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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01459
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/23/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01459
System ID: UF00028308:01459
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Cougars

Slammed
Columbia oo0017 0 ** DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



Lake Ci


votto is MVP
Cincinnati first baseman
ends Pujols' reign.
Sports, I B






Sorter



Vol. 136, No. 263 0 75 cents


School Board vows to fight layoffs


Officials expect
slashed budget
for 2011 to 2012.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
With predicted budget
cuts of approximately $1.4
million to $6.9 million for
the next school year, offi-
cials said Monday that the
school district may have to


cut jobs, but not without a
fight.
The Columbia County
School Board discussed
the potential budget cuts
for the 2011 to 2012 school
year at a general funds bud-
get workshop, stressing
that maintaining a quality
education for students is its
first priority and keeping
jobs is next on the list.
"Quality education
is first, but saving jobs


needs to be
our key,"
said Steve
Nelson ,

member.
Nelson After the
weighted
Full Time Equivalency
(FrE) student count came
up 385 students short of
what was expected for the
2010 to 2011 school year,


"Quality education is first, but saving
jobs needs to be our key."

Steve Nelson
School board member


the district will have to cut
more than $1.9 million this
year, said Lex Carswell,
assistant superintendent.
Weighted FTE determines
state funding the district


will receive and the most
recent count was taken in
October.
The district could suffer
more than $1.4 million in
the 2011 to 2012 budget if


those 385 students do not
show up at school again for
the next school year. Total
cuts for the 2011 to 2012
budget could be as high
as $6.9 million because of
the weighted FTE count
and other factors, such as
general stimulus money
and critical need dollars the
district will not receive next
year, Carswell said.
LAYOFFS continued on 3A


TOP HONORS


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High School Administrative Trainee Terri Thomas congratulates Richardson Middle School sixth-grader Terrell
Francis, 11, at the Presley's EXCEL and Scholars Program at New Day Spring Missionary Baptist Church on Monday.


Officials recognize academic excellence


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Only the stu-
dents who
made honor
roll for the
first nine
weeks know how difficult
their journey has been up
to this point, said Mike
Millikin, Columbia County
School System superinten-
dent.
Millikin was the guest
speaker at the Presley's
EXCEL and Scholars
Program Monday at New
Day Springs Missionary
Baptist Church. The pro-
gram honored kindergar-
ten through 12th-grade
students for making the
honor roll for the first
nine weeks of the school
year.
"Why do you try and
who cares, really?" he


. II I[N i 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Summers Elementary School fourth-grader Linath Thomas,
9, shakes Columbia County School Superintendent Mike
Millikin's hand as she walks up to receive a certificate for A/B
Honor Roll.


said. "The answer is sit-
ting in the audience. We
all care."
Recognition comes with
responsibility, Millikin
said.
There were things


some of the students
didn't know how to do
growing up, but they
learned with help from
someone along the way,
he said. They must, in
turn, help others when


Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


they can.
Students should never
be ashamed of opportuni-
ties to excel academically
or seek help from a teach-
er, Millikin said.
"Never be embarrassed
to do well at school," lie
said.
Each of the students
were at the program
because that can succeed
academically, Millikin
said.
The school system is
geared toward student
success at all levels.
"We have a good school
system," he said. "We
don't say that enough."
Millikin said the state
released graduation sta-
tistics for last year and
Columbia County with 87
percent has the highest
rate of any surrounding

HONORS continued on .7/1


O pinion ................ 4A
O bituaries .............. 6A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Bulletin Board ........... 7A


Big Lots opens doors in LC


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sherry Peters (left), Big Lots assistant manager, greets
customer Kelsey Luke, 19, during the ribbon cutting and
grand opening of the store on Friday.


CHS drama grabs

bullying problem

through education


Play emphasizes
impact of issue
in school system.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comn
Columbia High School's
drama program actively
addressed the issue of bul-
lying in schools on the CHS
stage Monday.
The program gave its
first of two in-school per-
forlmances for the CHS stu-
dent body. The second per-
formance will be held today
from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the
school's auditorium for all
students to attend.
'he performance consists
of two plays "Pickin'" and
"Memory of Harold" that
deal with the issue of bully-


ing and the consequences it
can cause.
Annabelle Blevins, 15, CHS
drama student and executive
director for both plays, said it
is important for the students
to be educated on bullying,
an issue students deal with
regularly.
The diversity of the plays'
characters and actors will
help all types of students to
identify, Blevins said.
"It really does reach every-
one," she said.
Blevins also noted the play
will help attendees to under-
stand that small acts of bully-
ing can have large, negative
effects on others.
"It'll catch different peo-
ple's attention and help them
to see even the linu .t f thing
can make a big impact on
people," she said.


SSMP to hold yearly

lights extravaganza

beginning Saturday


Exhibit to include
2-mile display of
Christmas scenes.
From statt reports

The Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park pres-
ents Suwannee Lights, the
annual Christmnas extrava-
ganza of lights, Saturday
through Dec. 24 at The
Spirit of the Suwaunee
Music lPark.


AROUND
FLORIDA
I11. I idy t 0 II, M im i
Ill, Ilis: [al veggies.


The annual event fea-
tures more than two miles
of lighted, handmade
Christmas displays built
by the SSMP's Christmas
workers.
Along the winding, 2-mile
long exhibit are Christmas
scenes such as Nutcracker
soldiers, swans, animals,
Christmas trees and more.
Guests can view the lights
from the comfort of their
UGHTS continued on 3A/1


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Suw water level










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


Elay4)
*' .


Monday:
Afternoon: 3-3-3
Evening: 8-1-3


Monday:
Afternoon :2-0-6-2
Evening: 1-9-0-5


- -Sunday:
8-17-21-24-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



T.I. talks about his drug problem


NEW YORK
T.I. says his drug prob-
lem started when he
received prescriptions
for Oxycontin and hydro-
codone after a series of
dental surgeries this year.
"After the pain went away, I kept
taking it. I had like five, six pre-
scriptions. So, I had, like 80 pills.
Everybody else might drink or
smoke a blunt; I took a pain pill,"
the 30-year-old says in an interview
win the December issue of Vibe
magazine.
T.I. said he is now clean and
sober, thanks in part to his
September arrest in Los Angeles.
Police found ecstasy pills on him,
and while the case was eventually
dropped, a judge found him in viola-
tion of his probation stemming from
a 366-day prison stint for trying to
buy illegal guns and sentenced him
to 11 months in jail.
Prior to going back to jail, the
Atlanta rapper attended one-on-
one and group therapy sessions to
help kick his addiction to pills and
codeine, which he was drinking to
get high.
He says he's now learned his
lesson.
"If you rationalize putting yourself
in harm's way, risking your well-
being, your health, your freedom,
your fails well-being and liveli-
hood in order to be high, that's the
rationale of an addict," he said.


In this July 2007, file photo, Rapper T.I. appears onstage during MTV's 'Total
Request Live' at the MTV Times Square Studios in New York. T.I. says his drug
problem started when he received prescriptions for Oxycontin and hydrocodone
after a series of dental surgeries.


an e-mail Monday that he's focused
on trying to free Snipes rather than
a surrender date. Snipes has been
free on bail for two years while
appealing his 2008 conviction for
willful failure to file income tax
returns. A Florida federal judge last
week ordered Snipes to begin serv-
ing his prison sentence but did not
set a surrender date.


Attorney. Wesley Snipes Mel Gibson returns to
not yet in prison court for custody fight


MIAMI The attorney for
Wesley Snipes says the actor has
not yet surrendered to federal
authorities to begin serving a three-
year prison sentence for a tax
conviction.
Attorney Daniel Meachum said in


LOS ANGELES Mel Gibson
is back in a Los Angeles courtroom
to resume his custody fight with
ex-girlfriend Oksana Grigorieva
The Academy Award winner sat
quietly in a courtroom across from
Grigorieva, a Russian musician,


before Los Angeles Superior Court
Judge Scott Gordon began a closed
hearing on Monday.

Beyonce promotes DVD,
'1 am ... World tour'
NEW YORK Beyonce is tired
of the baby rumors.
"At this point, they say that I've
been pregnant like eight times,
so I am kind of used to it," the
29-year-old singer said in an inter-
view with The Associated Press.
"I just hope that one day when I
decide to be pregnant that people
are happy for me. ... One day hope-
fully I will be. It's part of being a
celebrity, I guess."

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Michael Gough
(goff) is 93.
* Former Labor Secretary
William E. Brock is 80.
* Actor Franco Nero is 69.
* Actress Susan Anspach
is 68.
* Screenwriter Joe Eszterhas
is 66.
* Actor Steve Landesberg
is 65.

Daily Scripture


* Actor Maxwell Caulfield
is 51.
* Actor John Henton is 50.
* TV personality Robin
Roberts ("Good Morning
America") is 50.
* Actress Kelly Brook is 31.
* Actor Lucas Grabeel is 26.
* Actress-singer Miley Cyrus
(TV: "Hannah Montana") is 18.
* Actor Austin Majors is 15.


"Let the peace of Christ rule in
your hearts, since as members
of one body you were called to
peace.And be thankful."

Colossians 3:15


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ..............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online ... www.Iakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 am.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All maternal herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
'City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
in part Is forbidden without the permnis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10 am., next day re-delivery or er-
vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
PublisherTdd Wl son..7540418 vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ..............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakedtyreporter.com)
NEWSHome delivery rates
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delveryrates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ...................$48.79
ADVERTISING 52 Weeks................... $8346
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417 Rosindude 7% sies ta
(kpeterson@lakectyreportercom) Mall rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks...................$8280
To place a classifiedad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
In this'space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


First lady tells students


in Miami to eat veggies )

MIAMI I


Michelle Obama
had Miami
elementary
school students
cheering Monday over a
typically contentious din-
ner topic vegetables.
Even the green ones.
The first lady ate some
cherry tomatoes and fresh
herbs with the students,
who were the first in the
country to receive a free
salad bar as part of her
new initiative to get more
veggie displays into school
cafeterias.
"If you're going to
change your habits, you've
got to be ready to try some
new stuff ... trying some
vegetables you might not
normally eat," Obama
told students at Riverside
Elementary.
Only about 15 percent
of public school cafeterias
have salad bars. Dozens
of schools want to add
them, but can't afford the
$2,500 equipment display
or the produce to stock
it, said Lorelei DiSogra,
vice president of nutri-
tion and health for the
United Fresh Produce
Association.


:-.4-.


ASSOCIATED
First lady Michelle Obama speaks to fifth-graders at
Riverside Elementary in Miami about the start of a new
initiative 'Let's Move Salad Bars to Schools' on Monday.


pay $307 a month plus ret-
roactive support of $22,925
to 27-year-old Brandi
Peters.
Four days later Peters
was found dead, along
with the 6-year-old twins,
Tamiyah and Taniyah
Peters, and her 3-year-old
son, Joyante Segura.
Peters also had obtained
a final order for child
support from the boy's
father, Henry Segura Jr., in
August. No suspects have
been charged.


the locks and the unit's
owner opened the door
and fatally shot him. Police
opened fire and injured the
owner.

Air Force climbers
head to Antarctica
HURLBURT FIELD
- Two Panhandle air-
men from the Air Force's
Hurlburt Field Special
Operations Command will
spend Thanksgiving in
Antarctica trying to climb
that continent's highest
mountain.
Capt. Rob Marshall and
Capt. Graydon Muller head
to Antarctica Wednesday
morning. The two men
are part of a team trying
to become the first group
to carry the Air Force
flag to the highest peak
on all seven continents. In
Antarctica, they will try to
scale 16,076-foot Vinson
Massif.
* Associated Press


Psacela
76/60


Tdlahssee*
78/59

75/64


79/57 el
Lake City.
80/54
. Gainesle
.,80/55
Ocala
6 5/11R


82/63


FL Myeo
82/63

K


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81
56
,, 73
50
86 In 190e
25 In 2008

0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.54"
45.17"


,78/56

Daytwa Bu
8*,60
0


City
Cape Canave
Daytona Bea
Ft. Lauderdal
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


a- Key West
Odiando Cap Canaveral ake City
83/60 78/65 MIami
Naples
West Pahn ieach Ocala'
81/68 Orlando
Ft FLaudrdat Panama City
S,, 81/72 Pensacola
SNaples Tallahassee
'84/65 Miami Tampa
.t 't, 82/71 Valdosta
"Gy 0 W. Palm Bea


12/17


SUN
Sundse today
Sunset today
Sundse tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrtse today
Moonset today
Moondse tom.
Moonset tom.


7:03 a.m.
5:31 p.m.
7:03 a.m.
5:31 p.m.

