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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01456
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/19/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01456
System ID: UF00028308:01456
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






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Bouncing

Back
Lady Tigers beat P.K.Yonge,
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reporter



Vol. 136, No. 260 75 cents


Friday, November 19, 20 10


Free trade zone status could spark jobs


-__ __d
TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter
Rotarian and Columbia County Industrial Development
Aulhorii, board member Jeff Simmons (left) talks with Nancy
Rubin, director of communications for the Jacksonville Port
Authority, after Rubin's remarks to the joint meeting of Altrusa
Club of Lake City and Rotary Club of Lake City on Thursday.


Feds considering
zone expansion to
include Columbia,
By TODD WILSON
twilson@lakecityreporter. corn
A plan to include
Columbia County in the
expanding free trade zone
connected to the Port of
Jacksonville could be the
catalyst to create new jobs
locally.
Nancy Rubin, director
of communications for the
Jacksonville Port Authority


(Jaxport), spoke in Lake
City Thursday during the
Altrusa Club of Lake City
and Rotary Club of Lake
City annual joint meeting.
Rubin said the free trade
zone expansion proposal
was being considered at
the federal level and could
include any county with
a border that falls within
60 miles of Duval County.
Columbia County's eastern
border easily falls within
this radius.
Debbie Lofberg,
Jaxport director of mar-
keting services and for-


eign trade zones, said Jim
Poole, Columbia County
Industrial Development
Auh'...rit. executive direc-
tor, deserved the credit
for pursuing the topic with
Jaxport officials beginning
nine months ago. Before
Poole raised the question,
it was believed free trade
zones were limited to areas
contiguous to the host
county, Lofberg said.
If Columbia County is
approved for the free trade
zone status, this could open
up increased light manu-
facturing possibilities at the


Columbia County enter-
prise zone catalyst site east
of the Lake City Municipal
Airport.
In simple terms, a free
trade zone designation
allows for a company to
have multiple pieces of an
item shipped into the free
trade zone, then assembled
with only the final piece
being assessed an import
tariff. The pieces enter the
country tariff-free provided
they are assembled by an
American worker within
TRADE continued on 3A


SPIRIT OF GIVING


Catholic Charities offer Thanksgiving baskets


S; ___ __
JASON MATHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Dorothy Spradley (from right), district volunteer/education marketing coordinator for the Columbia County School Board,
Catholic Charities Chief Operating Officer Suzanne Edwards and Sally Smith, contract manager of the Department of Children
and Famnies, lend a helping hand to student volunteers from Richardson Middle School and Epiphany Catholic School.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecOtyreporter com
Thanksgiving
meals will be a
little brighter
for some fami-
lies in need in
the community.
More than 100 families
and 669 people received
Thanksgiving baskets
from Catholic Charities
Thursday, said Suzanne
Edwards, chief operating
officer.
"It's been a beautiful
day," she said. "People
have received it well and
are very thankful. We're
hearing stories of how
people are touched by the
meal."
The giveaway is a part-
nership between the orga-
nization and the Columbia


JASON MATHEW WALKER.L;-e C:, Pepc-e-
Richardson Middle School students Ashley Bassett (from
left), 13, Marcayla Austin, 13, and Titiana Ponder, 16, receive
thanks from Lake City residents Harold Stover and Winona
Sherman as they get Thanksgiving baskets from C atriro:i
Charities Thursday morning.


County School District.
Each school was
allowed to select 30
families for a total of 450


baskets, said Dorothy
Spradley, district volun-
teer/education marketing
coordinator. Remaining


baskets will be distributed
today.
Students are selected
by guidance counselors
based on need and bas-
kets include turkey and all
the trimmings, she said.
"It's providing food and
nourishment for families
that may not otherwise
have a Thanksgiving
meal," Spradley said.
Some families would
be unable to have a tradi-
tional Thanksgiving meal
without the baskets, she
said.
"A meal is another
way to bring families
together," Spradley said.
"We are helping bring a
meal to families to provide
peace and harmony on
Thanksgiving."
CHARITIES continued on 3A


Porter takes oath of office


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City Republican Elizabeth Porter (center) takes the oath
of office on the floor of the Florida House of Representatives
in the State Capitol in Tailahassee. Porter was sworn in as
the new Dist. 11 State Representative prior to this week's
special session.



County OKs offer

of tax abatements

to lure businesses


Commissioners'
unanimous vote
replaces rebates.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com
It's official: The county
will now offer tax abate-
ments instead of tax rebates
as an incentive for business-
es to locate to the area.
The' Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners unanimous-
ly approved a new ordi-
nance creating ad valorem
tax exemption for econom-


ic development purposes at
its meeting Thursday.
The ordinance outlines
requirements for future tax
abatement requests from
new companies or expand-
ing ones and allows the
exemption process to oper-
ate under Florida statute.
Abatement allows for
businesses to have their
property tax liabilities
deleted from their tax bills,
while rebates what the
county previously used -
required the company to
pay its taxes in full before
COUNTY continued on 3A


Local man arrested

as suspect in three

building burglaries

Authorities say
items stolen from a
storage facilities..
From staff reports

A Columbia County man,
arrested Thursday after
authorities used a K-9 patrol
officer to subdue him, faces
numerous charges in con-e
section with burglaries on
Ebenezer Road, officials COURTESY PHOTO
said. A sheriffs deputy takes Jerrid
Campbell. 18, to a detention
BURGLARIES continued on 3A facility as a burglary suspect.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293


73


SUBSCRIBETO Mostly Sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


O pinior ........
Obituaries ......
Advice & Comics.
Puzzles .........
Around Florida.


. 4A
... 5A
... 6B
.... 2B
. . . . 2


DAILY
BRIEFING
Ac -s to host
F ,,r o sho:-O


COMING
SATURDAY
CHS going
to state semis.


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~> 7' T ~T .


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY NOVEMBER 19. 2010


Celebrity Birthdays


Thursday:
Afternoon: 3-5-8
Evening: 7-0-2


iqya4 Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-3-3-2
Evening: 2-1-2-7


' 1 Wednesday:
13-19-25-27-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Adkins to host awards show


NASHVILLE, Tenn
Trace Adkins has been
tabbed as the host of
the American Country
Awards.
The tall singer from
Louisiana with the imposing pres-
ence and booming voice also will
perform during the inaugural show
on Dec. 6 at the MGM Grand in Las
Vegas, which airs on Fox.
The assignment will help Adkins
expand an ever-growing resume
that includes actor, reality TV star
and even comic book hero.
Adkins picked up Country Music
Association and Academy of Country
Music awards this year for his
"Hillbilly Bone" collaboration with
Blake Shelton.
Organizers of the fan-voted award
show also added performances by lead
nominee Easton Corbin, who is tied with
Lady Antebellum at seven, and Steel
Magnolia and Uncle Kracker.

Help for deaf, blind
'Harry Potter' fans
RICHMOND, Va. Hearing- and
sight-impaired fans of the blockbust-
er "Harry Potter" movies will be able
to enjoy the opening weekend of the
latest film about the boy wizard and
his Hogwarts friends.
Opening-night showings of "Harry
Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part
1" will feature on-screen captions
and audio headsets at two theaters
in Virginia, Regal Cinemas' Virginia
Center Commons in suburban
Richmond and Norfolk's MacArthur
Center. The movie comes out Friday
nationwide.
The enhancements stem from an
agreement between Regal Ciiemas
and the Virginia Office for Protection
and Advocacy in response to deaf citi-
zens' complaints.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file photo shows country singer Trace Adkins, who will be host to the
American Country Awards Dec. 6.


The National Disability Rights
Network says "Harry Potter" likely
marks the first time cinemas have
offered opening-weekend captioning for
a blockbuster movie. It praises the two
Virginia theaters for leading the way.

Watson has Hermione's
passion for learning
LONDON Emma Watson
may be leaving Hermione Granger
behind on the film set, but not in her
heart the two share a similar pas-
sion for learning.
Watson,.whose character in the
Harry Potter movies made it cool
to be a studious teacher's pet, says
she's "addicted to knowledge" and
motivated to keep learning while
doing other film projects.
Watson, who has played Hermione
for more than half her life, is a
sophomore at Brown University in
Rhode Island where she is majoring


in history. Unlike many of her young
Potter co-stars, she chose to con-
tinue her education after graduating
from high school.
"I love learning. I'm just addicted
to knowledge. It just like, makes me
happy. It keeps me motivated," she
said in a interview while promoting
her latest film, the first installment
of "Harry Potter and the Deathly
Hallows."
Although the Potter films have
enabled Watson to travel the
globe and work with many criti-
cally acclaimed actors, she said she
doesn't feel like she has learned
enough yet. Education, she said, is a
vital part of life.
"I don't think that by doing these
movies I know everything. I just feel
like that's the point of being alive, to
try and understand the world that's
around you. Aid it just keeps me in
touch with real life," she said.

N Associated Press


* Actor Alan Young is 91.
* Talk show host Larry King
is 77.
* Former General Electric
chief executive Jack Welch
Is 75
* Talk show host Dick Cavett
is 74
* Broadcasting and sports
mogul Ted Turner is 72.
SSinger Pete Moore


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


(Smokey Robinson and the
Miracles) is 71.
* Actor Dan Haggerty is 69.
* Fashion designer Calvin
Klein is 68.
* Sportscaster Ahmad
Rashad is 61.
* Actress Kathleen Quinlan
is 56.
* Actress Glynnis O'Connor
is 55.


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............... $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
52 Weeks ................ $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks ........... .. $41.40
24 Weeks ................. $82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION


In a photo caption about the Olustee Battle Festival poster
unveiling on the front page Thursday, Tierney Dubi, the wife
of John Dubi, was misidentified. We apologize for any incon-
venience this may have caused.


Woman claims
she was harassed

ST. PETERSBURG A
Florida woman claims
a debt collector went far
beyond the usual phone
calls in an attempt to recoup
$362 for an unpaid car loan
by sending her messages
on Facebook and by
telling family on the social
networking site to have her
call the agency.
Melanie Beacham, who
is suing the debt collection
agency Mark One LLC in
a Florida court, said she
never expected to hear
from a collection agency on
Facebook, which she used
to talk to loved ones and
post the occasional photo
or funny status update.
Beacham's attorney, Billy
Howard of the Morgan and
Morgan law firm in Tampa,
said the debt collectors vio-
lated Beacham's privacy
and Florida's consumer pro-
tection law, which prohibits
collectors from harassing
people. Beacham filed the
lawsuit in August, though
updated court papers were
filed Thursday.
The lawsuit also claims
that Mark One contacted
Beacham six to 10 times a
day by phone, sent her a
text message, contacted her
neighbor and sent a courier
to deliver a letter to her work-
place. Beacham's attorney
has asked a judge to prohibit
Mark One from contacting
her or her family through
Facebook or Twitter.
In a statement sent
Thursday, the collection
agency said it will not dis-
cuss Beacham's case and
denied any wrongdoing.


ORLANDO Orlando
Police said an angry motor-
ist fired four shots at a
driver for cutting him off
in traffic.
-Frank Prince told police


'Aladdin Jr.' now at Levy Center
Alexandra Bedoya (left) and Zach Kraus portray lago and
Jafar as they plot and scheme in the'Masterpiece Performing
Arts presentation of Disney's Aladdin Jr. Performances will be
at 7 p.m. Friday and at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday at
the Florida Gateway College's Alfonso Levy Performing Arts
Center.


he drove more than 100
miles per hour trying to get
away after a BMW cut him
off in traffic Wednesday.
But Prince said the BMW
caught up with him'and
made an obscene hand ges-
ture.
According to an arrest
report, 33-year-old Prince
told police he pulled out
his gun and flashed it at
the BMW's driver, Henry
Benejan-Vazquez.
Prince said he saw
Benejan-Vazquez reach for
something in his car so he
fired four shots.
Benejan-Vazquez pulled
off the road and called
police. Bullet holes were
found on the rear passen-
ger door and tire.
Prince was charged with
aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon and unlaw-
ful discharge of a firearm.


home had been burglarized
several times in the past
few days. It's unclear what,
if anything, was stolen.
Authorities found a side
door forced open and a 17-
year-old sleeping on the
floor Wednesday. He was
charged with burglary and
taken to a juvenile deten-
tion center.
His name is being with-
held because of his age.

