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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01458
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/21/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01458
System ID: UF00028308:01458
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





































LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police Department Chief of Police Argatha Gilmore
(right) talks with Alan Reiter of Lake City after 'Breakfast with
the Chief' Saturday at the department's headquarters.


Chief hosts forum for residents


Citizens talk
with department
leader at event.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
Several local residents
discussed neighborhood
safety issues with Lake
City Police Chief Argatha
Gilmore Saturday morning
during an open discussion


forum at LCPD headquar-
ters.
The "Breakfast with the
Chief event is the second of
its kind hosted by LCPD. It
provides an open forum for
residents and department
officials to come together,
discuss issues and resolve
them, Gilmore said.
"We're trying to be
responsive to your needs,"
Gilmore told the citizens.
"You expect results."


Several residents
expressed concerns about
issues with dogs in their
neighborhoods, such as
the animals barking con-
tinuously at early or late
hours and dogs running in
packs.
"They are all around,"
said Betty Wise, who said
she has stopped walking in
her neighborhood because
of the dog packs. "How can
you get them under con-


trol?"
Gilmore said the depart-
ment will direct its resourc-
es and work with animal
control in its efforts to tack-
le the issues.
Other concerns voiced
included speeding in cer-
tain areas of Lake City and
complaints of loud music in
many neighborhoods.
Gilmore said she and the
BREAKFAST continued on 3A


LCPD: SEARCH




FOR Two SusPI


ON


ECTS


I PATRICK SCOTTISpecial to the Lake City Reporter
Several Lake City Police officers including (from left) Becky Miles, Larry Shallar and Lt. Pete Spurlock secure a crime scene
at Windsong Apartment Complex Friday night. LCPD responded to a report of shots fired and an alleged armed robbery
attempt.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City Police contin-
ue searching for two sus-
pects they say were part
of a trio who attempted to
rob a man at gunpoint at
Windsong Apartments late
Friday.
A 16-year-old was
arrested at the scene and
charged with multiple
adult felonies in connec-
tion with the incident, but
LCPD officials said his two
accomplices escaped. The
two remained at large at
presstime Saturday night.
Cleveland Linard Dix,
16, 6513 SW County Road
242, Lake City, is charged
with armed robbery,
aggravated battery and
discharging a firearm dur-
ing a robbery.
He is being held with-
out bond at the Columbia
County Detention
Facility.
Capt. John Blanchard,
Lake City Police
Department public infor-
mation officer, said Dix


'-- ,* ^ ^ ^ I
PATRICK SCOTTISpecial to the Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police officer Becky Miles inspects a .45-caliber
handgun recovered at the scene. One man was injured and
one man was arrested in connection with the incident.


is facing felony charges
and therefore the police,
department can release
the suspect's age and
address.
The victim of the rob-
bery attempt was Corey
Dangerfield, age and
address unknown, accord-
ing to LCPD reports.
Dangerfield had a small


laceration wound on his
hand. He was treated at
the scene by emergency
responders and released.
Police said around
10:45 p.m. Friday, officer
Kevin Johns heard shots
being fired in the area of
the Windsong Apartment
Complex. Johns began
to check the area as a


call came into the police
department's dispatch
center, advising shots
had been fired near 2720
Windsong Circle. Upon
arriving at the scene,
Johns reported finding
two people fighting near
a retention pond.
"Witnesses were yell-
ing, 'He's been shot.',"
Blanchard said. "Johns
approached both people
and saw a Llama .45-cali-
ber pistol lying on the
ground in front of the two
people. Johns secured
both people as other offi-
cers arrived."
Reports indicate each
person was interviewed
and Dangerfield was iden-
tified as the victim.
"Dangerfieldhad small
laceration on his right
hand that was believed
to have been caused by
the firearm from the sus-
pect," Blanchard said.
Dix was identified as one
of three suspects.
Lake City Police
SUSPECTS continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Capt. Ed Mendes (left), leader of the 17th Connecticut
Company H re-enactors, prepares his men for battle at the
Raid on the Suwannee Civil War re-enactment at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park Saturday.


Re-enactment

revisits famed

Suwannee Raid


Thousands attend
event at Live Oak's
music park.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
LIVE OAK- People had
the opportunity to see Civil
War history come to life at
the Spirit of the Suwannee,
Music Park Saturday.
More than 2,000 attend-
ees and re-enactors partici-
pated in the second annual
Raid on the Suwannee Civil
War re-enactment, a realis-
tic Civil War re-enactment
hosted by Hardee's, Corp
that featured an afternoon
battle, a ladies tea with peri-
od dress and a grand ball.
The event continues
today at the park with gates


opening at 9 a.m., a church
service at the chapel, an
assembly, a grand review
and the final battle begin-
ning at 2 p.m. Camps close
to the public at 4:30 p.m.
Attendees had the oppor-
tunity to explore authentic
1860s encampments to see
how soldiers lived during
the war between the North
and the South. Re-enactors
were dressed in period
clothing and used period
firearms.
Gen. Robert Michael
Hardy. of Hardee's Corps,
event commanding officer,
said re-enactments pass
along America's history and
help educate the public.
"Events like this keep
American history alive," he
RAID continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Santa's preparing his list
Sara Harrington, 2, of Lake City tells Santa Clause what she
wants for Christmas as she sits on his lap upon his arrival at
the Lake City Mall Saturday. 'She talks about Santa all year
long,' said Jennifer Harrington, Sara Harrington's mother.
Local children and their families gathered to have their picture
taken with Santa.


1 842611


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


Opinion ................ 4A
Business ................ IC


A few clouds
WEATHER, I OA


Obituaries ..
Advice .....
Puzzles .....


............ 6A
............ 3D
............ 2B


TODAY
IN LIFE
Local couple marks
70 years of marriage.


COMING
TUESDAY
County academic
recognition.








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


ezmafcrh tA$H 3 4FLORIDA
.eytch. W.. ^.m @

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
8-22-37-39 6 2-9-10-14-34 Afternoon: 4-8-6 Afternoon: 6-9-0-9 8-11-13-35-38-39 14-16-53-54-59-5
Evening: 7-8-0 Evening: 2-3-2-0


AROUND FLORIDA


Police: Two high school students carried loaded guns


ROYAL PALM BEACH
- Two Palm Beach County
high school students have been
arrested for having loaded guns
in their backpacks.
A police report says the two
were apprehended by a sheriff's
deputy as they walked near a
store during school hours. The
two told the deputy they had
guns in their bags and said they
were members of a gang. The
pair also said they were afraid
of other gang members and had
the weapons as protection.
The two students from Royal
Palm Beach High are not being
identified because they are
minors. They each face one
count of carrying concealed
firearms and one count of car-
rying concealed weapons inside
and outside school grounds. One
also faces one count of carrying
a concealed weapon, while the
other faces three counts of the
same charge.

Football players safe
from burning bus
TALLAHASSEE A group of
high school football players from
Jacksonville is headed home
after being safely evacuated from
a burning bus in north central
Florida.
The bus carrying the Andrew
Jackson High School football
team caught fire early Saturday
morning as it was traveling on
interstate 10 in Gadsen County.
The Florida Highway Patrol
says all the 41 passengers were
removed from the bus and no
injuries were reported.
. Authorities say as the bus was
traveling down 1-10, for unknown
reasons the right rear well
caught fire. The driver stopped
the bus and was able to quickly
get everyone out.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Crist opens door for long-dead rocker's pardon
Members of The Doors (left to right) Jim Morrison, John Densmore, Robby Krieger and Ray Manzarek strike a
pose in this undated photo. Outgoing Florida Gov. Charlie Crist Crist said he is looking to pardoning the long-
dead rocker Jim Morrison who was convicted of exposing himself at a raucous 1969 concert in Miami.


The interstate was shut down
for about two and a half hours
as firefighters extinguished the
blaze.

Police find body
of woman, 3 children
TALLAHASSEE Police say
the bodies of a woman and three
children were found inside a
north Florida home.


Police spokesman David
McCranie told the Tallahassee
Democrat there were obvious
signs of violence inside the
home, but it was too early in the
investigation to rule out a mur-
der-suicide.
The woman is believed to be
the mother of two 6-year-old chil-
dren and a 3-year-old. i
Police have not released a
cause of death or the names of


the victims.

3 get federal prison
in sex-trafficking case
FORT LAUDERDALE -
Three men have been sentenced
to spend time in federal prison
for their roles in a sex-trafficking
case involving minors in South
Florida.
.A federal judge on Friday sen-


tenced 28-year-old Johnny Saintil
to ten years in prison; 26-year-old
Michael Defrand to just under
16 years; and 26-year-old Stanley
Wilson to eight and a half years.
Each man pleaded guilty in
August to a single count of con-
spiring to sex traffic minors and
sex trafficking by force. Defrand
also admitted to sex trafficking
a minor. Federal authorities say
the men were part of an orga-
nization that had prostituted
women in hotels in Broward
County since 2009. The services
were advertised online.

Military training plane
lands with gear up
NAVAL AIR STATION
PENSACOLA Two airmen
were taken to a hospital for
evaluation after their training
aircraft landed with its gear up at
Pensacola Naval Air Station.
The Navy said the T-6 aircraft
landed safely Friday afternoon.
The two airmen are members of
an Air Force training squadron
stationed at the Navy base.

Tampa-area crack
dealer gets life term
TAMPA A convicted
Tampa-area drug dealer has
been sentenced to life in federal
prison.
The U.S. Attorney's Office
said 48-year-old Ronald "Shine"
Jiles of Zephyrhills was sen-
tenced to life for possessing
crack cocaine with intent to sell.
He pleaded guilty Sept. 1 and
was sentenced Friday.
Prosecutors said Jiles' exten-
sive criminal history warranted
the life sentence. He had eight
prior felony drug convictions.
* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


'Deathly Hallows' charms fans with $61M


LOS ANGELES


Harry Potter is on the
way to his biggest
magic act yet.
"Harry Potter and
the Deathly Hallows:
Part 1" conjured up $61.2 million
domestically in its first day, position-
ing it for the best opening weekend
ever for the series about the young
wizard.
Friday's haul puts "Deathly
Hallows" on track to shoot past the
franchise's previous high; a $102.7
million opening weekend for "Harry
Potter and the Goblet of Fire" in
2005.
"Deathly Hallows" lands at No. 5
on the box-office charts for biggest
opening day, behind "The Twilight
Saga: New Moon" at $72.7 million,
"The Twilight Saga: Eclipse" at $68.5
million, "The Dark Knight" at $67.2
million and "Transformers: Revenge
of the Fallen" at $62 million.
It set a record for its own fran-
chise, coming in ahead of the $58.2
million opening day of last year's
"Harry Potter and the Half-Blood
Price."
The franchise has taken in $5.5 bil-
lion worldwide in theatrical revenue
since the first film debuted in 2001.
The latest film is based on the
first part ofJ.K. Rowling's seventh
and final "Harry Potter" novel. The
finale, "Deathly Hallows: Part 2," is
due out in July.

Daniel Day-Lewis
prepares for 'Lincoln'
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. Academy
Award-winning actor Daniel Day-
Lewis is preparing for his role as
Abraham Lincoln by visiting the
state where the former president
began his political career.
DreamsWorks Studios says
Day-Lewis will star in the Steven
Spielberg-directed film "Lincoln."
The movie is based on the book
'Team of Rivals" by Doris Kearns
Goodwin, who joined Day-Lewis on
his totir in Illinois.
The State Journal-Register reports
the actor toured several historic


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actor Rupert Grint (center) greets the audience at a movie theater, along with ,
Evanna Lynch (left) and Bonnie Wright, to promote their new film 'Harry Potter and
the Deathly Hallows: Part 1,' in Tokyo, Saturday.


sites Friday in Springfield, including
the Abraham Lincoln Presidential
Museum, the Lincoln Home and the
Old State Capitol, where Lincoln
served as a legislator.
Filming is expected to begin next
fall, and the movie is to be released
in late 2012.

'American Idol' time slot
change adds to upheaval
LOS ANGELES More change is
afoot for "American Idol," which will
air on a different night for its upcom-
ing .10th season.
The Fox TV network said its hit
singing contest will move from its
longtime Tuesday and Wednesday
night broadcasts to Wednesday and
Thursday when it returns. Its season
debut is Jan. 19.
The switch means more big
change .for "American Idol," which
is bringing in new judges Steven
Tyler and Jennifer Lopez after the
departures of Simon Cowell, Ellen


DeGeneres and Kara DioGuardi.
Randy Jackson will'be back on the
panel.
Fox's decision to move the
series, announced Friday, comes as
"American Idol" must fight to keep
its No. 1 spot. The show's ratings
have been declining, with this year's
finale between winner Lee DeWyze
and runner-up Crystal Bowersox
drawing about 24 million viewers,
down 5 million from 2009.

Rapper DMX back in
Arizona jail after arrest
PHOENIX Rapper DMX was
arrested in Phoenix for investiga-
tion of violating probation by using
drugs, authorities said.
Court documents released Friday
allege the 39-year-old performer
used cocaine and OxyContin, failed
to submit to drug testing, and drove
on a suspended license.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Baseball Hall of Famer
Stan Musial is 90.
* Actor Joseph Campanella
is 83.
* Country singer Jean
Shepard is 77,
* Actor Laurence Luckinbill
is 76.
* Actress Marlo Thomas is
73.


Daily Scripture


* Actor Rick Lenz is 71.
Singer Dr. John is 70.
* Actress Juliet Mills is 69.
* Basketball Hall of Famer
Earl Monroe is 66.
* Actress Goldie Hawn is 65.
* Movie director Andrew
Davis is 64.
* Singer Livingston Taylor
is 60.


"Come, let us sing for joy to
the LORD; let us shout aloud
to the Rock of our salvation.
Let us come before him with
thanksgiving and extol him with
music and song."
Psalm 95:1-2


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lake City Reporter
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













Obama tackles uproar over airport screenings


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama waves as he arrives at the White
House in Washington from two-day summit of NATO leaders
in Portugal, Saturday.


By JULIE PACE
Associated Press

LISBON, Portugal -
President Barack Obama
has asked security offi-
cials whether there's
a less intrusive way to
screen U.S. airline passen-
gers than the pat-downs
and body scans causing a
holiday-season uproar.
For now, they've told
him there isn't one, the
president said Saturday
in response to a question
at the NATO summit in
Lisbon.
"I understand people's
frustrations," Obama said,
while acknowledging that
he's never had to undergo
the stepped-up screening
methods.
Passengers at some
U.S. airports must pass
through full-body scanners


that produce a virtually
naked image. If travelers
refuse, they can be forced
to undergo time-consum-
ing fingertip examina-
tions, including of clothed
genital areas and breasts,
by inspectors of the same
sex as the passenger.
Obama said he's told
the U.S. Transportation
Security Administration:
"You have to constantly
refine and measure wheth-
er what we're doing is the
only way to assure the
American people's safety.
And you also have to think
through, are there ways
of doink it that are less
intrusive."
At this point, that agen-
cy and. counterterrorism
experts have told him that
the current procedures
are the only ones that
they think can effectively


guard against threats such
as last year's attempted
Christmas-day bombing. A
Nigerian man is accused
of trying to set off a bomb
hidden in his underwear
aboard a flight from
Amsterdam with nearly
300 people aboard.
Obama said that in
weekly meetings with his
counterterrorism team,
"I'm constantly asking
them whether is what
we're doing absolutely nec-
essary, have we thought it
through, are there other
ways of accomplishing it
that meet the same objec-
tives."
For now it sounds like
there aren't, and travel-
ers will face potential pat-
downs and scans.
"One of the most frus-
trating aspects of this fight
against terrorism is that it


has created a whole secu-
rity apparatus around us
that causes huge incon-
venience for all of us,"
Obama said.
The new scans show
naked images of the pas-
senger's body, without the
face, to a screener who
is in a different location
and does not know the
identity of the traveler.
The U.S. has nearly 400
of the advanced imaging
machifies deployed at 70
airports; expanding to
1,000 machines next year.
So not all airports have
them and not all travelers
are selected for scans.
The hands-on searches
are used for passengers
who don't want those scans
or when something suspi-
cious shows in screening,
or on rare occasions, ran-
domly.


Maj. Kitchings graduates

from executive seminar


From staff reports

Columbia County
Sheriff's Office Maj.
Wallace Kitchings (the
department's chief deputy)
recently graduated from the
Chief Executive Seminar
at the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement in
Tallahassee.
The graduates represent
criminal justice agencies
around the state who serve
in a leadership role with-
in their law enforcement
agencies.
The seminar classes were
held for one week each
month, for three months at
the FDLE Headquarters in
Tallahassee.
Graduates took classes
on topics such as demogra-
phy, budgeting, legacy lead-
ership, ethics and imple-
menting strategic change.
The goal of the Chief


Executive Seminar pro-
gram is to prepare Florida's
Criminal Justice leadership
for the challenging and
changing demands of the
future.
Class participants study
trends and events that may
affect criminal justice pro-
fessionals and the state and
develop new leadership
skills to address and man-
age the changes that lie
ahead.
Kitchings, 45, has been a
road patrol deputy, K-9 han-
dler, narcotics officer and
SWAT team member and
SWAT commander.
He has spent time as
a road patrol sergeant,
road patrol lieutenant and
commander of the Patrol
Division, as a Captain.
Kitchings has been
with the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office for 25
years.


SUSPECTS: Two at large


Continued From Page 1A

Department investigator
David Greear was called to
investigate the scene.
'The investigation has
revealed that Dix was act-
ing as a lookout for two
other unknown suspects
who intended to rob
Dangerfield," Blanchard
said.
LCPD reports indicate
that during the attempted
robbery, shots were fired
at Dangerfield, who began
to fight with Dix for the
pistol when a shot went
off, injuring Dangerfield's
right hand.
"The two unknown
remaining suspects ran


off and have not been
located," Blanchard said.
"We searched for hours.
Officers searched several
of the building complexes
out there and they were
going door-to-door. We are
trying to follow-up on infor-
mation and the investiga-
tors are still working on the
case. At this time; the only
verified description of the
two outstanding suspects is
that they are black men."
Anyone with additional
information about the inci-
dent can call the Lake City
Police Department's anon-
ymous tip line at (386)
719-2068.


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Marilyn Misulia (left) of Destin, event re-enactor, crochets while Heather Ray of Dacula, Ga. reads aloud as they wait for
the re-enactment of an afternoon battle at the second annual Raid on the Suwannee Civil War re-enactment at the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music Park Saturday.


RAID: Re-enactors say event offers new perspective


Continued From Page Vi
said, "and that's what it's
about. It's not about the
North and South, it's about
keeping the country's his-
tory alive."
Marilyn Misulia of
Destin and Heather Ray
of Dacula, Ga., re-enactors
and friends whose hus-
bands also were re-enact-
ing in the battle, said it
is their first time partici-


Misulia said she enjoys
re-enacting because it is
quiet and relaxing.
"You get a sense of his-
tory," she said.
Lt. Cameron Kempsell
of New Port Richey, adju-
tant for the fourth brigade
of the Union Army, 'said he
re-enacts because he loves
history.
"It's an opportunity to


pating in this particular portray an important time
event, in our lives," he said.


Barbara Caruso of
Jacksonville and B.J. Smith
of Blackshear, Ga., retired
teachers and friends who
attended the Raid, said the
event is "living history."
"It's a better perspec-
tive to see it re-enacted,"
Caruso said.
Chuck Stokes of
Jacksonville said he
attended because of a per-
sonal interest in the time
period's history and enjoys


seeing the period clothing,
camps and weapons.
"It's like stepping into
the. past," said Stokes'
wife, Joyce.
Admission to the Raid is
$6. Admission for children
age 6 and under are free.
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park is located at
3076 95th Drive in Live
Oak.
Call (386) 364-1683 or
visit musicliveshere.com.


BREAKFAST: Other complaints include speeding in certain areas of Lake City
Continued From Page 1A


department are striving to
provide a safe and happy
community and need the
help of the residents to
alert them to problems.
"Community policing
is a partnership with the


0


community," she said. "It's
all about working togeth-
er. I can't emphasize that
enough."
The chief gave a
PowerPoint presentation
that listed all concerns


Sw laWkectyrepOTer.com

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(;I ING D)E.\DLINES
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Our Advertising deadlines will be
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h : Display. Friday November 26 will deadline Monday, Novembr] 22
Saljiday November 27 il deadline tuesday. November 23
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fuesdav. November 30 will deadline Wednesday. November 24
We will be back in the office on Friday,
November 26th for our customer's convenience.
Thank You and Have a Great Thanksgiving


expressed at the first
"Breakfast with the Chief'
forum.
The presentation
offered specific, detailed
actions the department
has utilized to address


those concerns.
Residents thanked the
chief and the department
for its proactive approach.
Many said they are notic-
ing an increased presence
of LCPD officers in their


neighborhoods.
"Everything else since
the last meeting is calming


down pretty good," said resi-
dent Dolores Williams, "and
we appreciate that"


OB,/YN

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WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


Y.;


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Call today for a
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Jiuiank Yiu


3rom the family of
tkdam Shaun Ckapier / //
Ob all who called, spoke a kind word, came
to the service, said a prayer, stopped by,
prepared food, sent JTowers or shared in any
way the [ove for our Adam, we [ove and
appreciate each one of you. ct was good to
see and speak with you and to know that
God blessed Adam with so many loved ones,
family and friends. -CWe wi[[ remember your
kindness and pray that our 9ord and Savior
\ Jesus Christ remain in your
.'- L'-. hearts forever.
Q:- -], : 9Say God bless each of you,
SJ -he (Napier & he
(-oy T ami[y
L^


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


/


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION













OPINION


Sunday, November 21, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
SOP


THEIR
INION


Freedom

'ghosted'

by fanatics

In 1989, Salman Rushdie's
novel "Satanic Verses"
won him a fatwa a sen-
tence of death from
Iran's Islamic dictator, the
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini,
that sent him into hiding and
sent much of the civilized world
into righteous high dudgeon. Mr.
Rushdie, who probably still looks
over his shoulder a lot, is now a
certified world-historical literary
celebrity.
Fast forward two decades and
consider the plight of the politi-
cal cartoonist formerly known as
Molly Norris.
Ms. Norris, employed by
the Seattle Weekly, sketched a
mock poster, "Everybody Draw
Mohammed Day," sponsored
tongue-in-cheek by the ficti-
tious "Citizens Against Citizens
Against Humor." A fatwa was
issued by Anwar al-Awlaki a
Yemeni-American cleric living in
Yemen and known for his links to
at least two Americans involved
in terrorist episodes. The FBI
urged Ms. Norris to change her
name and go into hiding.
She has now "gone ghost"
Recall that in 2005 parts of
the Muslim world rioted when
a Danish newspaper published
cartoons that featured images
of Mohammed; last January, a
Muslim fanatic tried to murder
one of the cartoonists.
More recently still, the world
exploded in outrage when an
American evangelical pastor
threatened (stupidly, we think) to
burn the Quran even as some
Arab governments burn Bibles
as a matter of official policy.
Now an American cartoon-
ist fears for her life because
she exercised her freedom of
expression. What's almost as
appalling as the fatwa itself has
been the relative silence from
American political leaders and
opinion makers. Americans
need to hear more outrage, too,
from leaders of the American
Muslim community.
President Obama and other
leaders should frequently
emphasize that the First
Amendment still applies in
America. It's our country! In
any event, the Obama admin-
istration has ordered Anwar
al-Awlaki assassinated for his
terrorist activities, if he can't be
captured.
E The Providence Journal

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Arthur K. Black and Lake Desoto


When Lake City's
Arthur Keith
Black (1904-
1999) died, he
left an outstand-
ing record of public service:
City Attorney, State Attorney,
and the first Florida elected
public official to resign to volun-
teer for World War II service.
He was also the editor of the
first CHS yearbook, the found-
ing president of the local bar
association, and a driving force
in getting Special Olympics
athletes admitted to the Florida
Sports Hall of Fame.
He also knew a lot more local
history than most people.
So, about one year before his
death, I asked him to tell me
some of his memories of Lake
Desoto. Here is what he said.
Members of the Elks Club
shot clay pigeons (skeet) on the
west side of the lake.
Some Afro-American
churches baptized their mem-
bers on the north side.
Three nice, boats were kept
at the lake and each boat had its
own boathouse.
He personally saw the above
things first hand and added
some things he had heard about
the lake:
There once was an all-girls
academy and a sawmill on the
south side of the lake.
There was a lake (possi-
bly Watertown Lake) just east
of Lake Desoto where ducks
would gather and local hunters
shot hundreds of ducks every
season as the ducks flew back
and forth between the two
lakes.
Indians would camp on the
north side of the lake en route
back to Georgia swamps. While
there, they sold belts and fancy
belt buckles.
The FPL pumped water
from Lake Desoto to their


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williamsh2@firn.edu
372 W-Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
generator plant to cool their
machines, then returned the
water to the lake.
Two local citizens got into a
fight in the courthouse one day.
One ran outside and jumped
into the lake and started swim-
ming to the other side. The
other man chased him, pistol in
hand, and started shooting at
the swimmer. He didn't hit the
swimmer but he shot the man's
hat off and it floated alongside
him as he swam.
A.K Black provided a lot of
public service to our community
and also preserved a lot of our
local history in his 95 years on
this earth.

Skipping around
Julia Geohagen Osborn
(CHS 1950) announces that the
next combined reunion of the
CHS 1949-53 classes will be
held at 11:30 on Friday, Dec. 10,
at the Mason City Community
Center. This is an 'open' reunion
and anyone from any class is
invited to attend. Bring a cov-
ered dish. For more information
call Julia at 386-752-7544.
Congratulations to John
and Kathleen Burns who
recently celebrated their 70th
wedding anniversary. John was
Lake City's "Mr. State Farm
Insurance" for many years and
his father, J.W. Burns, Sr., was
our longest serving school


superintendent (22 years).
Happy Birthday to J.
Quinton Rumph (FWHS 1941),
generous benefactor to our
school system, to the Advent
Christian Village, and to many
other deserving institutions and
individuals. His birthday was
Nov. 8.
Our School Museum has
two game films from the 1983
football season: Ed White and
Buchholz. If you want them, call
me at 386-755-8183.
Celeste Belvin Bradley was
the first contracted and paid
female football coach in our
county's school history. She
coached at Richardson Middle
School in 2000-2001.
Many thanks to CHS grad-
uate (CHS 2010) Jordan Stiles
for her valuable work in our
School Museum over the past
few months, and best wishes in
your new job.

