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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01457
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/20/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01457
System ID: UF00028308:01457
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Indians Fall
Catholic eliminates Fort White.
Sports, IB

000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Laii


' i


Two Straight
Columbia girls soccer wins, 4-0.
Sports, I B







Dorter


Saturday, November 20, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 261 75 cents



Farm-city breakfast attracts big crowd


Event highlights
significance of
farm products.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
More than 70 commu-
nity members attended the
second annual Columbia
CountyFarm-CityBreakfast
Friday at the fairgrounds.
The event was spon-
sored by the Columbia
County Farm Bureau,
County Extension office
and Kiwanis of Lake City.


"We had a pretty good
turnout," said Charlie
Crawford, Farm Bureau
president. "A lot of good
people are here. It's a time
to have everybody recog-
nize where the food on the
shelves come from."
The farm-city breakfasts
are national events aimed at


bringing awareness about
codependency between the
farm and city community,
said Greg Harden, Farm
Bureau field service direc-
tor. National Farm-City
week is celebrated Nov. 19-
25 and the president of the
,United States issues a proc-
lamation in recognition.


Community members
are able to learn more
about agriculture's impact
in the community during
the breakfast, Harden said.
Agriculture in Columbia
County has an economi-
cal impact of $770 million
annually.
The event featured
breakfast and a procla-
mation from City of Lake
City Mayor Stephen Witt.
Stephen and Traci Fulford,
winners of the 2010 Florida
Farm Bureau Young
FARM-CITY continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Virginia McDaniel and Jessica Tire prepare pancakes for the
Columbia County Farm-City Breakfast Friday.


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School drum
major Andrew Jordan, 17, (left)
conducts the marching band
as they take the field. Sarah .
Reichert, 18, (right) plays the
Sflute.'I'm ecstatic,' Reichert said.
'It's my senior year. My goal is to
have one last hoorah.'





MARCH TO FAME

CHS band goes for state semifinals in Tampa


Colby Hollingsworth plays the sousaphone as he gets his timing
Competition's Class 3A Division state semifinals.


By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter.com

and perhaps it
becomes a bit
more under-
standable just
how difficult this is.
A total of 72 people.
Working together, mea-
sured steps, exact move-
ments. The smallest of
mistakes in this routine
can prove costly.
Add to the process the
necessity of playing musi-
cal melodies to perfection
and one gets the idea of
what being in a marching
band entails.
Columbia High School's


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
1 O Voice: 7555445
Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
right while practicing Friday for the Florida Marching Band


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
CHS band director Ryan Schulz offers some advice to his
band members after they played a few songs for family and
friends at Tiger Stadium on Friday.


current ensemble has
managed all this and
taken it to the next level.
They are among 25 prep


bands performing today
in the Florida Marching
Band Competition's
Class 3A Division state


76
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


semifinals at Tampa
Chamberlain High School.
Should the Tigers' band
continue to excel and fin-
ish among the top five
at the semis, it will earn
.a spot in the state finals
tonight at Tropicana Field.
"We're going to do our
best performance of the
year," said CHS band
director Ryan Schulz.
'"lhat's our goal."
Considering how well
the band has performed
thus far this year, that's
a lofty objective. It's also
one loaded with pressure.
In competitions like this,
mistakes aren't allowed.
BAND continued on 3A


Opinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Faith &Values............ 6A


Georgia wildfire

expected to impact

Columbia County


Smoldering fire
affects 870 acres,
spreads smoke.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Smoke from a smolder-
ing Georgia forest fire
is expected to drift into
Columbia County and sev-
eral other northeast Florida
counties for the next few
days.
According to the Florida
Division of Forestry, a
large swamp fire burning
in northern Clinch County,
Ga., in an area known as
Arabia Bay Swamp, is the


source of the smoke.
The fire, estimated at 870
acres, is a ground fire that is
smoldering below the sur-
face and producing a large
volume of smoke. Winds
out of the north will carry
the smoke to this area.
Kurt Wisner, Florida
Division of Forestry mitiga-
tion specialist and public
information officer, said for-
estry officials have advised
authorities in Columbia,
Bradford, Hamilton and
Union counties about the
smoke.
"We put out the first
report last Wednesday,"
SMOKE continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter
Crash injures truck driver
Florida Highway Patrol.officers investigate a crash scene
Thursday where a semi overturned at U.S. Highway 41 lead-
ing to the entrance ramp of Interstate 10. The driver was
taken to the hospital.


Police chief holds

community forum

to tackle concerns


Public gathering
to follow up on
previous issues.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.cont
The next "Breakfast with
the Chief" is 10 to 11:30
a.m. today at the Lake City
Police Department.
The event is a quarterly
open forum for the commlu-
nity to share concerns with
Chief of Police Argatla
Gilmore and command

TODAY IN
FAITH
Vatican issuing
guidelines.


staff and hear results from
the department.
Citizens will hear a follow
up on concerns outlined at
the previous "Breakfast
with the
Chief," said
Capt. John
Blanchard,
LCPD pub-
lic informa-
tion officer.
The depart-
Gilmore meant will
provide a report on the
CHIEF continued on 3A

COMING
SUNDAY
LC couple celebrates
70 years of marriage.


"It's a time to have everybody
recognize where the food on the
shelves come from."

Charlie Crawford
Farm Bureau president


~ii~T,


v










LAKE CITY REPORTER


DAILY BRIEFING


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Friday:
Afternoon: 3-2-4
Evening: 7-7-5


ra ) i> Friday:
"Afternoon: 8-0-7-1
Evening: 3-0-9-5


Thursday:
9-13-15-23-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Palin book lauds 'Juno, snubs JFK


NEW YORK

I n her new book, Sarah Palin
takes on everything from
"American Idol" to "American
Beauty," revives talk of the
Rev. Jeremiah Wright and
finds fault in JFK's famous religion
speech, saying he "seemed to want
to run away" from his faith.
Who gets praise? Simon Cowell,
for one. And the movies "Juno,"
"Knocked Up" and "40-Year-Old
Virgin."
Barack Obama? Unsurprisingly, not
so much. She accuses him of reflecting
"a stark lack of faith in the American
people," among many other things
without tipping her hand on whether
she will challenge him in 2012. -
"America By Heart Reflections on
Family, Faith and Flag," which has
been billed as a tribute to American
values, comes out Nov. 23. The
Associated Press purchased a copy.
Palin's first book, the memoir "Going
Rogue," has sold more than 2 million
copies.
In a chapter on faith and pub-
lic life, Palin addresses at length
John E Kennedy's noted speech on
religion during the 1960 campaign
a speech many saw as crucial
to counter sentiment that his faith
would hold undue sway over him if
he became the nation's first Catholic
president
"I am not the Catholic candidate
for president" Kennedy said at the
time. "I am the Democratic Party's
candidate for president, who hap-
pens also to be a Catholic."
Palin writes that when she was
growing up, she was taught that
JFK's speech reconciled religion and
public service without compromising
either. But since she's revisited the
speech as an adult, she says, she's
realized that Kennedy "essentially
declared religion to be such a private
matter that it was irrelevant to the
kind of country we are."


, .l tl .,r ,l l, I t,, I .. l I; ..i II. r I; .1.11 Ru.l= l,


SARAH
S A R A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this book cover image released by
HarperCollins, Sarah Palin's "America
By Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith,
and Flag," is shown.

She praises Mitt Romney, a
Mormon, for not "doing a JFK"
during his campaign for the 2008
GOP nomination. "Where Kennedy
seemed to want to run away from
religion, Mitt Romney forthrightly
embraced it," she writes. She attri-
butes the gulf not just to the differ-
ence between the men, but to the
distance the country has come since
1960. Now, she says, America is
"reawakening to the gift of our reli-
gious heritage."
Palin also praises "Juno," the
movie where a pregnant teen
chooses to carry her baby. "Most
Americans, I think, are a lot like
Juno," she writes they may not
be actively religious, "but they still
want to do the right thing." She also
likes "Knocked Up," in which a baby
results from a one-night stand, and
"The 40-Year-Old Virgin."


Wesley Snipes ordered
to surrender in tax case
ORLANDO A federal judge
ordered actor Wesley Snipes to sur-
render to authorities Friday so he
can begin serving a three-year pris-
on sentence for tax-related crimes.
U.S. District Court Judge William
Terrell Hodges, in Ocala, rejected a
request from the actor's attorneys
to review Snipes' sentence and grant
a new trial. Snipes has been free on
bond for more than two years while
appealing.
'The defendant Snipes had a fair
trial; he has had a full, fair and thor-
ough review of his conviction and
sentence. ... The time has come for
the judgment to be enforced," the
judge wrote in his 16-page decision.
The 48-year-old star of the "Blade"
trilogy and Spike Lee's "Jungle
Fever" was convicted in 2008 on
three misdemeanor counts of willful
failure to file his income tax returns.
He was acquitted of two more seri-
ous felony charges.

MTV's 'Teen Mom' faces
battery charges
ANDERSON, Ind. Indiana police
want prosecutors to file charges
against the star of the MTV program
'Teen Mom."
Anderson Police Detective Jake
Brooks said in a probable cause affida-
vit that 20-year-old Amber Portwood
"implicated herself' in slapping, chok-
ing, and punching 24-year-old Gary
Shirley three times since August 14,
2009. Brooks asked prosecutors to
file two felony counts and one misde-
meanor count of battery. The alleged
felonies occurred in the presence of
the child. Leah was one at the time of
the first incident

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Nobel Prize-winning author
Nadine Gordimer is 87.
* Actress-comedian Kaye
Ballard is 85.
* Actress Estelle Parsons is
83.
* TV personality Richard
Dawson is 78.
* Comedian Dick Smothers
is 72.
* Vice President Joe Biden

Daily Scripture


is 68.
* Actor Samuel E. Wright is
64.
0 Singer Joe Walsh is 63.
0 Actor Richard Masur is 62.
0 Actress Bo Derek is 54.
N Former NFL player Mark
Gastineau is 54.
1 Actress Sean Young is 51.
t Rapper Mike D (The
Beastie Boys) is 45.


"Blessed is the one who does not
walk in step with the wicked or
stand in the way that sinners take
or sit in the company of mockers,
but whose delight is in the law of
the Lord, and who meditates on
his law day and night."
Psalm 1:I


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED


To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7;30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.......... ........ $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
52 Weeks .................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Bucs player is
charged with DUI

TAMPA Tampa Bay's
Mike Williams did not
practice after his arrest on
a DUI charge early Friday,
however coach Raheem
Morris said the rookie who
leads the Buccaneers in
receiving will travel to San
Francisco and play Sunday
against the 49ers.
SThp fourth-round draft
pick out of,.Syracuse was
arrested after Florida
authorities spotted his
black Escalade speeding
and weaving in and out of
traffic around 2:30 a.m.
Hillsborough County
sheriff's deputies said the
23-year-old's eyes were
glassy and he smelled like
alcohol when they pulled
him over.
According to a breatha-
lyzer test, Williams had a
.065 blood-alcohol level,
which is below Florida's
0.08 percent legal limit.
The receiver was released
on $500 bond.
Authorities can conduct
a DUI investigation if they
see signs of impairment and
make an arrest regardless
of blood-alcohol or urine
tests, sheriff's spokesman
Larry McKinnon said.

Body found in
foreclosed home

ST. PETERSBURG A
man who bought a fore-
closed Florida home discov-
ered a body in.the garage,
and it may be that of the
former owner, authorities
said Friday.
The man went to the
home in Cape Canaveral on
Thursday, a day after buying
it, Brevard County Sheriffs
Major Andrew Walters said.
He found the body in a car in
the garage.
Walters said it's unclear
how long the body had
been there, or how the per-
son died. An autopsy was


Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Mike Williams was
charged with DUI early Friday after Florida authorities spotted
his black Escalade speeding and weaving in and out of traffic.


underway.
News of the gruesome
find came the same day
as a 71-year-old man in
Gulfport, across the state,
died after shooting himself
in the head Monday as he
was about to be evicted
from his home under fore-
closure.
Boyd Rubright shot him-
self as a sheriff's deputy
tried to drill through the
lock on his front door,
police said.
The body in the Cape
Canaveral house was
believed to be that of a
woman, Walters said.
Investigators think it may
the home's previous owner,
because she hasn't been
seen for a while. She went
through foreclosure earlier
this year. Neighbors told
authorities that the woman
had "disappeared" some
time ago.


62 charged in
food stamp fraud
WEST PALM BEACH
- More than 60 Floridians
are accused of stealing
nearly $300,000 from the
food stamp program.
Authorities said 62 people
have been charged with wel-
fare fraud. All but one of the
suspects lives in Palm Beach
County.
The Florida Departmentof
Law Enforcement said store
employees were improperly
ringing up purchases, giv-
ing cash back to the holder
of government-issued food
stamp cards and keeping a
cut for the store. Little or no
food ever changed hands.
Forty-four of the sus-
pects have already been
arrested. Another 18 are
being sought.

* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


S PARTLY PARTLYMOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
CLOUDY CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY


HI 76 49 HI 77 51 HI 79 L52 HI79 52 HI 79 L055


Pnsaca7
72/57


Tallahssee*
75/49 ..
Pa7a Cit
71/55


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


75/4* al4csne City
SJacksonille Cape Canaveral
Lke City* 73/51 Daytona Beach
D76/49 BFt. Lauderdale
Case D a ea Fort Myers
,76/51 7V,59
Oca59 Gainesvllle
.Ocala Jacksonville
77/52 t
Ordando Capan averal Key West
S 79/58 7/62 Lake City
S Miami
Naples
West PalMaBe*di Ocala
80/67 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdal Panama City
FL Myeri 80/71 Pensacola
82/60 Naples Tallahassee
8 1/62 Mimi Tampa
\Ket 89/69 Valdosta
K8ey 20 W. Palm Beach
82/70


75
40
74
50
90 in 1906
28 in 2008

0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.33"
44.96"


I,


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:00 a.m.
5:32 p.m.
7:01 a.m.
5:32 p.m.