$400K of jewelry
stolen in heist

ELLENTON Manatee
County Sheriff's deputies
are investigating an armed
heist at an outlet mall jew-
elry store that netted the
robber $400,000 in jewels.
The robbery happened at
Ultra Diamonds about 8:30
p.m. Tuesday. Police said a
man walked into the store
with an automatic handgun
and customers dropped to
the ground.
The man pointed the
handgun at the manager
and demanded she fill it
with jewelry. He then
walked out of the store and
was last seen heading east.


ORLANDO Police
didn't have a hard time find-
ing an alleged burglar who
broke into a central Florida
home. He was asleep on
the bedroom floor.
The homeowner said his


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
SSUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI173 L047 H76 L048 H176L050H H 80 049 HI 82 L51
11 t


Tallahassee
72/45 ..
Pensacola -
70/50 Patira Rty
71/51


SVadosta
*72/45
Lake City*
73/47
Gainesville
,74/49
Ocala
75/51


Tampa


10/


30,.


Ft Mye
80/5E


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


73
44
74
51
88 in 1957
29 in 1970

0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.26"
44.89"


7a Fd p 7p aP
SFridaNy t






, i, --uwila P .oo -T eit


* Associated Press


City Saturday
Jacksonvie Cape Canaveral 76/63/pc
71/50 Daytona Beach 76/59/pc
Ft. Lauderdale 80/71/pc
Daytna Beach Fort Myers 81/60/s
74 57 Gainesvllle 76/49/pc
Jacksonville 74/51/pc
OrandoCapeCanaveral KeyWest 77/67/s
77/56 74/60 Lake City 76/48/pc
Miami 80/69/pc
Naples 80/62/s
West Palm Beah Ocala' 77/52/pc
78/66 Orlando 79/59/pc
* FL Lauderdale Panama City 73/55/s
NS 79/70 Pensacola 72/57/pc
8 Naples Tallahassee 75/49/s
81/60 Miami Tampa 79/62/s
80/67 Valdosta 75/49/pc
ey West* W. Palm Beach 79/68/pc
R1 /7n


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


6:59 a.m.
5:32 p.m.
7-00 a.m.
5:32 p.m.

4:01 p.m.
4:59 a.m.
4:41 p.m.
5:57 a.m.


O(30CL
Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec.
21 28 5 13
Full Last New First



S On this date in
unlday 1975, a strong win-
ter storm developed
as it tracked from
Oklahoma north
across Kansas and
into Wisconsin.
Winds increased to
near 50 mph with
gusts to 75 mph
over Sioux Falls,
S.D, and the tri-
state area.
tanfrprnj


5

30 nts bbulmt
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Sunday
76/62/pc
77/60/pc
79/71/s
82/61/s
76/52/pc
75/53/pc
79/69/s
76/50/pc
81/70/pc
82/64/s
78/52/pc
79/59/pc
75/58/s
74/59/pc
77/52/s
80/63/pc
75/52/s
79/68/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weatheom
weather.com


S, Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 0 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


&Get onected


Daily Scripture


"Sanctify them by the truth;
your word is truth."



-John 17:17


AROUND FLORIDA


Police find burglar
Man charged with asleep on floor
shooting at driver


:11)11


~__ ~ u'l 'V ~


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


C~TE~FI


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1! TES21


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W$H3
^..









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19. 2010


Three residents injured


in two-vehicle collision

From staff reports the wreck and was also After stopping, Bradle
y
o tn ekat Shands Imkeshore attempted to cross U S


JASON MATHEW WALKERLde City Reporter
Epiphany Catholic School students Sam Canciglia (from left), 12, and Nick Anschultz, 1t, and
Richardson Middle School students Courtney Parker, 13, and Denishia Worthy, 13, work together
to pack a basket consisting of cor, yams, cranberry sauce, stuffing mix, fruit, potatoes 2nd soup.


CHARITIES: Schools hold food drives
Continued From Page 1A


Edwards said 19
schools held canned food
drives to contribute to
the baskets. Community
people and businesses
donated more than 100
turkeys.
"It certainly helps the
charity to continue to fund
the project when the com-
munity fills in the gaps,"
she said.


The collaboration gets
students involved and
helps them understand
the importance of giving,
Spradley said.
Students bring in
canned goods for the
baskets and help with dis-
tribution.
"We enjoy partnering
with Catholic Charities
every year," she said.


Catholic Charites
hopes families are
touched by the lxskets of
love, Edwards sail.
"Good and bad times
will come, but there's
always someone out
there willing to lelp," she
said. "That's themission
statement of Catlolic
Charities. We hdp anyone
in need.".


BURGLARIES: 3 structures ransacked
Continued From Page 1A


Jerrid Campbell, 18, 671
SE St. Johns St., is charged
with burglary (two counts),
resisting arrest without vio-
lence, possession of bur-
glary tools and grand theft.
He allegedly burglarized
three structures and was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $35,000 bond.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports, deputy Darrel
Clay and Cpl. Greg Horne
were investigating a
burglary off Southwest
Ebenezer Road. The vic-
tim reported that three
storage buildings were
burglarized, ransacked
and several items were
stolen, including the cre-
mated ashes of the vic-
tim's mother.
While processing the
crime scene, deputies
were notified that another
burglary was possibly in
progress off Southwest
High Falls Road.
"In that case, an alert
citizen observed a man in


his neighbor's home," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.
"When the suspect left the
home on foot, the citizen
followed the suspect at a
safe distance to observe
his direction of travel. The
suspect was last seen in
the area of County Road
245 and Southwest High
Falls-Road."- .-... --
Deputies were dis-
patched to the area and
Sgt. Keith Jackson was
able to track the path of
the suspect with his K-9
partner, Perry, a four-year
old German Shepherd.
Jackson saw the suspect
standing on the side of
a dirt lane and ordered
the suspect to lie 'on the
ground and put his hands
behind his back, but the
suspect refused to com-
ply with Jackson's com-
mands and attempted to
flee, reports said.
"Jackson deployed K-9
Perry and Perry was able
to quickly apprehend the


suspect, who was secured
without further incident,"
Seifert said. "The sus-
pect received minor inju-
ries to the bad: of his
leg from contact with the
K-9 officer. The suspect
was treated on tie scene
by Columbia Couity Fire/
Rescue paramedics."
The suspect wis found
to have property on him
that was consistent with
the type stolen i'om the
Ebenezer Road burglar-
ies, reports said.
"The suspect was
transported to detective
division at the Sheriff's
Office to be interviewed
and was then booked into
the Columbia County
Detention Facility with-
out incident," Sdfert said.
"Detectives are continu-
ing to search fcr the sto-
len items so that they may
be returned to tle victims.
Detectives will also be
looking at past burglaries
in the area to determine if
the suspect had a role in
those crimes."


A Lake City woman was
seriously injured in a two-
vehicle collision Thursday
morning while two other
Lake City residents suf-
fered minor injuries.
Lisa E. Bradley, 45, was
taken to a Gainesville
hospital with injuries
she suffered in the mis-
hap. Tyrese Bradley, 9,
a passenger in Bradley's
vehicle, suffered minor
injuries in the wreck
and was taken to Shands
Lakeshore Hospital.
The driver of the other
vehicle, Billy R. White, 39,
suffered minor injuries in


Hospital for treatment.
The wreck occurred
around 7:30 a.m. Thursday
at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 90 and Northeast
Montrose Avenue.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Lisa Bradley was travel-
ing north on SE Montrose
Avenue in a 2004 Pontiac
four-door, waiting at
the intersection of U.S.
Highway 90.
White was traveling
east on U.S. Highway 90
in a 2004 Chrysler Sports
Utility Vehicle in the left
lane of the roadway.


Highway 90 and official
reports said she drove into
the roadway and into the
path of White's vehicle.
White's vehicle report-
edly struck the left side
of Bradley's car, causing
Bradley's vehicle to spin
counterclockwise.
As'a result of the impact,
White's vehicle also began
a counterclockwise spin
before it came to rest in
the westbound lane.
Charges in connec-
tion with the wreck are
pending completion of a
Florida Highway Patrol
investigation.


PATRICK SCOTTI Special to the Lake City Reporter
Pictured is or&e of the two cars involved in an accident on East Duval Street Thursday morning.
Three people were injured, one being flown to Gainesville.



COUNTY: Officials OK incentives issue
Continued From Page 1A


the county refunded a por-
tion.
Under the ordinance,
property taxes can be off-
set for. businesses for up
to ten years upon board
approval.
In order to make sure a
company awarded abate-
ment is meeting its mini-
mum requirements for
the incentive each year,
the board approved mak-
ing the company apply for
abatement every year that
the company is eligible for
it.
Commissioner Jody
DuPree said the reappli-


cation is the safest way
to be sure a company is
adhering to its minimum
requirements.
"The concern I have
is that inevitably some-
thing's going to get lost
in the wash somewhere,"
he said.
In other discussion and
action:
The board unani-
mously approved a local
bid preference policy that
allows a 5 percent local
bid preference, keeps the
preference from exceed-
ing a difference in bids
of more than $250,000,


defines businesses eligi-
ble for local preference
and does not require a
local preference bidder to
match the low bid.
The board unani-
mously approved three
utility resolutions that
will allow private utilities
an opportunity for rate
relief in a timely fashion,
reduce the cost in pro-
cessing a change in rates,
reduce rate shock to cus-
tomers and give a utility
the chance to recover its
operating costs and earn
a return on its investment
to stay in business.


TRADE: Officials expect economic development jolt


Continued From Page 1A
the boundaries of the free
trade zone.
"Getting the port ready
for larger ships is only half
the story," Lofberg said.
"We can offer tax adian-
tages on customs duties (in
the free trade zone) and
products used for manufac-
turing."
No timeframe on a deci-
sion regarding Columbia
County's status with the
free trade zone decision
was discussed.

Channel dredging
possible
While the talk for more
than a year has centered
around deepening the chan-
nel at Jaxport, the money'
has not been allocated and
the project has not been
approved.
The U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers oversees the
channel and maintains its
standard ocean-going vessel
depth at 40 feet deep. The



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St Johns River channel from
its mouth at the Atlantic
Ocean to Jaxport is 21 miles
in length. Studies indicate
$500 mil-
lion in fed-
eral funds
would be
needed to
deepen the
channel to
Rubin 50 feet. It
was unclear
how much time would be
needed to dredge 21 miles
of channel, if the money was
appropriated, then allocated.
Rubin said Jaxport's
goal to deepen the channel
to accommodate the new
supersized ocean freighters
"is sometime in the next
decade." The super freight-
ers will draft more than 40
feet and will not be able to
dock at ports with standard
Corps of Engineers chan-
nels.


