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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01455
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/18/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01455
System ID: UF00028308:01455
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Postseason

Happiness
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Thursday, November 18, 2010 w


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SVol. 136, No. 259 e 75 cents


Officials eye tax abatement, instead of rebates


County to launch
moves attracting
new businesses.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county is ready to
switch gears from allow-
ing tax rebates to offering
tax abatement instead in its
efforts to attract new busi-
nesses.


The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will hold a
public hearing before vot-
ing on a new ordinance
creating ad valorem tax
exemption for economic
development purposes at
its meeting today.
The ordinance establish-
es parameters for future
tax abatement requests
and provides for abatement
to be carried out in accor-


dance with
Florida .
statute:
Dale
Williams,
county
manager,
said the Williams
county has
usually performed exemp-
tions by rebate in the past.
Offsetting property taxes
for companies is a tool
the county uses to bring


new business to the area,
Williams said. The proce-
dure, voted on every 10
years by county residents,
was passed again in the


recent election.
Rather than a company
paying its taxes and the
county refunding a portion
through a rebate, abate-


ment deletes the tax liabil-
ity from the tax bill.
"So no money will actu-
ally transfer or change
hands," Williams said,
"thus eliminating the pos-
sibility of mistakes."
Williams said abatement
is an easier process to
accomplish the same goal.
"If you look at the
mechanics of how it's done,
ABATEMENT continued on 3A


DRAMA IN PRINT


Local artist unveils 2011 Olustee poster


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
John Dubi (center), 21, one of the three models featured in the 2011 Olustee poster, tells his friends about his experience
modeling for the dramatic scene. 'I think it's amazing how he can make this out of a simple still shot,' Dubi said. 'He wanted
more expressions and deeper feelings. It felt good to put them into this.' Pictured are Adrian Cox McCabe (from left), Tyler
Dasilva, 15, Brad Cox, Dubi, Cody Gray and his wife, Tierney.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com


he 2011 Olustee Poster was a slight
departure from what local artist
Duffy Soto has created in the past,
he said. Most of his posters show
emotion.


"This is drama," Soto
said. "It added drama to
the emotion."
Soto unveiled "Shell-
Shocked" at the Blue
Grey Army meeting
Wednesday. The poster
was created for the 33rd
Annual Olustee Battle
Festival and 35th Olustee
Battle Reenactment
scheduled for Feb. 18-
20, 2011 at the Olustee
Battlefield.
Three models were fea-
tured in the poster: John
Dubi, Tyler Dasilva and
Zach Pennington.
The poster has two of
the models portraying
brothers, one from the
North and the other from
the South, he said.
The brothers went off


into the war thinking it
would be glamorous, but
experiences changed that
outlook, which is part of
being shell-shocked.
'They see things they
can't forget," Soto said.
The background of the
poster includes an appari-
tion of a horse rider com-
ing through flames and
a cannoneer with every-
thing ablaze.
SIt made no difference
what side a soldier was
on, Soto said.
"The emotions are the
same," he said.
It takes the full year for
him to create the event's
poster, Soto said.
"I put a lot into the
poster because it can't
speak," he said.


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Local artist Duffy Soto speaks about the 2011. Olustee Poster
'Shell-Shocked' after unveiling it at the Blue Grey Army meet-
ing on Wednesday.
JASON MATTHEW
SWALKER/Lake City
Reporter
Soto presents
,, an autographed
S' version of
the poster to
SSusan Lance,
Vice president
and marketing
director for First
SFederal Bank of
Florida.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/
Lake City Reporter
Joshua
Robertson, 10
and Joanna
Robertson,
5, prepare
their boxes
to be sent off
for Operation
Christmas
Child.


Shoe-box program

aims to spread joy

to kids worldwide


Christmas project
to distribute toys,
candies arid Bible.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Shoe box donations
for Operation Christmas
Child are being collected
from now until Nov. 22.
This year's goal is more
than 17,180 gift-filled shoe
boxes, said Bob Pettigrew,
Live Oak Area Operation
Christmas Child drop-off
point coordinator.


Operation Christmas
Child is a project of
Samaritan's.Purse, a disas-
ter relief organization.
It was established in 1993.
"It's a special collection
of shoe boxes to send all
over the world to children
who've never received a
gift before," said Pettigrew.
Standard-size shoe boxes
or plastic containers are
filled with school supplies,
personal items, hard candy,
small toys and more. Bible
tracts are also placed inside
PROGRAM continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Rachel Mabile balances a tray of food at the Lake City Moose
Lodge No. 624 Wednesday.

Moose Lodge offers

Golden Age dinner

for seniors, children


Group cooks food
for community's
elderly residents.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.conm
The Lake City Moose
Lodge's Golden Age Dinner
is something Edna Honer
of Lake City doesn't want to
miss each year.
"It's wonderful," she said.
"They give us a great din-
ner that couldn't be beat."
Honer joined more than


130 people at the annual
pre-Thanksgiving dinner
at Lake City Moose Lodge
No. 624 Wednesday.
The lodge has been host-
ing its Golden Age Dinner
for 25 years, said Robert
Ford, Moose Lodge gov-
ernor. The organization's
main focus is taking care of
children and the elderly.
"It's a community servic-
es we started for the elder-
ly," he said. "It's got bigger
and bigger."
LODGE continued on 3A


I 11 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


73
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3B
S Puzzles ................. 2B
Health. ................. 6A


AROUND
FLORIDA
Experts: BP
ignored signs.


COMING
FRIDAY
County commission
meeting coverage.


"If you look at the mechanics
of how it's done, it's easier to do
the abatement, so why not do
the easier way?"

Dale Williams
County manager


EalLIIW









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010


(ASH 3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 5-1-3
Evening: 8-2-0


.,. .4-' Wednesday:
Afternoon: 1-9-9-0
Evening: 1-8-4-0


eozatczh.
Tuesday:
8-15-25-26-29


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Eva Longoria, Tony Parker to divorce


LOS ANGELES



Eva Longoria filed court
papers Wednesday to
divorce basketball star
Tony Parker, citing irrec-
oncilable differences.
Longoria, a star of TVs "Desperate
Housewives," and Parker, an NBA All-
Star with the San Antonio Spurs, were
married July 7, 2007. They have no
children together.
In the filing, Longoria requested
that her name be restored to Eva
Jacqueline Longoria. She had taken
Parker's name when they married.
The filing also stated the couple had
a prenuptial agreement but no details
were provided.
Longoria asked the court to require
each side pay its own attorney fees.
She also wants to receive spousal sup-
port from Parker but not pay any to
him.
Longoria's spokeswoman, Liza
Anderson, said the actress had no
comment Parker wasn't immediately
available for comment
Longoria, 35, did not indicate in the
court filings when the couple broke
up.
Parker, 28, signed a multiyear exten-
sion with the Spurs two weeks ago. At
the time, the point guard from France
insisted he and Longoria wanted to
remain in San Antonio.
The former couple each posted a
statement on their Twitter accounts
addressing the divorce. "We love
each other deeply and pray for each
other's happiness," the posting said.

Lady A's Hillary Scott
buys her first house
NASHVILLE, Tenn. As if Hillary
Scott of Lady Antebellum didn't have
enough to celebrate, she's now an offi-
cial homeowner.
Scott could barely contain her
excitement as she gushed about her


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 5, 2009, file photo, actress Eva Longoria, left, and her husband, NBA
basketball player Tony Parker, watch a semifinal match of the French Open ten-
nis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Longoria filed for divorce
Wednesday morning in Los Angeles Superior Court citing irreconcilable differences.


new purchase.
"I just signed the papers on my
house, the first house ever. Like it's
finalized today. So I'm celebrating that,
too," she said before the CMA Awards
on Wednesday in Nashville, beaming.
The responsibility of owning a
home was only just beginning to sink
in for the 24-year-old.
"I'm like, 'Welcome to being a
grown-up, Hillary.' You know? It's like,
'Oh my gosh, now I have a mortgage.'
This is scary," she said.
Her bandmate, guitarist Dave
Haywood didn't have any advice to
give her. He still rents a condo. But
her other group member, singer
Charles Kelley, owns a home with his
wife and provided a dose of reality.
"Its something all the time, I can
tell her that right there," he said with a
knowing smile.
The group won CMA vocal group
of the year and single of the year for
their hit "Need You Now."


Springsteen covers
Willow's 'Whip My Hair'
NEW YORK If you needed
any more proof that Willow Smith's
"Whip My Hair" is the sensation of the
moment, look no further: The Boss
has performed his own acoustic ver-
sion of it
The moment came Tuesday night
during a skit on "Late Night With
Jimmy Fallen" with Fallen doing a
spot-on impression of Neil Young sing-
ing the dance groove as a folk song.
Moments later, Springsteen came
out wearing sunglasses and a fake
beard, and chimed in with his own
slow growl.
"Whip My Hair" is the debut song
from 9-year-old Willow. She's the
daughter of Will Smith arid Jada
Pinkett Smith.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Brenda Vaccaro
is 71.
* Author-poet Margaret
Atwood is 71.
* Actress Linda Evans is 68.
M Actress Susan Sullivan is
68.
* Country singer Jacky Ward
is 64.
* Actor Delroy Lindo is 58.
* Comedian Kevin Nealon


is 57.
* Pro Football Hall of Fame
quarterback Warren Moon
is 54.
* Actress Elizabeth Perkins
is 50.
* Singer Kim Wilde is 50.
* Rock musician Kirk
Hammett (Metallica) is 48.
* Actor Owen Wilson is 42.
* Actor Mike Epps is 40.


Daily Scripture


"Your word is a lamp for my
feet, a light on my path."



Psalm 119:105


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-
Circulation .............. 755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Rej
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to repo
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers s
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 1030 a.m. to report
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery.
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service vice error for same dayre-delivery
No. 310-880. 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery o
vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home de
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, I l other counties where home de
Lake City, Fla. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery o
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@ akectyreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $;
24 Weeks ................... $
ADVERTISING 52 Weeks................... $&
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417 Rates indude 7% sales tax
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $4
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks...................$8
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks ..................$1


0419


porter
a.m.
y 730

rt any

should
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26.32
18.79
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11.40
82.80
'9.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Experts: BP
ignored signs

WASHINGTON BP
and its contractors missed
and ignored warning signs
before to the massive oil
well blowout in the Gulf of
Mexico, showing an "insuf-
ficient consideration of
risk" and raising questions
about the know-how of key
personnel, a group of tech-
nical experts concluded.
In a 28-page report
released late Tuesday
night, an independent panel
convened. by the National
Academy of Engineering
said that the companies
failed to learn from "near
misses" and that neither
BP, its contractors nor fed-
eral regulators caught or
corrected flawed decisions
that contributed to the
blowout.
Those failures would be
unacceptable in compa-
nies that work with nucle-
ar power or aviation, said
Donald Winter, a professor
of engineering practice at
the University of Michigan
and chairman of the 15-
member study committee.
"A great number of deci-
sions, all of which appear
to us to be questionable
... also appeared to be jus-
tified by those individu-
als and those companies
involved," Winter said
Wednesday in an interview
with The Associated Press.
"In an operation like this
you have to recognize the
uncertainties of where you
are going."
BP, and its contractors,
apparently did not have
such recognition, Winter
said.

