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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01450
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/12/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01450
System ID: UF00028308:01450
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Paddle Battle
Fort White meets Santa
Fe as rivals clash.


000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
S p0o Box 117007
P 205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Laie


Friday, November 12, 2010 v


(-3


ww:lakecityreportc


End of the Line
Columbia takes on
Suwannee in season finale.

Sports, I B





porter


Vol. 136, No. 254 E 75 cents


LCFD has a practice session


Obstacle course
gives drivers
valuable training.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Orange traffic cones
were seemingly spread hap-
hazardly in the Southside
Sports Complex girls soft-
ball field parking lot with
fire trucks circling the area,
driving through, around
and, sometimes, over the
cones.


The fire trucks were at
the parking area as part of a,
Lake City Fire Department
Emergency Vehicle
Operations Training ses-
sion, with each driver
attempting to get certifica-
tion on their driving abili-
ties.
Lake City Fire
Department Battalion
Chief Buddy Crews said
Lake City Fire Department,
firefighters take part in
the Emergency Vehicle
Operations Training once
every two years.


"It's a certification that.
gives us a basic operation of
the trucks and handling of
the trucks," Crews said. "It
gives the guys an idea the
capabilities of the trucks as
far as the widths and being
able to handle them in tight
situations."
The training session,
which was graded by a
crew of former firefighters
from Jacksonville who cer-
tify the driving tests, was
not based on speed or hard
evasive maneuvers.
"It's just a gentle han-


dling of the trucks so
the firefighters can get
a basic understanding of
the maneuverability of the
trucks," Crews said.
As part of the train-
ing session, which began
Wednesday and is sched-
uled to conclude today, 18
full-time Lake City Fire
Department firefighters
and one of the department's
reservist participated in the
training session.
As part of the training,
TRAINING continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Fire Department driver/engineer Jeff McNeill
maneuvers a ladder truck through an obstacle course while
taking an Emergency Vehicle Operations Training certification
test Thursday.


CHEFS



TAKE



CENTER



STAGE

Auction, food
attract almost 400
people to benefit.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
electable
foods, auc-
tioned prizes
and fellow-
ship in a
holiday ambiance were all
a part of a benefit event
for the March of Dimes 19
Thursday.
Almost 400 guests
attended the Sixth Annual
"Holiday Magic" Signature
Chef's Auction hosted
by the Suwannee Valley
March of Dimes North
Central Florida Division
- at the Columbia County Luis Hernandez, of
Fairgrounds banquet spanakopita, which
hall. Event proceeds went
toward March of Dimes preventing birth
research and'the organi- premature birth a
zation's mission of improv- mortality.
ing the health of babies by "It's to help with


Donated turkeys

are needed for

the holiday


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
George Hudson Jr. (left) and his son Codi, 23, watch as IHOP cook
Jeff Reeves places a dollop of blueberries on top ofa banish crepe
Thursday night at the 'Holiday Magic' Signature Chefs Auction.


Catholic Charities
coming up short
in annual baskets.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Turkey baskets could
run short this year without
help from the community.
Catholic Charities is in
need of 80 to 90 turkeys for
the Thanksgiving baskets
given out to the school sys-
tem. The organization has


been providing baskets for
10 years.
"It's a little short this
year due to the ongoing
economic- issues," said
Suzanne Edwards, Catholic
Charities executive direc-
tor. "If everyone were to
give a turkey, we could ful-
fill our obligations for the
430 baskets we're giving
out."
Basket recipients have
been selected in each
TURKEYS continued on 3A


Cyclist is struck

by car, suffers

serious injuries


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Gondolier Italian Restaurant & Pizza, serves Sharon Gunter a piece of


is a tradition
defects,
and infant
research


ial Greek spinach pie.
of premature babies and
how we can continue to
do the research to make it
better in the' future," said


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Regina Shepard, a process improvement manager at Sitel, searches for items she would
want to purchase during a silent auction. 'I love to come,' Shepard said. 'Every year I try to
win something at an auction. It goes to a worthy cause. It's a fun place go be. It's very exciting.'
Si^^SW^^^ ^^^'^^^^r~&A^^'


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


74 V
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion .......
People........
Obituaries ...
Advice & Comics
Puzzles ........


