMHV NXJ MXVVZG XJVZZW
BG VBMZ." DAUZDK VAHBJ
J K Z I Z G J G
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I learned to appreciate and treasure each day,
because you don't know how many you're going to be given." Sandra Day
O'Connor
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-25


CLASSIC PEANUTS


8 SOMETIMES I TWJEAK
E THE NON-STANDARD
I ORDERS 50 I CAN USE
OUR APPROVED VENDORS.


YOU CAN'T I CAN
= TELL THE TELL THE
T DIFFERENCE DIFFERENCE
S BETWEEN A BETWEEN
5 SWITCH AND YOUR PROB-
- A PENCIL? LEM AND
-MINE.


,


ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER











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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000746
DIVISION
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION..,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANNE T. SARGENT, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated November 9,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000746 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, is the Plaintiff and
ANNE T. SARGENT; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE HERE-
IN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWNa TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TEN-
ANT #1 N/K/A SHAYLA NOR-
MAN are the Defendants, The Clerk
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at COURTROOM 1 OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 15th day of December, 2010, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 12, BLOCK 2, OF OAK PARK
SUBDIVISION,' AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 17, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND ALSO THE FOLLOWING:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK 2, OF
OAK PARK SUBDIVISION, AS
RECORDED. IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 17, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA ($AID POINT BE-
ING ON THE WEST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF BAKER STREET) -
AND RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES
37 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID LOT, 1 AND LOT 2, BLOCK
2, A DISTANCE OF 114.92 FEET,
TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF SAID LOT 2, SAID POINT
FALLING IN AN EXISTING
CHERRY TREE;, THENCE NORTH
89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 15
SECONDS EAST ALONG AN EX-
ISTING WIRE. FENCE 114.91.
FEET TO SAID WEST,,RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF BAKER STREET,
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 27
MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE 3.00 FEET TO THE,
POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 645 SE PUTNAM STREET,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025.
Any person claiming an' interest in
the surplus from the' sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
,WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on November 10, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk ofthe Circuit Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
'time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09110094
05524462
November 18, 25, 2010


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-241-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVID GLENN MAYO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
David Glenn Mayo,deceased, whose
date of death was November 24,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served 'must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of first publi-,
cation of this notice is November 18,
2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/: Nancy Jo Mayo
397 NW Orbison Drive
Lake City, FL 32055
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/: John J. Kendroi
Attorney for Nancy Jo, Mayo .
Florida Bar Number 0306850
Robinson, Kens~on &'Kendron, P.A.
582 West Duval Street
POBox1178 -
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Fax (386) 755-1336 ,
E-Mail: jjk@rkkattomeys.com
05524471
November 18,25, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDIC CIRCUIT OF
FLORiD TN'A tOR'COLrJM&
BIA COUNTY ; .1
Case #: 2009-CA-000757
Division .
UNC:
CitiMortgage. Inc.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Aaron White and Debra Ann White
a/k/a Debra Ann Stanley a/k/a Debra
A. White, Husband and Wife; United
States Department of Agriculture;
Sunstate Federal Credit.Union; Ben
Ellis; American General Finance,
Inc.; Unifund CCR'Partners d/b/a
Unifund CCR Partners, G.P.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF.SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENl pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated November 3,
2010, entered in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-000757 of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff
and Aaron. White and Debra Ann
White a/k/a Debra Ann Stanley a/k/a
Debra A. White, Husband and Wife
are defendantss, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash AT
THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT
173 HERNANDO STREET, LAKE
CITY,.. COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA. AT '11:00 A.M. on -De-
cember 15, 2010; the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 8, FRANK C. CUMMINGS
SUBDIVISION, UNIT 1, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT-
BOOK 6, PAGES 182 AND 183, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE. LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
'DATED at Lake City, Florida, this
4th day of November, 2010.
P. DEWIT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
/s/ B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT

05524412
November 18,25, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 09000015CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CATHERINE LOVELADY, et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHIR-
LEY ANN REED OWENS F/K/A
SHIRLEY ANN
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 2, BLOCK 7, OAK HILL ES-
TATES REPLAT, ACCORDING
TO THE MAP OR PLAT THERE-
OF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 52, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on