7:18 p.m.
8:53 a.m.
8:21 p.m.
9:46 a.m.


O OO
Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.
28 5 13 21
Last New First Full


J7al t p1 7p la 6a|
tuesday Wednesday


- -Fmuidt.wUnl. -"*b"F.aIs"nmwhIn


On this date In
1943, northern New
Hampshire was in
the grips of a record
snowstorm that left
a total of 55 Inches
at Berlin, and 56
Inches at Randolph.
The 56 Inch total
at Randolph estab-
lished a 24 hour
snowfall record for
the state.


Wednesday Thursday
ral 78/66/pc 78/64/s
ch 81/61/s 81/61/s
le 81/72/sh 81/72/pc
84/61/s 84/62/pc
80/55/pc 80/57/pc
77/57/pc 78/60/pc
82/72/pc 84/72/s
80/53/pc 79/56/pc
82/70/s 82/71/s
84/65/s 83/67/pc
81/56/pc 80/59/pc
82/61/s 83/62/s
74/63/s 70/56/sh
75/61/pc 75/58/pc
76/57/s 75/49/sh
83/65/s 82/66/pc
78/57/pc 79/58/sh
ch 81/69/sh 82/69/s


An exclusive
service
5 brought to
M oIIur readers
30 aille db ibn
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0 "
to 10+

-
*'- 71 weather.com

.^ Forecasts, data and graph-
SIcs 0 2010 Weather Central
S LLC, Madison, Wis.
^ www.weatherpubllsher.com


TALLAHASSEE A
woman who was killed
along with her three chil-
dren appeared in court ear-
lier last week seeking child
support from the father of
her slain twin girls.
Court records examined
Monday show a judge last
Tuesday signed a final
order requiring Antonio
L. Anthony, who had a
lengthy criminal record, to


helping police
MIAMI BEACH
- Authorities said a main-
tenance worker was fatally
shot while assisting them
in serving an eviction
notice at a South Beach
complex.
Police said that when no
one answered the door on
Monday, the maintenance
worker started changing


H 3)


oliaS woman was
in court last week Man killed while


I


1!SET


M WN


*'L LAK i~E CIIY ALMANAC


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


m^^^^^^^^^^^ ER^ H RT SD BY
WEATHERiC'nn1^ ^^ ^^ ^ BY-THEi -HOU I dJJ! IJ Iiii~^


*LfJ.J 1^\J


<1--_ sme.-









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


Economists forecasting IM new Fla. jobs in 7 years


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida will
gain at least a million new jobs
over the next seven years, which
is 300,000 more than promised by
Governor-elect Rick Scott without
the tax cuts and other changes
he's seeking, state economists
predicted Monday.
While their long-term forecast
remained rosy, the economists
from the Legislature and Gov.
Charlie Crist's office were gloom-
ier about the immediate future
than in July when they last updat-
ed their economic estimate.
They now are forecasting
unemployment rates will remain
at or near 11.8 percent and


"Our belief is that there is nothing that has changed about Florida,
its attraction to other states and other countries."

Amy Baker
Coordinator
Legislature's Office of Economic and Demographic Research


the housing market will stay
depressed for longer than antici-
pated. That's expected to reduce
state revenues, which may widen
a $2.5 billion budget gap ear-
lier predicted for the next budget
year.
The outlook is much more opti-
mistic beyond the next couple
years. The state now has about
7.2 million jobs, but that's expect-
ed to increase to at least 7.7 mil-
lion by the 2013-14 fiscal year and


to nearly 8.3 million seven years
from now in 2017-18.
The economists foresee a
rebound to pre-recession pros-
perity, but it's going to take a bit
longer.
"Our belief is that there is
nothing that has changed about
Florida, its attraction to other
states and other countries and that
we're slowly heading back to that
same pace," said Amy Baker, coor-
dinator of the Legislature's Office


of Economic and Demographic
Research. "Over the long run
there's still significant growth in
our forecast."
The job growth is expected to
,come from that economic rebound
even if the state does nothing
more to stimulate employment.
Scott, though, has proposed
property and corporate income
tax cuts, state budget reductions
and the repeal of government
regulations to reach his more


modest 700,000-job goal.
A spokesman for the Republican
governor-elect did not immedi-
ately respond to an e-mail seek-
ing comment.
The economists' new forecast
actually calls for slightly fewer
jobs than the 8.32 million they
had predicted in July for 2017-18.
They also said the unemploy-
ment rate will remain about 11.8
percent through the first quar-
ter of 2011. before dropping to
11.6 percent. That's a quarter
later than previously forecast. As
before, they still expect the job-
less rate to finally drop below 10
percent in the third quarter of
2012. It's expected to continue
falling until it reaches 5.5 percent
in 2019-20.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Members of the New Day Springs Missionary Baptist Church Youth Choir entertain the audience with a number of musical
selections. Pictured are Jayla Mills, 12, (from left)Aneia Henry, 9, Taylor Ivery, 9, and Jalyiah Mills, 6.


HONORS: Event recognizes schools' topnotchers
Continued From Page 1A


area. Its rate is also eight
points higher than the
state average.
"It's never been that
high," he said.
Graduating students
with a marketable diploma
and skills set is the end
product for the school
system.
"That's what we're here


for," he said.
Millikin's words were
very encouraging, said
Rhonda Johnson of White
Springs.
"He hit the high points,"
she said.
The program as a whole
is wonderful for youth,
Johnson said.
"It encourages them to


do better," she said.
Mazie Fennell of Lake
City was proud to see both
of her children recognized
at the program.
"It's really excellent,"
she said.
Receiving recognition
will hopefully make them
continue to make good
grades and make not just


AB honor roll but straight
A's as well, she said.
Bernice and Glynnell
Presley organized the
program two years ago.
Programs are held after
report cards are released
for each quarter.
"Our students need to
know we appreciate what
they're doing," she said.


LIGHTS: Hot chocolate and cookies at end of tour wa
Continued From Page 1A


own vehicles.
At the end of the tour,
hot chocolate and cookies
are available. Shopping
is also available at the
Crafts Village. The vil-
lage features handmade
gifts such as cigar-box
guitars and banjos, retro-


style aprons, purses,
hand-carved animal pic-
tures, crafted treasure
boxes, natural soaps,
clocks, old-fashion
candy and Adirondack
style furniture.
Santa Claus will also
be at the Crafts Village


waiting to hear from little
'boys and girls.
The SSMP radio stu-
dio will feature blue-
grass DJ and personality
Don Miller broadcast-
ing his radio show over
WLVO 106.1 on Sunday
evenings.


Admission to Suwannee
Lights is $8 per adult
and $6 per child. Gates
are open from 6 to 10
p.m. seven days a week,
regardless of weather
For more information
go to www.musicliveshere.
corn or call 386-364-1683.


LAYOFFS: Officials say cutting jobs will be last resort


Continued From Page 1A

The legislature may or
may not assist the district
in filling the gaps that the
loss of stimulus money and
critical need dollars will
leave, Carswell said, but
the district will not know
until May and must plan
ahead for the worst-case
* scenario.
Carswell presented two
plans of money-saving
ideas to the board based
on how much the cuts actu-
ally come out to be. For
instance, if cuts are $2 mil-
lion or less, the district can
work to get students back
and generate more FTE
4


dollars, but if cuts are more
than $2 million, employees
could take a 1 percent pay
cut or some employee units
may not be renewed.
Board members said cut-
ting jobs will happen only as
a last resort
"Let's make what cuts we
can before we get there,"
Nelson said.
Mike Millikin, superin-
tendent of schools, said the
board will assess every posi-
tion in the district as they
open up throughout the cur-
rent school.year, determin-
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OPINION


Tuesday, November 23, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
SOP


THEIR
INION


Depicting

tobacco's

horrific

effects

adavers, diseased
lungs, a man smok-
ing through a tra-
cheotomy hole.
The graphic
images depict the horrific
effects of smoking and could
cover half the space on ciga-
rette packages by late 2012.
All cigarette ads would have
to show the gruesome pictures
as well.
That's the smart change pro-
posed by the Food and Drug
Administration, needed to undo
decades of deceptive marketing
by tobacco companies.
Cigarette smoking remains
the leading preventable cause
of death in the United States,
causing an estimated 438,000
deaths each year. Meanwhile,
exposure to secondhand smoke
kills some 38,000 Americans
annually, according to the
National Cancer Institute.
Smoking also is a big factor
in the escalating costs of health
care, with smoking-related
diseases costing taxpayers as
much as $96 billion a year.
Despite those facts, some
tobacco companies have filed a
lawsuit to block the new warn-
ings, showing again their lack
of scruples when it comes to
protecting public health.
The FDA should fight back
and approve the new packaging
rule next year.
The powerful labels will
deter new smokers from pick-
ing up the deadly habit and
--motivate addicts to kick it.
:* Florida Today

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, Nov. 23,
the 327th day of 2010. There
are 38 days left in the year.

In 1804, the 14th president
of the United States, Franklin
Pierce, was born in Hillsboro,
N.H.
In 1963, President Lyndon
B. Johnson proclaimed Nov.
25 a day of national mourning
following the assassination of
President John E Kennedy.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


TDC partners with Reporter


for regional vacation guide


Working in
partnership
with the Lake
City Reporter,
the Columbia
County Tourist Development
Council and Florida's Suwannee
River Valley Marketing Group
has announced plans for a sec-
ond printing of the Suwannee
River Valley Vacation Guide.
The second edition of the
digest-sized magazine will high-
light information about attrac-
tions, year-round festivals and
a wide array of water activities
in the Suwannee River Valley.
In addition, a comprehensive
calendar of events and informa-
tion on lodging and camping
will be included. The magazine
will be the primary visitor fulfill-
ment publication for tourism in
our region with 40,000 copies
being printed and distributed
over a year-long period. Many
businesses will be contacted by
a representative of the Lake City
Reporter during the upcoming
six weeks, as the advertising
deadline is Dec. 15. For additional
information on the Suwannee
River Valley Vacation Guide,
please call (386) 754-0417.


Harvey Campbell
(386) 758 -197

either being tired or hungry and
the puppies are coupled with a
cute tlneme for the message of
stopping for lodging.or for a meal
at a restaurant. We will be doing
a research project in the spring
to ask visitors at local hotels and
campgrounds if they remember
having seen the billboards? If
so, what was their reaction to
the signage and did it have any
impact on their decision to exit
here? Please keep a lookout for
the new billboards and we'd wel-
come your reaction and input on
the new theme. In addition, the
new tri-vision billboard has been
installed and is operational. Two
of the faces were leased by area
hotels and the third board was
retained by the TDC to promote
our area.


Median island available for Upcoming sports events
sponsorship on US 90 West at Southside Recreation


The Columbia County Tourist
Development Council (TDC)
has been the agency in charge
of obtaining sponsors for the
landscaping of the four median
islands located on U.S. 90 West,
just east of the 1-75 interchange
for several years. We'd like to
express our appreciation to the
Hampton Inn & Suites, Texas
Roadhouse Restaurant and
Wal-Mart Supercenter for their
continuous sponsorship of the
islands which are maintained by
Earthscapes Landscaping. We
currently have one median island
which is available for sponsor-
ship, located in front of Cedar
River Seafood Restaurant. Cost
of the sponsorship is $150 per
month, payable in advance on
a quarterly basis. In addition to
the landscaping, which makes a
favorable impression on visitors
and residents alike, the sponsor-
ship includes an attractive sign
at each end of the median with
the name of your company on
the sign. There is an initial cost
of $175 for the two signs with the
TDC also paying $175. For addi-
tional information on this oppor-
tunity, please contact Harvey
Campbell at 758-1397.

New billboard campaign
and new tri-vision signage
A series of new puppy-themed
billboards have been installed on
1-75 in the southbound direction
during the past six weeks. The
concept behind the billboards
is to build an emotional connec-
tion with motorists, resulting in
them being more likely to exit in
our area. The six billboards use
themes relating to the motorist


As is usually the case, sports
tournaments are not nearly as
frequent in the fall with football
season and schools back in ses-
sion. In addition, several of the
tournaments that were originally
on our calendar for this fall, have
failed to make andl were canceled.
We already have 19 tournaments
on our schedule for the first-half
of 2011. We have one remaining
sports tournaments this calendar
year.
Dec. 3-5: Florida Travel
Baseball, 40 teams, and the con-
tact is Randall Plyn, 386-961-1782.