MOON
Moonrtse today 4:41 p.m.
Moonset today 5:57 a.m.
Moonrisetom. '5:28 p.m.
Moonset tom. 6:57 a.m.


Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec.
21 28 5 13
Full Last New first


5

30 naiestobn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.



Sunday
76, 62, pc
77/59/pc
81/71/pc
83/61/pc
77/52/pc
75/52/pc
78/68/s
77/51/pc
81/69/pc
82/63/pc
79/53/pc
78/59/pc
73/59/pc
74/59/pc
76/53/pc
80/62/pc
77/52/pc
79/68/pc


Monday
76,63,;
79/61/s
80/72/pc
83/63/pc
79/53/pc
76/54/pc
79/69/pc
79/52/pc
81/71/pc
83/65/pc
80/55/pc
80/60/s
76/57/s
76/60/pc
80/50/s
82/64/pc
79/52/pc
80/68/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


-.I .. Forecasts, data and graph-
S- Ics 2010 Weather Central
- LLC, Madlson, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected


IAM '11


~$H3.


AROUND FLORIDA


II I -n


SATUR;A
JY


[2ILSU


[22 MON


^^^^^Q
[23 TUESDAY^^^^^^


4WENESAY


r LAKE iTY AlMANIAC:B IBBB












State jobless rate remains at 11.9 percent


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSE
Florida's labor chief sees
a glimmer of hope in some
of the employment statis-
tics she released Friday
although October's jobless
rate was unchanged from
the prior month at 11.9 per-
cent.
One bit of good news is
the rate didn't go up again
after increasing for three
straight months, and it's
still below the 12.3 percent
peak hit in March.
Florida also added 6,900
jobs last month and 35,700
since-the prior October,
the strongest over-the-year
growth since May 2007.
"We continue to see
positive signs of stabili-


zation and growth," said
Cynthia Lorenzo, direc-
tor of Florida's Agency for
Workforce Innovation.
The job growth figures,
though, are both well
under 1 percent and the
state still has nearly 1.1 mil-
lion unemployed workers,
in a labor force numbering
9.2 million.
Florida's rate also
remains more than two
percentage points higher
than the 9.6 percent nation-
al rate.
That rate, also holding
steady from September
and August, was con-
sidered so dismal that it
helped Republicans take
control of the U.S. House
and gain strength in the
Senate, although it still has
a Democratic majority, in


the Nov. 2 election.
Florida voters, though,
apparently didn't blame
Republicans, who con-
trol both houses of the
Legislature and hold most
other statewide offices, for
their state's economic woes.
The GOP strengthened
its hold on the statehouse,
including a clean sweep of
races for governor and all
three Cabinet posts.
Lorenzo said another
reason for optimism is that
Florida posted the largest
decrease nationally in first-
time claims for unemploy-
ment benefits.
"Combined with increas-
ing numbers of job post-
ings online, this is encour-
aging news for our job
seekers and our economy,"
she said.


Lorenzo also cited a
University of Florida report
showing a six-point gain in
the state's consumer con-
fidence from September
to October. The new fig-
ure is 74 based on a 100-
point index. Perceptions of
whether it's a good time
to buy a car or other big-
ticket consumer item had
the greatest increase of 10
points to 85.
Agency economist
Rebecca Rust said anecdot-
al reports indicate holiday
season hiring from October
through December will be
up this year, possibly hitting
40,000. During the recent
recession seasonal hiring
has been between 20,000
to 30,000, while in a normal
economy it's usually 50,000
to 60,000. Typically some


of those jobs become per-
manent, Rust said.
State economists,
though, say Florida's long-
term employment forecast
remains bleak.
In an economic report
issued on Election
Day, the Legislature's
Office of Economic and
Demographic Research
said simply rehiring laid off
workers won't be enough
to make up for 862,100
jobs lost since the state's
employment peaked.
That's because Florida's
population is expected to
grow by 1,200 people in
the prime working ages of
25 to 54 every month, so it
would take almost 909,000
new jobs to get back to the
state's peak employment
level.


By comparison,
Republican Governor-elect
Rick Scott ran on a "Let's
get to work" platform of
creating 700,000 jobs in
seven years more than
200,000 fewer than the
peak-level target.
The state's poor employ-
ment prospects led to the
announcement earlier this
week of a sharp increase
in 2011 in unemployment
compensation taxes paid
by Florida's employers.
The minimum tax is set
to increase from $25.20 to
$72.10 per employee annu-
ally, but the maximum will
remain unchanged at $378.
Rates are individually set
based on employment his-
tory, so employers with
more layoffs pay higher
taxes up to the maximum.


BAND
From Page 1A

"We're going to have to
have great music and great
marching," Schulz said.
'We're going to have to
have a perfect show.
'The judges are looking
for us to mess up. They're
looking for mistakes."
Schulz didn't make
it easy on his band.
The music they'll be
performing is from
the Cirque du Soleil,
originally a Canadian
entertainment company
described as a dramatic
mix of circus arts and
street entertainment.
"We just started this
show in August," Schulz
explained. "We had some
fast learners this year."
Considering only 15
of the 72 band mem-
bers are seniors, that
quick learning curve
was imperative. "This
is demanding work,
demanding for the kids,"
Schulz added. "This is
one of the hardest music
selections we've had
since I've been here."
Schulz's time with the
band dates back to 1995,
when he was a student at
Columbia. He has been
involved there, in one
role or another this is
his fifth year as director
ever since.
The band will perform
four pieces of music
in the competition, all
from Cirque du Soleil:
Atmadja, ninkou latora,
Quidam and Incantation.
The total length for the
performance will be eight
minutes, or as Schulz
described it, "Eight min-
utes of continuous mov-
ing and playing."


JASON MATHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Charis Stone (center) hugs CHS color guard member Sara Ellis (far, left), 15, and captain Colleen Heeney, 17, after practice on Friday. 'I'm so proud of them
all,' Stone said.


"They have to march
and play, and it's all mem-
orized," he added.
A number of judges
will be involved, rating
each band on different
segments of its musical
and visual performance.
For example, in music
there will be judges for
ensemble, group balance
and individual playing.
Others will gauge per-


formances by the drum
major, the color guard,
and the percussion sec-
tions.
"It's pretty hard core,"
Schulz said.
The band gave a
rehearsal performance
on the all-too-familiar
CHS football field Friday
evening. They gathered
back at the school at 3:30
a.m. to take the bus for


Tampa.
What won't be return-
ing with them from the
state competition: disap-
pointment. As Schulz
described it, it's been
a surprisingly wonder-
ful experience thus far,
with the band exceeding
expectations and going
further than any previ-
ous CHS band since he's
been involved with it.


SMOKE: Forest fire to extend its economic impact
Continued From Page 1A


FARM-CITY: Contest held.
Continued From Page 1A


Farmers and Ranchers
Achievement Award, were
keynote speakers.
Farm-city week poster
contest winners were also
announced at the breakfast
Posters .used the theme,
"From the Farm 'to the
Fridge."
Winners for kindergar-
ten to second-grade cate-
gory were: Ed Florez, first
place; Cadi Williams, sec-


ond place; and Kolbi Ishler,
third place.
Winners for third to
fifth-grade category were:
Mason Cooper, first place;
Alaina Anschultz, second
place; and Nick Haines,
third place. All the win-
ners were from Epiphany
Catholic School.
The posters are on dis-
play at the Lake City Mall
until Nov. 30.


Wisner said, noting that's
when Georgia officials noti-
fied them about the fire.
Wisner said all the
information they're' get-
ting right now is through
the Georgia Forestry
Commission.
"The fire has been
growing at a rate of
about 100 acres per day,"
he said. "Because it's a
ground fire, it's smolder-
ing beneath the surface
and the Georgia Forestry
Commission is determin-
ing now what suppression
action they are going to
take. Whatever actions
they take, we will have
a smoke impact as long


as the winds are from
the north. Their actions
will determine how much
smoke and for how long
we have it."
The cause of the fire
has not been listed.
"When it first started, it
was only 60 acres," Wisner
said. "The problem with a
fire in the swamps like
this is they (forestry per-
sonnel) can't get any trac-
tors or equipment to it."
Wisner said several
calls were made to Florida
Division of Forestry offic-
es on Wednesday and
Thursday regarding the
smoke in the area.
"We have received many


CHIEF: Breakfast meeting
Continued From Page 1A


results of issues.
Any new problems can
also be shared during
the forum, he said. Some
issues might not necessar-
ily fall under the category
of law enforcement, but the
department will direct them
to the appropriate area.
The community is invited


to share and listen with the
department. Call (386)758-
5471 for more information.
"Come meet some of the
law enforcement officers,"
Blanchard said. "If you do
have some issues we can
help resolve them and get
resolutions for a happier
community."


calls from Hamilton and
Suwannee counties and
several calls from Columbia
County and basically the


by myside, nowf
I'd like to know v

ifyoullbe
S my bride.

Will You

ove, rryob ?

Love, Rob


people were inquiring
about where the smoke
was coming from," he
said.


Do You Need to

POP THE

QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Lovel

755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm


^((i^^^^y

a" ^^ip~ztj


Deadline for Artwork Submissions is
November 22nd -- Don't Miss Out!








1 ,1




Peoples State Bank is hosting a Thanksgiving
themed art contest for children.between the ages
of 6 and 11. Children can draw, paint or sketch
Thanksgiving themed artwork and have a chance to
win a $ 250, $ 100 or $ 50 US Savings Bond for
their future. Visit one of Peoples' branches today
and pick up the official rules and submission form,
but you have to hurry all artwork submissions
are due by November 22, 2010. Peoples State
Bank. Now that's banking!



>:


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W. US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


P PEOPLES

STATE BANK


AdshavetoLb eplcedbI yp
llljdaly'S prfl~l lIor to apin
DE^ADLN the Lak (it R1epoiiifH~irter.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


l H 'j


..!;f I;












OPINION


Saturday, November 20, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Potential

deadly

collisions

L ate October and
early November
are to car insurance
agents what tax
season is to accoun-
tants. The number of car-deer
collisions'inevitably increases
and the dangers are real.
For the uninitiated, this time
of year marks deer rutting,
or mating season. The deer
are less responsive to their
surroundings and much less
cautious. Bucks are focused on
finding a friendly doe and not
on any cars that may be travel-
ing on nearby roadways.
According to the National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, there are about
1.5 million auto-deer collisions
per year, resulting in damage
losses of around $1.5 billion.
In 2004, there were 150
human deaths in the U.S. that
were directly related to car-deer
accidents, according to State
Farm Insurance.
Deer-related collisions are
always a concern for local
drivers, especially in the more
rural and wooded parts of the
country.
But we urge readers to take
extra care while traveling in
the coming weeks, particularly
early in the morning and at
dusk when the deer are more
active.
* Burlington County (N.J.) Times

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Nov. 20,
the 324th day of 2010. There
are 41 days left in the year.
In 1789, New Jersey
became the first state to ratify
the Bill of Rights.
In 1929, the radio program
'The Rise of the Goldbergs"
debuted on the NBC Blue
Network.
In 1947, Britain's future
queen, Princess Elizabeth,
married Philip Mountbatten,
Duke of Edinburgh, at
Westminster Abbey.
In 1959, the United
Nations issued its Declaration
of the Rights of the Child.
In 1967, the U.S. Census
Bureau's Population Clock at
the Commerce Department
ticked past 200 million.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Rough times for air travelers


As I was packing for
a trip to visit two
sons in the mili-
tary, I watched TV
accounts of growing
flyer angst over the increasingly
intrusive body searches at air-
ports.
I was not particularly inter-
ested. I fly a lot and haven't
been unduly upset by the ever-
enhanced security measures.
Hey, we all want to be safe,
right? But I was struck by the
tone of outrage in all those
interviewed. One woman said
she felt violated by what she
called the excessive pat down
she received. Another foresaw
a time when air passengers will
be strip-searched.
To avoid hassle in the secu-
rity line, I gave more thought
to what to wear to the airport
than on what to pack. Since I
like flashy jewelry that screams
"I-bought-it-at-Chico's," I pared
down to a few thin strands of
tiny glass beads. No metal clasp.
No glitz. To be on the safe
side, I took off a silver bracelet
I always wear which usually
doesn't set off metal detectors.
But you never know.
Arriving at Ronald Reagan
Washington National Airport
at the crack of dawn, I took off
my jacket, a sweater, a scarf and
shoes. I put my laptop flat in a
plastic bin and laid my umbrella
beside it But the usual metal
detectors were gone, replaced
by a full-body imager.
By the end of next year about
1,400 of these see-everything
scanners are to be in place
in U.S. airports. Supposedly,