Firefighters
tackle brush fire

TITUSVILLE A por-
tion of US 1 in the central
Florida area was shut down
due to low visibility from
a brush fire and fog near


MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


HI 73 HI 73 HI 76 48 H 4977 51
H173LO HI73L044 H76L48 H177.L049 HI77L051


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A panel with representatives from BP, Transocean and
Halliburton prepare to give their views before the National
Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and
Offshore Drilling, during the panel's public hearing in
Washington Monday.


the Brevard-Volusia county
line.
The Florida Highway
Patrol said the major road
was shut down Wednesday
morning from County Line
Ditch Road to Coral Road.
Stuckey Road was also shut
down from Interstate 95 to
US 1.
-Authorities had to shut
down a 13-mile stretch of
1-95 Tuesday evening for
several hours after a con-
trolled burn got out of
control. A company had
been contracted to clear
land for a Titusville water-
main project, but fire res-
cue says winds picked up
and started a small brush
fire that grew to about 500
acres.
Authorities said the fire
was 25 percent contained
late Tuesday. Efforts to
combat the fire were slow
due to.strong winds.

Accused horse
killer pleads guilty


MIAMI


- A man


accused of slaughtering
horses in Miami pleaded
guilty to armed burglary,
killing a registered breed
horse and other charges.
Santiago Cabrera entered
his plea Wednesday. He will
be sentenced Dec. 17.
The 20-year-old Cabrera
and another person are


accused of breaking into
two farms last summer and
slaughtering several hors-
es.
Horse meat is illegal to
sell, but authorities believe
there's a thriving black
market.
Prosecutors had pre-
viously offered a 5-year
prison term during plea
negotiations for Cabrera. If
convicted at trial, he could
have faced up to life in
prison.

Bicyclist hit by
Jeep is killed

TAMPA A 64-year-old
bicyclist was struck and
killed by a vehicle, making
him the area's ninth cyclist
to be killed in the past three
and a half months.
Florida Highway Patrol
troopers said the man was
struck by a Jeep at 5:15 a.m.
Tuesday. He has not yet
been identified and authori-
ties are investigating.
Officials said the bike
didn't have lights and he
wasn't wearing a helmet.
Troopers said the bicy-
clist and Jeep, driven by
Kenneth Brown of Tampa,
were northbound on U.S.
41 when the Jeep's front
struck the bike from
behind.


Tallahassee *
72/39
Pensacola *
69/49 Panama City
70/48


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


VadMosta
71/39 -
Lake City,
73/40
Gainesville .
73/42
Ocala
,74/44


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. .auderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesvllle
Jacksonville


Orlando Cape Canaveral Key est
78/53 76/57 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
82/64 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
,. 84/69 Pensacola
SNaples Tallahassee
81/59 Miami Tampa
,y We 84/68 Valdosta
y West* W. Palm Beach
32/71


Nov. Dec. Dec.
28 5 13
Last New First


On this date in
1955, Helena,
Mont., experienced
138 consecutive
hours of sub-
zero temperatures,
including a reading
of 29 below zero,
which surpassed
by seven degrees
their previous record
for the month of
November.


{ .v Forecasts, data and graph-
Ice 2010 Weather Central
i %. -4 LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


SaJcksonville
\72/45

Daytona Beach
75/52
\


Friday
75/61/s
75/58/s
80/70/s
80/60/s
73/46/s
71/48/s
78/67/s
73/44/s
80/68/s
80/61/s
75/47/s
78/58/s
70/51/s
70/52/s
72/45/s
78/61/s
72/44/s
79/65/s


Tampa
76/54


Ft Myer
80/57

K


Saturday
75/60/s
76/58/pc
79/69/s
80/60/s
75/50/pc
73/52/pc
79/69/s
76/48/pc
80/68/s
81/62/s
77/51/pc
79/58/pc
73/55/s
72/57/pc
75/50/s
80/61/s
74/51/s
79/64/s


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


75
60
74
51
89 in 1957
26 in 1970


0.00"
0.44"
38.86"
1.19"
44.82"


6:58 a.m.
5:33 p.m.
6:59 a.m.
5:32 p.m.


3:26 p.m.
4:03 a.m.
4:01 p.m.
4:59 a.m.


5
MODEIME*
30niteslbbum
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Nov.
21
Full


-I


Thursday 7p friday



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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


9i FRI


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4









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010


Florida lawmakers override 8 Crist vetoes


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida law-
makers overrode eight of lame-
duck Gov. Charlie Crist's vetoes,
the first overrides in 12 years,
during a tightly scripted special
session that took just under three
hours Tuesday.
The Republican-controlled
Legislature also appropriated
$31.3 million in federal stimulus
money and passed a nonbinding
but contentious Medicaid resolu-


tion.
The vetoed measures originally
passed earlier this year with little
or no opposition and they were
overridden the same way, easily
getting the required two-thirds
vote in each chamber.
Legislative leaders earlier
agreed not to take up vetoes of
divisive bills on abortion, teacher
merit pay and tenure and elec-
tions.
A unanimous override restored
a $9.7 million budget item for the
University of Florida's Shands


Teaching Hospital to help pay for
charity patients and attract mil-
lions more in federal matching
money.
The only bill (HB 1565) that
drew debate will expand the
Legislature's authority by giving
it veto power over administrative
rules adopted by the governor
and other executive branch offi-
cials if they have a $1 million eco-
nomic effect over five years.
"That's a real cost to real peo-
ple," said Rep. Chris Dorworth
(R-Lake Mary).


Opponents argued the
Legislature will be overwhelmed
with thousands of rules that will
be delayed for months. In his veto
message, Crist said the bill would
infringe on executive authority.
"This is an unworkable idea,"
said Rep. James Waldman (D-
Coconut Creek).
Crist's veto was overridden 99-
21 in the House and 32-7 in the
Senate.
The Medicaid resolution passed
by voice vote in each chamber
after sharp debate although law-


makers won't take binding action
until next year.
It declares the Legislature's
intent to pass a measure that
would let for-profit companies
compete to provide managed care
statewide for low-income and dis-
abled patients. Florida now has
managed care in only five coun-
ties on an experimental basis.
The resolution also asks
Congress for changes in federal
law to reduce cost increases that
states are expecting from the
national health care overhaul.


LODGE: More than 20 volunteers serve meal for Lake City, FortWhite seniors
Continued From Page 1A


Invitations were sent to
Columbia County Senior
Services to reach the
elderly population, Ford
said. Dinner attendees
came from Lake City and
Fort White, and some
meals were delivered to
homebound members of


the lodge.
The menu included
turkey, ham, dressing,
mashed potatoes, green
beans, yams, cranberry
sauce, rolls and a dessert.
Cooking for the din-
ner began 9 a.m. and fin-
ished around 12:30 a.m.


Tuesday.
More than 20 volunteers
helped serve the meal.
The dinner gets people
out and meeting each
other, said Larry Kidd,
assistant legion secretary.
Serving the elderly is what
the lodge is all about.


"It feels good anytime
you help somebody," he
said.
The lodge also hosts a
dinner before Christmas,
Ford said. The seniors
attending the Golden Age
Dinner always enjoy the
event.


"We enjoy it," he said.
"They enjoy it and look
forward to it every year."
Carolyn Wayt of Lake
City has been coming
to the dinner for several
years, she said. Each year
is marvelous.
The dinner provides an


opportunity for a good
lunch as well as fellow-
ship and a good time, she
said. The Moose Lodge is
always doing good things
in the community.
"I say, 'Thank you to
the Moose Lodge,' Wayt
said.


PROGRAM: Shoe boxes will be sent to 130 countries
Continued From Page 1A


the boxes.
"It's a gospel opportu-
nity," said Bonita Mosby,
relay coordinator. "Children
receive a box and a word
about the Bible."
Boxes are collected at
donation sites, taken to pro-
cessing centers and then
distributed to 130 coun-
tries, Pettigrew said.
Last year, 16,198 boxes
were sent from the col-


election area to Operation
Christmas Child. This year
some of the boxes will be
going to Haiti.
"It's a blessing to pack
the box and know it's going
to a child living in dark cir-
cumstances," Mosby said.
Many donors ask chil-
dren to help fill the boxes
with items they would like
to receive.
Mosby's granddaugh-


ter, Joanna Robertson,
5, helped prepare boxes
for Operation Christmas
Child.
"It's really fun,"
Robertson said.
Donations for Operation
Christmas Child can be
dropped off at the Beulah
Baptist Association office,
189 NW Cali Drive, from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today
and Friday; 10 a.m. to 2


p.m. Saturday; 2 to 4 p.m.
Sunday; and 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monday. Collection
sites are also available at all
Ken's Barbecue locations.
Shoe box packing
instructions are available at
www.samaritanspurse.org.
"It's just a blessing to
work with," Pettigrew said.
"It's a blessing to see kids
are getting gifts like they've
never had before."


ABATEMENT: County officials seek to minimize risks


Continued From Page 1A
it's easier to do the abate-
ment, so why not do the
easier way?" he said. 'Then
it does minimize any risk
because if you don't handle
the money to start with, you
can't overcompensate."
All other exemptions
or incentives provided to
businesses locating to the
area will be handled under


separate agreements and in
accordance with state stat-
ute, Williams said.
In other action and dis-
cussion:
The board will discuss
three utility resolutions
dealing with small county
utilities' rate relief, cost-
reduction in processing a
change in rates, reducing


rate shock to customers
and allowing a utility the
opportunity to recover its
operating costs and earn a
return on its investment to
remain viable.
M The board will con-
tinue discussion on leas-
ing its tower on Franklin
Street to the North Florida
Broadband Authority, as


the NFBA wishes to sublet
the tower to a company
that will provide high-speed
wireless Internet services
to county residents.
The board will meet at
7 p.m. at the Columbia
County School Board
Administrative Complex
auditorium, 372 West
Duval St.


