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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01460
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/24/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01460
System ID: UF00028308:01460
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Double Down
Tigers' boys, girls soccer
squads both lose.

S (..0.00 1 0C)

Lo aoe





L ay, November 24, 2010



Wednesday, November 24, 2010


2 3 1GT"'


32611 -.1)943


uAIL


Stumble Start
Fort White falls in boys
hoop opener.


Sports, IB






porter



Vol. 136, No. 264 N 75 cents


Two women shot and killed in Jacksonville


Both at one time
called Lake City
their home.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter:comn
Jacksonville sheriffs
sought the public's help
Tuesday as they searched.


for a van stolen from two
female friends who were
shot dead on a seclud-
ed street Monday in
Jacksonville.
Lt. Larry Schmitt con-
firmed during a news
conference that Tashanda
Jones, 20, and Janet Mincey,
33, were found with fatal
wounds at approximately


5:20 p.m. Monday in the
3700 block of Springrove
Street.
Capt. John Blanchard,
Lake City Police
Department public infor-
mation officer, said the
women had previously
listed Lake City as their
addresses. Jones last listed
her address as Lake City in


October and Mincey last
listed her address as Lake
City in 2007.
JSO did not confirm if
the women were current
Lake City residents as of
presstime Tuesday.
Schmitt said police are
searching for the vehicle
the women drove to the
location before the shoot-


ing occurred a 2004 bur-
gundy or red Ford van with
Florida license plate num-
ber M107RN. The vehicle
is listed as stolen. Police
contacted the owner of the
missing van, who is one
of the women's relatives,
but have not been able to
locate the vehicle, Schmitt
said.


"If anybody sees that
vehicle we're asking them
to immediately call 911 and
do not approach the vehicle
or any occupants of it," he
said.
Mike McCall, JSO public
information officer, said in
an e-mail that the inves-
WOMEN continued on 3A


SUWANNEE RIVER FLOWING


AT NEAR-RECORD Low LEVELS


October was one
of county's driest
months ever.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The flow of the
Suwannee River
at two area water
level gauges
has dwindled to
near-record low levels.
Suwannee River flows.
according to the water level
gauges at White Springs
and Branford, are below
the fifth percentile for thel
entire record, officials
said.
"Ninety five percent of
the time since the l1I. ,,
the flows have been high-
er at these gauges than
they are now," said Megani
Wetherington, a senior
professional engineer with
the Suwannee River Water
Management District. "It's
pretty significant low-flow
conditions."
She said the principal
culprit behind the low river
flows has been lack of rain-
fall.
"In the last two months
we've had a really pro-
found lack of rainfall,"
Wetherington said.
"Columbia County had one
of the driest months on
record. In October there
was only two-one hun-.


Man admits to


burglarizing


Recycle Center


Spotted by police
running from
the business.
I Fon st,)af reports

A man was arrested by
Columbia County Sheriff's
Deputies for burglarizing
a local business Sunday,
according to reports.
Billy Joe Tonmlinson. 23,
of 1I." S.W. IFriendship X\ ..
was charged with burglary.
possession of burglary
lools and grand theft.
ClC SO deputies were
actively patrolling the area
ot Th"c Recycle Center oni
Fast Washington Street in
Response to recent burglar-
ics to local metals recyclers,
IccO ding to reports. Sgt.
Jeff Wattson was patrolling


JASON MATTHEW WALKERLake C::y ReporIer
Wendell Hannum, the owner of American Canoe Adventures in White Springs, gazes at the
Suwannee River, which is in some places reaching its near record low levels. Hannum
said that the low levels have affected his business so much that he had to cut down the num-
ber of 'put-in' places along the Suwannee River from nine to seven.


dredths of rain recorded
at the Lake City gauge -
that's among the four dri-
est months on record since
1892 for Lake City."
Thus far in November,
Columbia County is at
about 50 percent of its nor-
mal rainfall.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/l.ake City Reporter
A tree line is seen in the reflection of the Suwannee River.


Wetherington said the
past few dry months, com-
bined with just normal rain-
fall levels during the sum-
mer, has caused the rivers
'to decline, even though
they were at normal levels
in May and June.
"It's just steadily fallen
and now (the flow levels)
are close to record low
for both the Santa Fe and
Suwannee Rivers," she
said. I
Suwannee River Water
Management District offi-
cials are concerned with
the low flow levels and the
potential it has to impact
the area.
For people who use the
rivers for recreational pur-
poses such as boating or
canoeing, Wetherington
said more effort may be
required in making trips.


"Alilhiugh at low levels
the rivers are very beauti-
ful and there are some very
interesting geological fea-
tures exposed on the banks
thatl"don't get seen very
often," she said.
The Suwannee River's
watershed begins in
Georgia, with half of it
around Tiptoo and with
the Okeftenokee Swamp
serving as its headwaters.
'Two of the Suwannee
River's major tributaries.
the Alapaha River and the
Withlacoochee River, begin
north of Tipton..
"ThIie portion of Georgia
that affects us has basically
been having the same iprobl-
lems we've been having,"
Wetherington said.
Rainfall predictions
RIVER continued onI 3/


the area on foot and saw
Tomlinson run from the
business and into a nearby
neighborhood.
Watson stopped
Tomlinson and noticed
that he was
sweat iging
profusely
and his
clothes
w e r e
r c recently
s o i I e dc
with dirt, Tomlinson
according
to the report. Tomlinson
provided \:. iiinc accounts
for his presence in the area
and his whereabouts prior
to ing W\atson.
Deputies attempted to
verify Tomlinson's alibis
POUCE continued on 3A


School board to

aid in railroad's

reconstruction


Board will give a
caboose to help
with the project.
By LEANNE TYO
It ot%'i e d('C te portt, t.corn

Local governmental enti-
ties, including the school
district, have been teamn-
ing up with the town of
Fort White to create a spe-
cial Fort White landmark
that will enhance both
the town and learning for
local children, officials said
Tuesday.
That landmark: an
authentic train museum
located at Fort White's
restored train depot, com-


-plete with 150 feet of train
track, a steam engine, box-
car and caboose.
The Columbia County
School Board discussed
the project to which it is
donating a 1920s caboose
that the district currently
owns and received an
update on the project from
Glenn Hunter, board mem-
ber, at its regular meeting.
I Hunter said after the
Town of Fort White recent-
ly restored its historic
train depot with state grant
money, the school board
decided to donate a caboose
it owned one that used to
be a playground prop at the
SCHOOL continued on 3A


50 Boston butts donated to CSC


Columbia HS FFA effort," said Shawn Mayo iJr.,
gives food as part chapter president.
Tlhe donation was part of
of Farm City Week. celebrating Farmn City Week
for the chapter.
From staff reports The chapter, along with
the support of the Columbia
Columbia High School FI"A FFA Alumni, raised the money
donated 50 cooked Boston to provide ithe neat as a
butts to Christian Service Thanksgiving Day main course
Center Tuesday. for families in need. Alumni
"We are thankful to have members began cooking the
the opportunity to give back meat at 6 a.m.
to our ciiiunnnin through this CSC had several people call

IIII l l CALLUS :i ,l
(386) 752-1293 '1 ')
cI1u 1 SUBSCRIBE TO Partly cloudy
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
I Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


about Thanksgiving baskets,
said Shirley McManus, execu-
live director. 'liet organization
usually focuses on l)roviding
baskets for Christmas.
"It's a real blessing," she
said. "It's something normally
we don't have."
Providing thie meat was a
wonderful project for FFA,
lcMaiinus said.
The chapter was simply
following the FF"A motto,
"IAarning to 1)o. I)oing to

l/ Opinion ......
S People........
~ Obituaries .. .
Advice & Comis
Puzzles .......


Ix'arn, Earning to Live, Living
to Serve," said Sheby IHarden,
vice president.
"It's a great feeling knowing
that you made a difference in
someone's life this holiday sea-
son," she said.
The National FFA organi-
zation is dedicated to making
a posiliv' dillerence in the
lives ol students by de'velolp
ing lheir potential tor preliner
BUTTS continued on 3A.


........... 4A
........... 2A
. . . . ... 5A
cs ......... 3B
........... 2B


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake i'ty Reporter
Shawn Mayo Jr., Columbia High School FFA president,
and Shelby Harden, vice president, give a Boston butt to
Teresaca Cleek and her sister Marrissa Russell, 16, Tuesday.
TO A W I N SSt~'i^^at^is>ie^?^eSt't~a *^.ai


TODAY IN
NATION
Si ilcde's to
I,, r i ... th KoreaI .


COMING
THURSDAY
A pri'eview ol the
I (' ivfl l 0l I ,l i',l


S ."









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


lIay.'


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 4-2-7
Evening: 3-1-1


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 6-5-2-8
Evening: 1-2-7-0


ewnatch.
Zp 6 Monday:
S16-22-29-30-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Swift to hit four continents on tour


NASHVILLE, Tenn.

Taylor Swift will be hitting
the road again in early
2011 with an ambitious
schedule that includes 19
countries on four conti-
nents.
Swift announced plans for an 87-
date tour in a news release Tuesday
that includes six stadium dates in
the United States. The tour kicks off
Feb. 9 in Singapore, then moves on to
several European dates in March. The
U.S. leg starts May 27 in Omaha, Neb.
Swift will then hit Australia and New
Zealand later in the year.
The 20-year-old is one of music's top
concert draws, selling out all 107 dates
on her wildly successful Fearless Tour
in 2009-10. Swift's latest album, "Speak
Now," sold more than 1 million copies
in its first week of release the best
debut for an album since 2005.

Save the date: Wills and
Kate to wed on April 29
LONDON Pomp and circum-
stance what "Britain does best"
will rule the day when Prince William
and Kate Middleton get married April
29 at Westminster Abbey
The young couple on Tuesday
rejected the notion that austere times
will force them to pare down the royal
festivities. The church itself is free, at
least
William and Kate ended days of sus-
pense by choosing the abbey, a grand
venue where members of the House of
Windsor have been crowned, married,
mourned and buried. The abbey was
also the site of the funeral for William's
beloved mother, Princess Diana.
Palace officials said the two were on
"cloud nine" with their wedding choice
and want the nation to share their joy.
"We know that the world will be
watching on the 29th of April, and the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Taylor Swift accepts the award for country favorite female artist at the 38th Annual
American Music Awards on Sunday in Los Angeles.


couple are very, very keen indeed
that the spectacle should be a classic
exunple of what Britain does best,"
said William's private secretary, Jamie
Lowther-Pinkerton.
nThe date after Lent and Easter but
before the 90th birthday of William's
grandfather. Prince Philip allows the
pair to have a spring wedding. It also is
the feast day of St. Catherine of Siena,
whose nane Middleton sluares.


Best of all for Brits, the day, a Friday,
will be a public holiday.
St. James' Palace, the offices of
Princes William and Harry, stressed
that the Middletons and the royal family
would pick up the bill for the wedding
- the flowers, the reception, the honey-
moon everything apart from security
and transport costs.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Basketball Hall of Famer
Oscar Robertson is 72.
* Country singer Johnny
Carver is 70.
* Former NFL Commissioner
Paul Tagliabue is 70.
* Rock-and-roll drummer
Pete Best is 69.
* Rock musician Donald
"Duck" Dunn (Booker T. &
the MG's) is 69.

Daily Scripture


* Actor-comedian Billy
Copnolly is 68.
* Singer Lee Michaels is 65.
* Actor Dwight Schultz is 63.
* Rock musician Clem Burke
(Blondie; The Romantics) is
55.
* Actor Ruben Santiago-
Hudson is 54.
* Actress Denise Crosby is
53.


"Enter his gates with thanksgiv-
ing and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise
his name. For the Lord is good
and his love endures forever; his
faithfulness continues through
all generations."
Psalm 100:4-5


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip. call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTiSING
Ditor Kfthyn Person..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakectyrepoer.com)
CLASSIFIED


Reporter
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(drculation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $4879
52 Weeks . . . . . . . $83.46
Ratms ndxde 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks . ............. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Legislators prod
Scott on jobs

FORT LAUDERDALE -
Show us the jobs. Thafs what
Republican and Democratic
legislators said Tuesday dur-
Sing informal meetings with
Gov.-elect Rick Scott as he
followed through on a cam-
paign promise to sit down
with state leaders before tak-
ing office in January.
"I would hope whatever
: we discuss in the legislature,
will be tied to jobs. I have no
problem talking about giv-
ing credits and tax breaks
- as long as there is docu-
mented job creation," Miami
- Republican Rep. Esteban
Bovo said.
Too often incentives are
given to industries promis-
ing to create jobs, he said,
but when "you ask them,
'Show me exactly where the
jobs are af ... that part of
the discussion always goes
mute."
Several legislators said
they want a hands-on gov-
ernor who will attract busi-
nesses and call corporate
CEOs from around the coun-
try and encourage them to
come to the state.
"Florida's not even on
their radar. Someone has
to go out there and sell it,"
said Rep. Mack Bernard, a
Democrat who said parts
of his South Florida district
have unemployment rates of
higher than 40 percent.
Officials also told Scottthat
reforming the state's health
care and education policies
will drive job creation and
encourage businesses to
relocate to Florida.

