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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01451
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/13/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01451
System ID: UF00028308:01451
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Indians win paddle
Fort White rolls over Santa Fe, 30-7.

Sp( 000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007A
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
__ __ GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


uity


Bucket winners
Columbia crushes Suwannee to earn
Old Oaken Bucket.
Sports, I B






Reporter


Saturday, November 13, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. 255 E 75 cents


New library dedicated to Weaver II


Fort White branch
expected to open
in late December.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@iakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Library
patrons in Fort White will
soon have a new location to
call home.
The new Fort White
Branch of the Columbia
County Public Library was
dedicated Friday. The new
branch is off Highway 47,
across from Fort White
High School.
The efforts of for-
mer Columbia County
Commissioner Dewey
Weaver led to the building
of the facility.
The Fort White area
has always been treated


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Dewey Weaver and Columbia County Public Library Director
Deborah Paulson unveil a plaque dedicated to Weaver.
Pictured are County Commissioner Stephen Bailey (from left),
Rusty DePratter, County Commissioners Scarlet Frisina and
Weaver, Paulson, County Commissioner Jody DuPree and
Board Chairman Ron Williams.


like the red-headed step-
child, said Board of County
Commissioners Chairman


Ron Williams. Candidates
running for District 2 would
say they were going to help


Fort White and once elect-
ed, forgOt abbut the area.
'Then up came a gentle-
man by the name of Dewey
Weaver," he said.
Weaver made a com-
mitment to be a commis-
sioner not only for District
2 but Fort White as well,
Williams said.
It shattered Weaver's
dreams whnh the state
could not provide funding
for the library, but he was
able to have the board com-
mit money, Williams said.
Getting a new library
required the support of the
board.
"Regardless of who's
pushing, without three
votes you don't go any-
where," Weaver said. "My


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter
Pedestrian struck by pickup
Sgt. Clint VanBennekom (standing) and EMS personnel
attend to a man who was struck by a Chevy 1500 pickup
truck as he tried to cross Northwest Commerce Drive at about
6:15 p.m. Friday, The pickup was turning from Highway 90
onto northbound Commerce when the accident occurred. The


UBRARY continued on 3A pedestrian was taken to a local hospital.


$9 million road

improvement

project underway


OldWire, Herlong
roads scheduled
to be paved.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Construction on a major
county road improvement
project, with a budget of $9
million, is currently under-
way.
Officials said Friday that
the first phase of paving Old
Wire and Herlong roads,
which
intersect,
Nov. 1,
with con-
struction
of the
phase s e
costing Williams
a 1 most
$1.5 mil-
lion. The project's first sec-
tion is on Old Wire Road,
beginning at County Road
240 and running south for
3.3 miles.
Kevin Kirby, Public Works
director, said the project's
first phase will take more
than a year under contrac-
tor C.A. Boone. Right now,
workers are clearing and
grubbing land and manag-
ing utility relocation, he


said.
Only the bid for the first
phase has been filled; said
Dale Williams, county man-
ger. The county is still
working on right-of-way
acquisition for the second
phase of Old Wire Road.
Williams noted that as
unpaved roads, Old Wire
and Herlong historically
account for about 20 per-
cent of the total mainte-
nance calls received by the
county.
"They're old, long-estab-
lished roads," he said.
"They're both very lengthy
and for that reason very
costly to improve by pav-
ing."
The county appropriated
money about two years ago,
mostly for the project's pre-
liminary engineering and
design and an engineering
study to determine cost,
Williams said. The commis-
sion chose to use gas tax
revenue for funding and
will employ a loan or bond
to generate the necessary
money to pay for the paving
cost, he said.
Kirby said the project's
first phase is currently
ahead of schedule.
"They are making
ROAD'S continued on 3A


Olustee State Park

hosts special event

honoring veterans

From staff reports attend and recognize mem-
bers of the United States
A special event honoring Armed Forces.
veterans for their service The United Daughters of
and sacrifice to the country the Confederacy will offer
is 10 a.m. 2 p.m. today at light refreshments and
Olustee Battlefield Historic distribute .a small token of
State Park appreciation to all visiting
The event is hosted by veterans.
the state park along with The event and admis-
the United Daughters of sion to the park is free. For
the Confederacy. more information call toll
All veterans and their free 1-877-635-3655 or visit
families, along with the www.FloridaStateParks.
community, are welcome to org/stephenfoster.


1 I84264 U I2 1


74
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


GAMERS FIND THEIR



SLICE OF HEAVEN


Students gather
at FGC for Anime
Club's game night
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
C constant gui-
tar riffs filled
the air inside
the Florida
Gateway
College Friday night as stu-
dents crowded around tele-
vision sets, computers and
projection screens, playing
a variety of video games
that turned the room into a
gamer's haven.
The students were at
the library as part of the
Florida Gateway College
Anime Club game night.
As part of the event, a
variety of consoles were
set up so attendees could
play games such as Call
of Duty: Black Ops; Halo:
Reach; Street Fighter IV;
Guitar Hero; and League of
Legends.
Anthony Brown, whose
nickname is Axle, was


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Adrienne Boatright, 10, and Andy Duong, 18, celebrate after successfully driving out alien
invaders in Halo: Reach, during the Florida Gateway College Game Night on Friday.


absorbed by a serious game
of Street Fighter IV.
Brown, a FGC college,
sophomore, is president of


the school's Anime Club
and said Friday's event was
one of the school's bi-annu-
al game nights.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Daniel Stenquist (left), 20, uses a joystick to play Dwane Cherry, 28, in a rousing.game of
Super Street Fighter 4.


4 ,/


Opinion ................ 4A
Faith ................... 6A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics....... .. 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


.1.


TODAY IN
FAITH
Baptist Church
honors pianist.


"We have this two times
a year, one in the fall and
one in the spring," he said,
noting he helped set up
the college's first game
night when he was in high
school. "This is an awe-
some event where students
and faculty come together
and they play all kinds of
games."
During this year's game
night, attendees could be
the shooter or experience
role-playing, adventure,
fighting or motion games.
"This is that time before
finals where students can
come here and wind down
and relax," Brown said.
"It's not just a place where
you have to come to study
and grind, but you can
also have a good time with
friends."
Organizers said the event
traditionally averages 70-80
students and expectations
for this year's attendance
hovered around those
numbers. An estimated 50
GAMING continued on 3A

COMING
SUNDAY
Adoption experience
chronicled in book.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


m











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


Friday:
Afternoon: 7-2-2
Evening: 9-6-3


"ay4) Friday:
Afternoon: 4-8-7-2
Evening: 2-6-4-3


IL Thursday:
3-17-23-24-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



West cancels 'Today' performance


NEW YORK

Kanye West has backed
out of a scheduled
performance on NBC's
'Today" show after get-
ting upset with how his
interview with host Matt Lauer this
week was handled.
Wests record company confirmed
the cancellation to 'Today" on Friday
after the rapper said on his Twitter
account that he wouldn't perform. He
was scheduled to appear Nov. 26, part
of a promotion drive for his new disc,
"My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy,"
which is being released next week.
During the interview, which was
taped Tuesday and aired Thursday,
West appeared thrown when 'Today"
aired a video clip of an embarrassing
moment when he grabbed a micro-
phone from Taylor Swift at the 2009
MTV Video Music Awards and said
Beyonce should have won an award
instead of Swift.
West tweeted this week that he
felt "set up" by the interview and that
Lauer tried to force his answers. His
cancellation notice was accompanied
by mixed messages.
In the interview, West talked about
former President George W. Bush's
angry response to West saying after
Hurricane Katrina that Bush "doesn't
care about black people." 'Today"
played a clip of Bush speaking about it
in his recent interview with Lauer. In
seeking a reaction, Lauer noted that
it was the most emotional Bush had
become during three and a half hours
of talking with him.
"Don't even listen," Lauer said. "I
.want you to look at his face."
That appeared to upset West, who
looked away.
West's decision could be a lose-lose
situation. It deprives 'Today" of an
appearance from one of music's most
popular performers on the day after
Thanksgiving, when many people are


ASSOCIATED PRESS
American musician Kanye West performs in Yas Island on the first night of the F1
motor race meeting in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Friday. West cancelled an
upcoming performance on the "Today" show because he was upset with the way
his interview with host Matt Lauer want.


off from work and school.
From Wests standpoint, he was due
to perform on Black Friday on the
nation's most-watched morning show,
when New York streets around the
'Today" studio will likely be clogged
with holiday shoppers who might be
persuaded to add his disc to their lists.

No pink slip for Homer:
'Simpsons' is renewed
NEW YORK Raise a can of
Duff beer! Fox network says "The
Simpsons" will be back next fall for
its 23rd season.
Fox says that will bring the
animated series to a total of 515
episodes. '"The Simpsons" is the lon-
gest-running comedy in TV history.
The network announced the renewal
Thursday..
Since premiering in December
1989, "The Simpsons" has won 27
Emmy awards. In the meantime,


family patriarch Homer Simpson has
consumed an uncountable number of
doughnuts and Duff.
'The Simpsons" airs Sundays at 8
p.m. Eastern time.

Gyllenhaal, Sarsgaard to
tackle Chekhov again
NEW YORK Maggie Gyllenhaal
and her husband, Peter Sarsgaard, will
be together again on stage next year
in another off-Broadway play by Anton
Chekhov.
The Classic Stage Company says the
couple will appear alongside Jessica
Hecht and Josh Hamilton in 'Three
Sisters."
Sarsgaard is also known for his
films including "Garden State,"
"Kinsey" and "Jarhead." His wife's
movie credits include "Crazy Heart"
and 'The Dark Knight."

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays
* Actress Madeleine 0 Actr
Sherwood is 88. is 57.
* Journalist-author Peter 0 Actc
Arnett is 76. N Actr
* Producer-director Garry Goldb
Marshall is 76. Actc
* Country singer-songwriter Miami'
Ray Wylie Hubbard is 64. 0 Forr
* Actor Joe Mantegna is 63. VinnyT
* Actress Sheila Frazier is ECom
62. is 43.

Daily Scriptures

"For this reason. we


ess Tracy Scoggins

)r Chris Noth is 56.
ess-comedian Whoopi
erg is 55.
)r Rex Linn ("CSI:
') is 54.
ner NFL quarterback
Testaverde is 47.
edian Jimmy Kimmel


have not


stopped praying for you.We
continually ask God to fill you
with the knowledge of his will
through all the wisdom and
understanding that the Spirit
gives.
-Colossians 1:9


Lake City Reporter


'HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.iakecityreporter.com.
The Lake City Reporter; an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday 'at 180
E. Duvai St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED


To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks............... $48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates indude 7% salestax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks................ $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Crews work on
restoring gas

FORT MYERS As
many as 8,000 customers
are without gas after a natu-
ral gas line exploded along
Florida's Gulf coast, criti-
cally injuring one person.
TECO Peoples Gas
spokesman Rick Morera
told The News-Press that
partial service could be
restored to downtown Fort
Myers by Friday night.
Crews will then work on
restoring service to busi-
nesses and restaurants near
Naples. Morera said it could
take a week before service
is completely restored to all
customers.
Police said a bulldozer
working on a road-widening
project Thursday severed
a gas line and caused the
explosion in Fort Myers,
about 100 miles south of
Tampa.
Posen Construction
employee Mario Santos of
Bonita Springs suffered
burns on half his body.

Pedro Pan flights
mark anniversary

MIAMI Veterans of
the so-called Pedro Pan
flights out of Cuba are gath-
ering in Miami to mark the
50th anniversary of their
exodus.
More than 14,000 chil-
dren were spirited out of
the island between 1960
and 1962 at the behest of
Cuban parents fearful of
the new communist gov-
ernment.
On Friday, those chil-
dren, many now with grand-
children of their own, will
revisit the South Florida
camps they first stayed in'
following their U.S. arriv-
al. The youngsters later
moved into foster homes
and orphanages until their
parents could also leave the
island. In many cases, the
reunions took years.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A gas main fire burns out of control near the intersection
of Colonial Boulevard and State Road 82 Thursday in Fort
Myers. A construction worker was injured when a gas line
exploded along Florida's Gulf coast. The injured worker is in
critical condition and was taken to a hospital.

Woman dies after Man charged with
mobile home fire killing girl from ad


LAKELAND Tampa
General Hospital said a 46-
year-old woman who was
severely burned when her
mobile home caught fire
earlier in the week has
died.
Kimberly Richendollar
died sometime late
Wednesday or early
Thursday. Tampa General
Hospital officials wouldn't
be more specific, citing
confidentiality laws.
Richendollar's Lakeland
mobile home caught fire
Tuesday. Firefighters said
she had fourth degree
burns on about 10 percent
of her body and she inhaled
smoke and soot.


DAYIONA BEACH A
man who allegedly answered
an ad from a central Florida
woman who called herself
the "Girlfriend next door" has
been charged with slashing
her throat .and stashing her
body in the back of a car.
Volusia County sheriff's
investigators said Thursday
they had arrested 32-year-
old Willie Hicks, charging
him with first-degree mur-
der in the death of Danielle
Santangelo.
Investigators said
Santangelo placed an ad
describing herself as a beau-
tiful, classy, Italian.

* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


-UNNY AND UNNY AND OLATED
WARM WARM SHOWERS


H1i74 L043 H176L048 HI77L054


RILOAMfStaNer
Ssur*' WV~tuda ngh'slo 1


Tallahassee
75/36

73/53 .Panima City
,72/48


SWldesta
72/36
Lake City,
74/43
Gainesville .
,74/45
Ocala
,76/44

Tampa *
o,


79/


OY'


Ft Mye
81/5


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
71/45 Daytona Beach
B-\ Ft. Lauderdale
Daytpna Beach Fort Myers
75i,54 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
78/55 M7459 amI C
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
79/62 Orlando
i Ft Lauderdale Panama City
rs, 80/68 Pensacola
7 oNaples Tallahassee
8'0/58 MWami Tampa


S 80/68 Valdosta .
Key West W. Palm Beach
80/69


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


77
45
75
52
87 In 1946
32 in 1977

,0.00"
0.37"
38.79"
0.84"
44.47"


SUN
Sundsewtoday
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


6:54 a.m.
5:35 p.m.
6:55 a.m.
5:35 p.m.


MOON
Moonrse today 12:57 p.m.
Moonset today
Moonrise tom. 1:27 p.m.
Moonset-tom. 12:31 a.m.

C030
Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec.
13 21 28 5
First Full Last New


6

30ni to bn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

- .' .'


Sunday
76, 58/pc
74/55/s
81/67/pc
80/58/s
77/50/s
71/49/s
77/68/s
76/48/s
81/66/pc
80/60/pc
76/50/s
78/56/s
73/58/s
74/60/pc
76/48/s
78/60/s
75/43/pc
81/63/pc


Monday
77 62,'pc
78/61/pc
81/69/pc
82/62/pc
77/55/pc
76/56/pc
80/70/s
77/54/pc
82/69/s
81/63/pc
78/57/pc
81/60/pc
72/61/t
72/52/t
75/60/t
80/63/pc
75/57/r
81/66/s.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weather.com


,.. .f.. Forecasts, data and graph-
=- '"%_ Icos 2010 Weather Central
SLLC, Madison, Wis.
"\ K e' www.weatherpubllsher.com


S i 6 On this date in
aSaturday1P .7p unday6a 1946, scientist s 1 C n t
Vincent Schaefer It nneba l
dropped 6 pounds
S, .of dry ice pellets
into a cloud over
Pittsfield, Mass.,
seeding the cloud.
duced snow flurries
from the cloud.