Wise words
The CCA Lake City
Corrections Facility, just east
of town, prominently displays
this wise and compassionate
message from Supreme Court
Justice Thurgood Marshall:
"When the prison gates slam
behind an inmate, he does not
lose his human quality; his
mind does not become closed
to ideas; his yearning for self-
respect does not end, nor is his
quest for self-realization con-
cluded."

Letter to lawyer
"Dear Lawyer; Unless I get
my husband's alimony money
real soon, I will be forced to
lead an immortal life."

E Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


The United States has
about 700,000 con-
victed sex offenders,
a figure that is rising
rapidly. A'story we
did last year found the number of
the most dangerous sex offenders
on the South Shore had soared by
37 percent in three years
Although they are supposed to
register with local authorities, at
any given time about 100,000 are
unaccounted for.
New ways of tracking them
are always being proposed but
not all fly. Law enforcement in
Massachusetts was struck a blow
in September when the state's
high court ruled sex offenders
who are on probation cannot be
forced to live under new restric-
tions such as GPS monitoring
unless they violate the original
conditions of their probation.
Sometimes when sex offenders
fall off the radar it's just a mix up
in paperwork and the offender
is quickly located. But often it's


for more sinister reasons the
offender is lying about his where-
abouts or the offender has gone
off the grid altogether. Others
game the system by seeking
out jurisdictions known for lax
oversightor taking advantage of
differing time limits to register by
moving between states. Others
exploit gaps in communication
among the 18,000 law enforce-
ment agencies in the U.S.
These unaccounted for offend-
ers are worrisome. Almost 1 out
of 8 fugitive offenders have mul-
tiple arrest warrants; some have
dozens. Two who were recently
apprehended had 35 warrants
each.
State and local laws require
convicted sexual predators to reg-
ister with local law enforcement
officials, and since the 2006 Adam
Walsh Act the U.S. Marshals
Service has been tasked with
helping them verify addresses
and hunt down absconders.
Recently released records from


the Marshals' Justice Detainee
Information System found encour-
aging evidence of a faster, tighter,
more efficient system of tracking
offenders.
And it is paying off In 2007,
marshals arrested 2,221 offend-
ers on registration violations; this
year they are on track for 4,500.
By the end of this year, the
Marshals Service will have 100
full-time agents hunting AWOL
sex offenders. They now have
real-time access to sex offender
records in the FBI's National
Crime Information Center.
The tracking is more
than a paper exercise. Tom
Henman, the U.S. marshal in
charge of the Child Predator
Apprehension Team in Arizona,
said, "They could be up to no
good, stalking another child.
You never know."
For the child's sake, we need
to know.
* The Patriot Ledger


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org


Symptom

of bigger

problem


Rangel, convicted
of eleven eth-
ics violations
the most ever
found against any member of
Congress was resoundingly
re-elected, getting 80 percent of
his district's vote.
After 40 years representing
these folks, you can't conclude
he was an unknown commod-
ity. Granted, the conviction
occurred after the election, but
the charges were well publi-
cized.
Has Charlie Rangel's leader-
ship produced life so grand in
Harlem that flagrant and persis-
tent unethical behavior by their
Congressman means nothing
to its residents?
The national poverty rate is
around 14 percent. In the 15th
district of New York, Charlie
Rangel's district, it's 24.3 per-
cent The child poverty rate is
30.9 percent.
Whatever it is that Harlem
voters find so attractive about
Rangel, it's hard to conclude
that quality of life is something
they feel they owe to him.
But let's think about this in a
broader context
Charlie Rangel is a founding
member of the Congressional
Black Caucus.
There are now 41 House
members who belong to the
Caucus. In the most recent
elections, 37 of them ran as
incumbents 'and all regained
their seats handily. The four
seats that were vacated were
easily captured by new black
Democrats.
That's a 100 percent return
rate. These Black Caucus
Democrats recaptured their
seats getting an average 75 per-
cent of their district's vote.
. In a year when 62 Democrats
were defeated a 25-percent
reduction in the bloc of 252
Democrats in the current
Congress the reduction of
the bloc of 41 black Democrats
was zero.
The average poverty rate in
the districts of Congressional
Black Caucus members is 20.3
percent six points higher
than the national average. The
average child poverty rate in
these districts is 28.8 percent
So, as in Charlie Rangel's
case, it's hard to conclude
that these Black Caucus
Democrats are being sent back
to Washington by large vot-
ing margins, year after year,
because they are delivering
such fine lives to their constitu-
ents.
A problem here is that elec-
tions in Black Caucus districts
are not exactly what might be
described as free and open.
About three quarters of
these districts are Majority
Minority districts, hard wired
to guarantee election of blacks.
The remaining districts are
also gerrymandered through
various schemes flowing from
collusion of political'parties and
state legislatures.
Political markets are like
commercial markets. The
absence of competition results
in shoddy products.
When we send American sol-
diers into harm's way abroad to
fight for free elections, perhaps
we should spend more time
considering the quality of our
own democracy at home.

* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Tracking sex predators has promise









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Congress rookies vie for Capitol office space


By LAURIE KELLMAN
Associated Press

Rep.-electf
Bob Gibbs was
trying to get this
straight. There's
a public women's bathroom in
the middle of a congressman's
office suite? And in the build-
ing next door, not one but two
House aides have made their
workspace in an unused elevator
shaft?
A glittering week being wined,
dined and oriented by the most
powerful people in Washington
gave way Friday to the exercise
in humility that is the freshman
office lottery. The most senior
lawmakers get the best real
estate on Capitol Hill. The fresh-
men get what's left- the worst
office space in Congress.
At the outset, most professed
not to care what their new work
spaces looked like, or how far
they were from the floor of the
House.
But an hour into wandering
the dark hallways of the Cannon
and Longworth office buildings,
Gibbs, an Ohio state senator,
had acquired some standards.
What about 128 Cannon, the
one that bookends the ladies'
room?
"That's out," Gibbs declared.
He could afford to be a little
choosy. Earlier Friday, Gibbs
drew No. 10 in the lottery, which
means he would) be the 10th
incoming lawmaker of 85 to pick
his office. The lawmaker who


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep.-elect Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio) looks over his new office in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill in
Washington, Friday, as incoming House of Representatives members picked their office space.


.could be the most discriminating
was Rep.-elect Corey Gardner,
R-Colo., who earlier in the
day drew the first place in the
office-picking line. Surrounded
by cameras and well-wishers at
the 1 p.m. selection meeting,
Gardner rose and picked 213
Cannon, a 997 square-foot space
that's due for new drapes.
And the guy who got the
office nobody wanted? That
would be Rep.-elect Robert
Hurt, R-Va., No. 85 of 85. His


home base henceforth will be
Longworth 1516, an 842 square-
foot space wedged next to a
stairwell and a bathroom on
the furthest side of the building
from the Capitol.
Contested races and offices
for the five newly elected law-
makers who had served in
Congress previously were not
included in the lottery.
Hurt shouldn't worry too
much, said one veteran.
"They spend very little time


actually in the office," said Rep.
Gary Peters, D-Mich., who
two years ago traded an 1,800
square-foot office as the director
of his state's lottery for an office
the same size as Hurt's. Peters'
office, though, was a three-min-
ute walk from the House floor,
considerably shorter than Hurt's
commute. And Peters is moving
upstairs next year to more spa-
cious digs.
Whatever the criteria, fresh-
men and their aides huddled


over office building maps, lists
and notes. Many crossed paths
as they toured the available spac-
es, most still inhabited by their
current occupants.
At the entrance to some, the
wide and enthusiastic grins the
freshmen had sported all week
faltered.
There were boxes, little light
and a guarded sadness among
the staffers in the Longworth
office of Rep. Kendrick Meek,
the Florida Democrat who ran
for Senate and lost to Republican
tea party darling Marco Rubio.
Elsewhere in the building,
Gibbs shuddered a bit at a sign
that read, "The Shaft," posted on
the entrance to, well, an unused
elevator shaft that serves as
office space for two aides to the
Republican Study Committee.
Gibbs said he had seen a chief
of staff's office that was even
smaller.
Gibbs said his office back in
the Ohio Senate was bigger, and
had a window-for each staffer.
Most of the suites available to
freshmen were standard three-
room affairs of roughly 800 to
1,047 square feet: reception, the
lawmaker's office and a separate
space for about a half-dozen staff
members. In some, the reception
room was bifurcated by a tempo-
rary wall erected to give senior
aides their own space.
"Can I move that?" Gibbs
asked, pointing to one such wall.
You can do anything you want,
replied a staffer who declined to
be named. You're a member of
Congress, the aide pointed out.


Air Force says it sent bid info to competitors


By H. JOSEF HEBERT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
long-standing competition
worth tens of billions of
dollars to build a new Air
Force refueling tanker
has become entangled in
a glitch after the Air Force
mistakenly provided the
rival companies sensitive
information that contained
each other's confidential
bid.
The Seattle-based Boeing
Co., and the European
Aeronautic Defence and
Space Company (EADS),
parent of Airbus, are in an
intense competition for a
$35 billion contract to. build
179 new Air Force tankers
based either on the Boeing
767 jetliner or the Airbus
A330.
The Air Force late Friday
confirmed that because of a


Bernanke

hits back

at critics

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON
Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
has sought to defuse criti-
cism of the Fed's $600 bil-
lion bond-purchase plan
by arguing that it's need-
ed to boost the economy
and reduce unemploy-
ment. But he warned that
the Fed's program can't
succeed on its own.
SIn his first speech since
the Fed announced the
program Nov. 3, Bernanke
on Friday made his most
forceful case to date that
Congress also must pro-
vide more stimulus aid.
The Fed chief also
issued a stern warning to
China, saying that it and
other emerging nations
are puffing the global
economy at risk by keep-
ing their currencies artifi-
cially low.
He made the remarks
during his speech to a
banking conference in
Frankfurt, Germany.
Without more stimulus,
high unemployment could
persist for years, he said.
But in making that
argument, Bernanke risks
heightening complaints
that he's plunging the Fed
into partisan politics.


clerical error the Air Force
accidentally provided
Boeing with detailed pro-
prietary information about
the EADS bid and corre-
sponding information to
EADS North America con-,
cerning the Boeing bid.
"Itwas a clerical error and
involved a limited amount
of source selection informa-
tion," Air Force spokesman
Col. Les Kodlick in a tele-
phone interview with The
Associated Press. Kodlick
declined to be more spe-
cific about what data had
been transmitted.
Source selection infor-
mation is data critical to
the Air Force's making a
-decision on which bid to
select and could include
technical data about the
competing aircraft as well
as financial information.
The Seattle Times, which
first reported Friday on


the Air Force mixup, said
the data included crucial
pricing information on the
competing bids.
Kodlick said the incident
"will not delay" the award-
ing of the' contract which
had been expected before
year's end, but recently
had been postponed until
early next year. Kodlick
said the postponement was
not related to the disclo-
sure of proprietary data.
It was not clear what use
- if any the two compa-
nies made of the informa-
tion they received, report-
edly on a computer disk.
"As soon as it hap-
pened and they received
(the information) they
recognized the errors and
contacted the Air Force
contracting officers," said
Kodlick. He said the Air
Force has taken steps "to
make sure both companies


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have access to the same
information."
But if the information
included price data, it could
have an impact on each
companies' final bid propos-
al. Pricing has been a key
issue in the competition.
Last summer, Boeing CEO
Jim McNerney expressed


concern in a meeting with
securities analysts that his
company might be under-
bid by its European com-
petitor.
The Air Force is review!
ing how the disclosures
occurred and was "taking
steps that it doesn't happen
again," said Kodlick.


Sen. Maria Cantwell
.(D-Wash.), who was briefed
Friday on the incident,
called the mixup "an inex-
cusable mishandling by the
Air Force of very sensitive,
proprietary data" and was
concerned that it might
delay the contract decision,
according to the Times.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Community involvement
Summers Elementary
After School is seeking
artifacts, cuisine, dances,
music, customs, pictures
and more from countries
and cultures around the
world from people in the
community. Anyone willing
to share please call 755-
8243.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069. "

Matching Funds Drive
The Christian Service
Center is having its Que
Matching Funds Drive u
from now until Dec. 31. All
donationswill be doubled Humar
by local sponsors. Mark Medica
your check "Matching baked
Funds" and mail to baked
Christian Service Center, cranb(
PO. Box 2285 Lake City, potato
FL 32056. Call 755-1770. green
or tea,
carrot
Monday charge
752-06
Academic Recognition
Ceremony Satu
Presley's Excel and
Scholars Program is Holida
hosting it's academic The
recognition ceremony Christi
for Columbia County at 5 p.r
school students at 7 Park. t
p.m. Monday at New holiday
Day Springs Missionary Gatewe
Baptist Church. The Harry
speaker for the event tor. Th
is Superintendent Park is
Mike Millikin, and the by the
theme is "Knowledge Is Claus.
Contagious." The church are fro.
is located at 1321 West
Long St Students are
encouraged to bring a Sun(
book to the program to Food f
exchange or giveaway.
The
Thursday Fines
28-Dec
Lad Soup Kitchen Count
Each c
Lad Soup Kitchen is expire(
hosting its 15th Annual item br
Community Thanksgiving will rei
Feast from 10 a.m. 2 items
p.m. on Thanksgiving Day, and W
Thursday. The kitchen deliver
is located at 127 NE Servic
Escambia St. City fo
Items i
Thanksgiving dinner White
be dist
The entire commu- White
nity is invited to the 10
Annual Thanksgiving
Day Dinner 11:30 a.m. Wed1
- 1:30 p.m. Thursday in
the Fellowship Hall of the Public
First Presbyterian Church. Elde
The church is located at a public
697 SW Baya Drive. The Dec. 1
menu will include fresh


Bst for the perfect omelet leads to battle at Medical Center

i Resources Director Steve Gordon prepares an omelet for Coding Specialist Kimberly Young during the Lake City
al Center Omelet Battle on Thursday.


turkey with gravy,
jerry sauce, mashed
es, sweet potatoes,
beans, rolls, coffee
pumpkin pie or
cake. There is no
e for the dinner. Call
70.

irday, Nov. 27
ay happenings
kickoff to the
mas season begins
m. Nov. 27 in Olustee
Activities begin with
y music featuring The
ay City Big Band and
Wuest as conduc-
e lighting of Olustee
s at 6:30 p.m. followed
arrival of Santa
Photos with Santa
m 7-9 p.m.

day, Nov. 28
for Fines
annual Food for
program is Nov.
:. 4 at the Columbia
y Public Library.
ne sealed, non-
d, non-perishable
brought to the library
duce a fine by $1. All
collected at the Main
est Branch will be
red to the Christian
e Center in Lake
r local distribution.
collected at the Fort
Branch Library will
ributed at the Fort
food shelf.


Bureau Building. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 5700
SW 34th Street, Suite 222,
Gainesville. Contact Cindy
Roberts at 352-378-6649.

Thursday, Dec. 2
Christmas Concert
Richardson Middle
School Wolf Pride Band
is having its annual
Christmas Concert
6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 in the
Columbia High School
auditorium. The RMS
Jazz Band, Symphonic
Band, Beginners Band and
Drumline will play songs
of the season under the
direction of Sherrod Keen.


Main Boulevard. Each
donor will receive a free
small one-topping pizza or
small sub. Call 386-438-
3415.

Tuesday, Dec. 7
Volunteer literacy tutor
A volunteer literacy
tutor training workshop
is 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Dee. 7 at 308 NW
Columbia Avenue. The
workshop will emphasize
reading strategies, the
writing process, infor-
mal assessments, lesson
planning, and phonics
using the Laubach Way to
Reading method of train-
ing. Call the library's lit-
eracy coordinator, Glennis
Pounds, at 386-758-2111 or
e-mail columbialiteracy@
neflin.org.


Saturday, Dec. 4 Wednesday, Dec. 8
Dream Machine Ride Public meeting


The 9th Annual
Christmas Dream
Machine Toy Ride is Dec.
4. Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. and the toy
ride pulls out at 12 p.m.
from the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. There will be
raffles and live bands, and
all proceeds will go to ben-
efit the Christmas Dream
Machine. Contact Cookie
at 386-362-6529 or Polly at
386-758-9811.


Sunday, Dec. 5
nesday, Dec. 1 drive
Blood drive


c meeting
er Options is having
c meeting 10 a.m.
in the Florida Farm


Hungry Howie's Blood
Drive is scheduled from
noon-6 p.m. Dec. 5 at
Hungry Howie's, 857 SW


Elder Options is hav-
ing a public meeting 10
a.m. Dec. 8 in the Hilton
University of Florida
Conference Center. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending.
The building is located
at 1714 SW 34th street,
Gainesville. Contact Cindy
Roberts at 352-378-6649.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 10 a.m. Dec. 8 at
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law


Center for Estate and
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expands
the opportunities available
with Medicaid Planning.
Seats must be reserved by
calling Shana Miller at 386-
755-1977.


Friday, Dec. 10
Class Reunion
Columbia High School
Classes of '49, '50, '51, '52,
and '53 are having a class
reunion 11:30 a.m. Dec. 10
at Mason City Community
Center. Anyone who
attended Columbia High
is invited. Contact Julia
Osburn at 386-752-7544 or
Morris Williams at 386-
752-4710.

Saturday, Dec. 11
Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts "The Life
of a Christian Teenager"
at 6:15 p.m. Dec. 11. The
theater is located at 348 N.
Marion Avenue. Call 386-
344-0319.

Holiday happenings
Snow Day, sponsored by
Hopeful Baptist Church,
is 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Dec.
11 in the parking lot next
to Gulf Coast Financial.
The event will feature 30
tons of snow delivered
along with two bounce
houses, a 26-foot dual lane
slide, a rock climb wall,
an obstacle course and a
bungee challenge. The
Festival of Lights will take
place around Olustee Park
throughout the day and
will feature arts and crafts,
food vendors.


WOODSTOVES FIREPLACES SPARK SCREENS
THE WOOD STOVE
I~ AND FIREPLACE CENTER
ph 377-9535
11 N. Main St. M-F 9:30-5:30
Gainesville Sat. 9:30-4:00


OBITUARIES


Dayton Travis
Mr. Dayton Travis, 91, resident
of Ft. White passed away Thurs-
day November 18, 2010 at the
Veterans Administration Hospi-
tal in Lake City, FL after an ex-
tended illness. He was a native of
Atkins, Arkansas, son of the late
Ralphie and
Cindy Fridell
Travis. He A
served in the
U.S. Navy for
15 years dur-
ing WWII as i
a Chief Petty
Officer on an
aircraft carrier in
North Africa. He
owned and oper- ,
ated a dryclean-
ersinJacksoville, '
FL until retiring in Ft White, FL
in 1983. He was a member of
the Cherry Hill Masonic Lodge
F&AM, of Ft. White, FL; and
the Morroco Shrine in Branford,
FL. He is survived by his wife
--of sixty-nine years Cleve Tra-
*'vis, Ft. White, FL; three sons,
Boyd Travis (Patricia); Ronald
Travis (Chris); and Dennis Tra-
vis (Sue); a granddaughter, Dana
Sewell; grandson Dale Travis.
One great-granddaughter, Jor-


dan Grooms, also survives. Fu-
neral services will be conducted
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
at Elim Baptist Church with
The Reverend Charles Knight
officiating and The Reverend
Andy Thomas assisting. Visita-
tion with the family will beheld
Monday, November 22, 2010
from 5-7 p.m. at the funeral
home. Interment will follow in
Elim Baptist Church Cemetery,
GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
FL (386-752-1954). Please
sign the guest book at www.
gatewayforestlawn. corn

John S. Taylor

Mr. John S. Taylor, 76 of Lake
City passed away on Friday,
November 19, 2010 at his home
following an extended illness.
Mr. Taylor is survived by his
wife, Evelyn Taylor and his
daughter, Sandra Taylor both
of Lake City, one son, Mitchell
Taylor (Patricia), O'Brien, three
brothers, Edward Taylor (Mary),
Lake City, Robert Taylor (Sue),
Taylorville and Frank Taylor,
Lake City and three sisters, Bob-


bie Jean Tomlinson, Taylorville,
Margaret Waters, Lake City and
Ruth Lang (Harry), Lake City.
Graveside funeral services for
Mr. Taylor will be conducted on
Monday, November 22, 2010 at
11:00 AM at Fellowship Baptist
Cemetery in Suwannee County
with Dwight Law officiating.
Interment will follow. Visitation
with the family will be Sunday
afternoon from 4-6:00 PM at the
funeral home. Arrangements are
under the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 SW
Main Blvd.,Lake City. 752-2414.

Thomas Kendrick McKee

Mr. Thomas Kendrick McKee,
Jr., 77 of Lake City passed away
on Thursday, November 18,
2010 at the Heron Point Nurs-
ing Center in Brooksville. A life
long resident of Lake City, Mr.
McKee was the only child.to the
late Thomas Kendrick and Ger-
aldine Herring McKee, Sr. He
was a graduate of Columbia High
School class of 1951 and was a
veteran of the United States Air
Force during the 'Korean War.
He graduated from the Universi-


ty of Florida with a law degree in
1963 and worked in his private
practice in Lake City for many
years and was a professor at the
Lake City Community College.
Mr. McKee was a member of the
Lake City Masonic Lodge #27.
Mr. McKee is survived by two
sons, Thomas Kendrick Me-
Kee, III, Denver, CO and Adam
McKee, Tallahassee, two daugh-
ters, Carrell Rains, St. Augus-
tine and Samantha Neel, Talla-
hassee and four grandchildren,
Meghan McKee, St. Augustine,
Jacob McKee, Tallahassee,
Harland Rains, St. Augustine
and Ethan Neel, Tallahassee.
Memorial services for Mr.
McKee will be conducted on
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
at 5:00 PM in the Chapel of
Guerry Funeral Home with Rev.
Kenneth Edenfield officiating.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of GUERRY FUNER-
AL HOME, 2659 SW Main
Blvd., Lake City. 752-2414


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.

Your Family


Honoring

Those We Love!


CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!

755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm



^vVdV 7V


NOTICE
This notification is addressed to any
former patients of the deceased Dr.
Owen B.K. Osborne of Ramadan Hand
Institute. If you were a patient being
treated at the Lake City, Gainesville,
Palatka or Lake Butler location and
you need a copy of your medical re-
cord, you may contact the office staff
at 386-496-2461 Monday thru Friday,
8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m. for assistance.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424





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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


'S. *" ~


ANN


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama and Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai .(left) take part in a bilateral
meeting during the NATO Summit in Lisbon, Portugal, Saturday.


Don't block Russia atms

treaty, Obama tells GOP


By BRADLEY KLAPPER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
took aim Saturday at
Republican senators stand-
ing in the way of a nucle-
ar arms reduction pact
with Russia, saying they-
were abandoning Ronald
Reagan's lesson of nucle-
ar diplomacy: 'Trust but'
verify."
The Senate's GOP leader
accused his Democratic
counterparts of wasting
Congress' lame-duck ses-
sion on issues from gays in
the military to environment
regulations. Sen. Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) didn't
mention Obama's push
to ratify the new START
weapons treaty with Russia,
but said extending expiring
Bush-era tax cuts needed
to be.the top priority.
Obama, speaking from a
NATO summit in Portugal,
used his weekly radio and


Internet address to focus
on international affairs at a
time of increased political
gridlock at home as the
GOP prepares to take con-
trol of the House in the new
Congress next year.
Describing his nuclear
efforts as part of a five-
administration continuum,
Obama said the treaty to
cut the permitted number
of U.S. and Russian long-
range nuclear warheads by
a third was "fundamental
to America's national secu-
rity.,
The president went to
great length listing the
prominent Republicans
from previous administra-
tions who back the deal,
including former secretar-
ies of state Colin Powell,
George Shultz, Jim Baker
and Henry Kissinger. He
cited GOP Sen. Dick Lugar's
support, but suggested that
other Republican senators
were playing politics with
national security.


"Some make no argu-
ment against the treaty
- they just ask for more
time," Obama said. "If the
Senate doesn't act this year
- after six months, 18 hear-
ings, and nearly a thousand
questions answered it
would have to start over
from scratch in January."
And it would face tough-
er odds as the Democratic
majority loses six seats.
Without ratification,
Russia may be less coop-
erative in enforcing strong
sanctions on Iran, secur-
ing loose nuclear material
from terrorists or helping
the U.S. equip troops in
Afghanistan, Obama said.
He said no agreement
with Russia meant no U.S.
inspectors watching over
one of the world's biggest
nuclear arsenals.
"Those who would block
this treaty are breaking
President Reagan's rule
- they want to trust, but
not verify," Obama said.


Al-Qaida-influenced terrorism

threats in Indonesia worry US


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
discovery of a militant train-
ing camp in Indonesia,
along with persistent ter-
rorist attacks there, have
increased U.S. concerns that
extremists are regrouping
and eyeing Western targets
in a country long viewed as
a counterterrorism success
story.
With President Barack


Obama set to begin a visit
Tuesday to the world's most
populous Muslim country,
there is renewed attention on
terrorists in Indonesia who
in the past year appeared
to be banding together into
a new al-Qaida-influenced
insurgency.
Recent Pentagon moves
to renew a training program
with Indonesia's special forc-
es and bolster military assis-
tance show that the Obama


administration believes the
country needs more help
tracking and rooting out
insurgents, particularly
those who rejoin the fight
once they are released
from jail. The U.S. has
praised Indonesia's efforts
to crack down on terrorists.
Government police and
military authorities have
captured or killed more
than 100 terrorists over
the past year.