Case closed on
mother-daughter

PEMBROKE PINES
Pembroke Pines police
said the case of a woman
who fatally shot her 11-year-
old daughter before turning
the gun on herself has been
closed.


THE WEATHER


'i'- PARTLY
CLOUDY

'HI 81 LO 55
HI 81 L0 55


MOST PARTLY
SUNNY CLOUDY


HI71 LO45 H73LO45


REIOA FOEATMPfrWdedy oebr2
Wo~ sfy' hgh W .3cly igt' l w


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov.-elect Rick Scott listens as state legislators dis-
cuss what they see as problems during discussions in Fert
Lauderdale Tuesday. Tops on the list: Show us the jobs.


The bodies of 49-year-old
Shirley Campos and 11-
year-old Patricia Campos
were found Saturday inside
their home. The Broward
Medical Examiner's Office
determined the mother died
from an apparent suicide andu
the daughter from a gunshot
wound.
A police report released
Monday said Edward Camps
has been interviewed and is
not a person of interest. He
was not home at the time
of the shootings, but called
police when he found the
bodies. The 49-year-old told
police his wife had been
depressed and was taking
medication for anxiety.
He also said the couple
did not own guns.
Private services are
planned for Wednesday.

No arrests in
eviction shooting

MIAMI BEACH No
arrests have been made in
the case of a maintenance
worker who was fatally shot
while assisting officers in
serving an eviction notice
at a Miami Beach apartment
complex.
Miami Dade police are
investigating. A report says
their officers were serving
an eviction Monday when
the shooting happened. The
victim, a maintenance work-


er in tile process of chang-
ing the locks, was shot and
killed on the scene. An offi-
cer returned fire, striking the
subject who was later taken
to the hospital and remains
in serious condition.
Police have not yel identi-
fied the victim or subject,
who also has not been
charged.

Murder-suicide
victims identified

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
- Police are identifying
the victims of an apparent
domestic murder-suicide in
South Florida.
North Miami Beach
Police said 37-year-old Mark
Glinton turned the gun oni
himself Saturday night after
fatally shooting his girl-
friend, Evelina Jack.
Her sister, told the Miami
Herald Monday that Jack
was pregnant and rarely
talked about her relation-
ship with Glinton. But police
said Glinton had a history of
domestic violence.
Jack's three older children
were injured in the shoot-
ing. One remains paralyzed;
another suffered wounds to
his stomach and side: and a
third is in stable condition.
A fourth, younger child was
not injured.


76/61


Sidiesta
80/55
Tlahassee* Lake Ct*o
80/56 81/55
SGaimnesvlk e
Pamtaity 81/55
77/59 Ocaa *
81/56


Tma *9
SA J


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


rmbhuet


* Associated Press


82
54
73
49
88 In 1906
27 In 2000

0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.61"
45.24"


'FLMy
84/63

Key
81


City
JacksMle Cape Canaveral
78/57 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Dal eadi Fort Myers
7862 Galnesville
Jacksonville
riando Cape Calavaerl Key West
1/61 76/66 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Pa Beach Ocala
81/69 Orlando
Ft. audee Panama City
82/73 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
83/65 Mimiw Tampa
Wst 82/71 Valdosta
West* W. Palm Beach
1/73


SUN
Sundse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:03 a.m.
5:31 p.m.
7:04 a.m.
5:31 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 8:21 p.m.
Moonset today 9:46 a.m.
Moonrise torn. 9:25 p.m.
Moonset tom. 10:34 a.m.


Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.
28 5 13 21
Last Now Firet Full


On this date in
7p urday 1 : 988, low pressure
brought heavy snow
and high winds to
the Northern and
Central Rockies.
Snowfall totals in
Colorado ranged up
to 40 inches at Wolt
Cicok Pass, with 27
Inches falling In P4
hours.
* r4

5

300imebbbum
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
' .d


Thursday
79/65/pc
80/62/pc
82/70/s
84/65/s
81/57/pc
81/58/pc
84/72/s
81/56/pc
82/70/s
83/66/s
82/58/pc
83/63/s
76/64/pc
76/64/pc
78/59/pc
82/67/s
80/56/pc
81/68/s


Friday
78/64/sh
81/63/sh
82/70/pc
83/66/pc
77/56/pc
76/52/pc
85/73/pc
76/51/pc
82/70/pc
81/68/pc
79/59/pc
82/64/sh
71/50/sh
67/41/sh
76/50/sh
80/66/pc
76/49/sh
82/67/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com
rn


, Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.woatherpubllsher.com


Giet Connected


W l 3i


AROUND FLORIDA


~


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


Big crowd expected

for 10th Annual

Thanksgiving Dinner


By A.C. GONZALEZ
Special to the Reporter

More than 500 people are
expected to be fed during
a Thanksgiving tradition at
First Presbyterian Church,
according to- event organiz-
ers.
The 10th annual
Thanksgiving Day Dinner
is 11:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m.
Thursday in the church's fel-
lowship hall.
Edna Reichert, along with
the support of her husband,
Wally, began the dinner as an
outreach to the community.
The event has had promis-
ing success year after year,
said Wally Reichert. The
attendance number has
increased since its inception.
The church is excited to see
as many new faces as they
can at the meal.
"This event isn't only for
the poor and hungry, but
anyone is invited, especially
those people who just don't
want to cook," Edna Reichert
said.
Several other local
churches, such as St. James
Episcopal, have pitched in
this year to help with the
dinner, said the organizers,
happy to receive St. James'


donation of 15 pumpkin
pies.
Food for the dinner
includes 14 Turkeys, 100
pounds of potatoes, 18 gal-
lons of string beans, 20 gal-
lons of sweet potatoes and
enough corn bread dress-
ing to fill each and every
plate, Wally Reichert said.
The spread is hefty enough
to tackle the predicted atten-
dance for this event
"We also have well over 40
pies," he said.
Traditional silverware and
solid plates will be used as
opposed to paper and plastic.
'We will be giving a first-
class presentation," Wally
Reichert said.
The meal will also be served
to the public. Plates will be
brought to each individual by
volunteers from the church.
"We try to make people as
comfortable as possible," said
Wally Reichert
The Reicherts feel hosting
the dinner each year is a way
to reach anyone who's alone
for the holidays.
"I feel like a lot of people
are alone on this day, and we
just like to think of this as
a big family getting together
for Thanksgiving Day," Edna
Reichert said.


WOMEN: Shot, killed

Continued From Page 1A

tigation is still ongoing. Sheriff's Office at (904)
Anyone with information 630-0500 or First Coast
about the case is asked to Crime Stoppers at 1-866-
contact the Jacksonville 845-TIPS.


through Spring 2011 are
not optimistic and officials
say there is little relief in
sight.
"According to the National
Weather Service, their pre-


diction is for a high chance
for drier than normal con-
ditions through the spring
because of the La Nina con-
ditions in the Pacific that typ-
ically produte dry weather


Home sales dip slightly


MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON Sales
of previously owned homes
slipped slightly in October
as the housing market
struggled in the face of
high unemployment and
tight credit.
The National Association
of Realtors said Tuesday
that sales of previously
owned homes dipped 2.2
percent last month to a sea-
sonally adjusted annual rate
of 4.43 million units. The
performance was weaker
than had been expected.
Economists at JPMorgan
Chase had forecast that
sales would rise in October
to an annual rate of 4.60
million units.
The median price for a
home sold in October was
$170,500, down 0.9 percent
from a year ago, as prices
continue to be depressed
by weak sales conditions
and a huge overhang of
unsold homes.
* Sales had plunged to the
slowest pace in 15 years in
July and then posted gains


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 4 photo, signs are posted for an open house on
the front lawn of a home for sale in Los Angeles. Sales of
previously owned homes slipped slightly in October as the
housing market struggled in the face of high unemployment
and tight credit.


in August and September
before slipping back in
October. Sales in October
were 38.9 percent below
their peak of 7.25 million
units set in September 2005
during the height of the
housing boom.
The housing market has
never fully recovered from
the downturn. Many buyers
worry home prices could
fall further. Some can't
sell their current home to


POLICE: Man confesses

Continued From Page 1A


but found his statements to
be inconsistent, according to
the report He admitted to
burglarizing the business in
an attempt to steal metals,
after further interviews.
Deputies were able to
recover several vehicle radia-
tors with an estimated value
of $400 that Tonmlinson alleg-
edly stole from the business,


according to reports. He
attempted to hide the stolen
items in a roadside ditch.
The recovery of the stolen
property has assured that
the business owners will not
have to face a financial loss
as a result of the theft.


upgrade to a larger home,
either because they have
lost equity or they can't
find prospective buyers.
The moratorium that
many big lenders imposed
on foreclosures may have
dampened sales in October
by introducing more uncer-
tainty in the sales market.
But the Realtors group said
a bigger problem is tight
lending standards that
banks have put in place in


the wake of record foreclo-
sures.
Those lending standards
mean that many potential
home buyers can't qualify
for mortgages even though
mortgage rates have plum-
meted. Mortgage buyer
Freddie Mac said the aver-
age rate on a 30-year fixed
mortgage was 4.39 percent
last week. That was up
from from 4.17 percent the
previous week the low-
est level on records dating
back to 1971.
"The dial has been tight-
ened way too much" on
lending standards, said
Lawrence Yun, chief econo-
mist of the Realtors.
Yun forecast that sales
of existing 'homes for the
entire year will total 4.8
million units, which would
be 7 percent below the
5.16 million homes sold
last year, showing that the
housing market contin-
ues to struggle with tight
credit and unemployment
that remains painfully high
in the wake of the worst
recession since the 1930s.


BUTTS: Donated to help

Continued From Page 1A


leadership, personal growth and
career success through agri-
cultural education, said Patricia
Starnes, Columbia FFA advisor.
"I am proud of our chapter


members for identifying a need
within the community and orga-
nizing the campaign to accom-
plish their goal," she said.
I


for us," Wetherington said.
"According to those long-
term forecasts, it's a statisti-
cal likelihood that we will
not get much relief in the
next several months."


SCHOOL: Board to aid reconstruction

Continued From Page 1A


county's kindergarten cen-
ter that would otherwise
have been thrown away -
and help to find other train
components like a boxcar
and steam engine to cre-
ate a historic display at the
town's train station.
The board also saw the
project as a way to enhance
learning for district students
as a hands-on exhibit to aid
in studies of Florida and
Columbia County history
and how railroads affected
growth, Hunter said. The
board is currently working
with its curriculum depart-
ment to see if such learning
will meet the standards of
the courses, he said.
"It's a good opportunity
to preserve history and tie


it together with curricu-
lum," Hunter said.
Also helping with the
project are the county
commission, with its road
department putting the
train tracks in place; the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council,
which is helping to facili-
tate the project and locate
a steam engine and boxcar;
and Anderson Columbia
Inc., a local road-paving
business that will donate
the track materials and
move the caboose.
Hunter said the project
is being done with contri-
butions from all entities
involved.
"It's being done at virtu-
ally no cost," he said. "It's


just in-kind service that
everyone's contributing a
little bit to make it hap-
pen."
School board members
thanked Hunter for his
involvement in the project.
"I'm looking forward to
something like that being
established," said Linard
Johnson, board chairman.
Hunter projected that
the project's major parts
will be finished in about
six months, but since it is
a museum, it will always
have additions.
He noted the board is
seeking local people who
used to work on railroads
to help with the museum's
details to make the display
as authentic as possible.