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OPINION


Thursday, November 18, 2010


OUR- -


OUR
OPINION


Kirkman

tribute

fitting for

local hero

The story of Michael
Kirkman is a feel-
good story of
how hard work,
dedication and good
character come together in
the achievement of a lifelong
dream.
Kirkman, Lake City's first
resident to play in the World
Series, is an outstanding
example of how a Little League
dream turned into a big league
payoff. Kirkman spent much of
his recreational time as a kid
playing baseball in the youth
leagues in Lake'City. He is a
product of our summer base-
ball leagues and our Columbia
High baseball program. He is a
hometown sports hero and we
salute him.
Kirkman, a 6-foot-5 left-hand-
ed middle reliever, made it to
the 2010 World Series with the
Texas Rangers. A rookie, he
was called up from the minors
in August and made the post-
season roster for the American
League Championship Series
against the Yankees and also
the World Series roster against
the San Francisco Giants. He
saw action on the mound in
both series.
Kirkman was honored with
a street within the Southside
Sports Complex named
Michael Kirkman Boulevard. It
is a fitting tribute for the clean-
cut, soft-spoken 24-year-old.
He was and still is a kid
with a dream.
Now he's living it And he's
an inspiration to the thousands
of youth baseball players who
experience the joy of summer
leagues and have the dream of
someday making it to the major
leagues.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HI STO RY
Today is Thursday, Nov. 18,
the 322nd day of 2010. There
are 43 days left in the year.
In 1886, the 21st president
of the United States, Chester A
Arthur, died in New York.
In 1966, U.S. Roman
Catholic bishops did away with
the rule against eating meat on
Friday outside of Lent

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Change not right for Obama


heard the great Yiddish
writer Isaac Bashevis
Singer read from his work
in the late-1980s, only a
few years before his death.
Although Singer was already
frail at the time, he read his
short stories with considerable
strength, passion, and wit.
Singer spoke about "change."
He asserted that people, even
whole societies, can change in
very fundamental ways. For
example, you used to go to the
theatre, he said, and Oy! The
Stench! The odor of unwashed
bodies in a large warm room
was overwhelming. In fact,
when my own parents were chil-
dren, few took a bath more than
once a week, and then only if
they needed it.
Now we make a fetish of
cleanliness, and the slightest
whiff of body odor is an awk-
ward indiscretion. If society can
make a change that profound,
Singer said, why can't it make
others, including, for example,
changing the way it treats
women, blacks, or gays?
In 2008 candidate Barack
Obama ran on a platform of
"change we can believe in." The
theme of the 2010 election was
"change," as well. And it would
be surprising if we don't hear a
lot about "change" as we close
in on 2012.
In fact, I suspect that most
elections, almost by definition,
are about change. We can think
of a few exceptions: In 1916,
Woodrow Wilson's campaign
slogan was "He kept us out of
war." Ronald Reagan and oth-
ers made much of "Stay the
Course."
But in general when people


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmor.edu
run for office, it's because they
want to change something.
And Obama probably had more
change in mind than most can-
didates. During the campaign, ,
the prospect of change was
inspiring. Now, two years into
Obama's presidential term,
he's besieged on one side by
those who don't want anything
to change and on the other
by those who say he hasn't
changed enough.
. Are there profound culture-
transforming changes that
we should be thinking about,
changes on the scale of the one
that Singer describes? If so,
how are we doing with them?
Consider.these four:
Gays and Lesbians: People
born with this natural biological
and psychological variation will
never have equal status in our
culture until same-sex marriage
is permitted and "Don't ask,
don't tell" is abolished. Progress
is halting and sporadic.
Global-Warming: We con-
tinue to ignore this crisis. The
cultural change that would be
required to deal with it doesn't
appear to be getting any closer.
In fact, the election of 2010
probably pushed it farther away.
Health Care: Contrary to
popular opinion and the asser-
tions of John Boehner and


other Republicans, the United
States does not have the best
health care system in the
world. In a recent column in
the Washington Post, Richard
Cohen reveals that by standards
like longevity and infant mortal-
ity, the U.S. falls in the middle
of, or even at the back of, the
pack. And we pay a lot more for
that undistinguished position.
Progress on this front is prob-
ably the best accomplishment of
the Obama administration thus
far, apart from saving the econo-
my. Republicans are determined
to reverse it.
War: Is a cultural change in
this area at all possible or will
we continue to rely on "hard
power" methods that haven't
been that successful in the past?
Bob Woodward's new book
"Obama's Wars" isn't encourag-
ing. It depicts a tentative, uncer-
tain decision-making process
that resulted in an uncertain
military policy in Afghanistan.
Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton sees encouraging signs
in Afghanistan. But what about
the seven, nine, or twelve
American soldiers killed every
week in a war without any clear
purpose, goal, or end?
In short, even though
President Obama was the can-
didate of "change," progress on
the big, challenging changes
that we really need ones
on the order of getting every
American to take a shower
every day, rather than a bath
once a week is very tentative.
In fact, we've hardly changed,
at all.

John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


OTHER OPINION


Beer wholesalers want hand on the tap


In 2005, in a major deci-
sion involving online
commerce, the Supreme
Court ruled that states
could not discriminate
between in-state and out-of-state
producers in the sale of alcohol.
If an in-state winery could ship
direct to local customers, so too
could out-of-state vineyards.
That ruling has helped legal-
ize direct sales in 37 states and
the District of Columbia.
It was a boon to small bou-
tique wineries but hardly an
industry revolution.
Direct shipping of wine
accounts for only 1 percent
of all wine shipped nationally.
Nonetheless, alcohol wholesal-
ers saw the ruling for what it
was a potential threat to their
privileged position in the alcohol
supply chain.
The wholesalers' attempts to
protect that position legislatively
have divided the normally uni-
fied world of alcohol producers,
wholesalers and retailers. The


infighting has taken place large-
ly out of the public eye.
The wholesalers are pushing
Congress to pass the benignly
named Comprehensive Alcohol
Regulatory Effectiveness Act
(CARE), a bill that, as Lee
Bowman of Scripps Howard
News Service points out, was
written largely by the wholesal-
ers' lawyers.
The bill would bolster the
ability of state legislatures and
regulators to regulate in favor
of their local companies and it
would restrict the federal courts
in using the Commerce Clause
of the Constitution to overturn
state regulations on the sale of
alcohol.
The wholesalers are a political
force, more powerful than any
other segment of the $400 bil-
lion a year alcohol industry.
Bowman reports that they are
consistently among the top 10
donors to congressional cam-
paigns; they gave more than $3
million in the last election cycle


and are on track to give about
the same in the current cycle.
But it is in the states where
the wholesalers flex the most
political muscle.
A watchdog group reports
that members of the National
Beer Wholesalers Association
donated $4.9 million to state
campaigns in 2007-08, and
another report has wine and'
spirits wholesaler collectively
pouring nearly $50 million into
state legislative campaigns
between 2000 and 2006.
NBWA general counsel Paul
Pisano, the chief author of
CARE, casts the issue as one of
states' rights. "Our concern is
unelected federal judges making
alcohol policy instead of state
legislatures," he says.
In the end, the wholesalers'
real concern is having their
industry regulated where they
have the most clout. It is all
about self-interest
Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Mapping :

a way out:

of Kabul

This century we have
twice relearned the :.
age-old lesson that it .
is easier to go to war
than it is to return
home.
An absolute condition to our
ultimate departure from Iraq,
where we've been for over
seven years, is to leave behind a
functioning government Eight
months after their elections,
Iraq's quarreling factions seemed
to have finally agreed on a gov-
ernment Whether it will be func-
tional remains to be seen.
In the meantime, 50,000 U.S.
troops remain there in an "advise
and assist" capacity. Although the
last American combat brigade
officially departed in August,
these troops are quite capable
of combat operations as needed.
The fingers-crossed date for their
departure, and the end of our
Iraqi venture, is the end of 2011.
Afghanistan, where we've been
since the fall of 2001, is proving
more difficult President Obama
optimistically overly so set
a date of July 2011 for the U.S. to
begin withdrawing.
That date will officially be
out the window later this week,
when a NATO summit in Lisbon,
Portugal, is expected to approve ,
a new timetable for coalition,
forces to withdraw. The plan' .
calls for a phased wind-down of
combat operations over the next
four years. Over the next 18 to
24 months, NATO will begin
transferring the responsibility for
security in select areas to Afghan
government forces. The U.S. and
NATO combat.role would then
end by 2014.
Once Obama approved the
surge in Afghanistan, based
on the Iraq precedent, the July
deadline didn't make much
sense. The buildup was only
recently completed. U.S. forces
in Afghanistan have tripled under
Obama and there are 100,000
American troops there now.
Under the best circumstances,
they will be needed until at least
2013. That's when the Afghan
military and police, currently at
264,000, are to reach a force of
350,000. There are two problems
with this: The security forces are
prone to desertions and defec-
tions; and Afghanistan's erratic .
leader, Hamid Karzai.
Over the weekend, Karzai
told The Washington Post that he
wanted foreign forces mean-
ing mainly us to reduce their :..
visibility there by curtailing
military operations and ending
special operations raids, espe-
cially at night. The military says
the night raids are a key reason
there has been a sixfold increase
in the killing or capturing of
Taliban commanders, and inter-
cepted communications confirm
the effectiveness of the raids.
Karzai said he would like to
see coalition forces confined
to their bases, with withdrawal
beginning next year. The
U.S. commander, Gen. David
Petraeus, is said to have reacted '
with "astonishment and disap-
pointment"
Actually faced with a possible
U.S. withdrawal, Karzai tends to
change his mind, and the next
day his aides were trying to soft- :.
en his words, conscious of how
they might play with the public in
the U.S. and other NATO coun-
tries.
Once there is momentum for
withdrawal, it is likely to be irre-
versible. In which case, Karzai
might want to reflect on the old
adage: Be careful what you wish
for.

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010


Child's vomiting

in restaurants

worries parents


GOIT:My
healthy and
smart 8-year-
old daughter
vomits in restaurants.
When she was 3, she
had a spell of vomiting
over the course of a
couple of weeks that we
could not explain.
Her pediatrician sug-
gested keeping track of
what she ate to see if
there was a pattern with
certain foods, because
there was no abdominal
pain and it was not consis-
tent with motion sickness.
We discovered that the
vomiting often occurred
after she consumed dairy
products, so after another
doctor visit, we limited
dairy and used Lactaid
tablets. The vomiting did
not occur as often; howev-
er, we noticed it was still a
problem in restaurants.
Then our daughter
revealed something: She
got nervous in restau-
rants.
She was afraid she
would vomit and be
embarrassed and got her-
self so worked up she got
sick. Back to the doctor
we went The doctor said
kids usually grow out of
lactose intolerance as she
probably had but "some
kids just barf a lot" He
said she would grow out
of that, too.
She still has the prob-
lem. It does not happen
at home or school, or
in the homes of others.
Eating out is'not enjoy-
able because everyone is
on edge wondering if she
will get sick. We have had
her talk with our pastor.
We have tried rewards,
praying, breathing exer-
cises and distractions.
Some things work for a
little while, maybe even
months, but then it will
suddenly and unexpect-
edly happen again. Could
a medical issue be the
cause?
DEAR READER:
I do not believe the
stress and anxiety your
daughter undergoes is
related to an underlying
medical condition, nor do
I feel she does it for atten-
tion, but I don't know her.
Speak with her physi-
cian to be assured of
her medical well-being.
Vomiting can be the
result of fear or emotional
stress but can also repre-
sent a viral infection, milk
allergy, a blocked intes-
tine, tumor, gastritis and
the reaction to specific
smells or odors.
These potential condi-
tions are relatively easy
to rule out with the assis-


ON HEALTH
'v-


Dr. Peter Gott
tance of laboratory work
and X-rays.
Again, because she
doesn't complain of pain,
fever, diarrhea, headache
and other common symp-
toms, my guess is that
her testing will be normal.
However, her pediatri-
cian would be remiss if he
or she did not consider
the big picture. If her
tests fail to reveal any-
thing and she is an oth-
erwise normal, physically
healthy child, request a
referral to a child thera-
pist with whom she feels
comfortable and can see
regularly.
While you might give
the therapist a heads-up,
she should be allowed
to speak freely without
a parent sitting nearby
coaching her.
Everything may be
stress related, but it may
be difficult to understand
why she only reaches her
limit when in a restaurant.
This should be investi-
gated and dealt with.
You have indicated that
you are on edge when
dining out, expecting a
repeat of her normal pat-
tern.
A step you may or may
not have considered is
to stay away from restau-
rants.
From my perspective,
it doesn't appear worth
putting your daughter
through the trauma of
public embarrassment.
If there are compelling
reasons for eating out,
perhaps you can pick a
corner table away from
the hub of activity.
Consider allowing her
to bring a friend along so
they can talk and giggle
to reduce the tension
level. Select a "restaurant"
that has outdoor tables,
and weather permitting,
eat out of doors.
Allow her and her
friend to bring a hand-
held game board to divert
her attention away from
her surroundings.
* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author
of the book "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Diet," avail-
able at most chain and
independent bookstores,
and the recently published
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Cookbook."