.Hang On
a minute

SOur customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
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w" h s-d ..ip i


Rubin said Jaxiort was
not first in line for tie federal
dollars. "There aretwo East
Coast ports that a-e ahead
of us," Rubin said. 'We hope
there's a steady sream of
allocation to do this"

Growth on the horizon
Jaxport, in terns of vol-
ume, continues tc be the
second largest automobile
import location in the U.S.
Rubin said Jaxport ias expe-
rienced growth he past
several years, despite the
tight economy. Ore of the
top exports from tie port is
used vehicles headed to less-
fortunate countries


Rubin said Hanjin, a
Korean shipping jugger-
naut, has plans to build a
large facility at Jaxport that
would increase the num-
ber of containers passing
through the port. Shipping
container volume through
the port is expected to triple
in the next few years. This
volume, in addition to the
potential free trade zone
expansion, could mean an
economic development jolt
for surrounding areas.
'There's a great deal to
be made in regional part-
nerships," Rubin said. "We
exist to create benefit,
jobs and success in the
region."


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES
at the Lake City Reporter
So ar employees can enjoy Thanksgiving with their
families, the Lake City Reporter will be closed,
Thursday. November 25th, 2010.
ONr Advertisng deadles will be
DP | dlNobr 26,5dMaiO We*d3y,Noembe 24 1im.
S" rdawpvbe27 6 u&dgmda b msoeday, November 22
SOil, 2e Wyouii idead Teoaday, Noeber23
SuMday, Nanberw28UandaeuTuesday,.Novaeber23
i Tuesday, loebw 30 wI deadline Wednelday, Nodember24
Ve will be back in the office on Friday,
November 26th for our customer's convenience.
Thaik You and Have a Great Thanksgiving


S Our

Little lack
Sent from
Heaven,

SEnioyVyour

day asyour -
turn seven.

S love, orm, Dad, i


Call today to place a
surprise ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special day!


Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


'Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to annearance in the Lake City ReDorter.


T


al -..-.1













OPINION


Friday, November 19,2010


OUR


OUR
OPIN ION


Proper


tribute


for Skiles

The renaming of one
of our local freshwa-
ter spring jewels as
Wes Skiles Peacock
Springs State Park
is a fitting tribute to one of our
most dedicated environmental
supporters.
Wes Skiles was known
around the world for his unbe-
lievable underwater video
work. He was recognized as a
cave diving expert and one of
the most sought-after videog-
raphers in the world when he
drowned during a shoot off
Palm Beach last summer.
Locally, Skiles was our cham-
pion for the continued health
of our freshwater springs.
He was an advocate for clean
water, for public awareness of
how our daily behavior affects
the ground water below and
what we all must do together to
ensure a healthy environmental
future.
Skiles grew up around the
springs and lived his adult life
in the High Springs area, diving
in the clear waters and caves of
North Florida whenever pos-
sible.
To have his name forever
remembered at Wes Skiles
Peacock Springs State Park is
a greattribute to a man who
did all he could to boost aware-
ness of our stressed freshwater
springs and the effort needed
to save them.
The move by the state to
salute Skiles' memory and con-
tribution to our environment is
very appropriate.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Friday, Nov. 19, the
323rd day of 2010. There are
42 days left in the year.
In 1600, King Charles
I of England was born in
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.
In 1794, the United
States and Britain signed
Jay's Treaty, which resolved
some issues left over from the
Revolutionary War.
In 1831, the 20th president
of the United States, James
Garfield, was born in Orange
Township, Ohio.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


In defense of the TSA workers


Just in time for the
Thanksgiving travel
crunch, new security
measures at airports
have caused officials to
raise the color-coded passen-
ger irritability threat advisory.
You need to be alert to this if
you are planning to fly.
Not to be confused with the
better known security threat
advisories, the passenger irri-
tability advisory had been pink
(flushed cheeks) but is now red
and white (red face with steam
coming out of the ears).
While the latest alert is not
yet black (nimbus cloud with
lightning over passenger's
head), it is in everybody's inter-
ests that the alert slides down
the scale to lavender (cute smile
and teddy bear in carry-on).
So as a public service today,
I have volunteered to clear
up some public misconcep-
tions for the good folks at
the Transportation Security
Administration, who could do it
themselves if they were not so
busy inspecting the grand pia-
nos that passengers hope to fit
in the overhead bins.
As the Associated Press
reports, "Annoyance at secu-
rity hassles has been on the
rise among airline crews and
passengers for years, but the
widespread use of full-body
image detectors this year and
the simultaneous introduction of
more intrusive pat-downs seems
to have ramped up the frustra-
tion."
A software engineer named
John Tyner fed the fire of public
discontent when he wrote in his
blog that he had been ejected
from the San Diego airport He
said he had been threatened
with a fine and lawsuit for refus-
ing a groin check after turning
down a full-body scan. He said
he told a TSA worker, "If you
touch my junk, I'm gonna have


LETTER


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
you arrested."
As well as providing what we
can agree is the best quote of
the year, this incident illustrates
the problem. Some peoplejust
come to the airport with amy-
junk-is-superior-to-thine attitude.
Mr. Tyner, the TSA workers
do not want to touch your;unk.
They are doing their duty. That
is all. Nobody would be intr-
ested in touching your junk if
it were not for the jackass er-
rorist who tried to blow uphis
underpants and the plane hey
were flying in. The threat tom
foreign underpants is real.
The same goes for the o'fi-
cial who must sit in a separate
location and view the images
from the body scan machines.
What a horrible job. This being
America, acres and acres do
fatty flesh pass by, putting tie
viewer off cupcakes for the rest
of the shift.
If a hot body should appear,
the government's no-fun pdicy
ruins the moment, because
heads are blurred on the
screen. And if a supervisor does
hear laughter or hubba-hutba
sounds coming from the view-
ing booth; the operator is pit in
charge of shoe inspection.
What we have with this
controversy is hyper-modesty
in bed, so to speak, with tfe
American penchant for mistrust
of government. It is the Tea
Party ethic clothed in the bng
frocks and high-buttoned dollarss
of Victorian prudery. This is all
very well and good, but think
of the poor TSA workers. 's


not all about you and your too-
'wonderful-for-official-inspection
body.
As for me, I don't care if some
unfortunate TSA worker wants
to look at my body in the inter-
ests of national security. They
do not pay that person enough.
All I ask is that he or she keeps
the giggling to a minimum and
doesn't put me in a calendar.
You see, I believe the body is
a temple, not a source of shame
to be hidden away at all times.
Admittedly, in my case, it is a
temple to the veneration of beer
and sandwiches, but the prin-
ciple holds.
Do people who object to
these full-body scans ever go to
the doctor? If Mr. Tyner gets a
pain in the groin area, does he
accuse the doctor of planning
a sexual assault for trying to
put a glove upon the affected
area? I bet he doesn't, because
he knows full well that if left
untreated, the condition could
require a junk-ectomy.
Yes, and in the same way,
hands must search and screens
must be observed in case the
plane blows up. The rule of rea-
son, not modesty, must prevail.
Much of what goes on in
security screening is, of course,
ridiculous. Yes, a certain
amount of random searching of
grandmas goes on, but those
grandmas can be tough. I think
only flight crews have a good
case to be excused from screen-
ing if they can be trusted to
operate the plane, they can be
trusted not to smuggle water
onto the plane.
What is needed for flying is a
sense of humor and a recogni-
tion that the TSA did not cause
the problem. Osama bin Laden
should be the one worried
about his junk.
Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


TO THE EDITOR F


God will purge, not destroy, Earth


es, there is hope for
anyone to receive
God's mercy, if they
seek it by receiv-
ing Jesus Christ as
their personal savior, by believ-
ing the Gospel of Salvation (I
Corinthians 15:1-4).
A letter to the editor ("Hope
for anyone who asks for God's
Mercy," Nov. 13) stated that
new revelation from the Bible
points to the exact day that
God will destroy the earth (of
course, we know that the earth
will not be destroyed, only
purged by fire, according to the
Bible).
The date would be exactly
7,000 years after the flood and
would be May 21, 2011.
We know that from the cre-
ation of man to the flood was
approximately 2,000 years, and
from the flood to the birth of
Jesus was another 2,000 years,


and from the birth of Jesusuntil
now was just over 2,000 years
(approximately 6,000 years
total).
When Jesus was asked tie
question in Matthew 24:3, Tell
us when will these things be
and what will be the sign ol
your coming and the end of
the world (age)," He tells them
of the things that must hap-
pen before the second conag.
Jesus said in Matthew 24:36
"But the day and hour no rran
knoweth, no not the angels of
heaven, but my Father only'
The apostle Paul wrote: "For
yourselves know perfectly
that the day of the Lord so
comes as a thief in the night (I
Thessalonians 5:12)."
The teaching is clear. Whle
we cannot know the day no- the
hour, we're to look for sign. of
the second coming.
There are many signs forthe


second coming of Christ.
One sign is found in the
Parable of the Fig Tree,
Matthew 24:32-35; Mark 3:28-
31; Luke 21:29-33. Another sign
is that of the days of Noah.
Jesus said that if we look at the
actions of the people before
the flood and compare them to
the actions of the people today,
we would see that the time is
short (Matthew 24:37-38; Luke
17:26-27). Then in Luke 17:28-
30, Jesus adds the city of Sodom
to the signs. Jesus said, "When
you see these things begin to
happen, look up, lift up your
head, because your redemption
draws near."
So we see the error of date
setting, because only God the
Father knows. I would love to
see comments from some local
pastors.
Hugh G. Sherrill, Jr.
Lake City


4A


Bonnie Erbe.
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


Losing


faith in


Catholic


Church

T here's a raging
debate about the
state of the Catholic
Church in America.
Some Church
officials still cling to the hope
that massive influxes of recent
immigrants will fill the pews
left empty by more educated,
fallen-away parishioners. But
clearly the Church has reced-
ed as a religious and cultural
force, like a steroid-pumped
bicep to a withering muscle.
The New York Times reports
that the Roman Catholic
Diocese of Brooklyn plans to
close two churches, fold six
parishes into three and impose
strict budget constraints on
every one of its 198 parishes.
This comes after a half-dozen
waves of closings and merg-
ers that left only about half
as many Catholic elementary
schools operating in Brooklyn
as there were in the mid-1990s.
Clear signs point to an
institution on the wane, with
parishes going bankrupt
nationwide. Those that con-
tinue face a shortage of lead-
ers. The Reuters news agency
reported in September that a
sign outside St. James Church
in the affluent Boston sub-
urb of Wellesley summed up
Catholicism's deepening strug-
gles in the United States.
"Still searching for a priest,".
it reads. Another sign affixed
to its thick doors pleads: "Save..::
St James."
Facing dwindling congrega- :
tions, shifting demographics
and a drain on cash from set-
tling sexual abuse lawsuits,
Roman Catholic churches are
shuttering at a quickening
pace in a traditional strong-
hold, the Northeast.
It's tempting to blame the
priest pedophilia scandal and
the Vatican's response to it
for the church's collapse.
Georgetown University's
Center for Applied Research
in the Apostolate reports
nationwide 850 parishes have
shut down since 1995. And the
scandal has cost the church
$2 billion in settlements with
more to come.
Dogmatic, dictatorial
churches do not resound with
today's spirituality, and young
people are not clamoring to
join them. So sending a mes-
sage that says, in essence,
"Follow my rules or go to hell"
might be a good way of retain-
ing older parishioners used to
such harsh boundaries. But
as elderly parishioners die off,
they take the church's mes-
sage with them.
Church leaders blame
shrinking parishes on a short-
age of priests, in some cases.
But making that argument is
like blaming the hen for the
egg. There would be no short-
age of priests (or nuns, for
that matter) if there weren't a
shortage of congregants.
Is it too late for the Church
to turn around? As long as
the Vatican forces priests to
remain celibate, it will have
an ever-greater shortage of
priests in educated countries.
And since Pope Benedict clear-
ly looks to the past for spiritual
guidance instead of referring
to the past but simultaneously
peering into the future, people
who have choices will choose
to leave.
Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19. 2010


FACES & PLACES


Scenes from the annual joint meeting between the Rotary Club of Lake City and the Altrusa Club of Lake City, Thursday, at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center.