Horse trainers convention
draws positive reviews
If you've read the Lake City
Reporter during the past few
weeks, you are aware we hosted
the Certified Horsemanship
Association (CHA) International
Convention on Oct. 21-24. Around
100 residents of the U.S. and
Canada attended the four-day
event which was hosted at The
Oaks Equestrian Village. We
received tremendous positive
feedback from the attendees
about the Southern hospital-
ity extended by everyone they
encountered and the attention
to detail by the host committee.
The CHA board of directors will
meet again in March 2011, and
we are confident the organization
will vote to return to Lake City
in 2013. We'd like to express our
appreciation to the staff of Dicks
Realty and The Oaks; Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites; Columbia
County Emergency Medical
Services, Suwannee Valley
Transit, the Lake City Reporter
and the Tourist Development


Council staff for combining forces
to produce a highly success-
ful event that had a significant
positive economic development
impact on many areas of our com-
munity. Thanks to all who were
involved.

Press trip paying dividends
for Suwannee River Valley
We publicized a recent press
familiarization tour hosted in our
area on Oct. 11-14. Six journal-
ists from around the country
attended and participated in
activities such as kayaking on
both the Suwannee River and
at Ichetucknee Springs State
Park. They also visited Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center State
Park and Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park. Tours of the Lake
City-Columbia County Historical
Museum, Alligator Lake
Recreation Complex, O'Leno
State Park, Olustee Battlefield
Historic Park and a walking tour
of downtown Lake City. We had
an extremely cordial and engaged
group of writers. We have already
had a large feature story appear
in the Miami Herald, which was
produced by one of the writers.

Suwannee River Valley
calendar of events
Listed below are the dates,
activities, location and informa-
tion contacts for a wide array
of festivals and special events
scheduled in the Columbia/
Hamilton/Suwannee County
area for the remainder of this
year.
Nov. 26-27: Old Tyme
Farm Days, Spirit of Suwannee,
386-364-1683
Nov. 27: Christmas
Lights/Santa Photo in Olustee
Park, 752-3690
Nov. 27-Dec. 24:
Suwannee Lights, Spirit of
Suwannee, 386-364-1683
Dec. 3-31: Stephen
Foster Festival of Lights/White
Springs, 386-397-2733
Dec. 4: Christmas on the
Square, Live Oak, 386-362-3071
Dec. 11: Christmas Arts
& Crafts, Downtown Lake City,
752-3690
Dec. 11: Lake City Snow
Day, Downtown Lake City,
752-3690
Dec. 11: Lake City
Christmas Parade, Marion
Avenue, 752-3690

Bed tax collections show
upward trend in August
According to the Florida
Department of Revenue, bed
tax collections continued to
improve in August, compared to
figures for the same month in
2009. Collections this year were
$25,286 on the basis of a 2% tax,
compared to $20,537 in 2009.
Our bed tax rate is now 3% and
actual collections were $37,928.
* Harvey Campbell is executive
director of the Columbia County
Tourist Development Council.


Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com


National

Mall suffers

from its

popularity


The National Park
Service has a formi-
dable two-volume
document called
the Final National
Mall Plan. And Congress has
declared that the Mall was a
work of civic art that is "sub-
stantially" complete.
That word "final "might be
overly optimistic; so, too, might
"substantially." Even though the
Mall figured in Pierre L'Enfant's
original plan for the city of
Washington, it has never really
been finished. The Mall has
served as a network of drainage
canals, a dump, a site of slaugh-
terhouses and railway stations,
a red-light district, a military
encampment and temporary
offices for government workers
starting in World War I, the last
of those barracks-like buildings
not being torn down until the
1970s.
Just when Congress has
yielded to the pleas of Mall lov-
ers of whom there are many
- and declared the Mall finished
and out of vacant space, the law-
makers yield to one or another
lobby and approve a new memo-
rial or museum.
And just the other day the
government announced plans for
a $9 million levee on the Mall to
protect the Federal Triangle from
100-year floods. The permanent
part of the levee will be an 8-foot-
high, stone-covered concrete
berm. A removable floodwall of
girders and steel panels will close
off a street when high water
threatens. Someone always has a
use for vacant space on the Mall.
The other problem, if it can
be called that, with the Mall is
that tourists, demonstrators and
natives alike love it to death. Its
684 acres receive over 22 million
visitors a year. No other national
park is even close.
The Mall is truly a magnifi-
cent space, extending from the
Lincoln Memorial to the U.S.
Capitol on one axis and from the
White House to the Jefferson
Memorial to the other, and
presided over more or less in
the middle by the Washington
Monument.
That makes the Mall much
in demand for concerts, rallies,
demonstrations, parades and
assorted festivals. Each year the
National Park Service receives
over 6,000 applications for per-
mits for activities on the Mall
and approves about half of them.
Special consideration is given
to what the service calls "First
Amendment gatherings," like
the rallies staged by Jon Stewart,
Stephen Colbert and Glenn Beck.
The result is that the Mall
suffers from a considerable main-
tenance backlog. The stimulus
money is taking care of one of
the most critical needs. The side:
walk and retaining wall around
the Jefferson Memorial were
crumbling and sinking into the
Tidal Basin.
Several of the lawns are worn
down to bare earth because the
existing sidewalks are not wide
enough to accommodate all the
visitors. The foot traffic spills
over on to the grass and visitors
wear new paths taking shortcuts.
The National Par'k Service
knows what it wants to do
- and miraculously got 20 other
federal agencies to agree but
with funds being short and bud-
gets sure to be cut, it is hoping
for hell) from individuals and the
private sector. We hope so, too.
* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A


I _


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

, Wednesday
Matching Funds Drive
The Christian Service
Center is having its
Matching Funds Drive
from now until Dec. 31. All
donations will be doubled
by local sponsors. Mark
your check "Matching
Funds" and mail to
Christian Service Center,
PO. Box 2285 Lake City,
FL 32056. Call 755-1770.

Thursday
Thanksgiving feast
Lad Soup Kitchen is
hosting its 15th Annual
Community Thanksgiving
Feast from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. on Thanksgiving Day,
Thursday. The kitchen
is located at 127 NE
Escambia St

Thanksgiving dinner
The 10 Annual
Thanksgiving Day Dinner
is 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Thursday in the
Fellowship Hall of the
First Presbyterian Church.
The church is located at
697 SW Baya Drive. The
menu will include fresh
baked turkey with gravy,
cranberry sauce, mashed
potatoes, sweet potatoes,
green beans, rolls, coffee
or tea, pumpkin pie or
carrot cake. There is no
charge for the dinner. Call
752-0670.

Saturday
Holiday happenings
The kickoff to the- "
Christmas season begins
at 5 p.m. Saturday in
Olustee Park. Activities
begin with holiday music
featuring The Gateway
City Big Band and Harry
Wuest as conductor. The
lighting of Olustee Park
is at 6:30 p.m. followed by
the arrival of Santa Claus.
Photos with Santa are from
7-9 p.m.

Blood drive
A blood drive is at Ole
Times Country Buffet 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Trading hugs before battle with ASU
University of Florida head coach Urban Meyer hugs senior Ahmad Black as the football player
prepares to take the field in a game against Appalachian State at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in
Gainesville on Saturday.


Free buffet to the first 15
donors and a free Gators
or Seminoles shirt.

Sunday
Food for Fines
The annual Food for
Fines program is on
Nov. 28 to Dec. 4 at the
Columbia County Public
Library. Each one sealed,
non-expired, non-perish-
able item brought to the
library will reduce a fine
by $1. All items collected
at the Main and West
Branch will be delivered
to the Christian Service
Center in Lake City for
local distribution. Items
collected at the Fort White
Branch Library will be dis-
tributed at the Fort White
food shelf.

Monday
Blood drive
A blood drive is at Pizza
Boy from noon to 6 p.m.
Monday. There is a free
14-inch cheese pizza for
every donor. Receive a
free Gators or Seminoles
shirt

YEP committee meeting
There is a YEP
Committee Meeting on
Nov. 29 at Gondolier
Italian Restaurant &
Pizza. Call the Lake
City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce to
RSVP at (386) 752-3690


Dec. 1 in the Florida Farm
Bureau Building. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 5700
SW 34th St., Suite 222,
Gainesville. Contact Cindy
Roberts at (352)378-6649.

Thursday, Dec. 2
Christmas concert
Richardson Middle
School Wolf Pride Band is
having its annual Christmas
concert at 6:30 p.m. Dec.
2 in the Columbia High
School audititorium. The
RMS Jazz Band, Symphonic
Band, Bekginners Band andi
Drumline will play songs of
the season under the dlirec-
tion of Sherrod Keen.

Friday, Dec. 3
Candlelight tour
The Lake City Garden


Club is hosting the
Castagna Christmas
House Candlelight Tour
6:30-9:30 p.m. Dec. 3.
The house is located at
521 NW Old Mill Road.
Admission is $10. Tickets
are available at Brown-
Vann Carpet One, Lake
City Florist, Your Hearts
Desire or at the residence
the evening of the tour.
Save your ticket and come
out 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec.
4 when select Christmas
decor will be sold.

Saturday, Dec. 4
Dream Machine Ride
The 9th Annual
Christmas Dream Machine
Toy Ride is on Dec. 4.
Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. uul tihe toy ride
pulls out at noon from
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. There will be
raffles and live bands, and
all proceeds will go to ben-
efit Tlhe Christmas Dream
Machine. Contact Cookie


110O OFF
t ANY OFFICE VISIT
WITH THIS AD
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P


Wednesday, Dec. 1 LO v I
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Public meeting
Elder Options is having
a public meeting 10 a.m.


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES
at the LiisCe Citi Reporter
I m tl e, t,0 I i l( p.rlr r %mill lt ,.l..l J.
I Itird,. ... I.e ,tw 2i1,. 21111
Our Advertising deadline will be
Clamflled; Friday, November26 mill dMedlli Wednesday, November 24 11a.m
Diplayr Fiday, November 20 will deadlne Monday, November 22
Saturday Novmber 27will deadline Tuesday. November 23
Sunday, Novellbu 28 will deadline Tuesday. November23
Tuesday. November 30 will deadline Wedneday. November 24
We will be back in the office on Friday,
November 26th for our customer's conv ence.
Thank You and Have a Great Thanksgiving



-. ,,.


i 1 r'" Bird H ts
,4J U'^J aU U J. .1d 'ds and Morel

(38) 38818 18 DmiosWa


at (386) 362-6529 or Polly at
(386) 758-9811.

Sunday, Dec. 5
Blood drive
Hungry Howie's Blood
Drive is scheduled from
noon-6 p.m. Dec. 5 at
Hungry Howie's, 857 SW
Main Boulevard. Each
donor will receive a free
small one-topping pizza or
small sub. Call (386) 438-
3415.

Tuesday, Dec. 7
Volunteer literacy tutor
A volunteer literacy
tutor training work-
shop is 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 7 at 308 NW
Columbia Avenue. The
workshop will emphasize
reading strategies, the
writing process, informal
assessments, lesson plan-
ning, and phonics using
the Laubach Way. Call the
library's literacy coordina-
tor, Glennis Pounds, at
(386) 758-2111 or e-mail


columbialiteracy@neflin.
org.