Fmcuad tmwat ....Ink *Fuoline e


AROUND FLORIDA


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 75 LO 52


~"


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


L LAirECTY lALMANAC


3.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL &, NATION SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


Doctors brace for Medicare pay cuts


RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Breast cancer surgeon
Kathryn Wagner has post-
ed a warning in her waiting
room about a different sort
of risk to patients' health:
She'll stop taking new
Medicare cases if Congress
allows looming cuts in doc-
tors' pay to go through.
The scheduled cuts -
the result of a failed system
set up years ago to con-
trol costs have raised
alarms that real damage to
Medicare could result if the
lame-duck Congress winds
up in a partisan standoff
and fails to act by Dec. 1.
That's when an initial 23
percent reduction would
hit.
Neither Democrats
nor newly empowered
Republicans want the sud-
den cuts, but there's no
consensus on how to stayed
them off. The debate over
high deficits complicates
matters, since every penny


going to make doctors
whole will probably have to
come from cuts elsewhere.
A reprieve of a few months
may be the likeliest out-
come. That may not reas-
sure doctors.
"My frustration level is
at a nine or 10 right now,"
said Wagner, who practic-
es in San Antonio. "I am
exceptionally exhausted
with these annual and
biannual threats to cut my
reimbursement by drastic
amounts. As a business
person, I can't budget at
all because I have no idea
how much money is going
to come in. Medicine is a
business. Private practice
is a business."
The cuts have nothing to
do with President Barack
Obama's health care over-
haul. They're the conse-
quence of a 1990s bud-
get-balancing law whose
requirements Congress
has routinely postponed.
But these cuts don't go
away; they come back for a
bigger bite.


Doctors have muddled
through with temporary
reprieves for years. This
time, medical groups esti-
mate that as many as two-
thirds of doctors would
stop taking new Medicare
patients, throwing the
health program for 46 mil-
lion older and disabled peo-
ple into turmoil just when
the first baby boomers will
become eligible.
Health care for military
service members, families
and retirees also would
be jeopardized because
Tricare payments are tied
to Medicare's.
Former Medicare admin-
istrator Gail Wilensky, a
leading Republican policy
expert, says lawmakers
coming back to Washington
next week better take note.
"We simply cannot let phy-
sicians take a 23 percent
reduction in payment and
think that we are not going
to seriously disrupt access
for beneficiaries," Wilensky
said.
Yet there's no agreement


among lawmakers and the
Obama administration on
how long a reprieve to
grant or whether the cost
- about $1 billion per
month should be added
to the deficit or paid for
with spending reductions
elsewhere.
The last reprieve, in June,
was paid for after a strug-
gle to come up with offsets
acceptable to Democrats
and Republicans. The
deadline, for congressional
action expired, plunging
Medicare's claims system
into confusion for wv'eeks.
How did it get to be such
a big mess?
There's widespread
recognition that the way
Medicare pays doctors is
flawed because it rewards
sheer volume of services,
not quality results. But
there's no agreement on a
better way.
So in the 1990s law-
makers devised a formula
for cuts as an automatic
braking system to keep
Medicare humming along


at a sustainable growth
rate.
Except every time costs
went up, they hit the over-
ride button. Repealing the
formula now would cost
more than $280 billion over
10 years.
The American Medical
Association is calling for
a 13-month reprieve that
would give Congress time
to work on a new payment
system; the administration
supports that approach.
'The single biggest step
we can take to strengthen
Medicare ... is to make sure
these disruptive cuts don't
take effect," said Health and
Human Services Secretary
Kathleen Sebelius. "We
will ultimately need a per-
manent fix ... but in the
meantime, we don't want
any doctor to be stuck in
a limbo where they don't
know week to week how
much they'll be paid."
The AMA and Obama
would settle for adding the
cost to the deficit. Most
Republicans and many con-


servative Democrats want
it paid for.
Aides to the Senate
Finance Committee chair-
man, Sen. Max Baucus,
D-Mont., say he's working
toward the longest possible
extension that will-get the
60 votes needed to pass the
Senate.
Last summer, when
Congress missed the
deadline for an extension,
Wagner had to tap her line
of credit to pay the salaries
of her nurses and office
staff. Medicare is only a
fraction of her practice, but
the cancer surgeon said pri-
vate insurance companies
also held up payments wait-
ing to see what would hap-
pen. "I didn't get a check
in the mail for almost a
month," she said.
As a doctor, she recog-
nizes there could be grave
consequences if she follows
through on not taking new
Medicare patients. Older
women are more likely to
have malignant disease
than younger patients.


ROADS: Paving project

Continued From Page 1A


remarkable headway," he
said.
Commissioner Scarlet
Frisina, whose district -
District 5 is home to
the first phase of Old Wire
Road, said the unpaved
roads have been an issue.
"Old Wire Road has been
a terrible problem road my
whole life," she said. "The
folks out here are very


excited to see it get started,
as am I."
Frisina thanked the coun-
ty commission, the Public
Works Department and the
county engineer.
'The project is well
underway and is going to
be a huge success," she
said. "I can't wait to see it
finished."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Commissioner Scarlet Frisina and Public
Works director Kevin Kirby discuss the plans for paving Old
Wire and'Herlong Roads while crews clear a pile of debris.


LIBRARY: Fort White dedication honors Weaver

Continued From Page 1A


board saw the need."
Libraries are an essential
part for the quality of life in
a community, he said.
"I "love libraries," he
said.
Weaver added that
although he came from a
very poor family, he was
able to travel the world
through reading. A book
series he discovered at his
school library in fourth
grade first sparked a love
for reading.
"It opened a whole new
world for me," Weaver said.
If the new library gives
one poor child in the com-
munity an opportunity to
visit places they would never
normally see it will be worth-
while, Weaver said.
"I'm proud of it," he
said. "I can't tell you how
proud."
The new library is 5,000
square feet and double the
size of the old building,
said Deborah Paulson,
director. A meeting room
in the new building will


.- > ..7, :. .. :


*0'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Patty Street (center), the Columbia County Public Library Fort White branch manager, gives a
tour to County Commissioner Dewey Weaver and his wife Mary Jane Friday during a dedica-
tion ceremony. 'It was his work that got us this library,' Street said regarding Weaver's work
toward getting the library built. 'This is needed.'


finally provide a place to
have library programs.
The library is hoping to
move into the new loca-


tion .by late December,
she said. A grand opening
celebration will follow at a
later date.


"I just think this is a
wonderful opportunity
for the citizens of Fort
White," Paulson said.


High court allows gay military ban for now


MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court on Friday
allowed the Pentagon to
continue preventing openly
gay people from serving


in the military while a fed-
eral appeals court reviews
the "don't ask, don't tell"
policy.
The court did not com-
ment in denying a request
from the Log Cabin
Republicans, a gay rights


group, to step into the ongo-
ing 'federal court review
of "don't ask, don't tell."
The Obama administration
urged the high court not to
get involved at this point.
Last month, a federal
judge ruled that the policy


violates the civil rights of
gay Americans and she
issued an injunction bar-
ring the Pentagon from
applying it. But the San
Francisco-based appeals
court said the policy could
remain ,in effect while it


considers the administra-
tion's appeal.
"Log Cabin Republicans
are disappointed that the
Supreme Court decided
to maintain the status quo
with regards to 'don't ask,
don't tell,' but we are not


surprised," said R. Clarke
Cooper, the group's execu-
tive director. "We are com-
mitted to pursuing every
avenue in the fight against
this failed and unconstitu-
tional policy."'


POLICE REPORTS


The following, informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.

Wednesday, Nov. 10
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office


Samantha Jo Charles,
23, 214 NW Craig Ave.,
warrant: Sale of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of a child
care facility.
John Wallace, 36,
3561 County Road 10A,
Wellborn, sell or delivery
of a controlled substance.
Larry J. Williams,
no age given, 4396 SW
County Road 240, DUI,


GAMING: Videos draw

Continued From Page 1A


people were at the event
during its first hour.
While a crowd of people
watched the gaming activi-
ties on big-screen televi-
sions, Amber Vann and
Jessica Gleman sat upstairs
playing a few rounds of
team death match on the
Call of Duty: Black Ops


game.
"I'm having a lot of fun,"
said Gleman, a member
of the Anime Club as she
waited for the next round to
start. "It's important to hold
an event like this because
it gets people together and
advertises for the college.
It's a fun event."


driving while license sus-
pended/revoked and war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
possession of a controlled
substance.
Lake City
Police Department
Althea Leona Vance,
no age given, 2580 NW
County Road 341, Bell,
possession of cocaine and
possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Thursday, Nov. 11


K


Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jack Steven Jeffers,
no age given, 135 SW
Towerview Glen, battery
on the elderly and grand
theft auto.
Lake City
Police Department
Bonnie Lynn
Meehan, no age given,
427 NE Alachua Ave., bat-
tery (domestic violence).

From staff reports.



JMk\ aI w


' Sewing Machines


Starting at:$ 5

e
*5 0


PEACE BAPTIST CHURCH
will b; .,,i,. a seminar on




"GIFTS OF THE SPIR'

This is a seminar you will NOT want to miss!
The Bible says we all have eii but how many know what "their"
gifts are. If you have never done an in depth study on the spiritual
gifts, this is the time to do it. Dr. I-. V. "Gene" Coons, Evangelist
will be our speaker/teacher on this exciting topic, and we
encourage everyone to attend.

DATES: Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 10 AM with coffee
and doughnuts being served at 9:30 in the church fellowship hall
so please come early. The first day's study will close at
approximately 3:10 PM, Lunch will be provided.

Sunday, November 21, 2010, starting at 10 AM.
Lunch will be served in the K-li..--..i. hall following the morning
worship service, with the last session starting "it 6 PM.

The church is located at 7794 S. E. US HIwy. 27, Branford, FL

For more information please call the church office 386-935-4681

wwwpeacebaptistchurch.net'
E-Mail peacebaptistchurch @(windstream.net


I


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Saturday, November 13, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Effects

of cutting

junk food

at schools

California voters
rejected legalizing
the recreational use
of marijuana, and a
study in England,
using a wide range of criteria
related to various drugs' harm
to users and others, found that
alcohol is by far the most dan-
gerous..
No surprise in either one of
those developments, or that
we are hesitant to make drugs
more accessible, despite the
.failed Prohibition experiment
Food is a substance none of
us can do without, yet there is
justification for restricting cer-
tain types of it as well.
A new study from the
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
makes the case.
The three-year study of sev-
enth and 12th graders and their
parents at eight Midwestern
schools found that barring all
junk food from a la carte lines
during school hours would
result in an 18 percent reduc-
tion in overweight or obese
students.
With more than 30 million
children being served lunch
and 9.7 million breakfast each,
school day, that's a big deal.
The information seems to
indicate the need to expand the
USDA's current ban on sell-
ing so-called Foods of Limited.
Nutritional Value to things like
candy bars, sodas, potato chips,
cookies and other high-fat
snack foods.
The researchers also called
on marketers to limit or elimi-
nate marketing their sales of
junk foods in schools as well.
While freedom of choice is a
right to be protected in adults,
limiting the range of choices of
foods available to children in a
school environment is the right
choice.
McCook (Neb.) Daily Gazette

HIGHLIGHT
IN HISTORY
On Nov. 13, 1789, Benjamin
Franklin wrote in a letter to a
friend, "In this world nothing
can be said to be certain, except
death and taxes."

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
PO LI CY
SLetters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and wilt be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


sTh i9GMoA COGTAf ARM and a1,,,,,


Washington waffles on deficit issue


President Barack
Obama has urged
Congress to extend
the Bush tax cuts for
all but high-income
individuals and families. It's the
right thing to do if we're going
to attack the problem.
Letting the tax cuts expire
for individuals earning over
$200,000 and families over
$250,000 would generate $700
billion in revenues for the gov-
ernment over the next 10 years.
You can't walk away from that
kind of money and claim to be
serious about deficit reduction,
a point that seems lost on con-
gressional Republicans.
'But the Obama White House
indicated it was open to com-
promise, possibly a one- or two-
year extension. From Seoul, the
president said that "it would be
fiscally irresponsible of us to
permanently extend the high-
income tax cuts."
But if the administration
and Congress don't face up to
that now, the delay only kicks
the can, to use the current
Washington cliche, into the next
election cycle with likely the
same result
During the campaign, GOP
Tea Party-backed candidates
were adamant about the need
to abolish earmarks, specially
mandated spending on indi-
vidual lawmakers' projects. It's


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
not in the whole scope of the
federal budget a large amount
of money last fiscal year, it
entailed 9,413 projects costing
about $16 billion but the
process has become symbolic of
backroom budgets.
Not so fast, Tea Partiers.
GOP bulls of the Senate like
James Inhofe and Tom Coburn
are explaining to the newcom-
ers that earmarks are actually
a good thing, and for reasons
ranging from the lofty pro-
tecting constitutional preroga-
tives to the crass keep-
ing the money out of Obama's
hands they must be retained.
Both senators have written
defenses of earmarks that could
serve as talking points for the
Tea Partiers to explain their
about-face to the folks back
home.
For bipartisan waffling on
the need to curb government
spending and attack the deficit,
it's hard to beat the reaction to
the preliminary recommenda-
tions of a blue-ribbon panel on


deficit reduction a combina-
tion of thunderous silence from
the president and vociferous
opposition from the two wings
of Congress.
Barring a miraculous explo-
sion in economic growth, deficit
reduction can only be achieved
by some combination of tax
increases and spending cuts.
The right, and especially the
Tea Party wing, is flatly opposed
to any tax increases and the
left is opposed to major cuts in
domestic programs.
The lines aren't even that
clearly drawn. Social Security
and Medicare are the two 800-
pound gorillas in the budget and
also the programs most popular
with the public, but any serious
deficit reduction will require
changes in those programs.
But Tea Party favorite Sen. Jim
DeMint sees no need to modify
Social Security.
"If we can just cut the admin-
istrative waste," he told "Meet
The Press," "we can cut hun-
dreds of billions of dollars at the
federal level."
Faced with a problem of its
own making, and one with obvi-
ous but unpleasant solutions,
Congress is desperately search-
ing for a way to stick with the
status quo.
* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


I WAIT #Ye GlAHTIER


9THMER.,
: a:pl:.


OCT. DEC.


JUGL.


LETTERS TO

An uphill struggle
to undo the harm
As a taxpayer, I am relieved
that we may have seen the end
when taxpayers were paying
for "cash for clunkers" stimulus
handouts, earmarks, bailouts for
Wall Street and auto-industry
management failures.
We are facing an uphill
struggle to undo the harm the
Democrats have wrought on us
in the past two years, yet, with
patience on our part, we will
succeed.
Keep writing your newly-elect-
ed representatives and encour-
age them. The president and
Democrats will be challenging
their every move.
Keep reminding them the
goal is to lower taxes, reduce
spending and government size,
and repeal Obama's healthcare.
Our healthcare does need
attention to allow out-of-state


AUG.


THE EDITOR
insurance to be available,
address pre-existing situations
and deal with malpractice abus-
es. Will this take place soon?
Probably not. Stay watchful that
our representatives don't forget
why we sent them there. What
is scary is almost as many vot-
ers voted the Democratic ticket
backing Obama's agenda.
Milton F. Muskewitz
Lake City

Hope for anyone who
asks for God's mercy
Anyone realize how busy and
fast-paced life has become, caus-
ing less patience, less love, less
compassion for our fellow man
and woman?
The last time the world was
in this condition, God the cre-
ator of all mankind, flooded the
whole world and all but eight
people living at the time per-
ished. God chose to save only


eight people, the prophet Noah
and his family.
New revelation from the Bible
today points to the exact day
God will once again destroy
earth and most of mankind,
only this time beginning with
a giant earthquake and ending
five months later with fire. This
is great news for those who
belong to God.
God teaches today (because
the seals have been opened,
spoken in the book of Daniel,
Chapter 12) that the beginning
of the final judgment is exactly
7,000 years from the flood,
which translates from the bibli-
cal calendar as being May 21,
2011.
Remember, God is very, very
merciful and loving. There is
hope for anyone who humbly
cries, who begs, and beseeches
God that maybe they, too, might
become saved before next May.
David Krahnke
Lake City


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


Thanking

wartime

veterans

It was Veterans Day, and
I was standing with a
group of middle school
students as historian Bill
Dean talked about World
War II and some of the photos
and artifacts he has collected
over the years. They were
on display at the Northeast
Georgia History Center, where
busloads of students came all
week long to learn something
about a war many of them
knew nothing about
During a lull in the presenta-
tion, a woman who must have
been a teacher stepped up and
asked, "Are you a veteran?"
I said yes.
She held out a handmade
card of colorful poster paper,
said "thank you" and walked
away. The card, I noticed later,
thanked me for serving in the
war.
"Oh, no," I said to myself. "I
can't keep this. I didn't serve
in any war."
Actually, I served five and
a half years in the Georgia
National Guard, and the only
time my unit was called up was
to deliver feed to farmers dur-
ing an ice storm. I missed the
call-up because I was doing my
six months in the Army.
So what should my card say?
Perhaps: "Thanks for serving
and almost getting the, chance
to deliver chicken feed to ice-
bound farmers."
I'm being facetious. And,
believe me, I'm not selling
the National Guard short
Its soldiers are well-trained
much better today than
when I served and the
same armory where I trained
. has sent troops to both Iraq
and Afghanistan. I'm proud
of them. They went to war. I
didn't So I found the woman
who gave me the card and
gave it back to her.
"It doesn't matter," she
said. "You served, didn't you?"
Finally, she convinced me to
take a different card, one that
said "thanks for serving," but
did not mention a war. I felt
better.
Lord, deliver me from
rewriting my history. There's
enough of that going on
already:
The president of a Christian
college resigned after a news-
paper revealed that he never
earned the master's degree he
claimed on his r6sum&. The
head football coach at a major
university did the same thing.
Some politicians have boasted
of wartime service that never
happened. Others have taken
only a grain of unpleasant
truth about their opponents
and built a whole nasty elec-
tion campaign around it
History is being rewritten
all over the world because
someone didn't like the way it
sounded.
I can understand revising
history when we've learned
new facts that give an event or
an era a different, more accu-
rate perspective. But to rewrite
history to suit personal beliefs
is undefendable.
I'm sorry. I have stretched
this point far enough. After all,
it was only a sweet, innocent
poster-paper card that thanked
me for being a veteran, and I
have launched it into a tirade
about dishonesty in general.
I could have told the woman:
"Please tell the student who
made this card, Thanks a lot.'"
But on that day, Veterans
Day, I couldn't do that.