Maureen Lloyd, event co-
chairwoman. "And it con-
tinues to get better."
"It's for the babies," said
Kathy McCallister, commu-
nity director of Suwannee
Valley of March of Dimes
North Central Florida
Division.
In addition to compli-
mentary wine-tasting, live
music, live and silent auc-
tions, and a festival of trees
and wreaths, the event
showcased specialty foods
from 25 community chefs,
the largest number of chefs
the event has ever had,
McCallister said.
"If people want to go out
and eat, they can surely
test any chef in our commu-
nity," Lloyd said, "because
they're all here."
Steve Briscoe, communi-
ty business owner, named
the event's honorary chair-
man, was presented with a
plaque.
Guests said they attended
AUCTION continued on 3A

......... 4A
......... 2A
......... 6A
......... 3B
..........2B


FHP: Rider was
not wearing any
reflective markings.
From staff reports
A Lake City man was seri-
ously injured Wednesday
evening when his bicycle
was struck by a car.
Randall Carl Harrington,
50, was taken to Shands at
the University Florida for
treatment of his injuries.
Authorities have not released
an update on his condition.
The incident occurred
at 7:50 p.m. Wednesday on
U.S. 90 in front of the Lake
City Municipal Airport.


According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Harrington was traveling
west on U.S. Highway 90
in the inside lane. He was
reportedly not wearing
reflective markings and was
not equipped with lighting
on his bicycle.
At the same time
Harrington was traveling on
the roadway, Timi Thomas,
30, of Lake City was travel-
ing west on the roadway in
a 2002 Honda Accord with
Michael Gaylord, 10, as his
passenger.
Thomas failed to see
CYCUST continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter
Three-vehicle wreck on US 90
A three-vehicle accident at the intersection of US Highway
90 and Faith Road resulted in the driver of the Toyota Tundra
being taken to a local hospital. Traffic was delayed an esti-
mated 45 minutes by the accident.


AROUND
NATION
'Nightmare'
cruise.


COMING
SATURDAY
Dedication of Fort
White Library.


11& 01


---


C










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-0-1
Evening: 1-2-1


Thursday:
Afternoon: 5-5-0-0
Evening: 5-7-5-8


Wednesday:
1-7-14-19-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



De Laurentiis, 'Serpico' producer, dies


D ino De Laurentiis,
one of the last great,
intrepid film producers
who with unmatched
showmanship shep-
herded movies as varied as "La
Strada" and "Barbarella," has died.
He was 91.
De Laurentiis helped build the
Italian film industry during the
heyday of its "new wave," oversaw
seminal American films such as
"Serpico" and "Blue Velvet," and
pursued blockbusters in flops like
"Dune" and critical fiascos such as
the 1976 remake of "King Kong,"
which nearly ended the career of a
young Jessica Lange.
In producing more than 500 wide-
ranging films over six decades, he
presided over an incredible mix
of high and low. That the same
filmmaker could be involved with
Federico Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria"
and Arnold Schwarzenegger's
"Conan the Barbarian" would seem
to contradict normal understanding
of taste. Instead, he was irrevocably
drawn to the spectacle of the movies.
"Our industry is a special one,"
he told The Associated Press in 1998.
"You deal every day with different
people, creative people. Every day
is different at work. To produce a
movie, you have to create the star,
you make script, you find director.
You have to shoot the movie."
An entrepreneur, De Laurentiis,
who died Wednesday night in
Beverly Hills, pioneered the way
films were sold internationally -
and he did it all in grand style. The
sprawling studio complex he built
on the outskirts of Rome he dubbed
Dinocitta (Dino City).

Willis salutes troops
with party on Intrepid
Bruce Willis, famous for his movie


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 12, 1979, file photo, actress Mia Farrow (left) smiles with producer
Dino De Laurentiis at the premiere of the movie 'Hurricane,' in Los Angeles. De
Laurentiis, a film impresario and producer of 'Serpico,' 'Barbarella' and 'Death
Wish,' died Wednesday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 91.


roles, believes the real stars are the
military and veterans.
In honor of Veterans Day, the
actor threw a party Thursday for
hundreds of veterans on board
the USS Intrepid, a U.S. Navy
aircraft carrier that has been
converted into a museum in New
York City.
Willis says supporting veterans
isn't about politics but about free-
dom, and he wants to recognize the
men and women who've sacrificed
their lives for Americans.