Wednesday, Dec. 8
Public meeting
Elder Options is hav-
ing a public meeting at 10
a.m. Dec. 8 in the Hilton
University of Florida
Conference Center. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 1714
SW 34th St., Gainesville.
Call (352) 378-6649.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 10 a.m. Dec. 8 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate and
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expands
the opportunities available
with Medicaid Planning.
Call (386) 755-1977.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


Man in past jogger attacks guilty of Levy slaying


By MATTHEW BARAKAT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
man imprisoned for attack-
ing two female joggers
was found guilty Monday
of murdering Washington
intern Chandra Levy, wrap-
ping up a murder mystery
that took down a congress-
man and captured the
nation's attention a decade
ago.
Ingmar
Guandique
was con-.
victed
of first-
degree
murder
for attack-
Guandique ing Levy
while she exercised in
Washington's Rock Creek
Park in May 2001. Her
disappearance made head-
lines when she was roman-
tically linked to then-Rep.
Gary Condit (D-Calif.).
Condit was once a sus-


Dorothy Louise Bramel
Dorothy Louise Bramel, 85 of
Milton, FL went home to be with
her Lord and Savoir on Wednes-
day, November
17. 2010. Dor- -
othy was born m
on October 7,
1925, to James
Roy and Jes-
ic Mae Dyer
Moon in India-
ana. She married Lloyd Junior
Bramel on Thanksgiving Day,
1948. They met at the skating
rink and after enjoying their first
sixteen years of married life just
to themselves, they started a fam-
ily raising their two sons, Mitch
and Phil. They enjoyed bowling,
boating, fishing, camping in and
around Indiana. They vacationed
each year in the Daytona Beach,
Port Orange and Ponce Inlet ar-
eas of Florida: Upon Lloyd's
death in 1972, Dorothy moved
to Lake Ciy, Florida to raise her
sons and be close to her brother
LeRoy Moon and his family.
Having previously worked as an
operator for Indiana Bell Tele-
phone, she worked for Southern
Bell until she retired in 1982.
She also served as a school
nurse aid at Lake City Columbia
High School where she enjoyed
spending time with the students
and pulling for the mighty "Pur-
ple and Gold" Tigers. Dorothy
also lived in Port Orange and
Winter Haven, Florida before
moving to Milton in 2004. Here
in Milton, she enjoyed support-
ing her granddaughters in their
Gospel Projects, Milton Com-
munity Center and the Milton
High School mighty "Black
and Gold" Panthers academic,
community service and sports
activities. She loved the beach
and it was always a special time
when she could share this love
with her grandchildren. Doro-
thy touched the lives of three
generations. She was especially
helpful and supportive to her
daughter-in-laws through moves,
raising children and becoming
wonderful wives and mothers.
Grandma and Mema valued be-
ing involved in the lives of her
sons and her seven grandchil-
dren. Her life was dedicated to
her two sons and their families
that she cherished. In addition
to her parents, her in-laws, John
and Alma Phillippe of Indianap-
olis, and husband Lloyd, she is
preceded in death by her broth-
er, LeRoy Moon of Lake City,
Florida. Along with her sons,
Mitch and Phil, Dorothy is sur-
vived by her loving sister, Hilda
Moon Nard of Lancaster, Cali-
fornia and loving and wonder-
ful sister-in-law, Patricia Poland
Moon, of Lake City, Florida and
many loved nephews, nieces and
their children in those communi-
ties today. She leaves to cher-
ish her memory, son, Mitchell
Dean Bramel, his wife Sandra
Kay Cooper Bramel, and their
daughters, Stacy Victoria, Mal-
lory Joy, and Kellcy Noel Bra-
mel all of Milton, Florida. She
also leaves, Phillip Dale Bramel,
married to Elizabeth Marie Britt
Bramel and their sons, Collin
Phillip, Hayden Lloyd, Clayton
Tucker, and Ethan Riley who
all reside in Rogers, Arkansas.
Family and friends will celebrate
her life at First Baptist Church
at Milton, Florida on Sunday,
November 21, 2010 beginning
with visitation at 1:00 P.M and
the service to follow at 2:00 PM
Central Time. Dr. David Spen-
cer, Rev. Bob Lowe and Dr. Jim
Waters will officiate the service.
Honorary Pallbearers will be the
Fidelis Sunday School class at
First Baptist. Pallbearers will
be grandsons, Collin Bramel and
Hlayden Bramel, and ,nephews
Boh Moon, Jim Moon, Doug
Nard and Aaron Johns. A grave
side service and interment is
scheduled at Washington Park
East Cemetery, Indianapolis, In-
diana on Wednesday, November
24, 2010 at l 11:00 AM where she


pect, but police no longer
believe he was involved in
her disappearance.
Speaking outside the
courthouse, Levy's mother
said she'll never be free
from the pain of losing her
daughter.
"I have a lifetime sen-
tence of a lost limb miss-
ing from our family tree,"
Susan Levy said after the
hearing. "It's a lifetime of a
broken heart."
Investigators eventu-
ally focused on Guandique,
an illegal immigrant from
El Salvador, and brought
formal charges last year.
Prosecutors acknowledged
they had little direct evi-
dence but said Levy's death
fit a pattern of other crimes
committed by Guandique
in the park.
The defense argued that
the 29-year-old Guandique
became a scapegoat for
a botched investigation.
Levy's body was found
about a year after she dis-


OBITUARIES

will rest by her husband, Lloyd.
For those desiring to make a
donation in lieu of flowers, the
family wishes that donations
be made to the Childrens' or
Student Ministries at First Bap-
tist Church of Milton, Florida.
Family,and friends may send
condolences and share fond
memories with the family at
www.lewisfuneralhome.net.

Robert "Boots" Widener
Mr. Robert "Boots" Widener
passed away peacefully on Tues-
day, November 16, 2010 while
doing what
he loved best,
running a Golf
Tournament. A
long time resi-
dent of Lake
City. He will
always be re-
membered for
his love of Golf Hlie was a retired
Rules Official with the LI'GA
and PGA lours and was pres-
ently the Tournament Director
and Rules Official for the Leg-
ends Tour. a sanctioned Senior
Tour of the LPGA. He played
an integral part in it's formation.
He leaves behind his wife Karen
Widener of Lake City; His son
Jason and his wife Hanna; his
daughter Halle Pilkington and
her husband Brent. Also his pre-


EdwardJones
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May 28, 2002, file photo taken at the ModestO Centre
Plaza in Modesto, Calif., photos of Chandra Levy are on display
as musicians (right) stand by at the memorial service for Levy.


appeared.
In a telephone interview,
Condit's lawyer Bert Fields
said the verdict represents
a vindication that comes too
late to repair the damage to
his client's career. Still, trial
testimony that Condit's
DNA was on underwear at
Levy's apartment bolstered


cious granddaughters, Lilly and
Laney Pilkington; and Ava and*
Zenna Widener, all of North
Carolina. Also his close friend
Sandra Young of Lake City. Be-
sides his many friends locally
and across the country. He also
leaves many friends in Japan.
Per Boots' wishes, there will be
no service. We ask all his friends
to raise a toast following their
next round of Golf and remem
ber him with a "Boots Story".
HE WILL BE
MISSED BY ALL.

Dorothy Lucille Williams
Mrs. Dorothy Lucille Williams,
90, of Lake City, died early)
Monday morning, November
22, 2010 in the Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley. Funeral
services are incomplete at this
time but will be available later
taday by calling 752-1234. A
full obituary will appear in the
ll It IRSI)AY edition ofthel.ake
City Reporter. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave..
lake City. 386-752-1234
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Robert Woodard
Financial Advisor


148 North Marion Ave Downtown
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
robert.woodard@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com


V.--- .
S. --. <.. .Q .:,

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DINING r FAMILIES FOR FLORIDA KIDS


the idea that the married
politician had an affair with
the intern.
"At least Gary Condit
can find some measure of
closure to this nightmare,"
Fields said'. "It's a complete
vindication, but that comes
a little late. Who gives him
his career back?" Fields


said his client, whose pri-
mary loss in 2002 was
largely blamed on negative
publicity from the case,
wasn't going to speak to
reporters.
The jury deliberated
over parts of four days
before returning with a
verdict shortly before noon
Monday. Guandique was
convicted on two counts
of first-degree murder, one
alleging death as part of a
kidnapping and one alleg-
ing the death as part of an
attempted robbery. Jurors
had the option of convict-
ing him on a lesser charge
of second-degree murder.
Guandique could be sen-
tenced to a minimum of 30
years and a maximum of
life in prison. Sentencing
was set for Feb. 11.
Defense lawyer Santha
Sonenberg declined
comment on whether
Guandique would appeal
the verdict.
Guandique stared


straight ahead as the
verdict was read, and he
shook his head as he left
the .courtroom. As he has;
throughout the trial, he:
wore a turtleneck that cov-
ered gang tattoos.
Levy's mother squinted
and took notes during the
hearing, then craned her
neck to observe Guandique's
reaction to the verdict.
Susan'Levy had been out-
spoken in her suspicions of
Condit during the investiga-
tion, even openly speculat-
ing about Condit's involve-
ment in the weeks before
the trial.
On Monday she indicated'
that she believed the jury's
verdict was correct.
"It makes a difference to
find the right person who is
responsible for my daugh-
ter's death," she said.
While she was glad to
have attended nearly every
day of the trial, she added: "I
can certainly tell you, it ain't
closure."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


BulletinBoard

NEWSSABOUTOUR SCHOOLS.


ON
CAMPUS

Eastside Elementary
Eastside Student Council
is up and running with
Marlo Atkinson, fifth-grade
teacher, as its sponsor.
Officers for the year are
Joshua Hancock, president;
Nicholas Kasper, secretary;
and Garet Dicks, treasurer.
Riley Hartsfield was the
vice president, but has
since moved to Live Oak.
Commissioner Stephen
Bailey, Eastside alumnus,
spoke to the students about
what a privilege it is to
serve others. Each student
received a Student Council
pin.
Students in prekin-
dergarten through third
grade enjoyed a visit from
Ronald McDonald. Ronald
McDonald presented a
fun-filled show on staying
active and the importance
of exercise and a positive
attitude.
Congratulations to
bur September and
October Winning Writers.'
September grade-level
winners were Raekwaan
Sowell, fifth grade; Jeffrey
Parker, fourth grade;
Autumn Lamonda, third
grade; and Sarah Douglas,
second grade. October
grade-level winners were
Gracey Hudson, second
grade; Ramsey Kight, third
grade; Rhianna Ratliff,
fourth grade; and Thomas
Yu, fifth grade. All Winning
Writers from each grade
level read their stories over
the morning news and will
have a special celebration
at the end of the year.

Melrose Park
Elementary
Fourth-grade science
projects at Melrose Park
were a success. Students
put a lot of time and effort
into their projects and it
showed. We are now mov-
ing from expository writing
to narrative writing and are
working on two-digit mul-
tiplication in math. Fourth
graders are continuing to
learn strategies to become
better readers and work-
ing hard to meet their AR
goals.

Niblack Elementary
Violet Symonette,
Niblack Elementary teach-
er, was recently surprised
by a visit from OfficeMax
representatives after
being selected by Adopt-A-
Classroom and OfficeMax
to receive
a surprise
package of
classroom
resources
and sup-
plies worth
Symonette $1,000.
"The most
memorable gifts are those
offered from the heart at a
time when they are greatly
needed," Symonette said.
"A sincere 'thank you' to
OfficeMax for helping to
empower our students via
the community education
connection. Hopefully,
their special way of giving
back to the community
will become contagious
among other business
communities."
Richardson Middle
School
Richardson Middle's
Wolf Pride Band is holding
its annual Christmas con-
cert at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 at
the Columbia High School
auditorium. The RMS
Jazz Band, Symphonic
Band, Beginners' Band


and Drumline will play the
songs of the season under
the direction of Sherrod
Keen, RMS band director.


COURTESY PHOTO
LCMS Student Council holds canned food drive
Lake City Middle School's Student Council recently held a canned food drive for Catholic
Charities. The food is used for Thanksgiving food baskets. LCMS students brought in almost
1,900 food items to be donated to Catholic Charities. Pictured (from left) are Jocelin Bal,
Tori Jackson, Chase Broome, Jake Bates, Kaleb Thomas, Alison Eubank, Ashton Lee, Riley
Eubank, Ashley Shoup, Tara Thomas and Savannah Thomas.


Lake City Reporter


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Anthony "Trell"
Caldwell
Age: 11
Parents: Latoya and
Anthony Caldwell
School and grade:
Melrose Park Elementary,
fifth grade
What clubs or orga-
nizations do you belong
to? Student Council presi-
dent, chorus for two years
and youth at church
Achievements: A/B
Honor Roll and fourth-
grade Good Helper award
What do you like best
about school? Learning.
My favorite subject is
math.
What would you like
to do when you com-
plete your education?
Play football, basketball


COURTESY PHOTO
Anthony 'Trell' Caldwell
or do something with my
smarts and become a doc-
tor or nurse.
Teacher's comments:
Trell is a wonderful
example to others. He has


COURTESY PHOTO


CSU student body
president say s he's
undocumented
Associated Press
FRESNO, Calif. The
popular student body presi-
dent at California State
University-Fresno has pub-
licly revealed a personal
detail he long sought to
keep secret: He is an illegal
immigrant.
Pedro Ramirez, 22, previ-
ously told campus admin-
istrators in confidence that
he was concerned about
going public with his immi-
gration status after winning
the top post in student
government.
But that changed
Tuesday when The
Collegian, the newspaper
at the largest university in
California's prolific farming
region, disclosed his status
after receiving an anony-
mous e-mail.
"I don't want this issue to
be about me," Ramirez said.


a physical disability, but
it never stops him from
joining in with sports. The
other students respect that
in him. I love having Trell
in my class.
Principal's com-
ments: Trell has the best
attitude of any student
that I have been associ-
ated with in my 21 years
of education. Trell has a
physical challenge that
students do not even
notice because he does
not let it stand in the way
of reaching for his goals.
Student's comments
about honor: Well, I
personally think that I'm
a hardworking, outgoing,
athletic person, but I still
make time for my school
work.