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationolpress.com
the Transportation Security
Administration person viewing
your body in places where the
sun never shines is in a separate
room. Supposedly, the image is
a little fuzzy to spare passengers
embarrassment. Supposedly, the
image is immediately erased.
(So how come a TSA agent went
berserk in Miami when fellow
agents ridiculed him over the
small size of a certain part of his
body? Check it out on Google.
I refuse to name him. And why
do TSA employees invariably
look to be both terminally bored
and surly?)
After standing, legs askance,
in the reveal-all body imager, I
was directed over to the body-
pat down woman, a rotund
woman who looked bored and
surly.
"Why are you doing this?" I
asked incredulously.
"You're an anomaly," she said
indifferently.
"What!?" I asked.
"He thinks your necklace is
an anomaly," she said, nodding
at a male TSA agent standing in
a corner.
She proceeded to publicly pat
me down with the thoroughness
of a mother applying baby oil to
a six-week-old infant and then


grunted that I could gather my
belongings and actually get on
an airplane.
Somehow, I don't feel safer.
Every time the terrorists think
of some new way to try to blow
up a plane, the TSA after six
months or a year comes up with
a new way to hire thousands
more bored, surly TSA agents
and spend several hundred mil-
lion dollars. We have to take off
our shoes, belts, jewelry, jack-
ets and can't take our bottles
of water through security. You
know darn well some terror-
ist is going to stash something
dangerous in a body cavity that
even the show-everything imag-
ers can't detect. Then what?
The Israelis, with the most
intense security in the world,
have avoided the full-body imag-
ers, probably because it's a lot
of money that still isn't 100 per-
cent reliable.
Homeland Security Secretary
Janet Napolitano says she is
willing to listen to frustrated
air passengers. Hey, Madame
Secretary, how about a little
flexibility here? And, beware!
Those new tea partying, liber-
tarian Republican office holders
are really wary of more regula-
tion.
PS.: Thanks for not losing
my luggage. But after I arrived
at my destination, the necklace
broke, scattering minute beads
everywhere. It was probably an
anomaly.
* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Thanking those who supply the food


his Thanksgiving
Day, as we gather
with family and
friends to count our
blessings, let's give
thanks for the bounty we enjoy
not just on this holiday, but
every day.
The safe, plentiful food that is
available to us, and the products
used to produce the clothing,
housing, medicines, fuel and
other products we use on a daily
basis, don't just appear in stores.
Rural and urban residents are
"Partners in Progress" who pro-
duce the products, consume the
products, and make them read-


ily available through an efficient
production and marketing chain.
Farmers and ranchers are just
the beginning of that chain.
Farm workers, researchers, pro-
cessors, shippers, truck drivers,
inspectors, wholesalers, agri-
businesses, marketers, advertis-
ers, retailers and consumers
all play important roles in the
incredible productivity that has
made our nation's food and fiber
system the envy of the world.
In appreciation of this farm-
city partnership, the president of
the United States annually pro-
claims the week leading up to
and including Thanksgiving Day


as National Farm-City Week.
This week, as we celebrate
Thanksgiving, let's remember
the vital farm-city partnerships
that have done so much to
improve the quality of our lives.
Rural and urban communities
working together have made
the most of our rich agricul-
tural resources, and have made
significant contributions to
our health and well-being and
to the strength of our nation's
economy.
For this, we can give thanks.
Charlie Crawford
Columbia County
Farm Bureau


Cliff May


Delay


vote on


New


START


you don't need to be
in the Tea Party to
believe that mem-
bers of Congress
ought to read and
understand bills before signing
them into law.
I think it's fair to say that
in this mopth's elections vot-
ers rejected the alternative
approach, best articulated
by soon-to-be-former House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi in
regard to legislation designed
to transform American health
care: "(W)e have to pass the
bill so you can find out what is
in it. ..."
Now under consideration by
the U.S. Senate is New START
- a consequential strategic
nuclear arms-limitation treaty
with Russia.
The Kremlin interprets it
as restricting America's abil-
ity to deploy missile defenses.
Administration spokesmen say
that's not correct. To resolve
this confusion, some senators
have asked to review the nego-
tiating record the paper trail
left by those who participated
in the talks.
The administration has been
unwilling to provide those doc-
uments, in effect asking mem-
bers of the Senate to embrace
the Pelosi approach: Vote for
the treaty first, figure out what
it means later.
During his Asia tour last
week, President Barack
Obama said that ratification
of New START is his top
foreign policy priority and
that he wants to get it done
in the lame-duck session of
Congress. Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton and Defense
Secretary Robert Gates this
week had an op-ed in the
Washington Post headlined:
"We Can't Delay This Treaty."
On the one hand, sitting
senators are paid to cast votes,
not kick cans down the road.
On the other hand, again, you
probably' don't have to be a
Tea Party member to think
that for departing senators to
ratify this treaty would be like
fired executives deciding on a
corporate merger just before
turning in their keys to the
bathroom.
A treaty establishes inter-
national law and commits a
nation to a solemn obligation.
It would be appropriate for
senators-elect of both parties
to send a letter to the White
House and the Senate express-
ing their preferences. Let
me nominate Marco Rubio,
a Republican from Florida,
Mark Kirk, a Republican from
Illinois, and Joe Manchin, a
Democrat from West Virginia
to lead that effort.
The United States has the
technology to win any arms
race and to counter all imagin-
able missile threats.
What we do not have are
political leaders who agree
that, in the 21st century, the
best way to promote peace
is not for Americans to leave
themselves vulnerable the
Cold War doctrine known as
Mutually Assured Destruction
or MAD but for Americans
to use their scientific prowess
to render useless the weapons
of those hostile to us.

Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


_ I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.corn.


Today
Breakfast with the
Chief
The Lake City Police
Department is hosting
breakfast with Chief of
Police Argatha Gilmore
10 11:30 a.m. today at
the public safety build-
ing. The event features a
complimentary breakfast
and community forum on
neighborhood issues. Call
Capt. John Blanchard 386-
758-5471.

Santa's Arrival
Santa Claus is coming
at 11 a.m. today to the
Lake City Mall. All area
children are invited to wel-
come Santa back to town.
The first 100 children will
receive a free gift from
Santa. Area dance, karate
and gymnastic students
will perform in center
court until 2 p.m.

Art and photography
show
A fall art and pho-
tography show is 6 9
p.m. today at St. James
Episcopal Church. It
will feature wild African
safari photography and
art work by local artists
Jeanne Van Arsdall, Leslie
Reid-McDaniel and Dottie
List. Call 386-288-8898.
The church is located
at Bascom Norris and
McFarland Avenue.

Roller Derby Bout
The ACR Hunnies Flat
Track Roller Derby Team
take on the Fort Myers
Derby Girls 7:30 p.m.
today at Skating Palace,
357 N.W. Hall of Fame
Drive. Doors open at 7
p.m. Pre-sale tickets are $5
at Skating Palace. Tickets
are $7 at the door, and
children under 12 are free.
Visit www.acrderby.org.

Folk Club performance
The White Springs Folk
Club presents Scott and
Michelle Dalziel 7:30 p.m.
today at the Telford Hotel
in White Springs. E-mail
mckenziew@windstream. net
or 386-397-2000. The sug-
gested donation is $12.50
per person. It includes
refreshments during inter-
mission.

Benefit fundraiser
A benefit fundraiser
for Rick Harkness "Big
Daddy" is 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
today at First Full Gospel
Church. A benefit bike run
starts at 10 a.m. and costs
$10 per rider and $5 for
extra rider. Yard sale space
is available for $15. BBQ
pork lunches will be sold.
Activities will also include
a gospel sing. Call Janice
at 623-7375, Jackie, 984-
0453 or Michelle, 365-5780.

Sunday
Community involvement
Summers Elementary
After School is seeking
artifacts, cuisine, dances,
music, customs, pictures
and more from countries
and cultures around the
world from people in the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Final day to see 'Aladdin Jr.' at Levy Center

Aladdin, played by Devin Huchingson, is promised three wishes by Genie, played by Austin
Akins,in the Masterpiece Performing Arts production of Disney's Aladdin Jr., during a dress
rehearsal on Thursday. Show times continue toddy at the Florida Gateway College's Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.


community. Anyone willing
to share please call 755-
8243.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Matching Funds Drive
The Christian Service
Center is having its
Matching Funds Drive
from now until Dec. 31. All
donations will be doubled
by local sponsors. Mark
your check "Matching
Funds" and mail to
Christian Service Center,
PO. Box 2285 Lake City,
FL 32056. Call 755-1770.

Monday
Academic Recognition
Ceremony
Presley's Excel and
Scholars Program is
hosting it's academic
recognition ceremony
for Columbia County
school students at 7
p.m. Monday at New
Day Springs Missionary
Baptist Church. The
speaker for the event
is Superintendent
Mike Millikin, and the
theme is "Knowledge Is
Contagious." The church
is located at 1321 West
Long St. Students are
encouraged to bring a
book to the program to
exchange or giveaway.

Thursday
Lad Soup Kitchen
Lad Soup Kitchen is
hosting its 15th Annual
Community Thanksgiving
Feast from 10 a.m. 2
p.m. on Thanksgiving Day,
Thursday. The kitchen
is located at 127 NE


OBITUARIES


L.D. Carr
Mr. L.D. Carr, 85, resident of
Lake City, Fl, peacefully passed
from this life Thursday, No-
vember 18, 2010, at his home
following an extended illness.
He was a native
of Glennville, ,
GA, son of the
late Dave and
Minnie Rush ,
Carr and had
made his home in Lake City
since 1959 where he retired
from Guerdon Industries after
27 years of service. He served
in the U.S. Army Infantry during
World War II and was wounded
in The Battle ofThe Bulge where
he received the Purple Heart and
the Bronze Star. IHe was a mem-


ber of Parkview Baptist Church,
enjoyed telling stories to his
family and friends, was a past
member of The Lake City Elks
Lodge, enjoyed hunting and
fishing and was devoted to his
family. He was preceded in death
by his infant son, Dale Carr.
Survivors; Beloved wife of 63
years, Roxie Moody Carr, Lake
City. Three daughters, Judy (El-
mer) Wheeler, Lake City, Gail,
(Sammy) Nettles, Lake City
and Jean Klay, Lake City. One
son, Rocky Moody, Lake City.
One brother, Bill Carr, Glen-
nville. GA. Grandchildren,
Angie (Charles) Nccley, Scott
(Kim) Wheeler, Troy (Tiffany)
Cason, Sam Cason, David Klay,
Wendy Holmcs, Kailyn Moody
and Brock Moody. Nine Great


Escambia St.

Thanksgiving dinner
The entire commu-
nity is invited to the 10
Annual Thanksgiving
Day Dinner 11:30 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m. Thursday in
the Fellowship Hall of the
First Presbyterian Church.
The church is located at
697 SW Baya Drive. The
menu will include fresh
baked turkey with gravy,
cranberry sauce, mashed
potatoes, sweet potatoes,
green beans, rolls, coffee
or tea, pumpkin pie or
carrot cake. There is no
charge for the dinner. Call
752-0670.

Saturday, Nov. 27
Holiday happenings
The kickoff to the
Christmas season begins
at 5 p.m. Nov. 27 in Olustee
Park. Activities begin with
holiday music featuring The
Gateway City Big Band and
Harry Wuest as conduc-
tor. The lighting of Olustee
Park is at 6:30 p.m. followed
by the arrival of Santa
Claus. Photos with Santa
are from 7-9 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 28
Food for Fines
The annual Food for
Fines program is Nov.
28-Dec. 4 at the Columbia
County Public Library.
Each one sealed, non-
expired, non-perishable
item brought to the library
will reduce a fine by $1. All
items collected at the Main
and West Branch will be
delivered to the Christian
Service Center in Lake
City for local distribution.
Items collected at the Fort
White Branch Library will
be distributed at the Fort
White food shelf.


Bureau Building. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending. The
building is located at 5700
SW 34th Street, Suite 222,
Gainesville. Contact Cindy
Roberts at 352-378-6649.

Thursday, Dec. 2
Christmas Concert
Richardson Middle
School Wolf Pride Band
is having its annual
Christmas Concert
6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 in the
Columbia High School
auditorium. The RMS
Jazz Band, Symphonic
Band, Beginners Band and
Drumline will play songs
of the season under the
direction of Sherrod Keen.

Saturday, Dec. 4
Dream Machine Toy
Ride
The 9th Annual
Christmas Dream
Machine Toy Ride is Dec.
4. Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. and the toy
ride pulls out at 12 p.m.
from the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. There will be
raffles and live bands, and
all proceeds will go to ben-
efit the Christmas Dream
Machine. Contact Cookie
at 386-362-6529 or Polly at
386-758-9811.

Sunday, Dec. 5
Blood drive
Hungry Howie's Blood
Drive is scheduled from
noon-6 p.m. Dec. 5 at
Hungry Howie's, 857 SW
Main Boulevard. Each
donor will receive a free
small one-topping pizza or
small sub. Call 386-438-
3415.


Wednesday, Dec. 1 Tuesday, Dec. 7
Public meeting
Elder Options is having
a public meeting 10 a.m. :;'
Dec. 1 in the Florida Farm . '"


BBirthday
I Kelsey Stormant
"Baby Precious"





1 1 .






S We love you!
Mom, Mr1. ), Grandma
& Pops
" /* -. . .* , ,


Grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 2 P.M. Sunday, No-
vember 21,2010 at GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 South U.S. High-
way 441, Lake City, Fl. 32025
(366-752-1954) with Pastor
Craig Ienderson olliciating,
assisted by Rev. Mike Tatum.
Interment will follow in Memo-
rial Cemetery. Visitation with
the family will be Saturday, No-
vember 20, 2010 at the mineral
Ilome from 5 P.M. until 7 P.M.
Please sign the guest book at
wwvw.gateiwaeforestliawin.coim.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Volunteer literacy tutor
A volunteer literacy
tutor training workshop
is 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 7 at 308 NW
Columbia Avenue. The
workshop will emphasize.
reading strategies, the
writing process, infor-
mal assessments, lesson
planning, and phonics
using the Laubach Way to
Reading method of train-
ing. Call the library's lit-
eracy coordinator, Glennis
Pounds, at 386-758-2111 or
e-mail columbialiteracy@
neflin.org.