BRIEFS


Two Ohio women,
boy dismembered

MOUNT VERNON,
Ohio Two women and
an 11-year-old boy were
stabbed to death and dis-
membered before their
remains were put in gar-
bage bags and lowered into
a hollow tree, a coroner said
Saturday, the latest grue-
.some details of the murders
that have stunned this tiny
town.
Preliminary autopsy
reports show that Tina
Herrmann, her son, Kody
Maynard, and her friend
Stephanie Sprang were
.stabbed multiple times
with a knife in the back and
chest Nov. 10, Knox County
Coroner Jennifer Ogle said.
"They were then placed
inside large plastic garbage
bags and later lowered, into
the hollow of a large tree,"
Ogle said in a statement. Ifs
unclear exactly when they
died or when their remains
were put in the tree. There
were no signs of sexual
assault
The remains of the family
dog a miniature pinscher
named Tanner were
found in the tree with the
bodies, said Joe Pejsa, a
family friend.
The victims disap-
peared Nov. 10 along with
Herrmann's daughter, 13-
year-old Sarah Maynard,
who was found bound and


gagged several days later in
the basement of an unem-
ployed tree-cutter, Matthew
Hoffman. Hoffman is
accused of kidnapping the
girl and keeping her in the
basement of his home in
Mount Vernon.


Neptune Township had
claimed Facebook ignites
old passions, and he
ordered about 50 married
church officials to delete
their accounts with the
social networking site or
resign from their leader-
ship positions.


NJ pastor admits Gates, Obama:
threesome scene Gateseal obama
Renewal of e av ban


NEPTUNE TOWNSHIP,
NJ. A pastor who said
Facebook was a "portal to
infidelity" and told married
church .leaders to delete
their accounts or resign
once testified that he had
a three-way sexual relation-
ship with his wife and a
male church assistant
The Rev. Cedric Miller
confirmed the informa-
tion reported Saturday by
the Asbury Park Press of
Neptune, which cited tes-
timony he gave in a crimi-
nal case in 2003. The rela-
tionship had ended by that
time.
Miller gained national
attention when he issued
the Facebook edict this
week. He said it came about
because much of the mari-
tal counseling' he has per-
formed over the past year
and a half has concerned
infidelity stemming from
the social-networking web-
site.
The ,48-year-old leader
of Living Word Christian
Fellowship Church in


WASHINGTON
- Defense Secretary
Robert Gates is encour-
aging 'Congress to act
before year's end to repeal
the ban on gays serving
openly in the military. It's
a position shared by his
boss, the president.
But his new Marine com-
mandant thinks otherwise
and the Senate has not
yet taken action, setting
up yet another hurdle for
gay activists who see their
window quickly closing.
After Tuesday's elections
that saw Republicans chip
away at Democrats' major-
ity in the Senate and wrest
the House from their con-
trol, their hopes for ending
the 17-year-old law have
dimmed.
"I would like to see the,
repeal of 'don't ask, don't
tell,' but I'm not sure what
the prospects for that are
and we'll just have to see,"
Gates told reporters.
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


^INt 7 ,- BRIEFS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Grieving family members leave after a briefing on the 29 miners and contractors trapped
underground at their Pike River mine in Greymouth, New Zealand, Sunday. Underground
combustion that continues to generate dangerous gases was preventing rescuers from
entering the coal mine after a powerful blast trapped 29 workers nearly two days ago.


Rescuers plan to drill hole

at New Zealand coal mine


By RAY LILLEY
Associated Press
WELLINGTON, New
Zealand Rescuers pre-
pared to drill a gas sampling
hole through 500 feet of hard
rock and into a New Zealand
coal mine Sunday where a
powerful blast trapped 29
workers nearly two days
ago.
Pike River Mine Ltd. chief
executive Peter Whittall
told reporters a small six
inch-wide hole would be
drilled into the mine from
the mountain above over the
next 16 to 24 hours to enable
rescuers to sample gas lev-
els from deep in the mine's
center.
Underground combustion
that continues to generate
dangerous gases was pre-
venting rescuers from enter-
ing the mine.
"We've got a heating of


some sort underground and
that means there's some
combustion generating
the gases that go with that,
carbon monoxide, a slight
increase in methane and
some other gases," Whitehall
said. "Something is happen-
ing underground, but what
it is we don't know."
The small six-inch hole,
to be drilled through the
mountainside, was aimed at
an area a couple of hundred
meters further into the mine
from where the main ventila-
tion shaft is located.
"That will give us more
information about what's
going on" with gas levels
near the center of the mine,
he said.
Dangerous methane and
carbon monoxide gas lev-
els meant "it's still not safe
for rescue teams to enter
the mine," Whittall said,
though "the oxygen quality


coming out of the mine is
still high."
Fresh air is still being
pumped into the mine
through an open air line.
Police search control-
ler, superintendent Gary
Knowles, said the "primary
focus today (Sunday) is still
a rescue operation.
"Our major focus is
bringing these guys home,"
he told reporters, "but we
need a stable air environ-
ment. When we have a sta-
ble environment ... and as
soon as we have that we're
going in."
Anguished relatives
voiced frustration over the
delays in the rescue opera-
tion.
"If I had my way I'd be
down there, I'd go into the
mine myself," said Laurie
Drew, whose 21-year-old
son, Zen, is one of the
missing men.


Pope talks about
condom vs. AIDS

VATICAN CITY -
Pope Benedict XVI has
opened the door on the
previously taboo subject of
condoms as a way to fight
HIV, saying male prosti-
tutes who use condoms
may be beginning to act
responsibly. It's a stunning
comment for a pontiff who
has blamed condoms for
making the AIDS crisis
worse.
The pope made the com-
ments in an interview with
a German journalist pub-
lished as a book entitled
"Light of the World: The
Pope, the Church and the


Signs of the Times," which
is being released Tuesday.
The Vatican newspaper.
L'Osservatore Romano ran
excerpts on Saturday.
Church teaching has
long opposed condoms
because they are a form
of artificial contraception,
although the Vatican has
never released an explicit
policy about condoms and
HIV.
Benedict said that con-
doms are not a moral solu-
tion to stopping AIDS. But
he said in some cases, such
as for male prostitutes,
their use could represent
a first step in assuming
moral responsibility "in
the intention of reducing
the risk of infection."


Mexico charges
drug suspect

MEXICO CITY -
Mexican authorities said
Saturday they have filed
formal charges against
alleged drug kingpin
Edgar "La Barbie" Valdez
Villareal and are weighing
a request to extradite him
to the United States.
The Texas-born
Valdez, considered one
of Mexico's top drug traf-
fickers in recent years,
faces charges including
drug trafficking, kidnap-
ping and arms possession,
Mexican officials said.
* Associated Press


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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 21. 2010


THE WEATHER

;" .-. -
A '. MOSTLY I PARTLY PARTLY ISOLATED
CLOUDS SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY -SHOWERS


HI LO HI79LO : H


NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system will generate a mix of rain and snow showers
over parts of the Upper Midwest and northern Plains today. A broad upper-level trough of low
pressure will remain in place over the western half of the nation, with widespread rain and
snow showers expected. Snow will be especially heavy in the Sierra Nevada, where gusty
winds are also expected.


Bangor


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74/60


75/54 City
75/54 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee Lake City 76/54 Daytona Beach
76/56 79/52 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Panama City 79/53 78/60 Gainesville
75/60 Ocala Jacksonville
79/54 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
80/60 78/64 MiLake ity
Miami
Tampa Naples
81/63 West Palm Beach Ocala
80/69 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 81/72 Pensacola
84/62 Naples Tallahassee
83/64 Miami Tampa
Key West 81/70 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


80/72


* ~~iai~3mm


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPhATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


80
48
73
50
88 in 1906
29 in 2008


0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.40"
45.03"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:01 a.m.
5:32 p.m.
7:02 a.m.,
5:31 p.m.


5:28 p.m.
6:57 a.m.
6:20 p.m.
7:56 a.m.


5
MOOMUE
30n mites t bum

tI-0 .r, r,.1
Ir.:. rr, .ar. tn

I0 I.i+.


Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec.
21 28 5 13
Full Last New First


Monday
77/68/pc
79/61/s
81/72/pc
83/62/pc
79/53/pc
76/54/s
79/72/pc
79/52/pc
81/70/pc
83/65/pc
80/55/pc
80/60/pc
75/60/s
75/61/pc
77/52/s
83/64/pc
78/51/pc
80/69/pc


Tuesday
77/6r- ,.
80/.. '
82/;--'
83/6! ,-
80/':.1 ,:
77/ .r. ,:
81 2 :
80/'-. ,.
82/71/pc
82/66/pc
80/56/pc
81/61/pc
75/60/pc
76/61/pc
80/55/pc
82/64/pc
79/54/pc
81/69/pc


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LLC, Madison, Wis.
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Cold Front
Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Oce Iloe
Frctnl


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
rPytona Beach
Denver


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY
50/32/0 40/33/pc Des Mt
66/40/0 60/33/pc Detro
18/7/0 34/30/s El Pat
68/43/0 71/55/s Fairba
63/34/0 52/44/pc Green
12/10/.26 13/0/c Hartfo
70/51/0 73/53/s Honol
16/9/.02 20/0/pc Houst
37/33/.12 38/27/sn Indiar
54/34/0 39/34/s Jacks
47/42/0 .47/42/pc Jacks
72/44/0 71/55/s Kansa
62/32/0 67/42/s Las V'
68/39/0 70/49/s Little
32/23/0 45/21/c Los A
43/30/0 60/53/sh Memp
58/30/.01 66/53/pc Miam
49/38/0 56/50/pc Minne
71/36/0 72/48/s Moblil
71/50/0 76/64/c New
79/56/0 78/60/s New Y
34/25/0 53/28/c Oklah


lolnes
it
so
inks
isboro
ord
ulu
on
napolls
on MS
onville
is City
egas
Rock
ngeles
phis
i
eapolis
e
Orleans
York
oma City


High: 86*, Laredo, Texas Low: 0, Roseau, Minn.


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY
42/26/0 55/37/pc Omaha
50/36/0 53/50/pc Orlando
9 .1 i ,., 71/43/pc Philadelphia
22/18/.14 20/5/c Phoenix
65/37/0 65/46/s Pittsburgh
55/32/0 40/31/s Portland ME
81/68/0 83/68/pc Portland OR
76/48/0 81/67/pc Raleigh
45/35/0 63/54/pc Rapid City
69/46/0 78/58/pc Reno
76/49/0 76/54/s Richmond
56/35/0 67/54/c Sacramento
62/56/0 56/40/c St. Louis
58/39/0 71/58/c Salt Lake City
63/55/.02 59/49/sh San Antonio
67/39/0 72/58/pc San Diego
80/70/0 81/70/pc San Francisco
23/18/0 37/27/sn Seattle
75/55/0 75/60/pc Spokane'
66/48/0 78/59/pc Tampa
54/41/0 44/41/s Tucson
71/45/0 77/56/c Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
38/28/0
80/57/0
57/39/0
74/54/0
45/39/0
50/29/0
46/39/.24
69/40/0
20/14/0
40/30/.02
67/38/0
53/43/.04
56/36/0
56/48/0
76/47/0
63/59/.10
54/45/.01
43/39/0
36/25/0
78/60/0
77/50/0
65/40/0


HI/Lo/W
52/34/c
80/60/pc
50/42/pc
68/48/sh
57/43/pc
37/25/s
41/33/sh
67/46/s.
25/12/pc
34/25/sn
63/45/s
54/38/sh
67/58/pc
44/28/rs
79/66/pc
62/53/sh
55/45/sh
37/29/sn
24/15/c
81/63/pc
66/44/sh
53/45/pc


7a 1p 7p la 6a
Sunday Monday









a Fore sted ilempeathre feelsh le" temperatuie


I .I ..'4 I

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record low tem-
peratures. Record
lows included 21
degrees at Pinson,
Ala.. 9 degrees

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Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today
CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Acapulco 84/73/0 91/73/pc La Paz 66/34/0 67/36/t Rio 88/70/0 83/71/t
Amsterdam 48/37/0 45/34/pc Lima 73/64/0 68/58/s Rome 55/50/1.63 61/53/sh
Athens 72/50/0 69/54/s London 46/41/.02 46/37/sh St. Thomas VI 83/74/.01 87/72/t
Auckland 72/64/0 63/53/sh Madrid 57/46/.16 51/35/sh San Juan PR 85/77/0 85/71/t
Beijing 55/32/0 45/25/s Mexico City 75/46/0- 77/48/c Santiago 77/54/0 75/48/pc
Berlin 46/39/0 44/33/pc Montreal 45/32/.02 33/30/c Seoul 55/32/0 59/37/pc
Buenos Aires 84/63/0 81/60/t Moscow 39/32/.42 38/31/rs Singapore 86/75/1.45 88/76/t
Cairo 77/68/0 79/61/s Nairobi 79/59/0 78/59/t Sydney 72/57/0 75/56/s
Geneva 45/36/0 49/40/sh Nassau 82/73/0 82/69/sh Tel Aviv 79/59/0 77/60/s
Havana 79/61/0 80/66/t New Delhi 57/57/0 81/58/s Tokyo 61/52/0 64/51/pc
Helsinki 30/25/.02 33/26/sf Oslo 27/19/0 23/17/sf Toronto 45/39/0 47/46/sh
Hong Kong 75/66/0 81/70/pc Panama 86/73/0 87/73/t Vienna 43/32/0 49/39/c
Kingston 86/73/0 88/75/pc Paris 52/41/0 48/39/sh Warsaw 45/41/.33 42/33/sh
KEYTO CONDITIONS: c cloudy, dr-drizzle, f=fair, f/ -fr 'i h-h ., ,-.ce, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
sh-showers, sn=snow,' -11iii. 1.. .... w=windy.


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CAM PURS


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Join today!

Visit us or call

754-9088 and press 5.

www.campuscu.com


Membership is open to everyone in Alchua, Clay, Columbia. Lake, Marion and Sumter counties
Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia.. Lake, Marion and Sumter counties

l l I l I I , l l' l I l. l l I i
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Count on' to help you wrap it up!


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


NCUA J










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042
tkuibyC@lakectyreporter com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. November 21, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CLUB VOLLEYBALL
Travel team
meeting Monday
The North Florida
Fusion volleyball club
program has a meeting
at 6 p.m. Monday at the
Columbia High
auditorium. Girls
interested in playing
travel volleyball and
their parents are urged
to attend. Tryout dates,
cost of participation and
general information will
be discussed.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.
From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Cornerstone
Academy, 7 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Buchholz
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Suwannee
Fe High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Vanguard
High, 8 p.m. (JV-6)
Nov. 29
Columbia High
soccer at Ed White High,
girls-5:30 p.m., boys-
7:20 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Nov. 30
Fort White High
girls soccer at Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
-soccer vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 1
Fort White High JV
girls soccer vs. Columbia
High, 5 p.m.
Dec. 2
Fort White High
girls soccer at Williston,
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball at Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Dec. 3
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. P.K. School,
7 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Columbia
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Dec. 4
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Fort White High girls
soccer at St. Francis


Catholic, 2 p.m.


New position, same


coach for CHS-boys


JASON MAfTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Marcus Amerson will be counted upon as a
starter on this years Tigers' squad.


Jefferson to
lead Tigers after
coaching girls.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
Coach Horace Jefferson
didn't have to change
schools for a new coach-
ing opportunity. Instead, he
changed genders.
The former coach of the
Lady Tigers will take a stab
at coaching the Columbia
boys squad this season,
replacing coach Trey
Hosford.
For Jefferson, the change
wasn't much of a transition.
"Even in the interview,
I was asked the question


Seniors shine




one more time


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida head coach Urban Meyer hugs senior Mike Pouncey (55) during the Senior Day
ceremony before the game against Appalachian State at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in
Gainesville on Saturday.

UF ends 3-game home losing streak


By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Jordan Reed accounted for
four touchdowns, includ-
ing a pass to quarterback
John Brantley, and Florida
beat Appalachian State


48-10 Saturday.
The Gators turned in
one of their best offensive
performances of the sea-
son, snapped a three-game
losing streak at home and
gave 23 seniors a positive
finale in the Swamp.
In a season with nearly


as many ups as downs, it
didn't matter that it came
against a team from the
Football Championship
Subdivision.
The Gators (7-4) scored
touchdowns on four of
FLORIDA continued on 3B


about transition," Jefferson
said. "I told them that the
transition wasn't going from
girls to guys, but going from
guys to girls."
Jefferson has previous
coaching experience in the
boys' game.
"It's simple, that's where I
started and I am more com-
fortable there," Jefferson
said. "I'm more relaxed
with my behavior and don't
have to worry about the
perception of what people
will think. I don't have to
worry about the appear-
ance of evil."
Jefferson also likes the
added athleticism he'll get
to coach.
"I think that the guys are
naturally more athletic than


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@okecityreporter.com

Seniors

only

players

leaving?

t's been a
roller-coaster ride
for the Florida
football team this
season, but for a few
special seniors, Saturday's
game marked the end of
their home journey.
The Gators still travel
to Tallahassee, but Ahmad
Black, Mike Pouncey and
others will never hear the
roars of a Swamp crowd
again.
Though the crowd was
noticeably smaller than
most weeks, it was good
to see a little life in the
Florida football team after
suffering three home
losses this season.
Given the Gators'48-10
win was against a far-
inferior opponent, Florida
was able to have one of
their most impressive
showings of the year. It


the girls, not that the girls
aren't athletic," Jefferson
said. "It's just that boys are
usually more athletic than
girls, and that's especially
true at CHS. It was hard
getting girls to come out,
where every boy thinks he
can play."
Jefferson's job is get-
ting the most out of every
player.
"I think we can do more,"
he said. "I think we can
press and play as fast as
we can, but we'll do what's
best for the Tigers. If we're
at our best going fast, we'll
go fast. If we're playing bet-
ter slow, we'll play with that
tempo."
CHS continued on 3B


was good timing too as
it was a day to honor the
seniors in a year where
there surely has been a
little left to be desired.
Still, what many will
be wondering is if this
is another player's last
game in the Swamp. John
Brantley is a legacy of the
University of Florida. His
father starred there. His
uncle was one of the best
defensive players to wear
orange and blue, but for
Brantley the timing was all
wrong.
He had the terrible
misfortune of following
the best player in the
history of the team, and
he wasn't a perfect fit for
Urban Meyer's offense.
Still, Brantfley was.given
his shot to succeed.
Sometimes he was able to.
Often he wasn't
As Jordan Reed found
his way to the end zone on
four different occasions, it
almost seemed like it was
Brantley being pushed out
the door. So often times
heroes don't get to ride out
into the sunset.
Only a year ago, Tim
Tebow was left in tears
as his championship
dreams were destroyed.
Unfortunately for Brantley,
he never got a chance to
take the Gators that far.
It's not all Brantfley's
fault that this year's Gators
have took a step back.
There are many places that
the finger can be pointed,
but Brantley's shoulders
unfortunately are carrying
a lot of the blame. There's
still a glimmer of hope
GATORS continued on 2B


Fort White


shows heart


in playoff loss


Indians fall
to Pensacola
Catholic, 31-21.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
PENSACOLA It is all
Class 2B, but Pensacola
Catholic High looked daunt-
ing with 55 players listed on
the roster Friday to 34 for
Fort White High.
Fort White's list included
four junior varsity players
and seniors Alexis Blake and
Kevin Poteat, who were lost
midway through the season
with injuries. Indians head
coach Demetric Jackson


showed class in naming
Blake and Poteat as two of
the four captains for the
coin toss.
After spotting the
Crusaders 14 points, Fort
White twice pulled within
three points. One came
on a touchdown pass from
Andrew Baker to A.J.
Legree with 13 seconds
left in the half. A catch by
Donnell Sanders between
two defenders while lying
on his back set up the score.
The Indians trailed 17-14 at
intermission.
JR Dixon rumbled 20
yards on a draw play for a
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Dalton O'Dell (55) and Adonis Simmons (50) collide with a Bradford High runner
on a punt return in a game on Nov. 5.


I I










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford
400, at Homestead
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Honda Puerto Rico Tip-
off, third place game, at San Juan, Puerto
Rico
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Honda Puerto Rico Tip-off,
championship game, at San Juan, Puerto
Rico
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia
SOCCER
8:30 p.m.
ESPN --ILS Cup, Colorado vs. FC
Dallas, at Toronto

Monday.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Maui Invitational, first
round, Wichita St. vs. Connecticut, at
Lahaina, Hawaii
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Maui Invitational, first
round, Oklahoma vs. Kentucky, at Lahaina,
Hawaii
6 p.m.
FSN Paradise Jam, third place game,
at St.Thomas,Virgin Islands
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 CBE Classic, first round,
Duke vs. Marquette, at Kansas City, Mo.
8:30 p.m.
FSN Paradise Jam, championship
game, at St.Thomas,Virgin Islands
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 CBE Classic, first round,
Kansas St.' vs. Gonzaga, at Kansas City,
Mo.
12 Midnight
ESPN2 Maui Invitational, first round,
Virginia vs.Washington, at Lahaina, Hawaii
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Denver at San Diego
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Boston at Tampa Bay

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Today's Games
Detroit at Dallas, I p.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Washington at Tennessee, I p.m.
Houston at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Buffalo at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Arizona at Kansas City, I p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Carolina, I p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, I p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.

College scores

Illinois 48, Northwestern 27
Michigan St. 35, Purdue 31
Ohio St. 20, Iowa 17
Oklahoma St. 48, Kansas 14
Penn St. 41, Indiana 24
W Michigan 38, Kent St. 3
Wisconsin 48, Michigan 28
Clemson 30,Wake Forest 10



Pitt keeps

USF off

top of

Big East

By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press

TAMPA Dion Lewis.
rushed for 105 yards and a
touchdown Saturday, help-
ing Pittsburgh beat South
Florida 17-10 to retain sole
possession of first place in
the Big East
The Panthers (6-4, 4-1)
rebounded from a two-
point loss to Connecticut
to remain in control of the
crowded conference race.
They can clinch the title
and the league's automatic
Bowl Championship Series
bowl berth by winning
their remaining games
against West Virginia and
Cincinnati.
Receiver Terrence
Mitchell scored on a 45-
yard TD run for USF (6-4,
3-3), however the Bulls got


little production out of their
passing game. BJ. Daniels
completed 15 of 29 passes
for 132 yards, and his final
attempt was intercepted on
the game's final play.
Tino Sunseri threw a 12-
yard touchdown pass to Ray
Graham in the third quar-
ter, then helped Pitt put the
game away.


Coastal Carolina 70, Charleston
Southern 3
Delaware St. 53, Howard 43
Florida 48, Appalachian St. 10
Florida A&M 38, Bethune-Cookman
27
Gardner-Webb I0,VMI 7
Georgia Southern 32, Furman 28
Georgia Tech 30, Duke 20
LSU 43, Mississippi 36
N.C. State 29, North Carolina 25
Pittsburgh 17, South Florida 10
South Carolina 69,Troy 24
UAB 31, Memphis 15
UCF 61,Tulane 14
Virginia Tech 31, Miami 17
WestVirginia 17, Louisville 10
Colorado 44, Kansas St. 36
E.Washington 34, Idaho St. 7
Idaho 28, Utah St. 6
Montana St. 21, Montana 1 6
Nevada 52, New Mexico St. 6
Stanford 48, California 14
Wyoming 44, Colorado St. 0
Rice 62, East Carolina 38
SMU 31, Marshall 17
Sam Houston St. 31 ,Texas St. 29
Texas 51, Florida Atlantic 17
Texas Tech 64,Weber St. 21
Tulsa 31, UTEP 28
Boston College 17,Virginia 13
E. Michigan 21, Buffalo 17
Georgetown. D.C. 14, Marist 7
Harvard 28,Yale 21
Navy 35,Arkansas St. 19
Villanova 28, Delaware 21, OT
N. Illinois 59, Ball St. 21
NW Missouri St 28, Missouri Western 24
North Central 57, St. Norbert 7

Friday
Boise St. 51, Fresno St. 0

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Ford 400
Site: Homestead.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (ESPN2,
noon-I p.m.; ESPN, I-5 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.

Ford 400 qualifying

At Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (83) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 176.904
mph.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 176.725.
3. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
176.713.
4. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 176.586.
5. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
176.569.
6. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
176.482.
7. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
176.453.
8. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
176.442.
9. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 176.321.
10. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
176.217.
II. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
176.194.
12. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 176.177.
13.(17) Matt Kenseth,.Ford, 176.114.
14. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
176.056.
15. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 175.924.
16. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 175.776.
17. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
175.764.
18. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
175.701.
19. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 175.655.
20. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
175.627.
21. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 175.547.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
175.347.
23. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
175.251.


24. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 175.177.
25. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
175.154.
26. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
175.109.
27. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 175.029.
28. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
174.927.
29. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
174.893.
30. (66) Mike Bliss,Toyota, 174.831.
31. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
174.82.
32. (09) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
174.82.
33. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 174.548.
34. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 174.486,
35. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet,
174.469.
36. (38) Dave Blaney, Ford, 174.452.
37. (II11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
174.407.
38. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 173.919.
39. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 173.885.
40. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
173.01.
41. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, owner
points.
42. (7) Kevin Conway, Toyota, owner
points.
43. (64) Landon Cassill. Toyota,
174.452.
Failed to Qualify
44. (46) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet,
174.407.
45. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford,
172.414.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Boston at Toronto, I p.m.
New Orleans at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Golden State at LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers,
10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 8 North Carolina vs. TBA at
Coliseo de Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto
Rico,TBA
No. 9 Florida vs. Morehead State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Syracuse vs. William & Mary,
2 p.m. .
No. 14 Purdue vs. Oakland, Mich.,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Memphis at LSU, 5 p.m.
No. 20 Georgetown vs. TBA at
Carolina. First Arena, Charleston, S.C.,
TBA
No. 22 Virginia Tech at UNC
Greensboro, I p.m.
No. 25 San Diego State vs. IUPUI at
Millett Hall, Oxford, Ohio, 5:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Edmonton atAnaheim, 8 p.m.
Phoenix atVancouver, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Dallas at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Calgary at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:30 p.m.


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES
at the Lake City Reporter
So our employees can enjoy Thanksgiving with their
families, the Lake City Reporter will be closed,
Thursday, November 25th, 2010.