Photos by TODD WILSON
Lake City Reporter


Sheryll Walker and Jan Smithey


Sue Towns and Sandy Kishton


Dennille Folsom and Dennis Roberts


Tyson Johnson and Teresa Morgan


Mike Pendergraft and Herb Ellis


Brett Crews and Steve Smith


OBITUARIES


|Dallas Merle Junkin

Dallas Merle Junkin 72, a resi-
dent of Ft. White died Novem-
ber 12, 2010 at his residence.
He is the son of the late Boise
and Marie Gill Junkin. He had
made Ft. White his for the past
ten years after moving here
from North Ft. Myers, he was
of the Baptist faith. He enjoyed
model airplanes and his dogs.
He is survived by one son Dal-
las Junkin (Gloria), North Ft.
Myers, FL; two daughters Su-
zanne Nine (Rob), Akron, OH;
Kimberly Diestler, Clearwa-
ter. FL; two brothers Richard
Junkin Copley, OH; and Leroy
Junkin (AliceFaye), Ft. White,
FL; Seven grandchildren also
surviveGraveside funeral ser-
vices will be conducted on Sat-
urday November 20, 2010 at Ft.
White City Cemetery at 10:00
A.M. Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. Hwy 441,
Lake City, FL (386-752-1954).
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com


Brenda K. McDiarmid

Brenda K. McDiarmid, 54, died
Wednesday November 17, 2010
at the Lake City Medical Cen-
ter after a brief illness..She was
the daughter of the late Jack and
Grace Culver. She had lived
in Ft. White for the past seven
years moving here from Richton
Park, IL. She was of the Baptist
faith, enjoyed gardening, and
was a member of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary Post #
57. She is preceded in death by
one son, Thomas William Bell
Jr., and two brothers, Donald
Culver, & J.V. (Pete). Culver.
She is survived by her husband
of ten years, Donald McDi-
armid of Ft. White, FL.;one
daughter, Cari Conway of Blue
Island, IL; stepson, Bryant Mc-
Diarmid (Christina) of SC.; step
daughters, Dr. Melanie Nelson
(Charles) Norman of OK; Vicki
Pogose (Ron) of Lansing, IL;
brothers, Kenneth Culver of
Crestwood, IL, Carl Culver (
Kelly) of Crestwood, IL, David
Culver (Gillian) of Las Vegas,
Nevada and Wai Moy of Crest-
wood, IL; sisters, Linda Dean of
Oak Lawn, IL, Cathy Echavarria
(Jose) of Oak Lawn, IL, Debra
Rudofski (Joseph) of Ft. White,
FL; and nine grandchildren.


Funeral services will be conduct-
ed in Oak Forest, Illinois at Mck-
enzie Funeral Home on Tuesday,
November 23, 2010 at 11:00
A,.M., visitation with the family
will be held Monday, November
22; 2010 from 3:00 P.M. until
9:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
Local arrangements were
handled by GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.

Marlow Alexander
Robinson

Marlow Alexander Robinson,
age 57 departed this life on
November 15, 2010 at his sis-
ter's home in
Gainesville,
Florida termi-
nating an ex-
tended illness.
He was born
on October 6.
1953 in Lake
City, Florida,
to the late Mr.
"and Mrs. Thom-
as and Gladys "
Robinson. o


He received his education in the
public school system in Colum-
bia County, where he graduated
from Columbia High School,
class of 1971. He then later at-
tended Lake City Community
College from 1971-1973 where
he was a member of the basket-
ball team. In 1973; Mr. Robin-
son served, his country in the
U.S. Army and was honorably
discharged in 1976. He then
later retired from the Florida
Department of Transportation.
Marlow was an active mem-
ber of Trinity United Method-
ist Church where he actively
participated in the men s
choir until his health failed.
He leaves behind to cherish his
memories, his sister, Marzinnia
Robinson Dean, brother, Thom-
as Eugene Robinson, Jr.; broth-
er-in-law, Jewitt Dean; sister-
in-law, Elinda Robinson; nieces
Serena Dean, Brittany Dean,
Kendra Robinson; nephew. Cor-
win Robinson; cousins, Daniel
Sanders (Geneva), Stevie Davis
(Cindy), Erma Jean Thompson,
Rosalyn Baisden, Todd Thomp-
son (Angelina) Mark Thomp-
son, Wanda Rollins (Andra),
Tammy Jordan (Sento), Dwayne
Thompson (Felicia), Gregory
Spicer (Diana), Beverly Spicer;
Special friends, Linda Newton,


Ms. Katherine Kelly and a host
of loving family and friends.
Funeral services will be held
on ll:00am Saturday, Novem-
ber 20, 2010, at Trinity United
Methodist Church Rev. J.D.
Johnson, Eulogy, Rev. Fatha
M. DeSue, Pastor. The fam-
ily will receive friends Friday
from 5:00pm until 6:0t, pm.
Arrangements entrusted
to COOPER FUNERAL
HOME 251 N.E. Washing-
ton Street, Lake City, Flori-
da, Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D.

Donald B. Swilley

Mr. Donald B. Swilley, 61 of
Lake City passed away on Tues-
day, November 16, 2010 at his
home in Lake City following
an extended ill-
ness. Mr. Swil-
ley was born on S .
April 3, 1949 .
in Lake City
and was a son to the late Earl
H. and Ruby Swilley. He was
a retired veteran of the United
States Army having served dur-
ing Vietnam. Mr. Swilley was
preceded in death by one sister,
Nancy Sharon Powell and his
brother, Earl Kendall Swilley.


Mr. Swilley is survived by four
daughters, Dawn Marie Swil-
ley, Tampa, Denise Coombes
(Steve), Nashua, NH, Donna Al-
varez and Deborah Swilley both
of Tampa, two sons, David Swil-
ley and Daniel Swilley both of
Tampa and two sisters, Loretta
Powell (Danny), Adrian, MI and
Margaret Mims (Glen), Trenton.
Numerous grandchildren, niec-
es, nephews and a close friend,
Keith Hudson and Donald's close
friend and caretaker, Bambi Hill
both of Lake City also survive.
At his request no services are
scheduled at this time. Private
family services will be con-
ducted at a later date. Condo-
lences may be sent to the fam-
ily at, Swilley Family, P.O. Box
1253, Safety Harbor, FI 34695.
In lieu of flowers donations
may be made to the Disabled
American Veterans Organiza-
tion, P.O. Box 14301, Cincin-
nati, OH 45250-0301 Attn: Gift
Processing. Arrangements are
under the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 SW
MainBlvd.,LakeCity. 752-2414

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







L,.E CITY REPORTER


LOCAL FRIDAY. NOVE'.'~ 19. 2010


C H S STAR


& STRIPES


tiger


of the week
of the week


II,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High seniors Jordan Morris (72) and Danny Ratliff (70) hoist up the Old Oaken
Bucket trophy after the team's 46-13 victory over Suwannee High.


Rakeem Battle (3) looks behind him as he passes Suwannee High defenders for a score.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Head coach Craig Howard conducts a quick interview with local media in the middle of Tiger
Stadium on Friday.


2010 Tiger Football Schedule


CHS 38, Brooks County 13

CHS 30, South Lafourche 19

CHS 22, Buchholz 14

CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20

Madison 19, CHS 0

Ridgeview 16, CHS 9

Godby 35, CHS 14

Ed White 25, CHS 11


CHS 29, Wolfson 12

CHS 46, Suwannee 13


Bucket claimed


olumbia High concluded
an exciting 2010
campaign at 6-4 with a
victory in the battle for
the Old Oaken Bucket.
The Tigers defeated Suwannee
High for the third straight time
under coach Craig Howard, 46-13, on
Friday at Tiger Stadium.
Howard's teams have now
outscored the Bulldogs a combined


138-13 in three seasons as head
coach of Columbia.
"We. take this game very serious,"
Howard said. "We coach our boys
to beat Live Oak Suwannee. I may
be the most hated man in all of Live
Oak, but I can handle that."
Howard may be hated in
Suwannee, but he's loved in Lake
City following the win.
With no bowl game in view, the


Tigers treated Friday's game like it
was one.
Suwannee scored first and last,
but the Tigers put up 46 points in
the middle led by Rakeem Battle's
121 rushing yards.
It was a chance to say goodbye
to seniors like Timmy Jernigan,
Ben Bell, Jordan Morris and Danny
Ratliff. For those seniors, it also was
a chance to go out winners.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
trJrby aketkrer /repr orn


SPORTS


Friday, November 19, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS
I I


Columbia bounces

back with victory


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@Jak6otyreporter.com


Battling

Catholic

again
Pensacola
Catholic has
made 12 trips
to the playoffs,
with a state
runner-up in 2004, the
best finish for the school.
Fort White knocked
out the Crusaders in
the first round in 2007.
The Indians came in
4-6 in coach Demetric
Jackson's first year.
Fort White held on
to a 36-34 victory for its
only playoff win to date.
Alex Gilmer was
7-of-10 passing for 210
yards and four
touchdowns. Three were
hauled in by Jordan
Dewhirst for 14 and 29
yards, plus an 87-yard
catch and run in the
fourth quarter to give the
Indians some breathing
room. He had 169
receiving yards.
Montr6 Cray filled in
at running back after two
were injured, rushed for
123 yards, and scored a
touchdown and a
two-point conversion.
Alexis Blake caught a
27-yard touchdown pass.
Pensacola Catholic's
current quarterback
Shaun White was
pressed to start as a
freshman and threw
a touchdown pass.
Marquis Sumler had a
touchdown run, also in
his freshman season,
and Devin Dukes had a
touchdown catch.
In 2008 Fort White
came into the re-match at
9-1, its best-ever record.
The Indians trailed 13-7
at the half, but it was all
Catholic after the
intermission with the
Crusaders winning 35-7.
Xavier Blake rushed
for 123 yards on 27
carries and scored Fort
White's only touchdown.
Sumler rushed for
163 yards and scored a
touchdown. White had a
touchdown run and pass.
The Crusaders scored on
another run and an
interception.
Fort White's first
playoff team was in
2002 under coach Mike
Hunter. It was the first
meeting with Catholic.
The Indians were
7-3, but played like a
neophyte. They totaled
less than 100 yards and
turned the ball over six
times in a 35-0.loss.
Roderick Swopshire
had a 100-yard
kickoff return negated by
a penalty. In the fourth
quarter, Fort White had
a 16-play drive only to
suffer an interception at
the goal line.
Catholic's first trip to
the playoffs was in 1969,
and the Crusaders lost to
Columbia High, 8-7.
Trailing 7-0 late, the
Tigers got a 45-yard
touchdown run from
Mike Vinson. Pat Hunter
threw to Mike Tillotson
for the two-point
conversion that proved ,to
be the difference.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Lady Tigers beat
PK. Yonge after
four-game slump.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High was reel-
ing heading intp Thursday's
game at PK. Yonge..After a
2-0 win, the Lady Tigers are
back on the right track.
The Lady Tigers had
fallen in four-consecu-
tive games heading into
Thursday's contest includ-
ing a 3-1 loss to Ridgeview,
an 8-0 loss to Fleming Island
and a 6-0 loss to Buchholz
on Tuesday.
Heading into the game,
coach Ashley Brown was
JASON MATTHEW WALKElLa e Ctyr Peporter looking for a response from
Buchholz High midfielder Abby Huber (13) and Columbia High defender Ruth Ruiz(7) fight'fdr her players.
the ball in a game on Tuesday. "We played good in


Fairy-tale ending?