Legal

Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or be-
fore December, 10, 2010, a date
which is within thirty (30) days after
the first publication of this Notice in
the LAKE CITY REPORTER and
file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there-
after, otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 10th day of Novem-
ber, 2010.
P.Dewitt Cason
As Clerk of the Court
/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05524460
November 18, 25, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-297-CA
LENVIL H. DICKS,
Plaintiff,
vs, -
BOBBY W. HINGSON, a/k/a
BOBBY W. HINGSON, JR. and
DENISE L. HINGSON,
Defendants'.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 16, Block B;.Pine Hills Addition,
a subdivision as recorded in Plat
Book 6, Pages 36-36A, public re-
cords of COLUMBIA County, Flori-
da.
shall be sold by the. Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment: in the above styled'
.action dated November 15, 2010, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da. at 11:00 A.M.; on. Wet.esday,
December 15, 2010, to the best and
highest bidder for- cash. Any person
claiming an interest. in:any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this,
15th day of November, 2010
, P. DEWITT.CASON.
Clerk of Court
By:./s/ J. HARRIS
Deputy Clerk
04542377
November 18, 25, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE-
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-CA-35
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
UNDER POOLING AND SERVIC-
ING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF
MAY 1, 2007 SECURITIZED AS-
SET-BACKED RECEIVABLES,
LLC TRUST 2007-BR3 MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIF-
ICATES, SERIES 2007-BR3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LINDA L. HURLEY, ANTHONY
HURLEY, CAPITAL ONE BANK
'(USA), NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION F/K/A CAPITAL ONE
BANK, HARVEST CREDIT MAN-
AGEMENT VII, LLC UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSESSION #1
and #2, and ALL OTHER UN-
KNOWN PARTIES, et. al.,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Summary Judgment
of Foreclosure dated November 16,
2010, entered in Civil Case No.: 10-
CA-35 of the Circuit Court of the
Third Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
UNDER POOLING AND SERVIC-
ING AGREEMENT DATED AS'OF


Legal

MAY 1, 2007 SECURITIZED AS-
SET-BACKED RECEIVABLES,
LLC TRUST 207-BR3 MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIF-
ICATES, SERIES 2007-BR3, Plain-
tiff, and LINDA L. HURLEY, AN-
THONY HURLEY, CAPITAL ONE
BANK (USA), NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION F/K/A CAPITAL ONE
BANK, HARVEST CREDIT MAN-
AGEMENT VII, LLC, are defend-
ants.
I will sell to the highest bidder for
cash, Third Floor of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055 at
11:00 AM, on the 12th day of Janu-
ary, 2011 the following described re-
al property as set forth in said Final
Summary Judgment, to wit:
LOT 28, JOY ACRES, A SUBDIVI-
SION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PA-
GES 15 AND 15A, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
If you are a person claiming a right
to funds remaining after the sale, you
must file a claim with the clerk no
later than 60 days after the sale. If
you fail to file a claim you will not
be entitled to any remaining funds.
After 60 days, only the owner of re-
cord as of the date of the lis pendens
may claim the surplus.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
the court on November 16, 2010.
P. DEWI'T CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire
Popkin & Rosaler, P.A.
1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard
Suite 400
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954) 360-9030, Facsim-
ile (954) 420-5187
10-23237
05524495
November 25, 2010
December 2, 2010


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found
LOST, One Hearing Ajd,
Wed, Nov 17
in Lake Ci;ty
Call 386-497-3443 if found

100 Job
Opportunities

04542412
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience.. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

Need to hire One Person,
Must have Computer exp.
Order Entry/Purchasing/Shipping/
Receiving exp. Needed.
Apply in Person 174 NE
Cortez Terr, Lake City FL


100 Job
SOpportunities

04542450
CDLA OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542454
CCSS, Inc, is accepting
applications for PT CNA &
Housekeepers. Must have CPR,
First Aid training. Dependable
transportation. Level II
background screen & drug test
required. Apply in person
628 SE Allison Ct.
Lake City, FL EOE

05524512
HELP WANTED
SALES PERSON
To call on company
convenience stores and private
stores. Help develop new
locations. Must have sales
ability; good driving record
required.Dependable and good
communication skills.
Transportation furnished,
willing to live in Perry, FL
Send resume and income history
to: PO Box 1201 Perry, FL
32348

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412

Medical
120 Employment

Medical assistant/secretary
needed in local physician office.
Please fax CV
to 386-719-9662.