Wednesday, Dec. 8
Public meeting
Elder Options is hav-
ing a public meeting 10
a.m. Dec. 8 in the Hilton
University of Florida
Conference Center. The
Board of Directors will be
reviewing applications for
organizational grants, as
well as hearing appeals
from those attending.
The building is located
at 1714 SW 34th street,
Gainesville. Contact Cindy
Roberts at 352-378-66.49.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 10 a.m. Dec. 8 at
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate and
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expands
the opportunities available
with Medicaid Planning.
Seats must be reserved by
calling Shana Miller at 386-
755-1977.

Friday, Dec. 10
Class Reunion
Columbia High School
Classes of '49, '50, '51, '52,
and '53 are having a class
reunion 11:30 a.m. Dec. 10
at Mason City Community
Center. Anyone who
attended Columbia High
is invited. Contact Julia
Osburn at 386-752-7544 or
Morris Williams at 386-
752-4710.


Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts "The Life
of a Christian Teenager"
at 6:15 p.m. Dec. 11. The
theater is located at 348 N.
Marion Avenue. Call 386-
344-0319.

Holiday happenings
Snow Day, sponsored by
Hopeful Baptist Church,
is 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Dec.
11 in the parking lot next
to Gulf Coast Financial.
The event will feature 30
tons of snow delivered
along with two bounce
houses, a 26-foot dual


lane slide, a rock climb
wall, an obstacle course
and a bungee challenge.
The Festival of Lights will
take place around Olustee
Park throughout the day
and will feature arts and
crafts, food vendors and
live entertainment. The
Christmas parade, present-
ed by the Lake City Rotary
Club, is 6 p.m. Christmas
music will begin after the
parade in Olustee Park
until 9 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 14
Literacy tutor training
Volunteer literacy tutor
training workshop is 5:30
to 8:30 p.m. Dec. 14 at 308
NW Columbia Avenue.
The workshop will empha-
size reading strategies,
the writing process, infor-
mal assessments, lesson
planning, and phonics
using the Laubach Way to
Reading method of train-
ing. Call the Library's
Literacy Coordinator,
Glennis Pounds, at 386-
758-2111 or e-mail colum-
bialiteracy@neflin. org.

Saturday, Dec. 18
FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of
Lake City announces a
Christmas party taking
place from 6:30 10:30
p.m. Dec. 18 at the
Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. Enjoy a night
of culture, dancing, and
entertainment, and pos-
sibly become a member of
FACS. For more informa-
tion, contact Bob Gavette
at 386-965-5905.

Ongoing

Every day
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday-Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

Every Monday


Meets 6:30 to 9 p.m.
Monday. For more infor-
mation, please call Maj.
Grant Meadows, 386-365-
1341.

Every fourth
Monday
Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meeting
The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from
1 to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Ct. Call 755-
0235.


Reverse Mortgage

-" -: INCOME FOR LIFE



s McELHANEY'S
Frank McElhaney, GMA MORTGAGE SERVICES
Principal Broker 1Your Local/ Aortage Connection ..
291 SW Sisters Welcome Rd. NMiB


[ E.\R1. TIHA\NkSC I(; |)t.\IG )E. LINE:-
til the I.:mLse (Cill Reliorler
ll , l 11~l l l .I 'll -'l ,Ii 1 Ih'l l l >| L J 1. lh ll
.. .1^ II ..1 'I _11%% Il I l 1
I h. ii da, N. 1111 1 1 140, 2110
Our Advertising deadlines will be
Classfied Friday. November 26 willdeadline Wednesday. November 24111 m.
Display: Frday, November 26will deadline Monday, November 22
Saturday November 27 will deadline Tuesday. November 23
Sunday, November 28 will deadline Tuesday, November 23
Tuesday, November 30 will deadline Wednesday November 24
We will be blck in the office on Friday,
November 26th for our customers coInvelience.
7Thank )ou (and1 ave a Great 'Thanrksgizving


Suwannee valley
Saturday, Dec. 11 CompositeSquadron
Civil Air Patrol


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












FAITH


Saturday, November 20, 2010 v


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS

E Vatican issuing guidelines


Catholic Church moves to curtail sex abuse of children


Angie Land
angieland3@windstream.net

Meanwhile

could take

another

meaning


love of multi-
tasking (Don't
you just love
that rare day
when you get to check off
everything on your list?),
but I really like the word ,
"meanwhile," especially
when it gets used like this:
My dinner was in the oven;
meanwhile, I finished up
the laundry.
Meanwhile literally means
"at the same time." Chapter
four (Ruth 4:1-8) begins by
telling us that while Ruth
was at home feeling very
concerned and probably
confused about what was
happening, Boaz was in
town getting the matter set-
tled, just like Naomi assured
her that he would.
Like a man on a mission,
Boaz gets to work: First, he
waits for the nearer kins-
man-redeemer at the city
gate where all legal transac-
tions were settled. It's the
equivalent of our courtroom.
Once he is in place,
10 elders were gathered
and then the case was
opened. The details get a
bit confusing in our English
translation, but remember
that property wasn't actu-
ally bought and sold in the
way that we understand
today. Through his inheri-
tance, Naomi's husband,
Elimelech, had rights to a
parcel of land that was for-
feited when the family left
Bethlehem to go to Moab.
What Boaz is presenting
to the closest kinsman is the
opportunity to buy back the
property for Naomi's family,
herself and Ruth, not from
them. This appeared to be
agreeable until he under-
stood the strings attached:
the widow, along with the
responsibility to maintain
her dead husband's name.
Isn't Boaz playing it cool?
No doubt his heart is beat-
ing double time, hoping
that he gets to be the one to
redeem the property and get
the girl!
Did you notice how he
throws in the fact that Ruth
is a Moabitess (one of them
foreigners!) and a "dead
man's" widow?
I mean are there any
other kind? It sure seems
like Boaz was trying to
make the deal sound as
least appealing as possible.
Whether it was those small
details or not, Boaz's strat-
egy worked and the offer
was refused!
One last point to make
you think: While I'm so
glad that everything works
out for Boaz to redeem the
property and marry Ruth,
I surely feel a bit sorry for
that other relative. I mean,
for heaven's sake, what if
he were wearing his favor-
ite pair of shoes? And I
can't help but wonder: Did
they have a shoe store in
Bethlehem where you could
buy just one in cases like
this? Just goes to show, you
never know what might be
going on meanwhile.

* 1-eart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Benedict XVI delivers his message to cardinals he summoned for a day of reflection at the Vatican on Friday, the day before a ceremony to create
24 new cardinals. The top agenda, religious freedom, grew remarkably timely given China's planned ordination Saturday of a bishop who doesn't have the
Pope's approval.


By NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY
The Vatican said
Friday it was plan-
ning to issue a set of
guidelines to bishops
around the world on
responding effectively to the sex-
ual abuse of children by priests
that will include recommenda-
tions for prevention programs,
better screening of priests and
the need to obey civil reporting
requirements.
Cardinal William Levada, who
heads the Vatican office that
deals with clerical sex abuse
cases, told some 150 cardinals of
the guidelines during a daylong
summit Friday that dealt in part
with the sex abuse scandal.
A Vatican statement said
Levada discussed the need for
bishops to collaborate with civil
authorities in reporting abuse,
the need to protect children and
the need for an "attentive selec-
tion and formation" of future
priests.
It said the guidelines, in the
form of a letter to bishops' confer-
ences, would suggest a "coordi-
nated and efficient program" to
crack down on abuse.
Levada has previously said he
thought the tough, zero-tolerance
approach applied in U.S. could
be a model for.bishops confer-
ences globally. Those norms were


"Child protection is the big positive thing now
and we've taken care of the problem."

Cardinal-designate Donald Wuerl
Archbishop of Washington, D.C.


developed in 2002 after the cleri-
cal abuse scandal erupted in the
United States.
They bar credibly accused
priests from any public church
work while claims against them
are under investigation. Diocesan
review boards, comprised mostly
of lay people, help bishops over-
see cases. Clergy found guilty are
permanently barred from public
ministry and, in some cases,
ousted from the priesthood.
The church abuse scandal
erupted anew earlier this year in
Europe and beyond with thou-
sands of reports of priests who
molested children, bishops who
covered up for them and Vatican
officials who turned a blind eye
for decades.
The Vatican has been reeling
from the fallout, and included the
issue on its agenda for a one-day
summit of cardinals who were
gathering in Rome for a ceremo-
ny on Saturday to name 24 new
cardinals.
The Vatican statement said sev-
eral cardinals spoke during the
meeting of the need to encourage
bishops' conferences to develop
"efficient, prompt, articulated,


complete and decisive plans to
protect minors" that took into
account the need for various
types of intervention, including
the need for the "reestablish-
ment of justice, assistance to vic-
tims, prevention and formation"
- even in countries where the
problem hasn't been felt.
The main U.S. victims group,
Survivors Network of Those
Abused by Priests, was not
impressed, saying children
remain at risk.
"We didn't have high hopes
for this meeting because these
church officials are the same men
who ignored and concealed, and
are largely still ignoring and con-
cealing, horrific crimes against
kids," said David Clohessy,
SNAP's national director.
Four SNAP members from the
United States, Belgium, Germany
and Britain, staged a brief demon-
stration in Rome's Piazza Navona
on Friday to demand the Vatican
do more to protect children by
releasing the names of known
pedophile priests and turning
over documentation about their
crimes.
Cardinal-designate Donald


Wuerl, the archbishop of
Washington, D.C., said Levada
had told the gathering of car-
dinals that he thought the U.S.
norms had combatted the prob-
lem credibly.
Levada, the prefect of the
Congregation for the Doctrine of
the Faith, is a former archbishop
of San Francisco and Portland,
Oregon who helped develop the
"zero tolerance" policy in the U.S.
"Child protection is the big pos-
itive thing now and we've taken
care of the problem," Wuerl told
the AP after the meeting. "We
need to look to the future, and
what we can do to make sure"
children are safe.
In addition to clerical abuse,
Friday's meeting also dealt with
the Vatican's unprecedented invi-
tation to Anglicans disaffected by
the ordination of women priests
and bishops to convert to the
Roman Catholic Church.
The Vatican last year made it
easier for Anglicans to convert
by allowing them to retain some
of their liturgical practices and
heritage.
As the cardinals were meeting,
the church in Britain announced
that about 50 Church of England
priests had expressed interest
in joining five of their bishops in
converting to Roman Catholicism
and that the first so-called person-
al ordinariate would be erected
in January to welcome them into
the fold.


CHURCH NOTES


Saturday
Women's conference
The Women of Antioch
Missionary Baptist
Church are hosting a
Women's Conference
today and Sunday. The
theme is "Women of
Destiny: Fulfilling
Our Divine Purpose."
Prophetess Cornita
Ferrell is speaking at 9
a.m. Saturday and 3:30
p.m. Sunday. Conference
registration is $25 which
includes breakfast and
lunch on Saturday, tote
bag and conference
materials. Contact Tracy
Sanders at 386-497-2275,
Marilyn Frazier at 352-318-
3441 or Shenise Mulberry
at 352-316-1493.

Shuman in concert
Stan Shuman is present-
ing a musical concert 7
p.m. today. There will be
light refreshments after
the concert in the fellow-
ship hall. The church is
located 18302 SW State
Road 47. Call 497-1388

Pre-Thanksghving Dinner
Shiloh Missionary


Baptist Church is host-
ing its Annual Pre-
Thanksgiving Dinner and
Clothing Giveaway 8:30
a.m. today. The commu-
nity is invited to attend
and partake of food and
clothing at no cost. The
church is located at 948
SE Aberdeen St. The Rev.
Dr. Dwight Pollock is pas-
tor.

Thanksgiving dinner
A free Thanksgiving
dinner is 11 a.m. 1 p.m.
today at the Community
Center at Hatch Park in
Branford. The dinner
is hosted by Branford
Area Interfaith Church
Ministry. Dinner will
include turkey, dressing,
mashed potatoes, cran-
berry sauce, green beans,
cornbread dressing, des-
serts, soft drinks and tea.

Equipping to Share
A complimentary
workshop fpr everyday
witnessing is 9 a.m.
- 3 p.m. today at Our
Redeemer Lutheran
Church. Registration is 8
- 9 a.m. The Equipping
to Share is bible based
and interactive and will


provide practical insights
for sharing faith daily. A
complimentary lunch will
be available. Register by
calling 386-288-2421. The
church is located at 5056
SW State Road 47.

Gifts of the Spirit
Peace Baptist Church
in Branford is presenting
a seminar of "Gifts of the
Spirit" 10 a.m. 3:10 p.m.
today and 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. Sunday. Dr. E.V.
"Gene" Coons, evangelist,
is the speaker/teacher.
Call the church office at
386-935-4681. The church
is located 7794 S.E. US
Highway 27.

Gospel Music Service
The Gospel
Harmoneers of Lake City
will celebrate its 60th anni-
versary starting at 7 p.m.
today at the Community
Revival Center. This musi-
cal service will include
several gospel artists, and
everyone is invited. The
community Revival Center
is located at 244 NE
Patterson Ave. Contact
Pastor Minnie Gomes at
386-758-1886.