Indians begin
playoff journey
for 2B title hunt.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE It's not
exactly the tortoise against
the hare, but Fort White
High will take a fairy-tale
ending.
Fort White's football
team travels to Pensacola
to play Catholic High in the
opening round of the Class
2B state playoffs. Kickoff is
7:30 p.m. CST.
Fort White (7-3) is run-
ner-up in. District 2; the
Crusaders are Disfrict 1
champions.
Pensacola Catholic was
10-0 during the season,
but forfeited four games
because of an ineligible
player and stands 6-4. The
Crusaders are ranked in the
top five in two state polls.
It is the third play-
off trip for Fort White in
four years under coach
Demetric Jackson. Catholic
coach Greg Seibert has
the Crusaders on a six-
year playoff streak (seven
straight overall).
The Indians describe
their offensive attack as
"ground and pound," while
Catholic works out of the
spread.
'These are two types of
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's JR Dixog (11) makes room for quarterback Andrew Baker (12) in a game
against Bradford on Nov. 5.


spurts, but we haven't seen
it for 80 minutes," Brown
said.
On Thursday, Columbia
gave that kind of effort.
Heather Roundtree
scored on an assist from
Lucie Faris to start the
second half and Michaela
Burton gave the Lady
Tigers some breathing
room with an assist from
Joanne Ortiz.
"I think we came out with
some intensity tonight,"
Brown said. "We passed
well and we were able to
capitalize. It should give us
some momentum and I'm
really happy to win."
Columbia improves to
2-4, but the Lady Tigers
won't be able to think about
it long. The girls soccer
team takes on Oak Hall
school at 7 p.m. today.


Gators


smash


UNC


A&T

FSU beats Florida
International to
,stay undea.
From tep

Both Florida and Florida
State picked up easy vic-
tories on Thursday as the
Gators' knocked off North
Carolina A&T, 105-55, and
the Seminoles defeated
Florida International, 89-66.
Florida had eight play-
ers score in double-digits in
a Bounce-back game after
falling to Ohio State on
Tuesday. Chandler Parsons
and Kenny Boynton both
dropped in 16 points to lead
the Gators in the scoring
department. Will Yeguete
led Florida in rebounds
with 13 and added'seven
points to his total.
No. 9 Florida improved
to 2.1 on the season with
the win. The Gators face
Morehead State at 3:30 p.m.
Saturday.
Florida State strug-
gled early against Florida
International gaining only
a 38-34 halftime lead. The
Seminolesfound rhythm in
the second half, however, to
pull away in the win.


Indians post first win


-,-- -i- ," .'. ... -"" .*.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White sophomore Ricardo Barrera (21) wins possession of the ball
against Columbia's Nick Tuttle (17) on Nov. 9.


Fort White soccer beats
Newberry Panthers,
1-0, in district match.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort White High
soccer came together for its first
victory of the season. The Indians
won a 1-0 district match from visiting
Newberry High.
The Panthers played an offside
trap defense and it took 30 minutes
for Fort White to adjust Trevor Stout
finally beat an offsides call and got a
shot on goal, but it was wide left.
Minutes later, Stout was back again
with the ball, and this time he drilled
a shot from 35-yards out up and over
the jumping keeper.
Fort White dominated the play in
the second half and made the shutout
stand up for Brandon Sauls.
"It was something we haven't seen
yet at all," Fort White head coach
Pete Blanchard said. "They really
brought the energy tonight This is


a good Newberry team and they
battled us, but we didn't give up."
Fort White had a couple of scor-
ing opportunities in the second half.
Stout had another near miss early in
the period. Josiah Miller got free on
a breakaway, but his shot from the
right side went up and over the goal.
Fort White's defense was more
pressing in the second half and
kept the Panthers from any serious
threat
"We will have a hard time picking
a player of the game," Blanchard
said. "We questioned their heart and
hustle, and they answered tonight"
Fort White had lost its first three-
games, the last two at home. St.
Francis Catholic beat the Indians, 6-0,
on Saturday and Keystone Heights
High defeated Fort White, 3-1, on
Tuesday.
Fort White improved to 1-3 in
overall and 1-0 in district play.
The Indians play at Santa Fe High
at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Newberry fell to 1-3 overall and 1-2
in district play. Their other district
loss came against Santa Fe.


I_











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 19. 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION AUTO RACING


TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I 1:30 aLm.
ESPN2 NASCAR. Sprint Cup,
practice for Ford 400, at Homestead
I p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for Ford 300, at
Homestead
3 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR. Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Ford 400, at Homestead
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR.Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Ford 200, at Homestead
6:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Ford 300, at
Homestead
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Ford 200, at Homestead
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Fresno St at Boise St.
GOLF
12 Midnight
TGC European PGA Tour, Hong
Kong Open, third round
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 2K Sports Classic, third
place game, at New York
7 p.m.
ESPN2 2K Sports Classic,
championship game, at NewYork
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma City at Boston
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Dallas

,FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Thursday's Game
Chicago at Miami (n)
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Dallas, i p.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Washington at Tennessee. I p.m.
Houston at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Buffalo at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Arizona at Kansas City, I p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Carolina, I p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, I p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia; 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.

College scores

Wednesday
Miami (Ohio) 19,Akron 14
Toledo 33, Bowling Green 14

APTop 25 schedule

Today
No. 3 Boise State vs. Fresno State,
9:30 p.m. ,


Race week

NASCAR
Ford 400
Site. Homestead.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
I 1:30- p m.), qualifying (ESPN2. 3-5 p m.)
Saturday, practice (Speed, 1:30-2 30 p.m;
ESPN2, 3-4 p m.), Sunday, race. I p.m
(ESPN2, noon- I pm.; ESPN, 1-5 p.m).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Ford 300
Site: Homestead
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
1-2-30 p.m., 6:30-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, 11:30 a.m.- I p.m.), race,
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2,4-7:30 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Ford 200
Site: Homestead.
Schedule: Todayqualifying (Speed,
5-6 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-
10 30 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway.
Race distance: 201 miles, 134 laps.

NHRA driver standings

Top five final 2010 standings for
NHRA:
Top Fuel
I. Larry Dixon, 2,684
2.Tony Schumacher, 2,582
3. Cory McClenathan, 2,55 1
4.Antron Brown, 2,460
5. Shawn Langdon, 2,43 I
Funny Car
I. John Force, 2,621
2. Matt Hagan, 2,579
3.Ashley Force Hood, 2,449
4.Jack Beckman, 2,439
5. Bob Tasca III, 2,395
Pro Stock
I. Greg Anderson, 2,591
2. Greg Stanfield, 2,479
2. Mike Edwards, 2,469
4. Shane Gray, 2,439
5.Jason Line, 2,438
Pro Stock Motorcyle
I. Louis Tonglet,,2,68 I
2.Andrew Hines, 2,677
3. Ed Krawiec, 2,559
4. Matt Smith, 2,450
5. Hector Arana, 2,442

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Miami 123, Phoenix 96
Toronto 94, Philadelphia 86
Boston 114,Washington 83
L.A. Lakers 103, Detroit 90
Minnesota 113, L.A. Clippers II I
New Orleans 99, Dallas 97
Oklahoma City 116, Houston 99
Utah 98, New Jersey 88
San Antonio 103, Chicago 94
NewYork 113, Sacramento 106
Today's Games.
Oklahoma City at Boston, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Houston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Washington, 7 p.m.


Charlotte at M'al 7.30 p
Cleveland at New Oeans. 8 pm.
San Antonio at Utah. 9 p n
LA. Lakers at M -nesota 9 p
Chicago at Dalas. 9 30 pm
New Jersey at Sacramento. 10 p m
New York at Golden State. 10 30 pm
Saturday's Games
Phoenix at Charotte. 7 p.m.
Orlando at Indiana, 7 p m
Miami at Memphis. 8 p m
Dallas at Atlanta 8 p.m
Okla. City at Milwaukee. 830 pm.
Cleveland at San Antonio. 8:30 p m
New Jersey at Denver. 9 pm
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
New York at LA Clippers. 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. Colgate, 8:30 p.m.
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. No. 13 Illinois
or Texas at Madison Square Garden,
5 or 7 p.m.
No. 7 Kansas vs. North Texas, 8 p.m.
No. 8 North Carolina vs. Western
Kentucky or Minnesota at Coliseo de
Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 6 or
8:30 p.m.
No. 12 Kentucky at Portland,
10:30 p.m.
No. 20 Georgetown vs. South
Carolina-Update or Wofford at Carolina
First Arena, Charleston, S.C.,TBA

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Islanders 2
Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Pittsburgh 3,Vancouver I
Washington 4, Buffalo 2
Carolina 7, Ottawa I
Florida 2,Atlanta I
Detroit 7, St. Louis 3
Minnesota 2,Anaheim I.OT
Colorado 4, San Jose 3, OT
Phoenix 3, Calgary I
Chicago 5, Edmonton 0
Columbus 5, Los Angeles 3
Today's Games
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
.Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary. 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 10 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL CyYoung award

(Total points on a 7-4-3-2-1 basis)
Player I st 2nd 3rd 4tht 5th Total


F. Hernandez, Sea2
David Price,TB 4
CC Sabathia, NY 3
Jon Lester, Bos.
Jered Weaver, LA -
Clay Buchholz, Bos.-
Cliff Lee, Sea.Texas-
Rafael Soriano,TB -
Trevor Cahill, Oak.-
Joakim Soria, KC -
F. Liriano, Minn.
J.Verlander, Det


I 167
- Illi
I 102
12 33
2 24
4 20
1 6



I I
3 5
2 4
2
1


BRIEFS


CHS BASEBALL

Dugout Club sets

golf tournament

The CHS Dugout Club
has a golf tournament at
The Country Club at Lake
City at 8 a.m. Saturday.
Cost is $60 per player or
$200 for a foursome.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754.

LADY TIGERS SOCCER

Breakfast at

Kazbor's Grille

Columbia High's girls
soccer team has a
breakfast fundraiser at
Kazbor's Grille from
7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday.
Tickets are $6 at the door
and may be purchased in
advance from team
members.
For details, call
(386) 365-1877.

FISHING

Input sought on

redfish proposal

The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission has a public
workshop to discuss
possible fishing regulation
changes for red drum from
6-8 p.m. Tuesday at the
Jacksonville Public Library.
There is a proposal to raise
the daily bag limit from
one to two redfish per
person.
For details, visit
MyFWC.com/Rules.

CLUB VOLLEYBALL

Travel team

meeting Monday

The North Florida
Fusion volleyball club


program has a meeting
at 6 p.m. Monday at the
Columbia High auditorium.
Girls interested in
playing travel volleyball
and their parents are urged
to attend. Tryout dates,


Seattle ace Hernandez


wins AL Cy Young award


By BEN WALKER
Assoc.ared Press

NEW YORK Felix
Hernandez drew plenty of
support in this final pitch-
ers' duel.
The Seattle ace won
the AL Cy Young Award
on Thursday despite a
13-12 record. His major
league-leading 2.27 ERA
and superior stats made
him an easy choice over
David Price of Tampa Bay
and CC Sabathia of the
Yankees and their impres-
sive win-loss numbers.
Victimized by poor
run support all season,
Hernandez found ample
backing with the voters.
They clearly recognized
how little the last-place
Mariners helped him in
10 starts, they were either
shut out and held to one
run.
'This confirms the Cy
Young is an award not only
for the pitcher with the
most wins, but the most
dominant," a teary-eyed
Hernandez said while cele-
brating with relatives at the
family home in Valencia,
Venezuela.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 239; 2. Joyce Hooper 181;
3. Carla Nyssen 173. 1. Luke Milton
225; 2. Tom Sewejkis 204; 3. Ken
Watson 203.
High scratch series: 1. Gloria
Dennis 578; 2. Mary Lobaugh 491;
3. Maggie Battle 480. 1. Luke Milton
589; 2. Tom Sewejkis 555; 3. Dess
Fennell 547.
High handicap game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 269; 2. Karen Moody 218;
3. Beth Koppa 216. 1. Ken Watson
251; 2. Steve Greaves 235; 3. Jim
Lobaugh 224.
High handicap series: 1. Pat
Fennell 671; 2. (tie) Pat Frazier, Joyce
Hooper, Carla Nyssen 622; 5. Lorie
Niquette 615. 1. Luke Milton 670;
2. Scott Thompson 650; 3. (tie) Willie
Frazier, Marshall Campbell 624.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
174. 1. Tom Sewejkis 196.
(results from Nov. 9)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Legal Ladies


ACROSS.


cost of participation and
general information will be
discussed.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.