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RIVER: Near record-low levels

Continued From Page 1A


OB/ YN

DANtNA GREENE, MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH













*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


IlrlCL%


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I













OPINION


Wednesday. November


24.2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
SOP


THEIR
T NH EION
,IN I 0ON


Moratorium

on fed taxes

might help

economy


called "stimulus"
bills haven't worked.
Hanging carrots
outside banks hasn't
done it. Now the Federal
Reserve is going to try to stimu-
late the economy with a $600 bil-
lion bond purchase it hopes will
drive interest rates even lower
and get people borrowing again.
Do these people in
Washington know something
the rest of us don't? What's up
with their idea of stimulating the
economy?
They seem to think the only
way to get things going is for
everyone to borrow money at
once. Isn't excessive borrowing
what got us into this mess in the
first place?
People who are working don't
know how safe their jobs are.
And they think people will
rush out to get deeper in debt
- or that they even should?
The "experts" in politics and
finance decided several months
ago that what was needed was
easier lending to small busi-
nesses. Guess what: The small
businesses aren't biting, for the
reasons stated above and more.
We don't need more of other
people's money. What we need is
more of our own:
Instead of the Fed spend-
ing $600 billion on bonds, and
instead of Washington's nearly
$1 trillion stimulus plan that
failed utterly to get the economy
moving, why don't our leaders
do the sensible thing? Why don't
they let us keep more of our own
money?
Rather than enrich the gov-
ernment with borrowed money
and let some of it trickle slowly
down, why doesn't the federal
government enact a six-month or
yearlong moratorium on federal
income taxes?
The difference would show
up within weeks, if not days
and in your pocket, not in
Washington. Imagine the stimu-
lative effect of letting Americans
keep nearly all of what they earn.
The rain downside to that
idea is that Washington would
have less power.
Well, that's a downside to
Washington, anyway.
Maybe that's why it's the last
thing they'll ever do.
0 The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


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YOU CRICKOUT

OMN MAMY APAY
GEZ,.YOU'RE
A unAeW"VAT!






!ion













TIH AltbRT G CURHIY 6UAP ?M3 A PTOCiCWT1



At Thanksgiving, a full heart


One bite at a time.
That's what I
used to tell my
children about
homework or book
reports or science projects that
loomed a little too large.
Whenever they whined, "ITl
never finish this!," I'd ask, "How
do you eat an elephant?"
And they would roll their eyes
to heaven and mutter, "One stu-
pid bite at a time."
This only worked, of course,
when they were young enough
to believe their mother knew
what she was talking about.
Actually, come to think of it,
I'm not sure it ever worked.
But I remembered it this
morning when my mind was
spinning like, well, something
that spins really fast and makes
you feel dizzy and about half as
smart as you need to be.
I was trying to get organized,
looking up recipes, making
a list of what I will need to
make Thanksgiving dinner for
a houseful of hungry people,
long-distance, 500 miles from
my oven and my mixer and my
turkey baster and my meat ther-
mometer, which will never in a
million years make it through
airport security.
I was trying to make a plan,
but it just wasn't happening.
All of a sudden I heard myself
asking out loud as if anybody
else could hear it "How do
you eat an elephant?"
I didn't have to think very
hard for the answer. It was easy:
"With a baby on my hip."


Sharon Randall
W\VM huOntu df!f .or':
My youngest and his wife,
who gave birth three months
ago to my first grandchild, are
hosting our family gathering
this year in their new home, a
place they moved into recently,
where they're still trying to get
settled.
They will host, and everyone
will contribute something to the
nmeal, if only a smile, but I will
still do much of the cooking.
Cooking and holding Baby
Randy that's my plan. He
will be my sous chef. This is his
first Thanksgiving. He has a lot
to learn. We will learn together.
This morning, I had a revela-
tion. All these years, I've been
doing Thanksgiving backward. I
always start by making a list of
the things I need to do. I clean
house, shop for groceries, cook
for days.
When everyone arrives and
everything is ready, we all join
hands, say grace, sit down and
eat. We eat for a very long time.
We also talk and laugh and tell
lots of stories, old stories we tell
every year, plus a few new ones
we've never heard.
Most everyone (and we all


know who they are) pitches
in on cleanup. (Note: I usually
help, too, but won't this year, as
I will be holding Randy.)
Finally after everyone has
gone home or gone to bed, the
leftovers have all been stuffed
in the fridge and the house has
fallen as silent and still as a
church after the last amen -
that's when I count my bless-
ings. I count them one by one.
more than I can name, and give
thanks for these three things:
Past, present and future.
I've been doing it that way for
a very long tiimc. Backwuard.
'llanksgiving shouldn't begin
with a list. It should begin, and
end, with being thankful.
When that thought dawned
on me this morning, I set aside
tmy long to-do list and started
counting my blessings, past,
present and future.
It took a bit longer than it
should, partly because I have a
great many blessings, but also
because I kept falling asleep.
Falling asleep while giving
thanks doesn't mean you aren't
thankful. It just means you're
tired. Or jet-lagged. Or sleep-
deprived from lying awake
wondering how to sneak a meat
thermometer through security.
How will I do Thanksgiving
long-distance?
With a full heart, and a baby
on my hip, one thanks at a time.
Here's hoping you will, too.
Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


B y doggedly comb-
ing through state
and federal com-
puter files and
aggressively filing
state Freedom of Information
Act requests with local police
departments, Scripps Howard
News Service reporter Thomas
Hargrove created a database of
185,000 unsolved murders com-
mitted since 1980.
Crime experts say it is the
most complete accounting of
homicide victims ever assem-
bled in the United States.
A search of that database
turned up alarming clusters
of unsolved killings of women
across the nation that strongly
suggest the work of serial kill-
ers.
The SHNS study focused on
communities where police failed
to solve at least three-quarters
of murders of women of similar
age killed by similar methods.
The reason for singling out
women in the study is that
they represent 70 percent of all
known serial murder victims.
The search turned up 161
clusters in which 1,247 mur-
dered women met the criteria.
lThe results prompted authori-


ties in Indiana and Ohio to
launch new investigations into
suspected serial killings and
Nevada police to acknowledge
that they are hunting a likely
serial killer who targeted up
to seven women, most of them
prostitutes, and scattered their
dismembered remains across
three states.
Phoenix police reviewed 11
murders flagged by the study
but found no evidence of serial
murder. 'The city, however, is
building its own database of
1,900 unsolved murders commit-
ted since 1990 to search for pos-
sible serial involvement.
The U.S. Justice department
estimates that less than 1 per-
cent of all murders are the work
of serial killers, but the SHNS
database suggests the real num-
ber is higher.
And the database as currently
configured cannot track highly
mobile killers or ones who prey
on a variety of victims.
Perhaps as frightening as the'
murders themselves are the
gaping holes Hargrove found in
the statistical reporting net.
Local police reported about
510,000 of the 565,000 murders
committed from 1980 to 2008


to the FBI's Supplementary
Homicide Report.
'hle reporting is completely
voluntary and local police
departments can and do ignore
it. The state of Illinois does not
participate, although the city
of Chicago does. California has
made reporting mandatory'for
local police departments and
other states should do like-
wise.
The FBI and law enforce-
ment agencies generally have
their hands full, but it should
not be left to reporters like
Hargrove to build, with easily
available technology, an effec-
tive homicide database.
Moreover, these databases
should be built and scrutinized
by experienced professionals
to detect victim patterns and
gaps in law enforcement.
Finally, police should put
aside their reticence to tell the
public when they suspect a
serial killer is at work.
The Justice De'partnment
recommends public warnings
be issued, especially when
specific groups like prostitutes
and children are targeted.
M Scripps Howard News Service


John Crisp
jcrisp(jcfelmo' edu


Think about

French-style

retirement

What is it with
the French? '
Here are a ':
people who eat
frogs and snails,
and horsemeat and are crazy
-for Jerry Lewis. Mostly they
sat out World War II and then,
after we saved their country
from the Germans, they insult
us if we don't speak perfectly
accented French in Paris.
It turns out that the French are
lazy, too. The standard French
workweek for the last decade
has been 35 hours. And now the
country has turned out in mas- ,
sive protests against a proposal
by President Nicholas Sarkozy to
raise the official retirement age
from 60 to 62.
But many of the things that
we like to believe about the
French aren't true. Allow me to
assert, based on my experiences
in France, that the rudeness of
the French is greatly overstated.
They may eat a little horsemeat,
but so do the Swiss, and there
are plenty of young French men
and women who wouldn't think
of touching a plate of horse. And
snails? Well, the French know
how to make them taste very,
very good.
And we should try to get
over our misunderstanding of
France's role in World War II.
llTe country's casualties, both
military and civilian, were stag-
gering, at a rate approximately
double that of the United States.
And even when the French were
overwhelmed by Germany many
of them fought on in a resistance
that helped change the course of
the war.
But is it asking too much of
the French to work to the age
of 62? Their protests against the
change in the retirement age
coincide with the publication last
week of a report by the co-chair- -'
men of President Obama's com-
mission on the deficit Among
other things Erskine Bowles and
Alan Simpson recommend that
the full retirement age for U.S,
workers be raised, over time, to
69.
Bowles and Simpson were
charged with finding ways to
bring the government's fiscal
obligations more in line with
its revenues, and one way to do
that is to expect people to work'
harder and retire later. This "-
is logical. People are living lon-
ger: why shouldn't they work
longer?
Recently, Mitch Albom
reported ("'he Coach Who
Walked Away." in Parade) on
University of Michigan football
coach Lloyd Carr, who left
his successful tenure on the
sidelines at age 62. Carr says,
expressing a very French idea,
"As much fun as it is, there's a
period when you come to grips
with your mortality. You ask,
'Do I want to do other things in
life besides try to win a game?'"
So it may be that the French
are on to something besides
self-interest and the pursuit of
leisure. Still, there's nothing
shameful about being more
interested in the quality of one's
life than its length or productiv-
ity. This may explain why the
French eat much better than
we do, drink more wine, and
continue to smoke.
We, on the other hand, make
industry a virtue, though we
gave upl) on thrift some time
ago.
The less-corporate French
are still able and willing to push
back, even though it seems like
a lost cause. Vive la France!

John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi. Texas.


4A


OTHER OPINION


Use databases to find serial killers


~ ~ --~ ~ -- ---' i ` - ~ -1 ~ ~










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


Obama pledges US to defend its ally South Korea


By ANNE GEARAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
on Tuesday pledged the
United States would defend
South Korea after what the
White House branded a
provocative, outrageous
attack by North Korea on
its neighbor. Its options
limited, the U.S. sought a
diplomatic rather a military
response to one of the most
ominous
class h e s
between
r ithe Koreas
in decades.
"South
Korea is
Obama our ally. It
has been
since the Korean war,"
Obanma said in his first
comments about the North
Korean shelling of a South
Korean island. "And we
strongly affirm our com-
mitment to defend South
Korea as part of that alli-
ance."
Working to head off any
escalation, the U.S. did not
reposition any of its 29,000
troops in the South or make
other military moves after
North Korea fired salvos


of shells into the island,
setting off an artillery duel
between the two sides.
The president, speak-
ing to ABC News, would
not speculate when asked
about military options.
He was expected to tele-
phone South Korean
President Lee Myung-bak
late Tuesday night. He met
earlier with his top national
security advisers to discuss
next steps.
Washington has relative-
ly few options when deal-
ing with Pyongyang.
Military action is particu-
larly unappealing, since the
unpredictable North pos-
sesses'crude nuclear weap-
ons as well as a huge stand-
ing army. North Korea
exists largely outside the
system of international
financial and diplomatic
institutions that the UI.S.
has used as leverage in
dealing with other hostile
countries, including Iran.
North Korea has also
resisted pressure from its
major ally, China, which
appears to be nervous
about the signs of instabil-
ity in its neighbor.
"We strongly condemn
the attack and we are rally-
ing the international com-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
South Korean villagers watch smoke rising from South Korea's Yeonpyeong island near the
border against North Korea on Tuesday. North Korea fired artillery barrages onto the South
Korean island near their disputed border, setting buildings alight and prompting South Korea
to return fire and scramble fighter jets.


munity to put pressure on
North Korea," Obama said
in the ABC interview, spe-
cifically citing the need for
China's help. Obama said
every nation in the region
must know "this is a seri-
ous and ongoing threat"


Defense Secretary
Robert Gates phoned
South Korea's defense min-
ister to express sympathy
for the deaths of two of
the South's marines in the
artillery shelling of a small
South Korean island and


to express appreciation
"for the restraint shown
to date" by the South's
government, a Pentagon
spokesman said.
Obama called North
Korea's action "just one
more provocative incident"


and said he would consult
with Lee on an appropriate
response.
In his phone call to South.
Korea's defense minister,
Gates said the U.S. viewed
recent attacks as a violation
of the armistice agreement
that ended the Korean War
more than a half century
ago, and he reiterated the
U.S. commitment to South
Korea's defense, said
Pentagon -press secretary
Geoff Morrell.
Obama was awakened at
4 a.m. Tuesday with the
news. He went ahead with
an Indiana trip focused on
the economy before return-
ing to the White House
after dark.
State Department
spokesman Mark Toner
said the U.S. would take
a "deliberate approach" in
response to what he also
called provocative North
Korean behavior.
At the same time, other
administration officials,
speaking on condition of
anonymity to describe
,the emerging strategy,
said the White House was
determined to end a dip-
lomatic cycle that officials
said rewards North Korean,
brinksmanship.