Phil Hudgins is senior editor
of Community Newspapers Inc.


4A


I


OCT.


DEC.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


Today
RHS Alumni meeting

The next RHS Alumni meeting
is at noon today at Richardson
.Community Center. Call 752-
0815.

Health fair

A Diabetes Health Fair is 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. today at Lake City
Mall. There will be many booths
with educational materials on dia-
betes. Contact Michelle Mattox
at Randolph Medical Practices at
386-755-1440.

Veterans event

The United Daughters of the
Confederacy will host a special
event honoring veterans for their
service and sacrifice 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. today at Olustee Battlefield
Historic State Park.

Dulcimer Retreat

The Stephen Foster State
Park Dulcimer Retreat is today
at Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park. A concert-
featuring instructors from the
workshops is 7 p.m. in the park
auditorium. Dulcimer master
David Beede hosts the retreat.
Tickets for public admission are
$10. Visit www.FloridaStateParks.
org/stephenfoster/Events.cfn. Call
386-397-7009 or toll free 1-877-
635-3655.

Flu vaccine and shots

The Columbia County Health
Department now has flu vaccine
and is offering flu shots by appoint-
ment Monday through Friday. The
cost is $25, and Medicare Part B is
accepted. Pneumonia vaccinations
are also available for those eligible
at $40. Call for an appointment at
758-1069.

Sunday
Plow and Family Day


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

March of Dimes recognizes Briscoe
Maureen Lloyd, the event co-chairwoman for the March of Dimes of
Suwannee Valley Sixth Annual 'Holiday Magic' Signature Chef's Auction,
hugs Steve Briscoe after awarding him with a plaque. Briscoe was recog-
nized as the event's honorary chairman.


Old Fashioned Plow and
Family Day is 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Sunday at Tice Farms.
The farm is located at 2145
SW Tustenuggee Ave. Activities
include plowing, horse and
mule exhibitions, wagon rides,
petting zoo, buggy rides and
chicken pilau dinners. Proceeds
benefit the Chances for Children
Christmas Program. Bring an
unwrapped new gift for a child.
For event or dinner tickets, call
386-623-4732 or 623-7780. For
team participation, call 386-754-
0959.


Matching Funds Drive

The Christian Service Center
is having its Matching Funds
Drive' from now until Dec. 31.
All donations will be doubled by
local sponsors. Mark your check
"Matching Funds" and mail to
Christian Service Center, PO.
Box 2285 Lake City, FL 32056.
Call 75541770.

Monday
Food drive
The City of Lake City is


having its Tis the Season Food
Drive Nov. 15-19. The food drive
will assist the LAD Soup Kitchen,
located at 127 NE Escambia
St., for its annual Community
Thanksgiving Feast. Items need-
ed are rice, sugar, meal, canned
goods, pasta, paper goods and
any non-perishables. Call 719-
5742.

Hospice volunteers

Hospice of the Nature Coast is
searching for individuals who are
interested in volunteering in the
Columbia County area. Volunteer
Orientation Training is 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. Nov. 15 at the Columbia
County Public Library. Call Ronnie
Richardson, volunteer services
manager, at 386-935-4520.

Academic recognition

Presley's Excel and Scholars
Program is hosting its aca-
demic recognition ceremony
for Columbia County school
students at 7 p.m. Nov. 22 at
New Day Springs Missionary
Baptist Church. Students whose
first nine weeks report cards
have grades no less than B or S
can participate in the program.
Submit a copy of the report card
and a contact number to Bernice
D. Presley by Nov. 15 at 646 S. E.
Pennsylvania St., Lake City, FL,
32055, or P.O. Box 402, Lake City,
FL 32056. Fax 719-4389 or e-mail
presleyb@firn.edu. Call 752-4074
or 755-8130.

Tuesday
Organic Producers Workshop

A free workshop on organic
producers and MarketMaker
is 1-3:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
Columbia County Extension
Office located at the fairgrounds
in Lake City. Learn about the
steps to organic certification,
basic rules of organic production
how to connect online to find
markets for produce and more.
Call 752-5384 to register.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


OBITUARIES


Julius Balog
Mr. Julius Balog, 58, of Lake City
, died Wednesday, November
10, 2010 in the Robert Jenkins
Veterans Domiciliary. Funeral
arrangements are incomplete at
this time but will be available
by calling 752-1234. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Avenue Lake City ,
Florida (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Kyle "Ben" Benjamin
Boone
Mr. Kyle "Ben" Benjamin
Boone, 24, resident of Lake City,
died, Wednesday, November 10,
2010, at his residence. He was a
life long resident of Lake City
and was of the Christian Faith.
He was a member of the gradu-
ating class of 2004 of Columbia
High School. He enjoyed snow-
boarding, scuba diving, fishing,
and hunting. He is preceded in
death by his paternal grandmoth-
er, Ruth E. Boone and maternal
grandfather, John E. Shiver.
He is survived by his parents
Charles A. Boone and Jea-
nette Boone, Lake City, FL;
two brothers Clint A. (Kristen)
Boone Lake City, FL; Cliff
E. (Leslie) Boone, Lake City,
FL; Two sisters Kendra Boone,
Lake City,FL; and Krista Boone
(Vince) Robinson; Worthington
Springs, FL; Parental Grandpar-
ents CA Boone Sr. (Joan); Lake
City, FL; Maternal grandparent,
Lorilla Shiver, Thomasville,
GA.; nieces Taylor Griffin, Al-
lison Bedenbaugh, Reagan and
Hayden Robinson, Kylee Boone,
and two nephews Josh (Kristi)
Griffin and Cash Boone. Two
special friends Jennifer and Bel-
la Murphy and a host of aunts,
uncles and cousins also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted on Sunday, November 14,
2010 at 3:00 P.M. at Christ Cen-
tral Ministries with Pastor Lonnie
Johns officiating. Interment will
follow at Forest Lawn Memo-
rial Gardens Cemetery. Visita-
tion with the family will be held
Saturday November 13, 2010,
from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386-752-1954)
is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.


Zelia Bell Bowman
Mrs. Zelia Bell Bowman, 94 of
Glen St. Mary passed away on
Thursday, November 11, 2010
at the Baptist Medical Center in
Jacksonville. She was a native
and lifelong resident of Baker
County and a daughter to the late
Corbett and Della Rewis Crews.
Mrs. Bowman was a. wonder-
ful seamstress and cook having
made many wedding dresses
over the years and opening her ,
home to friends and family for
meals. She enjoyed sewing,
cooking, crocheting and making
quilts in her spare time. She was
preceded in death by her husband
and father of her children, Ellis
Brannen, 1994, four sons, Hay-
ward Brannen, 1996, Ellis Bran-
nen, Jr., 1992, Billy E. Brannen,
2010 and Lawrence Brannen,
1971 and one great granddaugh-
ter, Valerie K. Godwin, 2004.
Mrs. Bowman is survived by
her daughter, Hazel Fish, Glen
St. Mary, one sister, Bertie
Mae Godwin, Lake Butler, thir-
teen grandchildren, nineteen
great grandchildren and six-
teen great great grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs. Bow-
man will be conducted on Mon-
day, November 15, 2010 at 2:00
PM at the Taylor Church in
Taylor, Fl with Rev. Jim Cox
officiating. Interment will fol-
low at Swift Creek Cemetery
in Union County. Visitation
with the family will be one hour
prior to.the funeral from 1-2:00
PM, Monday at the church. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME, 420 East Macclenny
Ave:; Macclenny. 904-259-2211

Clara Chew
Mrs. Clara Chew, 90, of Lake
City died Friday November
12, 2010 in the Shands at Lake
Shore Regional Medical Cen-
ter E.R. following a sudden
illness. Funeral arrangements
are incomplete at this time
but will be available by call-
ing 752-1234. Arrangements
are under the direction of the.
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Avenue Lake City ,
Florida (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome., corn

Alice Elizabeth Hill
Mrs. Alice Elizabeth Hill, 69,
died on Thursday, November 11,
2010 after an extended illness.
She was the daughter of Carl &
Gracie F. Johnson, and has been


a life long resident of Columbia
County. She was a loving wife,
mother, and grandmother who
enjoyed cook- "
ing and devot-
ing time to her
family. She
was a faith- .
ful member of
the Jehovah's
Witness King-
dom Hall,
Lake City, as well as co owner
of the. family business, FJ Hill
Construction. She is preced-
ed in death by her daughter,
Fritzi S. Hill-Stuart, her sister,
Mary Evelyn Johnson-Shaw
and her father, Carl Johnson.
Survivors include her mother,
Gracie Johnson of Lake City,
FL; husband, Frederick J. Hill
of Lake City, FL; son, Freder-
ick J. (Kendra) Hill II of Lake
City, FL; daughters, Lisa Hill
(Greg) Waltrip of Lake City,
FL, Wendy Hill (Robert) Jor-
dan of Mountain Gilead, NC,
and Mitzi Hill (Marty) Law of
Lake City, FL; brothers, Seeber
Ray (Anetta) Johnson & Jerry
Carl Johnson both of Lake City,
FL; 17 grandchildren, 6 great
grandchildren and. numerous
nieces & nephews also survive.
Memorial services will be con-
ducted at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday,


November 14, 2010 in the cha-
pel of GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME
3596 U.S. Hwy 441 South, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954.
Flowers are welcome but me-
morials may be made to the Su-
wannee Valley Care Center (Ha-
ven Hospice) 6037 U.S. Hwy
90 West, Lake City, FL 32055.

Eula Mae Milton
Mrs. Eula Mae Milton, 71, a life-
long resident of Columbia Coun-
ty, passed away peacefully on
Thursday, November 11, 2010
in the Lake City Medical Cen-
ter following a sudden illness.
One of eleven children born to
the late Linzia & Clifford Dar-
miney Jenkins, Mrs. Milton had
worked for Metal Products for
twenty-six years prior to retir-
in g. Since retiring she enjoyed
fishing, gardening, cooking and
most especially spending time
with her beloved grandchildren.
Mrs. Milton was a member of
the Oak Grove Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Leslie Luther Mil-
ton, two brothers and five sisters.
Mrs. Milton is survived by her
sons and daughters-in-law, Lu-
ther and Teresa Milton; Bruce


and Jessica Milton; her three sis-
ters, Zilla Cribbs (Earl); Lorene
Parrish; and Mearl Milton (A.C.);
her grandchildren, Carlton Mil-
ton (Skyler), Amanda Milton,
Lane Milton and Emma Milton
and her great-grand daughter,
Kinzi Milton all of Lake City.
Funeral services for Mrs. Milton
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
on Monday in the Chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home with Rev. Lewis Daniels
and Rev. Howard Thomas of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
in the Scott Cemetery (which is
located on 441 North of Deep
Creek). The family will receive
friends from 3:00-5:00 Sunday
afternoon in the chapel of the
funeral home. Flowers are wel-
come but if you choose to make
a memorial donation the family
requests that it be directed to the
Haven Hospice of the Suwan-
nee Valley, 6037 U.S. Highway
90 West, Lake City, FL 32055.
Arrangements are under the di-


reaction of DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. MarionAvenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Clinton L. Walker
Mr. Clinton L. Walker, 49, of
Lake City died early Friday
morning, November 12, 2010.
Funeral arrangements are in-
complete at this time but will be
available by calling 752-1234.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. MarionAvenue, Lake City
, Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Did You Hear About Peoples State Bank's
Thanksgiving Art Contest?


W r 1 .






Peoples State Bank is hosting a Thanksgiving
themed art contest for children between the ages
of 6 and 11. Children can draw, paint or sketch
Thanksgiving themed artwork and have a chance to
win a $ 250, $100 or $-50 US Savings Bond for
their future. Visit one of Peoples' branches today
and pick up the official rules and submission form,
but you have to hurry all artwork submissions
are due by November 22, 2010. Peoples State
Bank. Now that's banking!



,>. '"


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES
STATE BANK


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.



NARFE Meeting

The next monthly meet-
ing of the National Active and
Retired Federal Employees is
1 p.m. Tuesday at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center. Deborah
Rivera of Three Rivers Legal
Services Inc. is the speaker. Call
Mariam Stanford at 755-0907 or
Jim Purvis at 752-8570.

Wednesday
Community involvement
Summers Elementary After
School is seeking artifacts, cui-
sine, dances, music, customs
and pictures from countries and
cultures around the world from
people in the community. Anyone
willing to share please call 755-
8243.

Thursday

SOS meeting

Save Our Suwannee is meet-
ing at 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Fort White Community Center,
Highway 47. The speaker is
Jacqui Sulek, National Audubon
Conservation coordinator. This
is the final program for the
year. Light refreshments will be
served. Call 386-497-3536.

Retired educators to meet

Columbia County Retired
Educators meet at 1 p.m.
Thursday in the School Board
Adult Center room 120. Bring
white socks for men or women
and a covered dish. Any retired
person interested in education
is welcome. Call 752-2431.