E From staff reports


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES

at the Lake City Reporter
So our employees can enjoy Thanksgiving with their
families, the Lake City Reporter will be closed,
Thursday, November 25th, 2010..

Our Advertising deadlines will be
Closed: Fidri, Nomsibes 26l r ddil ea Wednesday, NmMber 24 b sU.
splar. Fay. Nouamber 26 wil deadline Monday, arember 22
Btad eNoveber 27 wil deadline TuesOay. Nosemae 23
Sunda Noembef 28 anH deed ae Tuesday, Noveber 23
Tuesday. Nouemb30 wi deadline Wednesday. Nuvmber24

%e s il he bkck in the ofice nn L'
Frida.). rN,%emhcr 2nih for ,ur 14
cus omersir cnI.lnenlnicc.
Thank )wi and
Have a Great Thanksgiving


1 Student stat
4 Beige
8 Moose kin
11 Lady's
honorific
12 Shepard or
Ladd
13 Curly's friend
14 Ducommun or
Wiesel
15 Asian condi-
ment (2 wds.)
17 Trilled
19 Early moralist
20 Yahoo! rival
21 Sticky fruit
22 Tooth cleaner
25 Brown bear
28 54, to Flavius
29 Countess's
spouse
31 Racket
33 Draws on
35 Price increase
37 Frat letter
38 Lion
families


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 17, file photo, Seattle Mariners pitcher Felix
Hemandez pitches against the Texas Rangers in Seattle.
Hernandez won the AL Cy Young Award Thursday by the
Baseball Writers'Association of America.


King Felix got 21 of the
28 first-place votes and
167 points in balloting
by the Baseball Writers'
Association of America.
The 24-year-old led the
league in innings (249 2-3),
was second in strikeouts
(232) and topped the AL in
innings/hits ratio.
Price, who went 19-6 with
a 2.72 ERA, was second



BOWLING

(33-19, 577 average); 2. Lucky
Strikers (33-19, 559 average); 3. The
Sandbaggers (29-23).
High handicap game: 1. Angie
Meek 231; 2. Catherine Howell 228;
3. Linda Herndon 226.
High handicap series: 1. Catherine
Howell 625; 2. Iva "Jean" Dukes 607;
3. Karen Gardner 595.
(results from Nov. 16)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(37-15); 2. Farmers (30-22); 3. Razzle
Dazzle (28.5-23.5).
High scratch game: 1. Barbara
Griner 194; 2. Betty Brown 191;
3. Barbara Griner 170.1. Earl Hayward
226; 2. Dan Ritter 208; 3. Dan Ritter
205.
High scratch series: 1. Barbara
Griner 493; 2. Betty Brown 483;
3. Yvonne Finley 469. 1. Dan Ritter
583; 2. Earl Hayward 522; 3. Thorn
Evert 502.
(results from Nov. 16)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Gamblers
(29-19); 2. Wild Things (28-20, 28,385
pins); 3. Bea's Bunch (28-20; 27,731
pins); 4. Golden Niners (28-20, 27,543
pins).


40 Nest builders
42 Mineral find
43 Diver's
milieu
44 Big pipes
47 Cutting
remarks
51 Relativity name
53 Grass-skirt
dance
54 Mdse.
55 Depend on
56 Revise a man-
uscript
57 Was on a jury
58 John and -
59 Mouth part

DOWN

1 Fete
2 Pants pur-
^k- i


with four first-place votes
and 111 points. Sabathia,
who led the league with
21 wins, drew the other
three first-place votes and
finished third at 102.
The 13winsbyHernandez
marked the fewest for a Cy
Young starter in a full sea-
son Tim Lincecum set
the record last year with 15
victories for San Francisco.


High handicap game: 1. Sandra
Johns 244; 2. Cookie Reddick 224;
3. Yvonne Finley 221. 1. Jack Stanfield
237; 2. (tie) Jerry Ellis, George
Mulligan 227.
High' handicap series: 1. Judy
Sanders 673; 2. Debbie Walters 631;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 618. 1. (tie) Jim'
Hawkins, Earl Hayward 630: 3. Sal
Annello 610.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith,
150.82; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 150.08;,
3. Bea Purdy 149.42. 1. David Duncan'
188.22; 2. Bill Dolly 182.44; 3. George,
Mulligan 180.
(results from Nov. 11)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(38-14); 2. Team #1 (31-21); 3. Average:
Joe's (30.5-21.5). "".-' i
High scratch game: 1. Normal
Yeingst 211; 2. Donna Duncan 189;,
3. Norma Yeingst 182. 1. Mark Moore
244; 2. Leonard Randall 231; 3. Matt
Stephan 225.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yeingst 570; 2. Kim Schneiders 498;i
3. Liz Randall 494. 1. Joe Cohrs
610; 2. Mark Moore 588; 3. Leonard'
Randall 584.
(results from Nov. 14)


Answer to Previous Puzzle

UN T ALMIS
GRAHAM BREAKS
HAVANA OMELET
UNREEL AWE

VOLE UREY
GAD DEL TUNA
ALDA DOM K ICK
SU ET SG SERE
EROS I IV Y CIJA


APT DOSIDO


RACKET PLEASED
THEN SNAPS


cnase
3 They have 7 Tacit
pseudopods 8 Non-flying birds
4 Gauguin's 9 Loony
prop 10 Hang on to
5 Earthen lump 11 Plaintive cry
6 Moonbeam 16 Zeus' shield


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I ICCOL


Answer:"
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: ORBIT OPIUM FLORAL BROGUE
Answer: When the aging model dyed her hair, she got
to the ROOT OF THE PROBLEM


11-19


18 Fail to win
21 People
22 Virus infection
23 Speech prob-
lem
24 Not sunnyside
up
25 Kringle
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unit
27 Actress
Madeline
30 Polite cough
32 Calendar divs.
34 Zodiac dozen
36 Jug
39 1939 movie
lawman
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Carson
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rival
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48 Imported car
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2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19. 2010


Dewhirst, Jacksonville


await playoff destiny


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Jacksonville has a nine-
game winning streak,
a share of the Pioneer
Football League title and its
highest ranking in school
history.
The Dolphins (10-1) also
are in the top-10 nationally
in several offensive and
defensive categories.
Former Fort White
High football player Jordan
Dewhirst is part of the
Dolphins team and helped
the team to a league title.
Has it all been enough to
get them into the Football
Championship Series
playoffs? The non-scholar-
ship program will find out
Sunday when the postsea-
son bracket is released.
"We've done everything
we could do," coach Kerwin
Bell said. "This team has
played at a very high level
and I think we have proven
we can play with any team
in the country."
Ten teams will get auto-
matic berths for winning
their conferences. The Ohio
Valley and Big Sky confer-
ences likely will get addi-
tional bids, leaving about 14
teams vying for six spots..
Many of those teams play
each other this weekend.
The Dolphins are off this
weekend, allowing them to
sit back and watch things
unfold.
No matter what happens,
players and coaches feel


like they've got the creden- committee comprised of
tials. Jacksonville shared 11 FCS ADs, the Dolphins
the PFL title with Dayton worked on style points
and is averaging 486 yards all season. They ham-
and 42 points a game, both mered Valparaiso 86-7 and
tops in the FCS. thumped Morehead State
Josh McGregor ranks 61-17 both on the road.
first in passing efficiency, Their only loss came
and the team is fifth in turn- to then top-ranked
over margin, seventh in Appalachian State, 45-14
passing offense and 10th and-the Dolphins trailed
in sacks. 17-14 in the third quarter.
Nonetheless, the They've been ranked as
Dolphins are seemingly high as No. 20 in the FCS
hampered by being a non- coaches and media polls.
scholarship program. "The big thing is you'd
Athletic director Alan hope (the selection com-
Verlander believes the pri- mittee) would look at the
vate school with an enroll- whole body of work," Bell
ment of about 3,200 faces said. "If you look at what
an uphill battle because of we've accomplished in our
the non-scholarship label. conference and go to what
"It's a huge battle," we've done outside the con-
Verlander said. "I do think ference, I think it shows
there is a label put on us, favorable that we can com-
unfortunately. Just because pete at that level. I think
we're not scholarship foot- it would be a great story
ball doesn't mean that to have a team that can
we're not investing a lot of legitimately compete on the
dollars into our program. scholarship level."
Operationally, if you look at The only regret Bell, a for-
everything, we're making mer quarterback at Florida,
the investment that the top has is the Appalachian
schools in FCS are making. State game in which he
It's hundred of thousands says two missed passes
of dollars. foiled the Dolphins. One
"If you take the finan- had a Jacksonville receiver
cial aid the university is behind the defense and the
awarding, the university is second was a miss that "was
investing a decent amount wide open," Bell said.
of money into football. Two completions and the
Granted, the players have Dolphins probably would
to qualify, there's a set of have been up 28-17 in the
criteria. Nobody on our second half, which might
team is on a free ride." have changed that the out-
Knowing they needed. come of the game and the
to impress the selection postseason.


COURTESY PHOTO
Former Fort White Highfootball player Jordan Dewhirst holds the Pioneer Football League
trophy after helping the Jacksonville Dolphins capture a share of the league title earlier this
season.


"If we do not get in and
we're 10-1, I'll be highly
disappointed," Verlander
said. "It's a chance to cre-
ate a perception and a
reality that you are now
competing for a national


championship."
He remains hopeful as the
selection process nears.
'They know who we are,"'
he said about the commit-
tee. 'They know our stats.
We're on the charts,' It


becomes, 'Are we on the
charts high enough?' It's
convincing some of those
people to take the label off
the non-scholarship and
we're just an FCS football
team."


JASOIfMATTHEW WALKER/Lake'City Reporter
South Carolina's Marcus Lattimore (21) scores a touchdown in a game against Florida at Ben
Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on Saturday.