Storm smacks Pacific Northwest

before moving to Utah and Idaho


By BROCK VERGAKIS
Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY A
ferocious storm that crip-
pled much of the Pacific
Northwest barreled into the
Rockies on Tuesday, caus-
ing whiteout conditions on
one of the busiest travel days
of the year.
The National Weather
Service issued a blizzard
warning for Utah, where
Interstate 84 and Interstate
15 were temporarily shut
down in northern Utah
because of windy, snowy
conditions that led two trac-
tor-trailers to jackknife and
block traffic. Even once the


Clara NeSmith Mauldin
Mrs. Clara NeSmith Mauldin,
97, a resident of Lake City, Flor-
ida, passed away late Monday
evening in the Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley follow-
ing an extended illness. She was
born on December 15, 1912 in
Thomas County, Georgia and
was the daughter of the late El-
lis Payton NeSmith and Ida
Aleathia Bailey NeSmith. Mrs.
Mauldin and her late husband,
Carl M. Mauldin, Sr. moved to
Lake City from DeLand, Florida
in 1946. She was employed with
Metal Products for approximate-
ly nine years but the greater part
of her life was spent as a home
maker, devoted wife, mother and
grandmother to her loved ones.
She was a faithful member for
many years of her much beloved
Lake City Church of Christ.
Mrs. Mauldin is survived by
two sons, Carl Mauldin, Jr. of
Freeport, -Florida; and James
Ellis Mauldin of Lake City,
Florida; her daughter-in-law,
Betty Mauldin French of Lake
City; five grandchildren, Su-
zanne Morton (Kevin), Johnny
Mauldin and Mike Mauldin
(Kelly) all of Lake City; Randall
Mauldin and Terry Mauldin both
of Keystone Heights, Florida;
thirteen great-grandchildren,
Scott Morton (Lindsey), Lindsey
Morton Pridgeon (George), Jes-
sica Mauldin Ganskop (Mark),
Dalton Mauldin, Christopher M.
Mauldin, Zachary D. Mauldin,
Emily Mauldin, Ashley Mauld-
in, Courtney Mauldin, Elizabeth
Mauldin, David Mauldin, Sarah
Mauldin and Mallory Mauldin
and four great-great grand-
children, Lucas Scott Mor-
ton, Aiden Topoulous, Alysia
Sader and Jordyn Carey. Mrs.
Mauldin was also survived by
her caregiver, Kay Henderson.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Mauldin will be conducted at
11:00 A.M. on Friday, Novem-
ber 26, 2010 in the Lake City
Church of Christ with Bro. Roy
Dicks and Bro. J.T. Brown offi-
ciating. Interment will follow in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
The family will receive friends
at the church for one hour prior
to the funeral service on Friday.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISI1 FAMILY F.UNER-
AL HOME, 458 S, Marion
Ave., Lake City, II. 32025.
(386)752-1234 Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parris'hf/imilyfnimeralhome, cor


roads were reopened, vis-
ibility was still very limited
there and elsewhere in the
state as many commuters
made their way home on
snow-covered roads.
Numerous schools, gov-
ernments and businesses
in Utah closed hours ear-
lier than normal Tuesday
because of the storm, with
state traffic officials warning
the evening commute could
take four times longer than
usual.
Of nearly 300 flights
scheduled to take off front
Salt Lake City International
Airport Tuesday evening,
nine had been canceled,
although it wasn't immedi-


OBITUARIES

Dorothy Lucille Williams
Mrs. Dorothy Lucille Williams.
90, of Lake City, died early
Monday morning. November
22, 2010 in the Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley follow-
ing an extended illness. A na-
tive of Live Oak, Florida. Mrs.
Williams had been a resident
of Lake City since 1955 having
moved here from Perry, Florida.
Mrs. Williams was a homemaker
and was of the Baptist faith. In
her spare time. Mrs. Williams
enjoyed tending to her flowers.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Walter Clayton "W.C."
Williams, a daughter. Dorothy
Beasley and a son. Ray Williams.
Mrs. Williams is survived by
her sons. Billy Williams (Patri-
cia); l.amar Williams (Kathy);
J.C. "James" Williams all of
Lake City; a daughter, Martha
Jane Williams of lake City; two
brothers, Lorenzo (lenmmons of
Polk City. Florida; and William
"Bud" Clemmons of (iasport.
New York; and three sisters, Lela
Mae Bronson of Clermont, Flor-


ately clear if all of those were
caused by the storm.
Highway officials told hol-
iday travelers earlier in the
day to get out of town now
or risk being stranded on
Thanksgiving.
In the western part of
Utah, empty eastbound semi-
trailers on Interstate 80 were
being held near the Nevada
line to prevent them from
tipping over in the windy
salt flats.
At least three deaths in
Washington state have been
blamed on thi' storm, includ-
ing a man struck and killed
outside his car Monday
night on snowy Interstate 5
in Tacoma.


ida; Margaret Aheran and Kath-
leen Mullis both of Cochran.
Georgia. Fifteen grandchildren
and numerous great and great-
great grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mrs. Williams will be conducted
at 1:00 P.M. on Saturday. No-
vember 27, 2010 in the Live Oak
Cemetery in Live Oak. ,jlorida
with Rev. Leo Bronson officiat-
ing. Interment will immediately
follow. The family will receive
friends from 10:00 A.M until
Noon on Saturday in the (Cha-
pel of the Dees-Parrish Family
Funeral Home. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
IDEES-PARRISll FAMILYFU-
NERAl IIOME. 458 S. Marion
Ave., Lake City. FL 32025.
(386)752-1234 Please sign the
on-linc family guesthook at
parrirshl/11ilnif/un('rialhiomer com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


llonofg

W Those We love!


In Loving Memory
You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.


Your Family


CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss

755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm


atA"v


Because November is National
Hospice Month, Haven wants to answer
your questions about living wills.



HAVINGALIVINGWILL. ALSOKNOWNASANADVANCEDIRECTIVE,
IS IMPORTANT. NOT ONLY DOES IT TELL YOUR HEALTH CARE
PROVIDER AND FAMILY YOUR WISHES, IT EASES THE BURDEN
OF ANSWERING DIFFICULT QUESTIONS THAT SOMETIMES COME
WITH SERIOUS ILLNESS. IT'S A GIFT TO YOUR LOVED ONES
LETTING THEM KNOW YOUR WISHES.

Available through laven H hospice. Five Wishes is a living will that's
easy to use and understand. You choose who will make decisions, if
oou 're not able to. and how you wan!t to he treated.

All you have to do is check a box. circle a direction or write
a few sentences. It's that easy. Your family will have peace of
mind, and you'll know decisions made during end-of-life care are
your wishes.


HAVEN
H 0 S P I C E

"i]ke a few rmomnints to onrir vyour
free copy of Five Wishc's loday by visiting
HAVEN HOSPICE.ORG or call 800.727.,889


A I N, l \ en, wII hI, i N that I e, N v dan iaN g i
Serv,'ing Non1l tti'( i Ilh sF n c r Ilt'v t I ic're old ;s ia not or 1 ,t prt it hospirce nce ISO.


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Brandle Jolean
Ward
DOB: 3/13/76
Height: 5' 3"
Weight: 115 lbs.
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Blues
Wanted For: Griand Theft III


Nicholas Edwin
Harrell
DOB: 10/19/79
Height: 6'
Weight: 220 Ibs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Blue
Wanted For: VOP Grand
Theft III, Credit Card Fraud:
Unauthorized Use


WANTED AS OF 11/22/10
ANYONE WI1H INFORMATION ON THE WHERIAlIOUTS 01 IHFSE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED 10 CALL CRIME SlOPPiER OF COLUMBIA COUN1'.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION
The likeness of suspects is supplied by tihe Columbia County Shrifm 's Office Warrants Division and/oi other lawenfocomeont agencies,
Tile cases are active it the time of pliuhllcatiolln iless othiowisel nootd. Crinin Stoppers of Columbila Count, Inc.. and thlli volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt flom any and all liability which might arise as a Iesult of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
hB SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA CO TY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney Generat


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


, \\ \..-"









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Flu vaccine and shots
The ( )lumbia County
Healt' department now
has f.ti vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Mond.ly
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Matching Funds Drive
The Christian Service
Center is having its
Matching Funds Drive
from now until Dec. 31. All
donations will be doubled
by local sponsors. Mark
your check "Matching
Funds" and mail to
Christian Service Center,
PO. Box 2285 Like City,
FL :2o ,i. Call 755-1770.

Thursday
Thanksgiving feast
Lad Soup Kitchen is
hosting its 15th Annual
Community Thanksgiving
Feast from 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
on Thanksgiving Day. The


kitchen is located at 127
N E Escambia St.

Thanksgiving dinner
The 10 Annual
Thanksgiving Day Dinner
is 11:30 a.m. 1:30
p.m. Thursday in the
Fellowship Hall of the
First Presbyterian Church.
The church is located at
697 SW Baya Drive. The
menu will include fresh
baked turkey with gravy,
cranberry sauce, mashed
potatoes, sweet potatoes,
green beans, rolls, coffee
or tea, pumpkin pie or
carrot cake. 1There is no
charge for the dinner. Call
752-0670.

Saturday
Holiday happenings
The kickoff to the
Christmas season begins
at 5 p.m. Saturday in
Olustee Park. Activities
begin with holiday music
featuring The. Gateway
City Big Band and Harry
Wuest as conductor. The
lighting of Olustee Park
is at 6:30 p.m. followed by
the arrival of Santa Claus.
Photos with Santa are from
7-9 p.m.


Blood drive
A blood drive is at Ole
Times Country Buffet
11 a.m. 6 p.m. Nov. 27.
Free buffet to the first 15
donors and a free Gators
or Seminoles shirt.

Sunday
Food for Fines
'ihe annual Food for
Fines program is Nov.
28-Dec. 4 at the Columbia
County Public Library.
Each one sealed, non-
expired, non-perishable
item brought to the library
will reduce a fine by $1. All
items collected at the Main
and West B ranch will be
delivered to tlie Christian
Service Center iln Like
City for local distribution.
Items collected at the Fort
White Branch Library will
be distributed at the Fort
White food shelf.

. Monday
Blood drive
A blood drive is at
Pizza Boy 12 p.m.- 6 p.m.
Monday. Each donor will
receive a free 14" cheese
pizza.


YEP committee meeting
There is a YEP
Committee Meeting noon1
Monday at Gondolier
Italian Restaurant &
Pizza. Call the Lake
City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce to
RSVP at 386-752-3690

Wednesday, Dec. 1
Public meeting
Elder Options is having
a public meeting 10 a.m.
D)ec. 1 in the Florida Farml
Bureau Building. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
froin ll those atten(lding. The
buildingg is located at 5700
SW 34th Street, Suite 222,
Gainesville. Contact Cindy
Roberts at 352-378-6649.

Friendship Luncheon
The December
Friendship Luncheon of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11:30 a.m.
Dec. 1 at Costa Del Sol,
located at 2260 W U.S.
Highway 90. There will
be a $10 gift exchange for
those who wish to partici-


pale. All members, friends
and guests are welcome.
Contact 719-5564 or 754-
7227.


Save your ticket and come
out 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Dec.
4 when select Christmas
decor will'be sold.


Thursday, Dec. 2 HSCT production


Christmas concert
Richardson Middle
School Wolf Pride Band
is having its annual
Christmas concert
6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 in the
Columbia High School
auditorium. The RMS
Jazz Band, Symphonic
Band, Beginners Band and
Drumline will play songs
of thlie season under the
direction of Sherrod Keen.

Friday, Dec. 3
Candlelight tour
The Lake City Garden
Club is hosting the
Castagna Christmas
House Candlelight Tour
6:30- 9:30 p.m. Dec. 3.
The house is located at
521 NW Old Mill Road.
Admission is $10. Tickets
are available at Brown-
Vann Carpet One, Lake
City Florist, Your Hearts
Desire or at the residence
the evening of the tour.


The High Springs
Community Theater
opening of its Radio-on-
Stage dramatic adaptation
of Charles Dickens' "A
Christmas Carol" opens
Dec. 3, The show runs
weekends through Dec.
19. Tickets are available at
The Framery on W. Baya
and at highspringscommu-
nitytheatercom. Four local
residents are involved in
the production.

Saturday, Dec. 4
Dream Machine Ride
The 9th Annual
Christmas Dream
Machine Toy Ride is Dec.
4. Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. and the toy
ride pulls out at 12 p.m.
from the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. There will be
raffles and live bands, and
all proceeds will go to ben-
efit The Christmas Dream
Machine. Contact Cookie
at 386-362-6529 or Polly at
386-758-9811.