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


141 Babysitters

Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or P/T,
located near the center of town.
WilLaccept onet0o twd'childten
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

0 Schools &
240 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/29/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $40 386-752-0987

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2008 Toyota Tacoma
4DR, access cab.
17,250 mi., AT, all power,
Tonneau cover, bedliner,
class III hitch, nerf bars,
AM-FM stereo w/CD,
sliding rear glass.
$17,995
Call
386-752-8227


2009 Custom
Chopper 300cc
Low miles, like new,
must sell.
$2,000 OBO

Call
386-758-1784


1987 Ford
Mustang GT
5spd, 28,000 orig. mi, interior
showroom new, cobra wheels
(have orig. wheels)
$10,500 OBO
Call
386-963-2271


In Print,

& Online

One Low

Price!


I at 38- 75-5440 -I


I -


* ADvantage *








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

408 Furniture
COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
(904)704-9377
Craftmatic full size elec adj bed
w/vibrating feature, includes
mattress and 5 piece bedrm suite
$400 752-2572 leave message
RECLINER,
TALL & wide beige. Decent
shape. $40.00
386-755-8941

416 Sporting Goods
Gym Equipment: Olympic Plates,
Benches, Dumbbells, Treadmill,
Stepper, Nautilus Machine.
MUST SELL! 386-752-0749

420 Wanted to Buy
GUITARS WANTED
Gibson, Fender, Etc.
Cash paid will travel.
(407)733-1687
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri. &
Sat., (8-4). 247-240R CR 49R,
247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
Multi Family Fri Sun. 8am.
Comer of Lake Montgomery.&
Alamo. Appli., elec., hswares,
Christmas, auto, tools, clothes,
sewing mach. wheels/tires, furn.





PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
AVON
Great Gift Ideas
Shop online at
www.youravon.com/vlawton
Physical Therapy Equipment:
Exam/treatment table,
$100.00 MUST SELL
386-752-1652

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420
The Nut Cracker
Buyand sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
RobertTaylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $60,
Tigerette dancer selling firewood
to go to competition, will deliver
Call 386-965-3728
461 Office
461 Equipment
OFFICE FURNITURE
All Wood Computer
Desk $50
386-752-0749
OFFICE FURNITURE
BLACK LEATHER
CHAIRS $20
386-752-0749
630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422'
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass; $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3BR/2BA NEWLY renovated
MH on 1/2 ac. private property.
$700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Security dep.
References needed. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/l BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba- Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
71 Unfurnished Apt.


$Holiday Cash $
NOAppFee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-324 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Efficiency apartment, Close to
VA, $430 mo. plus $150.00 sec,
utilities included.No pets.
386-754-9641 or 386-438-4054.
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
-Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
04542444
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.
1/1 Cottage, pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Very Clean 2br/lba. in own.
298 SW Miller Terr. CH/A, Shed.
$650.mo. lst.mo. & security.
Call Vick 386-623-6401
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

750 Business&
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial, tatus or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the a'e of 18. This
newspaper will irbt knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of'the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800.;669-9777,
SP A. ... itheolliee-
telephone number to the hearing.
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. bf Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


t-~' I-~7




.4


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

930 Motorcycles
2009 Custom Chopper, 300cc,,
low miles, like new,
must sell $2000 obo
386-758-1784

940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto, AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, neff
bars, stereo. $17,995. 752-8227

COX^UMDBN GB I'S
N 1 SBu FkBaj[ ('K!!! I
[,))KIV1111,(''kM a~l-D


950 Cars for Sale
1999 Chrysler Concorde LXI,
leather interior, automatic,
gold in color, tinted windows
386-984-0770
87 Ford Mustang GT, 5 spd.,
28,000 orig miles, adult owned,
runs exc., cobra wheels,
$10,500 OBO 386-963-2271
94 BUICK LeSabre
Low miles.
Runs great, $2400.00
386-752-0824


Lake City Reporter


AY to reserve

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