SOURCES: Ardian Inc., American Heart Association


AP


Study: Zapping nerves helps


control high blood pressure


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press

CHICAGO Some peo-
ple .who couldn't get their
blood pressure under con-
trol despite taking a fistful of
pills every day found relief
from an experimental treat-
ment that shows promise
as a permanent fix for the
condition.
The treatment uses radio
waves to zap nerves near the
kidneys that fuel high blood
pressure. It is done through
a tube pushed into a blood
vessel in the groin, much
like the angioplasty proce-
dures for opening clogged
heart arteries.
In a study of about 100
people, the top number of
the blood pressure reading
fell an average of 33 points
among those who had the
treatment. Doctors say that
is much better than the less-
than-10-point drop that many
drugs give.
"I am extremely interest-
ed in this," said Dr. Elliott
Antman, a Brigham and
Women's Hospital cardiolo-
gist who is vice chairman
of the American Heart
Association conference
in Chicago, where study
results were reported on
Wednesday.
Even if the treatment
doesn't wind up being a cure
and is only partly successful,
that's still beneficial because
these people are at grave
risk of heart attacks, strokes
and death, and drugs are not


helping them enough now,
he said.
The fact the treatment
also improves blood-sugar
control makes it especially
attractive for diabetics with
high blood pressure. 'This
opens up a dramatic new
option for them," Antman
said.
About 75 million
Americans and 1 billion
people worldwide have high
blood pressure readings
of 140 over 90 or more.
Most people need three or
four drugs to treat it, and
only about one-third are
well-controlled on medi-
cines. About 10 percent are
unable to achieve control
despite taking many drugs
that relax the blood vessels
and prevent water and salt
retention.
The new treatment dam-
ages certain nerves and
cause key arteries to per-
manently relax. It is being
developed by Ardian Inc.,
a private company based in
Mountain View, Calif., whose
investors include medical
device giant Medtronic Inc.
It was approved two years
ago in Europe and just com-
ing into wider use now as
doctors there get trained to
do the procedure.
In Europe, it costs about


- \


I,
.. .
Vk


~i j I~ '


$14,000, but no U.S. price
has been set yet, said
Ardian's chief executive,
Andrew Cleeland. A study
aimed at winning U.S.


approval will start early
next year, and about 200
U.S. medical centers have
called unsolicited to ask to
be part of it, he said.


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Promising a new blood pressure fix

Scientists are testing a new procedure that may give high blood
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i
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fi
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L:


- I II ----- ---


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@l kecityreportercom


SPORTS


Thursday, November 18, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

LADY TIGERS SOCCER
Breakfast at
Kazbor's Grille
Columbia High's
girls soccer team has
a breakfast fundraiser
at Kazbor's Grille from
7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday.
Tickets are $6 at the door
and may be purchased
in advance from team
members.
For details, call
(386) 365-1877.

CHS BASEBALL
Dugout Club
golf tournament
The CHS Dugout Club
has a golf tournament
planned at The Country
Club at Lake City on
Saturday (8 a.m. shotgun
start). Single player cost
is $60; cost for a
foursome is $200.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754.

CLUB VOLLEYBALL
Travel team
meeting Monday
The North Florida
Fusion volleyball club
program has an
information meeting set
for 6 p.m. Monday at the
Columbia High
auditorium. Girls
interested in playing
travel volleyball and
their parents are urged
to attend. Tryout dates,
cost of participation and
general information will
be discussed.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.

FISHING
Input sought on
redfish changes
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission has a public
workshop to discuss
possible regulation
changes for red drum
from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday at
the Jacksonville Public
Library. There is a
proposal to raise the
daily bag limit from one
to two redfish per person.
For details, visit
MyFWC.com/Rules.

ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Young Jr. at 623-4817.

N From staff reports


GAMES

Today
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Newberry
High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer at P.K. Yonge
School, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
girls soccer at Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5)
Friday
Columbia High boys
soccer in Buchholz JV
tournament, TBD
Columbia High
girls soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 7 p.m.
Fort White High foot-
ball at Pensacola Catholic
High in regional semifinal,
7:30 p.m. (CST)
Saturday
Columbia High boys
soccer in Buchholz JV


tournament, TBD


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
LSU kicker Josh Jasper watches as he connects on a field goal
against Florida in the Tigers' 33-29 victory against the Gators in
Gainesville on Oct. 9.


Postseason


Fort White shows
'focus and energy'
for playoff rn.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White -High's football play-
ers are embracing their
return to the playoffs.
The Indians travel to
Pensacola Catholic High for
a Class 2B first-round play-
off game on Friday. Kickoff
is 7:30 p.m. CST.
"Practice has been real
good," Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said at halftime of the Lady
Indians basketball game on
Tuesday. 'The guys are just
so happy to get back to the
playoffs. There is real good
focus and energy."
Football is a grueling
sport and players start the
season gearing up fqr 10
games. The playoffs takes a
new attitude.
"When you get to the
11th or 12th week, some-
times you worry if the guys
are really up for it," Jackson
said. "They came out fired
up on Monday. It was like
they had the week off last
week."
Pensacola Catholic had
to forfeit four games and
dropped to 6-4, but the
Crusaders remain ranked


Fort WhiteHigh 's JR Dixon (1

in the top five in state polls.
'They are a good team,
but we are shoring up our
thing and not worrying
about them," Jackson said.
"We have to do what we do,


Showdown Saturday
could clear picture to
championship matchups.

RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

With three of the four unbeaten teams
sitting it out, this weekend is all about
the conferences races.
The Big Ten could lose some clutter
at the top with No. 6 Wisconsin and
No. 8 Ohio State playing on the road,
while No. 14'Virginia Tech can lock
up its fourth trip to the Atlantic Coast
Conference championship.
In the Big 12, No. 9 Nebraska can
lock up the North Division and poten-
tially eliminate No. 18 Texas A&M from
contention in the South, where No. 16
Oklahoma is trying to stay close to first-
place No. 12 Oklahoma State.
Iowa realistically fell out of the Big
Ten race when it lost to Northwestern
last week, leaving Michigan State, Ohio
State and Wisconsin all tied for first with
5-1 records.


The Hawkeyes can clear a path to the
Rose Bowl for Michigan State by beat-
ing Terrelle Pryor and Ohio State. If the
Spartans and Badgers tie for the league
championship, Michigan State goes to
Pasadena because it beat Wisconsin.
In a three-way tie, the BCS standings
decide which team plays in the Rose
Bowl and Wisconsin currently leads
the race, with Ohio State next and then
Michigan State.
The Badgers, coming off an 83-20
victory over Indiana, are at Michigan on
Saturday, so expect Wisconsin's offense
to keep rolling against the Big Ten's
lowest rated defense. Michigan State is
home against Purdue.
Tyrod Taylor and the Hokies can lock
up another ACC Coastal crown by win-
ning at No. 24 Miami. The Hurricanes,
who have never played in the confer-
ence title game since joining the league
in 2004, would remain alive in the divi-
sion race with a victory.
Nebraska needs to win either of its
final two games to earn a second straight
PICKS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
I) is swarmed by Bradford High defenders in a game on Nov. 5 in Fort White.


and get better at it."
Fort White's thing is run-
ning the football, and the
Indians have the numbers
to prove it.
JR Dixon has carried 213


times for 1,201 yards and
scored 15 rushing touch-
downs. Much of that was
after Alexis Blake, who had
491 yards on 71 carries with
10 touchdowns, went down


with an injury.
Quarterback Andrew
Baker has 66 carries for 224
yards, while fullback Zach
INDIANS continued on 2B


Black, Gardenhire picked as managers of the year


Padres coach
edges Cincy's
Baker by a point.

By BEN WALKER
Associated Press

NEW YORK San
Diego's Bud Black hung
on in this race, nudging
Cincinnati's Dusty Baker by
one point for NL Manager
of the Year. Minnesota's
Ron Gardenhire was the
clear choice in the AL,
becoming a first-time win-
ner Wednesday after five
times as the runner-up.
Black was selected after
guiding San Diego to a 15-
game turnaround last sea-
son. The Padres finished
90-72 and led the NL West
until a late, 10-game slump
wound up costing them a
playoff spot on the final
day.


Black I
dre w
16 first-
place
votes in
balloting
by the
Baseball GARDENHIRE
Writers'
Association of America and
got 104 points. Baker had
13 first-place votes -and 103
points.
Baker, a three-time
Manager of the Year, led
the NL Central champion
Reds to their first playoff
spot since 1995. He was
listed on 27 of the 32 bal-
lots while Black was picked
on 26.
Bruce Bochy of the
World Series champion San
Francisco Giants, Atlanta's
retiring Bobby Cox and
Philadelphia's Charlie
Manuel got the other first-
place votes.


This marked the third
time that the NL Manager
of the Year was decided
by a single point. There
was a tie for the AL honor
in 1996 between Joe Torre
and Johnny Oates.
Two BBWAA voters from
every league city send in
three top choices when
the regular season ends.
Votes are counted on a 5-3-1
basis.
Gardenhire was an
easy pick after another AL
Central crown, becoming
the first manager in base-
ball history to win six divi-
sion titles in his first nine
seasons. Gardenhire drew
16 first-place votes and 108
points, and was the only
AL manager listed on all 28
ballots.
"Congrats to the best
manager in bestball!" Twins
center fielder Denard Span
tweeted. "Way overdue!"


Span



later for
misspell-
BLACK ing base-
ball.
Ron Washington, who
started the year with a
cocaine admission and
ended it with Texas' first
trip to the World Series, was
next in the AL with 10 first-
place votes and 81 points.
Tampa Bay's Joe Maddon
and Toronto's retiring Cito
Gaston drew the other first-
place voles.
Despite another loss to
the Yankees in the first
round of the playoffs this
season, there are many in
the Minnesota organization
who feel that Gardenhire
had his best year as a man-
ager.