Sunday


follow the service.


Jesse Hill Harvest Day Guest Speaker


Sisters Welcome
Missionary Baptist
Church is observing Jesse
Hill Harvest Day 11 a.m.
and 3 p.m. Sunday. There
will be an old-fashioned
picnic dinner on the
grounds and many antique
items on display.

Church Anniversary
Greater Truevine
Missionary Baptist
Church is celebrating
its 126th Annual Church
Anniversary 11 a.m. and
3 p.m. Sunday. The Rev.
Ernest J. Brewton is the
morning speaker. The
Rev. Dr. Dwight Pollock
is the afternoon speaker.

Thanksgiving Feast
The combined congre-
gations of Lulu Baptist
Church and Lulu Advent
Christian Church are
having a Thanksgiving
Worship Service at 11
a.m. Sunday. The ser-
vice is at Lulu Advent
Christian Church. A
Thanksgiving Feast will


Fort White Church
of God is having Jesten
Peters as a guest speaker
at 11 a.m. Sunday. Peters
is well known in the Lake
City area and is a member
of Aglow.

Homecoming
Live Oak Church of
God is celebrating its 91st
Homecoming 10:30 a.m.
Sunday with gospel band
Fortress. The Rev. Ken
Hosford is the speaker.
Live Oak Church of God
is located at 9828 US Hwy.
129 S. in Live Oak. There
will be an Old Fashioned
Dinner-on-the-grounds
immediately following
morning worship.

Submit Church Notes
items in writing no later
than 5 p.m. Monday the
week prior to an event by
e-mail to arobinson@lake-
cityreporter.com, fax to
(386) 752-9400 or drop-off
at 180 E. Duval St., Lake
City. Call (386) 754-0425
with questions. Church
Notes run as space is avail-
able each Saturday.


6A










LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


SWhen the Pilgrims held their first Thanksgiving

celebration, it wasn't a new idea, it was a new setting.


SOn a strange shore, barely settled and surrounded by-'

dangers, but grateful for the bounty God provided, they

found a way to say thanks to Him. Wherever we are,

whatever our circumstances, He provides. Take time this

week to say "Thank you, God". Worship with family and

friends and honor that first Thanksgiving celebration.

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm,
93 95 96 99 100 104 107
Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You "
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
OCvon Chevron Oil
Jobber

'I 'II '


[Holhl/eectnc, Inc.
"Quality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all Ihngs through, Chrimt hicll strneng th nie"
Philippians 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S (RANE SERVICE
Located at 25A
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
SundaySchool: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: ll:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM
-: I ]
GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
SundayWorship .. 1030AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM & 6PM
WednesdayEve. Service 7PM
Pastor Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE JamesAve. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM &6PM
Wed. Prayer MtglBible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
- Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
SundayWorship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
ChildrensMinistry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OIVET MISSIONARY BATIST CHURCH
541 N.E.Davis Street
(386)752-1990
Ronald V.Walters, Pastor
Simnay School 9:45AM
Sunday MomingWorship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God'sWord, Will &Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTISTCHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. 752-0681.
Lake City, Florida 32055
S www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,945& IAM
SundayWorship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM


AWANA .
EveningWorship
I Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation)
Children's Ministry
Youth Worship
Prayer Meeting


,5:30 PM
6:00 PM

5PM
6PM
6:00 PM
6:00 PM


Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 830PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study. 9:45AM
SundayWorship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive 755-5553
Sunday;
Bible Study 8:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
EveningWorship 6:15PM
Wednesday:
AWANA 5:45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 6:15 PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274
Sunday School 10AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6 PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman
THEVINEYARD
A Southern Baptist Church
2091 SW Main Blvd. 623-0026
SundayWorship 10:00AM
Where Jesus is Preached
and jeans are appropriate.
Pastor, Bo Hammock

EPIPHANYCATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SWEpiphanyCourt 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
SundayMass 8:15AM, 10:30AM,
5:00 PM (SpanishlEnglish)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITYCHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7PM

NEW HORIZON
churchof Christ
Direcioni& Times 755-1320
lack Exumjr., Miister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
lb Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Nigh 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SundayWorship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment. 7PM
"ShockYouth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs'
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, FI 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: sunagis33jQAgIib thact
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The RevMichael Armstrong
Deacon: Th Rev, limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
112 miles S, of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Providedi
Chnsnan Educanon Hour
For all age at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev Bruce Aliue
SPIRIT OF CHRISI LUTHERAN
wy 90, 1 5 miles West al 1-75 *752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:OOAM
Nurmery Avail
Wed Pot Luck F.PM Worshp 7PM
Vicar lohn David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 830 & I 1:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelum corn
Finit Uniled Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Servce 8:30AM
Iradinonal Service I :00AM
Program opporrunties available in all
areas for all age.
For a complete schedule
contact church oEce at
752-4488
WESLEYMEMORIAL UNITED '
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 8:00 & 1000AM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6.00PM
AWANA sanm 9/15 Wed. 5 0PM
Pastor The Rev. I Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Oknawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun.Worhip IIAM& 6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Oghurn


LAKE CTY CHURCOF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM,6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided.
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive* 752-0670
Sunday Contemporary. 9:00AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
NURSERYPROVDED
Pastor Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
SundaySchool 10:00AM
MomingWorship 11:00AM
EvangelisticService 6-00 PM
Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service -Wednesday 7:00 PM
For infocall 755-3408* Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRALMINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
SundayMorning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-225
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30AM
Pastor Chris Jones* 752-9118
PALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 EM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIAEVANGEICA
APOSENTOAC'
17077 25th Rd. L UC FL32055
Service Fri: 7:00PM, Sur 1:00PM
Arturo Suarez* 386-754-1836
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
NMonungWorship ll:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240'
Sunday 10AMand7PM


Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


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SCall





752-1293!


Toavrie inths Curh ir*etr Cl 5554


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register
386-961-9100
Northside fIotors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St Mon.-Fri. 9:00 am. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL32055 Closed Wednesday

@ ADIIBSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St, Lake City

HARRY'S
us,,nr Healing &BAir Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President.


Puon 752-2308 a-

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKE'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
1701 S. 1.5 7
s?' 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAY lil.oria l Sence,
FIRE & ui:tr Rctor.luon
Floor & Cirpl (.Ire
It. ,t ,L, ,I ;, I ,I,,,,. ,1
755-6142


^.




To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectrlc.com


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High School marching band drum line advance while practicing on Friday.



Competition excites band members


By A.C. GONZALEZ
Special to ime Reporter-. -
ne, and hopefully
two, performances
remain for the
Columbia High
School marching
band. They will perform at
the Florida Marching Band
Competition in the Class 3A


Division semifinals today, with a
qtop-five finish in the semis pro-
-p-lling them to fie state finals
- tonight at Tropicana Park.
The drum majors and senior
officers spoke of their excite-
ment of the upcoming semifi-
nals. Andrew Jordan, a drum
major and baritone player, was
excited that "This year we feel
really good about the show and


it's cool, because I've never
been to finals before." A senior,
Jordan has played in the band
all four years. "I like the
response from the crowd."
The second of three drum
majors, Sarah Reichert, also
a senior, played the flute and
conducted. Her driving moti-
vation has been that "Thjs is
our last year, and we want to


see our band succeed for the
yitmnger people in the band."
Tliiis ariiaraderie she had
was shared by all 72 of the
high schoolers.
"We are a family within our-
selves" said Reichert.
Kalyn Coker, the third drum
major who played clarinet, had
a definite goal in mind. "We
have the chance to go all the


way, but we need to be com-
pletely focused," she said.
SParents, friends and band
enthusiasts watched that final
performance prior to the trip to
state. Ezra Brooker, senior offi-
cer and baritone/trumpet player,
said the band shared a single
attitude: "Yes we CAN win state.
And it's not a matter of if, but
when!"


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Head drum major Kalyn Coker, 17, conducts the band while on top of a platform Friday.


"We are a family within ourselves"


Sarah Reichert

Drum major


~_ ~


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, November 20, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


CHS girls soccer finding

their groove in 4-0 win


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecitreportercom

How's

the fair

weather?
Hello
fair-weather
fan. Today
is Saturday,
a day many
fans in Lake City devote
to Florida football. Unlike
many Saturdays there's
a question most fans will
have to mull over before
heading down
1-10 to watch Florida take
on Appalachian State for
Senior Day.
So as you sip on that
last cup of Folgers, ask
yourself if its worth it.
Does the disappointment
of this year's squad make
it just a bit harder to
show up in Gainesville
for a noon kickoff? Will
the coffee just not quite
knock the bitterness out of
your mouth left by South
Carolina last Saturday?
Do you refuse to watch
another play called by
Steve Addazio?
Or are you old school?
Do you show up rain or
shine? Will the seniors'
combined 41-10 record be
enough to bring you out?
There's plenty of
reasons to be at the game,
but some of those same
reasons can be motivation
to stay home.
For instance, Florida
could be ripe for the
picking. Appalachian State
has knocked off storied
programs before. One need
only to look at their 2007
victory against Michigan.
Those looking to witness
history may want to make
the trek. Those looking to
avoid it might want to mow
the grass.
Then again, some fans
might want to pay homage
to senior stars like Ahmad
Black and Chas Henry.
Those two have been
bright spots of this year's
unit. Still, when a punter is
one of the biggest names
leaving, some fans might
just assume the rest of the
senior class had already hit
the road.
There's no doubt much
bitterness involved with this
year's Gator team. Florida
fans expect much more.
The question is do they
deserve it What has made
Florida fans so great over
the years is the fact that no
matter how bad the Gators
have been, there has been
an overwhelming amount
of orange and blue decking
out Ben Hill Griffin Stadium
on Saturday.
During my years living
in Gainesville, Florida was
coached by Ron Zook -
and the performance was
less than stellar but still,
rain or shine, the crowd
always showed.
Today will be another
true test of the greatness of
the Swamp. It's been called
the most electrifying college
atmosphere by many. Today,
the senior class could go out
with a thud.
Then again, that's what
makes the fans of Florida
great. Just when you think
you'll see 20,000 empty
seats like other schools
in the state the Florida
faithful surprise again.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Lady Tigers now
riding two-game
winning streak
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's girls
soccer team now has a win-
ning streak. After a four-
game skid, the Lady Tigers
notched together consecu-
tive wins for the first time
in the short 2010 season.
The Lady Tigers easily
defeated Oak Hall School
in a 4-0 game at Tiger
Stadium Friday.
Injuries hampered the
early success of Columbia
High after senior captain


Indians fall
to Pensacola
Catholic, 31-21.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Fort White High had
plenty of heart, but not
enough fire power in its
regional semifinal game
against Pensacola Catholic
High.
The No. 3 ranked
Crusaders held off the
Indians, 31-21, at Gorecki-
LeBeau Stadium Friday.
Catholic scored on four
plays on its first posses-
sion of the second half.
Marquis Sumler ran it
in from four yards out.
The PAT gave Catholic a
10-point lead, 24-14.
The Crusaders then
stopped Fort White on
back-to-back fourth-down
tries, but the Indians kept
coming.
Wesley Pitts, sidelined
much of the season with
an injury, picked off a pass
and returned it 19 yards for
a first down at the Catholic
27. JR Dixon ran in a draw
from 21-yards out. Colton
Jones' PAT put the Indians
back in the game at 24-21
with 9:20 left to play.
Catholic showed why it
was undefeated on the field
this season. The Crusaders
marched 65 yards in 11
plays to put the game


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon (11) struggles to break a tackle in a game against Bradford on on Nov. 5.


away.
Catholic converted on a
fourth-and-five pass with
4:10 left to play and Sumler
soon broke a 27-yard run
for his third touchdown of
the game.
Fort White failed to capi-
talize on an early turnover
and Pensacola Catholic
made them pay.
The Crusaders fumbled
the ball away on their open-
ing possession and Darius
Pollard recovered at the
Catholic 40. Fort White
came up short on fourth-
and-two and Catholic


answered with a seven play,
69-yard scoring drive.
Shaun White completed
four passes during the
drive and set the stage for
Sumler to score on a draw
from 12-yards out.
After an exchange of
punts, Catholic's Emon
Smith jumped a pass in
the flats and returned the
interception 42 yards for
a touchdown. Catholic led
14-0 with a half minute left
in the first quarter.
Fort White began to turn
the tide. A Catholic personal
foul was marked off on the


kickoff and Soron Williams
returned it 37 yards to the
Crusaders 42.
Dixon softened the
Catholic defense with runs
of 13 and 22 yards. Andrew
Baker scored on a bootleg
keeper from the one. Jones
added the PAT.
Catholic ripped down
the field in six plays to a
first-and-goal at the four.
Fort White's defense held
the Crusaders to a field
goal.
On their next posses-
sion, the Indians converted
a fourth-and-one and added


two more first downs to the
Catholic 38.
Baker lifted a pass and
Donnell Sanders went up
against two defenders. He
came down on his back
and with the ball. Baker
then hit AJ. Legree on a
fade for eight yards and
a touchdown. Fort White
had cut the lead to 17-14 at
the half.
Fort White finished
the season 7-4. Pensacola
Catholic (7-4) will advance
to play the Taylor County
High/Walton High winner
on Friday.