Fort White's
'Take Stock'
scholars
Nine Fort White High School
Students were signed into
the Take Stock in Children
program Monday, Nov. 15.
Pictured are Billy Camplin
(back, from left), Brandon
Gonzalez, James Bryan,
Manuel V'asquez, Kayla Nash
(front, from left), Danielle
Leon, Kaitlin McCarroll, Tiffy
Murrow and Tiana Calhoun.
The district and Florida
Gateway College partner
topromote the Take Stock
in Children program, which
provides an opportunity for
students to earn a two- to
four-year prepaid tuition
scholarship.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I J "
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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


At least 349 die in stampede at Cambodian festival


By SOPHENG CHEANG
Associated Pr s

PHNOM PENH,
Camnbodia Thousands of
people st ipeded during a
festival the Cambodian
capital, caving at least 349
dead and hundreds injured
in what the prime minis-
ter called the country's
biggest tragedy since the
1970s reign of terror by the
Khmer Rouge.
A panic-stricken crowd
- celebrating the end of the
rainy season on an island in
a river tried to flee over
a bridge and many people
were crushed underfoot
or fell over its sides into
the water. Disoriented vic-
tims struggled to find an
escape hatch through the
human mass, pushing their
way in every direction.
After the stampede, bodies
were stacked upon bodies
on the bridge as rescuers
swarmed the area.
The search for bodies in
and along the Bassac River
continued Tuesday.
The prime minister's spe-
cial adviser, Om Yentieng,
denied some reports that
the victims were electrocut-
ed by lighting cables and
that the panic was sparked
by a mass food poisoning.
Ambulances raced back
and forth between the river
and the hospitals for sev-
eral hours after, the stam-
pede. Calmette Hospital,
the capital's main medical
facility, was filled to capac-
ity with bodies as well as
patients, some of whom
had to be treat 'd in hall-
ways. Relatives, some cry-
ing, searched for the miss-
ing Tuesday morning.
"I was taken by shock.
I thought I would die on
the spot. Those who were
strong enough escaped,
but women and children
died ," said Chea Srey Lak,
a 27-year-old woman who
was knocked over by the
panicked crowd on the
bridge.
She managed to escape
b"t described a woman,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A crowd of Cambodians are pushed onto a bridge on the last day of celebrations of a water festival in Phnom Penh,
Cambodia, Monday. Thousands of people celebrating a water festival on a small island in a Cambodian river stampeded
Monday evening, killing at least 349 people, officials said.


about 60 years old, lying
next to her who was tram-
pled to death by hundreds
of fleeing feet.
"There were cries and
calls for help from every-
where, but nobody could
help each other. Everyone
just ran," she said at
Calmette Hospital, where
she was being treated for
leg and hand injuries.
Hours after the chaos,
the dead and injured were
still being taken away from
the scene, while searchers
looked for bodies of anyone
who might have drowned.
Hundreds of shoes were
left behind on and around
the bridge. An Associated
Press reporter saw one
body floating in the river.
The government televi-
sion station said 3-19 people
had been killed and 500
injured. Authorities said
there were no foreigners
among the (lead or injured.


THAILAND LAOS


I--.






Phnom
1J ,Penh
LiJ \


(;iii/oI


SOURCE: ESRI
""This is the ii. hmi .I trag-
edy we have experienced
in the last 31 years, since
the collapse of the Klhmner
Rouge regime," Prime
Minister liun Sen said,


CAMBODIA




o 80

0 80k

VIET


referring to the ultra-
munist mloveent w
radical policies are bl)
for the deaths of 1.7 mi
people duringg the 19
Ile ordered an inve


tion into the cause of the
stampede and declared
- Thursday would be a
national day of mourning.
Government ministries
were ordered to fly the flag
at half-staff. He said that the
government would pay the
families of each dead victim
5 million riel ($1,250) for
funeral expenses and pro-
vide 1 million riel (-5,'' 1 for
each injured person.
Authorities had estimat-
mi ed that upward of 2 million
people would descend on
m IPhnom Penh for the three-
day water festival, the Bon
Om Touk, which marks the
end of the rainy season and
whose main attraction is tra-
(litional boat races along the
AP river. In this year's event,
-coin- .120 of the long, sleek boats
'hose colinlpetd, with crews of up
ameld to 80 racers each.
million lThe last race ended early
I Is. \,11dl.t evening, the last
stiga- night of the holiday, and the


panic started later on Koh
Pich Diamond Island a
long spit of land wedged in
a fork in the river where a
concert and exhibition were
being held. It was unclear
how many people were on
the island to celebrate the
holiday, though the area
appeared to be packed with
people, as were the banks.
Soft drink vendor So
Cheata said the trouble
began when about 10 people
fell unconscious in the press
of the crowd. She said that
set off a panic, which then
turned into a stampede, with
many people caught under-
foot
Information Minister
Khieu Kanharith gave a
similar account of the cause,
adding that major causes of
death were asphyxiation and
internal bleeding. He denied
some reports that authori-
ties fired water cannons
on the crowd. He said 62
women, mostly in their 20s,
have so far been identified
among the dead.
. Seeking to escape the
island, part of the crowd
pushed onto a bridge,
which also jammed up,
with people falling under
others and into the water.
So Cheata said hundreds
of hurt people lay on the
ground afterward. Many
appeared to be uncon-
scious.
Philip Heijmans, a 27-
year-old photographer
from Brooklyn, New York,
who arrived at the scene
half-an-hour after the stam-
pede, walked up the bridge
to see hundreds of shoes
and pieces of clothing,
then a body, then more
"bodies stacked on bod-
ies." Heijmans works for
the Cambodia Daily, a local
English-language newspa-
per.
He counted about 40 in
all, with about 200 rescuers
in the area. Some Australian
firefighters were on the
scene_ it wasn't clear why
they were in town who
were checking pulses before
loading bodies into vans.


TSA chief warns against


boycott of airport scans


By RAY HENRY
Associated Press

ATLANTA The
nation's airport secu-
rity chief pleaded with
Thanksgiving travelers for.
understanding and urged
them not to boycott full-
body scans on Wednesday,
lest their protest snarl what
is already one of the busi-
est, most stressful flying
days of the year.
Transportation Security
Administration chief John
Pistole said Monday that
such delaying actions
would only "tie up people
who want to go home and
see their loved ones."
"We all wish we lived in
a world where security pro-
cedures at airports weren't
necessary," he said, "but that
just isn't the case."
He noted the alleged
attempt by a Nigerian with
explosives in his underwear
to bring down a plane over
Detroit last Christmas.
Despite tough talk on the
Internet, there was little if
any indication of a passenger
revolt Monday at many major
U.S. airports, with very few
people declining the X-ray
scan that can peer through
their clothes. Those who
refuse are subject to a pat-
down search that includes
the crotch and chest.
Many travelers said that
the scans and the pat-down
were not much of an inconve-
nience, and that the stepped-
up measures made them feel
safer and were, in any case,
unavoidable.
"Whatever keeps the
country safe, I just don't
have a problem with," lIeah
Martin, 50, of Hlouston, said
ais slie' waite(ld to go through
seciriity al Ilie Atlaita air-


A traveller is patted down by a TSA agent at O'Hare
International Airport in Chicago, Monday. There are new
requirements at some U.S. airports that air passengers must
pass through full-body scanners that produce a virtually
naked image. Those who refuse to go through the scanners
are subject to thorough pat-downs


port.
At Chicago's O'Hlare
Airport, Gehno Sanchez,
a 3.s-yevar-old from San
Francisco who works in mar-
ketfhg, said he doesn't mind
the full-body scans. "I mean,
they may make you feel like
a criminal for a minute, but
I'd rather do that than sonme-
one touching me," he said.
A loosely organized
Internet campaign is urging
pe)('ol)e' to r(fls( th(e scans oni
Wednesday iI wlhat is it)'inl


called National Opt-Out
Day. T"lle extra tinie nee(lded
to pal down people could
cause a cascade of delays
at dozens of major airports,
including those in New York,
Los Angeles, Chicago and
Atlanta.
"Just one or two recalci-
trait passengers at an air-
port is all it takes to cause
huge delays," said Paul
Ruden, a spokesman for the
American Society of Travel
Ag unts.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


, N ', k, (Nvxt '', 4 1 'c ... ,







Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkitby@lakecityreporter:com


SPORTS


Tuesday. November 23. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FISHING
Input sought
on redfish today
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission has a public
workshop from 6-8 p.m.
today at the Jacksonville
Public Library to
discuss fishing regulation
changes for red drum.
For details, go to
MyFWC. com/Rules.

ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games'
at Richardson
Basketball games for
men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Buchholz
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Suwannee
Fe High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6).
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Vanguard
High, 8 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Nov. 29
Columbia High
soccer at Ed White High,
girls-5:30 p.m., boys-
7:20 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Nov. 30
Fort White High
girls soccer at Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 1
Fort White High JV
girls soccer vs. Columbia
High, 5 p.m.
Dec. 2
Fort White High
girls soccer at Williston,
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball at Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Dec. 3
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. P.K. School,
7 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Columbia
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 4
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at St. Francis


Catholic, 2 p.m.


Votto christened MVP


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cincinnati Reds' Joey Votto celebrating after hitting a solo
home run against the Cardinals in St. Louis on June 1.


IN THE PITS



No. 48 lets



5 titles do



the talking


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
MIAMIl
t was early Monday
morning, and
Jimmie Johnson was
celebrating another
NASCAR champion-
ship in the surf on South
Beach.
His five NASCAR
championship trophies had
been placed delicately in
the sand, and with rolled
up pant legs, Johnson and
crew chief Chad Knaus
stepped into the water
for one final photo
commemorating their
historic march through the
record books.
Nobody in NASCAR
can find the right
adjective to describe
Johnson's unprecedented
five-year run. And his
performance in Sunday's
season finale, running
second at Homestead-
Miami Speedway to lock
down his fifth consecutive
title, should certainly have
secured his legacy as one
of the decade's most
dominant athletes.
But after so many years
of being either overlooked


Columbia

soccer

defeats

Cougars

From staff reports

Columbia High soccer
scored a 6-1 win over visit-
ing Cornerstone Academy
on Monday.
Cooper Hall scored a pair
of goals to lead the Tigers.
Jimmy Blakely, Hunter
Grow, C.J. McRae and Nick
Tuttle each scored one goal.
Dylan Sessions, Josh Davis,
Kyle Dooley and Tuttle
recorded assists.
Columbia (3-1) hosts
Vanguard High at 8 p.m.
today.
The Tigers open District
4-5A play at Ed White High
in a doubleheader game
with the girls on Nov. 22.


or disliked, Johnson has
stopped caring what
people think of him, or his
resume.
"People tell me they
hate me, but they respect
me, and that's always
cool," Johnson said. "In
the moment, I think it's
tough for fans to maybe
look at what we have
accomplished, because
they want their guy to win
and I understand that. But
I know what we have done
is respected sports-wide,
not just in our little bubble
we live in.
"But I don't need it to
make me feel better about
what we've done. I'm
totally content based on
our performance. Five
in a row, no one has ever
done it."
Nobody but Johnson
and his No. 48 Hendrick
Motorsports team, which
continue to defy any
reasonable expectations of
performance, consistency
and longevity.
See, Johnson has been
very good from the very
first day owner Rick
Hendrick teamed him with


PITS continued on 2B


Cincinnati first
baseman ends
reign of Pujols.
By RONALD BLUM
Associated Press
NEW YORK Joey
Votto and Albert Pujols had
a long conversation behind
the batting cage before a
game a few years ago.
'"There's something about
a star player of that magni-
tude kind of pulling you
in and saying, it's OK, we
can talk, don't be a rookie
right now, we're going to
talk like men," Votto said. "I
think he made me feel com-
fortable and a little more
confident."
Lesson learned.
Votto was overwhelm-


ingly elected the National
League's Most Valuable
Player on Monday, ending
the Pujols' two-year reign.
A first baseman who'
helped the Reds reach the
postseason for the first time
in 15 years, Votto received
31 of 32 first-place votes
from the Baseball Writers'
Association of America.
Pujols was second after
winning the award in 2005,
2008 and 2009.
"I tried to keep my head
down for almost a year
there, and it was nice to
speak to somebody who's
been there and done that
when it comes to every-
thing," Votto said. "For him
to give me time of the day
and to talk about defensive
stuff and ways to improve
my game was very gener-


ous of him, and he certainly
didn't have to do that."
Votto was a first-time All-
Star, finishing second in the
NL in batting average at
.324 and third in homers
(37) and RBIs (113). He led
the NL in slugging percent-
age (.600), topped the major
leagues in on-base percent-
age (.424) and had 16 stolen
bases in 21 chances.
Pujols batted .312 and led
the NL in homers (42) and
RBIs (118).
"After the season, when
I looked at my numbers
and at Albert's numbers,
I thought: 'Holy cow! He's
beaten me in a lot of them,'"
Votto said. "He beat me in
runs, he beat me in RBIs,
home runs, I think a couple
others. I beat him in a few
of the qualitative stats."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jimmie Johnson gives thumbs-up after winning his fifth consecutive NASCAR Sprint Cup
Championship in Homestead on Sunday.