Our Adverising deadlines will be
Cladied: Friday, Numbere 28 iddeadline Weduiday, November 24 tl.m.
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Tuesday. Niesmber30 wi ddldne Wednesday,RNovember24

Wcv will be back in the office on
Fndai, Noember 26th for our
customer's convenience.
Thank }ou and
Have a Great Thanksgiving


Football players expected


to help Indians basketball


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE With
many of the prospective
players on the football field,
Fort White High basketball
is not yet in full swing.
The Indians will have to
make a go of it at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday when Suwannee
High visits for the District
5-3A opener. Suwannee was
district runner-up in 2009-
10.
Williston High is defend-
ing District 5 cham-
pion, with Santa Fe and
Newberry high schools


also in the district.
Indians head coach Isiah
Phillips also has been con-
centrating on football as
receiver coach. New assis-
tant C.C. Wilson's schedule
will be fully worked this
week, so the job of prepar-
ing Fort White has fallen
on junior varsity coach
Jason Martinez.
Wes Osterhoudt and
Jordan Talley return for the
Indians, and Milton Sanders
also is on the varsity.
Potential football play-
ers are hoop returnees A.J.
Legree and Raul Colon.
They are expected to be


joined by Trey Phillips, and
others though Wilson was
unsure of all who might
come out after football.
Fort White hovered near
.500 overall last year and
was 3-5 in district after pick-
ing up a pair of forfeit wins
from Williston. However,
that meant the Indians had
to face the Red Devils in the
district tournament play-in
game. Williston eventu-
ally made it to the state
semifinals.
The Indians will have
another week to work
before traveling to Santa
Fe High on Nov.-30.


INDIANS: Taylor County advances

Continued From Page 1B


touchdown with 9:20 left
in the game, as Fort White
made it 24-21. Wesley Pitts
snared an interception and
returned it 19 yards to put
the Indians in position to
score.
The Crusaders answered
with a scoring drive. Josh
Faulkner made it tough with
a sack that cost Catholic
eight yards. Shaun White
came back with his second
completion of the drive to
bring on a fourth-and-5 at
the Indians 34.
Catholic first lined up.
for a field goal, then called
a time out and sent the
offense back on the field.
White rolled left and hit
Eddie Mathews for the
first down. Two plays later,
Marquis Simler scored his
third touchdown of the
game.
"It came down to them
making a few more plays
than we did," Jackson said.
'"They made their fourth
down and we didn't. It is
really nobody's fault. You
have to give it to a good


team."
Catholic only outgained
Fort White by 28 yards.
Dixon had his seventh 100-
plus yard game in a row.
Legree had a catch on a
pass deflected by a defend-
er to go-with the touchdown
reception from Baker, who
also ran for a score.
Soron Williams sparked
another scoring drive with
a kickoff return, this one
for 37 yards after Fort
White fell behind 14-0. The
Indians scored in five plays
to cut the lead in half.
Darius Pollard recovered
a Catholic fumble on the
second play of the game
to set up the Indians at the
Crusaders 40. The defense
stopped a fourth-down try,
the first of three times on
the night ,
Taylor County High beat
Walton High, 41-13, and will
host Catholic this week.
Fort White's other
opponent in the playoffs
is Madison County High.
The Cowboys crushed
Raiies High, 43-6, to set up


a 1-2A rematch xith Godby
High.

Pens. Catholic 14 3 7 7 31
FortWhite 0 14 0 7 21
First Quarter
PC-Sumler 12 run (Kiefer kick), 6:20
PC-Smith 42 interception return
(Kiefer kick), :29
Second Quarter
FW-Baker I run (Jones kick), 10:24
PC-Kiefer 25 FG, 5:20
FW-Legree 8 pass from Baker (Jones
kick), :13
Third Quarter
PC-Sumler 4 run (Kiefer kick), 8:18
Fourth Quarter
FW-Dixon 20 run (Jones kick), 9:20
PC-Sumler 27 run (Kiefer kick), 3:05

Catholic FortWhite
First downs 13 II
Rushes-yards 28-186 46-189
Passing I \2 81
Comp-Att-Int 10-17-1 5-14-1
Punts-Avg. 2-33 2-25.5
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0 '
Penalties-Yards 6-40 6-34
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Catholic, Sumler 16-126,
White 11-60, Matthews I-0. Fort White,
Dixon 31-133, Baker 12-44, Cormier 2-6,
S.Williams 1-6.
PASSING-Catholic,White 10-17-112-
I. Fort White, Baker 5-14-81-1.
RECEIVING-Catholic, Dukes 3-47,
Matthews 3-18,Akintonde 2-28, Coulahan
1-10, Sumler I-9. Fort White, Legree 3-41,
Sanders 2-40.


GATORS: Brantley's return unknown?


Continued From Page 1B
that Brantley could return
and redeem Florida for a
season of
disappointment, but the


1
4
8
11 I
12'

13 )
14

16

17 I

18

20 I


sad truth is he'll probably
be playing for a team in
which his skills are better
suited.


ACROSS 38 Needing a rinse
39 Grassland
Went first *40 August sign
Clonk 41 Rugged coun-
Puffin kin try
Bullring shout 44 Doctor's con-
"Star Trek" cern
lieutenant 48 Cable
Sporty truck network
With a free 49 Region
hand 51 Not neathh
Archaeological 52 Troubadour
operation instruments
talian 53 Not hesitate
entree 54 Bunyan's tool
Works like a 55 Important
dog decades
Embed 56 Morse click


21 liver oil
22 Pondered
25 Shoal
29 Mimicked
30 Codgers'
queries
31 - premium
32 Puppy's bark
33 Nope
34 Gator cousin
35 Opposite


DOWN

1 Recline in a
lazy manner
2 Charles Lamb
3 Cotillion hon-
orees
4 Burma's U
5 Grass-skirt
dance


It was good to see him
leave with a win on his
shoulders, no matter what
caliber opponent.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FOW INC TACK
AURA LAH AIGUE
TRIG VE EVALUATE
ESTEE ALE REL


SAN APS
PRO IT MAHAL








GONG TIA ELIA
SWAG SRS NEST


6 Home page
addr.
7 Ohio city
8 German
import
9 Tel. or gas


Want more puzzles?
Check out.the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words, .

I PRUCO I


-- f y 1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A: A I"I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: DUMPY QUAKE MOSAIC PUMICE
Answer: When prices are knocked down, bargains
are PICKED UP


10 Barbecue
extras
12 Lobbied for
15 Moderated
19 Like some
socks
21 Billfold con-
tents
22 Yucatan native
23 - the air
24 Equinox mo.
25 Fraud
26 Silent-screen
temptress
27 Perched on
28 Risque
30 New Age
singer
34 Appropriate.
(hyph.)
36 Prehistoric
37 Snuggle
38 Truck stop
sight
40 Ancient harps
41 Horse stopper
42 Mountain goat
43 Folk wisdom
44 Mex. miss
45 Warty
critter
46 Bicolor whale
47 Bulfinch spe-
cialty
50 KLM destina-
tion


11-22 2010byUFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Page Editor: Brandori Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Coaching rur


for new Lady
By BRANDON FINLEY coach the junior varsity
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com softball team at Columbia
High, but this season she'll
Coaching was an easy be the head lady in charge
decision for Columbia of Lady Tigers' basketball.
High's Michele Bisaccia. "At 5-foot-2, I realized
The only question was I was going to have the
which sport she would most success playing soft-
coach. ball, due to my inability to
Bisaccia is the daughter grow," she said. "Basketball
of Tampa Bay Buccaneers has always been my first
special teams coach love. I was coached by
Richard Bisaccia and has one of the best in the state
been around coaching her (Jeff Nelson) growing up.
entire life. He's one of the people I've
She played football as looked up to the most as a
child until she was "too coach, and coaching girls
cute" to play anymore. After basketball has always sort
that she played softball and of been my dream."
basketball at Oxford High A good player in her
in Mississippi. Though bas- own right, Bisaccia set her
ketball was always her first high school's career assists
love, softball was her call- record. Now she'll have a
ing card as she played for chance to mold players in
the University of Florida in her image. The first thing
college. she'll look to improve is the
Last year, she helped team's mentality.


is in family


Tigers
"We're trying to step it up,"
she said. "Coach (Horace)
Jefferson did a good job
with the girls teaching plays.
Now, we're just looking for
that mentality from a young
female. We need more focus
and communication. That
has to be our priority. We
want to take this program to
a high level."
Of course, the Lady
Tigers won't have an easy
district to contend with.
Along with the Tigers,
the district is comprised
of Buchholz, Ed White,
Fleming Island, Gainesville,
Middleburg, Ridgeview and
Robert E. Lee high schools.
Bisaccia already has her
eyes on a couple of teams
that the Tigers will have to
overcome in order to con-
tend in the district.
"Buchholz has all their
starters returning," she


coach
said. "They're a solid bas-
ketball team. Most of them
play in a summer league
and that's something we
need to establish."
Among the leaders for
the Lady Tigers will be
Simone Williamson, Briya
McGuire, Shaniqua Henry,
Justice Campbell and
Marnae Gaskins according
to Bisaccia.
"Simone is definitely a
good leader, good kid and
hard worker," Bisaccia said.
"Briya. definitely has leader-
ship abilities. She just has to
find it Shaniqua has a great
three-point shot. Marnae and
Justice are both very, very
talented and athletic. We just
need to work hard on the fun-
damentals of basketball."
Columbia opens up the
home schedule against
Gainesville High at
7:30 p.m. on Nov. 30.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Simone Williamson (15) guards an opponent
last season. Coach Michele Bissacia expects Williamson'to
be one of the leaders on the Lady Tigers this season.


Time for contenders


to shut up and drive


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

HOMESTEAD- After
all the talk, tweeting
and obvious attempts at
mind games, it's time for
NASCAR's three title con-
tenders to get serious about
the tightest championship
race in seven years.
In other words, they
need to shut up and drive.
The Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship
will be settled Sunday
at Homestead-Miami
Speedway, where points
leader Denny Hamlin'


has weathered a steady
wave of needling from
Jimmie Johnson and Kevin
Harvick.
Johnson, the four-time
defending series champi-
on, poked Hamlin several
times in an effort to rattle
Hamlin's nerves as Hamlin
tries to protect a 15-point
lead the smallest in the
seven-year history of the
Chase.
Harvick, sitting in third
and 46 points behind
Hamlin, has openly played
the aggressor and talked
of how he's got nothing
to lose and everything to


gain.
The trash-talk and mind
games have gone' on all
week, adding an extra ele-
ment of drama to what's
already been a terrific title
race.
"I never remem-
ber a time in our sport
where there's been this
much talking," Jeff Burton
said. "I almost feel like
we're going to a boxing
match."
By the checkered flag
Sunday, it may very well
feel like the contenders
went 12 tough rounds in
this spirited title race.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Jordan Reed (11) breaks a tackle made, by Jabari Fletcher (54) and Patrick
Blalock (34) to score a touchdown in a game against Appalachian State at Ben Hill Griffin
Stadium in Gainesville on Saturday. Florida beat Appalachian State, 48-10.

FLORIDA: Reed scores 4 touchdowns
Continued-From Page 1B


their first five possessions,
led 35-0 early in the third
quarter and enjoyed their
third lopsided victory of
the season.
Appalachian State (9-2)
lost for the second time in
three weeks. Nonetheless,
the Mountaineers almost
certainly will get a bye in
the first round of the FCS
playoffs that begin next
week.
The Gators, coming off
a 36-14 home loss to South
Carolina that knocked them
out of contention for the
Southeastern Conference's
Eastern Division title,
started the day by hon-
oring a senior class that
expected much more than
a mediocre bowl game.
It was an emotional cer-
emony for several guys,
especially safety Ahmad
Black and center Mike
Pouncey. Both had tears
rolling down their cheeks
as they ran onto the field,
hugged coach Urban
Meyer and gave flowers to


their mothers.
Black, Pouncey and their
teammates responded by
making quick work of the
Mountaineers.
Florida's defense set the
tone with a three-and-out to
start the game, then Chris
Rainey opened the scoring
with a 16-yard run.
Backup quarterback
Trey Burton made it '14-
0 on Florida's next drive,
scoring on a 3-yard run,
then it became the Jordan
Reed Show.
Reed had a 1-yard TD
run in the second quar-
ter, then two more short
scoring runs in the third.
He also threw a 5-yard TD
pass to Brantley that made
it 28-0 just before halftime.
Brantley lined up as a
receiver, then slipped
uncovered into the end
zone. Reed rolled right,
then tossed a ball to the
corner of the end zone.
Brantley caught it and got
both feet down for his first
career score.


Reed got an even big-
ger assist in the fourth.
He handed off to walk-on
senior Gary Beemer, then
shoved the defensive tack-
le across the goal line for
a 1-yard score that made it
48-10 with 3:18 to play.
Beemer's reaction was
classic. His helmet came
off during the celebration
and he clutched the ball
with both hands as he ran
back to the sideline; where
coaches and teammates
waited to congratulate
him.
Brantley completed 16
of 22 passes for 222 yards,
with an interception. Rainey
led Florida's ground game
with 87 yards. Reed (71),
Emmanuel Moody (56),
Mike Gillislee. (56) and
Burton (37) also contrib-
uting to Florida's season-
high 311 yards rushing.
Appalachian State's
DeAndre Presley was 19
of 28 passing for 157 yards
and a touchdown. He also
ran for 26 yards.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
University of Miami quarterback Stephen Morris (left) is pressured by Virginia Tech
defensive end Steven Friday right in the second quarter during an NCAA college football
game in Miami, Saturday,


Virginia Tech wins


ACC Coastal title after


beating Miami, 31-17


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI Virginia Tech
had one bad week this sea-
son. The Hokies have been
perfect in all others.
Their reward is another
shot at an Atlantic Coast
Conference championship.
Ryan Williams ran for 142
yards and two touchdowns,
including a career-long 84-
yarder with 13:24 remain-
ing, as No. 14 Virginia Tech
beat No. 24 Miami 31-17
on Saturday to clinch the
ACC's Coastal Division title.
The Hokies (9-2, 7-0) won
their ninth straight, the pro-
gram's longest streak since
1999, and will get an oppor-
tunity to play .their way into
the Orange Bowl in Miami's
home stadium Jan. 3.
Tyrod Taylor's 18-yard


keeper with 6:25 left sealed
it for Virginia Tech, which
beat Miami for the 11th
time in 16 meetings.
Danny Coale added four
catches for 83 yards and a
touchdown for the Hokies,
who gave up 44 yards but
intercepted Miami fresh-
man quarterback Stephen
Morris three times in the
final 9 minutes.
Lamar Miller rushed for
a career-best 163 yards and
a touchdown for Miami (7-4,
5-3), which has not won the
ACC since joining in 2004.
Virginia Tech opened
the season with- a loss on
Labor Day to Boise State,
then got stunned five days
later against lower-divi-
sion James Madison at
home, no less in a game
that seemed to suggest the
Hokies weren't going to


- be factors in the ACC. Not
quite.
Next week, the Hokies
will have a chance to be the
first team to go unbeaten in
the ACC since Florida State
in 2000.
For the second straight
year, it was Williams doing
the damage to Miami.
He ran for 150 yards and
two scores last season when
Virginia Tech dismantled
the Hurricanes 31-7 in
Blacksburg, but was kept
relatively in check until the
fourth quarter Saturday.
Then on his first touch of
the final period,Williams'went
up the middle and gone.
A one-play drive for 84
yards gave the Hokies the
lead for good, and after
Jayron Hosley intercepted
Morris with 9:01 left, the
Hokies were in total control.


CHS: Trying to create new identity


Continued From Page 1B

The one thing Jefferson
wants is to install fear into
the eyes of Columbia's
opponents.
"I'm trying to create an
identity of toughness," he
said. "It starts with me. I feel
that, because we don't have
a great perimeter-shooting
team, that we have to be
blue collar. I hope to see
people diving on the floor
and an aggressive style of
play."
Columbia will run a 32
defense, which will use vari-
ables of a 1-2-2 and 1-3-1
defense. It will all hinge on
the yo-yo position accord-
ing to Jefferson, and the
Tigers have a surprise play-
er there.
"Believe it or not, Laremy
Tunsil' (a power forward)
is there," he said. "Ideally,


we'd have a ball handler
there, but in this defense,
the wings can get it."
Jefferson is depending
on the defense to create
fast-break opportunities for
what he hopes can be a
scrappy team. The focus,
however, will be getting as
much as he can out of the
Tigers in his first season.
"We have to focus on
what we can do," Jefferson
said. "It's the first year, so
we have to learn what we
can do. We have to gain
loyalty and trust in each
other. Teamwork makes
the dream work."
The usual suspects will
still be in contention to win
the district, but Jefferson
isn't setting expectations
before the season. He
did, however, mention


Buchholz, Gainesville and
Woifson high schools as
perennial contenders.
Jefferson's starting
five will consist of Nigel
Atkinson, Marcus Amerson,
Marquez Marshall, David
Morse and Tunsil.
"I've been very impressed
with the football players
(Atkinson and Tunsil),"
Jefferson said. 'They've
come out and worked hard
thus far. We want to keep
Morse and Tunsil on the
floor and if we can, I think
we'll be alright. We could
also be surprised with
Markem Gaskins. He'll be
on the wing, and he's always
played down low. He's up to
the challenge."
Columbia will tip off the
regular against Gainesville
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420





LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


WWW.FGC.EDU
386.752.1822


Washington Monthly Magazine's #1 ranked Community College in Florida


* .* ...'A l . l :,








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0428
tmayerC@akeatyreportercom


BUSINESS


Sunday, November 21, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Convenience store adds 'cool' in coolers


From staff reports

Convenience
stores aren't
just convenient
any more.
They're also
becoming trendy and
energy efficient.
S&S Food Stores new-
est addition, located at
Pinemount Road and
Birley Avenue in south-
western Columbia County,
offers the expected con-
venience store items,
but also provides trendy
energy efficient fixtures
consumers may not notice
or appreciate.
In addition to the normal
soda fountain, coffee area
and snacks, S&S officials
have implemented energy-
saving wall coolers and
freezers some so smart
they can sense when the
customer approaches.
"They have sensors that
turn the lights on in the
cooler when you walk up,"
said Keith Brown, S&S
Food Stores vice president
of marketing. "In the cool-
ers and the frozen foods,
this is a very energy-effi-
cient store."
The Pinemount-Birley
store also features wide
islands and more gas
pumps in front of the store,
plus a restaurant and grill
inside with two specialties.
The food counter is Lester's
Chicken and Subs.
This is the second new
S&S Food Store construct-
ed this year, Brown said,
with the other in Ellisville.
Both new stores have
expanded food service.:
"Ifs a trend," Brown


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
April Harvey, assistant manager of the new S&S Food Store No. 29 at 2366 Southwest Pinemount Road, demonstrates the store's new energy-efficient
coolers. Sensors at the cooler doors activate lights whenever customers approach, instead of leaving the lights on constantly.


said. "When you have food
service, it makes the store a
destination."
The store is S&S No. 29
and Joyce Foley is the man-
ager. The store is opened
daily from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.
"I love the new store,"
she said. "Its beautiful, it's


at a good location and I
moved over here from Live
Oak, so it's a lot different."
She said the store seems
to be more popular than its
predecessor, which was a
short distance down the
road, and the new store is
larger.


Foley said the new store
also offers milkshakes,
subs and boasts about 10
tables, capable of seating
two people each in a small


eating area.
"Since the store is larger
it's more convenient for the
customers and staff," she
said. "Ifs more convenient


to get the customers in and
out to get what they need
and they have more access
to everything."


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Stock Split
Lessens Loss
Q I bought 100 shares of Cisco
Systems for around $90 each
way back in 1999. They've recently
been trading in the mid-$20s. I
refuse to sell them at a loss. Will
the stock ever recover to $90? -
N.R., Escondido, Calif.
A First off, know that when
you see a Cisco stock price
of, say, $23 today, you're looking
at a number that's "split-adjusted"!
If you bought your
shares in November \
1999 for $90, the
stock split 2-for-1 i r '
after that, reducing
your cost basis from $90 to $45.
Meanwhile, your 100 shares were
doubled, leaving you with 200. At
$23 apiece, those 200 shares are
worth $4,600. So your loss is close '
to 50 percent, less than what you
might have thought .
The past shouldn't matter,
though, in your decision to hold
or sell.. What matters is how you
expect your shares to perform
from here. If you don't have a
good handle on Cisco's financial
strength and competitive position,
or perhaps an> compelling reason
to hang on, consider selling. You
should be, invested only in your
best ideas. (That said, many still
have great expectations of Cisco. i
Even wheri you lose money
on a stock, you might stand a
better chance of making your ,
money back in some other
company in which you hae
more faith There's no reason to
insist on makmg \our money
back on that stock

Q If I sign up to use an online
brokerage, can I deposit funds
by just mailing in checks? M H.
Kansas City, Mo.
Yes indeed. That's how most
A online brokerage account-
holders handle it. Learn more about
brokerages and how to choose a
good one at
www.broker.fool.com.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
- see Write to Us


' The Motley FoolT

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Taking Stock
of Retailers
When looking for investments, it's-
smart to focus on familiar fields
that interest us. For many, retailing
fits that bill. To invest successfully
in retailers, combine your personal
observations with what you glean
from news and company.reports.
. Spend time in the stores them-
selves, where retailers control the
presentation of their brand, customer
service and the shopping experi-
ence. Assess inventory levels in
displays. Are stocks being depleted
quickly? Check for markdowns. If
most of the store is on sale, there
may be inventory-control problems
that will shrink profit margins. See
how satisfied shoppers are you
might even ask them.
At malls, see what people are
wearing and where they're shop-
ping. Note which stores' bags show
up most often in shoppers' hands,
paying attention to demographic
groups of interest, such as teens or
older women.
After determining which compa-
nies seem 'most promising, examine
their financial reports to see how
healthy they really are. Call each


0
pani
in 19
1980,
acres o
about $6
like a ques


company and request its latest
financial statements, or look them
up online.
Examine sales growth via the
income statement. Ideally, focus on
"same-store" sales growth, reflect-
ing sales at established stores.
Growing chains will always be
looking to add more locations, but
if a company is also able to increase
sales at older stores without increas-
ing store size or its labor force, it
will make more money.
Check out profit margins. Strong
gross margins imply that the firm is
selling products at close to full
.price and that consumers are willing
to pay extra for the company's
brand. High margins also suggest
effective inventory management.
Relatively high net-profit margins
mean a sizable chunk of each sales
dollar is kept as profit.
On the balance sheet, check. inven-
tory. High levels are risky, as inven-
tory value may decline before it's
sold. Many goods are perishable,
either literally (food spoils) or theo-
retically (items could go out of fash-
ion). If inventory levels are growing
faster than sales, that's a red flag. ,
These are just some of many mea-
sures to examine when evaluating
retailers. Learn more on retailing at
http://retailindustry.about.com
and www.nrf.com.


Tax Laws Change
In grad school, my real estate
professor said that the dumbest
thing one could do was make a
real estate decision based on tax
considerations, since tax laws
could change overnight. I never
violated that rule in real estate, but
I did invest in an oil partnership
where the only benefit was the
favorable tax treatment and lost
-money, because the tax laws did
change. No investment decision
should be based on tax considera-
tions. MS., Dallas.
The Fool Responds: This is a
great lesson. It's smart to consider
'taxes when you invest, but don't
let the tail wag the dog. First be
sure you find the investment
compelling on its own merits.
Some folks these days are even
wary of Roth IRAs, which promise
tax-free withdrawals in retirement.
They remember how Social Secu-
rity benefits were never supposed
to be taxed.
Roths are very attractive, espe-
cially for those with many years in
which their investments .can grow
powerfully. Just keep it in the back
of your mind that Roth IRAs may
work a little differently in the


AsktheIFoo


********************************* future than they do today. ity i m Inua. lUe company also boasts
Name That Company a 60 percent interest in a joint ven-
NameThat CompanyDo you have an embarrassing ture to produce similar equipment in
Y > I trace my roots back to a sawmill lesson learned the hard ? China, and it has also acquired a 65
Boil it down to 100 mwro. (or percent stake in a Chinese manufac-
in 1858 and to a 1900 purchase of less) andsendit to The Motley Fool/o My turer of lattice boom crawler cranes.
> 900 aceoWaig e less) and send it to Tnhe Motley Fool co omy These and other international
900,000 acres of Washington state DumbestInvestment. Got one that worked? natives are building a formidable
4 Initiatives are building a formidable
timberland (the largest private land SubmittoMySmartest Invstment. Ifwe fortress for Terex. Assess its long-
transaction in American history-at the : print yours, you'll win a Fool'scap! term potential accordingly.
time). During World War I, my spruce LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
was used to make airplanes. Today I'm My original parent company began in 1960 as a research lab serving the
ne of Earth's biggest forest products com- government. It soon began buying other companies and morphed into an
es, managing my land sustainably. (Back industrial manufacturer. In 2007, it split into three separate companies, a
health-care one (now Covidien), an electronics one, and ... me. I'm a leading
37, I ran a "Timber Is a Crop" campaign.) In provider of security products and services, fire protection and detection
Mount St. Helens devastated 68,000 products and services, valves and controls, and more. You may know my
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4_ -'A T A- ..... 7


Pilots to be exempt from some airport checks


By DAVID KOENIG
and EILEEN SULLIVAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The Transportation Security
Administration has agreed to let airline pilots skip
the security scanning and pat-downs that passen-
gers face at the nation's airports, pilot groups said
Friday.
Beginning Friday, pilots traveling in uniform or
on airline business will be allowed to pass security
by presenting two photo IDs, one from their com-
pany and one from the government, to be checked
against a secure flight crew database, the TSA
said.
The Obama administration's retreat on screen-
ing pilots comes less than a week before the hectic
Thanksgiving holiday travel period.
Some travelers are threatening to protest the
security measures by refusing to go through the
scanning machines. Airlines are caught in the
middle.
Pilots welcomed the changes.
"This looks good. It's basically what we've been.
after for 10 years," says Sam Mayer, a spokes-
man for the Allied Pilots Association at American
Airlines, the union that raised objections to the new
screening process about two weeks ago. "Pilots are
not the threat here; we're the target."