'Deathly Hallows' arrives
as end nears for Potter
LONDON Harry Potter's jour-


ney is nearly over.
"Harry Potter and the Deathly
Hallows: Part 1," the next-to-last
installment in the film franchise
about th6 teen wizard, premiered
Thursday in London ahead of its
theatrical release next week.
The adaptation of J.K. Rowling's
seventh and final novel comes in
two installments, with the second
film due out next July.
Fans may leave frustrated that
they have to wait eight months
for the finale. But Rowling's last
book needed to be broken into
two parts for the big screen, said
Daniel Radcliffe, who stars as
Harry.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Ruby Nash Curtis (Ruby and
the Romantics) is 71.
* Actor-playwright Wallace
Shawn is 67.
* Singer Brian Hyland is 67.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Jimmy Hayes (Persuasions)
is 67.
* Rock musician Booker T.
Jones (Booker T. & the MGs)


is 66.
* Sportscaster Al Michaels
is 66.
* Singer-songwriter Neil
Young is 65.
* Rock musician Donald
"Buck Dharma" Roeser (Blue
Oyster Cult) is 63.
* Country/gospel singer
Barbara Fairchild is 60.
* Actor Sam Lloyd is 47.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S: Postal Service
No. 310-880.
*POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to "Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, RFla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ................755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks. .............. $48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks . ............. $41.40
24 Weeks................. $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Suspect in school
threat questioned
MIAMI Authorities
are questioning a poten-
tial suspect involved with
threatening to harm South
Florida schools and gov-
ernment buildings.
Schools were locked
down Wednesday after an
unidentified woman called ,
a radio station and said
her husband might go to a
campus and open fire with
a gun.
Pembroke Pines Police
said the unidentified poten-
tial suspect was in custody Cessil
Thursday and is not coop- at Lak
rating. Thous
The man who sent the trict s1
message identified with an un
the station's conservative husba
radio talk show host, Joyce
Kaufman, who was tapped
to be Republican U.S. Rep.- cious
elect Allen West's chief of Co
staff. one d
On Thursday, Kaufman the s
said she will not join his by tw
staff and participate in and f
efforts to bring down pect
West's political career. at the
Kaufman called the inci- pect'
dent "an electronic lynch- pital.
ing." It's
caret
. - knew


ASSOCIATED PRESS
ia Triana waits for the lockdown to be lifted Wednesday
.eside Elementary school in Pembroke Pines.
sands of students in the nation's sixth-largest school dis-
pent hours locked in their classrooms Wednesday after
identified woman called a radio station and said her
nd might go to a campus and open fire with a gun.


vehicle. ,
l. Craig Aldrich said
deputy who arrived at
cene was confronted
ro armed individuals
ired shots. The sus-
and caretaker died
e home. Another sus-
was taken, to the hos-

unclear whether the
aker and suspects
each other.


z dead alter two
separate shootings Mother charged


JACKSONVILLE A
deputy is under investiga-
tion after being involved
in a shooting in north
Florida.
Authorities are still try-
ing to sort out what hap-
pened Wednesday during
two separate shootings in
the same area that left an
armed suspect and anoth-
er person dead. A second
suspect was taken to the
hospital.
It's unclear who killed
whom.
Clay County Sheriff's
deputies said the shoot-
ings led to a neighborhood
evacuation. Authorities
were called to the area
after reports of a suspi-


in daughter's death
OVIEDO A 26-year-old
mother and her 45-year-old
boyfriend have been charged
in the death of the woman's
3-year-old daughter.
Crystal Aday and Isaac
Burt were arrested late
Monday and charged with
child abuse with great bodily
harm.
Aday's daughter, Faith
Jackson, died Saturday.
The medical examin-
er said the girl died from
asphyxiation and also suf-
fered from a severe case of
child abuse.
Police said Aday and Burt
arrived atthe South Seminole
Hospital on Saturday evening


with the child, claiming they
found her unconscious on
the bathroom floor. Doctors
pronounced the girl dead on
arrival..

Man gets DUI
after cab ride

NAPLES An intoxicat-
ed St Petersburg man blew
his chance to avoid a DUI
after a Collier County deputy
called a cab and encouraged
him not to drive.
The sheriff's office report-
ed that 40-year-old Mark Roy
Marshall walked out of a bar
Monday night, and a deputy,
responding to an employee's
call, encouraged Marshall to
take a taxi.
The deputy even called
the taxi for Marshall and
watched him ride off in the
cab.
Five minutes later, the
deputy watched the cab
return to the bar parking
lot, where Marshall tried to
get into his own truck and
drive away.
Marshall was then booked
into the Naples Jail Center
on a charge of DUI.