Spurrier sees more work


ahead for South Carolina


By JEFFREY COLLNS
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -
Steve Spurrier doesn't want
his rebuilding job at South
Carolina to end with one
Southeastern Conference
division title.
With two regular sea-
son games and the SEC
title game against Auburn
remaining, Spurrier didn't
want to talk this week about
his legacy with a program
that before he arrived was
one of the league's also-
rans.
That's because he still
has goals to accomplish
well beyond an SEC East
title with the 17th ranked
Gamecocks.
'That's only half of the
SEC. Well worry about the
other half in three weeks,"
Spurrier said.
Spurrier has long said his
plan just wasn't to win a title
and walk away. He wants
to make the Gamecocks a
team to be reckoned with
every year.
"I really wanted to come
to South Carolina for one
reason because South
Carolina had not won much
since 1969," Spurrier said,
referring to the team's only
league title, an Atlantic
Coast Conference cham-
pionship. "Everything was
out there to do for the first-
time."
Thanks to solid recruit-
ing in the last few years,


Spurrier should have
chances to reach plenty of
other goals. Fifteen of South
Carolina's 22 likely starters
in Saturday's.game against
Troy should be back next
season.
That includes all the skill
players on offense, includ-
ing SEC leading receiver
sophomore Alshon Jeffery,.
freshman Marcus Lattimore
- the SEC's second leading
rusher and quarterback
Stephen Garcia.
"Sometimes we kind of
catch ourselves at the end
of the. play looking to see
what is going to happen,"
center T.J. Johnson said.
Johnson is a sophomore
anchoring a much improved
offensive line that will
return three starters. Half
the defensive line should
come back, along with the
entire secondary.
S"The reason we've been
fortunate enough to win
the East is the ability to
recruit," Spurrier said.
Lattimore appears to be
the prize recruit of them
all. Spurrier, who can be
quite stingy with his praise,
hasn't stopped heaping
compliments on the fresh-
man.
"Without him running
the ball, I don't know what
our record would be right
now," Spurrier said.
Lattimore has 964 rush-
ing yards this year. With
four more games to go, he
is just 170 yards away from


ending up third in yards for
a season for the Gamecocks,
only trailing George Rogers
in 1979 and his Heisman
Trophy year of 1980.
JohnsonfiguresLattimore
will be in the Heisman
Trophy discussion before
the end of,his Gamecocks
career.
"We want Marcus to get
as much recognition as he
possibly can," Johnson said.
"Marcus makes us look,
like I said, a lot better than
we've been doing. We just
want to get him as much
recognition and get him as
many yards as possible."
And when teams start
keying on Lattimore,
it eases the pressure on
Jeffery, who has emerged
as one of the best receivers
in the SEC.
Jeffery has 1,087 yards
receiving this season, just
56 yards behind Sidney
Rice's season record set
in 2005. In just 23 games,
the sophomore trails South
Carolina's career receiving
mark by less than 1,000
yards.
'Those guys are fantas-
tic players," offensive line-
man Hutch Eckerson said.
"They make everybody
look good."
Having talented players at
two positions gives opposing
coaches fits. Troy defensive
coordinator Jeremy Rowell
knows what will happens if
his team tries too hard to
stop Lattimore.


Miami athletics getting


$5 million for facilities


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES -
Miami's athletic depart-
ment has received the
largest gift in its history,
a $5 million donation ear-
marked toward substan-
tially upgrading facilities
for the university's 400 stu-
dent-athletes.
SThe gift from the Ted
& Todd Schwartz Family
Foundation will help pro-
vide a new academic center
for members of Hurricane
sports teams, a larger
sports medicine facility, a
new football locker room
and a gallery of champi-
ons. The deal is scheduled
to be announced Friday.
Preliminary details
obtained by The Associated
Press show the total cost
of the project is planned
at $13.6 million, of which
$10.5 million had already
been raised.
"The generosity of
the Schwartz Family will
sustain the University of
Miami in its spot among
the top premier athletics
programs in the nation by
expanding and renovating


the resources and facilities
we offer to current and
future student-athletes,"
university president Donna
Shalala said; .
Miami has long been,
maligned for not having
state-of-the-art facilities,
and changing that percep-
tion has been a point of
emphasis for the university
for the past several years.
The university created
what it called 'The Sprint
for Hurricane Athletics" in
2007, a plan to raise more
than $70 million for all of
Miami's programs.
Some of the work has
already been done: The
baseball stadium, largely
through a gift from New
York Yankees third base-
man and Miami trustee
Alex Rodriguez, has been
upgraded, as have the facil-
ities for track, soccer and
tennis. The Hurricanes'
basketball teams now prac-
tice in a new fieldhouse as
well.
'Ted & Todd Schwartz's
gift ensures our future
ability to sustain ath-
letic excellence in this
age of continued facility
growth and enhancement


throughout the college ath-
letics landscape," Miami
athletic director Kirby
Hocutt said.:': .7
The' new. facility wilL.be
*known as the Theodore
G. Schwartz and Todd
G. Schwartz Center for
Athletic Excellence. It will
be an expansion and reno-
vation of the current Hecht
Athletic Center.
Plans for the new facility
include a 120-seat audito-
rium, classrooms, tutoring
rooms, labs for computer,
math and science study,
as well as staff offices,
study spaces, the football
locker room and a lounge
for the football team. The
sports medicine facility
will expand to three times
its current size, with new
in-ground hydrotherapy
pools, digital imaging and
rehabilitation space.
Ted Schwartz founded
and chairs the board of
APAC Customer Services,
based in Illinois. His son
T6dd Schwartz is direc-
tor of the family founda-
tion and founder and
president of Beach Coast
Properties and Opportunity
Financial.


INDIANS: Left Thursday for practice


Continued From Page 11

offenses and we will see
which one will prevail,"
Jackson said. "It is hurry-
up vs. slow-it-down."
Fort White's rushing
game puts points on the
board and also serves to
keep the opposition off the
field.
"We have got to take care
of the ball and keep good
field position," Jackson
said. "We need to make
them drive down the field
and not give up the big
play. If we do that, we have
a chance to win."
With ball control and good


defense by his team, Jackson
said Catholic's firepower
could work against them.
'They have been in big
,games and are putting up
some numbers," Jackson
said. 'Teams that like to
score in a hurry generally
make mistakes when they
have to drive the ball. We
have got to capitalize."
The IndiansleftThursday
and stayed in Milton. They
had a practice run-through
at Florida State.
In addition to Fort
White's game, the top half
of the 2B state bracket


I aGet 0or0,,c

r w. "-i'


has Walton High at Taylor
County High, Yulee High
at Trinity Catholic High
and Mount Dora High at
Bolles School.
Directions: Take
Interstate 10 west to
Interstate 110 south (exit
12); go to Fairfield Drive/
State Road 295 exit; turn
right on Fairfield Drive;
take a left on W Street; go
to first red'light, which is
Scott Street; school is on
right; turn right in front of
school and the parking lots
are on the west and behind
the school.


www,lakecityreporter.com
S Lake City
., ., Reporter


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420







SPORTS Fe:'AY O:Ea'--'l y9z
)* _ta .i= ~ c, . =


Pressure on points leader

Hamlin going into finale


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denny Hamlin (front) drives into a turn ahead of Kurt Busch, (center) and Carl Edwards
during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Phoenix International Raceway on
Sunday in Avondale, Ariz.


By JENNA FRYER

CORAL GABLES Look
out, Denny Hamlin. Jimmie
Johnson and Kevin Harvick
are right behind you and
they're making sure you
know it.
With the title up for
grabs in Sunday's season
finale, Johnson and Harvick
are doing their best to turn
up the heat on NASCAR's
points leader.
Johnson, the four-time
defending series cham-
pion, was his usual model
of California cool during
Thursday's news confer-
ence to preview the closest
title race in Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship


history. Harvick was his
typically mischievous self,
lacing every question with
blunt honesty and never
.-.-ini on an opportunity
to needle the competition
- well, mostly just Hamlin.
"This has been one of the
most awkward 30 minutes
I've been through," Hamlin
squirmed about halfway
through the session.
Stuck on a podium
between the two drivers
trying to stop him from win-
ning his first NASCAR title,
Hamlin didn't participate in
the generally good-natured
- but pointed mudsling-
ing being tossed at him
from both sides.
What a way for Hamlin to
spend his 30th birthday!


"He definitely seems like
the most nervous." Harvick
said, nodding at Hamlin.
"For us. I mean, we have
nothing to lose. This guy
does." Johnson said, putting
his arm around Hamlin.
On and on it went for
more than an hour, as read-
ing body language became
important during the many
awkward silences.
Harvick made at least two
jokes about Hamlin using
the same carburetor he had
last week in Phoenix, when
his car was unable to make
it to the finish on fuel. The
gaffe cost Hamlin a more
sizable lead in the stand-
ings heading into Sunday's
race at Homestead-Miami
Speedway.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


I .-11


? ;,'.. <'.


I L *,,.






LAKE CITY FEPORTER


SPORTS


=A \~..VEMBER 19. 2010


-, -,ilk,.L




s~sS~af ^* el- -141!aA f

--..


indian'

ph of the week
of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/La.ke~ity Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon (11) points to the sky after scoring a touchdown against 4
Bradford High on Nov. 6.


Return to the playoffs


after missing out
on the playoffs
last year, Fort
White High
-Jis returning
to the postseason for the
fourth time in the school's
11-year history.
The Indians will play at
Pensacola Catholic High at
7:30 p.m. CST on Friday.
For Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
it will be the third playoff
appearance in his four
years at the helm. Jackson


also guided the Indians to
the playoffs in 2007-08.
Fort White first made
the playoffs in 2002 under
Mike Hunter, who coaches
the middle school team.
Pensacola Catholic
has been the first-round '
opponent in all four trips
and leads the series 2-1.
Jackson's team in 2007
posted Fort White's only
playoff victory.
The Indians finished the
2010 regular season at 7-3,
with two losses


coming to Taylor County
and Madison County and
both high schools are
undefeated. The other
loss came to powerhouse
North Florida Christian
School, which had a down
year by its standards.
Fort White went 4-1
in district with wins over
Bradford, East Gadsden,
Union County and FSU
high schools.
The Indians also beat
Suwannee, Santa Fe and
Newberry high schools.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High quarterback Andrew Baker (12) discusses a play with offensive coaches
Demetric Jackson (from left), Chad Bonds and Isiah Phillips.


LUUKItSbY PMUlU
Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson shows the 'Paddle' with players and cheerleaders.


2010 Indians Football Schedule


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0
Fort White 14, Newberry 13
Fort White 52, Suwannee 22
Fort White 31 Union County 12
N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28
Fort White 30, Florida High 27
Fort White 28, East Gadsden 14
Taylor Co. 38, Fort White 21


Fort White 27, Bradford 22
Fort White 30, Sante Fe 7


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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


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-


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
yogg ao& P RA7AeYW P /H
SA A47Y, tMfGoop0NW,/


DEAR ABBY


Man seeks words of comfort

for sister unlucky in love


I MISS
... AND THE DAYS
- IT JUST LHEN
CRASHED. WE HAD
BRIEF
WUINDOWJS
OF SUCCESS.

Sto^ \
a' _
I-i


DEAR ABBY: I'm a
33-year-old male who has
finally found the love of
my life. My girlfriend and
I have been together for
three years. Needless to
say, an engagement is right
around the corner.
I have a sister who has
struggled her entire life dat-
ing the wrong men. She's
beautiful inside and out
She called me last night
crying, asking me why men
always cheat on her.
Most people would as-
sume that the use of the
word "always" is an exag-
geration. I would have to
say that 90 percent of her
boyfriends, have indeed,
cheated on her one way or
another whether it was
in high school, or when she
dated a race car driver or,
more recently, an acquain-
tance of mine.
What can I say to reas-
sure her that there are
some good guys left in this
world who won't cheat?
- LOOKING FOR AN-
SWERS FOR SIS
DEAR LOOKING FOR
ANSWERS: Tell your sis-
ter that there are men with
character who take rela-
tionships seriously. They
may notbe as glamorous as
a race car driver, or flashy
or glib, but they have more
important qualities to of-
fer. Point out that when
one man after another is


if I can handle that I'm ask-
ing for advice on how to
handle these events now.
I do not have family near
me but an amazing circle
of friends for support I just
know that I'm going to slip
into a world of sadness that
I'm afraid I won't come out
of. My problems may seem
minor in light of today's
issues, but I do need guid-
ance. SELFISH IN LAS
VEGAS
DEAR SELFISH: The
concerns you are feeling
are not "selfish." They are
normal, if. somewhat pre-
mature.
You are fortunate to have
your parents and grandpar-
ents in your life if only
through phone calls and
e-mails. You are also lucky
to have supportive friends
nearby.
The hardest part of
grieving the loss of a loved
one is regret about words
that were never said. So tell
your parents and grandpar-
ents often how much you
love and appreciate them.
See them when you can.
And continue to be the kind
of person of whom they can
be proud; because when
they are gone, YOU will be
their legacy.