Pilots have also argued that it made no sense to
subject them to the same screening process as pas-
sengers since they control the plane.
If they were intent on terrorism, they could
crash it and the scanners wouldn't provide extra
safety.
TSA offered few details about the specific chang-
es in screening of pilots, which expands a program
tested at airports in Baltimore, Pittsburgh and
Charlotte, N.C.
"Pilots are trusted partners who ensure the.safe-
ty of millions of passengers flying every day," said
TSA Administrator John Pistole. He said putting
pilots through a faster screening process would be
a more efficient use of the agency's resources.
Pistole has defended the invasive pat-downs and
said intelligence about potential terrorist attacks
and plots to evade airport security have guided
these changes.
Still, some lawmakers want a review of the
government's pat-down procedure.
Pilots have complained about possible health
effects from radiation emitted by full-body scan-
ners that produce a virtually naked image, and
they said that pat-dowrls by security inspectors
were demeaning.
Passengers have lodged similar complaints, but
the government is not changing the screening
requirements for air travelers.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Wednesday, a Transportation Security Administration
agent performs an enhanced pat-down .on a traveler at a security area at
Denver International Airport.


GM stock slips, hovers

above initial price on

second day of trading


By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT General
Motors' stock fell the sec-
ond day it traded, although
it stayed above its initial
price Thursday of $33.
GM's stock dipped as
low as $33.11 early Friday,
more than 3 percent below
Thursday's closing price,
before climbing back to
$33.95 at midday.
Investors and the U.S.
government are watching
how the market views GM.
The company's stock went
public Thursday amid an
impressive turnaround 16
months after exiting bank-
ruptcy protection.


The second-day stock dip
isn't surprising, although a
drop below the IPO price
could spell trouble because
it would trigger computer-
ized "stop loss" orders to sell
millions of shares, said Scott
Sweet, senior managing part-
ner of the research firm IPO
Boutique. He expects vola-
tility for three or four days
before the shares stabilize.
The stock jumped as high
as $35.99 in its market debut
before pulling back later on
Thursday.
Almost 457 million GM
shares traded, about one
tenth of all trading on the
New York Stock Exchange.
GM closed up 3.6 percent at
$34.19.


WE ARE-
GEN E R A L


S NE \
W O'TOR 5


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The General Motors headquarters are shown in Detroit in
this photo taken Thursday. Shares of the reborn General
Motors lost momentum in early trading Friday, dropping
more than 2 percent on their second day of trading as a
new company.


Local physician


recognized with


national award

Staff report

Dr. GuyS. Straussreceived
the American Medical
Association's Physician
Recognition Award with
Commendation.
The nationally recog-
nized award is achieved by
accumulating at least 270
continuing medical hours
over a three-year period. Dr.
Strauss amassed 487 hours
in that time period.
Dr. Strauss is a board-cer-
tified specialist in Internal
Medicine and Critical Care
and has been in practice in
Lake City since 1992. Dr. Guy Strauss


?-or u m: > @fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attic The
be enateJ one a Jawing for a nifty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individual financial advice.
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Terex Builds a Fortress
Beleaguered equipment manufac-
turer Terex (NYSE: TEX) is finally
establishing defenses against domes-
tic economic malaise and uncertainty.
The company posted a bigger-than-
expected loss-for the third quarter,
despite a 15 percent jump in net sales
to $1.08 billion. Its consolidated order
backlog expanded 8 percent sequen-
tially from the second quarter, thanks
in large part to a 45 percent surge
within the aerial work platform seg-
ment. Demand for Terex's telehan-
dlers and other mobile lifting equip-
ment emerged principally from South
America and an $18.9 million supply
contract with the' U.S. Marine Corps.
By far the most encouraging
development has been Terex's effort
to increase its overseas manufactur-
ing presence in places such as China
and India. Developing a strategic
presence in emerging Asian markets
may be the single greatest differen-
tiator between survivors and victims
of economic stagnation in the West.
Developing markets account for
one-third of Terex's overall sales. Cit-
ing robust demand for coal-crushing
Equipment in places such as Aus-
tralia, Terex aims to increase produc-
tion at its materials processing facil-


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


'


F









BUSINESS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21. 2010


BUSINESS BRIEFS


Harrah's folds hand on planned IPO

LAS VEGAS Harrah's Entertainment Inc. canceled
its planned initial public offering Friday, folding its hand
for now on what was already a money-losing bet on return-
ing to the stock market just three years after the casino
giant went private.
It's a big setback for the investors who paid top dollar
for the largest American casino company right before the
economy tanked and took the gambling industry with it.
The cancellation is also a sign that an improving market
for stock offerings, highlighted by General Motors Co.'s
successful return to the New York Stock Exchange on
Thursday, isn't ready for debt-laden companies in indus-
tries that are still near the bottom.
Apollo Management Group, led by buyout titan Leon
Black, and Texas Pacific Group paid $17.1 billion and took
on $12.4 billion in debt in 2007 to take Harrah's private in
one of the biggest leveraged buyouts ever. At the time,
private money was on a shopping spree for casino opera-
tors, considered hot targets for their cash-generating abil-
ity and real estate holdings. Then the financial crisis hit,
taking with it many of the dollars that kept slot machines
spinning and blackjack tables full.

New documents found in Waters case

WASHINGTON The ethics trial of Rep. Maxine
Waters was postponed Friday, as the House ethics com-
mittee found new documents connected to charges that
she improperly tried to help a bank in which her husband
owned stock.
Waters, a senior member of the Financial Services
Committee, was set to go on trial Nov. 29 before a jury
of eight House colleagues. She has vigorously fought the
charges, saying she did nothing more than set up a meet-
ing between an association of minority-owned banks and
U.S. Treasury officials.
In June, an investigative House panel charged Waters,
D-Calif., on three counts, saying she improperly tried to
obtain federal money for OneUnited Bank. Her husband,
Sidney Williams, had an investment in the bank that was
worth more than $351,000 on June 20, 2008, but dwindled
to $175,000 by Sept. 30, 2008.

Judge rejects dismissal of Toyota suits

SANTA ANA, Calif. A federal judge in California said
Friday he will not dismiss lawsuits against Toyota from car
owners who claim sudden-acceleration defects caused the
value of the vehicles to plummet.
U.S. District Judge James Selna said in a 63-page ruling
that he believes suits filed by car owners who say the value
of their vehicles plummetted after a series of recalls by the
Japanese automaker can move forward. Selna said he will
issue a final ruling within a week.
Hundreds of lawsuits have been filed since the auto-
maker starting recalling millions of vehicles because of
acceleration problems in several models and brake defects
with the Prius hybrid.

IPOs scheduled to- debut next week.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 16 file photo, traders Martin Durkin (left) and Michael Ditrani work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.



US stocks waver after China


makes banks raise reserves


By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK Stocks
wavered Friday after
China took more steps to
curb inflation, which trad-
ers fear could slow down
the country's growth.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average pared early
morning losses and was
down 6 points in late
afternoon trading. The
Dow had surged 173 the
day before on hopes for
a bailout for Ireland and
a successful initial public
offering of new shares of
General Motors Co. after
the automaker emerged
from bankruptcy.
With no major econom-
ic reports due out in the
U.S. Friday, investors were


again focusing on overseas
news.
"As long as the Chinese
government takes more
restrictive actions, that's
going to be somewhat of
a roadblock for equities,"
said Alan Gayle, a senior
investment strategist at
RidgeWorth Investments.
The Chinese govern-
ment ordered banks in
that country to hold more
reserves, the second time
it has done so in the past
two weeks. The goal is
to curb lending and avoid
speculative bubbles.
Inflation in China shot up
to a more than two-year
high last month. Investors
also expect China to raise
key interest rates as part
of its effort to curb infla-
tion.


Raising bank reserve
requirements and raising
interest rates could slow
China's robust economy.
Expansion in China has
been vital to the global
economy because of slug-
gish recoveries elsewhere
around the world, includ-
ing the U.S. Europe.
China is a major con-
sumer of commodities
including copper and oil,
which it needs to fuel its
rapidly expanding econo-
my. News of China's latest
moves to slow its economy
helped send prices of com-
modities lower. Oil fell 0.5
percent and copper was off
0.1 percent.
"China is doing what's
best for China," said Chris
Hobart, founder of Hobart
Financial Group. But he


said such actions aren't
necessarily good for any-
one else.
The Dow fell 6.02, or 0.05
percent, to 11,175.21. It had
been down as much as 62
points earlier.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 0.17, or 0.01
percent, to 1,196.52. The
Nasdaq composite index
fell 0.29, or 0.01 percent, to
2,514.11.
Stocks pulled back slight-
ly a day a rally triggered
by a successful return of
General Motors Co. in the
stock market and signs that
Ireland was close to agree-
ing to a bailout. Ireland's
finances have been decimat-
ed after it nationalized three
of its six banks following
the collapse of a real estate
boom.


NEW YORK The following is a list of initial public
offerings planned for the coming week. Sources include
Renaissance Capital, Greenwich, CT (www.renaissance-
capital.com) and SEC filings. Week of Nov. 22
Anacor Pharmaceuticals Inc. Palo Alto, Calif., 4.7
million shares, priced $16 to $18 each, managed by
Citigroup and Deutsche Bank..Proposed Nasdaq symbol
ANAC. Business: Biopharmaceutical company focused on
discovering, developing and commercializing novel small-
molecule therapeutics. Originally scheduled last week.
Previously filed and withdrew in 2008.
China Xiniya Fashion Limited Jinjiang, China, 8 mil-
lion American depositary shares, each representing four
ordinary shares, priced $9 to $11, managed by Cowen
& Co. Proposed NYSE symbol XNY. Business: Specialty
retailer that designs and manufactures men's business
casual apparel in China.
SYSWIN Inc. Beijing, China, 12 million American
depositary shares, each representing four ordinary
shares, priced $9.25 to $11.25, managed by Morgan
Stanley. Proposed NYSE symbol SYSW. Business: Leading
primary real estate service provider in China with opera-
tions in 17 cities.
Zogenix Inc. San Diego, 6 million shares, priced
$12 to $14 each, managed by Wells Fargo and Leerink
Swann. Proposed Nasdaq symbol ZGNX. Business:
Pharmaceutical company commercializing and develop-
ing products for the treatment of central nervous sys-
tem disorders and pain. Originally scheduled last week.
Previously filed and withdrew in 2008.

Amazon gives hint on Kindle users

SEATTLE Amazon.com is giving a hint about how
many people are using the Kindle and related apps.
The Kindle e-reader starts at $139 for a version that
can wirelessly download content over Wi-Fi, but Amazon
also offers a number of free applications that can be used
to read Kindle books on gadgets such as laptops, tablet
computers and smart phones.
The online retailer says millions are reading Kindle
books on the dedicated e-reader and on free apps. This
still doesn't give an indication regarding how many people
have bought the Kindle something which the Seattle-
based company has never given precise details about.
But does make it clear that many people are flocking to
Amazon's device and Kindle software.
There are currently more than 725,000 books in Amazon.
com Inc.'s Kindle Store.

Union wants talks on Resorts sale

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. The union representing nearly
800 hotel, food and beverage workers at Resorts Atlantic
City is trying to limit the impact of proposed job and pay
cuts when new owners take over the casino next month.
Local 54 of Unite-HERE has a negotiating session
scheduled for Monday afternoon with current manage-
ment of the casino. It's also seeking talks with the new
owner, Gomes Gaming Group. Gomes is due to take over
on Dec. 5 when the $35 million sale closes.


* Associated Press


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4C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


We. St Excha... e Hihli. .
- -. ; ; ; .- . .- ...


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


A NYSE
7,641.08 +17.84


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AccretvH n 12.44 +2.81 +29.2
Envestntn 16.15 +3.20 +24.7
IDTCorp 22.54 +4.43 +24.5
DelMnte 17.51 +3.31 +23.3
IDTCpC 22.35 +4.20 +23.1
Rotekh 3.27 +.59 +22.0
UnivTravel 6.60 +1.18 +21.8
Newcastle 5.72 +.91 +18.9
Salesforce 136.74+21.73 +18.9
Havery 12.25 +1.71. +16.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaNepst 3.62 -1.43 -28.3
JinkoSol n 26.06 -8.58 -20.2
DaqoNEnn 11.52 -2.44 -17.5
GrtAtlPac 3.61 -.70 -16.2
ReneSola 9.51 -1.62 -14.6
M corpn 30.32 -5.00 -14.2
WMbros 7.09 -1.17 -14.2
NaviosAcq 5.00 -.80 -13.8
SouFunn 76.77-12.16 -13.7
PulteGrp 6.50 -.99 -13.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 19313487 4.27 -.02
FordM 9550562 16.28 -.02
S&P500ETF8605108120.29 +.09
BkofAm 7345434 11.66 -.46
GenMotn 5594238 34.26
SPDR Fndcl4069462 14.86 -.09
iShEMkts 3789137 46.51 +.10
RegionsFn3500479 5.50 -.65
SprintNex 2587853 4.01 -.02
GenElec 2478320 16.22 -.03

Diary
Advanced 1,479
Declined 1,668
New Highs 192
New Lows 168
Total issues 3,185
Unchanged 38
Volume 21,346,605,264


Y Amex 3 Nasdaq
2,104.49 -2.91 2,518.12 -.09


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
CheniereEn 6.16 +1.79 +41.0 CleanDsIrs 17.08 +7.43 +77.0
NewConcEn 5.00 +1.35 +37.0 Ladish 46.17+15.56 +50.8
Talbotswt 2.02 +.47 +30.3 Cyanotch h 3.38 +1.05 +45.1
MagHRes 6.17 +1.22 +24.6 EntreMrs 5.69 +1.65 +40.8
eMagin 5.36 +1.01 +23.2 RurbanFn 3.37 +.92 +37.6
SinoHub 3.10 +.52 +20.2 CostPlus 7.24 +1.96 +37.1
Suprmind 2.81 +.44. +18.6 ionO&G wt 3.43 +.82 +31.4
UraniumEn 6.04 +.89k +17.3 EDAPTMS 4.27 +1.00 +30.6
ASpecRfts 18.59 +2.54 +15.8 Exelixis 5.56 +1.30 +30.5
CagleA 8.37 +1.12 +15.4 AltoPIrm 17.78 +4.13 +30.3

Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
SoCTBcp 4.10 -2.10 -33.9 StilFWArs 16.50-16.50 -50.0
HalitwdGp 20.79 -8.18 -28.2 RINOInt 6.07 -4.94 -44.9
VimetX 12.16 -2.95 -19.5 Aastromrs 2.40 -1.80 -42.9
HeraldNB 2.10 -.48 -18.6 CarverBcp 2.24 -1.16 -34.1
LonsgeiPI 2.88 -.50 -14.8 QKLStrs 3.84 -1.68 -30.4
SearchMed 2.98 -.47 -13.6 MMTripn 27.06-11.09 -29.1
ChinaShen 2.77 -.41 -12.9 Merrimnrs 2.17 -.86 -28.4
OrienPap n 5.58 -.81 -12.7 Tekmira g 5.20 -2.02 -28.0
Cohen&Co 4.31 -.61 -12.4 Netlist 2.18 -.68 -23.8
RareEleg 9.94 -1.16 -10.5 Tri-Tech 9.97 -2.75 -21.6

Most Active ($1si or more) Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NovaGldg 381789 14.60 -.06 Ciso 6560822 19.61 -.54.
Taseko 221585 4.59 +.02 PwShs QQQ348480552.47 -.04
GoldStrg 215304 4.34 -.15 SiriusXM 3067390 1.40 -.02
NA Pall g 202923 5.68 +.35 Microsoft 2851082 25.69 -.42
NwGold g 193833 8.98 +.50 Intel 2720077 21.14 -.40
GrtBasGg 193328 2.75 -.32 MicronT 1647250 7.39 -.33
NthgtMg 185142 2.93 -.14 Dellinc 1613698 13.90 +.48
CheniereEn132549 6.16+1.79 Oracle 1350997 28.15 -.17
KodiakOg 111307 4.49 +.24 Level3h 1347948 1.00 -.14
PhrmAth 100066 3.34 +.24 Yahoo 1195531 16.57 +.02

Diary Diary
Advanced 213 Advanced 1,471
Declined 325 Declined 1,341
New Highs 22 New Highs 210
New Lows 57 New Lows 139
Total issues 557 Total issues 2,883
Unchanged 19 Unchanged 71
Volume 614,835,371 Volume 9,836,518,523


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name Ex Div Last
,T&T Inc NY 1.68 28.32
AutoZone NY ... 251.20
3kofAmn NY .04 11.6608
BobEvans Nasd .80 33.08
,NBFnPA Nasd .66 14.37
GSX NY 1.04 62.44
Chevron NY 2.88 83.94
Cisco Nasd ... 19.61
Citigrp NY 4.27
ocaCI NY 1.76 54.32
Delhaize NY 2.02 73.41
Dell Inc Nasd ... 190
OirFnBear NY :.. 11.78
DrxFBulls NY ... 23.01
EMC Cp NY 21.82
FamilyDIr NY .62 48.84
FordM NY ... 16.28
SenElec NY .48 16.22
SenMot n NY ... 34.26
HomeDp NY .95 31.22
ShSilver NY 26.74
ShEMkts NY .59 46.51
ShR2K NY .79 72.45
Intel Nasd .72 21.14
JPMorgCh NY .20 39.41
LVSands NY ... 49.39
Level3h Nasd ... 1.00
Lowes NY .44 22.09


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg
-.14 -0.5 +1.0
+.52 +0.2 +58.9
-.46 -3.8 -22.6
+3.33 +11.2 +14.2
-.64 -4.3 -10.1
+1.59 +2.6 +28.8
-.78 -0.9 +9.0
-.54 -2.7 -18.1
-.02 -0,5 +28.,9
+1.40 +2.2 +12.8
+.39 +0.5 -4.3
+.48 +3.5 -3.2
+.16 +1.4 -39.4
-.52 -2.2 -6.9
+.10 +0.5 +24.9
+.48 +1.0 +75.5
-.02 -0.1 +62.8
-.03 -0.2 +7.2
+.2
-.22 -0.7 +7.9
+1.22 +4.8 +61.7
+.10 +0.2 +12.1
+.42 +0.6 +16.0
-.40 -1.8 +3.6
-.20 -0.5 -5.3
+.97 +2.0+230.6
-.14 -12.3 -34.6
+.40 +1.8 -5.6


Name Ex Div
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .56
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .33
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.31
SearsHIdgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .16
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
Yahoo Nasd ...


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg


-6.0 +33.2
+1.0 +27.5
-4.3 -30.0
-1.6 -15.7
+0.1 -33.8
-3.1 -1.6
... -25.8
-1.6 -21.2
+0.8 +8.4
-0.6 +14.8
+3.2 +20.7
+0.1 +6.4
-0.3 -7.7
+0.2 +29.3
-0.1 +14.7
-0.3 -24.7
-10.6 +4.(
+1.3 +6.A
+0.1 +7.9
-7.9 -23.1
-1.5+133.1
-0.1 +14.3
-0.5 +9.6
-0.6 +3.;
+0.1 +5.6
+0.5 +1.8
-0.2 +1.9
+0.1 -1".3


Stock Footnotes: = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h =Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 62 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock spli
of at least 50 percent within the past ear. ri = Right to buy security at a specified price, a = Stock has split by al
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. '.1 = ir.i i -,.utl *:. ri v-,r.np o r = When astntul i =
When issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee'covering market costs Is paid from fund assets'd = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee.f = ht h .1iia ;. r,f ra r r, : murh.in l 1 arecm n, eo Na = no a- aiai l n .a pd. el ou ad
net asset value. s a ruv t.[ill i r.are. iun.,) e i week Ir.d panl a nmdr unkr dunr..) I ne e-v..Galners and
Losers must be worm at least $2 to D istea n l taoas at left. Most Actives must be wonrh at least $1. Volume i
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
PrirrAe Rjie : ".'
,.oru0 t7.e '. 0 '.
F.l-ir l Furn.l .ie '00- 2 i'0 2
Tre ,r e
r I u .5r, .-5_
-rr..I.T 0 1 i II
'. -rr,.,r,lr. 1 9 r l r, .
-,-ye sr I '.il I -1.
10-vjr 2 87 2 .5
4-ye-ar 4 24 .-126


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0146 1.0104
Britain 1.5973 1.6044
Canada 1.0183 1.0214
Euro .7314 .7334
Japan 83.49 83.45
Mexico 12.3010 12.3000
Switzerlnd .9952 .9965
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones


,ii


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 11,203.55
1-week change: 10.97 (0.1%)
11 ,500 . .... ...................


9.39 -178.47


MON TUES


-15.62 173.35 22.32


WED THUR FRI


11,000


10,500


10,000*


9,500


3 Total Assett Total Return/Rank Pet Min Init
6 Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCO TotRetls Cl 147,053 11.53 -1.1 +9.3/B +8.5/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStldx LB 65,975 30.07 +3.5 +14.1/A +1.9/B NL 3,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 64,096 29.41 +3.2 +10.1/D +2.3/8 5.75 250
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,470 49.97 +0.9 +7.8/D +4.6/C 5.75 250
3 Fidelity Contra LG 58,191 65.92 +4.2 +16.6/B +4.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds CpWdGrIA m WS 54,945 35.43 +1.8 +6.8/E +5.4/B 5.75 250
. American Funds IncAmerA m MA 51,266 16.43 +1.0 +11.6/B +4.3/A 5.75 250
it Vanguard Instldxl LB 50,875 110.03 +3.1 +11.8/B +1.4/C NL 5,000,000
it American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 47,546 27.20 +2.3 +8.7/D +2.0/8 5.75 250
= Vanguard 5001nv LB 46,538 110.74 +3.1 +11.7/B +1.3/C NL 3,000
Dodge & Cox InlStk FV 41,949 35.49 +2.2 +12.7/A +5.6/A NL 2,500
'r Dodge & Cox Stock LV 41,481 102.76 +3.9 +10.0/C -0.6/0 NL 2,500
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 39,464 41.31 +2.2 +8.3/C +6.6/A 5.75 250
n Vanguard Totilnt d FB 39,442 15.64 +2.3 +9.3/C +5.0/B NL 3,000
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 37,596 26.25 +2.3 +10.8/B +1.2/B 5.75 250
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl 35,429 11.53 -1.1 +9.0/B +8.2/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 35,236 30.08 +3.6 +14.2/A +2.0/B NL 10,000
Vanguard 500Adml LB 33,155 110.76 +3.1 +11.8/B +1.3/C NL 10,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 33,023 2.14 +1.0 +14.2/A +5.6/A 4.25 1,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 32,555 28.00 +3.4 +11.0/C +6.2/A 5.75 250
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 31,383 35.23 +3.1 +11.3/C +4.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds BalA m MA 30,718 17.45 +1.7 +10.2/C +3.3/C 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 29,529 110.04 +3.1 +11.8/B +1.4/C NL 200,000,000
Vanguard Welitn MA 28,985 30.41 +1.5 +8.7/D +5.2/A NL 10,000
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 28,883 11.53 -1.1. +8.8/B +8.0/A 3.75 1,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 27,605 12.36 -1.0 +7.9/C +3.9/E 3.75 250
Fidelity GrowCo LG 27,227 79.38, +5.8 +20.9/A +5.1/A NL 2,500
CA -Conservatve Allocation, Cl -intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign Lageroth, FV-Foreign
Large Value, IH -Wod Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Lar Growth, LV -La Value, MA-Moderate Alocation, MB -MiCap Blend, M -
MCap Value, SH -Spelly-heath, WS -Won Stock Total Return: Chg in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund perfoed vs.
others with same objecive:A is in lop 20%, E in bottom 20%. M Init Invt Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingslar. '


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


-.21 -15.5
+.30 +18.2
+.07 -37.8
-.28 +6.6
-.14 +1.0
-1.18 -12.2"
+1.38 +35.7
+.85 +6.5
-.16 -22.8
-.98 -3.3
+.10 +17.3
-.02 -12.0
-.11 -17.0
+.19 -65.0
+.15. +1.0
+2.18 +17.1
-.11 +26.0
+.42 +38.0
+.84 -4.3
-.77 +2.8
+.05 +5.5
-.35 +1.9
+.97 +11.4
+2.84 +88.9
-.10 +2.1
-.40 +5.8
-.27 -25.2
+1.20 +36.2
-.42 -5.3
-1.27 -22.6
+.32 +3.7
-.17 -7.2
.-.34 -3.5
-.48 +12.9
+1.64 +23.9
+.02 +15.7
+.07 -28.8
-.22 +.1
-.46 -22.6
+.35 -55.3
+.27 -.8
-3.15 -67.4
-.96 +26.4
+.52 +22.9
-.05 +10.3
... -3.2
-.29 -44.5
+.50 +17.5
+.03 -24.8
-.60 +5.7
-.07 +2.8
-1.25 +36.7
-.13 +17.4
-1.94 +29.7
-.01 +13.9
+1.59 +28.8
+.79 -3.7
-.18 +11.6
+4.46 +16.5
-1.45 -1.4
+1.18 +12.3
+.39 -6.0
-.52 +32.3
+2.93 +47.3
+.02 -18.3
-.29 +9.0
, -.08 -12.5
-.78 +9.0
+1.11 -19.4
-.03 +3.6
-.02 +28.9
+2.54 +51.7
+2.92 +49.1
+.57 +75.5
+1.40 +12.8
+1.95 -4.4
-.53 -6.8
-.50 +21.2
+.07 -14.5


Wkly TD WIly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


... +2.42 +1.8 34.69
... -1.80 -2.6 2.40
16 +.18 +5.1 11.68
32 -.68 -21.5 28.86
59 -.24 +95.5 49.53
16 +.93 +47.7 33.43
67 -.86 +22.5 164.82
6 +.34 +205.3 7.45
12 +.53 -2.8 55.00
20 -1.30 +45.6 306.73
18 -.06 -10.1 12.53
... -.04 -60.8 1.39
.. +1.54+117.9 18.65
54 -.01 +31.7 5.94
... +.62+118.9 23.34
39 +.19+119.3 10.11
40 -1.48 +32.9 33.77
19 -.03 +6.0 45.39
... -.35+133.7 4.44
93 -2.05+164.1 108.59.
16 -1.03 +11.6 43.09
86 +.68 +84.8 25.04
27 +1.88 +37.3 43.22
19 +.09 -24.6 5.75
25+19.58 +58.2 89.20
16 +.01 +3.1 23.16
16 +.40 -49.5 14.56
31 +.31 +8.9 60.61
... -.10 +S5.0 14.63
12 +1.04 +102.6 13.82
14 -.54 -18.1 19.61
46 +1.14 +58.4 65.93
... +.83 +7.1 7.24
30 +2.01 +43.9 65.24
16 +.13 +22.7 20.56
15 +.21 +21.9 19.39
23 +.27 +42.7 10.32
3 +.53 -65.5 4.75