Brittany Strickland went
out with an ACL injury,
forcing the Lady Tigers to
reshuffle some positions.
After taking some bumps,
Columbia seems to have
found its groove.
The Lady Tigers scored
three goals in the first
half before adding a pen-
alty kick in the second for
additional breathing room.
Holly Boris gave
Columbia an early 1-0 lead
off an assist from Ruthie
Ruiz before Oak Hall gave
the Lady Tigers a gift with
an own goal.
Columbia made it 3-0
before the half as Michaela
Burton connected from
about 18-yards out on an


unassisted kick.
The second half was all
about defense for Columbia
as the Lady Tigers fought to
preserve the victory. Haley
Dicks added to the margin
of victory late with a pen-
alty kick to lift Columbia to
the 4-0 victory.
"I'm proud of the girls,"
Columbia coach Ashley
Brown said. "It was a good
win and now we're on the
right track. We're passing
better and we're capatiliz-
ing on opportunities."
The Lady Tigers (3-4)
take the weekend off before
heading to the CYSA fields
trying to even their record
against Santa Fe High at
7 p.m. Tuesday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Janoris Jenkins (1) celebrates with Duke Lemmens (44) after making an interception against
South Carolina.


Florida closes
home schedule
with FCS power.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Florida
coach Urban Meyer has
been reluctant to point fin-
gers at problematic players
all season.
On Saturday, he's going
to call some guys out pub-
licly. Well, sort of.
It's Senior Day in
Gainesville, and Florida's
23-man class which
Meyer will recognize dur-
ing a pregame ceremony
- has the distinction of
losing three consecutive
home games for the first
time since 1989.
The Gators (6-4) need
a win against Football


Championship Series power
Appalachian State (9-1) to
avoid four in a row. That's
no easy task considering
the Mountaineers, three-
time FCS champions, have
scored at least 35 points in
nine games this season.
"Make no mistake about
it, the team we're playing
isn't some clown show,"
Meyer said. "This is a real
one."
The Mountaineers
wrapped up their sixth
consecutive Southern
Conference championship
last week and earned an
automatic bid to the post-
season tournament. But
don't expect them to rest
starters in Gainesville.
"People talk about this is
a money game and all that.
It's not for us," center Brett
GATORS continued on 2B


ne


and


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High captain Haley Dicks (23) fights for
possession of the ball with defender Alexa Austin (10) in a
game on Tuesday.


one


Gators try to snap

home losing skid

on Senior Day


-- I I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


CLUB VOLLEYBALL
Travel team

meeting planned
The North Florida
Fusion volleyball club pro-
gram has an information
meeting at 6 p.m. Monday
at the Columbia High audi-
torium. Girls interested in
playing travel volleyball
and their parents are
urged to attend. Tryout
dates, cost of participation
and general information
will be discussed.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.

CHS BASEBALL

Dugout Club
plans golf
tournament
The CHS Dugout Club
has a golf tournament
planned at The Country
Club at Lake City on
Saturday (8 a.m. shotgun
start). Single players may
enter for $60; a foursome
receives a discounted price
of $200 for the team. Hole
sponsorships are available.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754.

LADY TIGERS SOCCER
Breakfast at


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today

AUTO RACING
11:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Ford 300, at
Homestead, Fla.
1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, prac-
tice for Ford 400, at Homestead, Fla.
3 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
Ford 400, at Homestead, Fla.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Ford 300, at Homestead, Fla.
BOXING
10 p.m.
HBO Champion Sergio Martinez
(45-2-2) vs. Paul Williams (39-1-0), for
WBC middleweight title, at Atlantic City,
N.J.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN -Wisconsin at Michigan
ESPN2 Pittsburgh at South Florida
FSN Oklahoma St. at Kansas
VERSUS -Yale at Harvard
2:30 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC NCAA, FCS,
Florida Classic, Bethune-Cookman vs.
Florida A&M, at Orlando, Fla.
3:30 p.m.
ABC National coverage Ohio State
at Iowa
CBS National coverage, Mississippi
at LSU
ESPN -Virginia Tech at Miami
FSN Stanford at California
7 p.m.
ESPN -Arkansas at Mississippi St.
FSN Missouri at Iowa St.
NBC Army vs. Notre Dame, at
New York
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Oklahoma at Baylor
8:07 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Florida St.
at Maryland, Southern Cal at Oregon St.,
or Nebraska at Texas A&M
GOLF
Midnight
TGC European PGA Tour, Hong
Kong Open, final round
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
VERSUS -Wisconsin at UNLV
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League,Tottenham
at Arsenal
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
3:30 p.m.
VERSUS LasVegas at Hartford
Sunday, Nov. 21
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford
400, at Homestead, Fla.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Honda Puerto Rico Tip-off,
third place game, teams TBD, at San Juan,
Puerto Rico
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Honda Puerto Rico Tip-off,
championship game, teams TBD, at San
Juan, Puerto Rico
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, double-


header
FOX


Regional coverage
4 p.m.


FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, double-
header game
8:15 p.m.
NBC N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia
SOCCER
8:30 p.m.
ESPN MLS Cup, Colorado vs. FC
Dallas, at Toronto

FOOTBALL


NFL schedule

Thursday's Game
Chicago 16, Miami 0
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Dallas, I p.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Washington atTernnessee, I p.m.
Houston at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Buffalo at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Arizona at Kansas City, I p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Carolina, I p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, I p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today
No. 5 LSU vs. Mississippi, 3:30 p.m.
No. 6 Wisconsin at Michigan, Noon
No. 7 Stanford at California, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Ohio State at No. 21 Iowa,
3:30 p.m.
No. 9 Nebraska at No. 18 Texas A&M,
8 p.m.
No. II Michigan State vs. Purdue,
Noon
No. 12 Oklahoma State at Kansas,
Noon
No. 13 Arkansas at No. 22 Mississippi
State, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Virginia Tech at No. 24
Miami, 3:30 p.m.
No. 15 Missouri at Iowa State, 7 p.m.
No. 16 Oklahoma at Baylor, 8 p.m.
No. 17 South Carolina vs. Troy,
12:21 p.m.
No. 19 Nevada vs. New Mexico State,
4 p.m.
No. 20 Southern Cal at Oregon St.,
8 p.m.
No. 25 Utah at San Diego State,
10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Ford 400
Site: Homestead.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
1:30-2:30 p.m.; ESPN2, 3-4 p.m.); Sunday.
race, I p.m. (ESPN2, noon-I p.m.; ESPN.
1-5 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Ford 300
Site: Homestead.
Schedule: Today, qualifying
(Speed, 11:30 a.m.-I p.m.), race,
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2, 4-7:30 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Indiana 107, LA. Clippers 80
Orlando 105, Phoenix 89
Portland 86, Denver 83
Today's Games
Phoenix at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Miami at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas atAtlanta,8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Milwaukee,
8:30 p.m.
Cleveland at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Denver, 9 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
New York at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

College scores

Thursday
Army 63, N.J.Tech 60
Providence 77, Morgan St. 55
St.Joseph's, LI. I I I,Vaughn 69


Yale 75, Boston College 67
Florida 105, N. Carolina A&T 55
Florida A&M 64, Savannah St. 53
Florida St. 89, Fla. International 66
LSU 79,Tenn.-Martin 56
UCF 65, South Florida 59
VMI 65, Jacksonville St. 55
Kansas St. 76, Presbyterian 67
Michigan 69, Bowling Green 50
Missouri 66,W. Illinois 61
Arkansas 75, Grambling St. 52
Baylor 63,Jackson St. 49
Oklahoma 82,Texas Southern 52
Arizona 83, New Mexico St. 57
CS Monterey Bay 50, Cal Poly 47
Colorado St. 77, Denver 66
North Florida 76,Wyoming 60
Saint Mary's, Calif. 101, Point Loma 69
Santa Clara 66, Rice 65
Stanford 81,Virginia 60
Pittsburgh 79, Maryland 70
Texas 90, Illinois 84, OT
George Mason 78, Charlotte 56
Georgetown 80, Coastal Carolina 61
N.C. State 85, East Carolina 65
North Carolina 107, Hofstra 63
Vanderbilt 59, Nebraska 49
WestVirginia 84, Davidson 70

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No.4 Ohio State vs. UNCWilmington,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Villanova vs. Lafayette, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Missouri vs. North Florida,
4 p.m.
No. 16 Butler vs. Ball State, 2 p.m.
No. 23 BYU vs. Chicago State, 10 p.m.
No. 25 San Diego State vs.Wisconsin-
Green Bay at Millett Hall, Oxford, Ohio,
5:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 8 North Carolina vs. TBA at
Coliseo de Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto
Rico,TBA
No. 9 Florida vs. Morehead State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Syracuse vs. William & Mary,
2 p.m.
No. 14 Purdue vs. Oakland, Mich.,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Memphis at LSU, 5 p.m.
No. 20 Georgetown vs. TBA at
Carolina First Arena, Charleston, S.C.,
TBA
No. 22 Virginia Tech at UNC
Greensboro, I p.m.
No. 25 San Diego State vs. IUPUI at
Millett Hall, Oxford, Ohio, 5:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Boston 4, Florida 0
Toronto 3, New Jersey I
Tampa Bay 8, Philadelphia 7
Nashville 3, Montreal 0
Dallas 5, San Jose 4, OT
Today's Games
Los Angeles at Boston, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at N.Y Islanders. 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Carolina, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS Cup

Sunday
Colorado vs. FC Dallas at Toronto,
8:30 p.m.

NCAA Women's Div. I

Third round
Today
Marquette at Florida St., I p.m.
Georgetown at Minnesota, 2 p.m.
Ohio State at Virginia, 2 p.m.
Notre Dame vs. North Carolina,


Kazbor's Grille
Columbia High's girls
soccer team has a break-
fast fundraiser at Kazbor's
Grille from 7:30-10:30 a.m.


Saturday. Tickets are $6
at the door and may be
purchased in advance from
team members.
For details, call (386)
365-1877.


Johnson outqualifies title


rivals Hamlin, Harvick


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press

HOMESTEAD If qual-
ifying is any indication of
how the championship race
might shape up in Sunday's
NASCAR season finale,
Jimmie Johnson appears
to have an edge over
Denny Hamlin and Kevin
Harvick.
Kasey Kahne turned a lap
of 176.904 mph to win the
pole at Homestead-Miami
Speedway on Friday, but
the focus was on the Sprint
Cup series' three title con-
tenders.
Johnson qualified sixth,
while Harvick was 28th and
Hamlin was 38th on the
speed chart- although he'll
actually line up in the 37th
spot on Sunday because of
NASCAR's qualifying rules
for teams that aren't in the
top 35 in points.
Hamlin, who has a
15-point lead over Johnson
and 46-point lead over
Harvick going into Sunday,
wasn't panicking.
"Our car's going to be fine
tomorrow, we know that,"
Hamlin said. "And this is a
track where you can pass.
We're looking forward to
that part of it"
A poor qualifying effort
certainly didn't matter
at Homestead last year,
when Hamlirr won the race
after qualifying 38th. And
Hamlin has put himself in
position to win the cham-
pionship this year despite
not qualifying particularly
well all season.
"Fridays have just never
been our strong suit,"
Hamlin said. "So we've got
to battle back again."
Still, it's another potential
reason to worry for a driv-
er who already is having
his nerves tested. While
qualifying might not be an
accurate indication of how
fast Hamlin's car might be
in the race, he'll still have
to avoid trouble as he picks
his way through the field
Sunday.
Harvick isn't typically a
strong qualifier either.
"I thought we would
actually be a touch better
- but not much," Harvick


1
5

8
12 I
13 -
14 1
15 I
16
18 I
20 1
21
22.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Driver Denny Hamlin studies the computer's analysis of his
car's performance during practice for Sunday's NASCAR
Ford 400 auto race, Friday, in Homestead.


said.
Earlier Friday, Johnson
joked that he, Hamlin and
Harvick have been having
a "a world class pillow fight"
in qualifying of late. All
three drivers have qualified
17th or worse for each of
the last two races, although
Johnson was happy to break
out of that mold.
"It's not ideal, but I
think we've all shown that
you don't have to qualify
up front to run up front,"




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

PUDMY


Johnson said. "If you had
a scale of risk, the further
back you start, the higher
up the scale of the risk it
would take you than (quali-
fying) up front"
And Johnson was well
aware that Hamlin won
from deep in the field last
year.
"If I was in their shoes,
I'd say, 'Heck, we quali-
fied 38th last year. It
doesn't matter,"' Johnson
said.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: m
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday Jumbles: COLIC CREEK ATTACH AVOWAL
Answer: The staff described the executive shake-up
as a "TITLE" WAVE


ACROSS 45 Tie-dyed gar-
ment
Ducks and geese 48 Feel poorly
Fortune 500 49 Melting snow
abbr. 53 Feelers
Tick- -toe 56 Hockey feint
Mystique 57 Pagoda
- -di-dah feature
The chills 58 Maria (coffee
Math course liqueur)
Weigh 59 Essay
Helena rival byline
Pub pint 60 Festoon
Aunt or bro. 61 Almost-grads
Carrot-too 62 Tree house?


25 Francisco
28 Wild distur-
bance
29 Knocks firmly
33 Capitalist's
goal
35 Taj -
36 Spry
37 Chorus girl
38 Zoomed
39 Thicken
41 Pricey car
42 Guacamole
base


"EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES
at the Lake City Reporter
So our employees can enjoy Thanksgiving with their
families, the Lake City Reporter will be closed,
Thursday, November 251h, 2010.