Medicaid planning workshop

Workshop on the truth about
Medicaid planning Myths and
Opportunities is 10 a.m. Nov.
18 at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. It is presented by Teresa
Byrd Morgan of the Morgan
Law Center. Call Shana at 386-
755-1977.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












FAITH


13, 2010


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


Angle Land
angieland3@windstream.net


We must

continue

to listen for

Jesus' voice

'"Although it is true that
I am near of kin, there is a
kinsman-redeemer nearer
than I. Stay here for the
night, and in the morning
if he wants to redeem, good;
let him redeem. But if he is
not willing, as surely as the
Lord lives I will do it. Lie
here until morning.'
So she lay at his feet until
morning. But got up before
anyone could be recognized;
and he said, 'Don't let it be
known that a woman came
'to the threshing floor'...
When Ruth came to
her mother-in-law. Naomi
asked, 'How did it go, my
daughter?'
Then she told her every-
thing Boaz had done for her
'and added, 'He gave me
these six measures of barley,
savg'7 .' o 'T g to
your mother-in-law empty-
handed.'
Then Naomi said, Wait,
my daughter, until you find
out what happens. For the
man will not rest until the
matter is settled today."
(Ruth 3:12-18)
I wish I could tempo-
rarily erase the mem-
ory of every reader
who knows how the
story ends.
For the sake of our expe-
rience, let's forget the end-
ing for a few minutes and
concentrate on the tension
in these moments.
What does Naomi
know that Ruth doesn't?
Remember that Ruth was a
foreigner, new to the ways
of God and His people.
She was, at best, vaguely
familiar with Jewish law,
and really only understood
that she had come to Boaz
and although he was kind,
he still sent her home.
She must have wor-
ried that he really didn't
want her. However, Naomi
understood what needed
to take place in order to
secure the best for Ruth,
and so she was content and
confident ... to wait.
This is often a parallel to
our relationship with Jesus.
For reasons we often do
not understand, He holds
Himself back from filling
our life with every kind of
blessing.
But when it seems like
He is doing nothing in the
midst of our suffering, we
can rest assured that He
will not rest until matters
are settled.
As mysterious as the rea-
sons for our suffering can
sometimes be, the deeper
mystery is His restrained
love for us.
So for those of us strug-
gling with unanswered
prayers, unmet needs and
:shattered dreams, we must
continue to listen for His
voice.
We will hear Him most
clearly when suffering
humbles us enough to want
to hear Him, more than we
want to be free of the suf-
fering.
U Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
:cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


Catholic bishops say more


American exorcists needed


By RACHEL ZOLL
Associated Press
NEW YORK
iting a short-
age of priests
who can per-
form the rite,
the nation's '
Roman Catholic bishops
are holding a conference
on how to conduct exor-
cisms.
The two-day training,
which ends Saturday in
Baltimore, is to outline
the scriptural basis of
evil, instruct clergy on
evaluating whether a
person is truly possessed,
and review the prayers
and rituals that comprise
an exorcism. Among
the speakers will be
Cardinal Daniel DiNardo,
archbishop of Galveston-
Houston, Texas, and
a priest-assistant to
New York Archbishop
Timothy Dolan.
"Learning the liturgi-
cal rite is not difficult,"
DiNardo said in a phone
interview before the con-
ference, which is open to
clergy only. "The problem
is the discernment that
the exorcist needs before
he would ever attempt
the rite."
More than 50 bishops
and 60 priests signed up
to attend, according to
Catholic News Service,
which first reported the
event. The conference
was scheduled for just
ahead of the fall meeting
of the U.S. Conference
of Catholic Bishops,
which starts Monday in
Baltimore.
Despite strong interest
in the training, skepti-
cism about the rite per-
sists within the American
church. Organizers of the
event are keenly aware
of the ridicule that can
accompany discussion of
the subject Exorcists in,
U.S. dioceses keep a very
low profile. In 1999, the
church updated the Rite
of Exorcism, cautioning
that "all must be done
to avoid the perception
that exorcism is magic or
superstition."
The practice is much
more accepted by
Catholics in parts of
Europe and elsewhere
overseas. Cardinal
Stanislaw Dziwisz, the
longtime private secre-
tary of Pope John Paul


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Tuesday Jan. 26, 1999, file picture, Cardinal
Jorge Medina Estevez holds the book 'De Exorcismis
et Supplicationibus Quibusdam' (Of Exorcisms and
Supplications), the Vatican's new guidelines on exorcism,
presented during a news conference at the Vatican.


II, revealed a few years
after the pontiff's death
that John Paul had per-
formed an exorcism on a
woman who was brought
into the Vatican writhing
and screaming in what
Dziwisz said was a case
of possession by the
devil.
Bishop Thomas
Paprocki of Springfield,
ll., who organized the
conference, said only a
tiny number of U.S. priests
have enough training and
knowledge to perform
an exorcism. Dioceses
nationwide have been rely-
ing solely on these clergy,
who have been over-
whelmed with requests to
evaluate claims. The Rev.
James LeBar, who was
the official exorcist of the
Archdiocese of New York
under the late Cardinal
John O'Connor, had faced
a similar level of demand,
traveling the country in
response to the many
requests for his expertise.
The rite is performed
only rarely. Neal Lozano, a
Catholic writer and author
of the book "Unbound:
A Practical Guide to


Deliverance" about com-
batting evil spirits, said he
knows an exorcist in the
church who receives about
400 inquiries a year, but
determines that out of that
number, two or three of
the cases require an exor-
cism.
No one knows why
more people seem to be
seeking the rite. Paprocki
said one reason could
be the growing inter-
est among Americans
in exploring general
spirituality, as opposed to
participating in organized
religion, which has led
more people to dabble in
the occult
"They don't know exact-
ly what they're getting
into and when they have
questions, they're turning
to the church, to priests,"
said Paprocki, chairman
of the bishops' committee
on canonical affairs and
church governance. 'They
wonder if some untoward
activity is taking place in
their life and want some
help discerning that."
Many Catholic immi-
grants in the U.S. come
from countries where


exorcism is more com-
mon, although Paprocki
said that was not a moti-
vation for organizing the
conference.
Exorcism has deep
roots in Christianity. The
New Testament contains
several examples of Jesus
casting out evil spirits
from people, and the
church notes these acts in
the Catholic Catechism.
Whether or not individual
Catholics realize it, each
of them undergoes what
the church calls a minor
exorcism at baptism that
includes prayers renounc-
ing Satan and seeking free-
dom from original sin.
A major exorcism can
only be performed by a
priest with the permission
of his bishop after a thor-
ough evaluation, including
consulting with physicians
or psychiatrists to rule
out any psychological or
physical illness behind the
person's behavior.
Signs of demonic pos-
session accepted by the
church include violent
reaction to holy water or
anything holy, speaking in
a language the possessed
person doesn't know
and abnormal displays of
strength.
The full exorcism
is held in private and
includes sprinkling holy
water, reciting Psalms,
reading aloud from the
Gospel, laying on of hands
and reciting the Lord's
Prayer. Some adaptations
are allowed for different
circumstances. The exor-
cist can invoke the Holy .
Spirit then blow in the face
of the possessed person,
trace the sign of the cross
on the person's forehead
and command the devil to
leave.
The training comes at a
time when many American
bishops and priests are
trying to correct what they
view as a lack of emphasis
on the Catholic teaching
about sin and evil after the
Second Vatican Council,
the series of meetings in
the 1960s that enacted
modernizing reforms in
the church. Many in the
American hierarchy, as
well as Pope Benedict
XVI, believe that the
supernatural aspect of
the church was lost in the
changes, reducing it to
just another institution in
the world.


Baptist

Church

honors

pianist

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

First Baptist Church of
Lake City is honoring one
of its own during a special
program.
"An Evening with Martha
Mier" is at 6 p.m. Saturday
at the church.
Mier is an internationally
recognized composer and
clinician and a nationally
certified teacher of music.
She is co-author of Alfred's
S Premier
Piano
Course in
addition to
S.,: more than
200 other
education
piano publi-
Mier cations.
She began playing the
piano at the age of 8.
"It was something .1I
always wanted to do," she
said. "My older brothers all
took lessons."
The Music Teachers
National Association hon-
ored Mier as a Foundation
Fellow earlier in the year.
Mier was nominated by
other teachers in the state to
represent Florida, she said.
Fellows are considered to
have made outstanding cAn-
tributions in music teaching
both nationally and interna-
tionally.
She is a graduate of
Florida State University and
was a member of Sigma
Alpha Iota, the national
honorary music fraternity.
Mier owned a piano studio
in Lake City and taught for
40 years.
Teaching has been a
rewarding experience, espe-
cially when students go out
and share their talents with
the community, Mier said.
"It's given me a great deal
of pleasure," she said.
The performance at First
Baptist will feature sacred
music that has all been
arranged by Mier. Two of
her former students, Kinita
Bishop and Dede Darby,
will also participate in the
event.
A reception will follow
the service in the fellowship
hall. The public is invited
to attend, and admission is
free.
"I hope people will come.
out and join us," Mier said.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Emergency fund
An emergency fund has
been set up in the name
of Rayma Markham and
Glad Tidings Assembly of
God at Mercantile Bank.
Markham is 94, and her
home was destroyed in a
fire Oct 28. Contact the
Rev. Van Vleck, pastor, at
365-1533 or 752-0620.

Yard sale
Tabernacle Baptist
Church and Academy is
having a yard sale 7 a.m.-
1 p.m. today. The yard
sale is a fundraiser for the
academy and will feature
a little bit of everything.
The church is located at
144 SE Montrose Ave.
Call 752-4247.

Gospel sing
New Beginning Church
on Hwy. 242 is hosting a
gospel sing featuring the
Believers a' 7 p.m. today.
The community is invited.
Call 386-935-6553.


Gospel Sing
An afternoon of
Christian fellowship starts
2 p.m. today at Beth
Haven Baptist Church,
216th St. Anyone who can
play an instrument or sing
gospel music is encour-
aged to attend. After the
singing, there will be hot
dogs, beans and salads.
Call 386-935-3452.

Music celebration
Angel Ministries of
Lake City Inc. is host-
ing the 18th Anniversary
Celebration for gospel
promoter Pastor Minnie
Williams Gomes at 7 p.m.
today at New DaySpring
Missionary Baptist
Church. The event will
feature music by national
and local gospel artists. A
love offering of $10 will be
received at the door. The
church is located at 709
NW Long St. Call 386-758-
1886.

Doug Carter speaking
Watertown Congrega-
tional Methodist Church


is having Doug Carter as
the guest speaker 7 p.m.
today; and 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. Nov. 14. He is the
senior vice president of
EQUIP, a non-profit orga-
nization with a mission
of developing effective
Christian leaders to fulfill
the Great Commission.
Call 752-1329 or 965-4706.

Sunday
Singing group
The Church of God
in Fort White is hosting
the singing group Light
Soldiers during its 11
a.m. service Sunday. The
church is located at 339
SW Bryant Ave.

Pastor appreciation
DaySpring Missionary
Baptist Church is celebrat-
ing the first appreciation
of Rev. Aaron Thomas
Lewis Sr. at 3 p.m.
Sunday. The speaker is
the Rev. Wendell Wallace,
Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church pastor. A
Thanksgiving dinner will


be served after the ser-
vice. The church is locat-
ed at 849 NE Congress
Ave.

Homecoming service
Edgar Davis will
preach Homecoming at
Journey Fellowship, First
Assembly of God, at 10:30
a.m. Sunday. A fellowship
lunch will follow. The
church is located at 1571
E. Duval St.

Deacon ordination
The New Dayspring
Missionary Baptist
Church is having a deacon
ordination service 3:30
p.m. Nov. 14. Candidates
are Ronald Berry,
Wallace Jones, Sr., Horde
Jefferson and Julius
Moreland. The church is
located at 709 NW Long
St.

Mission/Matron
St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church is celebrat-
ing its Mission/Matron
Program 3:30 p.m. Nov.
14. Katrina Powell of


Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church is the
speaker.

Friday
Women's conference
The Women of Antioch
Missionary Baptist
Church is hosting a
Women's Conference
Nov. 19-21. The theme
is "Women of Destiny:
Fulfilling Our Divine
Purpose."
Prophetess Tara
Williams of New
Beginnings Restoration
Church is speaking at 7:30
p.m. Friday. Prophetess
Cornita Ferrell is speak-
ing 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday and 3:30 p.m.
Sunday.
Conference registra-
tion is $25 which includes
refreshments on Friday,
breakfast and lunch on
Saturday, tote bag and
conference materials.
Contact Tracy Sanders
at 386-497-2275, Marilyn
Frazier at 352-318-3441 or
Shenise Mulberry at 352-
316-1493.


Saturday, November









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010 7A


3


Scriptures Selected by The Aierican Bible Society
Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"


GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
Jobber




Holly edic, Inc.
/"Quality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-59441


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"1 can do all things hrou Christ which strenglheneth me"
Phlhippia 4.13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


RICK'S (RANE SERVICE
Located at 25A
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW Mcfarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday Sjchool: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: I .0A
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF-GOD
993 NW Lake leffery Road
38'' 3 752-.020
Sunday Worship 10J0AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:06PM
"A church where IESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
5R47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9 30AM
SundayWorhip 10:45AM & 6PMN
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave. *386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mig/Bible tudy 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9.15AM
Sunday Worship 1030AM & 6.00PM
Wed 6 0OPM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahren%, Pastor
OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Davs Street
(386J) 752 1990
Ronald V Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9 45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11.00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6.00PM
"In God' Word, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake leffery Rd. e752.-f681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclccom
Sunday School 8:30, 9:45 &i HAM
Sunday Worship 9:45 & I lAM & 6PM
AWANA 5.3U PM
Evening Worship 6 00 PM
Wed Eve. Schedule
Family Supper fReservanorn) 5 PM
Children'b Ministry 6 PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule SL 8121108
Pariview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PMNI
Pastor. Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10-30 AM
Pastor Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 SEBaya Drive-755-5553
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Worship 6:15PM
AWANA 5:45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 6-15PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. *752-4274
Sunday School 10AM
'Sun. Mom.Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed Prayer Meeting 730 PM
Pastor. Mike Norman
THE VINEYARD
A Southern Baptist Church
2091 SW Main Blvd. *623-0026
Sunday Worship I0 00AM
Where lesus is Preached
and jeans are appropriate.
Pastor. Bo Hammock

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-44 70
Saturday Vigil Mass 5-00 PM
Sunday Masi 8:15 AM, 10 30 AM,
5:01J PM (Spanish/English
Sunday School/ Religous Educanon
900AM-10:15AM
C^HRISTIA
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun Momrn Wrshp 10:30 AM
Wed Prayer Meeung 7PM

NEW HORIZON
church of Christ
Directons & Times 755-1320
lack Exum,lr.. Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermmne St 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed Family Night 7PM
Wed Youth Service 7PM
Pastor. Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitoi Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Ennchment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, F1 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth,net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. MichaelArmstrong
Deacon:TheeaJimmie Hunsinger
Director ofMusic Dr. Alfonso Levy


S Winter is just around the

corner. The potted plants that

-, sat outside have been carried

& .in before the first frost.

-. Now they shine like

emeralds in the sunny
window, thriving in

Sthe warmth. We

experience seasons

Sof "winter" in our
lives, when we

are overcome with

doubt, frozen with fear. We can

come into God's house and warm our
ow% hearts. Psalm 92:12-13 promises "...

the righteous will flourish...
planted in the house-of
: the Lord.



A ll" U w. _-,-.. ...-. .J. k,- t .. I


No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance
I-- --- .


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
SFor all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1:5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed, Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John DavidBryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave,
386-752.4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morningworship
Contemporary Service 1: 5IA\M
Traidnonal Service I I-UUA1M
Program opportunires adable in adll
areas for all agei
For a complete schedule
contact church office ai
752.4488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
127. SW McFarlanea* '_' 1511
lAdlaceni to Sarmmeri S hooll
Sunday School O1II,0M
Wor.ip 8-I11)& J IIIIAM
Nursery provided
Prase & W ,orship 6.uUPM
AWANA srans 9./I ,Sved. 5 0PM
Pasicir The Re i Louie Mabrey
wwv wealfmemn com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. mrum on Cortez inei Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.,
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun Worship IAM&6PM
Wed., Night Service 7PM
Pastor, RandyOgbumn

LAKE CITYCHURCH OFTHE NAARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9.45AM1
Sunday Worship 10:45AM, 6-30PM
Wednesday 6.3uPM
Adult, Youth Mimstrv, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBMERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive *752-0670
Sunday Contemporary 9'00AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
'Traditional Service 11:00 AM
NURSERYPROVIDED
Pastor Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washingjni Si
Sunday School [0.UUAM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelstic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Serncea Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Serce Wedonda' 7:00PM
For infocadl 75S- 3401, Eve rone Welomii,:
Naslor Rev. S~in Elij,

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
SundayMoming 11:00AM
Wednesday Service. 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left.- 755 2'55
Lead Pasto[ Luonnielihn-
"AChurch on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones. 752-9119
FAILING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIAEVANGEULICA
APOSENTO ALTO
17077 25th Rd LUC fL 3'iri
Service Fri 7 00PM, Sun: I "tPM
Arturo Suarez* 386-754-1836
NEW BEGINNING CHUIIRCH
Highway 242 E ol Branlord Highuan
Sunday School "uiAM
MomingWorship II i'l,,M
Sunday Evening 6 uUPM
Wednesday 7 0u.'I'M
A Full] Gdinel Church Every-nr 'l ilol
(386J 755-519:
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir; Hwy 47 to Columbia City.
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AMand7PM
Thursday 8PM


Call





752-1293!