Name Div
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
DR Horton .15'
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.20
DelMnte .36
DeltaAir ..
DenburyR ..
DevonE .64
DicksSptg ...
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBulls ...
DirxSCBull 4.77
DirxLCBear ..
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
Dynegy rs ...
EMC Cp ..
EIPasoCp .04
EldorGld g .05
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCanags .80
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FstBcpPR ..
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .60
FordM
FordM wt ...
FMCG 2.00
FrontierCm .75
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenGrPr n ..
GenMillss 1.12
GenMotn ...
GMcvpfB 2.38
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .36
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrLtAPac ...
HCP Inc 1.86
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwIllntl 1.21
HostHotls .04
Huntsmn .40
Hypercom ..
IAMGId g .06
iShGolds .
iSAstIa .81
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn, .16
iSMalas .25
iShMex .75
iShSing .38
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20T 3.83
iS Eafe 1.38




Name Div
Costco .82
Cree Inc
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DiscCm A ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EricsnTel .28
Exelixis
Expedia .28
ExpScrips...
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .04
FsISolar ...
Rextm
FosterWhl ...
GT Solar ..
Genzyme ...
GileadSci
Google
GreenMtC s
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
HumGen
IntgDv
Intel .72
Intersil .48
Intuit
IsilonSys ...
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
4.9 14 -.51 +7.0 48.63
3.3 1 +.23 -17.1 29.17
1.1 9 -.49 -7.7 17.83
1.4 14 -1.03 -3.6 10.48
4.9 13 ... +4.9 45.71
.2 18 +.14 +16.2 43.69
... 8 +.01 -57.2 7.73
1.5 20 +1.12 +44.2 77.98
2.1 15 +3.31 +54.4 17.51
... 29 +.30 +20.9 13.76
... 25 -.59 +24.9 18.48
.9 7 +.72 -.4 73.20
.. 24 +4.66 +37.1 34.09
... ... -.48 -58.8 20.30
... +.16 -39.4 11.78
... ... -.52 -6.9 23.01
.2 ... +.77 +33.8 57.17
... ... -.10 -39.5 10.35
.4 15 -.20 +25.1 18.40
.9 18 -.74 +14.8 37.01
4.3 14 -.10 +9.9 42.76
1.9 21 +.41 +14.8 31.71
5.6 12 -.18 +2.3 17.61
... ... +.42 -43.5 5.11
... 28 +.10 +24.9 21.82
.3 11 +.58 +42.8 14.04
.. 45 -.71 +20.5 17.08
2.5 21 +.38 +30.9 55.75
2.8 15 -.50 -11.5' 28.68
5.3 11 -.05 -18.2 40.00
2.5 13 -.45 +3.4 70.54
... ... -.04 -88.6 .26
6.1 13 +.88-22.0 36.25
3.3 1 +2.18 +64.7 18.35
... 8 -.02 +62.8 16.28
... ... -.04 +57.9 7.64
2.0 13 -2.12 +26.8 101.80
8.2 16 +.17 +17.4 9.17
... 8 -.71 -8.3 20.12
1.3 5 +.06 -14.3 12.73
1.9 12 +.21 -.8 20.70
... ... -.30 +7.9 15.10
3.2 15 -1.23 -.8 35.11
... ... ... +.2 34.26
4.7 ... ... +.1 50.50
18 +.02 +2.0 11.58
2.5 ... -.33 -24.6 12.76
1.0 3 -.62 +27.3 16.69
.8 ... -.69 +16.3 45.75
.8 9 +.84 -1.3 166.67
... 37 +.23 -26.7 10.33
... ... -.70 -69.4 3.61
5.7 50 -1.21 +6.6 32.56
.9 23 +2.19 +26.3 38.01
.8 8 -.83 +1.3 23.57
... 86 +.17 +38.8 8.58
-..36 +.28 +3.2 12.30
.6 9 +.34 +16.4 70.40
.8 11 +.28 -17.5 42.49
3.0 17 -.22 +7.9 31.22
2.4 19 +2.57 +27.0 49.78
.2 ... +.27 +38.0 16.11
2.9 18 +.22 +20.4 13.59
24 +.85 +128.4 7.24
36 -.25 +9.2 17.08
-.15 +23.2 13.23
3.3 ... -.17 +7.8 24.62
3.3 ... +.51 +3.6 77.26
2.5 ... -.49 +22.8 19.23
1.5 .. +.24 +7.7 10.49
1.8 +.09 +31.9 14.01
1.3 ... +1.20 +21.9 59.55
2.7 ... -.13 +20.4 13.83
... ... +.09 +8.6 14.08
... ... +1.22 +61.7 26.74
1.5 ... -1.36 +5.7 44.66
1.3 ... +.10 +12.1 46.51
4.0 ... +.78 +7.5 96.59
2.4 ... +.33 +4.5 57.77


Wkly YTD Wly
Name Div Yld PE Cha %Chq Last


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iShR2K' .79
iShREst 1.88
ITW 1.36
IngerRd .28
IBM 2.60
Intl Coal ..
IntlGame .24
IntPap .50
Interpublic
Invesco .44
ItauUnibH ..60
JCrew ....
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JanusCap .04
JinkoSol n ...
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .64
JnprNtwk ...
Kellogg 1.62
Keycorp .04
Kimco .72
KingPhrm ...
Kinross g .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
UllyEli 1.96
United .60


,+.42 +16.0 72.45
-1.23 +17.0 53.73
-.13 -1.5 47.29
-1.10 +14.5 40.91
+1.31 +10.8 145.05
+.89 +81.6 7.01'
-.35 -15.0 15.95
-.87 -7.4 24.80
+.03 +43.2 10.57
-.09 -6.6 21.93
+.06 +8.1 24.67
+2.58 -18.4 36.49
-.20 -5.3 39.41
+.64 -13.5 15.03
-.10 -15.9 11.31
-6.58+136,7 26.06
+.16 -.9 63.83
+.22 +34,6 36.67
-1.08 +30.2 34.73
+.03 -7.9 48.98
-.36 +38.0 7.66
-.57 +21.0 16.37
-.02 +15.2 14.13
-.46 -2.8 17.88
+3.59 +2.0 55.01
-.18 +12.0 30.44
-1,29 +60.3 11.24
+.17 -5.3 5.69
+.97 +230.6 49.39
-.48 +21.9 15.57
-.26 -3.4 34.50
+1.37 +71.6 33.01


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
1.2 23 +1.36 +12.5 66.56
... 33 +4.85 +3.5 58.34
... 33 +.58 +50.2 15.86
... 13 +.48 -3.2 13.90
... ...+2.34 +42.6 37.47
... 25 -.29 +26.4 42.15
31 +1.94 +38.1 42.34
6.4 11 -.45 -26.9 16.28
... 21 +,10 -5.7 5.49
... ... +.17 -13.9 15.15
.. 15 +.16 +28.8 30.30
... ... -.48 -13.5 15.35
2.7 ... +.42 +14.9 10.56
... ... +1.30 -24.6 5.56
1.1 17 -.38 +1.9 26.21
... 27 +1.16 +23.5 53.38
... 66 -1.17 +131.6 122.69
.3 ... -.61 +25.7 12.26
... 17-11.64 -6.4 126.75
... 21 +.35 -2.9 7.10
... 13 +.77 -1.9 28.88
.. 8-1.43 +29.7 7.21
... ... +1.47 +45.5 71.31
... 11 +.28 -12.0 38.08,
... 24-12.46 -4.7 590.83
.. 59 -1.19 +11.4 30.26
... ... -.25 -43.9 2.68
... ... -.61 +11.4 16.15
5.2 10 +.05 -15.7 11.58
... ... +.60 -20.9 24.20
.. 40 +.28 -.8 6.42
3.4 11 -.40 +3.6 21.14
3.7 ... -.14 -14.9 13.06
... 26 -3.11 +46.2 44.93
... ... +7.47 +392.1 33.76
... 17 -.86 +34.0 7.64
... ... +.36 +45.8 12.03
... 22 -.03 +24.4 6.78


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


JoyGIbl .70
KLA Tnc 1.00
LTXCrd rs ...
Level3 h ...
LibtyMIntA...
UmelghtN
UnearTch .92
MELA Sci ...
MarvellT
Mattel .83
Maximintg .84
Mediacom ..
MelcoCrwn ..:
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20
Oxigene h ...
PDLBio 1.00
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PacCapB h ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
PetsMart .50
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.33
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ..
RschMotn ...


+4.07 +48.2
+.06 +1.6
+1.17 +42.5
-.14 -34.6
+.32 +43.5
-1.04 +68.4
+.74 +5.3
-.62 -51.7
+.26 -3.2
+1.41 +25.6
+1.55 +15.9
+1.61 +89.5
+.05 +84.8
-.33 -30.0
-.42 -15.7
-2.65 +49.8
+.04 +214.1
-.17 +3.6
-.24 +34.7
-.27 +27.6
+.49 -26.4
-.02 -9.1
-.17 +14.8
-.01 -77.7
+.29 -16.5
-.12 -13.6
+1.44 +49.3
-.18 -66.7
-.61 +28.3
+.62 -7.4
+.04 -24.9
-.32 +41.8
+.01 +26.2
+.34 +106.7
-.04 +14.7
+.49 +3.7
+.17 +52.8
-.14 -13.1


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68
AbtLab 1.76
AberFtc .70
Accenture .90
AMD
Aetna .04
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ..
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52
AmAxle
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .88
AnnTaylr
Annaly 2.60
Apache .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.36
Avon .88
BB&TCp .60.
BHP BilLt 1.74
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .52
BcoSantand .80
BcoSBrasil .33
BkofAm .04
Bklreind 1.04
BkNYMel .36
Bar iPVix rs...
BarrickG .48
BerkHBs ...
BestBuy .60
Bitauto n
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ...
BoydGm
BrMySq 1.28
CB REJlis ...
CBSB .20
CF Minds '.40
CMS Eng .64
CSX 1.04
CVSCare .35
Calpine
Cameron ...
CapOne .20
CardnlHIth .78
CareFusion ..
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56
Coach .60
CocaCE .48
CocaCI 1.76
ColgPal 2.12
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy .40


Wkly YTD
Yld PE Chg %Chg
.8 11 +.63 -1.4
... ... +1.35 +30.7
... ... -.38 +166.1
... ... -.98 -11.7
11.0 9 +.06 +11.0
-.77 +33.2
.8 17 +.02 +49.6
1.3 36 -.57 +1.9
... +.35 -17.8.
2.9 11 +.78 +9.8
S ... -.79 +28.3
.2 ... +.15 +12.1
... -.04 +52.1
.8 ... -.55 -8.8
2.7 ... -.33 -20.1
.5 ... +1.89 +16.7
.12 +.39 +43.3
26 -.28 +15.8
20 +1.65 -5.1
2.6 11 -.03 -21.3
4.3 18 +.62 -3.3
1.9 11 -.79 +9.9
21 +.08 +60.0
37 -.29 +8.7
... -5.00 +136.0
1.9 27 -2.70 -27.3
.8 10 +.05 -13.4
.3 30 +.35 +17.3
39 +.13 +4.6
... 11 +.18 +29.2
... 97 +.65 +2.4
... ... -.02 -56.7


NatGrid 7.17
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .60
Nexen g .20
NextEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.24
NobleCorp .90
NokiaCp .56
Nordstrm .80
NorflkSo 1.44
Novartis 1.99
Nucor 1:44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 2.54
PG&ECp 1.82
PMI Grp ..
PNC .40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.12
Petrobras 1.12
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ ...
ProUltSP .43
ProUShL20 ..
ProUShtFn ...
ProURn rs .09
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProUShCrude...
ProgsvCp.-1.16
ProLogis .45
Prudent 1.15
PSEG 1.37
PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS ...
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ..
RadianGrp .01
RadioShk .25
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola ..
RepubSvc .80
Rowan
SpdrDJIA 2.57
SpdrGold
S&P500ETF2.31
SpdrHome .12
SpdrKbwBk .11
SpdrLehHY4.21 1
SpdrRetl .57
SpdrOGEx .20
SpdrMetM .35
Safeway .48
StJude
Saks
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ..
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .55
SiderNac s .58
SilvWhtn g ..


-.85 -4.5 46.62
16 +4.08 +40.0 61.73
12 -.15 -12.2 13.49
13 -.15 +14.1 17.13
15 -1.21 +27.5 60.34
... -.43 -9.5 21.66
13 -1.66 -1.6 51.97
13 -.17 +10.7 17.02
22 +3.19 +29.9 85.81
8 -.77 -11.2 36.13
... -.16 -21.2 10.12
17 +.77 +12.2 42.17
16 +.42 +17.1 61.38
13 +1.00 +4.1 56.64
59 -2.10 -18.6 37.96
16 +.73 +8.4 88.19
+.21 -27.3 4.69
... +3.98 +10.2 130.98
14 +.03 46.4 47.50
... -.02 +26.2 3.18
9 -.35 +6.6 56.29
14 -.41 -20.4 25.71
... +1.26 +3.4 15.98
24 +1.59 +31.0 59.24
24 +1.00 +20.7 32.13
16 +.07 +6.4 64.71
23 +.29 -21.7 18.80
.. -.16 -28.0 30.52
-.28 -29.6 33.59
9 -.05 -7.7 16.80
16 +.17 +24.1 59.81
27 +.34 +29.3 140.25
... +.06 -1.8 22.67
... -.09 -24.7 26.41
-.14 +26.8 75.42
... -.01 -33.5 12.67
... +.03 +13.9 43.56
... -.54 -27.3 36.28
... +.26 -24.4 18.31
... -1.00 +2.5 57.72
... -.23 -40.8 14.92.
.. -.10 -37.1 22.81
.. -.78 -19.8 10.17
... +.82 -6.5 12.76
13 -.42 +15.4 20.76
+.13 -2.0 13.41
8 +.43 +8.1 53.78
10 -.90 -7.5 30.76
... -.99 -35.0 6.50
.. +.40 +24.9 3.66
50 +.14 +64.6 6.93
... +.04 -34.6 3.74
-.16 +2.9 7.52
14 -1.19 -2.7 18.97
8 +.60 -8.8 47.01
-.65 +4.0 5.50
.-1.62 +99.8 9.51
22 -.10 -.5 28.17
13 +.53 +39.5 31.59
+.21 +7.6 112.01
-1.49 +23.2 132.20
... +.09 +7.9 120.29
-.61 +3.0 15.56
... -.47 +8.1 22.88
... +.12 +4.1 40.42
... +1.40 +29.2 46.00
+.60 +18.0 48.64
... +1.05 +18.2 60.99
-.29 +6.9 22.76
14 +.89 +7.5 39.55
... +.20 +74.4 11.44
...+21.73 +85.4 136.74
5 +.09 -44.2 5.26
20 +.02 +25.6 15.30
30 +2.32 +17.4 76.43
31 -,08 -19.9 15.08
... +.32 +10.5 30.84
... -.21 +6.0 16.93
54 +.91 +131.0 34.70


Name Div
SiivrcpM g .08
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAir .02
SwstnEngy ...
SprintNex ...
SP Malls 1.05
SP HIthC .58
SP CnSt .77
SP Consum .43
SP Engy 1.00
SPDR Fnc .16
SP Inds .60
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Syniverse ...
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TJX .60
TRWAuto ...
TaiwSemi .47
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .60
TenetHith ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
3M Co 2.10
TimeWam .85
Total SA 3.13
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSol s
Tycolntl .85
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
USAirwy ..
UtdContl ..
UPS B 1.88
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
USOilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
Vale SA .76
Vale SApf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
Vishayint ..
Walgm .70
WalterEn .50
WsteMInc 1.26
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint ..
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20
WmsCos .50
WmsSon .60
XLGrp .40
Xerox .17
Yamana g .12
YingliGm ..
YumBmds 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
3 -4.94 -78.0 6.07
... ... +2.30 +173.8 31.45
22 -.89 -6.0 15.36
8 +.41 +37.9 39.98
... -.20 +30.9 3.69
.. +.43 -10.4 12.20
5 +.84 -17.9 14.93
8.0 ... -.02 -26.8 5.13
8 +.94 +32.0 59.64
70 -.02+133.0 1.40
32 +.98 +70.0 24.12
.. 21 -.36 +14.0 8.70
1.7 18 +1.15 -12.9 21.43
1.7 25 +.70 +33.4 30.76
1.9 22 +.15 -9.4 16.05
... ... +.12 -9.5 1.14
...-16.50 -59.7 16.50
29 -1.66 -48.0 12.31
18 ... -3.7 17.23
1.1 17 +.25 -10.0 17.45
1.2 11 -.06 +17.6 6.68
1.5 18 -.17 -10.0 50.58
... 30 -4.31 -1.0 26.64
11 +.54 +82.2 10.93
+.11 -55.8 1.50
.. ... -.21 +219.5 2.46
... 23 +4.36 +6.5 37.26
6 +.64 +43.8 34.85
.6 ... +.74 +60.8 27.06
4.9 .. -.59 +16.7 26.94
... 32 -1.15 +66.5 45.71
7.5 20 +.25 +20.6 13.25
1.0 ... -.01 +76.9 102.99
2.4 13 +.54 +8.4 27.18
.. 22 +.02 -1.3 16.57
.2 ... -.86 +59.8 20.50


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AlexcoR g ...
AlldNevG ...
AmApparel ...
AmO&G ...
Augusta g ...
Aurizon g ...
BMB Munai ...
BarcUBS36...
BarcGSOil ..
CAMACEn ...
CanoPet ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn...
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeRg ...
CrSuiHiY .32
Crossh glf ..
Crystallxg ...
DejourE g ..
DenisnMg ...
EV LtdDur 1.39
EndvSilvg ...
Fronteerg ...
Gastar grs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldStr g ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
Hyperdyn ...
InovioPhm ..
IntTowerg ...
KodiakO g ..
LibertyAcq ..
LongweiPI ...
MaqHRes ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
6.1 ... +.06 +11.3 6.92
... ... +.49 +85.4 6.97
... 53 -.94 +75.9 26.53
... ... +.13 -54.8 1.40
.. 23 +.09+130.0 9.66
... ... -.05 +55.8 3.77
... ... +.39 +69.3 7.62
... .. +.21 -21.9 .89
... ... -.84 +3.7 43.82
... ... -88 -10.9 23.05
... ... -.10 -50.5 2.31
... ... -.09 -69.4 .30
... -26.5 .50
-.04 -28.9 .64
.1 .+.25 +35.6 18.68
... ...+1.79+154.5 6.16
10 -.41 +290.1 2.77
... ... -.11 +33.1 1.57
10.8 ... -.05 +.7 2.95
... ... +.08 +73.7 .33
... ... -.03 -19.7 .31
... ... -.01 +12.6 .34
... ... -.09 +102.4 2.57
8.6 ... -.01 +9.0 16.24
... ... -.13 +64.6 5.99
... ... +.05+123.2 8.77
... ... +.51 -3.1 4.64
... ... +.20 +168.3 5.58
... 43 -.15 +39.1 4.34
... ... -.12 +31.4 7.53
... ... -.32 +60.8 2.75
... ... +.19+266.7 3.19
... ... +.01 +8.8 1.24
... ... +.20 +16.5 8.26
... ... +.24 +102.3 4.49
... ... -.18 +8.5 10.49
... 7 -.50 +6.7 2.88
... ... +1.22 +298.1 6.17


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... +.72 +83.5 12.11
4.8 15 -.02 +14.3 38.07
.1 25 +.01 +18.7 13.57
... 22 +.53 -20.3 38.42
... ... -.02 +9.6 4.01
3.0 ... -.12 +7.3 35.39
1.9 ... +.07 -.2 31.00
2.7 ... +.10 +8.8 28.81
1.2 >.. +.23 +21.7 36.24
1.6 ... +.65 +11.5 63.59
1.1 ... -.09 +3.2 14.86
1.8 ... +.35 +17.9 32,76
1.3 ... -.03 +6.0 24.31
4.1 ... -.21 +.4 31.13
.1 ... -.45 -.2 43.44
... ... +.02 -2.0 34.59
... ... -.99 -55.0 7.48
.2 ... -.95 +19.1 24.16
3.6 ... -.68 -24.1 9.65
.. 26 +.28 +75.3 30.65
2.0 ... -.02 -1.0 2.03
3.6 15 +.15 +3.2 28.84
1.3 14 +.30 +26.1 46.09,
... 8 -1.69 +100.8 47.96
4.2 ... +.03 -3.1 11.08
1.8 15 +2.37 +16.4 56.31
... ... +.90 +43.0 50.02
... 2 -.28 -18.9 4.37
.. 8 +.28 +10.5 11.86
... 19 +.59 +12.0 15.18
1.6 13 +.99 +22.6 31.94
.4 ... +.24 +14.8 21.60
2.5 15 -.70 +2.8 85.01
2.8 14 +.02 +5.6 30.76
5.9 ... -.72 -16.9 53.19
... 8 +.62 -17.5 68.33
2.6 8 -.82 +11.3 55.49
9 -.57 -11.3 23.94
2.2 16 +.18 +6.4. 37.95
1.0 58 +.65 +27.5 15.64
... ... -.58 +7.3 16.64
.. 7 +.45+128.9 11.08
... ... +.75 +121.7 28.62
2.7 21 +.99 +20.5 69.11
.8 16 +.25 +10.5 24.87
... ... +.42 -41.2 5.93
... ... -1.25 -10.3 35.22
.4 ... +.70 -13.2 47.86
1.4 9 -.67 +18.1 36.00
2.3 ... +.22 +12.3' 32.59
2.6 ... +.30 +17.8 29.24
1.0 ... -.35 +16.8 19.57
1.2 .. -.01 +15.1 47.21
6.0 ... +.03 +5.3 32.59
1.6 13 -.56 +29.1 38.39
.8 20 +.26 -11.9 77.05
... 11 +.25 +86.1 13.96
2.0 16 -.07 -5.3 34.76
.5 17+10.90 +40.6 105.91
3.6 17 +.13 +4.2 35.22
.. 91 +.55 +11.9 20.05
... 5 +.53 +.5 58.61
.7 11 -.05 +1.9 27.49
1.7 28 -.22 +1.3 4.75
... 6 +1.40 -23.0 33.98
1.3 14 -.02 -4.0 18.09
1.2 ... -.27 +8.5 17.18
2.1 33 +.46 +11.5 23.51
1.8 20 -3.03 +57.0 32.62
2.0 19 +.05 +10.1 20.18
1.5 16 +.39 +38.1 11.68
1.0 27 -.21 +1.0 11.49
.. 14 +.10 -29.5 11.14
2.0 22 ... +45.2 50.79


Wky YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


Metalico ... ... 21
Minefndg ... ...
NIVS IntT ... ... ...
NeoStem ... ... ...
Nevsung ... ... ...
NewEnSys ... ... ...
NwGoldg ... ...
NA Pall g ... ...
NthnO&G ... ... 88
NthgtM g ... ... 24
NovaGldg ... ... ...
Oilsandsg ... ...
OrienPap n ... ... 3
ParaG&S .. ...
PhrmAth
PionDrill ... ...
PlatGpMetl ... ...
PolyMetg
PudaCoal ... ... 12
RareEleg ... ... ...
Rentech
Rubicon g ... ... ...
SinoHub ... ... 5
TanzRyg ... ...
Taseko ... ... .
TimberinR ... ... ...
TmsatlPtn ... ... ...
US Geoth ... ... ...
Ulur ... ... ...
Ur-Energy ... .....
Uranerz ... ... ...
UraniumEn ... ... ...
VantageDr ... ... ...
VimetX .50 .. 9
VistaGold ... ... ...
WFAdvlncol.02 10.3 ...
WizzardSft ... ... ..


-.13 -13.8
+.36 -3.2
-.22 -7.4
-.48 -10.3
-.09 +137.4
+.16 +3.8
+.50 +146.7
+.35 +62.3
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-.14 -4.9
-.06 +138.2
-.01 -60.9
-.81 -46.8
-.02 +14.5
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-.04 +5.7
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+.02 +8.8
+.01 +8.3
+.07 -1.2
-.04 -20.3
-.00 -57.7
+.17+125.6
+.35 +146.2
+.89 +59.8
-.02 +4.3
-2.95 +313.6
+.11 +22.9
-.08 +4.4
-.01 -22.1


MUTUAL FUNDS


Name Div
LincNat .20
LyonBasA ...
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fnci .90
MGM Rsts
Macys .20
Manpwl .74
Manulffe g .52
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .11
MktVRus .08
MktVJrGId ...
Marshals .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McDrmlnts ...
McAfee
MedcoHlth ..
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MelLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MobileTels ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCR Corp ..
Nabors
NBkGreece .29




Name Div
RINO Intl ...
Riverbed s ...
STEC
SanDisk
Satcon h ...
SavientPh ..
SeagateT
SIcnware .41
Sina
SiriusXM
SkywksSol ...
Solarfun
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam :30
StemCellh ...
StrlFWArs ...
SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .75
Thoratec
TrQuint
UtdCBksGa
UranmRs ...
UrbanOut ...
Verisign
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.33
WholeFd ..
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1.00
Xilinx .64
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


AMEX Most Active


ASMLHId .27
Aastrom rs ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .28
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHId .12
ArtTech ..
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44
AvanirPhm...
Baidu s
BedBath ..
BrigExp ...
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
Bucyrus .10
CAInc .16
CdnSolar ...
Celgene
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire ..
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
Compuwre ..
CorinthC ...


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKECITYREPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Photo courtesy of'Getty Images
:


aisin Ea er ea ers

FAMILY FEATURES
Parents are looking for ways to get their kids back into the it Fu n


important for success, but childhood development as well. Exposure
to books in the early childhood stages plays a key role in a child's


reading development, and while most parents and caregivers know
that children benefit from reading time, many struggle to fit it into
their children's hectic schedules.
A survey conducted on behalf of VTech, a leading electronic
learning products provider, found that more than 40 percent of moms
with children ages 3 to 7 years old said that not having enough time
to spend reading with their children is the biggest challenge they face
in trying to make reading a daily activity.-And nearly half wished
there were ways to include reading in their child's on-the-go schedule.
Fortunately, there are plenty of fun and practical ways to make
reading a part of everyday family life.