' - .- --, .. .'. -
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lako City Reporter
Columbia High's Nick Tuttle (17) fights Fort White High's
Kevin Ovalle (3) for possession of the ball on Nov. 9.


Childress fired


Coach gone one
year after signing
extension.
By DAVE CAMPBELL
Associated Press
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- Hastily hired five sea-
sons ago to bring order to a
disheveled franchise, Brad
Childress vowed to lead
the Minnesota Vikings the
only way he knew how.
After an eventful and
often tumultuous run
marred recently by player
unrest, livid fans and a boss
angry about abrupt person-
nel decisions and a 3-7 start
this year, Childress is out.
His conservative
approach to offensive strat-
egy and rigid communica-
tion style are gone, too,
leaving behind a talented
team that's out of the play-


off race and a leadership
vacuum in an organization
trying hard to rebuild pub-
lic good will toward a new
stadium.
Childress was fired
Monday, one season after
he got a contract extension
and came within a field
goal of reaching the Super
Bowl.
"It's often difficult to
articulate one reason why
change is needed," owner
Zygi Wilf said.
Wilfment ioned his "deep
respect" for Childress, his
hand-picked replacement
for Mike Tice in 2006.
"He was an integral part
of helping this franchise
turn the corner and re-
establishing ourselves as
a force in the NFL," Will
said
Defensive coordillator
Leslie Frazier will serve as
interim head coach.


~~ ----~I~ "











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Temple at Miami (Ohio)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Maul Invitational,
consolation bracket, at Lahaina, Hawaii
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Maul Invitational,
consolation bracket, at Lahaina, Hawaii
7 p.m.
ESPN Maul Invitational, semifinal, at
Lahaina, Hawaii
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Maui Invitational, semifinal, at
Lahaina, Hawaii
10 p.m.
ESPN2 CBE Classic, championship
game, at Kansas City, Mo.
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Chelsea vs. Zilina, at London
8 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Braga vs. Arsenal, at Braga, Portugal
(same-day tape)

FOOTBALL

NFL scores

Sunday's Games
Dallas 35, Detroit 19
Pittsburgh 35, Oakland 3
Washington 19,Tennessee 16, OT
N.Y.Jets 30, Houston 27
Buffalo 49, Cincinnati 31
Kansas City 31,Arizona 13
Jacksonville 24, Cleveland 20
Baltimore 37, Carolina 13
Green Bay 31., Minnesota 3
Atlanta 34, St. Louis 17
New Orleans 34, Seattle 19
Tampa Bay 21, San Francisco 0
New England 31, Indianapolis 28
Philadelphia 27, N.Y. Giants 17
Monday's Game
Denver at San Diego (n)

College games

Today
Temple (8-3) at Miami (Ohio) (7-4),
7 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Ford 400

At Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (2) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267 laps, 150
rating, 195 points, $356,823.
2. (6) Jimmie Johnson. Chevrolet, 267,
119.4, 175, $279,503.
3. (28) Kevin Harvick. Chevrolet. 267.
111.3, 165,$229,151.
4. (24) Aric Almirola, Ford. 267, 103.2,
160. $172,840.
5. (5) A J Allmendinger. Ford, 267. 102,
155, $160.476.
6. (I) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 267, 97.3.
155, $148,098.
7. (23) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267,
95, 146,$129,104.
8. (31) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 267,
84.7, 147, $127,773.
9. (13) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 267, 107.7,
143, $122,176.
10. (27) Greg Biffle, Ford, 267, 89.1,
134, $86,100.
I I. (25) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 267.
122, 135, $79,250.
12. (17) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 267,
81.3, 127, $80,425.
13. (18) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 267,
77,124, $99,435.
14. (37) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267,
81.3, 121,$88.550.
15. (4) Bill Elliott, Ford, 267, 68.4, 118.
$68,900.
16. (8) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 267,
80.5, 115, $87.375.
17. (10) Regan Smith, Chevrolet. 267,
72.6, I 12, $79,175.
18. (15) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 267, 60.5.
109,$112,898.
19. (16) Paul Menard, Ford,.267, 68.6,
106, $78,575.
20. (9) David Ragan, Ford, 267, 81.4,
103, $80,000.
21. (3) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
267,97.9, 100, $103,954.
22. (32) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
267,47.1, 97, $69,400.
23. (41) Scott Speed, Toyota, 267, 57.1,
94, $87,673.
24. (26) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 267,
48.2, 91, $77,075.
25. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 267, 50,
88, $86,498.
26. (20) Marcos Ambrose,Toyota, 267,
58.9,85, $90,998.
27. (22) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
267, 52.6, 82, $76,125.
28. (12) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 267, 64,
79, $75,825.
29. (35) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, 266, 40,
76, $68,350.
30. (42) Kevin Conway,Toyota, out of
fuel, 263, 33.9,73, $82,198.
31. (14) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 253,
78.3,75, $99,190.
32. (33) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident,
242,85.7,67, $112,031.
33. (34) Casey Mears, Toyota,
transmission, 233,46.5, 64, $64,450.
34. (39) Travis Kvapil, Ford, rear gear,
231, 33.6, 61, $63,300.
35. (40) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
accident, 231, 54.7, 58, $98,781.
36. (36) Dave Blaney, Ford, accident,
203, 35.4, 55, $81,635.
37. (I I) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, engine,
199, 56.5, 52, $110,301.
38. (7) David Reutimann, Toyota, 185,


42.1,49, $93,156.
39. (19) Joey Logano, Toyota, accident,
166,51.1,46, $98,790.
40. (43) Landon Cassill, Toyota,
vibration, 35, 29.3,43, $62,045.
41. (29) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
transmission, 29, 28.9, 40, $61,830.
42. (21) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 25,
32.1,42, $61,535.
43. (30) Mike Bliss, Toyota, electrical,
10, 29, 34, $61,858.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:


126.585 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 9 minutes, 50
seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.608 seconds.
Caution Flags: 10 for 41 laps.
Lead Changes: 22 among 8 drivers.
Top 12 In Points: I. J.Johnson, 6,622;
2. D.Hamlin, 6,583; 3. K.Harvick, 6,581;
4. C.Edwards. 6,393; 5. M.Kenseth, 6,294;
6. G.Biffle, 6,247; 7. T.Stewart, 6,221;
8. Ky.Busch, 6,182; 9. J.Gordon, 6,176;
10. C.Bowyer, 6,155; II. Ku.Busch, 6,142;
12.J.Burton,6,033.


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland. 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Orlando, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Memphis, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m.

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Nov. 21, total points and last
week's ranking:


Record
1. Duke (58) 3-0
2. Michigan St. (6) 2-0
3. Ohio St. 3-0
4. Kansas St. (I) 3-0
5. Pittsburgh 5-0
6. Kansas 3-0
7.Villanova 4-0
8. Kentucky 2-0
9. Syracuse 4-0
10.Purdue 3-0
I 1. Missouri 2-0
12. Baylor 3-0
13.Washington 2-0
14. Memphis 4-0
15. Minnesota 5-0
16. Florida 3-1
16. Georgetown 5-0
18. San Diego St. 4-0
19. Illinois 4-1I
20.Texas 3-1
21.Temple 2-0
22: Gonzaga 2-1
23. BYU 3-0
24.Tennessee 3-0
25. North Carolina 2-2


Pts Pvs
1.616 I
1,547 2
1,437 4
1.423 3
1,388 5
1.263 7
1.260 6
1.063 12
972 10
905 14
862 15
757 17
735 17
707 19
608 -
589 9
589 20
567 25
460 13
424 -
362 21
355 II
347 23
164 24
124 8


Others receiving votes: Virginia Tech
109.West Virginia 99, Butler 96. Louisville
76, UNLV 66. Florida St. 36.Vanderbilt
31, Georgia 28, Wichita St. 16. UCLA
10. Connecticut 8. Arizona 5, Richmond
5, Wisconsin 5, Saint Mary's. Calif. 4,
Mississippi St. 3. California 1. Iowa St. I,
VMI IXavler I.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. No. 4 Kansas State
or No. 22 Gonzaga at the Sprint Center,


ACROSS


Road "beetles"
Urgent
message
Egg part
Low island
Holy image
Peter Gunn's
girl
Circus brothers
Well-ventilated
Lieu
Trunk posses-
sors
Zuider -
Domestic bird
Came to
Skiing mecca
Mac rivals
Some nest
eggs
Vex
Good name, for
.short
Distant
So-so grade
Method
House wing


Kansas City, Mo., 7:45 or 10 p.m.
No. 2 Michigan State vs. Connecticut
orWichita State at Lahaina (Hawaii) Civic
Center, 2 or 7 p.m.
No. 3 Ohio State vs. Morehead State,
7 p.m.
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. Robert Morris,
7 p.m.
No. 6 Kansas vs. Texas A&M-Corpus
Christi, 8 p.m.
No. 8 Kentucky vs. No. 13 Washington
or Virginia at Lahaina (Hawaii) Civic
Center, 4:30 or 9:30 p.m.
No. 10 Purdue vs.Austin Peay, 7 p.m.
No. II Missouri vs. Wyoming at
Aventura Palace, Cancun, Mexico, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Memphis vs.Tennessee-Martin,
8 p.m.
No. 16 Florida vs. FloridaAtlantic,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Illinois vs.Yale, 9:45 p.m.
No. 20 Texas vs. Sam Houston State,
8 p.m.
No. 23 BYU vs. MVSU, 9 p.m.
No. 25 North Carolina vs, UNC
Asheville, 7 p.m.


HOCKEY

NHL schedule -

Today's Game
Edmonton at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Columbus at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at New Jersey. 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Florida. 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose. 10:30 p.m.


BASEBALL

NL MVP

NEWYORK -Voting for the National
League Most Valuable Player Award, with
first-, second- and third-place votes and
total points based on a 14-9-8-7-6-5-4-
3-2-I basis:
Player Ist 2nd 3rd Total
Joey Votto, Cin. 31 I 443
Albert Pujols, St. L. I 21 8 279
Carlos Gonzalez. Col.- 7 13 240
Adrian Gonzalez. SD- I 3 197
TroyTulowitzki. Col.- -, 2 132
Roy Halladay. Phil. I 3 130
Aubrey Huff. SF 70
Jayson Werth. Phil. 52
Martin Prado, AtI. - 51
Ryan Howard. Phil. I I 50
Buster Posey. SF - I 40
Matt Holliday, St. L. 32
Brian Wilson, SF - I 28
Scott Rolen, Cn. - 26
Ryan Braun, Mil. 19
R. Z'merman,Wash.- 18
Carlos Ruiz, Phil, - 12
Dan Uggla. Fla. 12
A.Wainwright, St. L, 12
Jason Heyward.At. - II
Brian McCann.Atl. 9
Adam Dunn.Wash 9
Ubaldo Jimenez. Col, - 7
David Wright. NY - 3
Corey Hart, Mil. - 2
Josh Johnson, Fla. - 2
Heath Bell. SD 2


38 Marshal's
badge
39 Blown away
40 Goddess
of dawn
41 Like some
excuses
43 Decorates a gift
46 Clean the
board
50 Long ago
51 Shoot-'em-ups
54 Microwave
55 Blissful spot
56 Police
officer
57 Monster's loch
58 Raton,
Florida
59 Rte.