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
.752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register '.,
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St. Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, Fl 32055 Closed Wednesday

[ ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALTT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

1 HARRY'S
, A .,NsN, Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


Pan 752-2308 M
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




1701S5.1at
1SS.. 755-7050
La reu un a v io tLMU L

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440





V v''"


this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To List





Your



Church






on the





Church


IClay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Copyright 2010,


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


T.o avrts i hi huc iretoy a ll75-54










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


BRIEFS


200 UCF students
admit to cheating
ORLANDO About 200
students at the University of
Central Florida in Orlando
have come forward in a
cheating scandal.
University officials made
the announcement Friday.
Nearly 600 students had
to retake a midterm this
week for a senior-level
business course after the
instructor, Richard Quinn,
was tipped off to the cheat-
ing. When Quinn confront-
ed the class, he said any
students who turned them-
selves in before the-makeup
test could take an ethics
seminar and remain in the
class. Those who stayed
quiet and got caught could
face expulsion. The univer-
sity hasn't made a final deci-
sion about what to do with
15 students believed to have
cheated but not confessed.
It's still not clear how the
students acquired the test
questions, but UCF spokes-
man Grant Heston says it
appears they accessed them
online somehow.

Thurman quits as
Fla. Dem leader

TALLAHASSEE Karen
Thurman is quitting as
Florida Democratic Party
chairwoman.
The former congress-
woman and state lawmaker
announced her retirement
Friday, just 10 days after
Democrats took a drubbing
in this year's election.
Some Democrats began
calling for her resignation
just hours after the vote-
count ended.
Republicans swept all
statewide races gover-
nor, U.S. senator, attorney
general, chief financial offi-
cer and agriculture commis-
-,i ,ner and picked, up four
congressional seats.
Democrats also lost five
seats in the Florida House
ard two in the Senate.
Thurman did not mention
the election losses in a two-
page letter to party leaders,
but wrote that she was look-
ing forward to spending
more time with her family.

Police: Man killed
was unarmed

OAKLAND, Calif. A
37-year-old parolee was car-
rying a small, silver scale
- not a weapon when
Oakland officers fatally shot
him during a foot chase this
week, police said Friday.
Police said two officers
chasing Derrick Jones on
Monday night believed
he had a weapon when he
appeared to be reaching
toward his waistband for
a shiny metal object that
turned out to be an elec-
tronic scale less than 1-inch
thick. One officer saw the
object in Jones' hand before
police opened fire, authori-.
ties said.
Jones' death has prompt-
ed accusations of excessive
force, with his friends and
family saying the shooting
was unjustified.
The shooting came just
days after the sentencing of
former transit police officer
Johannes Mehserle, who
fatally shot another unarmed
man on an Oakland train
platform on New Year's Day
2009.

Zsa Zsa Gabor
hospitalized again
LOS ANGELES A
spokesman for actress Zsa


Zsa Gabor says the actress
has been admitted to a Los
Angeles hospital for treat-
ment of painful swelling in
her legs.
John Blanchette says
Gabor was admitted to
Ronald Reagan UCLA
Hospital earlier today after
a doctor visited her at home,
and said she had massive
blood clots in her legs,
which could make her vul-
nerable to a heart attack.
* Associated Press


Game warden investigating poaching is killed


By MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press

GETTYSBURG, Pa. A
felon caught poaching deer
and a state game warden
who had him partly hand-
cuffed engaged in a "fero-
cious exchange of gunfire"
that killed the officer and
wounded the suspect, who
was arrested 11 hours
later, authorities said.
David L. Grove, a 31-
year-old wildlife conserva-
tion officer from Fairfield,
was fatally shot Thursday
night in a rural area near
Eisenhower National
Historic Site outside
Gettysburg, police said.


The suspect, Christopher
Lynn Johnson, 27, told
police he fled with the
handcuffs locked on his
left wrist and shot them
off himself, according to
a police affidavit. He was
arrested at a hunting camp
Friday morning.
Grove had witnessed
what he suspected was ille-
gal night hunting with a
spotlight and had pulled
over Johnson's truck at
about 10:30 p.m., police
said. He had called in the
license plate before "a
ferocious exchange of gun-
fire" occurred, state police
Commissioner Col. Frank
Pawlowski said. Johnson


and a passenger then fled,
authorities said.
Police said Johnson
had an apparent gunshot
wound to the hip when he
was caught, and he was
treated at a hospital in
York. Authorities recov-
ered a dead buck near the
crime scene.
Grove was shot four
times, and the fatal wound
was to his neck, Adams
County Coroner Pat Felix
said. He was the first
Pennsylvania game war-
den killed in the line of
duty in 95 years.
The license plate number
that Grove called in "was a
critical piece of informa-


Troubled


tion," Pawlowski said.
"That gave us some-
where to go," Pawlowski
said.
Johnson, also of Fairfield,
abandoned his truck and
was limping on foot when
he flagged down a motorist
and asked for help, authori-
ties said.
The motorist took him
to the hunting camp, and
police were waiting when he
arrived Friday morning. The
truck was found nearby.
Johnson told police on the
way to the hospital that he
had shot Grove with a .45-
caliber handgun, authorities
wrote in an affidavit.
"He advised that he was


a convicted felon in posses-
sion of a firearm and did not
want to go back to prison,"
the investigating troopers
wrote.
He also told officers he
had thrown the weapon into
the woods after shooting off
the handcuffs.
Police filed charges of
homicide, weapons and
garhe offenses and other
counts, and Johnson was
expected to be arraigned by
videoconference late Friday.
Adams County District
Attorney Shawn Wagner
said he would likely seek
the death penalty. Court
officials said Johnson didn't
have a lawyer.


Cruise


Luxury liner's mishap shows unpredictability of the sea


By JOHN ROGERS
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES
luxury cruise
liner that
limped into San
Diego after a
fire knocked
out its power was lucky in
many ways no one was
killed or even seriously
hurt, a nearby Navy vessel
came quickly with supplies
and the mishap occurred
in tranquil waters.
Yet the drawn-out tale
of the stricken ship shows
just how quickly things
can go wrong on a giant
floating city carrying thou-
sands of people, and it's
prompting a closer look at
whether ocean liners are
properly equipped to deal
with the litany of prob-
lems that could strike:
rogue waves, norovirus
outbreaks and mechani-
cal problems that disable
ships in treacherous
weather.
"If you want a com-
pletely predictable vaca-
tion don't go on the sea,"
.said Carolyn Spencer
Brown, editor of the
industry trade publication
Cruisecritic.com and a
veteran of more than 200
cruises. "Ships are bigger
and have better stabilizers
than ever before, but they
are still on the sea and the
sea is nature and nature is
unpredictable."'
If the Splendor had been
crossing the North Atlantic
in the winter instead of
about 40 miles off the coast
of Mexico in calmhn waters
things could have been


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image shot Monday shows smoke coming from the engine compartment of the crippled
cruise ship, Carnival Splendor, off the coast of Mexico. An engine fire aboard the 952-
foot cruise liner on Monday morning knocked out power early in its seven-day trip to the
Mexican Riviera, setting the ship adrift about 200 miles outside San Diego and 44 miles off
the coast of Mexico.


far worse, said veteran
maritime attorney Charles
Lipcon of Miami.
"The weather in the
North Atlantic, and off the
coast of South Africa, can
be awful," he said. "They
usually try to stay close to
port, so if something does
go wrong they can avoid
that But sometimes they
have no choice."
Another stroke of luck
for the Carnival cruise:
Navy aircraft carrier USS
Ronald Reagan happened


to be in the area conduct-
ing training exercises, and
its 6,000 sailors quickly.
came to the rescue with
deliveries of food and other
supplies.
Tugboats weren't far
off, and they hauled the
952-foot cruise liner about
200 miles into a San Diego
dock on Thursday, bringing
weary passengers to shore
and ending the three-day
ordeal.
Passengers disparaged
the food and complained


about backed-up toilets, yet
praised crew members for
calmly getting everyone to
life boats that turned out
not to be necessary. The
blaze was extinguished
quickly, and no one was
hurt.
But onboard fires have
long been a significant
concern of investigators,
said former National
Transportation Safety
Board member Kitty
Higgins, and it's unusual
for a fire to shut down an


entire engine room and
take out every backup elec-
trical system on board.
"A fire can be quickly
contained so that it won't
require a ship to return to
port," she said. "That raises
a lot of concerns."
Four years ago, the Star
Princess oceanliner caught
fire on a windy night in the
Atlantic Ocean as it headed
toward Jamaica. One per-
son was killed, 11 injured
and 150 cabins damaged
before the crew could
douse the flames, which
were believed to be caused
by a cigarette.
As investigators try to
determine what happened
aboard the Splendor,
Higgins said they likely will
look at the ship's equip-
ment and also the crew's
response. Cruise ships
have extensive contingency
plans and drills that must
pass muster with the Coast
Guard, said Eric Ruff, exec-
utive vice president of the
Cruise Lines International
Association. The Splendor
had conducted a fire drill
- overseen by the Coast
Guard just a day before
the engine blew, ship offi-
cials said.
The National
Transportation Safety
Board said the probe into
the fire's cause would be
conducted by Panama,
where the ship is regis-
tered. Panama agreed
to let the U.S. Coast
Guard join the investiga-
tion because most of the
passengers were U.S.
citizens, and two NTSB
experts will assist, the
NTSB said.


G-20 fallout: Trade tensions could rise


By PAUL WISEMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The world's
most important economies are
going home to look after them-
selves. They left their summit with-
out any meaningful agreement, find-
ing it ever harder to cooperate and
more likely to erect trade barriers to
protect their own interests.
The Group of 20 meeting of lead-
ing rich and developing nations
ended Friday in South Korea with
no solutions to longstanding ten-
sions over trade and currency, and
with the cooperation of the 2008
financial crisis now a distant mem-
ory.
The U.S. couldn't persuade other
countries to pressure China to stop
manipulating its currency or limit
their own trade surpluses and defi-
cits. The Americans faced charges
of doing some currency manipula-
tion of their own by pumping $600
billion into their economy.
The stalemate in Seoul means
that trade disputes could intensify,
warns Eswar Prasad, professor of
trade policy at Cornell University.
He's worried that there "may be
more open conflicts on currency
matters. This has the potential to
feed into more explicit forms of
protectionism, which could set back
the global recovery."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
South Korean President Lee Myung-bak waves goodbye as he stands
onstage with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper (right) and President
Barack Obama at the conclusion of the Small Medium Enterprise Finance
Challenge Award Ceremony at the G20 Summit in Seoul Friday.


The summit was a diplomatic set-
back for the United States.
China was supposed to be the
villain of the G-20 meeting. The U.S.
and other countries have accused
Beijing of keeping its currency,
the yuan, artificially low to give
its exporters an unfair advantage.
The currency manipulation helps


Chinese exporters by making their
goods less expensive around the
world, leading to charges that cheap
Chinese products cost America jobs
at a time when U.S. unemployment
is stuck at 9.6 percent.
The U.S. wanted to rally other
G-20 delegates to strong-arm China
over the yuan. A stronger yuan


would reduce the U.S. trade deficit
with China, which is on track to
match the 2008 record of $268 bil-
lion. But the U.S. argument was
undercut by accusations that the
Federal Reserve was rigging the
currency market itself.
Last week, the Fed said it would
essentially print $600 billion to jolt
the U.S. economy back to life. The
Fed says its plan to buy Treasury
bonds was designed to lower long-
term interest rates, spur economic
growth and create jobs. Since the
Fed hinted at the policy in late
August, the Dow Jones industri-
als have risen 13 percent and
interest rates on 30-year fixed-rate
mortgages have hit a record low
of 4.17 percent.
But foreigners saw a more sin-
ister intent: to flood world mar-
kets with dollars, driving down the
value of the U.S. currency and giv-
ing U.S. exporters a price edge.
"Basically, what happened was
a diplomatic coup for China,"
says William Cline, senior fel-
low with the Peterson Institute
for International Economics. A
few months ago, countries from
Brazil to Germany were criticiz-
ing Chinese trade policies. "Fast-
forward, and now China and
Germany and Brazil are blaming
the United States for causing cur-
rency problems."


I I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


'A s










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday. November 13, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Indians paddle ,


Santa Fe, 30-7 ,


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

Newton

deserves

benefit

of doubt
W hat
happened
to the
phrase
innocent
until proven guilty?
Apparently that got
tossed aside with the
invention of twitter and
instant-news media.
For the past week
it's sickened me how
many media pundits
throughout the nation
have already condemned
Cameron Newton of a
deed that there's no clear
evidence he committed.
There have been
well-known media
members throughout
the country and state
that have said they
won't vote for Newton
when it comes time to
turn in their Heisman
ballot. Well, that's all well
and good if they don't
believe that Newton is
the most outstanding
college football player,
but there's more to this
than what's happening on
the field.
People are basing
their judgments off of
what they're hearing on
ESPN and reading in
the newspapers. What
happened to basing a
vote off a players ability
on the field?
Has Newton been
convicted of a crime?
Has Newton been
arrested?
Has Newton not played
in any game due to
academic suspension or
NCAA rule violations?
The answer to all of
these questions are the
same. Heisman voters
are too worried about
facing another Reggie
Bush situation, but
there's no hard proof that
Newton has violated any
NCAA rules. What we
have at this point is a
he-said, she-said
situation.
The word slander
doesn't get passed
around much, but that's
what's happening to
Newton's name.
Until the NCAA comes
out and says that Newton
has clearly violated a rule
for collegiate athletes,
there's nothing to punish
Newton for.
Everyone's entitled to
their own opinion, but
what we're talking about
here is fact and fiction.
Newton is either guilty of
breaking a rule with the
NCAA or he isn't.
If a voter feels that
Newton's play has been
superior to all other
players, their vote
should go to the Auburn
quarterback.
Voters aren't the jury
on the Newton situation.
The NCAA is and voters
should allow them to do
their job.
It's too bad that
Newton has already been
convicted in the court of
public opinion.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Fort White makes
it look easy
playoff tune up.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
ALACHUA Fort White
High put the exclamation
point on a productive sea-
son with a 30-7 win at Santa
Fe High on Friday.
The Indians (7-3, 4-1 dis-
trict) retained the Battle for
the Paddle trophy for the
sixth-straight year. Santa Fe
finished the season 1-9.
"I am so proud of this
team," Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said. "We had a lot of first-
year varsity players and
transfers, and we faced
adversity. For them to gel
together as a team, we are
headed on the right track.


The way they came togeth-
er with the FCA camp and
staying in the gym, those
things made a big differ-
ence."
Santa Fe actually had a
piece of the paddle early
when quarter D.L. Powell
scored on a sneak at 5:37 of
the first quarter.
Two touchdown passes
from Andrew Baker to AJ.
Legree, one minute apart,
got everything going right
for -Fort White. The first
touchdown -was set up by
an interception and 22-yard
return by Xavier Wyche.
Baker hit Legree from 20
yards out for the score with
1:11 left in the first quarter.
Santa Fe botched the
ensuing kickoff and this
time the Baker to Legree
scoring combination went
for nine yards. Colton Jones
added his second PAT with


Bucket


CHS crushes
Suwannee in
annual rivalry
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakec.t, reporter com
Suwannee High opened
and closed the Battle for"
the Old Oaken Bucket with
touchdowns, but that's all
Columbia High would sub-
mit in a 46-13 stomping
Friday.
The Tigers have beaten
the Bulldogs by a com-
bined 138-13 under coach
Craig Howard and Friday's
capped off a 6-4 season for
Columbia.
Jackson Brown connect-
ed with Felton Zanders for
an 11-yard touchdown pass
on the second drive for
the Bulldogs. but that was
all Suwannee ,4-6) would
score until the final minutes
of the contest.
Columbia trailed going
into the second quarter, but
a Nigel Atkinson keeper
resulted in a 35-yard score
to change the momentum
of the game.
The Tigers' defense
would hold on a fourth-
down attempt and Devonte
Bell's sack forced a fumble
recovered by Austin Reiter
to set up the Columbia
offense.
Braxton Stockton cov-
ered the remaining 10
yards after the recovery


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Zach Cromier (28) is swarmed by Bradford High defenders while driving up
the field on Nov. 5.


10 seconds left in the first
quarter.-
Fort White added a
12-play, 81-yard scoring
drive in the second quar-
ter. JR Dixon kept the drive
going with a first down on
a fake punt and scored the
touchdown on a 27-yard


run. Jones PAT made it 21-
7 at the half.
Soron Williams returned
the second half kickoff
31 yards and Fort White
marched 63 yards for anoth-
er score. Zach Cormier got
the touchdown on a two-
yard run.