THE WEATHER


SUNNY SUNNY MOSTLY PARTLY T-
SUNNY CLOUDY 'STORMS


H1i74 L043 H75L0H41 I.78 LO"47 HI79LO551 "176LO55

Sm g I


P73/acl52a
73/52


Tallahassee *
75/39
Paiiama City
74/49


* Vadsta
73/40
Lake City,
74/43
Gainesville
,.75/46
/ Ocala
,77/48


Tamisipa


Ft. Myers
81/57


*J


acksonmile
\72/45


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach


Ft. Lauderdal
Daytna Beadh Fort Myers
77 58 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Ordando apCanaveral Key West
79/57 77/61 Lake City
\ Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
80/66 6 Oriando
i FL Lauderdale Panama City
s 80/68 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
'81/59 Miami Tampa


e


K80/65 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
80/69


*I AKE ClT AMAA


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday ,
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


79
43
.75
52
89 in 1911
31 in 1943

0.00"
0.37""
38.79"
0.77"
44.40"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.


6:53 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
6:54 a.m.
5:35 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 12:24 p.m.
Moonset today 11:37 p.m.
Moonrise tomrn. 12:57 p.m.
Moonset tom.


Nov. Nov. Nov.' Dec.
13 21 28 5
First Full Last New


On this date in
1959, between
noon on the 11th
and noon on the
12th, a winter storm
buried Helena,
Mont., under 21.5
inches of snow,
which surpassed
their previous 24-
hour record by
seven inches.


5

30n muis b bm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0


Saturday
7I,, 59, p,:
75/55/s
80/67/s
81/58/s
76/44/pc
73/42/s
77/68/s
75/41/s
80/65/s
81/59/s
77/46/pc
79/55/s
74/51/s
73/58/s
A7/36/s
79/58/s
73/35/s
80/63/s


Sunday
76, 58, pc
76/55/pc
80/69/s
80/59/pc
77/48/pc
74/49/pc
80/70/s
78/47/pc
81/68/s
81/62/s
77/50/pc
79/55/pc
74/58/pc
73/59/pc
77/48/pc
79/60/pc
75/43/pc
80/65/s


Daily Scripture

"Do not love the world'or
anything in the world. If any-
one loves the world, love for
the Father is not in them. For
everything in the world comes
not from the Father but from
the world."
I John 2:15-16


Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


An exclusive
S service
brought to
our readers
by,
The Weather
Channel.


Sweatner.com j


*-' j' ,Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
S e LLC, Madison, Wls.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Cet Connected


* Associated Press


I


2FRI3


I I r r r --- Ir


SATURD]AM


1! SU


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


~i~dl~~


rUV AINDEXt


ER 3is^oRYTSPOS33BY


I WEATnaik 0 -M HOUR a]


au/


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010 3A


The past comes alive


at the inaugural


Plow and Family Day


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. comn

Activities of yesteryear
will take center stage dur-,
ing the inaugural Old
Fashioned Plow and Family
Day, set for 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
Sunday at Tice Farms.
The event is sponsored by
the Chances For Children
Program, which works to
strengthen families in the
community by addressing
issues they might face, said
Sandy Tice, event organiz-
er.
"We're just there for the
needs of a family within the
community," she said.
The Old Fashioned Plow
and Family Day is to help
the community understand
the past role agriculture
played in the area as well


as bring families together,
Tice said.
"My husband's family
have been farmers all their
life and we have a farm out
here," she said. "I realized
how important agricultural
and the farm community is
to the area."
The event will feature
activities such as wagon
rides, a petting zoo and
more. A bluegrass band
will also perform.
Teams will demonstrate
how the old farmers use
to plow fields. Plowing
teams are expected from
Florida, Georgia and North
Carolina.
Pieces of old farm equip-
ment will be on display.
"Just bring your family
and enjoy the day," Tice
said.
Admission is free, but


everyone is asked to bring
an unwrapped new gift for
a child. Chicken Pilau din-
ners will be sold for $6
apiece or two for $10.
Proceeds from the din-
ner and the toys will benefit
the Chances For Children
Christmas Program, she
said.
Tice Farms is located
at 2145 SW Tustenuggee
Ave., Hwy. 131. For dinner
tickets, call 386-623-4732 or
623-7780.
"I encourage people
to come out not only to
spend time with the com-
munity and learn more
about it, but to spend time
with their families," Tice
said. "Families don't spend
enough time together in
settings like this. Come out
and enjoy the day."