Fed lowers economic


outlook through 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
'Alonsignor Rino Fisichella (left) and Vatican spokesman Father Federico Lombardi meet
journalists at the Vatican on Tuesday. The Pontiff said in a book interview that condom use by
people such as male prostitutes was a lesser evil since it indicated they were taking a step
toward a more moral and responsible sexualty by aiming to protect their partner from infection.


Vatican says use of condom

less evil than spreading HIV


By VICTOR L. SIMPSON
Associated Press

VATICAN CITY In
a seismic shift on one of
the most profound and
profoundly contentious -
Roman Catholic teachings,
the Vatican said Tuesday
that condoms are the lesser
of two evils when used to
curb the spread of AIDS,
even if their use prevents a
pregnancy.
The position was an
acknowledgment that the
church's long-held anti-
birth control stance agauinl.
condoms doesn't justify put-
ting lives at risk.
"This is a game-changer,"
declared the Rev. James


Martin, a prominent Jesuit
writer and editor.
The new stance was
staked out as the Vatican
explained Pope Benedict
XVIs comments on con-
doms and HIV in a book
that came out Tuesday
based on his interview with
a Gernimn journalist.
The Vatican still holds
that condom use is innmmoral
and that church doctrine
forbidding artificial birth
control remains unchanged.
Still, i te reasscssient oni
condonim use to help lpreveint
disease carries profound
significance, particularly ini
Africa where AIDS is ranm-
pant.
"By acknowledging that


condoms help prevent the
spread of HIV between peo-
ple in sexual relationships,
the pope has completely
changed the Catholic dis-
cussion on condoss" said
Martin, a liberal-leaning
author of several books
about spirituality and
Catholic teaching.
"This is a great day itn
the fight against AIl)S ...
a major milestone." said
Mitchill Warreni head of
the All)DS Vaccine Advocacy
Coalition.
Thetologiants 1havc debat-
cd for y'ars whether it
could be morally acceptahl)l
for IIIV-inlctcd people (to
ise colndomtis to avoid
infecting their partners.


By CHRISTOPHER RUGABER
l'V I \ono ic>sA Wrltt,
\\.\s..11[ NGTON
- Federal Reserve officials
have become more ['ssi-
mistic ill their economic out-
look through next year and
have lowered their forecast
tor growth.
Ilie economy will grow
only 2.I l percent to 2.5 |K'r-
cent this year. Fed officials
aii(I Tuesday iIn an uljlated
torccast. Tihlath's down
sharply from a previous
projection of 3 l'-rccnlit to
3.5 ixTrccnt. Next year, the
ecotioiiy will expand by 3:1

S-.. i. <, .

% 'Thiank iyou '
rie tarniI o t
the iatre

ThInk- \ rthc tl *.
e,- t "41, linnt ."w t/.' -
t. ll < oi 'f ('.iit '" ,' rti

,, 1, 11 ,
,4 Jr i' lw i t



andi"n ,.d tt r


N\ t) n. ,, DI'. Vr
S *l trli CCent-r




I% *"" '0. ,


percent to 3.6 Ix'rcent, the
Fed said, also much lower
than its June forecast.
Fed officials project
that unemployment won't
change much this year,
averaging between 9.5
percent and 9.7 percent.
lThe current unemplloy-
ment rate is 9.6( percent.
Progress in reducing
unemployment hiil as been
"disappointingly slow." the
CCIltIral bank said, accord-
ing to the minutes of its
Nov. 2-3 meeting.


The darker view helps
explain why the Fed decid-
ed at its meeting earlier this
month to launch another
round of stimulus. The cen-
tral bank plans to buy $600
billion in Treasury bonds
over the next eight months
in an effort to lower interest
rates andul spur more spend-
ing.
h111 Fed is Ilightl. more
optimistic about 2012, in
part because officials expect
the I,.und 1.h,% ing program
to have a positive impact.


Thufsda), Novem-bei '25t'
11:30a.m. 1:30 p.m.
Everyone is invittl< to join
triends in sIlIain8 blood and
fellowslsip as we thank C(,xi
tfo our manj blessing.


l V0 tt


Turkey
Giavi
'anbeny Sauce
Real Mashed
Potatoes
Sweet Potaloes
Green Beans
Homtemade
Bieadi
conee
Ta
Putmpktin Pie
I irl1ot ake


L.


THANKSGIVING I




-DINNERI


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tdb)ly@ljkecrtyeporter.corn


SPORTS


Wednesday. November 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHEERLEADING
Columbia Cheer
meeting Tuesday
The Columbia Cheer
Association has its
end-of-the-year
meeting and election set
for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Southside Recreation
Center. The meeting is
open to anyone
interested in little league
cheerleading.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at 965-1377.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons plan
holiday bowl
The Lake City
Falcons has a holiday
bowl planned Dec. 4 at
Memorial Stadium. The
Falcons will be joined
by Duval Tigers, North
Florida Vikings and First
Coast Cardinals playing
for first-, second- and
third-place trophies.
Games begin at 3 p.m.
Admission is $5 for
adults, and $3 for seniors
and children older than
10. The team is seeking
sponsors for the event.
For details, call Elaine
Ortiz Harden at 292-3039
or (386) 438-5728, or Luis
Santiago at 292-4138.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Monday
Columbia High
soccer at Ed White High,
girls-5:30 p.m., boys-
7:20 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Tuesday
Fort White High
girls soccer at Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 1
Fort White High JV
girls soccer vs. Columbia
High, 5 p.m.
Dec.2
Fort White High
girls soccer at Williston,
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball at Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Dec. 3
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. RP.K. School,
7 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Columbia
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 4
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at St. Francis


Catholic, 2 p.m.


Indians fall to Bulldogs


in hoops home opener


Fort White rally
comes up short in
district contest.

By TIM KIRBY
*I .t.. ,'* l ,l l'pt ..'.te'r.tcom/

FORT WHITEl -
Suwannee High held off
host Fort White High,
5449, in Tuesday's District
5-3A basketball opener for
both schools.
The teams swapped
leads at the end of the
first and second quarters,
with the Bulldogs leading
21-17 at the half. Suwannee
stretched the lead to
35-28 at the end of the third


quarter.
A 12-1 run by the
Bulldogs to open lihe fourth
quarter seemed tlo put
thlie gante away, but Fort
White stormed back. With
Donnell Sanders scoring
nine points and Jordan
Talley scoring six down
the stretch, the Indians
closed to three points on a
3-pointer by Milton Sanders
with seconds left.
Talley finished with 20
points and Donnell Sanders
scored 11. Milton Sanders
had a pair of 3-pointers.
Dominique Carter and Wes
Osterhoudt both scored
five points and Trey Phillips
had a basket.


.liininy Taylor scored
17 for Suwannee (2-0) and
Tony I'Frierson added 15.
Fort White plays at
Santa Fe High at 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 30.

Fort White soccer
Fort White's boys soc-
cer team dropped a district
match, 3-1, to visiting Santa
Fe on Tuesday.
The Indians trailed 1-0 at
halftime and Trevor Stout
tied it with a goal 10 min-
utes into the second half.
"We made a couple
of mistakes and they
INDIANS continued on 2B


double


CHS boys and
girls soccer fall in
home games.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinle)@flakeci tyreporter corn
Despite falling in a
1-0 game against V.iiimii.ii
High, Columbia High coach
Trevor Tyler felt that thle
Tigers played their best
game of the season.
"It was the best game of
the year by far," Tyler said.
"It's just what we wanted as
far as .;r ggi -l-ii1 We're
disappointed that we lost,
but the |ir',gr,'-'iin as a
whole from the first game
couldn't be better."
Vanguard (6-2) brought
in quality soccer to test
the Tiger program, having
already defeated Gainesville
High, 3-2, which is also in
Columbia's district, earlier
this season.
"They've got a formi-
dable record," Tyler said.
"They're a quality team and
we played them well. We're
not worried about the result
as much at this point with a
bunch of sophomores and
juniors as we are learning."
Vanguard's only goal
came off a penalty kick in
the( first half when keeper
Cameron Hall was called
for a foul when coming out
to defend a shot. Bryce
Ciambella came through on


JASON MATTHEW WALKER .ake City Reporter
Columbia High captain Haley Dicks (23) takes possession against Buchholz High's Alexa Austin (10) in a game on Nov. 16.


the penalty kick.
T'11 Tigers had a chance
to tic in the second half
on a penalty kick of their
own. Nick Tuttle's kick was
deflected, but Cooper lHall
followed it il) with a goal.
It was only alterward that
the goal was ne at'ed alter
the lree called a;uother


Tiger player for a foul for
running into the keeper.
Columbia (3-2) returns to
the field against Ed White
I igh at 7:20 p.m. Monday.

Lady Tigers soccer
Ctoliumlia Iligh's girls
soccer teaii fell in a 6(-2


defeat to Santa Fe High.
'he Lady Tigers dropped
behind 3-0 early off a hat
trick by Naomi Lux, but
cut the lead to 3-1 coming
out of the half when Alyssa
Spahlski scored fiom 20
vards out.
Santa Fe's Amy Phillips
countered with a goal for


a 4-1 lead, but Holly Boris
again cut the lead to two.
Trailing 4-2, Santa Fe's
Lindsay Rivas added two
goals for the final 6-2 mar-
gin.
Santa Fe improved to
7-1 on the season, while
the Lady Tigers fell to 3-5
overall.


Texas' Hamilton easily


wins AL MVP award


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 29 file photo, Texas Rangers' Josh Hamilton sits
during practice for Game 3 of the World Series against the
San Francisco Giants, in Arlington, Texas. Hamilton won the
American League's Most Valuable Player award, Tuesday.


Player led majors
in slugging and
batting average.

By RONALD BLUM
Ass;ociftedr Press

NEW YORK Texas
outfielder Josh Hamilton
was a runaway winner of the
American League's Most
Valuable Player award.
Ilamilton received 22
first-place votes and 358
points in voting announced
Tuesday by the Baseball
Writers' Association of
America.
I laniilton overcalUme eight
trips to rehabilitation lor'
drug and alcohol addiction
to lead tle llajor leagues in
batting average (.359) and
slugging percentage (.633)
and help the Rangers reach
their first World Series. iHe
had 32 homers and 100 RBIs


despite missing time nearly
all of September because of
two broken ribs.
"I would say a 99 per-
cent chance that this would
never happen," Hamilton
said, chuckling. "I mean,
honestly, I think a lot of
people would agree with
that."
After going on the dis-
abled list in 2001 while
in tlie minor leagues, he
became addicted to alcohol
and cocaine. lHe didn't play
from 2003-05.
"I do reflect. If I didn't
reflect, T' might start
sneaking in there, a little
ego might start sneaking
in there, and that's one
thing I don't want to hap-
penl," lamilton said. "So I
do reflect and I think about
where I was at mily lowest
time."
His story has inspired his
teaninates,.


"It's awesome, every-
body makes mistakes in
their lives and c'ri\bad\
deserves a second chance,"
Rangers teammate David
Murphy said before voting
was announced. "A lot of
people don't take advantage
of that second chance. But
he took it and'hlie ran with
it."
After voting was conclud-
ed, Hlamilton was selected
MVP of the Al. champion-
ship series win over the
Yankees. Overall, he hit
.190 in the postseason with
five homers and nine RBIs
"There were other guys
around lthe league wliho
had great years, but seeing
Josh, what lihe was able to
do, it's pretty impressivee"
tealnulate Michael Young
said. "'You don't see guys
go three-month stretches
where they hitl .00, it's just
too difficult to do."


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Fort White's Caitlin Congi (10) attempts to recover a stolen
ball from Santa Fe's Naomi Lux (4) in a game on Nov. 8.


trouble


'











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
3 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
World Championship, first round, at
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Maui Invitational, third place
game, at Lahaina, Hawaii
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Preseason NIT, semifinal,
Virginia Commonwealth vs. Tennessee,
at New York
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Preseason NIT, semifinal,
UCLA vs.Villanova. at New York
10 p.m.
ESPN Maui Invitational,
championship game, at Lahalna. Hawaii
NBA BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN Miami at Orlando
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS St. Louis at Nashville

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF I
w England 8 2 0.800 289 2
Jets 8 2 0.800238 1
mi 5 5 0.50017220
alo 2 8 0.200213 2
South
W L TPct PF I
anapolis 6 4 0.600 268 2
sonville 6 4 0.600 220 2
nessee 5 5 0.500257 I1
uston 4 6 0.400 244 21
North


W L
7 3
7 3
3 7
2 8
West
W L
6 4
5 5
5 5
3 7


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


PA
42
77
08
76

PA
16
70
98
87


T Pct PF PA
0.700233 178
0.700235 165
0.300 192 206
0.200215 262

TPct PF PA
0.600243 207
0.500238 223
0.500274211
0.300217 287


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas

Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina '

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona
San Francisco


East
W L TPct PF PA
7 3 0.700284226
6 4 0.600253 220
5 5 0.500202 245
3 7 0.300229 271
South
W L TPct PF PA
8 2 0.800256 192
7 3 0.700235 170
7 3 0.700209 206
I 9 0.100 117 252.
North
W L TPct PF PA
7 3 0.700 191 146
7 3 0.700252 146
3 7 0.300 172 226
2 8 0.200234 237
West
W L TPct PF PA
5 5 0.500 185 233
4 6 0.400177 198
3 7 0.300188 292
3 7 0.300160219


Monday's Game
San Diego 35, Denver 14
Thursday's Games


New England at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at N.Y.Jets, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Green Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, I p.m.
Carolina at Cleveland, I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Giants. I p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 29
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.