Our Advertising deadlines will be
Classified Friday. Noembe 26 wlldeadline Wednesday, Noember 241 ll
Dispa Friday, November 26e l deadline Monday. November 22
Saturday November 27 will deadline Tuesday, November 23
Sunday. November 28 will deadline Tlueday. November 23
Tuesday, November 30 will deadline Wednesday, Novmber 24

\c ,will h back in the ,,flik. n o
I rid., N. .Lnmbhr 26th I,,r ,',ur

thank utu and
Have a Great Thanksgiving


DOWN

1 Inevitable out-
come
2 Not his and
hers
3 Formal court
order
4 Tavern brew
5 Percent ending
6 Hogan dweller
7 Mountain home
8 Frat letter


Answer to Previous Puzzle

GPA ECRIU EILIK
MAAM ALAN MOE
ELIE SOYSAUCE
WAR BLED AESOP
AOLE FIG
FLOSS OD IAK
LIV E R L SCAIM
USlE|S H I K E RIHIO
PRIDE S W R EINS
SGE A
M A I NS SAR C ASIM
E INST IN HUL
G D S RELYEi DIT
S A T YOKO L IP


Lab medium
Adorable
Boat's bottom
Pasture
Spooky
Telegraph signal


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 110

12 13 14

15 1 16 17

18 1 20 21


24 Tot of whiskey
25 Tiff
26 Jason's vessel
27 Roulette color
30 Whaler of fic-
tion
31 It may be read
32 Did in the
dragon
34 Kitty's bane
35 Canasta plays
37 Gulf st.
39 Knees and
elbows
40 Cream puff
43 Boxy vehicle
44 Of time long
past
45 Price markers
46 Sufficient, in
verse
47 Long-active
volcano
50 River in Zaire
51 Competes in a
slalom
52 Furnace out-
put
54 Custard ingre-
dient
55 Stockholm
carrier


2010 by UFS, Inc.


BRIEFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


11-20


CASMIO




MUPCIE
7^ -- --










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


Showdown has familiar


feel for FSU, Maryland


By DAVID GINSBURG
Associated Press

COLLEGE PARK, Md.
- The circumstances sur-
rounding Saturday night's
showdown between Florida
State and Maryland are
hauntingly familiar to the
Terrapins.
When the Seminoles
and Maryland last met at
Byrd Stadium, the Terps
needed a victory to .keep
alive their hopes of playing
for the 2008 Atlantic Coast
Conference championship.
The game was held under
the lights, and Maryland
fans were instructed to
wear black as part of a once-
a-year "Blackout" promo-
tion reserved for the most
important home matchup
of the season.
"We were all. excited,"
Terrapins senior safety
Antwine Perez recalled this
week.
And then came the game:
A 37-3 blowout by Florida
State.
"I remember it being
freezing cold," Maryland
receiver Torrey Smith said.
"It was a tough loss for us.
They beat us pretty good
that game."
The Terrapins were 7-3
overall, 4-2 in the ACC and
unbeaten at home. That's


precisely where they stand
this year, too, heading into
another "Blackout" game
against FSU.
Yet, much has changed
for Maryland since that
deflating defeat two years
ago. After going 2-10 last
year, the Terrapins have
become the surprise of the
ACC behind redshirt fresh-
man quarterback Danny
O'Brien and a defense that
appears to have enough tal-
ent to contain the robust
FSU attack.
"They're a good team. But
we're a brand new team,"
senior linebacker Adrian
Moten said. "We're much
different than we were than
we were two years ago and
even last year. We're ready
to go."
So is Florida State (7-3, 5-
2). The Seminoles snapped
a two-game skid by defeat-
ing Clemson last week and
have won three straight
against Maryland to take
an 18-2 lead in the lopsided
series.
Quarterback Christian
Ponder is expected to
return to the starting
lineup after sitting out the
Clemson game with an
elbow injury. TwO years ago
against Maryland, Ponder
completed 19 of 24 passes
for 143 yards and led the


Seminoles with 81 yards
rushing.
This will be the first time
in years that FSU will play
Maryland without Bobby
Bowden ,on the sideline.
Coach Jimbo Fisher has
orchestrated a seamless
transition, although he is
admittedly wary of facing
the surging Terps on the
road.
"I think the first thing
they've done is a super job
in turnover ratio. They're,
plus-13 in turnover margin,
which we know affects the
outcome of games more
than anything," Fisher said.
"They take care of it and
they get them on defense."
The main task for the
Florida State defense will
be to stop O'Brien, who has
thrown 10 touchdown pass-
es and only one intercep-
tion in his last four games.
"He's got a big time arm.
He's accurate. He can get
the ball down the field to
play makers and that loos-
ens things up," Fisher said.
In that defeat two years
ago, the Terps wore black
jerseys and black pants.
.This time, they will wear
camouflage uniforms to sup-
port the Wounded Warrior
Project.
Clearly, this is no ordi-
nary game for Maryland.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Mister Alexander (right) and Kendall Smith stop Clemson's Jamie Harper for a
short gain in the first quarter of an NCAA college football game on Nov. 13 in Tallahassee.


"I'm worried about it
being a little bit of a distrac-
tion," coach Ralph Friedgen
said. "Sometimes we get into
a lot of pomp and ceremony
with the new uniforms and
all that when it really comes
down to beating your oppo-
nent. Bascially, you've got
to go out and beat Florida
State. It doesn't matter what
you're wearing."
Defeating Florida State
has never been easy for


Maryland. Then again, the
Terrapins had lost three
straight and 14 of 18 against
Virginia before stomping
the Cavaliers 42-23 last
week.
The players insist this
squad should not be con-
fused with the one that lost
to FSU in 2008 or the one
that went 2-10 last year.
"Last week, .this team
never played UVA before,"
Smith said. "This team


has never played Florida
State before. It's a new slate
for us. We've just got to
go out there and play our
game."
'Torrey is right," sad
senior linebacker Alex
Wujciak,whovividlyremem-
bers that 2008 game. "Tnis
team hasn't lost to Florida
State. We definitely know
we can play with them. We
have to be ready to go, but
not too excited."


Winning streak has USF


back in Big East mix


By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press

TAMPA Coach Skip
Holtz preached patience
following South Florida's
slow start in the Big East,
confident that the Bulls
were capable of working
their way back into a race
Pittsburgh has led from
the start
With Pitt (5-4, 3-1) fail-
ing to play up to lofty pre-
season expectations, that's
exactly what USF (6-3, 3-2)
has done heading into a
key matchup between the
teams on Saturday.
"People said, you lost
two games, but I thought
we were playing great on
defense and special teams,"
Holtz said. 'There were
so many positive things
going on, we didn't say:
'It's broke, what are we
going to do, let's start all
over again.' ... We talked
about it as a staff and said:
'Don't flinch, just stay the
course."'
Since failing to score
an offensive touchdown
in losses to Syracuse and
West Virginia to begin
conference play, the Bulls
have strung together solid
all-around performances
against Cincinnati, Rutgers
and Louisville for their first
three-game league winning
streak since 2007.
That was the year USF
climbed to No. 2 in the
national rankings before
a midseason collapse sent
the Bulls tumbling out of
the Top 25 and contention
for the Big East title.
Holtz is in his first sea-
son with the Bulls, but is
well aware of the team's
conference struggles
under former coach Jim
Leavitt.
USF has appeared in
bowls the past five seasons
and is eligible for a sixth
consecutive berth. Still, the
Bulls have never entered
a game in late November
in contention for a league
title.
It would mean a lot to
the team's seniors to beat
Pitt, which is coming off a
30-28 loss to Connecticut,
and tighten an already
crowded race.
Syracuse, West Virginia
and Connecticut also have
two conference losses.
"It's something this
group, with as many things
as they've accomplished,
this late in the season they
haven't been in midst of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Louisville's Andrell Smith (14) carries South Florida tacklers
Jon Lejiste (8) and George Baker (22) into the end zone
after making a pass reception during first quarter action
in their NCAA college football game at in Louisville, Ky.,
Saturday.


the league championship
talk," Holtz said. "There
has not been a lot of the
'if this, then this' conversa-
tion. For them it's unchart-
ed waters. It's exciting."
Pitt entered the season
ranked nationally. And
while the Panthers have
met predictions of con-
tending for the Big East,
they've been a big disap-
pointment with four losses
overall.
"Everybody keeps ask-
ing me what's your opinion
of this league? What do
you think? Is everybody
even? Who's the best team
you've played," Holtz said,
adding that he gener-
ally tells people he wants
to go through an entire
conference schedule
for the first time before
drawing any kind of
conclusion.
But after watching film
of Pitt this week, the coach
said it's easy to see why the
Panthers were preseason
favorites to win the league.
"It's hard to imagine
when you sit down and
watch them play that
they've lost four games,"


Holtz said. "And, I think
they're playing better now
than they were early in the
year."
Last week's loss at
UConn stopped Pitt's three-
game winning streak. The
Panthers' usually reliable
run defense yielded 249
yards rushing, including
222 to Jordan Todman.
The setback trimmed
Pitt's lead in the confer-
ence standings, however
the Panthers can control
their destiny by winning
remaining games against
USF, West Virginia at
home and Cincinnati on
the road.
"It's on us that we didn't
win the last game, but we
still have the lead in the
Big East," Pitt defensive
end Jabaal Sheard said.
' Coach Dave Wannstedt
stressed his focus is solely
on USE
"Right now we have to
find a way to win a game,
and all that other stuff
really doesn't matter,"
Wannstedt said. "We have
to win a game, become
(bowl) eligible and go form
there."


GATORS: Seniors something to prove


Continued From Page 1B

Irvin said. 'We're going
there to beat Florida. That's
our No. 1 priority. If we play
like we're capable of, it can
happen very easily."
Appalachian State's vic-
tory at Michigan in 2007
still resonates with Florida
players. They remem-
ber the blocked field goal
attempt, the celebration
and the aftermath. They
also insist a similar stun-
ning upset won't happen in
the Swamp.
"It was a crazy victory,"
left tackle Marcus Gilbert
said. "I'm not really worried
about that. It's 2010. It's
a different year, different
teams.
"We're very confident.
We have the best talent out
there. I think we're going to
come out and handle busi-
ness because a lot if guys,
especially seniors, have a
chip on their shoulders and
are not going to let this be
our last loss at the Swamp."
Florida's seniors may
have something to prove
now, but they haven't
played with much urgency
in the first 10 games. Meyer
acknowledged this week
what outsiders have seen
all season that there's
a "void" in the team some-
where.
"I'm not into excuses,
but it's real," Meyer said.
"We've always been a high-
energy, up-tempo, chest-
bumping, flying-around
team. ... I don't see that. So
there's a void somewhere in
there that we have to recruit
to it, develop it and coach


the mess out of it, because
that's what we are."
The seniors bear the
brunt of the blame.
Florida's offensive line,
which has four seniors and
was supposed to be a team
strength, has struggled to
pick up blitzes all season
and has allowed 15 sacks in
the last five games.
Florida's starting
receivers, seniors Deonte
Thompson and Carl Moore,
have been disappointments.
Although Thompson leads
the team with 30 recep-
tions for 448 yards, he has
dropped several passes in
key situations. Moore came
up with some clutch catch-
es early in the year, but
has since been replaced by
Frankie Hammond in the
starting lineup.
Linebackers A.J. Jones
and Brandon Hicks, both
seniors, have seen their
playing time diminish,
too. The defensive line
has been equally baffling,
with seniors Justin Trattou,
Duke Lemmens, Lawrence
Marsh and Terron Sanders
failing to stop running
games and pressure
quarterbacks.
The Gators have allowed
196 yards rushing a game
in their four losses. They
also have 20 sacks, half
their total from last season,
and are on pace for the pro-
gram's lowest in Meyer's
tenure.
There have been a few
senior bright spots.
Safety Ahmad Black leads
the team with 93 tackles, 10


tackles for loss, three inter-
ceptions and three forced
fumbles. He's the team's
best tackler and arguably
their best player. Not bad
for someone Meyer deemed
too slow to play in the
Southeastern Conference
as a freshman.
"I regret nothing about
this whole ride," Black said.
"I enjoyed everything about
it. I met some great people,
some great players. I'm just
enjoying it. I'm just living
the moment, I'm having a
lot of fun. It's probably the
most fun year I've had here.
It's sad that it's coming to
an end."
Punter Chas Henry leads
the nation in punting (47.4)
and kicked a 37-yard field
goal to beat Georgia in
overtime last month.
"We are awful proud of
these guys," Meyer said. "I
love these guys. Obviously
this season has been full of
speed bumps and adversity,
and I would let you know if
I didn't believe we have a
good senior class."
Good, maybe. Certainly
not great
Nonetheless, the seniors
have a chance to turn
things around in their home
finale.
"Yeah, it'll obviously be
an emotional day," center
Mike Pouncey said. "It's
tough for me because I feel
like I gave it my all for this
program and it just (stinks)
to end it on a note like
this, but I want to finish the
season out strong with a
couple more wins."


Boise State to face Georgia

in 2011 opening game


By CHARLES ODUM
Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. Boise
State is coming to Atlanta
for season-opening games
in 2011 and 2014, includ-
ing next season's opener
against Georgia in the
Georgia Dome.
Chick-fil-A Bowl presi-
dent Gary Stokan said
Friday the game will be
played on Sept. 3, 2011, and
be televised by ESPN or
ABC.
The 'Chick-fil-A Bowl
committee organizes the
annual season kickoffgame.
The 2011 game will be the
first that does not match
a Southeastern Conference
team against an Atlantic


Coast Conference team.
Boise State will be mak-
ing a long trip to open its
season on a neutral field for
the second straight year.
The Broncos beat Virginia
Tech 33-30 in this season's
opening game in Landover,
Md.
The committee also
announced Boise State
will face Mississippi in the
2014 opening game at the
Georgia Dome. Boise State
and Ole Miss were sched-
uled to play the season
opener in 2011 in Oxford,
Miss.
Stokan said Ole Miss
will receive $2 million and
Boise State will receive $1.1
million to play in the Aug.
28, 2014 game.