He won his 800th career
game in September and
sixth division title of the
decade despite playing the
entire year without closer
Joe Nathan and most of it
minus former MVP Justin
Morneau. Gardenhire shuf-
fled his lineups and batting
order constantly, all the
while prodding the Twins
past the Chicago White Sox
in the division.
The Twins finished
94-68 in their first season at
Target Field.
Gardenhire joined Tom
Kelly as the only managers
in Twins history to win the
award. Gardenhire finished
second the last two years,
along with 2006, '04 and '03.
The Twins have long
had a reputation for hav-
ing one of the closest-knit
clubhouses in baseball.
MANAGERS continued on 2B


Conference races


take center stage


happiness


I- I - - -I i'


--~-











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN UCLA at Washington
GOLF
12 Midnight
TGC European PGA Tour, Hong
Kong Open, second round
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Honda Puerto Rico Tip-off,
first round, Hofstra vs. North Carolina, at
San Juan, Puerto Rico
7 p.m.
ESPN2 2K .Sports Classic, first
round, Pittsburgh vs. Maryland, at New
York
9 p.m.
ESPN2 2K Sports Classic, first
round, Illinois vs.Texas, at NewYork
10:30 p.m.
FSN -Virginia at Stanford
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT Phoenix at Orlando
10:30 p.m.
TNT Denver at Portland
NBA DEVELOPMENT LEAGUE
8 p.m.
VERSUS Texas at Rio Grande
Valley

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Today's Game
Chicago at Miami, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Dallas, I p.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Washington at Tennessee, I p.m.
Houston at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Buffalo at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Arizona at Kansas City, I p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Carolina, I p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, I p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.

College games

Today
Georgia St. (6-4) at Alabama (8-2),
7:30 p.m.
SE Louisiana (2-8) at Nicholls St.
(3-7), 8 p.m.
UCLA (4-5) at Washington (3-6),
8 p.m.
Air Force (7-4) at UNLV (2-8),
10 p.m.

College scores
Tuesday
Ohio 31 ,Temple 23

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Ford 400
Site: Homestead.
Schedule: Friday, practice (ESPN2,
11:30-1 p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,3-5 p.m.);
Saturday, practice (Speed, 1:30-2:30 p.m.;
ESPN2, 3-4 p.m.); Sunday, race, I p.m.
(ESPN2, noon-I p.m.; ESPN, 1-5 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
Online: http://www.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
Ford 300
Site: Homestead.



INDIANS

Continued From Page 1B


Cormier has 101 yards on
32 carries. Both Baker and
Cormier have one rushing
touchdown.
Soron Williams had sixl
carries against Santa Fe
High and increased his sea-
son numbers to 85 yards on
11 carries. He has scored
touchdowns on a fumble
recovery and a kickoff
return.
If the defense bunches up
to stop the running game,
Baker will throw the ball.
He has completed 47 of 80
for 578 yards. He has five
touchdown passes to offset
four interceptions.
AJ. Legree leads in recep-
tion with 15 for 208 yards. He
has four touchdown catches.
Trey Phillips has 14 catch-
es for 181 yards. Donnell
Sanders has five catches for
85 yards and one touchdown.
Sanders has scored twice
more on fumble returns.
Dixon has caught three pass-
es for 33 yards.
Colton Jones has scored


45 points with four field
goals and 33 PATs.
Xavier Wyche leads
the Indians with three
interceptions. Phillips
has two picks, while Josh
Faulkner and Legree each
have one.
Fort White has scored
261 points while giving up
228.


Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
1-2:30 p.m., 6:30-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, 11:30 a.m.- I p.m.), race,
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2,4-7:30 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Ford 200
Site: Homestead.
Schedule: Today, practice; Friday,
qualifying (Speed, 5-6 p.m.). race, 8 p.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10:30 p.m.).
Trade Homestead-Miami Speedway.
Race distance: 201 miles, 134 laps.

Formula One final

March 14 Bahrain Grand Prix,
.Sakhir (Fernando Alonso)
March 28 Australian Grand Prix,
Melbourne (Jenson Button)
April 4 Malaysian Grand Prix, Kuala
Lumpur (Sebastian Vettel)
April 18 Chinese Grand Prix,
Shanghai (Jenson Button)
May 9 Spanish Grand Prix,
Cataluyna (Mark Webber)
May 16 Monaco Grand Prix, Monte
Carlo (Mark Webber)
May 30 -Turkish Grand Prix, Istanbul
(Lewis Hamilton)
June 13 Canadian Grand Prix,
Montreal (Lewis Hamilton)
June 27 European Grand Prix,
Valencia, Spain (Sebastian Vettel)
July II British Grand Prix,
Silverstone, England (Mark Webber)
July 25 German Grand Prix,
Hockenheim, Germany (Fernando
Alonso)
Aug. I Hungarian Grand Prix,
Budapest (Mark Webber)
Aug. 29 Belgian Grand Prix, Spa-
Francorchamps (Lewis Hamilton)
Sept. 12 Italian Grand Prix
(Fernando Alonso)
Sept. 26 Singapore Grand Prix,
Singapore (Fernando Alonso)
Oct. 10 Japanese Grand Prix,
Suzuka (Sebastian Vettel)
Oct. 24 Korean Grand Prix,
Yeongam (Fernando Alonso)
Nov. 7 Brazilian Grand Prix, Sao
Paulo (Sebastian Vettel)
Nov. 14 -Abu Dhabi Grand PrixAbu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (Sebastian
Vettel)
Driver standings
I. Sebastian Vettel, 256
2. Fernando Alonso, 252
3. Mark Webber, 242
4. Lewis Hamilton, 240
5. Jenson Button, 214
6. Felipe Massa, 144
7. Nico Rosberg, 142
8. Robert Kubica, 136
9. Michael Schumacher, 72
10. Rubens Barrichello, 47
(tie) Adrian Sutil, 47
Constructors standings
I. Red Bull, 498 points.
2. McLaren, 454.
3. Ferrari, 396.
4. Mercedes,214.
S. Rnault, 163.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Cleveland 101, Philadelphia 93
Atlanta 102, Indiana 92
Washington 109,Toronto 94
Portland 100, Memphis 99
LA. Lakers 118, Milwaukee 107
Chicago 95, Houston 92
Denver 120, NewYork 118
Wednesday's Games
Phoenix at Miami, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Washington at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Utah, 9 p.m.
Chicago at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
New York at Sacramento, 10 p.m.


Today's Games
L.A. Clippers at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Oklahoma City at Boston, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Houston atToronto, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
NewYork at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 3 Kansas State vs. Presbyterian,
8 p.m.
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. Maryland at
Madison Square Garden, 7 p.m.
No. 8 North Carolina vs. Hofstra at
Coliseo de Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, 5 p.m.
No. 9 Florida vs. North Carolina
A&T, 7 p.m.
No. 13 Illinois vs. Texas at Madison
Square Garden, 9 p.m.
No. 15 Missouri vs. Western Illinois,
8 p.m.
No. 17 Baylor vs.Jackson State, 8 p.m.
No. 20 Georgetown vs. Coastal
Carolina at Carolina First Arena,
Charleston, S.C., Noon

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Toronto 5, Nashville 4
Montreal 3, Philadelphia 0
Dallas 2,Anaheim I
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Washington, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Chicago at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Today's Games
Florida at Boston, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
.Friday's Games
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 10 p.m.

BASEBALL

Manager of the Year

As selected by the Baseball Writers'
Association of America (5-3-1 basis):
NATIONAL LEAGUE


Manager, Team Ist
Bud Black, SD 16
Dusty Baker, Cin. 13
Bruce Bochy, SF I
Bobby Cox,Atl. I
Charlie Manuel, Phi I
Brad Mills, Houston
AMERICAN
Manager, Team Ist
R. G'denhire, Min. 16
R.Washington,Tex 10
Joe Maddon,TB I
Terry Francona, Bos
Cito GastonTor. I
Joe Girardi, NewYork


"WARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES
at the Lake City Reporter
So our employees can enjoy Thanksgiving with their
families, the Lake City Reporter will be closed,
Thursday, November 25th, 2010.

Our Advertising deadlines will be
lA FdMd, K o iHmber2 5B l desalIe Wedneday, November 24 11i m
phrl Mft:day, November26 1 deadline Mondaey, Nowanb 22
IMaN Iovember 217 w decade Tuesda, November 23
almndi, Nmwab 28 will deadll. Tuesday, Novembr 23
Tue i, Noember 30 wlldeadlne Wdlneday, November24 k

We will be back inm the office on l
Fnday, November 26th for our
customer's convenience.
Thank You and
Have a Great Thanksgiving


2nd 3rd Tot
7 3 104
12 2 103
4 13 30
4 II 28
4 3 20
1 3
LEAGUE
2nd 3rd Tot
8 4 108
8 7 81
10 9 44
2 7 13
5
I I


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. F


Nvuarrangeti cr l .i.l ietti s
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
OF _____7___________
A: THE ( I I I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CAMEO QUEST SLUICE EXCISE
I Answer: What the friends drank to at the birthday
party EXCESS


PICKS: Teams can clinch conferences

Continued From Page 1B


trip to the Big 12 title
game. The Cornhuskers
visit College Station, where
the Aggies are rolling but
need lots of help to catch
Oklahoma State.
Justin Blackmon and
the Cowboys should have
an easy time at Kansas on
Saturday, before finishing
the season at home against
Oklahoma. If the Sooners
can win at Baylor, the
Bedlam game in Stillwater
will be for the Big 12
South.
The picks:
THURSDAY
Georgia State (no line)
at No. 10 Alabama
Former Tide coach Bill
Curry leads this fledgling
FCS program... ALABAMA
60-0.
FRIDAY
Fresno State (plus
30%) at No. 3 Boise
State
Broncos keep the pedal
to the floor ... BOISE
STATE 55-21.
SATURDAY
Mississippi (plus 16)
at No. 5 LSU
Chance to play for nation-
al title still being contem-
plated in Baton Rouge ...
LSU 31-13.
No. 6 Wisconsin
(minus 5) at Michigan
History is with Michigan,
17-1 vs. Badgers at home;
the present is not ...


WISCONSIN 42-28.
No. 7 Stanford (minus
7) at California
Golden Bears have
allowed 49 points in five
home games... STANFORD
21-17.
No. 8 OSU (minus 3)
at No. 21 Iowa
Buckeyes have only 16
sacks, will need more pres-
sure to stop Ricky Stanzi ...
IOWA 27-21.
No.. 9 Nebraska
(minus 2'A) at No. 18
Texas A&M
Huskers took it easy on
Taylor Martinez last week
to get ready ... TEXAS
A&M 17-13.
Purdue (plus 20) at
No. 11 Michigan State
Spartans can smell roses
... MICHIGAN STATE
37-14.
No. 12 Oklahoma State
(minus 24) at Kansas
No chance Cowboys
let down before Bedlam
... OKLAHOMA STATE
48-10.
No. 13 Arkansas
(minus 3) at No. 22
Mississippi State
Razorbacks have won
13 of 15 in series, but lost
last trip to Starkville ...
ARKANSAS 28-17.
No. 14 Virginia Tech
.(minus 21) at No. 24
Miami
Beating Hokies would
be a season-changer for


Hurricanes ... MIAMI
28-24.
No. 15 Missouri
(minus 11) at Iowa
State
Cyclones lost QB Austen
Arnaud for season with
knee injury ... MISSOURI
31-14.
No. 16 Oklahoma
(minus 711) at Baylor
Sooners have lost four
straight Big 12 road games
... OKLAHOMA 35-30.
Troy (plus 22) at No.
17 South Carolina
Expect a bit of a hangover
for Gamecocks ... SOUTH
CAROLINA 34-14.
New Mexico State (plus
38) at No. 19 Nevada
Colin Kaepernick could
become first QB with three
straight 1,000-yard rushing
seasons ... NEVADA 65-10.
No. 20 Southern
California (minus 3) at
Oregon State
Trojans have lost four
straight games in state of
Oregon ... USC 35-24.
No. 25 Utah (minus
3) at San Diego State
Utes have led by a com-
bined score of 73-0 at half
in last two meetings ... SAN
DIEGO ST 34-24.
Lastweek: 17-5 (straight);
12-10 (vs. points).
Season: 154-48 (straight);
97-98-3 (vs. points).
Best bets: 3-4. Upset spe-
cials: 4-3.