AP Top 25

The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
Nov. 20, total points and prior ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Oregon (37) 10-0 1.467 I
2.Auburn (13) 11-0 1,430 2
3. Boise St. (10) 10.0 1,394 3
4.TCU 11-0 1.340 4
5,Wisconsin 10-1 1.197 6
6.LSU 10-1 1,192 5
7.Stanford 10-1 1,181 7
8. Ohio St. 10-1 1.086 8
9.Alabama 9-2 972 10
10. Oklahoma St. 10-1 959 12
1I.MichiganSt. 10-1 929 II
12.Arkansas 9-2 860 13
13.VirginiaTech 9-2 722 14
14. Oklahoma 9-2 652 16
1IS. Missouri 9-2 638 15
16. Nebraska 9-2 611 9
17.Texas A&M 8-3 575 18
18. South Carolina 8-3 560 17
19.Nevada 10-1 440 19
20.Arizona 7-3 270 23
21. N.C. State 8-3 240 -
22. Florida St. 8-3 233 -
23. Utah 9-2 213 25
24. Iowa 7-4 101 21
25. Mississippi St. 7-4 95 22
Others receiving votes: N. Illinois 72.
West Virginia 26.Tulsa 12. Hawaii 7. Navy
7, Florida 4. Miami 4. UCF 4, Southern
Miss. 3, Penn St. 2. Ohio 1. Oregon St. I.

GOLF

Golf week

PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
ASIAN TOUR
Dul wWord Champlonmip
Site: Dubal. United Arab Emirates.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Jumwerah Golf Estates. Earth
Course (7.675 yards, par 72).
Purse: $7.5 million. Winners share
$1.25 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday. 3-8 a.m.. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 630-
11:30 p.m.)
Online : lhijw.eurmpfeontour.com
LPGATOUR
Next eteLPGATour Championship.
Dec. 2-5. '*rind Cypress Golf Club.
Orlando.
Online. httpt/www p1o corn

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Indiana 100. Cleveland 89
New Jersey 107.Adanta 101.OT
Washington 116. Philadelphia 114.OT
NewYork I 10.Charlotte 107


Detroit at Dallas (n)
Chicago at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland. 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Orlando, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Memphis, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers,
10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Michigan State vs. TBD at
Lahaina (Hawaii) Civic Center,TBA
No. 7 Villanova vs. UCLA at Madison
Square Garden, 9 p.m.
No, 8 Kentucky vs. TBA at Lahalna
(Hawaii) Civic Center.TBA
No. II Missouri vs. Providence or La
Salle at Aventura Palace, Cancun. Mexico,
7 or 9:30 p.m.
No. 13 Washington vs.TBA at Lahaina
(Hawaii) Civic Center.TBA
No. 15 Minnesota vs. North Dakota
State. 8 p.m.
No. 24 Tennessee vs. Virginia
Commonwealth at Madison Square
Garden, 7 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Columbus at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta. 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay. 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Florida, 7:30 p m.
SL Louis at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Minnesota., 8 p.m
Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose. 10:30 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL MVP

NEW YORK Voting for the
American Leaue Most Valuable Player
Award, with first-, second- and third-place
votes and total points based on a 14-9-8-


7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis:
Ptayvr Ist
J. Hamilton.Texas 22
M Cabrera. Det 5
Robinson Cano. NY -
Jose Bautista.Tor. I
Paul Kotoecko. Chi -
Evan Longorta.TB -
Carl Crawford.TB -
Joe Mauer. Minn
Adrian Beltre. Bos
Del Young. Minn
Viad GuerreroTexas.
Rifael Soriano.TB
CC Sabathia. NY
Shin-Soo Choo. CI l
Alex Rodriguez. NY -
Felix Hernandez Sea.-
Ichiro Suzuki. Sea.
Jim Thome, Minn.
Joakim Soria. KC
Mark Teixeira. NY -


3rd Total
2 358
10 262
12 229
4 165
130
S100
98
97
83
44
22
S21
13
S 9
8
S 6
3
S 2
-I


Boynton, Tyus lead



Florida to 79-66 win


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Kenny
Boynton scored 21 points,
Alex Tyus added 19 and
No. 1( Florida beat Florida
Atlantic 79-66 on Tuesday
night.
Erving Walker chipped
in 14 points, six rebounds
and four assists for the
Gators (4-1), who showed
some fatigue while playing
for the fourth time in eight
days.
Florida struggled early
against the Owls (3-3),
allowing them to shoot
nearly 50 percent from the
floor in the first half and giv-



INDIANS

Continued From Page 1B

capitalized on them," coach
Pete Blanchard said.
Fort White (1-4, 1-1)
hosts Taylor County High
at 7 p.m. Monday.
Fort White's girls soc-
cer team split its last two
games.
The Lady Indians beat
Hamilton County High, 2-1,
in Jasper on Thursday, but
lost to Suwannee, 9-1, at
home on Monday.
Rebecca Onorati scored
goals in both games. Lync6
Stalnaker scored a goal
against Hamilton County
with an assist from Ashley
Beckman.
Fort White (2-3-2, 1-2-1)
travels to Oak Hall School for
a 6 p.m. game on Tuesday.


ing up way too many easy
baskets. The Gators, mean-
while, missed free throws
and failed to make the most
of their height and depth
advantage.
Florida settled down in
the second half and really
turned things around when
Brett Royster, the Sun Belt
Conference's defensive
player of the year in 2009,
picked up his fourth foul
with 16:43 remaining.

Florida State 79,
Mercer 55

TALLAHASSEE -Xavier
Gibson tied his career high



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I BLAYK


Answer:


Yesterday's


with 17 points and Derwin
Kitchen added 16 points as
Florida State cruised to a
79-55 win over Mercer on
Tuesday night.
Chris Singleton had
10 points, 13 rebounds and
four blocks for Florida State
(5-0).
Singleton has had a tri-
ple-double and three dou-
ble-doubles in his last four
games.
The Seminoles, who have
scored at least 75 points
in each game this season,
led 19-12 with 10:15 left in
the first half and went on
a 20-10 run to grab a 39-22
halftime lead.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Miko Argirion and Joff Knurok


lI I k I WHAT THE COW OY I
I FENPEP UP WITH I
FA AT THE ROPEo,. J
S- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

A
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: PROBE JOKER GUZZLE STODGY
Answer: What the bookkeeper did when he was hired
by the circus -- JUGGLED THE BOOKS


GOLF REPORTS



Jordan Dicks aces No. 5


Young golfers normally
play the par 3 fifth hole
from the gold tees at 105
yards. Thirteen-year-old
Jordan Dicks wasn't daunt-
ed by playing it from the
white "big boys" tee. He
nailed his 145-yard tee shot
into the cup for his first
hole-in-one.
His father Brian, who still
waits for his first ace, and
Hunter Allen witnessed the
shot.
The Barbers lived up
to their family name and
trimmed the field in the
CHS Dugout Club scram-
ble. David, Blayne, and
Jayce Barber teamed with
Nick Jones to post a 57 for
the victory.
Mark Leis, Derek Payne,
Bim Gonzales and Nathan
Lee finished in second
place, three shots behind
the winners.
Skill shot winners were
Nate Bass for closest to
the pin, Tim Dortch for the
longest putt, Leis for the
longest drive and Tyson
Johnson who won the
putting contest.


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

Steve Patterson (+9)
used three late birdies
to overcome Buddy Slay
(+5) for first place in the
Wednesday blitz.
Patterson also collected
for two winners in the skins
game. His take included a
pot hole win on No. 8.
Jonathan Allen matched
Patterson with two skins.
Bob Randall, Dennis
Crawford, Travis Timmons,
Don Combs and Jordan
Hale, with an eagle on No.
9, each had one skin.
Bruce Gibson and Steve
Osborne shared the top
spot in Saturday's blitz.
Both players pulled their
points on the nose.
Donny Thomas led the
skins game with two win-
ners. Dave Mehl, Richard
Gaines and Osborne each
had one.
Good Old Boys play fea-
tured close matches and
good individual scores.


In team play, match
one went to Eli Witt, Jim
Stevens, Nick Whitehurst
and Dan Stephens by a
score of 6-4 over Mark
Risk, Jim Bell and Tony
Branch.
A three-way match saw
Ed Snow, Joe Persons,
Merle Hibbard and
Howard Whitaker finish
with 7 points for the win
over Jerry West, Bobby
Simmons, Sax Saxon and
Jerry Snowberger with
6 points.
Stan Woolbert, Don
Christensen, Tom Elmore
and Mike Spencer were
another shot back with
5 points.
Top scorers were led by
Montgomery with 35-36-
71, followed by Risk (73),
West (74), Woolbert (77),
Whitaker (77), Stephens
(77), Witt (79), Persons
(79), Elmore (79) and
Hibbard (79).
A two-man best ball event
including golf, lunch and
prizes is Dec. 11-12. Play
will begin with an 8 a.m.
shotgun start each day.


MGA stresses iron play


The MGA's Par 3
Tournament was Saturday.
Every hole was turned into
a par 3, ranging from 75 to
198 yards.
Frank Soucinek won
low gross in the first flight
with a 56. Jason Watts won
first net and Don Horn was
second net.
In the second flight Joe
Herring won low gross
with a 66. Jack Tuggle won
first net and Gerald Smithy
took second net.
Wednesday Blitz winners
from Nov. 17:
A Division Don Horn,


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

even, first; Jim Evans and
Mike Kahlich, tied for
second:
B Division Rocky Ford
.+7. first: Ralph Beekman
+6. second; Gary Croxton
- 2, third;
C division Al Cohoon
+3. first: Jack Tuggle, even,
second; Richard Skipper
and Ronnie Ash -3. tied for
third:
D Division Jerry


Perkins +4, first; Terry
Shay +2, second; Gary
Dampier -2, third.
There were 10 skins.
Evans and Ford each had
three, while Todd Carter
had two and Chet Carter.
and Frog Niewisch each
had one. The pot hole will
carry over $136 for today.
Darlene Horn won the
Ladies Blitz on Nov. 16 with
+4. Sue Terlaje and Flo Neu
tied for second at -1.
Alan Phillips and Jack
Tuggle tied for the Top
of the Hill win on Nov. 15
at +2.


PGA champ Kaymer to stick with European Tour


Associated Press

Martin Kaymer says
he will not be joining the
U.S. P(;A Tour next year
and plans to stick with the


1
5
8
12 H
13
14
C
15

16
18
20 F
t
21 D
22 F


European Tour.
The PG(A champion says
he talked it over with his
family and manager and
concluded that trying to
compete on both tours was


ACROSS 38 Wisecracks
39 Nebr. neigh-
Desk material bor
Briny expanse 40 Chafe
Rooster's crest 41 Milk
Holy cow! preference
Chop down 43 Halted
Bassoon 46 Small (hyph.)
cousin 48 Treats a sprain
Rightmost col- 50 Portico
umn 51 In a snit
Pie seasoning 52 Wearisome
Works clay task
Rail connec- 53 Popcorn buys
ors 54 Be nosy
Deli loaf 55 Mongol
Poor grade dwelling


23 Flash flood
26 Lumber
29 Charged parti-
cles
30 Disease causer
31 Happy sighs
33 Word play
34 Showy and
pretentious
35 aper cut
36 Rock band crew
member


DOWN

1 Grand Teton
St.
2 Porker's plaint
3 Receptive
4 Cactus habi-
tats
5 Hue
6 Lampreys
7 Leather punch


not possible.
The No. 3-ranked
German says he will play
several U.S. events, but calls
the European Tour "his
home."