DOWN


BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES


Rk
1. Oregon I
2.Auburn 2
3.TCU 4
4. Boise St. 3
5. LSU 6
6. Stanford 7
7.Wisc. 5
8. Ohio St. 8
9. Okla. St. 9
10. Mich. St. 10
I I.Alabama II
12.Arkansas 12
13.Okla. 13
14. Missouri 16
15.Nebr. 15
16.Va.Tech 14
17.Tex A&M 18
18.So.Car. 17
19. Nevada 19
20. Utah 20
2 1.Arizona 21
22. FSU 22
23. NC St. 23
24. Iowa 24
25. Miss. St. 25


Harris
Pts
2793
2727
2557
2619
2227
2209
2295
2131
1805
1797
1783
1589
1412
1176
1199
1322
936
1037
894
495
471
439
330
284
178


Rk
I
2
4
3
6
8
5
7
9
10
II
12
13
16
15
14
18
17
19
22
20
21
23
24
25


USA Today
Pts
1459
1398
1300
1341
1175
1112
1211
1116
990
927
b85
784
733
585
6p4
723
492
577
456
228
279
243
208
74
68


Computer
Pct Rk F
.9892 2 .9
.9478 I I
.8814 3 .9
.9092 5 .1
.7966 4 .1
.7539 6 .1
.8210 8 .1
.7566 9 .6
.6712 7 .7
.6285 t12 .5
.6000 II .51
.5315. 10 .1
.4969 14 .5
.3966 t12 .S
.4163 15 .+
.4902 18 .
.3336 16 .
.3912 17 .:
.3092 t19 .:
.1546 t19 .:
.1892 21 .:
.1647 24 .A
.1410 25 .(
.0502 23 .I
.0461 22 .I


BCS
Avg
.9764
.9682
.8995
.8860
.8193
.7763
.7688
.7148
.6815
.6063
.6019
.5697
.5041
.4564
.4423
.4213
.3607
.3583
.2943
.1961
.1848
.1296
.0923
.0899
.0862


PITS: Champion's mental toughness

Continued From Page 1B


Knaus and turned the
duo loose in NASCAR's
premier series. In nine
seasons, they've amassed
53 wins and contended for
the championship every
single year.
Johnson has never
finished lower than fifth in
the standings: During his
2002 rookie season, and in
2005, when a blown tire in
the season finale dropped
him from second to fifth.
That race, when he
failed to catch Tony
Stewart for the title,
marked Johnson's third
straight near-miss at
winning NASCAR's
highest honor. The failure
nearly destroyed Johnson
and Knaus, but team
owner Rick Hendrick
instead used the
disappointment as
motivation for the duo to
finally break through in
their pursuit of a
championship.
Only they didn't stop
at one.
Johnson and Knaus have
not looked back since that
2005 finale.
The first four were
impressive for the team's
dominance alone.
The fifth one, after
the first true test of the
Johnson-Knaus reign was,
as Johnson said, simply
unbelievable.
Denny Hamlin took


Johnson all the way to
edge in this year's Chase
for the championship
and nobody would deny
that Hamlin outran him
through most of the
10-race series.
Kevin Harvick, who
used consistency to take
control of the regular
season, lurked behind
in third and never gave
Johnson a chance to coast
But there's a mental
toughness required in
being a champion, and
through all these years,
Johnson feels like he's
mastered it. He tweaked
Hamlin over the final few
weeks with pointed barbs
about nerves and
pressure, all the while
staying cool and calm.
It most certainly worked
on Sunday, which turned
into a battle of which
driver made the fewest
mistakes.
Hamlin was the loser
of that fight, spinning
, early from contact with
Greg Biffle thpt many
believe was a brain-fade
on Hamlin's part. And
Harvick was caught
speeding on pit road
moments before a flawless
pit stop pushed him into


the lead, and the penalty
took him out of
race-winning contention.
That was Harvick's only
true shot to win the title,
and he settled for third in
the race and third in the
standings.
Johnson, who overcame
several shaky pit stops
from his crew, remained
smooth and steady and
became the first driver in
the seven-year history of
the Chase to come from
behind in the season finale
to win the title.
"It's spectacular,"
Edwards said. "I think we
are all witnessing
something that is nothing
short of spectacular."
Johnson doesn't care
about popularity among
mainstream sports fans,
and he shrugs off
suggestions that race car
drivers aren't true athletes.
And he won't say where
he believes he ranks;
either.
"I don't know if I can
answer a question like
that. I can't," he said. "The
driver or a person should
not be up there saying,
'I'm great' That's just not
my deal. But I'm very
proud of what we've done."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

L EBD T HUD A UK
OL U H U A UTE
LALL Y DDIG






W~N TI n~S^MIS
E AANAE R TT LSR
MUSE SAN BAR

A PED EHS ATA
Y IP NAH C ROC
A~NTOY M SOAP Y
LEA LEO
WIL S S YNMPTOM
T O R R111TORY
OE R LUTES ACT
A XIE EERALS DAH


TV hookups 6 Mr. Howard
Stand in line 7 UK part.
New Year's Eve 8 Ache
word 9 Garfield's victim
Actor Cornel 10 Old Italian coins
Here, in Le Havre 11 Accordion, parts


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


16 Long looks
19 Aviv
21 Removes a
renter
22 Walkers
23 Not a single
woman
24 Spoken
25 NBA great
Malone
27 Part of WATS.
28 Boat front
29 Grant, as land
30 Drove too fast
36 Mexico's
Sierra -
38 "Titanic" mes-
sage
40 Fencers'
blades
42 Hartford com-
petitor
43 Keenan or Ed
44 Don Juan
45 Refuges
47 Curved
entrance
48 Winter
forecast
49 Observe
51 Duck's foot
52 Shogun's cap-
ital
53 Jiffy


11-23 2010 by UFS, Inc.


'q _ARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES

at the Lake City Reporter
So our employees can enjoy Thanksgiving with their
families, the Lake City Reporter will be closed,
Thursday, November 25th, 2010.

1'-.. N 'L wm- I -.h- -






We will be back in the office on
Friday, November 26th for our
customer's convenience.
Thank You and
Have a Great Thanksgivin L ,


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: THE

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CROUP SHYLY' EXTENT TANDEM
Answer: What he gave his boss when he was late for
the meeting A "LAME" EXCUSE


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


-.-*-


GLEZUZ




TYGODS
,"" \f ^"

S^ / _s^!^ _






LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010 3B
,, - ---- ,Ri


M~r M~fliLTlYl I
II s m !


201
FOOTBALL
COTS










4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT
I l.


THE REQUEST WE GOT
FOR A QUOTE IS VAGUE,
AND THE DEADLINE FOR
OUR RESPONSE IS
TOMORROW.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


IF I ASK FOR CLARITY,
LJEtL MISS THE DEAD-
LINE. IF I DON'T, OUR
BID LILL EITHER BE
BELOW OUR COST OR
TOO HIGH TO WIN.


WHICH I LIKE THE
PATHOF ON LIE THE
CERTAIN ONE THAT
FAILURE MAKES
DO YOU YOU WORK
DO YOU THE HARD-
PREFER? EST.


DEAR ABBY


Outgoing wives learn to live

with homebody husbands


DEAR ABBY: I am writ-
ing about the letter from "So-
cially Obligated in Pennsyl-
vania" (Oct. 4), whose fiance,
"Joe," refuses invitations to
events from her family. My
niece married a well-educat-
ed man who is like Joe. They
now live an isolated social life
and participate in none of the
normal family functions that
are so important in bringing
people together. Their chil-
dren miss so much.
My advice to "S.O." would
be to rethink the engagement
and consider meeting some-
one who is more socially
compatible and less control-
ling. Marriage is a partner-
ship built on compromise.
Joe is uncooperative.
My second husband was
like this man. I divorced him.
Family meant too much to
me. OLDER AND WIS-
ER IN ARIZONA
DEAR OLDER: Thank
you for your comments. I
heard from many readers
who were eager to share
what they have learned from
living with someone who is
uncomfortable in social situ-
ations. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: "Socially
Obligated" and her fiance
need counseling to find an-
swers to why he is reluctant
to attend her family func-
tions. Is he introverted? Does


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearab6y.com
he suffer from Asperger's
syndrome and is unable to
feel comfortable in crowds?
Could he be depressed?
Could there have been an is-
sue that has turned him off
to her family?
After seven years togeth-
er, they need to dig deeper or
it will continue to be a prob-
lem. LOUISE IN DAY-
TON, OHIO
DEAR ABBY: I, too, am
married to a man who re-
fuses to do anything with me
if anyone else is involved,
whether it be church, family
or work. He is comfortable
with me, and that's it!
We will do things from
time to time with family, but
he despises it. I feel it's un-
fair, because I go out of my
way to include his relatives
in my life. But I knew this
about him before we were
married.
I have quit making ex-
cuses for him and now just
explain that he is extremely
uncomfortable around peo-
ple. He has social anxiety and


will not likely change. I love
him in spite of it, and I make
adjustments.
One way I cope is by latch-
ing onto someone else in the
group so I don't feel left out
among the couples present.
I engage with nieces and
nephews and my widowed
mother.
I advise "S.O." to love the
man for who he is. Don't try
to force him or put him down.
- MAKING IT WORK IN
THE MIDWEST
DEAR ABBY: There
could be other explanations
for the man's social avoid-
ance. My wife is more social
than I. I used to go with her to
events that she wanted me to
attend. But I noticed that af-
terward, I would get chewed
out I talked too much or
too little, spoke too loudly or
couldn't be heard, mixed too
much or not enough. In oth-
er words, my wife was so so-
cially insecure that no matter
how I acted, she took issue.
I finally realized that the
problem was hers and not
mine. I haven't gone any-
where socially with my wife
since 1995 and it has worked
out just fine. STEPHEN
IN KENTUCKY

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Take a break,
visit a friend or plan a trip
that will bring you some
peace and happiness. Think
about yourself for a change
and make decisions that
ensure your health and
well-being. Success will
be yours if you take action
now. ****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You'll have plen-
ty to contend with if you let
people from your past inter-
fere with your future. There
is lots to deal with but mak-
ing a financial move based
on emotions or upset will
not be the way to handle
matters. Stay calm. ***
GEMINI (May 21 June
20): Look out for last-min-
ute changes brought on by
someone you least expect.
You will have to do some
fancy footwork if you want
to stay ahead of someone
that seems to know your
every move. Now is not
the time to show hostility.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Plan something
special that will enhance
your personal relationships.
You will learn something
valuable and reduce stress
if you take a creative semi-
nar. Look at your options for
altering your future. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You will get backing


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

from someone who under-
stands your position and
can offer useful advice that
allows you to express what
you have to offer to a tar-
geted market. Don't feel
obliged to accept changes
that other people make.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Lend a helping hand
and you will feel good.
Speak from the heart but
don't let your passion about
something lead you into
futile arguments. You have
to know where to draw the
line. Focus on what you do,
not what others do. ****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): You can call the shots
if you put a little pressure
on the people you need to
come through for you. It's
the end result that will bring
you recognition. Stay on top
of each and every detail and
you will succeed. *****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Money will mat-
ter. Don't overspend. An
investment may look good
but don't buy into some-
thing because of someone
else. Invest in your skills
and what you have control
over. You have more talent
than you realize. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Networking


will pay off, leading you into
a partnership that will help
you financially. The people
you get to meet through
the company you keep will
enhance your chance of
success. Don't be deterred
from attending important
functions. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): If you are
too busy taking care of ev-
eryone else's responsibili-
ties, you will miss out on an
opportunity to present and
promote what you have to
offer. Base your decisions
on what's best for you finan-
cially and professionally.
Face any challenge confi-
dently. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can make
amazing new contacts if
you mingle with people who
have common interests. Get
involved in something you
feel strongly about or en-
joy doing and the ideas you
come up with will take you
forward. There is money to
be made. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You'll have
trouble sticking to a budget
and seeing things clearly.
Rely on someone who is
practical and will look out
for your interests. Overdo-
ing, overreacting and over-
indulging will all be a prob-
lem for you. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, post and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals M
"XAW ABCX RVHN YA JA V HNIX
TN K YRDBPF I DPRY DB XAWI CDTN
F A C A B P VF XAW JAB'Y JA YAA


LV B X Y R D B P F K I A B P "


- K V I I N B


M W T T N Y Y
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There are risks and costs to action. But they are far
less than the long-range risks of comfortable inaction." J.F. Kennedy
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-23


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS
1123 10


THIS ISN'T RIGHT---THI $6It N'5 FOg A
/ G 6AT-IRIHNGOF
'| Sf wSTUDWfNTV!












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


SADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines,'one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emal by:
Tuesday Mon. 1000aam Mon, 900a.m
Wednesday Mon,i1000a.m Mon,900am.
Thursday Wed.,10.00am. Wed., 900a.m.
Friday Thurs, 1000 am Thurs,9:00am.
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These deadlines are subjel toi change without notico




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on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
CancelIations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing lnguiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print dI11( Online
www.laliveiilyreporter.corn


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Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise toalling S100 orless.



Each item must Include a price.
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6 days EiAN additional
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personal merchandise totalling $00 or less.



Each item must Include a price.
Ths is a non-refundablrate.







One Item per ad L
4 lines 6 days Each additional
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personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each item must Include a price.

This Is a non-refundable rate.