MANAGERS: AL CyYoung comes today


Continued From Page 1B

The feuds, bickering and
infighting that can plague a
team through the grind of
a 162-game schedule rare-
ly surfaces in Minnesota,
something often attributed
to the man in charge.
Gardenhire is as fiery and
competitive as they come, as
evidenced by his 53 career
ejections. But in the dugout
and behind the scenes, he
portrays a calming, play-
ers-first mentality, which


fosters a loose, easygoing
clubhouse atmosphere.
The pitching-rich Padres
were a surprise all season,
and led the Giants by 7'/2
games orf July 4. But San
Diego's inability to hit,
especially in key situations,
proved to be its downfall.
The Padres went into the
final day of the regular sea-
son needing to win at San
Francisco to keep playing.
Instead, they lost 3-0 and


Sarif's or S


.ACROSS

1 Not abridged
6 Mendicant's
shout
10 Kind
of cracker
12 Stops running
14 Fidel's city
15 Brunch favorite
16 Let out line
18 Dazzle
19 Meadow rodent
21 Deuterium dis-
coverer
23 Wander about
24 PC key
26 Fish
for salads
29 TV's Hawkeye
31 Funny
DeLuise
33 Go for a field
goal
35 Bird-feeder
treat
36 Police dept.
rank
37 Desiccated


38 Piccadilly stat-
ue
40 Leafy climber
42 KGB counter-
part
43 Think on
45 Had some bills
47 Quick to learn
50 Square dance
call (hyph.)
52 "False" prefix
54 Club joiqer
58 Noise
59 Make happy
60 Every now and

61 Ginger cookies

DOWN

1 Yech!
2 DC gun lobby
3 Mav's foe
4 Mover's rental
(hyph.)
5 Turned bronze
6 Cleopatra's
jewelry
7 1865 yielder


their season ended.
Black and Bochy are the
lone Padres winners for the
manager award, first pre-
sented in 1983. That first
year, Tom Lasorda of the
Dodgers beat Houston's
Bob Lillis by one point.
In 1985, St. Louis' Whitey
Herzog topped Cincinnati's
Pete Rose by a point.
The next BBWAA award
will be the AL Cy Young, to
be announced today.


Get Co .... i
www.lakecltyreporter.com
Lake City
I1ilI0 | Reporter



Answer to Previous Puzzle


PETS E B BE D
BETTAS FRAYED
INHALE INSERT
NE-'- E,', E
E Y R J A... N sB aT
KNELL LEEK

EYRE RAE EELS
RUIN STEAK
DOE SCORE K Ol


ERR SOLAR SSTI
EAGER I HAD
PLOD RNS WAGS
IDES FAI RE
LISBON VERMIN
OCELOT INFEST
NEWER ASSET


8 Actress Powers
9 Misrepresent
11 Impair
12 Afrikaner
13 Sault Marie
17 Tributes


19 Hold dear
20 Stranger
22 Raucous
laughs
23 Krypton or
radon
25 Mag. staffers
27 Brother's child
28 Sharp-
smelling
30 Proton's place
32 V.J.
employer
34 Green
parrot
39 Abrupt
41 Alpine
refrains
44 Chimney
deposit
46 Amazons, for
example
47 Loan abbr.
48 Jr.'s exam
49 support
51 Bratty kid-
53 Luau strum-
mer
55 Moo compan-
ion
56 Sixth sense
57 Home tel.


11-18 2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010


DILBERT
I GOT YOUR
E-MAIL.
IT ALMOST
MADE SENSE.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
I- MUST HAVE WHICH DAY ARE
BEEN A THRILL YOU TALKING
TO TRAVEL BY I ABOUT,
STAGECOACH v HONEY?
BfCK IN ruE 9AV,
I
,\ "* MII'/1

i^-. 1.


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Naming former spouses sets

record straight in obituaries


PERHAPS REALLY' ?
I CAN YOU CAN
BE MORE JUST TURN
IT ON AND
OFF LIKE
THAT?


L-


DEAR ABBY: "Surviv-
ing Son in California" (Sept.
20) sought your advice re-
garding proper protocol in
mentioning all surviving
relatives when parents had
been divorced. You said,
"After a couple divorces
and'one of them dies, the
name of the former spouse
is usually not mentioned
in the obituary." I think
your response needs a little
tweaking.
My siblings and I faced
this same scenario after my
father passed away. My par-
ents divorced when I was
in grade school, and each
parent had remarried by
my freshman year in high
school. Although their di-
vorce was painful, they re-
mained on friendly terms
throughout their lives. I
was adamant that my bio-
logical mother be listed in
my father's obituary for two
reasons: First, the obituary
serves as a historical docu-
ment. Second, I did not want
people reading the obituary
to think my siblings and I
were children from my fa-
ther's second marriage.
An obituary should serve
as a historical account of
our loved one's life not
a battlefield. LESLIE
IN PORT ANGELES,
WASH.
DEAR LESLIE: Thank
you for pointing out your
valid reasons for including


understand how some chil-
dren might decide to omit a
parent if the divorce wasn't
a friendly one. I was left
out of my first husband's
obituary, but I got over
it. IWO SIDES TO A
STORY
DEAR ABBY: There
is a difference between an
obituary and a death no-
tice. A death notice is a paid
announcement, usually in
small type and generally
placed by the funeral direc-
tor. It can include, or ex-
clude, anything the family
wishes.
An obituary is an objec-
tive news story written by
a bylined reporter, and it
contains the good, the bad
and the ugly including
the names of former spous-
es, whether separated by
death or divorce. FOR-
MER COPY EDITORIN
PHILADELPHIA
DEAR ABBY: Here in
the South, an ex-spouse is
often listed this way: "Jane
Doe of Memphis, Tenn.,
is the mother of his chil-
dren." The primary reason
is so the children feel their
surviving parent, and the
years their patents spent to-
gether, are acknowledged.
- NANCY IN CONWAY,
ARK.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


IF I G ET U ETO IT HER,THEN
TIrAT'H AWF 1, TU ATTE OF
C,,NTToAT /TOF\O
TMG/VNTAIN. /7\


GARFIELD


GCETOTHETOp TMATTHME
oFWHAT / OnH~-
MoUNTAIN? HA-FOFI IE
TrrL.


B.C.


/A. MCT~


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You'll be emo-
tional, especially when
it comes to affairs of the
heart. Don't jump impul-
sively into something that
has proven to be difficult
in the past. Find out if you
and the person you are in-
terested in are on the same
page. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You cannot
change much personally
or professionally right now,
but you can discover inter-
esting ways to make life
better. Change may not
be visible just yet but it is
heading your way, so you'll
want to be prepared to take
advantage. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): An opportunity
is apparent and you don't
want to miss out because
someone forgot to men-
tion something important.
You need to be proactive.
However, there is no room
for pushiness, only direct
response and promptness.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You'll be taken
advantage of if you are too
willing to do for others.
Draw the line or set a limit
Keep your finger on the
pulse at work or where new
positions are being posted
and you will make success-
ful gains. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Things are really cook-
ing' around you, so don't


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

take time to rest when you
should be in the middle of
all the excitement Getting
together with people who
can offer you interesting
proposals or bring greater
clarity to your plans will
lead to a brighter future. 5

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Spending unneces-
sarily will lead to worry
and stress. Budget wisely
and put your money into
something that will grow in
value. Tag along to a social
event with someone who
has a formal invitation and
you will be invited directly
to the next function. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll feel burdened
by someone who doesn't
enjoy the same things you
do. Consider whether or
not you are wasting your
time and energy. Greater
interaction with friends,
neighbors or a group you
would like to be a part of
will lead to social opportu-
nities. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): If you don't see
any options, you aren't look-
ing hard enough. There is
plenty going on, so start
sharing your thoughts and
including people in your
plans. You will get things
going and start moving in a
positive, forward direction.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Your de-
termination and progres-
sive action will lead to
controversy but will also
help you stand out and be
counted. There will'~e ups
and downs as the day pro-
gresses. Separate your per-
sonal and professional lives
so you can keep them bal-
anced. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You will have
some trouble emotionally.
Expect people who want
something from you to be-
come impatient if you aren't
accommodating. Love is ap-
parent but may take you by
surprise. Make sure you
aren't infringing on some-
one else's territory. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Remember your
dreams and goals and try to
incorporate them into your
current lifestyle or situa-
tion. You will gain greater
perspective, making it eas-
ier to rework, revamp and
reinstate what yqu know
and do best ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You should
allow time for learning and
applying what you have dis-
covered. Someone will be
quick to complain or criti-
cize. Focus on something
you can develop on your
own that shows potential
to become a moneymaker.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals F
"YT LGE WUGHISW MGPY YT AXWHGX
EP BLCX EBHISW HI EBX VPGZA
VBHKB VPJZA PEBXGVHWX IXCXG RX
EBXGX." WKJZUEPG KLGZ LIAGX

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Excellence means when a man or woman asks of
himself more than others do." Jos6 Ortega y Gasset


(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc.


11-18


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
former spouses in an obitu-.
ary. Allow me to share a few
more. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: I've
worked in newspapers on
the East Coast for the past
11 years, and I can tell you
that mentioning a divorced
spouse's name is totally a
matter of individual and
family preference. It is be-
coming more common to
see "So-and-so" was the for-
mer wife and good friend of
"the deceased," which is a
nice development. It is the
right of the surviving fam-
ily to decide the contents
of the obituary. Because
some people even include
pets among survivors, you
would think an ex-spouse
would receive the same.
consideration. NAME
WITHHELD IN CON-
NECTICUT
DEAR ABBY: Geneal-
ogy researchers often use
obituaries to find the par-
ents or children of families.
Here in Iowa, it is common
for the obituary to show that
a couple married, had chil-
dren and were divorced. I


STHE DAY WHEELS MUST HAVE
BROKEN HITTING A BIG ROCK OR
7THE DAY BLAZING SUN OR
SUDDEN STORMS MADE THERE




ie--- --
-T LIP MISERABLE _.- I


(^ -.