Answer to Previous Puzzle













IRA S IK RE

NFA E E C
EOS0 AD


8 Duplicator
9 Drama award
10 Beaded shoes
11 Hive dweller
17 Vaporized water
19 Yes, to Rob Roy


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


11-24


22 Boat with oars
23 Sample soup
24 Preside at tea
25 Livy's year
26 noire
27 Melting-watch
artist
28 Transport by
truck
30 Toothy smile
32 Urban rds.
34 "Gunsmoke"
doc
35 Grant
37 Stiff-coated
dogs
38 Sine non
40 Thin, as a
voice
41 In -(as
found)
42 Drawer handle
43 Despot
44 Neutral
color
45 Much-loved
46 Portland hrs.
47 Brat
49 Noncom


(c 2010 by UFS, Inc.


New
N.Y
Mia
Buff

India
Jack
Teni
Hou


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010 3B


DILBERT
HELLO, THIS IS THE
DOGBERT MARKET
RESEARCH COMPANY.
MAY I ASK YOU SOME
TOTALLY HARMLESS
QUESTIONS?


1--A


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


WHAT IS YOUR SOCIAL
SECURITY NUMBER,
BANK PIN NUMBER AND
MOTHER'S MAIDEN
NAMIE?



4'J.


DEAR ABBY


Single woman has knack for

dating e-mail exhibitionists


EXACTLY POVERTY
ARE YOU RATES.
RESEARCH- I'm
ING? SHOOTING
I ) FOR 100%.

nQ
1' N


DEAR ABBY: I am a
38-year-old woman with an
outgoing personality. How-
ever, when I first meet a
man, I move slowly.
If I agree to a date, I meet
him at a public place. After
a few dates, I'll share, my
e-mail address so we can
communicate more easily.
And, Abby, that's when the
trouble starts.
Over the past few years,
several men have e-mailed
me nude photos of them-
selves after I gave them my
contact information. I'm not
a prude, but I feel it was dis-
respectful. I broke up with
each of them and deleted
their photos from my com-
puter.
Please lend me some
advice and insight here.
Until then, I'm considering
remaining single forever.
- SEEN IT ALL IN SAN
ANTONIO
DEAR SEEN IT ALL:
I'm surprised you didn't
sign yourself "Seen Too
Much." Where are you
meeting these creepy indi-
viduals? Before the Inter-
net, they used to be called
"flashers."
Because this has hap-
pened to you more than
once in the past few years,
it's time to ask yourself if
somehow you may have
given the impression that


NEW YORK
DEAR WANTS NO
BABIES: Smile and tell
the nervy gentleman he
can expect you to give him
grandbabies after you start
feeling maternal, and when
you bbgin to feel maternal
he'll be the first to know.
Do not pick a fight with
him, and don't spend much
time with him. Apparently,
your boyfriend got his
brains from his mother.
And now, Dear Readers,
I am pleased to offer the
traditional Thanksgiving
Prayer that was penned by
my dear mother, Pauline
Phillips. No Thanksgiving
would be complete for me
without it
Oh, Heavenly Father,
We thank Thee for food
and remember the hungry.
We thank Thee for health
and remember the sick.
We thank Thee for free-
dom and remember the en-
slaved.
May these remembranc-
es stir us to service,
That Thy gifts to us may
be used for others. Amen.
Have a safe and happy
Thanksgiving, everyone!
- LOVE, ABBY

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): An added
burden will cause you to
rethink your plans.'A finan-
cial gain is possible if you
make a move that will lower
your overhead. A love rela-
tionship will be strained if
you cannot agree. Lay your
plans out plainly. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't be afraid
to present your case or to
be imaginative and inno-
vative. A money matter or
settlement is likely to take
an unexpected turn. Count-
ing on a promise will lead
to worry, stress and loss.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You can't allow
someone to push you in a
direction that doesn't feel
right. Love is in the stars
and a little romance late in
the evening will restore the
confidence you lost during
the day and help you recon-
figure your approach to ob-
taining your goals. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Emotions will be
hard to control. Make sure
you think before you speak.
Stick to whatever task you
have planned for the day
without complaining. Apply
for a new position or con-
sider something you might
not normally do. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): The less you reveal
to others about what you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

are doing or thinking, the
further ahead you will get
Someone is likely to pull
out or decline an offer you
have made. Don't let this
deter you from moving
ahead. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Helping people who
can offer favors in return is
your best bet Troubles at
home could cost you. Avoid
any settlements or legal
or financial matters with
the potential to stunt your
personal growth potential.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take on a challenge or
take part in an activity that
utilizes your quick mind
and competitive attitude.
Emotions will be close to
the surface and it won't
take much to start an argu-
ment or be drawn into one.
Travel plans are not likely
to run smoothly. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You may ques-
tion your past decisions,
but looking back or hav-
ing regrets doesn't bring
you any closer to reaching
your current goals. Mak-
ing a couple of changes will
bring what you are trying
to do into the forefront for
all to see. *****
SAGITARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): You will find
it much easier to deal with
the people in your life if you
maintain comfortable sur-
roundings and compatibili-
ty between yourself and the
ones you love. Aggressive
behavior will work against
you. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Dealing with
emotional issues that en-
tail added responsibilities
may not be your choice but
you need to do so if you are
going to be treated fairly.
Make it clear that, although
you are willing to do your
share, you expect help.
Take a position and stick to
it ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Dealing with
children or people requir-
ing your assistance will be
emotional. Say what's on
your mind, ensuring that
whoever you are dealing
with understands what you
are willing to do. Enhance a
romantic relationship with
a commitment ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Speak up and
don't be afraid to deal with
people who oppose you.
Your strength will come
from handling those who
are trying to make you
look inadequate. Stand up
for your rights, beliefs and
ideas and you will gain re-
spect and help. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luls Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present,
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Z equals M
"M BUGPAUR ES GCCPUHMGEU GAR
EPUGNDPU UG H F R K,. VUHODNU KSD
RSA'E TASJ F S J ZGAK KSD P U ISMAI
ES VU IMLUA." NOARP R G K
S' H S A A S P
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "You only have to do a very few things right in your
life so long as you don't do too many things wrong." Warren Buffett
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-24

CLASSIC PEANUTS


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
you would be receptive to
this kind of contact. In oth-
er words, think about the
signals you may be sending
after a few dates.
DEAR ABBY: With the
holidays coming, I know I'll
be spending time with my
boyfriend's family. Every
time I see his father (who is
a poor excuse for a dad) he
asks when I'm going to give
him grandbabies. This has
gone on for five years. I am
not even married to his son,
and I don't plan on having
any children. He makes me
feel like I don't deserve his
son if I don't have children.
(My boyfriend already has
a son from a previous re-
lationship.) I have tried to
answer him nicely. I have
even tried to be rude, but
he just doesn't get it!
I would like to know how
to respond to him. I cer-
tainly do not want it to af-
fect his family's Christmas,
but I feel I should stick up
for myself. Please help. -
WANTS NO BABIES IN


FRANK & ERNEST


J95









LAKE CITY REPORTER


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Columbia .. 'n

Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010 1C


Glenn I. Jones Inc. specializes in cooling, heating


Striving to solve
the problems
customers may
have with their
heating and cool-
ing is the priority of Glenn
I. Jones Inc., Cooling &
Heating Specialists.
"We're a service com-
pany," said Glenn I. Jones
Jr., who co-owns the family
business with his father,
Glenn I. Jones. "We're
here to solve people's
problems."
The local company is a
state-certified air condi-
tioning contractor, install-
ing air conditioners and
heating systems in resi-
dences and commercial
businesses. It also offers
residential and commercial
service and residential and
commercial replacements.
"We do it all," the young-
er Jones said.
The company was born
when the elder Jones
returned to Lake City
in 1967 and bought an
existing oil company that
supplied fuel, oil and gaso-
line. Air conditioning was
added to the product line
a few years later and the
fuel side of the company
was dropped completely in
195.
"We're the oldest, estab-
lished air conditioning con-
tractor in Lake City," the
elder Jones said.
The younger Jones said
he started working with
the business driving a fuel
truck during his summers
off from school. He came
to work full-time for the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Glenn 1. Jones and Glenn I. Jones Jr. strike a pose in front of their company logo. The Joneses are known as Lake City's


cooling and heating specialists.
company in 1974.
With a number of
awards from Florida
Power & Light Company
and others for conserva-
tion and efficiency, the
father-and-son team pride
themselves on their sales
of more efficient systems,
an aspect of their business
that sets them apart.
"Our company has been,
I think, a little different
than the run-of-the-mill


air conditioning contrac-
tor," the elder Jones said.
"From day one, our goal
was not to sell the most
units we could and the
cheapest, but we tried to
talk everyone into more
efficient units."
"I:-vten though they're
more expensive and stuff,"
he said, "in the long-run,
it's the best deal for a
homeowner if he buys
soinu-tlhing that's more


efficient."
"We've always been a
promoter of high -efficiiint
systems," the younger
Jones said.
If there is ever a prob-
lem with an installation
or any other service, the
Joneses said they will
always address it and take
care of it.
"I've always said, and
I think this is absolutely
true, we never walk off


from a problem," the elder
Jones said.
"We've always taken
care of the problems," the
younger Jones said.
When serving the cus-
tomer, the Jones' work
toward always making the
right decision.
"'That's just kind of the
bottom line." the younger
Jones said. "Do the right
thing."
Those employed by the


business are always kept
abreast of the changes in
the cooling and heating
industry from continually
attending training, they
said.
'Training is an ongoing
thing because every year
they make improvements,"
the elder Jones said. "For
instance, they've changed
the freon from one kind
to another, and this was
something we were right
on top of and we knew
how to do."
The younger Jones also
said that advertising with
the Lake City Reporter has
won them customers.
"When we've done the
ads, we've always gotten a
response," he said. "And
I'm sure we've had some
sales out of it."
Glenn I. Jones Inc. com-
petes to offer the best to
its customers.
"We're hopeful that we
can serve the customer's
needs better than any
company in the area,"
the younger Jones said.
"We've got the best-trained
employees and the best
group of people working
here."
'That's'our goal," the
elder Jones said.
Glenn I. Jones Inc. is
located at 552 NW Hilton
Avenue. Its office hours
are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday,
but has an employee on
call 24 hours a day, seven
days a week.
Call (386) 752-5389 or visit
www.glennijonesinc.com.


$25 Prize Weekly Winner
Contest rules and official entry blank in Tuesday's paper.


Lake City Reporter


Join us for Thanksgiving Dinner

Thursday. November 25th 12:00 pmi
$5'"' p perii *' Bi 1i a (a Cmered )Dis


OLD


TYME


FARM DAYS


& SWAP MEET


A nu .1I l, i.'iti l t,.tiv al f',4i trin' Late 19th Cviiur
Skill; such a. C Oaii Grin(diiig, Syrup Making, Antique
Equipment & Exhibit- it 'Vning l o. Ki(d Games, rood
Vendors. Blai smith, Arts & Crafts., Kettle Korn. tani
& .&Itlies, Basket W., idnt, iblnmumade Ice ( rteamn.
llnnmemad' Jewelry, Soip Making & Fossil Exhibits


I I I IhIb,, I l \ l l I l ,I l .I ,, r t I i li



/'i i -f.l -f *I *1t
OlowJ~d

Mi~s~y ?'j


3076 95th Drive Liv, Oak, FL 32060
sonouNoi il


I I' I ~










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


'lake ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


TBUY I




F SI NDI4


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month '92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8.00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.1 l' am Mon,900am
Wednesday Mon,1000 a m Mon,900am
Thursday Wed.10 00am Wed, 900am
Friday Th'rs. IO0 a m Thurs, 900 a m
Saturday Fri lO an Fin.900am
Sunday Fri.108am Fn,900am
T k ,' ..) r|,,.lIllrnr, .111. ,*ilt .. l h t) n 'O WtlhO lll .ll




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
Ilcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ver, Iho first word of each ad may
not bo abbreviated.

In lrini i d 011nline
ini.htl(c;ihvry'|)rit,()oiiI


1 7, 4 7, 7,


I)IVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved folms-
386-961-5896.


010 Announcements









060' Services

Looking for elder persons in need
of 24 hr care in my home.
Certified Nursing Ass't,
in Jasper. FL. 386-792-3149

100n Job
100 Opportunities

(M.S4 .124
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY

Columbia County is accepting
applications for a part-time
(20 hrs weekly- 10 AM 2PM)
Secretary I in the County
Extension Office. Position
performs routine clerical &
secretarial work. Minimum
requirements: High school
diploma/G.E.D. including
courses in typing, business
office routines, and filing
systems or equivalent
combination of training &
experience. Salary is $7.87 per
hr. Successful applicant must
pass pre-employment physical
& drug screening. Applications
may be obtained at the Human
Resources Office or our website
www.columbiacounitvfla.com.
Board of County Commission-
ers. 135 NE Hernando, #203.
Lake Citv. FL 32055.
(386)719 -2025.TDD
(386)758-2139. Applications
must be received on or before
12/03/10. A.A/EEO/ADA/VP
Emplo er.