Making Reading Fun
You can help a child develop reading skills even when you're
running errands or doing activities together. By going places and doing
things with children, you help build their background knowledge and
vocabulary, giving them a basis for understanding what they read.
Telling stories and interacting with each other while on the go
helps them develop their listening and thinking skills.
And now there are technologies that let you take interesting reading
material wherever you go. The new V.Reader, the first interactive,
animated e-book system for children, creates an engaging reading
experience for early readers, ages 3 to 7, so they love to learn to read.
"We understand that parents are looking for ways to merge
learning and fun and VTech is excited to offer the V.Reader, which
does exactly that," said Tom McClure, director of marketing, VTech
Electronics North America, LLC. "Parents can trust this cutting-edge
e-book to aid in their children's development while proving how
learning can be fun too."
The touch-and-read e-book brings stories to life with narration,
characters, animation, graphics, sounds and music. Kids interact as
they listen and follow along with a story, or touch the screen and play
games to learn each word and sentence. The V.Reader helps teach
reading comprehension, vocabulary, phonics and word building.
Reading is a skill that requires nurturing. Creating a literacy-rich
home is the best way to engage children with the joys of books and
help them become readers for a lifetime. One convenient way to keep
a constant stream of new books available to young readers is by


downloading new e-book titles. Through the VTech website, new titles
are available at your fingertips to add to your child's V.Reader library.
To find out more about the V.Reader and to download titles, visit
www.vtechkids.com

Create a Reading-Friendly Environment
Research' shows that lack of access to books and educational
materials is the single greatest barrier to literacy development in the
US and beyond. Books, magazines, newspapers and other reading
tools should be within easy reach of the whole family. Try designating
a bookcase or shelf where children can keep a personal library.
According to First Book, a nonprofit organization that provides new
books to children in need, a steady stream of new, age-appropriate
books has been shown to nearly triple interest in reading within
months. By visiting www.firstbook.org, families, teachers and reading
programs can help children from low-income communities build their
own home libraries and start the journey to becoming lifelong readers.
"It's important for beginner readers to continue practicing their
newly acquired reading skills," said Ron Fairchild, founding CEO of
the National Summer Learning Association and a national authority
on how to expand learning opportunities for youth. "Research shows
that access to reading material that matches kids' ability levels and
interests, and assistance to ensure comprehension, are important to
sustaining atid advancing reading skills."

Some other tips for helping young readers develop include:
* Read with your child every day, even if it's just for a few minutes.
* Ask open-ended questions, such as "What do you think is going to
happen next?" or "Why do you think he did that?"
* Read your child's favorite book over and over.
* Find out what interests your child and get reading materials to feed
that interest.
* Let children see you read and invite them to read with you.
The US Department of Education (DOE) also recommends that
when reading a book aloud to young children, point to each word as
you read. This helps the child make a visual connection that the
word said is the word seen.


Literacy Milestones
Most children develop certain skills as they move through
the early stages of learning language. According to the
Department of Education, these are some milestones to be
working toward:

From ages 3 to 4, most preschoolers:
x Enjoy listening to and talking about storybooks
m Understand that print carries a message
n Identify familiar signs and labels
n Participate in rhyming games
m Identify some letters and make some letter-sound matches

At age 5, most kindergartners:
n Retell simple stories
n Use descriptive language to explain or to ask questions
x Recognize letters and letter-sound matches
n Show familiarity with rhyming and beginning sounds
m Begin to match spoken words with written ones

At age 6, most first-graders:
Use a variety of ways to help with reading a story such as
rereading, predicting what will happen, asking questions,
or using visual cues or pictures
Read some things aloud with ease
Identify new words by using letter-sound matches, parts of
words and their understanding of the rest of a story or
printed item
Sound out and represent major sounds in awvord when
trying to spell
Try to use some punctuation marks and capitalization


'Susan B. Neuman, Ph. D. University of Michigan, Center for the
Improvement ofJEarlv Reading Achievement


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I -,.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME















EimII


SEHLL T


ianaiITT


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


-ADvantage


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School Board of Columbia
County, Florida announces that the
School Board will hold a workshop,
to which all persons are invited to at-
tend, as follows:
DATE: Monday, December 13, 2010
TIME: 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: Niblack Elementary School
Media Center
837 NE Broadway Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32055
PURPOSE: Workshop to discuss
State of the School.
No action will be taken at this meet-
ing.
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
04542279
November 21,2010
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of LAKE
CITY AUTO RECYCLERS at 2823
SW SR 47, LAKE CITY, FL. 32025

Contact Phone Number: (865)206,
9068 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: STEVEN PIERCY
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Steven Piercy
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 18 day of November, A.D. 2010.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04542418
November 21, 2010

PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
ITB-004-2011
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until December 7, 2010 at
11:00 A.M. at which time all bids
will be opened and read aloud in the
City Council Chambers located on
the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
12 INCH SANITARY FORCE
MAIN EXTENSION
Bid specifications may be viewed on
the City website
bhtp://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or (386) 719-5816.
04542417
November 21, 2010
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF FLORIDA GATE-
WAY COLLEGE WILL RECEIVE
BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING:
F.G.C. BID NO. 11-1-01
ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION
OVERHEAD TO UNDER-
GROUND CONVERSION -
PHASE 2 JONES EDMUNDS
PROJECT NO. 12040-013-02
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The general scope of work for the
base bid is described as converting
approximately 1/4 of the 13.2-kV
distribution system from overhead to
underground at the FGC Main Cam-
pus. This portion of the system is lo-
cated between the north side of
Building 14 and SE College Place
along SE Student Way and is ap-
proximately 1,200 feet in length.
Conduit for future communications
will be installed as part of this work
along the same corridor.
This will involve, but not limited to,
removing overhead primary and sec-
ondary conductors, three concrete
poles, four wood poles, one pole-
mounted 3-ph transformer bank, one
single-phase pole-mounted trans-
former, and several riser assemblies.
Additional work will be bid as Add-
Alternates, subject to, award at the
discretion of the College. The addi-
tional work will include installation
of two conduit and manhole systems


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

for future communications.
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS:
Only those General Contractors de-
fined in Section 489.105(3)(a), Flori-
da Statutes or Electrical Contractors
defined in Section 489.505(12), Flor-
ida Statutes and who are licensed and
registered to conduct business in
Florida may submit a bid on this
project.
PREQUALIFICATION OF CON-
TRACTORS:
ALL ELIGIBLE BIDDERS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to prequalify with
Florida Gateway College must re-
quest a prequalification package
from the College's Director of Pur-
chasing, Bill Brown at (386) 754-
4360 'or by email at
Bill.Brown@fgc.edu. COMPLETED
prequalification packages must be re-
turned to the College's Purchasing
office not later than 10:00 A.M.
E.S.T. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER
23, 2010.
TIME AND DATE FOR RECEIV-
ING BIDS:
2:00 P.M. E.S.T. TUESDAY DE-
CEMBER 14,2010
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138 Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid opening date/time. The College
will not be responsible for Postal or
other delivery service delays that
cause a bid to arrive at Room 138,
Building 001 after the designated bid
opening date/time. Bids that are
mailed must be clearly marked on
the outside of the envelope
BID # 11-1-01, ELECTRICAL DIS-
TRIBUTION OVERHEAD TO UN-
DERGROUND CONVERSION -
PHASE 2 JONES EDMUNDS.
PROJECT NO, 12040-013-02
DECEMBER 14,2010
PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
There will be a MANDATORY -pre-
bid meeting beginning at' 10:00 AM
TUESDAY, November 30, 2010 in
the Board Room located in the Ad-
ministration Building (001) on the
main campus of Florida Gateway
College.
BID DOCUMENTS 'AVAILABLE
FROM:
Carly Roach
Jones Edmunds & Associates, Inc.
730 NE Waldo Rd.
Gainesville, Florida 32641
Telephone (352) 377-5821
E-Mail: croach@jonesedmunds.com
COST FOR BID DOCUMENTS:
To ensure that Bidders receive all ad-
denda and or clarifications to the
Bidding Documents in a timely man-
ner, it is mandatory that all bidders
obtain at least one set of Bidding
Documents from the Engineer to be
eligible to bid on this project.
Bid documents are available at a cost
of $125.00 per set which includes
shipping. Bid documents may only
be purchased in their entirety and the
cost is non-refundable.
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES:
Florida Gateway College reserves
the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this. solicitation. The Director of
Purchasing of Florida Gateway Col-
lege shall be the final authority re-
garding waivers of irregularities and
technicalities.
FOR. FLORIDA GATEWAY COL-
LEGE
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing
04542269
November 7, 14, 21, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?








p*'itive attitude.,






Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
Sn EL ,386.754.8562
Lwww.sitel.com EOE


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES

Our Advertising deadlines will be
Clasified: Friday, November 26 will deadline Wednesday. November 2411a.m.
Display: Friday, November 26 will deadline Monday. November 22
Saturday Novemberl27 will deadline Tuesday. November 23
Sunday, Novembei 28 will deadline Tuesday, November 23
Tuesday, November 30 will deadline Wednesday, November 24
So our e mployees can enjoy &
I'hanksgiving with their families,
ithe Lake City Reporter willbeclosed
'i'lmTrsday, November 25th, 2010.

We will be back in the office on
ltriday, November 26th for our
customer's convenience.


Thank You and
Have a Great Thanksgiving


010 Announcements









060 Services

Looking for elder persons in need
of 24 hr care in my home.
Certified Nursing Ass't,
in Jasper, FL, 386-792-3149


070 Rewards

WANTED: Need to speak to man
that witnessed accident at the
intersection of Baya & Main St.,
11/9/10, 8 PM,Robin 832-7174

100n Job

Opportunities

04542367
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following position:
PROPERTY MANAGER
Application deadline is 5:00
PM, November 29, 2010.
All applicants must have
experience in purchasing and
inventory control preferably in
Law Enforcement or Military
Logistics Field. Applications
may be obtained at the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office Operations Center at
4917 East U.S.
Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.com.
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO Employer

04542407
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
fulltime Collector in Lake City.
Experience preferred dealing
with delinquent accounts or
solid administrative and
customer service skills.
Full benefits package.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, FL. 32056 or email resume
to Turbeville.J@ffsb.coin.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542412
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays'required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

BULLDOZER OPERATOR
Part time, references required,
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887


100 Job
Opportunities

04542421
HeritageBank of the South,
Lake City, Florida, seeks a part
time TELLER and a Customer
Service Representative in a
branch in Lake City. Job re-
quirements: cash handling.
experience, teller experience
desired, excellent customer
service skills, good organiza-
tional skills with the ability to
prioritorize and multi-task,
professional oral and written
communication skills, proficient
computer skills, keen attention
to details and must be friendly
and professional. High school
diploma or equivalent required.
Salary and benefits commensu-
rate with experience. Interested
candidates should forward
resume with salary history and
requirements to: humanresour-
ces(Beheritagebank.com

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $6.0K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.


120 Medical
120l Employment


100 Job
100 'Opportunities


05521481
DETAILER
Large Manufacturing Company
has the following position
available in the Lake City,
Florida, facility:
DETAILER/CHECKER
Graduate with AS degree or
experience in the steel joist
industry. Responsibilitities
include drafting and detailing of
joist and deck drawings. Must
have AutoCAD experience.
Company offers a highly
professional environment with
tremendous growth opportunity
and competitive salary commen-
surate with experience.
Excellent benefit package.
Qualified applicants submit
cover letter and resume in
confidence to:
Jan Tryon
jan.tryon@newmill.com


05524485
Medical Biller Needed
Several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please e-mail resume to :
mafaisalmd@Gmail.com
or fax 386-758-5987

Customer Support Job Pay $300-
$600 a week,could work from
home later on 95% of support is by
email.Emailtrueloss@gmail.com.


FLORIDA
+ GATEWAY
COLLEGE
__1 * * *
rmerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
Instructor to teach and assist the
EMS Coordinator and Executive
Director of Public Service Programs
in various aspects of program
development, planning and
implementation of the EMT-Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs, as well as
Firefighter programs. He/she
maintains a close relationship with
clinical sites and part-time faculty,
and assists in program expansion and
student recruitment; also assists
Coordinator in maintaining state and
national program accreditation.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Master's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field, or Master's degree with 18
graduate hours in the emergency
medical services or closely related
field. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS,
ABILITIES REQUIRED: Paramedic
certification either at the state or
national level (must have Florida state
license within six months of hire).
Four years experience as a
paramedic with an ALS provider.
Must have two years experience (full
or part-time) teaching EMS. Must be
able to establish and maintain
effective working relationships with
others. Knowledge of EMS
equipment. DESIRABLE
QUALIFICATIONS: Minimum three
years teaching experience at the
technical school or community college
level. ACLS, PALS, and PHTLS
instructor certification. Experience
with program accreditation process.
Experience with American Heart
Association accreditation and
credentialing. Fire/rescue experience.
Knowledge of firefighter equipment
and certification.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 12/17/10
Persons Interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resotrces
Florida Gateway.College
149 S.E. College Place,
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(lfqc.edu
IC i s accredite't by the Commisoon on Colleges or
the Southern Association of Collcges and Schools.
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and
Employment


F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
MA needed M-F for busy medical
practice. Send reply to Box 05058,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

Homecare LPN's needed 9a-6p
and CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare 352-291-4888

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


1 Medical
120 Employment

05524505



MERIDIAN
'BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's & LPN's
P/T & PRN 1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center

Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke

Case Manager
Child/Adult
G'Ville/Trenton
Live Oak/Starke/Lake City

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial/Maintenance
Lake City
Cook
PRN & P/T
Gainesville & Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.ore
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP



130 Part Time

05524503
Hiring for part-time qualified
office clerk. Must be proficient
- in Excel,Microsoft Word,etc.
Apply in person at
134 S E Colburn Avenue
Lake City Fl 32025

Drug Free Work Place
Equal Opportunity Employer


141 Babysitters

Babysitting'in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or P/T,
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

240 Schools &
v240 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers.
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-l11/29/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


177



NOW H.1 IN


SITEL


Customer Service

Agent Positions


We are an inbound customer care center and have Full Time, Part
Time and Temporary positions available. If you have customer service
experience, possess great telephone and computer skills and are
able to work flexible schedules, we are interested in talking to you.

We provide paid training, a competitive salary, and benefits after
90 days for Full Time agents.
You may apply on-line at: www.sitel.com
Or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Drive, Lake City, FL 32025
(Between Sisters Welcome Road and Hwy 47)
(386.754.8600) Equal Opportunity Employer


04542415
OBTAIN YOUR
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS
LICENSE, CLASSES
FORMING NOW AT
FLORIDA GATEWAY
COLLEGE, CLASSROOM
TRAINING, STATE-OF THE
ART SIMULATOR, BEHIND
THE WHEEL DRIVING
FINANCING AVAILABLE
FOR QUALIFIED
APPLICANTS
CALL 386-754-4405


I


04542183
Director of Human Resources
Small Critical Access Hospital
seeks experienced Human
Resources Director to lead HR
functions. Responsible for all
HR functions including
recruitment, retention,
regulatory compliance, benefits,
organizational development,
employee relations, and
State/Federal Survey
preparedness. Comprehensive
benefit package, salary
commensurate with
experience. Bachelor's degree;
PHR or SPHR preferred.
Hospital/Healthcare
experience preferred.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace

04542352
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted part time.ARRT &
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

04542419
RN, Unit Supervisor for
90 bed skilled nursing facility.
We provide short
and long term care and are
looking for an exceptional RN
to join our dynamic, dedicated
team. Full time position with
excellent benefits.
Please apply
Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center, 587 SE
Ermine Ave., Lake City,
Fl 32025 or fax resume to
386-752-7337 EOE/DFWP


-1 1 1 1


I


~J;~J~"










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


310 Pets & Supplies
Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $45 386-752-0987
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies
Baby Pigs for sale
ready in Dec
call for details
386-965-2215
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
SOLD
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
(904)704-9377
Craftmatic full size elec adj bed
w/vibrating feature, includes
mattress and 5 piece bedrm suite
$400 752-2572 leave message

414 Needlecraft
& Sewing
Quilting Frame
4ft. wide wood
$125.00
386-752-0987

420 Wanted to Buy
GUITARS WANTED
Gibson, Fender, Etc.
Cash paid will travel.
'(407)733-1687
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun,NO Early Birds 8-?,
kids clothes, furniture, odds and
ends 447 SW Summerhill Glen,
in Columbia City, off Mauldin

450 Good Things
450 toEat
Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420

530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt,
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098
386-965-3110

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422.
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Large 3/2 DW, very new.
South of town on 441.
$650. mo.
386-208-4702


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in (lie
country, Branford area, $450 ini.
386-867-1833 386-500=0tt42
www.suwanneevallevp|roperties com
640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTIHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2bah Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras
386-752-4258

Hr i yUnfurnished Apt.
I10 For Rent
5524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $530 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

,72 0 Furnished Apts.
v For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
7t( Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542292
For Rent-
3/2 home on Baya Ave.
convenient to shopping, schools
and churches. $790./mo with
$790./security. First month's
rent reduced to $395.00
for qualified tenant.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
386-365-5884.

05524427
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 %-int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2 br/lba House w/yard,
near airport, $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374 .


SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Very Clean 2br/lba. in own.
298 SW Miller Terr. CH/A, Shed.
$650.mo. lst.mo. & security.
Call Vick 386-623-6401
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720


750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments.
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


THURSDAY
.1


3322 W US HWV 90
386-755-2502


TWENTY FIFTH I

THANkSCIVING ,


THAkR YOU

SWEET TEA
I.


Office Space for lease.

Oak hill Plaza. 900sqft
From $675 + Sec.
DCA Realtor

SEagle

Properties
(386) 752-9626
Call for info


TURkEY

Help,ni LOreoms Come True
Onf mrrfle. or a Tnme


Martin
ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN. D.M.D.
755-1001
701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025
%U Mu.ll n ortlolilIo tiEs.com

PUMPklF PIE


810 Home for Sale

Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!!!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841

Live Oak remodeled. 1 acre.
Fence, large utility room, walk in
closet/computer room. Metal roof,
new AC/Heat. $365.mo w/$10K
down or $468 w/5K down. Owner
Finance. Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
O U Acreage
05524422
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


830 Commercial
3O Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


WBER3 DLWIRSH


U Y S H P S Q C S S N X F X

Q Q A S U W Y A S T P E E R

R M Y G M E X A H A E O S 0

S X I G P C Y A H Y C W E L I

E C H N K U T J Z H A C E L


ENTRY FORM

Name:

Phone Number:_

Address:

Subscriber: 1 Yes E No
Deadline is Monday, November 22, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.
Lake City Reporter
Ikke.il.'r pi .rre.[iq .:>-.m CURREN IS magazine


-__ _ _ _ J


"AAAM" Help Bail Bonds

but in case you do...
"Help" is a phone call away!
Office: (904) 397-9111
Cell: (904) 318-0118
Email: antjames(a)helpbail.net
wwvww.hclpbail.net

hn om .1n 1 ..m17
Surely Agcnt
SeCcnwcs I' 1 >78
S..1, : ('olu mbia in',i.
.. l~irIis, u .l.i..iin

PECAH PIE


TUESDAY SPECIAL
Jley Jr" Bundle

a '. e4 urrite chiCs
cV& o dri&
M ., -Ad 1.,,m : i.... ]t.".C, ,r.m c Ci.
S 29dl W US Hwy r90
B 1 & Sre# 101
1td e City FL
rU86)1754"z 373

www eso $rem

CORO


940 Trucks

1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215

CO E N UY
AN AEA UK!
0* 6 ,11 UM1"110


kI^reiUC[


Thursday, December 2nd 10:00am
Property I Property 2
65 Acres 57 r Aes
Commercial Property Jenings. FL Commercial Properry Jasper. FL
*ZLned Conemurcial Hgbvlwaltrdae oned Conarcll se dhanee
* I7i & FL HI, 143 Fr ag. erInfHkrae. o, 6 r nnMuw a
*Pr&pCrM Consimsn of Pine and Hardwood 1 t1mle n K.eho raDelpnum Pmtisal
'P c *o iIIID rale, :
*eling ft.ProNtM2 .selinmgOn.
Thursday, December 2nd 2-rOOpm Friday. December 3rd I OOOam
473 Acres 44 Acres
Timbe, & Hunting Land O(ichrist County. I. Clav Co.. FL
1I50 i a igh Fenced *Mrce Wooded Home Suis
Pne A, dwDwr' Hibal Grea LocatonOffFt H1 It 100 in brnren
* Good Deer urirV Hunt ig i
SertC Location iear Igh Spin Gi.iair. Ki rto Hghn and PalaI FL
Lake Cv & Aladcha. FL.
Broker Participation 2%
Call for Details
800-323-8388
Rowell Realty & Auctions, Inc.
10% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB 296
www.Rowel Aucin~o


FOOTBALL
I.


GWHunter, Inc.


cfwOw, Chevron
Oil
i Jobber


I' I"


O L W I I A D S Z 0 N T H S I|I -- l-- T-'
T L IV N S Q E N M P H C G ---

A A P I P Y T 0 T E I U D R STAY HOME

T B R G I R W T H D E R N E MACAROj A CHES


O 'T S S E R E A A A M S"A E


I
P 0T K G E N T N L R D I N

T O U N Y B T O K A M A N B

E F F A V N Y P Y S Q Y O E

E J F H A A F D O T T J R A

W R I T -R R I E U I U A A N,.

S T N Y G C F H Z U R U C SI

Z T G R Z C T S Q R K C A Y

T G W Z 0 C H A O F E E M M

I
J T P R A E T M L W Y U E E

M E N K S W E E T T E A D' X





I A
I


f~I~IlL f~ t a L S~f I ii


k an 0emflf k re forfou.


GAINEY

AUTOMOTIVE

& TOWING

3468 SW CR 138, FT. WHITE
3860-454-3580

CRMAVY

CRANgERRY SAUCE


Decl-P.w -!I

TFrtf7 wicrYi Home



/

458 Smtfh Miarims Avenu;.
Lan City, Fforida 32025
Phione:(386)752-1334 Fax.(386)752-70
s'wyav.'niitrrisdfbmiaifimartniomic.com


ROLLS


FANTASTIC


FENCING


^^ -'- *'&-ffi
Randy
386-454-9630

Elliot
386-961.8744


ffST


GREEN BEANS


Is PLY OWI OCL GI FTCRIs


GIII lYY IN TIHOANK IkIN z2IU
MASHE POTATOESI Find all 20 of the 'Giving Thanks' related words hidden in the STUIF_ _
I word search above. Words can be found in the banners on
SWEET POTATOES the ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and return it to the: FRUIT SALAD
Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street,
Lake City, FL by 5:00pm, for your chance to win I
h. IIn


Classified Department: 755-5440


j


%Vc iiillfin nce bll we


We !2L![tll c[1 Dealer Fee!


We ls sel ffrdaleusd irs
MVP Auto DealeIc


II


11 1 -


I


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IL








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY NOVEMBER 21, 2010


,0T A


aa


-' ,' U"0 0 t -V
llk'" CiTY,, FL
r' ,.tr 9flf


Rountree
TOYOTA


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 11/30/10


* Most cars & trucks
expires 11/30/10


SND.O.LIE.,|

OUr?
11-,- SPECIALS.;



GONDOLIE


Buy One Pizza
Get One


FREE
N. lI I n,, i. .i l AII


2 large Pins with (Cheese & -loppingi.
I Larqe Greek Salad', & I Order of
read;iilk w Mannor Sauce


13.00
i r,, .l ,. l,, ,,, ..I ,, ,,,
L


'---- -, uW -j -. nd ?_i-zZ-!-.C- %- ;
Z3Tx


i Exam and Necessar X-rays



R 1 SAVINGS OF 107
Expires November 30. 2010

: www.aspenlakecity.com


* --,

-4


2 -7<-i "-- r1 &,f'vy.;*..
57S39i OGDC


* '


P-----~SC$Brl~ ~


~Ew~IRmt~f~a_











Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@lakecayreporter com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, November 21, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Inviting

birds

for the

winter

Attracting birds
to your winter
landscape
adds another
dimension of
beauty and enjoyment to
your world. The activity
of birds in the garden
adds life and vitality while
many of our favorite
plants are taking a rest.
Setting out feeders now
will insure that you have
visitors this winter and
some great bird watching.
Natural food supplies are in
shorter supply during the
cooler months, so your visi-
tors will benefit from the
extra food source.
It is important to provide
water and plant cover in
addition to bird seed. Your
birdbath doesn't need to be
fancy, but the water should
always be fresh and clean.
Place your feeder close
enough to bushes or trees
so that birds can escape
for protection from hawks.
Low vegetation near the
feeder, however, may give
the advantage to a sneaky
cat
Consider planting some
native plants that will pro-
vide cover as well as food
for the birds. Beautyberry
has purple fruit that is
eaten by cardinals, mock-
ingbirds, and thrashers in
late winter. This gracefully
arching shrub grows to six
feet and has light purple
flowers through the spring
and summer.
Other native plants that
attract birds with their win-
ter fruit are holly, dogwood
and sumac. These provide
food favored by blue jays,
cardinals, robins and mock-
ingbirds. The cabbage
palm, our state tree, has a
fruit that is also enjoyed by
these birds.
The food that you
stock in your feeder plays
a role in which birds
you will attract to your
yard. Different birds, are
attracted by different kinds
of seed. Try offering a vari-
ety mix in a hopper style
feeder and see who comes
to dinner. For information,
visit http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
uw192
Black oil sunflower
seeds and peanuts will
probably bring in the great-
est variety of birds. Use
hulled seeds because the
leftover hulls create a mess
and can attract rodents.
Beware of bagged mixes
that contain unwanted food
such as milo and wheat.
Birds will fling them out
of the feeder to get to the
good stuff.
Before adding native
plants to your landscape,
bring in a soil sample for
a pH test. UF Master
Gardeners perform this
test free of charge at
the Columbia County
Extension office in Lake
City.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and,
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
John Burns, 93, kisses the hand of his wife, Kathleen, at the anniversary party held at their daughter's home on Tuesday. They have been married for 70 years.