YOU KNOW, JUST TRYING TO
SOMETIMES KEEP YOUR FEET
IT'S TOUGH TO r ON THE GROUND,
DISCUSS THE COWBOY i-'
ROMANCE OF THE WBV_
OLD WEST .-1
NirH ?,f
.Ou
r \ o -,


"-- S


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


c,


~ ~a7


CLASSIC PEANUTS









LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010


Race: Ford 400
Where: Homestead-Miami Speedway
When: Sunday, 1:00 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN
2009 winner: Denny Hamlin (right)


Race: Ford 300
Where: Homestead-Miami Speedway
When: Saturday, 4:00 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN2
2009 winner: Kyle Busch


Race: Ford 200
Where: Homestead-Miami Speedway
When: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2009 winner: Kevin Harvick


Hamlin, Johnson, Harvick all competitive going into Chase finale


A s the Sprint Cup Series heads into this
weekend's season-ending Ford 400 at
omestead-Miami Speedway with three
drivers still very much in the running for the
championship, it's pretty certain that one of the
topics of discussion this week won't be a poten-
tial tweaking of the Chase format.
Earlier this year, when it looked as if Jimmie
Johnson would cruise to a record fifth straight
title, there were calls and discussions byrhigh-
ranking NASCAR officials, including chairman
Brian France for changes to the 10-race run to
the championship.
But since that talk was so prevalent, Denny,
Hamlin has become the points leader, and
Kevin Harvick, who dominated the points
standings during much of the 26-race regular
season, is in the thick of the battle, just 46
points out of the lead. Johnson is 15 back after
nursing his last fuel load to the finish at
Phoenix.
At Phoenix, Harvick had to make an extra pit
stop late to have a lug nut installed, but because
he was in the back, he and his crew were in
position to take on the extra fuel he needed to
make it to the end, while Hamlin who domi-
nated the race stopped for gasoline in the clos-


Kevin Harvick (NASCAR photo)


ing laps and finished 12th. Instead of putting
his two challengers on the ropes, he now has
them right in his rear-view mirror.
The big debate this week likely will center on
which of the three has the advantage going into
Homestead.
Hamlin runs well there and is the race's
defending winner. The question marks for him
are whether he and his team can rally from a
deflating outcome at Phoenix and whether they
begin to second-guess each other, wondering if
they too could have stretched their fuel to the
finish instead of stopping.
Hamlin indicated in his post-race comments
that he wasn't told to save fuel and was never
told that his competitors planned to stretch
theirs. But he said he believed he could put the
disappointment behind him.
"For me I guess, as soon as I leave Phoenix, I
have to leave Phoenix in Phoenix," he said. "I
couldn't control it. I did everything I was sup-
posed to do today. Things didn't work out for
me.
"All I can do is concentrate on next week once
Monday comes, and put it behind me. So the
thing is, it could have been a lot worse. We could
have lost the points lead. But regardless, you
never know what can happen in the final race. I
hate that it boils down to the final race, but
thafs what fans love"
But he also seemed as if his confidence had
been shaken.
"I felt like we've been the best car over this
Chase, and we might not win it," he said.
In Johnson's favor is his experience dealing
with the pressures of the Chase. After all, he's
been in several close battles and has won the
last four. The weakness for him and his crew is
that in most of the recent races, Hamlin's car
has been faster than their own No. 48.
"We're very aware of that situation," Johnson
said. "We're doing everything we can. We're try-
ing as hard as we can. We're going to go home
and we're going to make sure we have the best
engines, go through our simulation stuff make
sure our car is as fast as it can be, and then
race.
"I wish we had more speed ... Last couple


weeks we've been good, and they've been great.
We need to get that turned around and be great.
"If not, I know that with [crew chief Chad
Knaus] on the box, we're going to work on a
strategy and hopefully find an upper hand
somewhere, somehow."
Harvick could be the sleeper in the deal, if
there is such a thing. He's shown that he can
overcome setbacks like poor qualifying results
and mistakes on pit stops to post solid finishing
results. And his car owner, Richard Childress,
has plenty of experience in championship bat-
tles, having been a part of six titles with Dale
Earnhardt driving his No. 3 Chevy.
The biggest challenge for Harvick is overcom-
ing the 46-point deficit he carries into the finale.
Harvick's crew chief Gil Martin, said he and his
team are going to Homestead believing they're
still viable contenders.
"Hey man, we're in this thing," he said. "I
think we still have it."
He said the key for all three teams will be
avoiding mistakes.
"It is going to take a flat tire or something
like that to make something happen," he said. "I
think next week it is going to be every man for
himself. It will probably be wild next week. rm
looking forward to it."


m m 0ay2


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UP...


2010 CHASE CONTENDERS
Points standings, race results from Surnda-y'
Kobalt 7bols 500 at Phoenix Infl Raceway
and commentary by Rick Minter
1. Denny Hamlin 6,462 (finished 12th)
He had the fastest car by far, but the least
fuel-efficient, apparently He made a late-race
stop for fuel while his closest challengers
stretched theirs to the end. Instead of leaving
Phoenix with a huge points lead. it's e~sential-
ly neck-and-neck heading into Homestead.
2. Jimmie Johnson -15 (finished fifth)
The pit crew swap paid off as Jeff Gordon's
old crew allowed him to hold his position in the
pits and sometimes gain spots He also was
able to stretch his fuel at the end and gain 18
points on the leader heading into the last race
of the season.
3. Kevin Harvick-46 (finished sixth)
A missing lug nut could have sunk the flag-
ship team at Richard Childress Racing. The pit
miscue dropped him from the top five to 19th
with just 80 laps to make up the lost ground,
but the extra fuel he took on because of beingin
the back anyway gave him enough to make a
long green-flag run at the end.
4. Carl Edwards -264 (finished first)
He and his fellow Ford drivers showed the
kind of speed they didn't have at the first of the
season. He set a track record in winning the
pole and stretched his fuel to the end, breaking
a 70-race losing streak and sweeping both the
Nationwide and Cup races.
5. Matt Kenseth-311 (finished seventh)
After admittedly being off the pace he need-
ed to run to contend for the championship, he's
rebounded and shown championship potential
in recent weeks, fishing second at Texas and
then seventh at Phoenix despite an extra, late
pit stop because of a missing lug nut.
. Jeff Gordon -338 (finished llth)
His contribution to the Chase picture was
through his old pit crew, which serviced Jimmie
Johnson's car with no issues. The replacements,
Johnson's old crew, had a few miscues.
7. Kyle Busch -347 (finished 13th)
Like his Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Hamlin,
he had to stop for fuel in the closing stages and
lost positions to drivers who didn't stop.
8. Greg Biffe -349 (finished fourth)
He played the fuel strategy just right and fin-
ished ahead of the three drivers still in the run-
ning for the championship. "We weren' that
good, but the fuel mileage worked out for us at
the end."
9. Tbny Stewart-388 (finished 17th)
He was fourth at Kansas and won at Auto
Club Speedway in the Chase, but in the other
seven races he's had an average finish of 21.3.
10. Kurt Busch -429 (finished ninth)
The only challenge from here on out, points-
wise, is to see whether hell finish in the top 10
and get to speak at the annual awards banquet.
The two at the bottom of the standings don't
have a part on the program.
11. Clint Bowyer -434 (finished 21st)
An early crash and an empty fuel tank near
the end of the 312-lap run doomed him to a
mid-pack finish.
12. Jeff Burton -404 (finished 19th)
After finishing second in the second Chase
race, at Dover, he looked like a title contender,
but since then he's had just one top-10 finish, a
ninth at Martinsville, and an average finish of
20.3 in Chase races this year.


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-241-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVID GLENN MAYO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
David Glenn Mayo,deceased, whose
date of death was November 24,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is November 18,
2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/: Nancy Jo Mayo
397 NW Orbison Drive
Lake City, FL 32055
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/: John J. Kendron
Attorney for Nancy Jo Mayo
Florida Bar Number 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
582 West Duval Street
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Fax (386) 755-1336
E-Mail: jjk@rkkattomeys.com

05524471
November 18,25, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-297-CA
LENVIL H. DICKS,
Plaintiff,
vs,
BOBBY W. HINGSON, a/k/a
BOBBY W. HINGSON, JR. and
DENISE L. HINGSON,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 16, Block B, Pine Hills Addition,
a 'subdivision as recorded in Plat
Book 6, Pages 36-36A, public re-
cords of COLUMBIA County, Flori-
da.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated November 15, 2010, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
December 15, 2010, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
15th day of November, 2010
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By: /s/J. HARRIS
Deputy Clerk

04542377
November 18, 25, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com



-U1



Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l &'Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

*** SPECIAL **
Holiday Cleaning
Done your way!
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Auto Shop: Tractors, Trucks,
Cars, Implements, Small Engines,
Welding, much more. Free Est.
386-623-3200 or 755-3890
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,


DORA J. JOHNSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated November 3,


Legal


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2009-CA-000757
Division #
UNC:
CitiMortgage. Inc.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Aaron White and Debra Ann White
a/k/a Debra Ann Stanley a/k/a Debra
A. White, Husband and Wife; United
States Department of Agriculture;
Sunstate Federal Credit Union; Ben
Ellis; American General Finance,
Inc.; Unifund CCR Partners d/b/a
Unifund CCR Partners, G.P.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated November 3,
2010, entered in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-000757 of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff
and Aaron White and Debra Ann
White a/k/a Debra Ann Stanley a/k/a
Debra A. White, Husband and Wife
are defendantss, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash AT
THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT
173 HERNANDO.STREET, LAKE
CITY, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on De-
cember 15, 2010, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 8, FRANK C. CUMMINGS
SUBDIVISION, UNIT 1, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGES 182 AND 183, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED at Lake City, Florida, this
4th day of November, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
/s/B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT

05524412
November 18,25, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 09000015CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CATHERINE LOVELADY, et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHIR-
LEY ANN REED OWENS F/K/A
SHIRLEY ANN
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 2, BLOCK 7, OAK HILL ES-
TATES REPLAT, ACCORDING
TO THE MAP OR PLAT THERE-
OF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 52, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or be-
fore December, 10, 2010, a date
which is within thirty (30) days after
the first publication of this Notice in
the LAKE CITY REPORTER and
file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
!heir disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 10th day of Novem-
ber, 2010.
P.Dewitt Cason
As Clerk of the Court
/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05524460
November 18, 25. 2010
The Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc.Board of Directors will
hold a meeting of the Board of
Directors on Monday, December 6,
2010, 6:00 P.M. at the Suwannee
River Economic Council, Inc.,
Senior Center Building in Live Oak,
Florida.

05524461
November 18, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2006-445-CA
DIVISION:
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY FKA BANK-
ERS TRUST COMPANY OF CALI-
FORNIA, N.A. NOT 1N ITS INDI-
VIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT SOLE-
LY AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF
VENDEE MORTGAGE TRUST
1994-3
Plaintiff,
vs.