County's top academic


students to be honored


From staff reports

Presley's Excel and
Scholars Program is host-
ing it's academic recogni-
tion ceremony for Columbia
County school students at 7
p.m. Nov. 22 at New Day
Springs Missionary Baptist
Church.
The speaker for the
event is Superintendent
Mike Millikin, and the
theme is "Knowledge Is
Contagious."


Students in kindergarten
through 12th grade whose
first nine weeks report
cards have grades no less
than B or S can participate
in the program.
Qualifying students
should submit a copy of
the report card and a con-
tact number to Bernice D.
Presley by Nov. 15 at: 646
S. E. Pennsylvania St., Lake
City, FL, 32055, or P.O. Box
402, Lake City, FL, 32056.


Fax 719-4389 or e-mail
presleyb@firn. edu.
Each student will receive
a confirmation call by No.
16.
The church is located at
1321 West Long St.
Students are also encour-
aged to bring a book to
the program to exchange
or giveaway.
For more information
call Presley at 752-4074 or
755-8130.


Action, not talk: Deficit

panel pushes Dems, GOP


ANDREW TAYLOR and
CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
leaders of the deficit com-
mission are baldly calling
out the budget myths of
both political parties, chal-
lenging lawmakers to
engage in the "adult con-
versation" they say they
want.
Their plan mix-
ing painful cuts to Social
Security and Medicare with
big tax increases has
no chance of enactment
as written, certainly not as
a whole. But the commis-
sion's high profile will make
it harder for Republicans
and Democrats to simply
keep reciting their tax and
spending talking points
without acknowledging the
real sacrifices that progress
against government deficits
would demand.
It's time for both con-
servatives and liberals to
"put up or shut up," says
Jon .Cowan, head of the
centrist-Democratic group
Third Way, which praised
the bold new proposals and
urged politicians to show
courage. Republicans failed
to produce their often-
promised deficit reduc-
tions when they controlled
the government, Cowan
said, and Democrats
refuse to acknowledge
that entitlement programs
such as Social Security
and Medicare must be
trimmed.
Already, some top
elected officials House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi,
for one have declared
Wednesday's proposals by
President Barack Obama's
bipartisan commission


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Wyoming Sen. Alan
Simpson, the co-chairmen of
President Barack Obama's
bipartisan deficit commis-
sion, arrives on Capitol Hill in
Washington Wednesday.

unacceptable. Others still
say deficits can be reduced
in relatively easy ways, a
notion that few mainstream
economists accept.
There's no need to trim
Social Security, Sen. Jim
DeMint, R-S.C., a tea party
favorite, said Sunday on
NBC's "Meet The Press."
"If we can just cut the
administrative waste," he
said, "we can cut hundreds
of billions of dollars a year
at the federal level."
Well, no.
As amply demonstrated
by the panel's co-chairmen
- former Clinton White
House chief of staff Erskine
Bowles and retired Sen.
Alan Simpson, R-Wyo. -
taming the deficit requires
real pain all around. One
person's government
"waste" is another's essen-
tial program.
The co-chairmen's ideas,


which they agree are sim-
ply a starting point, include
calls to raise the Social
Security retirement age
and reduce scheduled ben-
efit increases, whack the
Pentagon budget, cut farm
subsidies and increase the
federal tax on gasoline by
15 cents a gallon.
The most vocal critics of
the plan, which would cut
spending by $3 for every
$1 raised through higher
taxes, are Democrats. Many
will strongly oppose the bid
to slowly raise the Social
Security retirement age to
69. Republicans, especially
three commission mem-
bers appointed by incom-
ing House Speaker John
Boehner, are likely to balk
at tax increases
Opinion is split on
whether 14 of the panel's
18 members will ultimately
agree on a plan. That's the
number needed to demon-
strate bipartisan support
and send the measure to
the Senate and, maybe, the
House for a vote. Either
way, commission mem-,
bers are unlikely to pro-
duce actual legislation that
could become law. But they
could bless a set of recom-
mendations that would put
lawmakers on record for
or against a serious deficit-
reduction recipe.
The panel was created out
of both parties' frustration
with the government's chron-
ic inability to control budget
deficits and the national debt
The idea is that Republicans
and Democrats might join
hands and vote for an unpop-
ular mix of tax increases and
program reductions because
the shame and hypocrisy of
doing nothing would be too
great