* Write Dear.Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Use a little more:
aggression but don't be-
come stubborn. You need
to find a balance that allows
you to finish what you are
doing without upsetting
someone with whom you
deal regularly. Financial-
gain is apparent ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Emotional op-
portunities can turn your
life around. The more infor-
mation you have, the easier
it will be to make the right
move. A money matter can
lead to a disagreement
Make sure you pay old
debts. ***
GEMINI (May21-June
20): Lay your plans out for
everyone to see. There will
be strength in numbers. En-
joying what you are doing
to earn a living or falling for
someone you work with are
both likely. Don't compro-
mise. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Give greater
thought and time to improv-
ing your skills and adding
to what you have to offer.
Advancement can be yours
if you are open about your
plans and get everything in
writing. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You have to give your
own presentation if you ex-
pect to get ahead. Someone


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

is likely to make you look
bad in order.to gain control.
Don't underestimate the
competition. You have to
keep a close watch on what
others do and offer. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): The changes you want
to make will be opposed.
Hidden costs may take you
by surprise if you haven't
been keeping a close tab'on
everything. An argument
can easily change the fam-
ily dynamics, leading to an
irreversible problem that
may need legal or psycho-
logical help to mend. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): A relationship may
cost you but, in the end, it
will be worth every penny
you spent Changes at home
will lead to a happy environ-
ment and a better lifestyle.
Your dedication will pay off
and will enhance your repu-
tation. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): This is the per-
fect time to put your game
plan to work. Present your
skills to people who can
use your services. You can
make change happen if you
are innovative in the way
you approach tasks. ***
SAG1ITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Being secre-


tive will spare you grief. If
you are too open about what
you want to see happen or
what you plan to do, you will
face all sorts of problems.
You could alienate someone
you want to continue to have
in your life. Don't cause un-
necessary friction. ~**
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Youll have
more control working be-
hind the scenes and doing
things that are not visible
to your colleagues, friends
or family. The element of
surprise is the best way to
get what you want Make
sure you have a well laid out
plan. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Overspending
on things you don't need
will come back to haunt you
when someone comes by
to collect an old debt. Don't
leave yourself in a precari-
ous position that might af-
fect your credit or reputa-
tion. Love is in the stars.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You can get
ahead professionally if you
work hard and approach
people in a position to help
you. Letting people know
what you are capable of
doing will aid you in find-
ing a position with greater
responsibility and higher
income. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals U
"N ZLFLK XLIH ONXHLB. N AENB
ZJ EHH LZHNJZ NZ DNOD YP DJJI .
JZP L, N OJ H LF L K C GJ KB G KJZO
JZ E Y A L I INZO HLYH." H J Z C
PSK H NY
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "My art springs from my desire to have things in the
world which would otherwise never be there." Sculptor Carl Andre
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-19


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
unfaithful, it can damage a
woman's, self-esteem. And
when that happens it can
make her insecure and will-
ing to suspend her better
judgment out of fear that
she'll be alone.
Explain that women with
high self-esteem receive
more respect because they
won't settle for less, and
that they don't jump into
relationships they wait
for a man to prove himself.
Men value more highly
what they have to work for.
Perhaps that will help to set
her straight.
DEAR ABBY: I have
lived an amazing life sur-
rounded by family, friends
and loved ones. My parents
and maternal grandparents
are still active in my daily
life. Because I am so close
to all of them I'm scared,
worried and sometimes
downright depressed at
the thought of losing any of
them.
I know in the circle of
life, death should -be ac-
cepted as the next great
'adventure, but-I don't know


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


m


CLASSIC PEANUTS











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19. 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
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porter.com





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In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.coin


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-02-DP
B. D., DOB: 9/24/2008
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Brian Johnson
Address Unknown
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
clerk of court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on DECEMBER 8,
2010, at 10 A.M., for a Termination
of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT********
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 9th day of No-
vember 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Trish Brewington
Deputy Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In accord-
ance with the Americans With Disa-
bilities Act, if you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake ,City,; Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
04542322
November 12, 19, 26, 2010
December 3, 2010

010 Announcements









060 Services
Looking for elder persons in need
of 24 hr care in my home.
Certified Nursing Ass't,
in Jasper, FL, 386-792-3149


070 Rewards
WANTED: Need to speak to man
that witnessed accident at the
intersection of Baya & Main St.,
11/9/10, 8 PM,Robin 832-7174


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming.
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

*** SPECIAL***
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.


Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars. Implements, Small Engines.
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890


100 Job
Opportunities
(A, F2
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake Cit\ branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing. cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary.
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

04542407
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
fulltime Collector in Lake City.
Experience preferred dealing
with delinquent accounts or
solid administrative and
customer service skills.
Full benefits package.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City; FL. 32056 or email resume
to Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05524481
DETAILER
Large Manufacturing Company
has the following position
available in the Lake City,
Florida, facility:
DETAILER/CHECKER
Graduate with AS degree or
experience in the steel joist
industry. Responsibilitities
include drafting and detailing of
joist and deck drawings. Must
have AutoCAD experience.
Company offers a highly
professional environment with
tremendous growth opportunity
and competitive salary commen-
surate with experience.
Excellent benefit package.
Qualified applicants submit
cover letter and resume in
confidence to:
Jan Tryon
Sjan.tryon@newmill.com

05524485
-' Medical Biller'Needed
Several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please e-mail resume to :
mafaisalmd@Gmail.com
or fax 386-758-5987

BULLDOZER OPERATOR
Part time, references required,
Call FJ. Hill Construction
386-752-7887
Customer Support Job Pay $300-
$600 a week,could work from
home later on 95% of support is by
email.Emailtrueloss@gmail.com.
Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609


Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St, Lake City, FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
Local mortgage company is
looking for an outbound phone
salesperson. Please don't apply
unless highly motivated & strong
salesperson. Call 386-243-0878.
Pestmasters Services is seeking
F/T exp Pest Control Tech.
Certification A + but not required,
Please call 386-752-7779 for appt


practice. Send reply to Box 05058.
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Homecare LPN's needed 9a-6p
and CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare 352-291-4888


141 Babysitters
Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience. will provide lots of
love and attention. F/T or P/T.
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

240 Schools &
2 4 Education

045422-iS
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. S479
next class-11/29/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion. $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

wwwlakecityreporter.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $45 386-752-0987
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300. AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
S Supplies
Baby Pigs for sale
ready in Dec
call for details
386-965-2215
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
SOLD
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fur., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


S408 Furniture
COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo '
(904)704-9377
Craftmatic full size elec adj bed
w/vibrating feature, includes
mattress and 5 piece bedrm suite
$400 752-2572 leave message

414A Needlecraft
14 & Sewing
Quilting Frame
4ft. wide wood
$125.00
386-752-0987


420 Wanted to Buy
GUITARS WANTED
Gibson, Fender, Etc.
Cash paid will travel.
(407)733-1687
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Larger small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


Fri 8am Sat 8-12. Columbia City
on 47S. Collectibles, china, linen,
old book, name brand clothes,
lamps, much more. Rain cancels






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only, 7 AM,tools, clothes,
dishes, misc., RV stuff, tow dolly,
Irg dining rm table (Woodcrest
Subdiv) 231 SW Crest Glen
Sat. 8-?. 47S right on King turns
into Mauldin take sharp right to
Tangle Ct. Hshold, furn., girls
clothes & women plus sz, more.
Saturday 7:00am Emerald Forest
(off 247), end of Stanley Ct. Baby
furn., clothes, & toys, along
with household items items.

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties.
386-752-6896 386-697-6420


530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt,
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098
386-965-3110

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month.
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410


630 (Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's. small park.
near LCCC. Small pets ok, $500
dep S575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Large 3/2 DW, very new.
South of town on 441.
$650. mo.
386-208-4702
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/I BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

40 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras
386-752-4258
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940

710 Unfurnished Apt.
71v For Rent
5523977
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $530 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer -
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrd chk,
352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Nice Efficiency Room. Private
entrance. $400. mo plus deposit
Everything furnished. No pets.
386-758-5671 or 386-965-0778
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
I3J Home For Rent

04542292
For Rent-
3/2 home on Baya Ave.
convenient to shopping, schools
and churches. $790./mo with
$790./security. First month's
rent reduced to $395.00
for qualified tenant.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
386-365-5884.


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

0o524427
Move in for Christmas. lease to
own. 3000 sq ft. 4 br. 3 ba.. new
model home, nice sub div. 2
miles S. of city limit. 5 % int.
tax deduc. consider trade-ins.
386-752-1364

2 br/lba House w/yard.
near airport. $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace.
appliances, security & $700 mon..
386-590-0642' or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperies.com
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $850 mo. 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellbom,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment, .
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

740 Furnished
740 Homes for Rent
Completely Renovated furnished
'1 bdrnflihfse on private property.
Water included. No pets,
$350. mio 386-752-8755

750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

805. Lots for Sale

5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
Newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!!!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES

Our Advertising deadline will be
Closed: Friday,November 26 will deadline Wednesday, November24fa.m.
Disp Friday, November 26 will deadline Monday, November22
Saerday November 27 will deadline Tuesday, November 23
SdayB Noveber 28 will deadline Tuesday, November 23


o ) our emplo. ees can enjo.
Thanksgiving %%ith their families,
the Lake City Reporter will be closed.
Thursday. Noi ember 2.5th. 2010.

We will he back in the office on
Friday, November 26th for our
customer s convenience.
Thank Yiu and
Have a Great Thanksgiving


REPORTER Classifieds Medical

In Print and On Line 120 Employment
WWW.lakeCityrp ter.Ca Ou F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
WWilakec iyrepureriom MA needed M-F for busy medical


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


IBUYI
Itwiill^
S E L L T



Fj^IND1I4







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 2010


810 Home for Sale
Ov.ncr finance. MH ,. 4/2 on
3-ac.quiet. tenced. S. of Lake
(Cit. mrall dow n. S800 mo
36-8667-1833/386-590-06(42
Svu, V.,u A v ancc'. alle. propertiesi.com

820 Farms&
Acreage

10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling. grassed field. 3 miles E
of Col City School. 5% interest
S495 per month. 386-752-1364
4 1/2 acre lot. Lakb Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Ov. ner Financing! NO DOWN!
69.9j(XSo 5613mo 352-215-1018.
w w.v.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac..Ft White. Well. Septic &
Power. Owner Financing'
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only S613./mo 352-215-1018.
w w.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High. dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
830 Commercial
0 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
S386-965-2215


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Contact us

at the paper,


CLASSIFED ADS "
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


All OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


BECTRONIC ADS SENDBO
as ecityreporter.wf

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10 CEast DurvalSt
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Fabulous Home on Innsbruck Golf Couse


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$360,000
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1, .. Paradise P


ADVERTI1E IT HiERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad.
Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the
picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.

- A A


Q H I I X B E F F J
U E A T U D Y F S
B B C S I U V B A
E R E Q D C-N I Y
U A P K G U X IL Y
V F O H F M O E G L


A+ EveCare

SEyeglasses
Contacts
f- Exams
S Sunglasses



555-5555


For mra7


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H C
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S E


B I G V N
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