One Item per ad h
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4 lines 6 days Each additional
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personal merchandise totalling S.000 or lesas.
This Is a non-refundable rate.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-954-DR
In Re The Marriage Of
SHERRY LEE JASPER.
Wife/Petitioner,
and
JOHN LYNDON MOORE,
Husband/Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION OF
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: JOHN LYNDON MOORE
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition For Dissolution Of
Marriage has been filed and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on J. Daniel
Marsee, Attorney for
Petitioner/Wife, whose address is
Post Office Box 2007, Lake City,
Florida 32056-2007, on or before
November 30. 2010, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Wife or im-
mediately thereafter. If you fail to do
so, a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure, re-
quires certain automatic disclosure of
documents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanctions, in-
cluding dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court on-October 21, 2010.
P. DeWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By Mendy E. Warner
Deputy Clerk
05524319
November 2.9, 16. 23, 2010

To place your
classified ad call

755-440








Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.

Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.10-235-CP
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALLEN DELROY WITT
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ALLEN DELROY W1TT, deceased,
whose date of death was September
4, 2010, and whose Social Security
number is xxx-xx-3460, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
miands against Decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is November 23, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Dorothy L. Witt
DOROTHY L. WITT
707 Turkey Creek
Alachua, Florida 32615
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ A. Scott Toney, Esquire
A. SCOTT TONEY. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Dorothy L. WITT
Florida Bar Number: 982180
804 Northwest 16th Avenue
Pecan Park. Suite B
Gainesville. Florida 32601
Telephone: (352) 376-6800
Fax: (352) 376-6802
E-Mail: Toneylaw@gmail.com
05524480
November 23. 30, 2010


Legal

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of BOB'S
TOPS AND UPHOLSTERY at 1.150
EAST DUVAL STREET., LAKE
CITY, FL., 32055
Contact Phone Number: (407)352-
4562 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: ROBERT NARDINE
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Robert Nardine
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 19 day of November, A.D. 2010.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04542432
November 23, 2010

Suwannee County School Board
RFP #10-215 Legal Services Board
Attorney
Sealed proposals will be received in
the office of thoffice of the Chief Financial Of-
ficer, Suwannee County School
Board, 702 2nd Street NW, Live
Oak, Florida 32064, until 11:00 a.m.
Friday, December 10, 2010 for legal
services to the Suwannee County
School Board. Specifications are
available at the following web ad-
dress: \
http://teacherweb.com/FL/Suwan-
neeCountyDistrict/SchoolHomePage

RFP responses must be submitted in
a sealed envelope plainly marked:
SCSB RFP #10-215 Sealed Pro-
posal for Legal Services School
Board Attorney
The Board reserves the right to reject
any or all RFP submittals.
05524463
November 16,23, 2010


010 Announcements









060 Services

Looking for elder persons in need
of 24 hr care in my home.
Certified Nursing Ass't,
in Jasper, FL, 386-792-3149


070 Rewards

WANTED: Need to speak to man
that witnessed accident at the
intersection of Baya & Main St.,
11/9/10, 8 PM,Robin 832-7174

too Job
100 Opportunities

04542412
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k. health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Stree.t
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: IIR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gauinesville, FI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/.V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

0i5244l
DETAILER
Large Manufacturing Company
has the following position
available in the Lake City,
Florida, facility:
DETAILER/CHECKER
Graduate with AS degree or
experience in the steel joist
industry. Responsibilitities
include drafting and detailing of
joist and deck drawings. Must
have AutoCAD experience.
Company offers a highly
professional environment with
tremendous growth opportunity
and competitive salary commen-
surate with experience.
Excellent benefit package.
Qualified applicants submit
cover letter and resume in
confidence to:
Jan Tryon
jan.tryon@newmill.com


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
S(904)704-9377
Craftmatic full size elec adj bed
w/vibrating feature, includes
mattress and 5 piece bedrm suite
$400 752-2572 leave message

1 Needlecraft
414& Sewing

Quilting Frame
4ft. wide wood
$125.00
386-752-0987


416 Sporting Goods

Gym Equipment: Olympic Plates,
Benches, Dumbbells, Treadmill,
Stepper, Nautilus Machine.
MUST SELL! 386-752-0749


420 Wanted to Buy


100 Job
100 Opportunities

0552.4485
Medical Biller Needed
Several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please e-mail resume to :
mafaisalmd@Gmail.com
or fax 386-758-5987

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own Iransportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412
BULLDOZER OPERATOR
Part time, references required,
Call F.J. I lill Construction
386-752-7887
Customer Support Job Pay $300-
$600 a week,could work from
home later on 95% of support is by
email.Emailtrueloss@gmail.com.
Need to hire One Person,
Must have Computer exp.
Order Entry/Purchasing/Shipping/
Receiving exp. Needed.
Apply in Person 174 NE
Cortez Terr, Lake City FL

12i0 Medical
120 Employment

F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
MA needed M-F for busy medical
practice. Send reply to Box 05058,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Homecare LPN's needed 9a-6p
and CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare 352-291-4888
Medical assistant/secretary
needed in local physician office.
Please fax CV
to386-719-9662.
Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to





5.' SO(
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time


Hiring tor part-time qualified
office clerk. Must be proficient
in Excel.Microsoft Word.etc.

Apply in person at
134 S E Colburn Avenue
Lake City FI 32025
Drug Free Work Place
Equal Opportunity Employer



141 Babysitters

Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention. F/T or P/T.
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call ('Cindy iat 610-348-0336

240 Schools &
240 Education
0.14224S
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 11/29/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion. $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $45 386-752-0987
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PiIU.ISIIER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to he at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate fromn a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and arc
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must bh licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
JIJ Supplies
Baby Pigs for sale
ready in Dec
call lor details
386-965-2215
BI(G Boar Pig
about two years old
call flor details
SOLD
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NqTF
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellanous

Physical Therapy Equipment:
Exam/treatment table,
$100.00 MUST SELL
386-752-1652

4 Good Things
450 to Eat
Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling.
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell. crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pindmount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

461 Office
1 Equipment
OFFICE FURNITURE
All Wood Computer
Desk $50
386-752-0749
OFFICE FURNITURE
BLACK LEATHER
CHAIRS $20
386-752-0749


530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt.
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098
386-965-3110

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 fulll baths). S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410


630 Mobile Homes
6J3 for Rent

Large 3/2 DW, very new.
South of town on 441.
$650. mo.
386-208-4702
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
inci water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent


$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455


2 bdrm/1 bath. 1 car garage. W/D
hook up, $530 month,
no pets I month sec.
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town.
Ist, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A.
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious. 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up. CH/A.
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units.
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl..
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent

Efficiency apartment, Close to
VA.'$430 mo. plus $150.00 sec,
utilities included.No pets.
386-754-9641 or 386-438-4054.
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge. microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135.
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542202
For Rent-
3/2 home on Baya Ave.
convenient to shopping, schools
and churches. $790./mio with
$790./security. First month's
rent'reduced to $395.00
foi qualified tenant.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
386-365-5884.

1/1 Cottage, pool access, no pets.
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec.. $300 sec..near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES

Our Advertising deadlines will be
Cll ld: Friday, November 26 will deadline Wednesday, Novmber 24 Itl.m.
Display: Friday, November 26 will deadline Monday, November22
Saturday November 27 will deadline Tuesday, November23
Sunday, November 28 will deadline Tuesday, November 23 t
Tusy, November30 will deadline Wednesday, Novembe 24

So ouiir 'tiiploiycescn uill ejoy a
Tlhniksgivhnlg \ith their' Inlilies,
the take Cityv ItRlorter iill lbe closed,
lihursdav, Noiclliuber 25th, 211111.

We will be back in the office on
Friday, November 261ih for our
custoiner's conveienice.
Thank You and
Iate n Greait Thanksgiving \


GUITARS WANTED
Gibson, Fender, Etc.
Cash paid will travel.
(407)733-1687
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars. Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


i


I -


BUY IT


SELIS5..,


FID3T]


I









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2010


7 30 Unfurnished
'U Home For Rent
2 br/Iba House w/yard,
near airport. $450 ino,
Ist, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 Bednn/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd.
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo: $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage. big kitchen. No pets.

Rural beauty and privacy near
1- 10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Very Clean 2br/lba. in own.
298 SW Miller Terr. CH/A, Shed.
$650.mo. lst.mo. & security.
Call Vick 386-623-6401
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors. W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok.
non smoking environment.
$750/M. 1st, last. $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St.
then call 352-377-0720

7 0 Business &
7 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease:
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Offici
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City. FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. I
acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
83 A Commercial
O Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

930 Motorcycles
2009 Custom Chopper, 300cc,


low miles, like new,
must sell $2000 obo
386-758-1784

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2008 Toyota Tacoma. 4 dr, access
cab. 17,250mi. auto, AC, All
power Tonneau cover, bedliner,
hitch, nerf bars, stereo. $17,995.

CO EONGY


C N A F U C E E M A L
Q H I I X B E F J W 1

U E A T U D Y F S H

B B C S I U V B A Q L
E R E Q D C N I Y H C
U A P K G U X I L Y L V
V F O H F M O E G L S E

H A+EveCa re B I G V
Lake City
I. N EyeglasSes Reporter' s
^ o |popular weekly


Contacts
,.-- Exams
,.. Sunglasses




555-5555


word search is
a great way to
get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
week at a price
any business
can afford.


1 D S FOU *S
I- ]


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for youl
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad.
Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the
picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


Fo More Deta~~ ils Call Mary or
B r i d g e a t 3 8 7 5 5 5 4 0


SAnnouncements


NEED MORE RESPONSE? Advertise in Over 100
Florida Papers reaching MILLIONS of people. Ad-
vertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for You!
(866)742-1373 www.florida-classifieds.com.

Auctions

Absolute Real Estate Auction online bidding/live
www.abalauction.com 3BD/2BA SF Home, Leon
County (850)510-2501 Abal Auction Real Estate
AB2387 AU3239

Financial

CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or
annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SET-
TLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better
Business Bureau.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As
seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++within 48/lirs? Low rates APPLY NOW
BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com

For Sale

CHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used,
brand new in factory boxes. English Dovetail. Origi-
nal cost $4500. Sell for $895. Can deliver. Call Tom
(813)600-3653

Health & Medical

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! 40 Pills +
4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, Dis-
creet Shipping. Save $500 Buy The Blue Pill Now!
(888)777-9242

Help Wanted

ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-40 cpm. Excellent
Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com

Colonial Life seeks entrepreneurial professional
with sales experience to become a District Manager.
Life/Health license is required. Substantial earnings
potential. Please contact meredith.brewer@colonial-
life.com or call (904)424-5697

Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED
OTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker
REQ'D. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter
TODAY! (877)882-6537 www.oakleytransport.com

Drivers / Solo & Teams $2,000.00 Sign On Bonus
100% 0/Op Contractor Co. Dedicated Reefer Fleet
Run California & Eastern Half U.S. Call (800)237-
8288 or visit www.suncocarriers.com

Drivers Earn up to 490/ml! I year minimum OTR cx-


perience qualifies you to be a trainer for our fleet! Call:
(888)417-7564 CRST EXPEDITED www.JoinCRST.
com

INSURANCE REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED. Most
earn $50K-$100K or more. Call our branch office at
(866)896-1555. Ask for Dennis Mayfield or email
dmayfield@insphereis.com. Visit www.insphereis-
pensacola.com.

Drivers Hornady Transportation Miles Money &
Home Time! Start up to .42 cpm Sign on Bonus Avail-
able Great Benefits!! Great Hometime!! OTR Expe-
rience Req'd. No felonies Lease Purchase Available
(800)441-4271 X FL-100

Land For Sale

NC MOUNTAINS- Cabin Shell, 2+ acres with great
view, very private, big trees, waterfalls & large public
lake nearby, $99,500 Bank financing (866)275-0442

BANK ORDERED ONSITE AUCTIONS: 677
acres. Commercial, timber and hunting land. Hamilton,
Gilchrist and Clay counties. December 2nd and 3rd.
Visit RowellAuctions.com -AU479/AB296

Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769.

ATTEND COLLEGE bNLINE from Home. *Medi-
cal, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance.. Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165,
www.Centura.us.com

Out of Area Real Estate

NC MOUNTAINS- Cabin Shell, 2+ acres with great
view, very private, big trees, waterfalls & large public
lake nearby, $99,500 Bank financing (866)275-0442

Schools & Education

"Can You Dig It?" Heavy Equipment School. 3wk
training program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement asst. Start digging dirt Now.
(866)362-6497



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