TRAINING: Firefighters test on obstacle course

Continued From Page 1A


each firefighter had to
drive three of the depart-
ment's trucks through a
series of obstacles. The
obstacles were marked off
with orange cones in the
parking lot.
The training includ-
ed a diminishing clear-
ance obstacle, where the
space between cones only
allowed two inches on
each side for the truck to
pass; cones with six-inch
clearance, where drivers
had to drive 200-feet for-
ward and backwards; a
three-point turnout, which
is a forward and backward
serpentine; a lane-change
exercise and a highway
drive test, in which the
firefighters are tested on
their driving skills.
Lake City Fire
Department Lt. Greg


Collett has been with the
fire department for 21
years and said the train-
ing is important.
"This training give the
firefighters a little bit of
knowledge about the size
and capabilities of the
truck as far as turning,
stopping and backing up,"
he said. "It also gives man-
agement a written record
of the training that the
firefighters went through
in case something was to
ever happen."
Collett said the training
is an asset for firefight-
ers in the field and said it
would probably be benefi-
cial to have the training on
a more regular basis, like
once every six months
rather than once every
two years.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
LCFD Lt. Greg Collett repositions a topple traffic cone in
between exercises. 'I think this is a good idea,' Collett said.
'This makes (the firefighters) aware of the size of the truck
and its capabilities. Management will also have a record of
the firefighters' capabilities and downfalls.'


AUCTION: Benefit attracts almost 400 people

Continued From Page 1A


the event to enjoy the food
available and to support the
March of Dimes' cause.
'This event is great, the
food is phenomenal," said
Rene Keith of Lake City,
who attended the event
with her husband, Charlie.


"I haven't been to one in
years and they've really
upgraded."
"It's -a benefit," Charlie
Keith said. "You gotta help
the babies."
For husband-and-wife
William and Paula Lawton,


attending the event was
personal because of
friends who have dealt
with premature birth.
"I couldn't imagine
having that as an issue,"
Paula Lawton said. "I was
lucky."


Paula Lawton said she
hoped an event like the
auction will help to prevent
or remedy such issues for
parents and babies.
"Or at least help them
get through it," William
Lawton said.


CYCLIST: Hospitalized

Continued From Page 1A


Harrington and struck the
rear of the bicycle with the
front-left side of the car.
As a result of the collision,
Harrington was thrown
from the bicycle.
Thomas and .Gaylord
were not injured in the


incident, while Harrington
was taken to a Gainesville
hospital with his injuries.
Charges in connection
with the incident are pend-
ing completion of an FHP
investigation, reports said. |


TURKEYS: Help needed

Continued From Page 1A


school in Columbia County
by guidance counselors and
include canned goods and
donated turkeys, she said.
Some normal donors were
unable to do as much this
year to contribute turkeys,
thus causing the shortfall.
'We just want to make
sure everyone gets a chance
to enjoy Thanksgiving like it
was meant to be," Edwards
said. 'Times are extremely
tough."
Ift's somewhat of a silent
epidemic for families to be
without food, especially
during the holidays, she
said. In the last two years
there has been an increase
of the need for baskets.
The average size of a
family receiving a basket is
between six and 10 people,
Edwards said.
Ideally, any donated tur-
keys would be about 18-20
pounds to feed that many in


the household.
"Certainly if someone
found a good buy at one
of our food partners, we
won't turn down a smaller
turkey," she said.
Other meats, such as
chickens and hams, are
also accepted.
All donations are needed
by Nov. 17. The baskets
will be given out Nov. 18
and 19.
The Catholic Charities
office will be open 7:30
a.m.-2 p.m. and is located
at 258 Northwest Burk
Ave. Call 386-754-9180.
"You often think you like
to get involved and just
don't know how to start,"
Edwards said. "It's a very
unselfish act of kindness.
It's the nicest feeling to
know you actually can be a
part of a community and be
a silent gift giver."


J CHANCES FOR CHILDREN PROGRAM [
Presents the inaugural
Old Fashioned Plow & Family Day
Sunday, November 14, 2010
10:00am to 4:00pm
Bring your family and enjoy a day of old fashioned
demonstrations, exhibitions and entertainment
Chicken Pilau Dinners will be available as drive
thru of bring a lawn chair and enjoy dinner with us.