Jones added a 19-yard
field goal to wrap up the
scoring at 10:58 of the
fourth quarter.
Fort White played it close
to the vest down the stretch
to stay fresh for its playoff
trip to Pensacola Catholic
High next week.


beatdown


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High football team celebrate their 46-13 win against Suwannee High after the Battle for the Old
Oaken Bucket on Friday.


with three runs to give the
Tigers a 12-7.
Suwannee had a chance
to cut the lead to two points
going into the half, but a
group of Columbia players
blocked the field goal for the
second time in the game.
After a Bell interception,
the offense responded with
consecutive scoring drives.
Rakeem Battle capped off
a three-play drive with a
27-yard run for an 18-7 lead,


and Jayce Barber hit Nate
Ayers on the next drive for
29-yards to begin the sec-
ond half scoring. It was a
one-play scoring drive.
After a 45-yard punt by
Shayne Barber set up the
Tigers' defense for a three-
and-out, Columbia went back
to work on the scoreboard.
Jayce Barber then did his
best Atkinson impression
with a 26-yard touchdown
run for a 32-7 lead.


The fourth quarter
was highlighted by two
one-play scoring drives.
Markem Gaskins hauled
in a 30-yard pass in the
right corner of the end zone
from Atkinson, and after a
three-and-out, Battle ran 39
yards for another Columbia
touchdown.
The scores gave the
Tigers a 46-7 lead.
Suwannee dropped a
54-yard touchdown on


the Tigers as the running
clock ticked down late,
but Columbia had already
inflicted too much damage.
The pass came from backup
quarterback Jimmie Taylor
to Derrick Smith.
"We really challenged all
the kids at the half," Howard
said. "Some of them will
never get a chance to play
football again."
For those, they'll go out
as winners.


COURTESY PHOTO
Lady Indians basketball
Members of the Fort White High 2010-11 girls basketball team are manager Tiana Calhoun (from left), Kala Joseph, Krystin Strawder, Danielle Warmack,
Miracle Simmons, Lisa Glenn, Da'Leecia Armstrong, Jordan Earle, Sitia Martinez, Catherine Trisch, Amber Chapman and Sarah Stringfellow. Raven Major
also is on the team. Bregay Harris and Santeis Harris are coaches. See page 3B for season preview.


I -- I


As











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying
for Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, at Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for WYPALL 200, at
Avondale, Ariz.
1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for KobaltTools 500, at Avondale,
Ariz.
3 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Kobalt Tools 500, atAvondale,Ariz.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series.WYPALL 200, atAvondale, Ariz.
10:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Qualifying for NHRA Finals,
at Pomona, Calif. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
CBS Mississippi at Tennessee
ESPN Iowa at Northwestern
ESPN2 Indiana at Wisconsin
VERSUS Brown at Dartmouth
12:30 p.m.
FSN Kansas St. at Missouri
2:30 p.m.
NBC Utah at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Virginia
Tech at North Carolina, Penn St. at Ohio
St. or Texas Tech at Oklahoma
CBS Georgia at Auburn
ESPN Regional coverage, Penn
St. at Ohio St. or Virginia Tech at North
Carolina
4 p.m.
VERSUS San Diego St. atTCU
7 p.m.
FSN -Texas A&M at Baylor
7:15 p.m.
ESPN South Carolina at Florida
ESPN2 Mississippi St. at Alabama
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Oregon at California
8:07 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Clemson
at Florida St., Southern Cal at Arizona, or
Oklahoma St. at Texas
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Nevada at Fresno St.
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Children's Miracle
Network Classic, third round, at Lake
BuenaVista
4 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Lorena Ochoa
Invitational, third round, at Guadalajara,
Mexico
10 p.m.
TGC PGATour AustralasiaJBWere
Masters, final round, at Melbourne,
Australia
I a.m.
TGC European PGATour, Singapore
Open, final round (delayed tape)
MIXED MARTIAL ARTS
9 p.m.
SPIKE Light heavyweights, Goran
Reljic (8-2-0) vs.. Krzysztof Soszynski
(20-11-1); lightweights, Amir Sadollah
(4-2-0) vs. Peter Sobatta (8-3-0); light-
weights,AndreWinner (12-4-1) vs. Dennis
Siver (16-7-0); middleweights,Jorge Rivera
(18-7-0) vs. Alessio Sakara (19-7-0);
middleweights, Nate Marquardt (33-9-2)
vs.Yushin Okami (27-5-0), at Oberhausen,
Germany (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
WGN -Washington at Chicago
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2- Premier League, Manchester
United at Aston Villa
UFL FOOTBALL
II p.m.
VERSUS Omaha at Sacramento

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Thursday's Game
Atlanta 26, Baltimore 21
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at Chicago, I p.m.
Tennessee at Miami, I'p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, I p.m.


Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay,
New Orleans
Thursday, Nov. 18
Chicago at Miami, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 21
Detroit at Dallas, I p.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Washington at Tennessee, I p.m.
Houston at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Buffalo at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Arizona at Kansas City, I p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Carolina, I p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, I p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 22
Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.

Top 25 games

Today
No. I Oregon at California, 7:30 p.m.
No. 2Auburn vs. Georgia, 3:30 p.m.
No. 3 TCU vs. San Diego State, 4 p.m.
No. 5 LSU vs. Louisiana-Monroe,
7 p.m.
No. 6 Wisconsin vs. Indiana, Noon
No. 7 Stanford at Arizona State,
7:30 p.m.
No. 8 Ohio State vs. Penn State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 9 Nebraska vs. Kansas, 7 p.m.
No. II Alabama vs. No. 17 Mississippi
State, 7:15 p.m.
No. 12 Oklahoma State at Texas,
8 p.m.
No. 13 Iowa at Northwestern, Noon
No. 14 Arkansas vs. UTEP, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Utah at Notre Dame,
2:30 p.m.
No. 16VirginiaTech at North Carolina,


3:30 p.m.
No. 18
8 p.m.
No. 19
3:30 p.m.
No. 20
12:30 p.m.
No. 21
10:30 p.m.


Arizona vs. Southern Cal,

Oklahoma vs. Texas Tech,

Missouri vs. Kansas State,

Nevada at Fresno State,


No. 22 South Carolina at No. 25
Florida, 7:15 p.m.
No. 23 Texas A&M at Baylor, 7 p.m.
No. 25 UCF vs. Southern Miss,
Noon

College scores

Thursday
Connecticut 30, Pittsburgh 28
East Carolina 54, UAB 42
S. Carolina St. 32, Morgan St. 10
Texas Southern 41, Grambling St. 34,
OT


SOCCER

* MLS playoffs

Finals
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Today
San Jose at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday
FC Dallas at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Kobalt Tools 500
Site: Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, 1:30-
2:30 p.m.; ESPN2, 3-4 p.m.); Sunday, race,
3 p.m. (ESPN, 2-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway
(oval, I mile).
Race distance: 312 miles, 312 laps.
NATIONWIDE
WYPALL 200
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed,


noon-1:30 p.m.), race, 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
4-7 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
Site:Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m.).
Track:Yas Marina Circuit (road course,
3.45 miles).
Race distance: 189.8 miles, 55 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Automobile Club of Southern
California NHRA Finals
Site: Pomona, Calif.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN, 9-11:30 p.m.).
Track:Auto Club Raceway at Pomona.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Chicago 120, Golden State 90
Boston 112, Miami 107
Denver 118, LA. Lakers 112
Friday's Games
Utah at Atlanta (n)
Houston at Indiana (n)
Toronto at Orlando (h)
Charlotte atWashington (n)
NewYork at Minnesota'(n)
Philadelphia at Dallas (n)
Portland at Oklahoma City (n)
Sacramento at Phoenix (n)
Detroit at L.A. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Utah at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Orlando at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at Atlanta, 2 p.m.
Detroit at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Houston at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 games

Today
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. North
Florida, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Illinois vs. Southern Illinois,
8 p.m.
No. 17 Butler vs. Marian, Ind., 2 p.m.
No. 18 Washington vs. McNeese State,
4 p.m.
No. 25 San Diego State at Long Beach
State, 7:05 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Nashville 3, St. Louis 2, SO
San Jose 2, N.Y. Islanders I, SO
Montreal 3, Boston I
N.Y. Rangers 3, Buffalo 2, OT
Washington 6.Tampa Bay 3
Philadelphia 8, Carolina I
Atlanta 5, Minnesota I
Detroit 6, Edmonton 2
Vancouver 6, Ottawa 2
Los AngelesAngeles 3, Dallas I
Friday's Games
Edmonton at New Jersey (n)
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh (n)
Colorado at Columbus (n)
Minnesota at Florida (n)
Calgary at Phoenix (n)
Dallas atAnaheim (n).
Today's Games
Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at San Jose, 10 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Los Angeles,
10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Edmonton at N.Y. Rangers, 12:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.
Anaheim at Chicago, 7 p.m.


BRIEFS


YOUTH FOOTBALL ,

Memorial Bowl

games today

The Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department's
Memorial Bowl continues
today with four games:
Midget Division
9 a.m. Glen Presley
Wolves vs. Brian's Sports
Wildcats;
10:15 a.m. Annie
Mattox Eagles vs. Lions/
Trojans winner;
Jr. Midget Division
11:30 a.m. Keen
and Thomas Tigers vs.
Madison Lions;
2:45 p.m. Sitel
Logicats vs. Madison
Saints.
All games are at
Memorial Stadium.
Admission is $2.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Travel team tryout

planned today

An open tryout for
9-under travel baseball
team players is 10 a.m.


today at the Southside
Recreation Complex
practice fields. The team
will emphasize improving
fundamental baseball skills.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I STEAE I


For details, call
manager Todd Gustavson
at 365-2133.

E From staff reports


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CIVIL SHAKY FACTOR BEFALL
I Answer: What the new airline used to get business to
take off FLIERS


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 223; 2. Terry Wayne 207;
3. (tie) Joyce Hooper, Lori Davis 169.
1. Steve Fancy 234; 2. Mark Koppa
223; 3. George Walters 210.
High scratch series: 1. Gloria
Dennis 539; 2. Mary Lobaugh 516;
3. Joyce Hooper 477. 1. Mark Davis
584; 2. Dess Fennell 582; 3. (tie) Mark
Koppa, George Walters 575.
High handicap game: 1. Terry
Wayne 264; 2. $Cathey Creel 234;
3. Carla Nyssen 229. 1. Steve Fancy
264; 2. Jack Stanfield 242; 3. Chris
Camacho 230.
High handicap series: 1. Gloria
Dennis 644; 2. Joyce Hooper 633;
3. Dianne Petit 631.1. George Walters
668; 2. Mark Koppa 647; 3. Dess
Fennell 645.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
175. 1. Tom Sewejkis 197.
(results from Nov. 2)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Legal Ladies
(31-17); 2. Lucky Strikers (30-18);
3. The Sandbaggers (27-21).
High handicap game: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 249; 2. Harriett Woods
243; 3. Cythe Shiver 241.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 678; 2. Harriett Woods
661; 3. Cythe Shiver 656.
(results from Nov. 9)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(37-11); 2. Pink Panthers (28-20);
3. Razzle Dazzle (26.5-21.5).
High scratch game: 1. Betty
Brown 166; 2. Sandra Johns 164;
3. Janie Posey 163. 1. Earl Hayward
201; 2. Earl Hayward 201; 3. Ross
Meyers 193.
High scratch series: 1. (tie) Sandra
Johns, Amy Musselwhite 444;
3. Betty Brown 438. 1. Earl Hayward
558; 2. Ross Meyers 557.


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

(results from Nov. 9)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Wild Things
(27-17); 2. Shiners (25-19, 25,935
pins); 3. Gamblers (25-19, 25,409
pins).
High handicap game: 1. Sandra
Johns 250; 2. Yvonne Finley 243;
3. Joyce Hooper 231. 1. Dan Ritter
273; 2. George Mulligan 217;
3. Vernon Black 216.
High handicap series: 1. Jane
Sommerfeld 655; 2. Aggie Mumbauer
646; 3. Roberta Giordano 639.
1. Winton Brewer 661; 2. Sal Annello
.624; 3. George Walters 619.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
151.6; 2. Betty Carmichael 149.53;
3. Bea Purdy 149.33.1. David Duncan
188.64; 2. Bill Dolly 183.06; 3. George
Mulligan 180.24.
(results from Nov. 4)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(36-12); 2. Average Joe's (28.5-19.5);
3. Team #1 (28-20).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 201; 2. Linda Suttqn 195;
3. Kelly Terebo 190. 1. Bill Duncan
225; 2. (tie) A.J. Dariano, Mark Moore
221.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yeingst 535; 2. Kelly Terebo 476;
3. Gloria Dennis 460. 1. Bill Duncan
602; 2. Mark Moore 581; 3. Joe
Cohrs 555.
(results frori Nov. 7)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Lake City Bowl
(182.5-117.5); 2. Neil Hoffman's Auto
Transport (177.5-122.5) 3. Team 6
(176.5-123.5).
High scratch game: 1. Matt
Stephan 268; 2. Dale Coleman 258;
3. Boaty Boatwright 236.
High scratch series: 1. Dale
Coleman 763; 2. Matt Stephan 643;
3. J.J. Hilbert 636.
High handicap game: 1. Boaty
Boatwright 288; 2. Matt Stephan 286;
3. Dale Coleman 258.
High handicap series: 1. Dale


No Bowden Bowl this time


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

`TALLAHASSEE For
the first time in a genera-
tion, Clemson and Florida
State face each other with-
out a Bowden coaching on
the sideline.
Bobby Bowden patrolled
the Florida State side of the
field for 34 years, including
nine when he faced his son.
Tommy Bowden coached
Clemson for nearly 10 sea-
sons before giving way to
Dabo Swinney in 2008.
The much-hyped
"Bowden Bowl" disap-
peared after Tommy
Bowden was fired part way
through the 2008 season,
but Saturday's game could
be just as important by


ACROSS

1 Joule fraction
4 T'ai ch'uan
7 Greenish-blue
11 London lav
12 Scary
feeling
13 Hang five
14 Waxy flower
16 Fine sediment
17 Wavelike pat-
tern
18 Caps or lids
19 Grab
20 Nero's 102
21 Dismantle a tent
24 Returns
27 Hamlet's oath
28 School found-
ed in 1440
30 Went to court
32 Fiery gem
34 Region
36 Hula attire
37 Resistant to
change
39 Bohemian
dance


helping determine one of
the entries in next month's
ACC title game.
The elder Bowden, who
celebrated his 81st birthday
Monday, was nudged out at
the end of the regular sea-
son last year after a sixth
straight loss to in-state rival
Florida. While he remains
active by writing his mem-
oirs and making speeches
and Tommy 'Bowden con-
templates coaching again
someday, Florida State and
Clemson move on.
"It's the biggest game of
the year for us," Swinney
said. "We're trying to have
that good finish and get eli-
gible for a bowl, and keep
us alive in our conference."
Swinney'sTigers will have
to do it without sophomore


41 Forfeit ender
42 Dress part
43 MHz part
45 Ice-skating
jumps
48 Eye protector
49 France-Spain
range
52 Poker stake
53 "Et tu" time
54 Bygone mar-
quee notice
55 Middle Ages
quaff
56 Dangerous
curve
57 Pantyhose
shade

DOWN

1 Horror-flick'


tailback Andre Ellington
(toe injury) and Florida
State quarterback Christian
Ponder's availability won't
be known until game time.
Ponder has been trou-
bled the past several weeks
by a painful elbow injury
suffered Oct. 16. He didn't
practice until Thursday
when he only threw lightly
for a few minutes.
"It's not going to matter
who is under center," Swinney
said. 'They are going to do
what they do regardless.
This is the best offense we've
played all year."
Redshirt sophomore EJ
Manuel, who is 3-1 as a
starter in emergency roles,
took all the snaps in Florida
State's first three practices
this week.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

HOIG PAD NPR
EAR REE A YLA


BUGABOO S ROAD










MEMO BEDOUINS




HOD NED SLY


street
2 Be footloose 7 Besets 15
3 Disco dancer 8 Say uncle 18
(hyph.) 9 WWW address- 20
4 "People" person es 21
5 "Bali -" 10 Behind, at sea
6 Retiree's kitty 12 Silo filler 22


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Top digit
Speed off
Film
Strange sight-
ing
Barely beats
Soil amender
Long past
Tedious
HUnt for
Fable
Width of a cir.
Giggled
Triangle tips
Swimsuit half
Portent
Long-eared
animals
Horse's hair
This, in
Barcelona
In case
Vaccines
Take it on the


49 Homey
dessert
50 Fabric meas.
51 Mama's boy


2010 by UFS, Inc.