S.ASTING LoVE


Lake City couple celebrates 70th anniversary


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

What began as a
brief courtship
has turned into
a long-lasting
marriage for
Kathleen and John W. Burns of
Lake City.
The couple celebrated their
70th wedding anniversary Nov.
16 at the home of their daughter,
LaVon Leszkiewicz. They were
married in 1940.
Family and friends gathered for
an anniversary celebration.
"I am very touched with my
family doing this for us," ,said
Kathleen Burns, 90. 'This is very
nice and we appreciate it"
The Burns met while riding a
bus to Camp Blanding in Starke,
she said.
The couple only knew each
other for three weeks before get-
ting married.
"She claimed I asked her on
the first date," said John Burns,
93. "I've lived with that."
Four children were produced :'
from the union Leszkiewicz,
Linda Gafford, Willene Giles and
John Burns III.
Leszkiewicz said she and her
siblings feel very blessed to have
their parents.
"We're a very close family," she
said.


"My daddy is
the happiest when
all the children are
around here.... He's
a family person."

Linda Gafford

Family togetherness has
always been an important part
of the Burns marriage.
"My daddy is the happiest
when all the children are around
here," Gafford said. "He's a fam-
ily person."
Living long enough to see
grandchildren and great-grand-
children is a blessing, Kathleen
Burns said.
Couples being married for 70
years is something people don't
see every day, John Burns said.
"We've been lucky," he said.
"God has blessed us."
Young couples wanting to have
lasting marriages must believe
in God first and believe in one
another, among other things,'
John Burns said.
"I did so well, it's hard to say
what young people should do,"
he said.
Marriage can have its ups and
'downs, but it's worth the efforts.
"You just don't ever give up,"
Kathleen Burns said. "You take it
one day at a time."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The happy couple sneaks a kiss while waiting for the anniversary party to
begin. They have four children, six grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren.

,,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Burns share their love story with their four children. Pictured are LaVon
Leszkiewicz (from left), Willene Giles, John and Kathleen Burns, John Burns
III and Linda Gafford.


Wedding challenge: Make it grand, yet cheap


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Traffic passes the south side of St Paul's Cathedral in the
City of London, Wednesday. The cathedral is viewed as one
of the possible venues for the wedding of Britain's Prince
William and Kate Middleton in 2011.


By JILL LAWLESS and
ROBERT BARR
Associated Press
LONDON It's a wed-
ding planner's nightmare.
The nuptials of Prince
William and Kate
Middleton have to satisfy
the bride's family and the
groom's royal relatives -
but also a supportive but
recession-weary British
public. It must be grand,
but not ostentatious; regal,
but with a common touch;
expensive but not a drain
on taxpayers worried about


their jobs and the nation's
fragile economy.
"I don't even have
enough money for my own
wedding, let alone theirs,"
said Scott Northgrave, 39, a
London construction work-
er. 'They have a fortune,
why not use it?"
Who will foot the bill for
the wedding, likely to be
millions of pounds, is still
being worked out, but the
royal family knows they
must not seem out of touch
with the public's cash-
strapped mood. William's
office says "the couple are


mindful of the current eco-
nomic situation."
Because William is sec-
ond in line to the throne
after his father, Prince
Charles, the ceremony will
not be a formal state occa-
sion like the wedding of his
grandmother the queen,
then Princess Elizabeth, in
1947, or of Charles to Lady
Diana Spencer in 1981.
Both Elizabeth and Charles
were heirs to the British
throne.
Still, British Prime
WEDDING continued on 3D


I I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


Impacting students and leaving a legacy


You can be part
of College his-
tory, make a
major impact
on Florida
Gateway College students,
and leave a family legacy.
Florida Gateway College
is constructing its first
new building in 17 years, a
state-of-the-art library and
media center, located on
the east side of campus.
The 37,000-sq.-ft. facility
has an 80,000-book collec-
tion capacity. It will have
highly advanced television
production and media
capability and is part of
a 30-year master capital
improvement and expan-
sion plan.
This library and media
center will not only expand
and improve services to all
FGC students, but will be
a valuable area resource
by being available to
the entire regional com-


munity. It will also be a
tremendous asset as FGC
seeks to add baccalaureate
options to its programs.
The facility is scheduled to
open in April 2011.
The $9 million project is
funded by State of Florida
Public Education Capital
Outlay (PECO) funds and
has been planned for sev-
eral years.
The building is adjacent
to 1,000 acres of Suwannee
River Water Management
District (SRWMD) land
and a study is being con-
ducted to determine the
feasibility of developing an
environmental area in part-
nership with SRWMD.
The partnership would
benefit FGC's golf and
landscape, and physical
sciences programs.
The Foundation for
Florida Gateway College
and the FGC Board of
Trustees, are proud to


Michael Lee
mike. ee@fgc.edu
offer naming opportunities
in the new facility. Naming
an area is a wonderful way
to honor or remember
a loved one or friend, or
to establish a legacy by
having your or a family
member's name used.
Opportunities at all gift
levels are available, rang-
ing from sponsoring a
new book to naming the
entire building. Named
areas will remain for the
life of the building. Gifts
will be placed in a spe-
cial endowed program
enhancement fund and a
portion of the annual earn-


ings will be used to sup-
port nonscholarship needs
of the College.
Gifts will be eligible for
100% endowment matching
funds, which will double
the impact of the invest-
ment.
Up to $400,000 is avail-
able for match. Larger
gifts may be pledged and
paid over an agreed upon
number of years.
Why should you consid-
er investing in this project?
M The area named will
remain in effect for the
building life.
A loved one or friend
may be honored or you
may establish your own
legacy.
Building the endowed
program enhancement
fund will benefit all stu-
dents and programs.
The donor will receive
a charitable tax deduction.
Gifts will be matched


up to the $400,000 in
matching funds available.
The named area will
be highly visible as the
facility will be open to the
entire community and con-
tains public meeting areas.
Naming opportunities at
every gift level are avail-
able.
Several individuals,
corporations and couples
have already committed
their support for this proj-
ect. The Foundation and
College appreciate the fol-
lowing for their gifts made
early in this initiative.
Drs. Charles and
Robin Hall, Caf6
Guy and Suzanne
Norris, Reference Office
Sherry and Don
Kennedy, Reference
Office
Missy and Mike
Lee, Book Return
Mike and Jill
Adams, Study Niche


James H.
Montgomery, Study
Niche
Jones Edmunds
and Associates, Inc.,
Book Shelf Range
Dr. Linda Croley
Family, in honor of her
mother Marie B. Powell
on her 83rd birthday, pur-
chase of a courtyard paver
Please consider your
investment in education by
supporting this worthwhile
project at your hometown
college, Florida Gateway
College.
You may contact
Michael Lee, Executive
Director, The Foundation
for Florida Gateway
College at 386-754-4201 or
e-mail mike.lee@fgc.edu for
more information.

N Michael Lee is executive
director of The Foundation
for Florida Gateway College.
He can be reached at 386-
754-4201.


A ASSOCIATED PRESS
A selection of British national newspapers published in London on Wednesday, reacting to the
announcement on Tuesday that Britain's Prince William is engaged to be married to,his fiance
Kate Middleton. The couple announced that they will marry in the spring or summer of 2011.


WEDDING: Economic boon for Britain
Continued From Page 1D


Minister David Cameron
said it would be hard to
resist giving the country a
day off to celebrate.
'There would be a great
temptation to have a public
holiday, a day of national
celebration," Cameron said,
giving evidence to lawmak-
ers Thursday.
Nor will the wedding lack
in grandeur. Westminster
Abbey is the leading con-
tender for a venue after
Middleton was photo-
graphed leaving the cen-
tral London landmark on
Wednesday evening.
"Miss Middleton paid
a short, private visit to
Westminster Abbey in
order to be able to consider
it as an option," William's
office said Thursday. "The
couple wish for a little more
time to be able to consult
family members and make
a decision for themselves."
A spokesman for the
abbey refused to comment,
but it is, in many ways, the
perfect venue.
The 1,000-year-old
church where British kings
and queens are crowned
is grand but surprisingly
homey, crowded with the
tombs of poets, politicians
and 17 monarchs.
It has both happy and
sad memories for the royal
family. The queen and her
late mother both married
there, and Princes Diana's
funeral was held there in
1997.
It can hold 2,200 peo-
ple plenty of room for
guests and does not cost
anything to book. It is also
likely to be available, since
the list of people allowed to
marry there is limited to
members of the royal fami-
ly, abbey staff and members
of the ceremonial Order of
the Bath and their families.
About a dozen weddings a
year are held there.
Money for the festivi-
ties could come from the
annual 7.9 million pounds
($11.6 million) in govern-
ment funding given to the
royal household to pay for


salaries and official func-
tions, or from the queen's
personal wealth. Charles is
also expected to pay some
of the bill, and Middleton's
parents self-made mil-
lionaires who run a party-
planning business will
probably also help out.
*"I'd imagine that the
Middletons would like to
make some contribution,"
said Charles Kidd, editor
of Debrett's Peerage and
Baronetage, a guide to eti-
quette and the aristocracy.
"I'm sure they would like
to have a significant role in
making the wedding run
smoothly. They would pay
for something as part of
the reception, or the honey-
moon, perhaps," he said.
At the very least, taxpay-
ers will have foot the bill
for security, including the
large number of police on
duty that day. Further pub-
lic funding would have to
be approved by Parliament
and could spark a backlash
- although some Britons
said they'd be willing to
contribute.
"If everyone paid out
maybe five or 10 pounds
($8 to $16), just think how
that would add up," said
retiree Susan Dowling, 74.
"I'm excited for this wed-
ding and I'll surely help
out."
Julie Marks, a 25-year-
old London chef, was also
willing to chip in.
"I'd pay 50 pounds ($80)
tops," she said. "But if
everyone did, it would cer-
tainly help."
Analysts say the wedding
will be an economic boon
for Britain. Neil Saunders,
consulting director at
Verdict retail analysts, said
the economic kick from the
wedding could reach 620
million pounds ($985 mil-
lion).
"If, as expected, it is a
big set-piece event, it could
well capture the nation's
imagination and provide a
fillip (boost) to the retail
sector," he said.
Saunders said sales of


food and champagne for pri-
vate celebrations could be
worth 360 million pounds
($575 million) and tourism
could benefit by more than
200 million pounds ($320
million).
David Buik, market ana-
lyst at BGC Partners in
London, said he was "much
looking forward to the
William and Kate feel-good
factor taking effect on our
economy and our morale."
In addition to an expected
hotel, restaurant and retail
boom from tourists travel-
ing to London for the occa-
sion, retailers are rushing
to cash in with Kate-and-
Wills merchandise.
Asda, Wal-Mart's British
supermarket chain, tweet-
ed glad tidings that a com-
memorative mug would be
available soon for 5 pounds
($8).
The royal wedding could
also help raise the spirits of
a country still recovering
from the worst economic
downturn in half a century,
and facing the unknown
impact of deep government
spending cuts.
The queen's wedding in
1947 lifted Britain's post-
war gloom and came just
days after the government
announced a reduction in
rations.
Her ceremony at
Westminster Abbey was
described as simple: the
same as for "any cottager
getting married in her vil-
lage church," one of. the
priests said.
Well, except for the
gilded carriage and a 500-
pound wedding cake.
The spectacle of the
hugely popular Prince
William marrying his
attractive and seemingly
down-to-earth bride also
should bolster a royal brand
that has been tarnished by
divorce, sex scandals and
financial indiscretions.
The royal family has
become more conscious of
its public image after the
shocks and dramatics of
Charles' generation.


ENGAGEMENT


Edgley-Norris
Doug and Kimmy
Edgley of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter Ragan
Elise Edgley of Lake City
to Jonathan Kyle Norris
of Lake City. He is the


son of Thomas and Tonya
Tomlinson of White
Springs,
The bride-elect is a 2008
graduate of Columbia High
School. She is employed
with Peoples State Bank
and Hair Graphics.
The future groom is a
2006 graduate of Columbia


High School. He is
employed with the State
of Florida Department of
Corrections.
The wedding is planned
for November 2010 at
Mandi's Chapel at Camp
Weed. A reception will fol-
low at Varn Dining Hall at
Camp Weed.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT


David Scott Crews

Thomas and Heather Crews former-
ly of Lake City announce the birth of
their son, David Scott Crews, Nov. 1 in
Lakenheath AFB, England.
He weighed 7 pounds and 7 ounces


and measured 19 inches.
Grandparents are David and Pam
Crews of Atlanta, Ga. and Harold and
Susan Scott of Lake City.
Great-grandparents are Adrena Crews
of take City and Quinn Boone of Lake
City.'


McGuire retires from US Army


Sgt. Maj. Bardrick L.
McGuire recently retired
for U.S. Army active duty
after more than 32 years
and four combat tours
in Iraq. He is a native
of Lake City and gradu-
ated from Columbia High
School in 1977.
He entered the Army
Sept. 1, 1977 and com-
pleted the basic training
course at Fort Dix, N.J.,
advanced individual train-
ing at Fort Lee, Va. as
a distinguished graduate
and Airborne Training at
Fort Benning, Ga.
McGuire served in a
variety of leadership posi-


tions including squad
leader to battalion ser-
geant major. His mili-
tary assignments over
the years
include
overseas
and state-
side.
H Hi s
awards
M a n d
McGuire decora-
tions include the
Defense Meritorious
Service Medal, Army
Commendation Medal,
National Defense Service
Medal and many more.
McGuire is also


the recipient of the
Distinguished Order' of
Saint Martin from the
Army Quartermaster
Branch.
He is a graduate of
Campbell University in
Buies Creek, N.C.
McGuire is the father
of four daughters Tina,
Sophia, La'Quila and
Krista and four grand-
sons; Kyree, Jordan,
Louis and Christian.
His father is Hardwick,
and wife Flossie,
McGuire. His mother is
Winnie Richardson and
grandmother is Grethel
Rentz.


at91
'" ia


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Nosy neighbors need lessons


in the art of being neighborly


DEAR ABBY: I'm a stay-
at-home mom with a 10-year-
old daughter. We live in a
complex that houses about
250 people.
I'm a naturally friendly
person, but also very private.
When the weather is warm,
I love having my shades up
and my windows open. My
daughter enjoys the fresh air,
so she's out in the yard often.
Because of this, some of my
neighbors possibly bored
- take it upon themselves to
"pop in" for a visit when they
see we're home. I don't invite
them over, and I don't want
company. This happens, more
than once a day with the same
people.
I have tried making ex-
cuses ("rm in the middle, of
something," "I'm cooking din-
ner," "I have company"), but it
doesn't work. I have also said,
"We're just getting ready to
leave," but it soon becomes
obvious that we weren't going
anywhere. People have got-
ten mad and they now label
me a "snob" among other
things.
I don't want to spend my
life in the house hiding with
my daughter, but I also don't
want to entertain people who
come over uninvited. Abby, I
am not a snob. I just love do-
ing whatever I'm doing unin-
terrupted even if what I'm
doing is nothing at all. Please
help. NICE, PRIVATE
LADY IN ILLINOIS


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com,
DEAR NICE, PRIVATE
LADY: I don't know what eti-
quette book your neighbors
have read, but they have a lot
of nerve dropping by unan-
nounced and expecting you to
drop whatever you are doing
to entertain them.
It is not rude or snobbish
to defend your privacy. You
were too nice to them to be-
gin with by making excuses.
What you should have said
was, "I'm not up for company
right now. Please call to see if
I'm free before dropping over
next time."
DEAR ABBY: Three peo-
ple have helped me make lem-
onade out of life's lemons a
patient and talented therapist,
a beloved pastor and YOU.
After 50 years, here are my
top 10 Dear Abby lessons:
1. No one can "make" you
unhappy. You have choices.
2. The healthiest way to
cure depression? Volunteer
your hands and your heart
3. The best advice for rais-
ing children? Remember that
you raise them to let them
go.


4. The best person with
whom to discuss marital dif-
ficulties? Your spouse. Com-
plaining to others may make
you feel better for a day, but it
will be at the expense of your
marriage.
5. Don't "protect" those
you love from the pain that
will heal them.
6. Never criticize without
working toward a solution,
particularly when it comes to
politics.
7. Never forget abuse nor
tolerate it again, but do for-.
give the abuser.
8. What (and whom) you
love is not shown through
words but by where you de-
vote your time, your energy
and money.
9. You are what you eat,
read and watch on TV.
10. Life is linear. Make
every moment matter..
- A SURVIVOR IN' NEW
HAMPSHIRE
DEAR SURVIVOR:
I'm flattered that you have
learned so many life lessons
from reading the Dear Abby
column. However, one of the
items you listed in your letter
did not come from me or my
mother before me. It's No. 7.
I have never written that a vic-
tim of abuse should feel obli-
gated to forgive the abuser.

N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Do a little soul search-
ing and you will discover
there are people and goals
from your past that you need
to address. Put in a couple of
calls or visit places and old
friends who can help you pick
up where you left off. Love is
in the stars. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): An emotional matter
should be taken care of im-
mediately. The longer you let
something fester, the harder
it will be to correct. Nothing
is as bad as it seems. Turn a
negative into a positive with
a mature, loving attitude.
****EMINI (May 21-
June 20): Getting your feel-
ings out in the open will be
,good but will also bring a re-
lationship problem to a head.
The reaction you expect may
not be what. you encounter.
Decide whether this connec-
tion is beneficial to you emo-
tionally. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Keep your thoughts
to yourself, especially when
dealing with peers, colleagues
or anyone who can affect your
position or your future. Don't
be a complainer if you want to


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
maintain good relationships.
A hobby will help ease your
stress. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Your willingness to help the
underdog will make a good
impression on new acquain-
tances. Get involved in a
cause. Socializing will lead to
an interesting conversation
with someone you will want to
get to know better. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Changes you don't ex-
pect are likely to develop in
a family matter, causing you
some worry and upset Pro-
ceed quietly but aggressively.
It's best if you take subtle but
effective action. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You may feel tempted
to put money into your home
or a family purchase. Use
your imagination and you will
find a way to please everyone
without spending. Informa-
tion from attending a lecture
or talking about your financial
situation will help you bud-
get and will ease your stress.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals U,,. ,
"WKCPC TPC PYHOH TIJ SR.HWH W R
TSWYRI. DMW W K C F TPC Z TP G CH H
WKTI WKC GRIX-PTIXC P Y HOH R Z
SREZ RPW T.D G C YITSW YRI." A Z.
0 CII C J F
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "My junior high was dreadful. I see a lot of my fellow
alumni on 'America's Most Wanted.' Actress Yancy Butler
(c) 2010byNEA, Inc. 11-22


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): With the year coming to
a close, you may want to re-
consider with whom you want
to spend, time and how you
want to proceed both person-
ally and professionally. Mak-
ing changes now will help you
start the new year off on the
right foot. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Do something
that will reduce stress and
keep you out of trouble. The
less time you have to agonize
over personal or professional
problems, the better off you'll
be. Keep busy and avoid tur-
moil. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Problems with
someone you try to help will
become a burden. Focus
more on enjoyment, being fun
to be with and taking a walk
. down memory lane with the
ones you love. Social and fam-
ily gatherings will remind you
of your blessings. ***4*
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Problems at home
will be due to emotional ma-
nipulation. Focus on getting
your money matters .straight-
ened out: paying down debt
and taking care of holiday ex-
penses. Put a good budget in
place. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Discuss future plans,
sign up for a course or make
changes to your lifestyle or
philosophy that will help you
achieve your goals or en-
hance your environment or
surroundings. This is a good
time to do the groundwork
that will help you succeed.
***-*


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


DOUBLEHEADERS By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 415- 61 7 8 9 10[1l1]12 13- 14 115 16 117118


Across
1 Buggy versions,
maybe
6 Big yard area
10 Expresses
disbelief
16 "The Big Bang
Theory" network
19 Went beyond
21 Truck driving
competition
22 Muesli tidbit
23 Factors to
consider while
trying to sleep
on a campout?
25 Upper mgmt.
aspirant
26 Superior
27 You might come
up for this
28 Epitome of ease
29 Arabian
Peninsula
sultanate
30 What the marshal
declared the
moonshiner's
shed to be?
35 L on a T?
37 A. E. Housman's
"A Shropshire
38,Smelted
substances
39 Preventive
measure
40 Submerge
43 Upper support.
44 Attend to a plot
47 "Pardonnez-

48 Ohio State
athlete who
forgot his
uniform?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


53 Fighting fighting
56 Coxswain's lack
57 Relative standing
58 Publishing
hirees, for short
59 Part of P.T.A.:
Abbr.
60 From ___ Z
61 Name for a
persona non
grata
62 One who puts U
in disfavor?
63 C.E.O.'s
tricycle?
69 Start over on
70 Chain of life?
71 Local news hour
72 Keel's place
73 Dudgeon
74 Prologue
follower
76 Request upon
finishing
77 As a group
81 Wild Bill Hickok
holding his aces
and eights?
85 Spell
86 Respectful bow
87 Criminal charge
88 Picture that
shows you
what's up?
91 Platoon
members, briefly
92 Competed
94 Unit of current
96 Places to plug in
peripherals
97 Garbage
receptacle that
you and I insult?
103 Promising good
things
104 Music genre
prefix
105 Ancient Rome's
Appian ___
106 "What a
shame!"


107 Rose of rock
108 "That high
lonesome
sound," as
played by
Atlantic
crustaceans?
115 Uma's "Pulp
Fiction" role
116 Many a
Monopoly
property
117 Singer of the
2008 #1 hit
"Bleeding Love"
118 Seat facing the
altar
119 Worked on in
the lab
120 Cornerstone
abbr.
121 Put up

Down
1 Rise and fall
repeatedly
2 Big day.preceder
3 Red Sox legend
Williams
4 Call into court
5 Followed the game
6 Crooked
7 Rebel org.
8 Soprano Tebaldi
9 Went around in
circles, say
10 Opposite of post-
11 Landscaper's roll
12 Zimnbabwe's
capital
13 Pueblo
structures
14 Army-McCarthy
hearings figure
15 Roman sun god
16 "Borrows"
peremptorily
17 Founder of
Celesteville, in
children's lit
18 Roadside shop


20 Indication of
teen stress,
maybe
24 "Turn up the
heat!"
29 Missouri's
Trail
30 Common dessert
ingredient
31 Tess's literary
seducer
32 Offers a few
directions?
33 "Dies -
(Latin hymn)
34 By surprise
35 City where TV's
"Glee" is set
36 In a moment
41 Discountenance
42 Called upon
43 Fragrant cake
44 Round container
45 Singer Gorme
46 Cheeper lodging?
49 Eucalyptus eater
50 Defense grp.
headquartered in
Belgium
51 Pharmacopoeia
'selection
52 It bounces
54 Shakespearean
character who
says "I am not
what I am"
55 Nashville-to-
Memphis dir.
61 Diverse
62 Composer Bart6k
63 Kentucky college
64 pV= nRT, to
physicists
65 Geraint's wife in
"Idylls of th,q
King"
66 Aircraft,
informally
67 Like a
Chippendales
dancer


68 Massachusetts'
state tree
69 Frees (of)
74 Covered
75 Business address
ender
76 Army of the
Potomac
commander,
1863-65
78 Pool hall pro
79 Quatre + trois
80 Former union
members?


82 1989 Oscar-
winning title
role for Jessica
Tandy
83 Took a card
84 Census form
deliverer: Abbr.
89 Sequin
90 Crayon wielder
92 Moral standards
93 Focused
94 Fit for
cultivation


95 Invitees who
didn't R.S.V.P.,
say
97 Cargo vessel
with no fixed
route
98 ___ Hart,
showgirl in
"Chicago"
99 Deliver at a farm
100 Bygone rival of
Delta
101 Harass nonstop
,102 "Take ___
Train"


108 Be up
109 Ham helper
110 Spectrum
segment
111 Auction
purchase
112 What the
sublime inspires
113 Verbatim quote
addendum,
possibly
114 J.F.K. arrival of
old


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.


IGIVEUP AM 0 E BA REE VES
R E S I S TI NGAR E ST ARDENT
SRT 0 RIE TA T EA NIE

DI E RI S YELLSATlNNS

ADEXEC LUNG T0 IO L INGAT
D Y NAMI C MOOT NEU BADE
MANES X 0 JUT SATATOP
MER IGLO DREW URSINE E
0 DE01N LOVEAFAF I IR AER IE

S T U D EDO N L EL
HERE P EP NEAP POWERPC

ADNAUS AMFINA W AU

AND P I STOLS E ROS I T

SDERMIS ICEAX OUTER

F RA ENpMA S


9 28


3 5 6 8


2 7 6 9


38 41 7


4 2


1 4 3


7 8 4


3 5


15 4 7 6


C 9 Z LJ 17 6 L 8
9 L 81 9 CL 6




t17L678LSL 9
9 L 6 Z 8 1L 8 9








9 9 L 6 L v i 8 C


L 6 8 7 9 L 8 69


8 Z 9 L 6 9 8 L'7


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010








4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2010


,, i }" .&.
,,



,.N


v-


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration

Health and Safety
Wildlife


r1










"My family's been fishing for eight generations. It's just a way of life.
That's why we've got to get this cleaned up."
Pete Floyd
Commercial Fisherman,
Pascagoula, Mississippi


When the spill hit, a lot of people said it would be the end. BP said
they would try to make this right. But how was an energy company
going to help a fisherman?

Putting People to Work
The first thing they did was rent my boat and hire me to help with
the cleanup. They made up my losses so I could pay my bills. And
they worked with all kinds of people here from fishermen and
shrimpers to restaurant owners. It helped us keep our businesses
open. And it helped us make ends meet so we could support
our families.

Staying for the Long Haul
When they capped the well in July and finally killed it, we were all
relieved. But would BP stick around? Well, they did. The beaches
are clean and we're back on the water fishing so things are getting
a whole lot better. They are still here and have said they will keep
working for as long as it takes.

Getting Back to Normal
'BP asked me to share my story with you to keep you informed. If
you still need help, please call 1-866-448-5816 or go to bp.com. If
you're wondering what you can do.well the next time you're
shopping, buy a little Gulf seafood. There is none finer.


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


For assistance, please call:
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com




--" ..)
,. .. **, '.


@ 2010 BP, E&P


I




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