Ole Miss will receive
more money because it is
giving up a home game.
To fill its 2011 sched-
ule, Ole Miss will host
BYU in the season
opener.
The Rebels will give BYU
a $900,000 payout for the
game and will not make
a return trip, which was
the same arrangement they
had with Boise State.
BYU has announced it will
leave the Mountain West
Conference and become
independent in 2011.
Boise State is replac-
ing Louisville on
Georgia's 2011 schedule,
leaving the Bulldogs with
six home games instead of
seven.











4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010 Page EdItor: Emogene Graham 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
I DON'T HAVE ANV BALLOON
MAIL OR .YOU ANIMALS? ARE
TOOAY, Bur I YOU JOKING?!

ANIMALS A A
OAP UT FO
,- 'E ?l, -

C : '

-- )-I .


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


I DON'T PAY TAXES TO LEARN
> HOW TO MAKE BALLOON
ANIMALS FROM THE
POSTAL SERVICE'" I',


Si

,..T1


DEAR ABBY


Promise of long distance love

tests a teenage relationship


DEAR ABBY: I am
13 and my boyfriend just
moved to Colorado. He
won't be back home for
three years, but I promised
I'd wait for him. Now I feel
like I'm being tied down.
It's not that I don't want to
be with him anymore, but
I'm lonely with him being
away. I don't want to break
his heart, but I want some
freedom. What should I
do? MISSING HIM IN
MASSACHUSETTS
DEAR MISSING HIM:
Send him a sweet note and
tell him that you're lonely
without him and didn't
know what to do so you
wrote to me. Tell him I said
that while you may love
each other, it would be bet-
ter for both of you to social-
ize while he is away. This
is an important growth pe-
riod for you both and if
your relationship is meant
to be permanent, you can
resume it where you left off
when he returns.
DEAR ABBY: For the
past few holidays we have
had to accept the fact that
my sister-in-law was bring-
ing her husband AND her
boyfriend to family holiday
dinners. Last year we pro-
tested, saying it was ridicu-
lous and that we wouldn't
come. (We don't want our
kids thinking this is appro-
priate.) We relented when
my mother-in-law said we
were being unreasonable


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
because the husband and
boyfriend are OK with the
situation.
We have ended up going
in the past, but Thanksgiv-
ing is nearly here again and
we're not "thankful" for this
arrangement How do you
think we should handle this?
- RELATIVELY ODD IN
JACKSONVILLE
DEAR RELATIVELY
ODD: If your children are
small, they will accept the
"odd" man at the table as
simply a good friend of their
aunt and uncle, so I see no
reason why you shouldn't
join the family unless you
personally dislike the man.
However, if your children
are old enough to under-
stand that there is some-
thing romantic going on,
make other plans for the
holidays. To do otherwise
would make it appear that
you approve of what's go-
ing on, which you do not
DEAR ABBY: My 40th
wedding anniversary is
right around the corner.
Although it's a time for cel-
ebration, I know I'll end up
feeling depressed and emp-


ty. The reason is our son
'Trent," age 38, who lives
500 miles away.
Trent is great about rec-
ognizing holidays birth-
days, Mother's Day, Fa-
ther's Day and Christmas
- with a card, gift or phone
call. But for some reason,
he chooses to ignore our
anniversary every year. I
always mention it on Face-
book or on the phone, but
he never acknowledges it.
My husband says I
shouldn't let it bother me,
but it does. When Trent
was a teenager, we went
through some bad times
and almost divorced. That
was a long time ago, and
things are different now.
What am I missing here?
- SAD MOM IN TEN-
NESSEE
DEAR SAD MOM:
What you are "missing" is
that your son remembers
you on birthdays, Moth-
er's Day, Father's Day and
Christmas. Be grateful for
what Trent does for you
and stop trying to force him
into remembering an occa-
sion that, for whatever rea-
son, may have unpleasant
associations for him. Dwell-
ing on what you're missing
instead of what you've got
is a prescription for misery.
a Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Plan to have some fun
but don't take risks. A part-
nership will bring out the
best in you and inspire you
to try things you have never
done before. You will learn
from experience and will ex-
cel. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Surprise someone you
love. A partnership can take
on a fresh start if you are
honest about the way you
feel and what your plans are
for the future. Changes at
home will be welcome; don't
overspend. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20). Hiding information
from someone who cares
about you will not work. A
money venture that is enter-
taining as well as profitable
can change your life forever.
A partnership that has been
under pressure is likely to
reach its limit. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Try not to miss out
on an event that you want
to attend. There is a good
chance you'll meet someone
who can help you get ahead
or who can change your life.
Putting pressure on some-
one who owes you should
not make you feel bad. It's
only fair. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll talk with great
enthusiasm and attract a lot
of attention but be prepared


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

for someone who will be ea-
ger to correct you if you em-
bellish. A romantic relation-
ship can change your status
or enhance your lifestyle.
Children will influence your
relationship and your future.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Youll be on edge and
you'll make everyone around
you feel nervous as well.
Try to avoid serious talks or
decisions that will cause ar-
Sguments. Overreacting will
be a major concern, along
with overspending and over-
indulging. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't let anyone push
you into making costly
changes at home. Address-
ing what needs to be done
will ensure that you are
considering the possibil-
ity but aren't compromising
your financial position. Your
thoughts should be appre-
ciated by those involved.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You stand to
prosper if you are quick to
step up and take on a chal-
lenge. Offer something that
you've been working on as
an alternative to what's be-
ing offered. The point is,
you must not sit back when
action will lead to an oppor-


tunity. ***
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Stick to what
you know and avoid any
rash moves that will affect
your home or current sta-
tus. Get out and have fun
with friends or colleagues
but avoid any family situa-
tion. Arguments will lead
to isolation and disruption
in your home environment.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): A chance to
change the dynamics within
your family looks good, so
don't be afraid to voice your
opinion. You'll be surprised
by the response and the
help you receive. It's your
turn to step up and take
over. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Focus on what
you need to complete before
the end of the year and how
to make the most of what
you are capable of doing.
There is plenty of room to
advance. Take pride in your
knowledge; don't underesti-
mate what you can do. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You can posi-
tion yourself for success.
Concentrate on your best as-
sets in order to create oppor-
tunities leading to greater
prosperity. Think big and in-
corporate something unique
that is inspiring, unusual
and serviceable. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals G
"VD KSZHTI WHMW YBN XIOBXASC. H
NOO B CTR TA VD AOCCTY BCSVZH
TZ 'BVOI HGB'N VTNR YBZROX.' "
BGRIONN DBZGD LSRCOI
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I never felt gifted. I paid no attention in high school.
Once, I got every word wrong on a spelling test." Tony Curtis
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-20


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
THEY TOLD DEANNR I M GONNR KILL
SoBINQKI I jnAS | THOSE GOys!-I'M
IN LOVE WITH HER. GONNR-
-\MY LIFE ISeMqO I lr HUH-?;
T7 NVAUHT


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I CAN TEACH CARD TRICKS?
YOU SOME CARD REALLY?!
TRICKS


,i
F-:
^LS ^ >.


.^*^^f,^f


S ..


1 .1


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010










Classified Department: 755-5440


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One tem per ad $3 vje0
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personal merchandise totalling 00 r rs
Each item must Include a price
This i r a soetoundable rate







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ad fr each Eachdnedaialnsertion.


Limited to service type advertis-
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4 lines, one month....o92.00
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





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Should further information be
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In Print atin Online
www.ltaleeiytvreporter.conl


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 10-203-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JODI ELAINE WOOD,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JODI ELAINE WOOD, deceased,
whose date of death was August 1,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, File No. 10-203-CP,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with.this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2).
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS NO-
VEMBER 13, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Sam Jackson
SAM K. JACKSON, JR.
2204 SW Jim Wit Road
Lake City, Florida 32025
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATIOR-
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Mark Feagle
Mark E. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0576905
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
153 NE Hemando Avenue
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
04542313,. . :
November,13. 20, 2010


010 Announcements








060 Services

Looking for elder persons in need
of 24 hr care in my home.
Certified Nursing Ass't,
in Jasper, FL, 386-792-3149


070 Rewards

WANTED: Need to speak to man
that witnessed accident at the
intersection of Baya & Main St.,
11/9/10, 8 PM,Robin 832-7174

100 Job
Opportunities
BULLDOZER OPERATOR
Part time, references required,
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887

Customer Support Job Pay $300-
$600 a week,could work from
home later on 95% of support is by
email.Emailtrueloss@gmail.com.






Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape:
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

*** SPECIAL ***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.

Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.


[persnal'Mr'chandise


REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


100 Job
S Opportunities

04542407
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
fulltime Collector in Lake City.
Experience preferred dealing
with delinquent accounts or
solid administrative and
customer service skills.
Full benefits package.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, FL. 32056 or email resume
to Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542412
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524481
DETAILER
Large Manufacturing Company
has the following position
available in the Lake City,
Florida, facility:
DETAILER/CHECKER
Graduate with AS degree or
experience in the steel joist
industry. Responsibilitities
include drafting and detailing of
joist and deck drawings. Must
have AutoCAD experience.
Company offers a highly
professional environment with
tremendous growth opportunity
and competitive salary commen-
surate with experience.
Excellent benefit package.
Qualified applicants submit
cover letter and resume in
confidence to:
S i.' Jal Tryofin
jan.tryoh@newniill.com

05524485
Medical Biller Needed
Several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
SBilling required.
Please e-mail resume to :
mafaisalmd@Gmail.com
or fax 386-758-5987

Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St, Lake City, FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com

120 Medical
120 Employment
F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
MA needed M-F for busy medical
practice. Send reply to Box 05058,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Homecare LPN's needed 9a-6p
and CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare 352-291-4888
Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time

05524503
Hiring for part-time qualified
office clerk. Must be proficient
in Excel,Microsoft Word,etc.

Apply in person at
134 S E Colbur Avenue
Lake City Fl 32025
Drug Free Work Place
Equal Opportunity Employer



141 Babysitters

Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or P/T,
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

240 Schools &
Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/29/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


Sat & Sun,NO Early Birds 8-?,
kids clothes, furniture, odds and
ends 447 SW Summerhill Glen,
in Columbia City, off Mauldin
Sat only, 7 AM,tools, clothes,
dishes, misc., RV stuff, tow dolly,
Irg dining rm table (Woodcrest
Subdiv) 231 SW Crest Glen
Sat. 8-?. 47S right on King turns
into Mauldin take sharp right to
Tangle Ct. Hshold, furn., girls
clothes & women plus sz, more.
Saturday 7:00am Emerald Forest
(off 247), end of Stanley Ct. Baby
fur., clothes, & toys, along
with household items items.

450 Good Things
5J to Eat

Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420


530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt,
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098
386-965-3110

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422


310 Pets & Supplies
Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $45 386-752-0987
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
S Supplies
Baby Pigs for sale
ready in Dec
call for details
386-965-2215
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
SOLD
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
(904)704-9377
Craftmatic full size elec adj bed
w/vibrating feature, includes
mattress and 5 piece bedrm suite
$400 752-2572 leave message

1 Needlecraft
414 & Sewing
Quilting Frame
4ft. wide wood
$125.00
386-752-0987


420 Wanted to Buy
GUITARS WANTED
Gibson, Fender, Etc.
Cash paid will travel.
(407)733-1687
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Fri 8am Sat 8-12. Columbia City
on 47S. Collectibles, china, linen,
old book, name brand clothes,
lamps, much more. Rain cancels







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. C/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
20V For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542292
For Rent-
3/2 home on Baya Ave.
convenient to shopping, schools
and churches. $790./mo with
$790./security. First month's
rent reduced to $395.00
for qualified tenant.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
386-365-5884.

05524427
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2 br/bla House w/yard,
near airport, $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4


630 fMobile Homes
630 for Rent __
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500'
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Large 3/2 DW, very new.
South of town on 441.
$650. mo.
386-208-4702
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833, 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

640f Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras
386-752-4258
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940

0 Unfurnished Apt.
S0For Rent
Dl5524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455 i-
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $530 month.
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.


830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190


other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


I


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets

3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. Mb pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 ABar Sales


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!!!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841

Live Oak remodeled. 1 acre.
Fence, large utility room, walk in
closet/computer room. Metal roof,
new AC/Heat. $365.mo w/$10K
down or $468 w/5K down. Owner
Finance. Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
2 Acreage

05524422
o 10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2010


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215

ACOM ON QNS


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EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES


Our Advertising deadlines will be
Clasified: Fiday, November 26 will deadline Wednesday, November 24 Ila m.
Display Friday, November 26 will deadline Monday, November 22
Saturday November 27 will deadline Tuesday November 23
Sunday, November 28 will deadline Tuesday, November 23
Tuesday, November 30 will deadline Wednesday, November 24
So our employees can enjo)
'l'hanksgiving with their families,
the Lake City Reporter will be closed,
Thursday, November 25th, 2010.


We will be hack in the office on
Friday, November 26th for our
customer's convenience.
Thank atu and
Have a Great Thanksgiving


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad.
Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the
picture for you. Private party only
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.
Bridgetat 381-75-5440


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