11-13


Coleman 763; 2. Boaty Boatwright
722; 3. Matt Stephan 697.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
230.56; 2. Bill Duncan 214.67; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 212.15.
(results from Nov. 1)
MONDAY LADIES
Team standings: 1. Just Us Girls;
9. Lake City Bowl; 3. Scared
Splitless.
High scratch game: 1. Julie Myers
216; '2. Gloria Dennis 212; 3. Cythe
Shiver 202.
High scratch series: 1. Cythe
Shiver 560; 2. Julie Myers 511;
3. Kelly Stokes 505.
High handicap game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 252; 2, Danielle Burch 244;
3. Tracy Hamrick 239.
High handicap series: 1. Tracy
Hamrick 647; 2. Cythe Shiver 641;
3. Dee Nickodam 626.
High average: 1. Julie Myers 176;
2. Cythe Shiver 172.
(results from Nov. 1)
DRIFTERS
Team standings: 1. Pin Busters;
2. Eric's Green Machine; 3. The
Strikers.
High scratch game: 1. Jennifer
Freeman 171; 2. Gloria Dennis 170;
3. Linda Smith 160. 1. Bill Dolly 253;
2. John McFeely III 212; 3. John
Smith 189.
High scratch series: 1. Gloria
Dennis 468; 2. Cythe Shiver 429;
3. Linda Smith 428. 1.'John McFeely
III 548; 2. Bill Dolly 544; 3. John
Smith 528.
High handicap game: 1. Jennifer
Freeman 215; 2. (tie) Lori Zuccola,
Linda Smith 204. 1. Bill Dolly 257;
2. John Smith 213; 3. Eric Pope 204.
High handicap series: 1. Lori
Zuccola 584; 2. Betty Dicks 579; 3.
Linda Smith 560. 1. John Smith 600;
2. Eric Pope 583; 3. Bill Dolly 556.
High average: 1. Cythe Shiver
160; 2. (tie) Jennifer Freeman, Linda
Smith 144. 1. Bill Dolly 192; 2. Patrick
Markham 177.
(results from Nov. 2)


~


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


Lady Indians look to


be a force in basketball


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High's girls basket-
ball team had a devastat-
ing season in 2009-10, but
the never-say-die attitude
of Lady Indians sports is
coming through.
Fort White opens the new
season at Madison County
High at 7 p.m. Monday with
a roster twice as large as
last year.
"I feel really good," Fort
White head coach DeShay
Harris said. "A lot of girls
came out and said they were
interested in playing basket-
ball. A lot of them played in
the past, but had dropped
off the last few years."
Fort White's home open-
er is a District 5-3A game
against Santa Fe High on
Tuesday.
Defending champion
Suwannee. High, runner-
up Newberry High and
Williston High round out
the district.
"The players have made
it a point to have a winning
season," Harris said. "That
is one goal they set for
themselves and the other is
a district championship."
Fort White returns five
players seniors Da'Leecia


Armstrong, Jordan Earle,
Miracle Simmons and
Catherine Trisch and junior
Lisa Glenn and all have
plenty of floor time since
there were so few players
last year.
Seniors Amber Chapman,
Raven Major and Krystin
Strawder joined the team,
along with juniors Kala
Joseph and Danielle
Warmack, and sophomores.
Sitia Martinez and Sarah
Stringfellow.
"Dee is one of our big
post players," Harris said.
"She has a lot of basketball
experience and is a great
leader. She is pushing the
team in practice. With Lisa,
they are both over 6 feet.
That is the first time I've
seen that in a while."
Harris said Stringfellow
and Martinez are working
at point guard, with Earle
the shooting guard and
Strawder playing the No. 3.
"Jordan is a great 3-point
shooter and we expect big
things from her," Harris said.
"Krystin is very athletic and
very versatile. Catherine is a
four-year player with a lot of
experience."
Harris graduated from
Fort White in 2005. He did
not play high school basket-
ball, but spent 31/' years with


the University of Florida
women's team in roles from
manager to staff assistant
"I worked directly under
all of the assistant coaches
at Florida," Harris said.
"Working in that program
gave me a more thorough
knowledge of the game."
Harris graduated from
UF in May and is w9rk-
ing in the front office at
Fort White until a teaching
position opens. His sister,
Bregay Harris, is coaching
the junior varsity.
"I like to push the ball,
especially with the big
roster," Harris said. "We
want to tire out our oppo-
nents as much as possible.
We want to get the ball into
the post and it helps when
you have a great outside
shooter like Jordan. The
defense can chose to stay
outside and give up its focus
on the inside."
Harris scouted Santa Fe
and said the Lady Raiders
and Suwannee are likely
the teams to beat in district.
Fort White wants to be a
player, too.
"I am looking forward to
a great season," Harris said.
"The community is back
excited and we want to ride
that excitement throughout
the season."


CUUKIRTY PHOUU
Members of the Fort White High 2010-11 girls junior varsity basketball team (from left) are
Chelsea Mock, Rykia Jackson, Jasmine Robinson, Jashari Blige, Shania Pelham, manager
Tryshae Strawder, Desma Blake, Candace Hall, Khadijah Ingram, Jessica Mannira,
Alexis Gibbons, Ta'Bresha Cannon, Ka'Shanique Cook, Emily Roach and Sadie Wilbur.
Cenise Armstrong also is on the team. Bregay Harris and Santeis Harris are coaches.


Florida wide receiver Chris Rainey (3) brushes off Brandon
Georgia at EverBank Field in Jacksonville on Oct. 30.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Boykin (2) in a game against


South Carolina, Florida

playing for SEC East crown


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida
has played for division titles,
conference championships,
even for the ultimate tro-
phies.
South Carolina? Well, this
could be the biggest game
in school history. At the
very least, the Gamecocks
haven't had this much at
stake in a decade.
No. 22 South Carolina
and 24th-ranked Florida will
decide the Southeastern
Conference's Eastern
Division in the Swamp
on Saturday night, a win-
ner-take-all game between
teams that stumbled during
the season but still man-
aged a meaningful game in
November.
The winner earns a spot
in Atlanta for the league
title game next month and
gets a chance to make the
Bowl Championship Series.
The loser falls to a less-than-
desirable bowl and has to


wait another year maybe
longer for another shot.
"We're looking forward
to it," said South Carolina
coach Steve Spurrier, whose
latest return to his alma
mater and his former coach-
ing stop is merely a subplot
"Like I told our guys, We're
going on the big stage, fel-
las. If you're a little nervous
about it and scared, then
we're all in trouble."
The Gators (6-3, 4-3 SEC)
have been here before.
They pretty much own
East. They have a 16-game
winning streak against divi-
sion opponents and have
won the East three times in
the last four years.
Does all that experience
mean anything?
"It's irrelevant," defen-
sive tackle Omar Hunter
said. "It's the SEC. Every
week's a big game."
The Gamecocks (6-
3, 4-3) are taking a simi-
lar approach even though
they haven't had been in
this position a one-game


showdown for the division
title since 2000.
They realize they haven't
played well since knocking
off then-No. 1 Alabama in
early October. They lost
at Kentucky, sputtered at
Vanderbilt, overcame sev-
eral defensive lapses to beat
Tennessee and then got
blown out by Arkansas.
Now, South Carolina is
too busying trying to get
back on track to be over-
confident or looking ahead.
"This is for the SEC East
championship," defensive
tackle Travian Robertson
said. "We've never been
here before. This will be a
big opportunity for us. It's
big, but we can't make it
bigger than what it is. It's
a game, it's a conference
game, it's an SEC champi-
onship East game.
"We want to approach this
game and just play football.
It's another football game.
It's going to be a tough
game, but we need to just
play football."


SPORTS SHOTS


COURTESY PHOTO

Orange and Blue baseball
Jacob Tillotson of Lake City takes a throw at shortstop for the Blue team during the
University of Florida's fall Orange and Blue three-game series Nov. 5-7 in Gainesville.


Top-rated tackle
Fort White High graduate
Robert Hartley of
Florida A&M was named Mid-'
Eastern Athletic Conference
Offensive Lineman of the Week
for the Rattlers' 31-17
homecoming win over Morgan
State Oct. 30.


COURTESY PHOTO


COURTESY PHOTO

League champion
Owen Dew is a member of the Lake County Captains baseball team, which won the
Class A Midwest League championship. Dew joins his mother; Claudia, a graduate of
Columbia High and Lake City Community College, and dad, John, who graduated from
LCCC, in Eastlake, Ohio, on Labor Day. Owen's grandparents, Bert and Charlotte Young
and Barbara Owens, live in Lake City.


COURTESY PHOTO

Barber claims co-medalist
Lake City native Blayne Barber captured a co-medalist honor at the Bridgestone Collegiate
at the Forest Oaks Country Club last month in Greensboro, Ga.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.

C5-A- IS5 KNoW IT-AL-L,
IN -IU-AT OF AiAF,-TFM&E SEcuRIT'Y,
WiHATA T AE DIFFP-P-.e c t- B~rwFe
A FDL-L- fO'DY SEAR-rc A P4 A
poFR NK e &T GEORIN ES


_____ ,l-, ll C..C... .... ..FLP


FRANK & ERNEST


Dlst. by Creators Syndicate


TWo F-Ro T TrE-T .


DEAR ABBY


Dispute over cooking dinner

is threatening to boil over


DEAR ABBY: I have been
married for a year and I am
concerned about one issue.
Dinner is a constant source
of contention. Although my
husband and I work full time,
I enjoy coming home and pre-
paring a home-cooked meal
for. him. He views this as too
fancy and too expensive.
We are financially com-
fortable and our grocery bill
is modest. It frustrates me
that he doesn't appreciate the
thought and effort I put into
our dinner. That's the way
I was raised. My husband
would die happy eating frozen
pizza and salad out of a bag
every night! That may be fine
for some people, but I prefer
to eat better than that. Any
suggestions? LIKES TO
COOK IN ST. LOUIS
DEAR LIKES TO COOK:
Your husband may be happy
eating frozen pizza and salad
out of a bag every night, but
he'll live a longer, healthier
life if he varies his diet. Rath-
er than seeking approval or
gratitude for preparing those
home-cooked dinners, explain
to him that putting healthy,
balanced meals on the table
for you both to enjoy brings
you pleasure and is a way for
you to unwind after the work-
day. It's not "too fancy," and
the money is well spent.
DEAR ABBY: My wife of
20 years died recently. I was
hospitalized a few months lat-
er and nearly died myself.
I needed help at home as


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
I have three young children.
My brother's wife offered to
help. I had dated her many
years ago when we were kids
and I was attracted to her
theq. As time has gone on, we
have become very close and
the sparks have been reig-
nited. I feel terrible, but at the
same time I have always had
feelings for her.
She. told me she and my
brother haven't been getting
along and she is no longer
attracted to him. I like her
a lot, but I love my brother,
too. What should I do? -
BROTHERLY LOVE ON
THE WEST COAST
DEAR BROTHERLY
LOVE: What you should do
is thank your sister-in-law for
her help, and hire someone
to take care of your children.
That's what you should have
done in the first place. Then
join a singles group and put out
the word that you would like
to meet someone. I guarantee
you won't be lonely long. And
it will give your brother and
sister-in-law a chance to work
out their difficulties, which is
the honorable thing to do.
DEAR ABBY: Over the


years I have been the orga-
nizer who has hosted multiple
parties for friends and family.
When someone is having a
milestone birthday or other
event, I am always the one
who plans a celebration to
make it a memorable occa-
sion. This-requires effort, but
I love seeing the joy people
get from these events.
I will be turning 50 soon.
Just once, I would like to be
the recipient of a party. I know
it's unlikely that my friends
will throw a surprise birthday
party for me. Or if they do, it
will be something small and
last-minute.
I am beginning to dread
my birthday because I feel
my resentment building.
Should I plan my own party or
just hope for the best and see
what happens? Any other sug-
gestions? ALWAYS THE
HOSTESS, NEVER THE
PARTY GIRL
DEAR ALWAYS THE
HOSTESS: The surest way
to get the message across is
to communicate it to some
of your closest friends. And
if none of them volunteer
to host a party for you, then
either plan your own or ar-
range to spend the money you
would have spent on the party
treating yourself to a day of
pampering at a spa or a short
vacation. You deserve it.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You can enhance
your current relationship or
meet a new love interest, if
you are single. A chance to
partner with someone who
will complement what you
have to offer will lead to an
unusual opportunity. Pur-
chases and investments will
go in your favor. ****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't bother
asking 'for favors. Do your
own thing and take care of
your own business. A part-
nership will take an unusu-
al turn but you come out on
top. Advancement can be
yours. **
GEMINI (May21-June
20): Your intuition will not
lead you astray where your
career and personal life are
concerned. Love will play
a particularly interesting
role in a choice you have
to make regarding your liv-
ing arrangements and. your
vocation. Someone you re-
spect will give you greater
insight. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): A trip, taking a
course, attending a confer-
ence or getting away with
someone you love will all
lead to an interesting sce-
nario regarding your home,
work and lifestyle. There is
room for improvement and
the opportunity to build
your confidence. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Make changes to
your home that will make
you comfortable or better-
equipped to take on the
challenges you have ahead
of you. Anything worth do-
ing is worth doing the right
way the first time around.
Love, commitment and a
better home life can be
obtained with a couple of
changes. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): You will come
up against argumentative
people. Working as a team
player will help you keep
things under control. A
creative approach to your
health and well-being will
bring good results. ***
IUBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take part in commu-
nity events or enjoy a shop-
ping extravaganza. You will
find special gifts for the
people you love. You will re-
alize how much you care for
someone in your life. Speak
from the heart and you will
be heard. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't believe
everything you hear but do
take it into consideration
when making a personal
decision. Explore what's
being offered. Professional
and personal opportuni-
ties are apparent. Use your


imagination. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Knowledge
reigns supreme when it
comes to reaching your
goals, getting ahead or win-
ning a race. Your determi-
nation and drive, coupled
with your ability to charm,
everyone around you, will
help you find your way to
the top. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't put
pressure on anyone or you
will face more than you bar-
gained for. You have to ease
into whatever situation you
face. Working on an idea or
project that needs develop-
ing will bring the highest
returns. **'
AQUARIUS (Jan.. 20-
Feb. 18): Emotions will be
hard to control. Keep your
thoughts and feelings out
in the open so you aren't
accused of withholding in-
formation or fibbing. A re-
lationship that has money
issues can be sorted out if
you talk matters through.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): A chance to
work toward a long-term
goal will bring you great
satisfaction. A problem
with someone in a position
of power is likely. Opportu-
nity knocks and you must
take advantage, even if it
means there is no turning
back. ***


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals F
"VSDKLTJLRJL WT FGTZ DRL CWB
UVKEWRB AWHAKL." "W KWELS
HMTLKP CLZZLX UYLR W UVTR'Z
H L' JVXDK CGXRLZZ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I have these big, piano-playing hands. I feel like I
should be picking potatoes." Sandra Bull6ck


(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc.