FEET TO SAID WEST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF BAKER STREET,


2010 and efitered in Case NO. 2006-
445-CA of the Circuit Court of the
THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for
COLUMBIA County, Florida where-
in DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY FKA BANK-
ERS TRUST COMPANY OF CALI-
FORNIA, N.A. NOT IN ITS INDI-
VIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT SOLE-
LY AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF
VENDEE MORTGAGE TRUST
1994-3, is the Plaintiff and DORA J.
JOHNSON; DISCOVERY MAR-
KETING AND DISTRIBUTING,
INC.; The clerk will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at Court-
room 1 OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 8th day of December,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SE 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, AND
RUN EASTERLY ALONG SEC-
TION LINE TO THE WEST EDGE
OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO 247; THENCE NORTH-
EASTERLY PARALLEL TO AND
50 FEET ON A PERPENDICULAR
FROM THE CENTERLINE OF'
SAID STATE ROAD NO. 247,
2054.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH
48 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST
18.99 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SAID
STATE ROAD NO. 247, AS NOW
LOCATED AND TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE NORTH 48 DEGREES 30
MINUTES WEST 378.47 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 151.90 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 397.46 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 247; THENCE SOUTH
49 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02
SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 153.08
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, BEING A PART OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH RANGE 16 EAST
A/K/A 1222 SOUTHWEST STATE
ROAD 247, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on November 4, 2010.
P DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F06017711 NMNC-CONV

05524402
November11, 18, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000746
DIVISION
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION,.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANNE T. SARGENT, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated November 9,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000746 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, is the Plaintiff and
ANNE T. SARGENT; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE HERE-
IN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWNa TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TEN-
ANT #1 N/K/A SHAYLA NOR-
MAN are the Defendants, The Clerk
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at COURTROOM 1 OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 15th day of December, 2010, the
following described property as set
'forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 12, BLOCK 2, OF OAK PARK
SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 17, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND ALSO THE FOLLOWING:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK 2, OF
OAK PARK SUBDIVISION, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 17, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA (SAID POINT BE-
ING ON THE WEST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF BAKER STREET),
AND RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES
37 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID LOT 1 AND LOT 2, BLOCK
2, A DISTANCE OF 114.92 FEET
TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF SAID LOT 2, SAID POINT
FALLING IN AN EXISTING
CHERRY TREE; THENCE NORTH
89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 15
SECONDS EAST ALONG AN EX-
ISTING WIRE FENCE 114.91


EARLY THANKSGIVING DEADLINES

Our Advertising deadlines will be
Classiied: Friday, November 26 will deadline Wednesday, November 2411a.m.
Display: Friday, November 26 will deadline Monday, November 22
Saturday November 27 will deadline Tuesday, November 23
Sunday, November 28 will deadline Tuesday, November 23
Tuesday, November 30 will deadline Wednesday, November 24

Sit our or,pliyeec cll cll nj,,
Thanksgiving with their families,
the Iake CIty Rcprtcr %ill he chlseed.
Thursday, Novvember 25th, 2010.

Wle will he back in the tflice on
FIriday, November 26th for our
custnomner 's convenience.
'iThank Yu atnd
Htave a Great Thanksgivting W


Legal

THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 27
MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE 3.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 645 SE PUTNAM STREET,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on November 10, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09110094

05524462
November 18, 25, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 03-233-CA
COLUMBIA PLANTATION COM-
PANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEORGE M. BOWERS and DEL-
ECE BOWERS, his wife, THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, and TUSTE-
NUGGEE PLANTATION SOUTH
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC., a Florida non-profit corpora-
tion,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the third floor of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m.
on December 1, 2010, the following
property described in Exhibit 'A" at-
tached hereto.
EXHIBIT "A"
Parcel 17
Commence at the Northwest comer
of the NE 1/4 of Section 12, Town-
ship 6 South, Range 16 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida and run thence S
00'03'14"E along the West line of
the East 1/2 of said Section 12, 22.91
feet to the South line of Ichetucknee
Road (a county maintained graded
road) thence N 89'26'50"E along
said South line of Ichetucknee Road,
561.07 feet, thence N 89"05'20" E
still along said South line of Iche-
tucknee Road, 785.95 feet, thence S
00'20'48"W 549.74 feet, thence S
89"38'15"E 1300.53 feet to the Point
of Beginning, thence continue S
89'38'15"E 650.03 feet, thence S
00"20'48"W 671.46 feet thence N
89'38'15"W 650.03 feet, thence N
00'20'48"E 671.46 feet to the Point
of Beginning. Said lands being sub-
ject to a cul-de-sac easement in the
Southwest corer thereof. Said lands
being a part of the NW 1/4 of Sec-
tion 7, Township 6 South, Range 17
East.
Together With:
60 Foot Road Easement
A strip of land 60 feet in width being
30 feet each side of a centerline de-
scribed as follows: Commence at the
Northwest comer of the NE 1/4 of
Section 12, Township 6 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida and run thence S 00'03'14"E
along the West line of the East 1/2 of
said Section 12, 229.91 feet to the
South line of Ichetucknee Road (a
county maintained graded road)
thence N 89"26'50"E along said
South line of Ichetucknee Road
561.07 feet, thence N 89"05'20"E
still along said South line of the
Ichetucknee Road, 785.95 feet to the
Point of Beginning, thence S
00"20'48"W 1319.95 feet to refer-
ence Point "A" thence continue S
00"20'48" W 572.07 feet to reference
Point "B" thence continue S
00"20'48"W 743.46 feet to reference
Point "C" thence N89'38'15" W
664.25 feet to the center point of a
cul-de-sac having a radius of 50 feet
and the Point of Termination. Also
begin at reference Point "A" and run
thence N 89"38'15"W 668.85 feet to
the center point of a cul-de-sac hay-
ing a radius of 50 feet and the Point
of Termination. Also begin at refer-
ence Point "B" and run thence S
89"38'15"E 1300.53 feet to reference
Point "D" thence continue S
89"38'15"E 1300.06 feet to reference
Point "E", thence N 00"20'48" E
671.46 feet to the centerpoint of a


RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


I _ I


Legal

cul-de-sac having a radius of 50 feet
and the Point of Termination, also
begin at reference Point "D" and run
thence N 00"20'48"E 671.46 feet to
the center point of a cul-de-sac hav-
ing a radius of 50 feet and the Point
of Termination. Also begin at refer-
ence Point "D" and run thence S
00"20'48"W 671.46 feet to the center
point of a cul-de-sac having a radius
of 50 feet and the Point of Termina-
tion also begin at reference Poiht "E"
and run thence S 00'20'48"W 671.46
feet to the center point of a cul-de-
sac having a radius of 50 feet and the
Point of Termination, said easements
being a part of the NE 1/4 of Section
12 and the NW 1/4 of Section 7,
Township 6 South, Range 17 East
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated: November 4, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the
Court
By /s/ B. Scippio ,
Deputy Clerk

05524391
November 11, 18, 2010


010 Announcements










060 Services

Looking for elder persons in need
of 24 hr care in my home.
Certified Nursing Ass't,
in Jasper, FL, 386-792-3149


070 Rewards

WANTED: Need to speak to man
that witnessed accident at the
intersection of Baya & Main St.,
11/9/10, 8 PM,Robin 832-7174

100 Job
1 Opportunities

05524481
DETAILER
Large Manufacturing Company
has the following position
available in the Lake City,
Florida, facility:
DETAILER/CHECKER
Graduate with AS degree or
experience in the steel joist
industry. Responsibilitities
include drafting and detailing of
joist and deck drawings. Must
have AutoCAD experience.
Company offers a highly
professional environment with
tremendous growth opportunity
and competitive salary commen-
surate with experience.
Excellent benefit package.
Qualified applicants submit
cover letter and resume in
confidence to:
Jan Tryon
jan.tryon@newmill.com

05524485
Medical Biller Needed
Several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please e-mail resume to :
mafaisalmd@Gmail.com
or fax 386-758-5987

BULLDOZER OPERATOR
Part time, references required,
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887

Customer Stipport Job Pay $300-
$600 a week,could work from
home later on 95% of support is by
email.Emailtrueloss@ gmail.com.

Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609

Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St, Lake City, FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com

Local mortgage company is
looking for an outbound phone
salesperson. Please don't apply
unless highly motivated & strong
salesperson. Call 386-243-0878.

Pestmasters Services is seeking
F/T exp Pest Control Tech.
Certification A + but not required,
Please call 386-752-7779 for appt


BUY IT


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010


120 Medical
Employment
F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
MA needed M-F for busy medical
practice. Send reply to Box 05058,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709. Lake City, FL, 32056
Homecare LPN's needed 9a-6p
and CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare 352-291-4888

141 Babysitters
Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or P/T,
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336
240 Schools&
240 Education
(M542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/29/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Auto Pet Feeder portion control
PETMATE # 24240 Online $60-
95 like new! 10# Meow Mix
Both for $45 386-752-0987
Beautiful Female Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215
Black Limousine Bull
polled, great disposition,
$1,350 obo
SOLD
Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231
Pigs for sale
different ages and sizes,
call for details
386-965-2215

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

403 Auctions
Auction Thursday, Nov 18, 2010
6:30 pm, prev. all day 6x7x14
enclosed cargo trailer, RCA
big-screen TV, 2 leather recliners,
Kenmore Elite 3-door refrigerator,
Nintendo Wii unit,
2 gorgeous DR groups, more!
Pictures weekly @
www.auctionzip.com, ID # 19590
Phoenix Auction Services,
416 N. Main St. Trenton, FL.
Ph: 352 463 0707
AB2866 AU1437 10% BP

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
COMPLETE CHERRY
Queen Bedroom Set.
Good condition. $450.00 obo
(904)704-9377
Tempur-Pedic, double size bed
w/frame, like new,
paid $2000 asking $500
SOLD

411 Machinery&
STools
10" Craftsman Table Saw
Extra blades, good condition
$30 obo
SOLD
Craftsman Joiner/Belt Sander
Commercial model,
good condition $125 obo
386-755-3541

414 Needlecraft
& Sewing
Quilting Frame
4ft. wide wood
$125.00


386-752-0987

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


430 Garage Sales
Fri 8am Sat 8-12. Columbia City
on 47S. Collectibles, china, linen,
old book, name brand clothes,
lamps, much more. Rain cancels





PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only, 7 AM.tools, clothes,
dishes, misc., RV stuff, tow dolly,
lrg dining rm table (Woodcrest
Subdiv) 231 SW Crest Glen
Saturday 7:00am Emerald Forest
(off 247), end of Stanley Ct. Baby
furn., clothes, & toys, along
with household items items.

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420

530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt,
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098
386-965-3110
630 Mobile Homes
63v for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass. $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-54J0
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Large 3/2 DW, very new.
South of town on 441.
$650. mo.
386-208-4702
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465,
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm. Five Points.
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/I BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

640 oMobile Homes
for Sale
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras
386-752-4258
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05523977
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 /1 Apt in duplex for rent, very
clean. $560 mo. w/$560 dep. no
pets, w/carport, off Branford Hwy
(5 miles from town) 386-752-7578
2 bdrm/1 bath, I car garage, W/D
hook up, $530 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.


Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
352-514-2332 /352-377-7652
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2I For Rent
Nice Efficiency Room. Private
entrance. $400. mo plus deposit
Everything furnished. No pets.
386-758-5671 or 386-965-0778
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
04542292
For Rent-
3/2 home on Baya Ave.
convenient to shopping, schools
and churches. $790./mo with
$790./security. First month's
rent reduced to $395.00
for qualified tenant.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
386-365-5884.

2 br/lba House w/yard,
near airport, $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $700 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $850 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Alligator Lake-Executive Home
3/2, 2,200 sq. ft. fireplace, huge
deck. Lease, good credit & refer-
ences req'd. $1,000 mo; $1,500
refundable deposit 386-752-3397
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. RENTED
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

75 Business &
5 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments.
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!!!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck. white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215





To place your
classified ad call

755-5440

^^^^WJaiMs


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