Member Senr ice Specialist
Florid.i Credit I'ioni seeks ail
energetic. create\ e indi\ idual to
help us meet our goals Full itnei
Member Ser\ ice Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch Moind.la Friday
and some Saturda.is required"
If ou l hiae proven customer
service and sales skills we
wouldd like to hear fromnl ou
Prior financi.il experience is a.
plus Pay commensurate \itlh
experience Benelits include
vacation. 401k. hel.ihlli'lc
iisur.Uinc. cl'k Stop ll) .out
branch at 583 West D)u al Street
to complete ill .application or
send resume to i lith silarN
requirements to Florida Credit
UInion, Athn: HR NISS, P.O.
Box 5549. (;aiinsesille, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661l
E-mail: krose(a flcu.org
MF/D, V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

4)542421
HeritageBank of the South.
Lake City. Florida. seeks a part
time TELLER and a Customer
Service Representative in a
branch in Lake City. Job re-
quirements: cash handling
experience, teller experience
desired, excellent customer
service skills, good organiza-
tional skills with the ability to
priontorize and multi-task.
professional oral and written
communication skills, proficient
computer skills, keen attention
to details and must be friendly
and professional High school
diploma or equivalent required.
Salary and benefits coinnensu-
rate with experience. Interested
candidates sliould forward
resume with salary history and
requirements to: hiunianresour
ces0_ejeriltigebank. icoiii

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & he reliable. &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE esliniates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All I ome improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates, l.arry
352-339-50(156 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trinuning.
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Ilholiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.

Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines.,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-389()


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


inn Job
to1 0 Opportunities

)045.12,120
COLUMBIA COUNTY
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a Senior Staff
Assistant. This is liaison and
staff administrative work
assisting the County Manager.
Will interpret policy and ensure
compliance with ordinances.
Will serve as a liaison between
the Board of Countly
Commissioners antd the public.
Perfornis public relations
functions with public,
department heads, officials and
visitors. Minimum requirements
include Associate's degree in
business management or related
field and three to five yrs.
experience providing adminis-
trative/managemnent support,
preferably in a governmental
setting, or any equivalent
combination of training and
experience to provide the
required knowledge, skills, and
abilities. Must be a resident of
Columbia County within six (6)
months of employment. Valid
FL driver's license req. Salary
$54,933 annually plus benefits.
Successful applicant must pass
pre-employment physical &
drug screening. Applications
may be obtained at the Human
Resources Office Board of
County Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemando, Suite 203, Lake City.
FL 32055, or online at
www.columbiacountyfla.com
(386)719-2025. TDD
(386)758-2139. Application
deadline: 12/10/2010.
AAA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.


CCSS, Inc. is accepting
applications for IF CNA &
I housekeepers. Must have C('PR,
First Aid training. Dependable
transportation. Level 11
background screen & drug test
required Appiy in person
628 SE AllisonCt ('i.
La.ike City FL EOE

Medical Biller Needed
Several years experience i anll
.spects of Medical Insurance
Billing required
Please e-nmil rest ume Io :
In la sahlnd( orifa\. 386.758-51987


1ll:1.1' W\V.\l I
SALES II'lRSON
F'o call on company
con0venlience stores .and pri ail
stores IHelp develop nesw
locllons Must i have sales
.ibllilt; good driving ti-cord
requl d Dependaii.ible iand gold
colnlnniiii tilc ion skills.
Transportation furnished.
willing to live in IPerry. FL
Send resume and income history
to: PO Box 1201 Perry. FL
32348

BUL LDOZER OPERATOR
Part time. references required.
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887
Need to lpre One Person.
Must have Computer cxp.
Order Entry/Purchasing/Shipping/
Receiving exp. Needed.
Apply in Person 174 NE
Cortez Terr., Lake City FL

120 ^Medical
120 Employment


l)irector of Human Resources
Small Critical Access Hospital
seeks experienced Human
Resources D)irector to lead I IR
fliitncions Responsible for all
HIR funclions including
recruitmenti, retention.
regulatory compliancee, benefits.
organiitalional developnintl.
employee relations, and
Stale/Federal Survey
preparedness. Comprehensive
benefit package, salary
commensurate with
experience. Ilachelor's degree;
PI IR ori S llR prelterred.
I lospital/l lealthcare
experience preferred.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
E(quiial Employmnent
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace

I loinecare I.PN's needed 9a-6p
anid CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim I Heallthcare 352-291-4888
Medical assistant/secretary
needed in local physician office.
Please fax CV
to 386-719-9662.
Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler.
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
lake City. FL. 320(125


141 Babysitters
Babysillting in miy home, lots of
experience, will provide lois ol
love and allenlii, IF/I' or l'/I'.
located near the center of Iown.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy al 61(0-348-0(336


240 Schools &
240 Education

0,151422,18
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/29/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/l 1

Continuing education
Iees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
es. rir ltmafiningefr icrC.l olm



310 Pets & Supplies
Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $40 386-752-0987
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Baby Pigs for sale
ready in Dec
call for details
386-965-2215
BI1 Boar Pig
about two .Cears old
call for details
SOL.l)
Mini Mare a/lack.
can hold small children.
reduced to 5(X)
Ill dcheli r loc.all. 386-965-2231


401 Antiques
ANTIQ EN WANTED)
Furn Chini. Sil\ci. (CIl.issaire.
(oslilnic Jeclrs & Gold ;5 sccas
c\p. ( Ca.ih PI Pete ( 18606 :2621

408 .urni(ure

COMPETE CHERRY
Queen Hciedliim .iS,
(iOlil condition .t's450 (Xi obh
(iX-)704 )Q177

(ratmn. inc lullil e elec c .ic I.bed
/.\/vlbraling te.iure. Inclhides
mattress .and 5 piece bednn suinte
$400 752-2572 leave tness.ige
RECLINER,
TALL & wide hbege. Decent
shape. 4(.00 X
386-755-8941


416 Sporting Goods

Gym Equipment: Olympic Plates.
Benches. Dumbbells. Treadmill,
Stepper. Nautilus Machine.
MUST SELL! 386-752-0749


420 Wanted to Buy

GUITARS WANTED
Gibson. Fender. Etc.
Cash paid will travel.
(407)733-1687
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine I hardwood &
Cypress. large or small Iracts.
Call 386-96- 196 1.
Wanted Junk (ars. Trucks. Vans.
$225 & ulp ('ASI I! Free Pick Ulp!
NO title needed !386-878.-260
After 5pinm 386- 752 3648.

430 (Garage Sales







PUBL.ISIHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads


Must be Pre-Paid. 720 Furnished Apts.
712 For Rent

A440 a Efficienc' iipir'ltnt,el ('lose to
440 Miscellaneous VA. $4.10 mo. plus $15(0.1( sec,


'Physical 'Therapy HEluipment:
Exatn/trealtient table,
$100.00 MI IST SEII,
3.86-752-(152

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
Pecinn Ilouse in Ililisville
availhile for buying & selling.
Several good varieties
386 -752-(896l 38(-697-(.12(0
The Nut rackerer
uliy and sell, crack & shell pect'ans
2738 ('R 252 W. I.ake City 312021
I'inenouiinl Rd/(C'R 252/'l'ayiloivill'
Rober 'lylor .I 18 (.1 l1138
or 386-961 1420


460 Firewood
Truckload of firewood $6(0,
Tigerele cancerr selling fir ewood
to go Ito competition. will deliver
Call 381 -t9)5-3728


utilities ini.1lludel.No ipes.
3860-754-941 or 38(i-438-4054.


461 Office
4 1 Equipment
OFFICE FURNITURE
All Wood Computer
Desk $50
386-752-0749
OFFICE FURNITURE
BLACK LEAI'HER
CH lAIRS $20
386-752-0749


530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt,
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098
386-965-3110

r63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 (full baths), S/W. 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3BR/2BA NEWLY renovated
MH on 1/2 ac. private property.
$700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Security dep.
References needed. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lhi ba fron $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0(X17
VeNr clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. no treg. $650.) Rent
incl a\ler. se\ er, trash p/u. Close
to to\tn 386-984-8448 or 623-7547
'stcs C lca 2 ItR!I A. in the
'Iunln. Htnlloid .irci. S450 Uni,..
X(M 8(,7.1S 86, 5 X)-(0642
a\ \a a Ms\a .Ullt l .le\ pite.opell ieC,'coll

Mobile Homes
b64 0 for Sale
$200. MONTIl.Y. Remodeled
SW 2Ndx/2hb Appliances.
delh\ered & blocked ()Owner
finance available w/!3(XXI do% wn
Call (Gary I.innlion 186-758 98241

U1 nfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$Ilolid.ia\ C ash $
No Apple Fee NOt Sl).
250(i olfl Decellmber.,
lor OQualified Applicants
\Windsong Apartments
i380) 758-8455
2 bdrm l.buth, I car garage. W/D
hook utip. $520 month.
no pets I month sec.
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage.
east side of tows n.
Ist. last & sec
386-755-6867
2BRj2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Bava. CH/A.
Carport. Carpet, tile. $575 1mo.+
D)ep. Call 386(-752-0118 or
386(-023-1i698
i)uplex w/garage spacious. 2/I.
13(1) sq ft. W/D hook up. Cl1VA.
$650 plus dep & bckgnid chk.
386-697-324 or 352-514-2332
Move in specials available,
I & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per Inotli.,
.86-755-2423
T'he I .akes Apts. Siudios & IBi 's
from $125/wk. 1lit. & cable incl..
Sec" 8 voucliers accepted, imoinhl "
rales avail Call 386 752 2741
iUpdated apart iiments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
FronIl $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-t 1262


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?






I~ Pit mlf iYour skills
and
padllive atfitud)


Opportunity -f f




Apply Online or In Persont 1152 SW Business Point Dr
4WDb Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sttel.com EOE


* ADvantage


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

W Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

0.1'i 12.14-
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A'
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
1-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba. $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn.
$575 mo Ist. and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses. 3/2.
back yard. $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242.
386-965-0276
Very Clean 2br/lba. in own.
298 SW Miller Terr. CH/A. Shed.
$650.mo. Ist.mo. & security.
Call Vick 386-623-6401
White Sprgs. 3/1 house. CH/A,
swood floors. W/D. dishwasher.
fenced, small housetrained pet ok.
non smoking environment.
$750/MI. Ist. last. $300 sec dep &
pet fee. drive by 10623 Wesson St.
then call 352-377-0720

750 Business &
5 ( Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plazia. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961 -1086 DCA Realtor
Retall/Conmmercial/OmTice
12(K) + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City. FL.
low down. easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race. color, religion, sex.
disability. familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention ;o make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians. pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper w ill not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
forned that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
1111D toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is -8(00-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
I.ive Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. I
acre. Fence, large utility room.
walk in closet/conlputer room.
Metal roof. ness' AC/ileat. $365.
imo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance. (MHI. 4/2 on
3+ac.quiet. fenced. S. of Lake
Cilts. stall down. $800 mo
38( 867-1833/386-590-0642
awww..suwanineevalleyppiopelties.com







Classified Department: 755-5440.

820 Farmls &'
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Plaved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69.900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinanicing.comn
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
830 Commercial
83 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

930 Motorcycles'
2009 Custom Chopper. 300cc,
low miles, like new,
must sell $2000 obo
386-758-1784

940 Trucks
08 Toyota Tacoma. 4dr access cab.
17,250mi. auto. AC, All pwr Ton-
neau cover, bedliner, hitch, nerf
bars, stereo. $17,995. 752-8227


1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215

950 Cars for Sale
87 Ford Mustang GT. 5 spd..,
28,000 orig miles, adult owned,
runs exc.. cobra wheels.
$10.500 OBO 386-963-2271


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


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F I^^ ^^


94 BUICK LeSabre
Low miles.
Runs great. $2400.00
386-752-0824


-""=' ca$h

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE


WITH
LAKE CITY


$


THE
REPORTER


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ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for youl
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


2009 Custom
Chopper 300cc
Low miles, like new,
must sell.
$2,000 OBO
Call
386-758-1784


In Print,
& Online
One Low
Price!


P


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


'x'Ivi i


vxrn[T a7~*n


Lake City Reporter


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at the paper.


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386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
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THIS REPORTER W WFOR MW


180 East mv St
Lake City, FlRida 321


USED VEHICLES
5 12 Mont2h*l2, OOOMIeWarrnty


2009 Pontiac
G5 COUPE
j^ ~bb


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES!


G E T ,lakeciyrepolercor

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