11-13


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


CELEBRITY CIPHER


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


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Legal

NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME ACT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of The Cancer Center at Lake City,
located in Columbia County, Florida,
with an address of 795 SW State
Road 47, Lake City, Fl 32025, has
registered said name with the Divi-
sion of Corporations of the Depart-
ment of State, Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated the 11th day of November,
2010.
North Florida Cancer Center Lake
City, LLC
05524466
November 13, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 10-203-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JODI ELAINE WOOD,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JODI ELAINE WOOD, deceased,
whose date of death was August 1,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, File No. 10-203-CP,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. -
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
* DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS NO-
VEMBER 13; 2010. ,,
Personal Representative:
/s/ Sam Jackson
SAM K. JACKSON, JR.
2204 SW Jim Witt Road
Lake City, Florida 32025
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & ,.FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYS, P.A..
By: /s/ Mark Feagle
Mark E. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0576905
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
153 NE Hemando Avenue
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
04542313
November 13, 20, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 09000257CA
WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL
SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC.
Plaintiff
vs.
CHARLES B. BROWN, III; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES
B. BROWN, III; HOMETOWN
BROKERS, INC.; and UNKNOWN
OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWN-
ERS, and OTHER UNKNOWN
PARTIES, including, if a named de-
fendant is deceased, the personal rep-
resentatives, the surviving spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
and all other parties claiming by,,
through, under or against that de-
fendant and the several and respec-
tive unknown assigns, successors in
interest, trustees or other persons
claiming by, through, under or
against any corporation or other legal
entity named as defendant, and all
claimants, persons or parties, natural
or corporate, or whose exact 'legal







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Legal

status is unknown, claiming under
any of the above named or described
defendants
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to the Order or Final Judgment en-
tered in this cause, in the Circuit
Court of Columbia County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in Co-
lumbia County, Florida, described
as: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "A"
EXHIBIT "A"
ALL that certain land, situate In Co-
lumbia County, State of Florida, viz:
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH-RANGE 17
EAST ,
Section 8: Begin at the Northeast
corner of SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Sec-
tion 8, and run East along the North
boundary line of said SW 1/4 of NW
1/4 to the West right-of-way line of
U.S. Highway 441; then run South
along said right-of-way line of U.S.
Highway 441, 420 feet; then run
West parallel to the North boundary
line of said SW 1/4 of NW 1/4, 420
feet; then run South parallel to the
West boundary line of the SW 1/4 of
NW 1/4 210 feet; then run South par-
allel to the North boundary line of
SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 630 feet; thence
run South parallel to the West boun-
dary line of the SW 1/4 of NW 1/4,
420 feet; thence run West parallel to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of the NW 1/4, 270 feet; then run
North 270 feet to the West boundary
line of the SW 1/4 of NW 1/4; then
run North along the West boundary
line of the SW 1/4 of NW 1/4, 1020
feet to a point 30 feet South of the
t North boundary line of the SW 1/4
of NW 1/4.; then run East parallel to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4, 280 feet; then run
North parallel to the West boundary
line of SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 30 feet to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4; then run East along
the North boundary, line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4, a distance of 1040
feet, more or less, to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. Lying in Columbia
County, Florida:
LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOL-
LOWING LANDS:
Begin at the Northeast corner of the
SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 bf Section 8, then
run East to the West right-of-way
line of U.S. Highway 441; then run
South along said right-of-way line of
(U.S. Highway 441, 110 feet; than
run West parallel to the North boun-
dary line of the ; SW 1/4 of NW 1/4,
1320 feet, more or less, to a point on
the West boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4 which is 110 feet
South of the line of the SW 1/4 of
NW 1/4; then run North along the
West boundary line of the SW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4 280 feet; then run North
parallel to the West boundary line of
the SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4, 30 feet to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4; then run East along
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4, 1040 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Together with all the tenements, he-
reditaments and appurtenances there-
to belonging or in anywise appertain-
ing
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, on the third floor of
the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32056 at 11:00 A.M. on
December 1,2010.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST TO THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTH-
ER THAN THE PROPERTY OWN-
ER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITH THE CLERK OF COURT,
WITHIN -60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED this 28th day of October,
2010
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
ENRICO G. GONZALEZ, P.A.
Attorney at Law
ENRICO G. GONZALEZ, ES-
QUIRE
6255 East Fowler Avenue
Temple Terrace, FL 33617
Florida Bar #861472
(813)980-6302
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not
later than seven (7) days prior to the
proceeding via the Florida Relay
Service at 1-800-955-8771.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a copy of
the foregoing has been mailed to En-
rico G. Gonzalez, Esquire, 6255 East
Fowler Avenue, Temple Terrace,
Florida 33617; Charles B. Brown,
III, c/o Eddie M. Anderson, Esquire,
Post Office Box 1179, Lake City, FI
32056-1179; and Hometowne Brok-
ers, Inc., 487 N.W. Casterline Glen,
Lake City, FL 32055 this 28th day of
October, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04542210
November 6, 13, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION NO.
PLANTATION AT DEEP
CREEK, LLC, a Florida limited
liability company,
16525 Temple Boulevard
Loxahatchee, FL 33470
Plaintiff,
vs.
ADVERSE POSSESSION,
QUIET TITLE
P.G. BROWN, LULA HARDEE
BROWN,
E.V. BROWN, W.S. BROWN, JAN-
IE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B.
SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN, JR.,
E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH B.
HEATH,
addresses unknown, and their un-


known spouses and children, their
heirs, devisees, and personal repre-
sentatives and their or any of their
heirs, devisees, executors, adminis-
trators, grantees, trustees, assigns, or
successors in right, title, or interest to


Legal

the hereinafter described property
and any and all persons claiming by
or through them or any of them; and
all claimants, persons or parties, nat-
ural or corporate, or whose exact le-
gal status is unknown, claiming un-
der any of the above named or de-
scribed defendants, claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in and to
the lands hereinafter described, the
addresses of whom are unknown;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: P.G. BROWN, LULA
HARDEE BROWN, E.V. BROWN,
W.S. BROWN, JANIE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B. SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN,
JR., E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH
B. HEATH, addresses unknown, and
their unknown spouses and children,
their heirs, devisees, and personal
representatives and their or any of
their heirs, devisees, executors, ad-
ministrators, grantees, trustees, as-
signs, or successors in right, title, or
interest to the hereinafter described
property and any and all persons
claiming by or through them or any
of them; and all claimants, persons
or parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants,
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in and to the lands herein-
after described, the addresses of
whom are unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action seeking an order of ad-
verse possession for and to quiet the
title of the following property in Co-
lumbin County, Florida:
A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF
(W 1/2) OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE
17 EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING THOSE LANDS
DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1007,
PAGE 2420 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF
SAID SECTION 31; THENCE
NORTH 00205'09" WEST ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF SAID NE 1/4
A DISTANCE OF 825,05 FEET TO
THE INTERSECTION OF SAID
WEST LINE WITH THE NORTH-
ERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF NORTHWEST
CANSA ROAD AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL;
THENCE CONTINUE NORTH
00905'09" WEST ALONG SAID
WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF
566.67 FEET TO THE SOUTH
LINE OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1021,
PAGE 826 OF THE AFORESAID
RECORDS; THENCE SOUTH
61907'42" EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE A DISTANCE OF
353.29 FEET TO A REBAR ON
THE AFORESAID NORTHERLY
MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE; THENCE SOUTH 37"55'01"
WEST ALONG SAID NORTHER-
LY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF
502.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
CONTAINING 2.01 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
SAID LANDS SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Clay
A. Schnitker, Davis, Schnitker,
Reeves & Browning, P.A., Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Drawer 652, Madison, Florida
32341, on or before November 24,
2010, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
Dated October 21, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Cotrt
By:B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04542045
'October 23, 30, 2010
November 6, 13, 2010


010 Announcements










020 Lost & Found

Found German Shepard.
Southwest Lake City area.
Please call to identify.
386-438-5515


*100 Job
0 Opportunities

04542333
Route Driver Needed: If you've
got the motivation, We have the
opportunity. You will be
employed by an up and coming
Medical Waste Transportation
Company. Must be drug-free,
healthy, hardworking with Valid
Drivers License and excellent
driving record. No CDL
required. Experience preferred.
Will be some warehouse labor
involved. If experienced,
Starting Salary $120.00 per
route day. Will be a 90 day


probationary period.
Please ONLY apply if you are
professional and can
communicate well,with our
customers. Contact:
dmdvanetta(oaol.com or
904-583-7517 leave voicemail


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05524408
DETAILER
Large Manufacturing Company
has the following position
available in the Lake City,
Florida, facility:
DETAILER/CHECKER
Graduate with AS degree or
experience in the steel joist
industry. Responsibilitities
include drafting and detailing of
joist and deck drawings. Must
have AutoCAD experience, and
structural background is prefer-
red. Company offers a highly
professional environment with
tremendous growth opportunity
and competitive salary commen-
surate with experience. Excel-
lent benefit package. Qualified
applicants submit cover letter
and resume in confidence to:,
Jan Tryon
jan.tryon@newmill.com

05524447
Packinghouse Supervisor
Quality Kid Packaging, Inc., is
seeking a Packinghouse Super-
visor for our vegetable packing
facility in White Springs. This
individual will be responsible
for overseeing the packing, ship-
ping and quality assurance. This
person must be self-motivated
and seek perfection. Key
respon-
sibilities include all aspects of
daily packing, shipping and stor-
age facilities. They will have
day to day responsibility for
direct management of labor,
receiving, packing inventory
control, loading, shipping and
order fulfillment. Extensive
daily interaction and coordina-
tion between growers, sales and
order fulfillment to ensure con-
tinuity and customer satisfaction
are required. Five plus years of
packinghouse or produce ware-
house experience required.
Bilingual (English/Spanish) is
preferred. This individual must
be flexible as days and hours
vary as schedules are often
determined by mother nature
and season. EOE. Please submit
resume and salary requirements
to Quality Kid, P 0 Box 269,
White Springs, FL 32096 or
email to jenn@qkproduce.com

ACCOUNTANT/AUDITOR.
Full time position at local
CPA Audit Firm.
Accounting or closely related
degree required. Email resume
with salary history, to:
richard(a)PowellandJonesCPA.com
Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412
Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609
Exp. Sewing Machine
Operator and person for
misc sewing duties.
Call Hafner's 386-755-6481
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St, Lake City, FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
Local mortgage company is
looking for an outbound phone
salesperson. Please don't apply
unless highly motivated & strong
salesperson. Call 386-243-0878.
Pestmasters Services is seeking
F/T exp Pest Control Tech.
Certification A + but not required,
Please call 386-752-7779 for appt

120 Medical
120Employment

05523522
SHANDS LAKE SHORE
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER
has the following immediate
openings
Marketing &
Communication Director
Physical Therapists
Inpatient Coder
Surgical Technologist
Payro ll Specialist

Competitive salary and
benefit package.
Apply online @
shandslakeshore.com

EOE, M/F/V/D,
Drug Free Workplace.

Homecare LPN's needed 9a-6p
and CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare 352-291-4888


120 Medical
120 Employment

F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
MA needed M-F for busy medical
practice. Send reply to Box 05058,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


130 PartTime

Construction office looking for
part time help 24 hrs a week. Must
have general secretarial skills,
quickbook experience and be
good with the public.
Fax resume to 386-755-2165


141 Babysitters

Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or P/T,
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

240 Schools' &
4 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp -
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/29/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock&
30 Supplies
Black Limousine Bull
polled, great disposition,
-- $1,350obo
386-755-3541

Mini Mare w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques'

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Glass Top Stove
Self cleaning
White $150
386-344-1783

White Refrigerator
Freezer on top $125
Call
386-344-1783


407 Computers

Computer set, loaded, XP-Pro,
plus printer, scanner, web-cam, &
more. Everything up-to-date,
$275 386-961-9171

E-MACHINE
$75.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Tempur-Pedic, double size bed
w/frame, like new,
paid $2000 asking $500
call 386-755-9271

411 ,Machinery &
Tools
10" Craftsman Table Saw
Extra blades, good condition
$30 obo
386-755-3541

Craftsman Joiner/Belt Sander
Commercial model,
good condition $150 obo
386-755-3541


WE FIX IT SHOP
Cars, Truck, welding, etc.
Implement Repair.
386-623-3200


kSEriJLIIT.


F 'Tlo


Im









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
8am Callaway S/D, off 247. Wil-
shire Dr. Follow signs. Household,
twin bed, boys clothing. Too
much to list. NO EARLY BIRDS.
Estate Sale (Inside) Sat. 8.? off
242 & 47 on Blueberry Place.
Look for signs. Furn., antiques,
pool table, etc. glassware & more.
Fri & Sat, 8-?,
Miscellaneous items, Next to
Hopeful Baptist Church, corner
of Hopeful Dr & Rhett Place
Fri & Sat. 7:30 -? 129, right be-
tween Scaffs & Badcocks to end,
left on Green, right, 138 Hillcrest
Cr. Lots of stuff. Look for signs
Fri & Sat. 9-? 247 to Kirby, left in-
to Woodcrest, 1 blk turn right,
look for signs.Christmas deco,
clothing, misc household, more.
Fri & Sat. on CR 245 about 1/8
mile South of the 252 intersection.
Lots of misc. items. Too much to
list. Cleaning 2 households.






All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only, 8-?, Multi Family Sale,
New and Used Items
588 NW Harris Lake Dr,
(Lake City Country Club)
Sat only, 8a 2p, exer equip,
Christmas deco, collectibles
304 SW Bambi Lane (off of
Marvin Bumett Rd near balfields)
Sat only, 8A-2P, Support the
Future Health Professionals.
CHS HOSA Columbia County
School Board Office Building
Sat. only 8-2. Behind the Pepsi
plant in Crosswinds S/D on
Chesterfield.Look for signs Winter
clean out. Baby items, & more.
SAT. ONLY. 8-2. S. on 41 left on
238 at the top of the hill. Horace
Witt Way. Christmas deco, misc
house wares, sm tools, much more.

440 Miscellaneous

Rudolph's Christmas
lTree Farm
2000 Shaped, Ceder and
Leyland Cypress
US 90 E to Sanderson, left on
Hwyl27 go 8 miles, left on
Hwy 125 at caution light. Go
6/10 mile, turn right at Noah
Raulerson0Rd., 3 miles to farm
For more info call
904-259-7703

Need Holiday cash? Make 75% of
selling price at 3 day consignment
sale. Accepting gently used name
brand clothing, shoes & handbags.
Call 386-752-3631 or 755-1759


Good Things
450 to Eat
Pecan House in Ellisyille
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420

530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt,
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422 ,
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.

Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incI water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/I BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833, 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevallecyproperties.com


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras
386-752-4258
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940

Mobile Home
650 & Land
D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825

7 0 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 /1 Apt in duplex for rent. $560
mo. w/$560 dep. no pets,
w/carport, off Branford Hwy
386-752-7578
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $530 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075"
2/1 w/garage,
Seat side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-212 for details.
3BR/2BA HOUSE in Ft. White
w/Garage. Washer & Dryer
Rent $800. per month,
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage, spacious, 2/1,,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423 .
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

t02 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
1 Room Efficiency. Private.
$400. mo plus deposit
Everything furnished. No pets.
386-965-0778
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, 'fidge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
SHome For Rent

04542288
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

04542291
For Rent-
3/2 home on Baya Ave.
convenient to shopping, schools
and churches. $790./mo with
$790./security. First month's
rent reduced to $395.00
for qualified tenant.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
386-365-5884.

05524415
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $700 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3/2 w/family room;
in town; fenced back yard.
$ 600 per month.
386-623-2848
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $850 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Large 3/2, in town, near schools,
shopping, doctors, banks. Large
living & family rooms, spacious


closet space/storage throughout. 2
car carport, covered patio, W/D
hook-up, lawn care provided, city
util., lease $985 mo, 1st & sec dep
call 386-397-3335
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of LiveOak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276


73n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

75 0 Business &
SOffice Rentals
Great Opportunity
Sunoco Convenient Store for lease
3554 N Hwy 441, Lake City.
813-495-8461
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!!!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
O U Acreage

05524416
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

83O Commercial
8 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

850 Waterfront
SProperty
Own your own comfortable water-
front retreat at friendly Old Pavi-
lion RV Park, Keaton Beach, FL
28 Ft Cougar 5th Wheel. excellent
condition, located on full hook-up,
Gulf front lot$ 14, 000
Call 386-752-0941

940 Trucks


and mse !a"

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only
$1750

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS

(386) 755-5440


$25 Prize Weekly Winner
Contest rules and official entry blank in Tuesday's paper.


-I
(.'Y I
'U


, i. ,

.r.- t" pi. .*'- ...
S -


Lake City Reporter


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad.
Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the
picture for you. Private party only!

Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the

same vehicle in print and online.


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