Proceeds will benefit the Chances for Children Christmas Program
Bring an unwrapped new gift for a child for Christmas
and help bring a smile to the face of a child
ulAt Tice Farmsiving




2145 SW Tustenuggee Avenue in Lake City
(Hlighway 131, 1/2 mile south of Highwy 242)
For additional information, event or dinner tickets
-] please call (386) 623 4732 or 623-7780 [


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Friday. November 12, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


O
0 P


THEIR
INION


Changes

could

restore


trust


The Nov. 2 elections
changed the com-
plexion of Congress,
and voters seemed
to express their dis-
appointment and distrust of the
current Congress. Disapproval
ratings are high and so are
measures of trust
We don't think the dissatis-
faction is a party issue, but of
Congress as an institution. It's
..evolved over time into some-
thing we don't trust, and the
new Congress must take steps
to restore its standing'with
Americans.
The apparent new Speaker of
the House, Rep. John Boehner
of Ohio, has proposed some
new protocols that are designed
to rebuild trust in Congress.
We don't consider these
Republican ideas or Democrat
ideas just worthwhile initia-
tives.
A summary:
No earmarks. These are
appropriations for spending in
a particular member's district
They were once rare, but have
grown into the thousands as
some members use them to
gain favor among voters for
the next election. Spending the
extra money is bad enough,
but the earmark process has
also helped destroy trust in
Congress.
Let Americans read bills
before they are brought to a
vote. Bills could easily be post-
ed on the Internet days before
a vote.
No more comprehensive
bills. Sometimes called "omni-
bus" bills, these contain legisla-
tion affecting many areas all
wrapped up in one. Members
of Congress often want to vote
in favor of some parts of the
bill and against others, but
can't because it is all presented
together. A pork-barrel project
in Florida and a waiver of work-
place safety rules might be
attached to a postal rate bill.
Comprehensive bills confuse
and burden interested citizens,
and that hurts trust even more.

Madison Daily Leader

Lake. City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest colurrins are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Bury the estate tax for good


Director Randall
Wallace's
"Secretariat" is a
well acted, exciting
and beautifully shot
1970s period piece about the
Babe Ruth of thoroughbreds. It
also dramatizes the immorality
of the death tax.
This paragraph barely reveals
the plot During a contentious
scene in a generally upbeat
movie, Penny Chenery Tweedy
(the outstanding Diane Lane),
her husband Jack (Dylan
Walsh) and brother Hollis
(Dylan Baker) convene soon
after the family patriarch has
lost his lengthy fight against
Alzheimer's. Even before they
can organize his funeral, the
three loved ones replace grief
with acrimony as they con-
template an impending $6 mil-
lion federal death tax liability
(equal to $29.5 million today).
They must dry their tears long
enough to debate angrily wheth-
er to liquidate the family's 2,798-
acre horse farm, sell Secretariat,
or take other steps to satisfy the
tax authorities.
"We don't want to end up
foolish or broke," warns Hollis
Chenery.
The death tax is at 0 percent
today. But if the 2001 and 2003
tax cuts lapse on Jan. 1, that
levy rockets back to 55 percent
on estates above a $1 million
threshold. This would trigger
far more Chenery-style family
squabbles.
Talk abounds regarding a
compromise 35 percent rate
and a $3.5 million threshold.
Republicans in the mid-term
winner's circle should ask
humane Democrats to join them
in resisting this deal and insist-
ing that the death tax remain as,
dead as its deceased victims.
Just.because someone has

LETTERS TO

Straightening
the record
In the Oct 29 issue of the
Lake City Reporter, there was an
article about the Columbia High
School Band. The band is to be
congratulated, and also their
director, Ryan Schulz, on the
excellence of this year's band.
The information contained
in the article indicated that this
year's band has established a
new record for participation
at the state band contest, and
the history Mr. Schulz gave is,
of course, only as good as his
source.
I certainly do not intend
the information herein as any
attempt to detract from the qual-
ity of the present CHS band, but
in fairness to former students
who have participated in the
band, I would like to straighten
out the record a little bit
I was band director at
Columbia High School from
the beginning of the 1956-57
school year until the end of the
1966 school year, a period of 10
years, and during that 10 years


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock<@gmoil.com
expired, why should Uncle Sam
collect even one thin dime of
the departed's money?
Some argue that America
needs the death tax to prevent
the serious cash of wealthy
dead people from converting
their heirs into aristocratic lay-
abouts. If that's the goal, why
not simply confiscate everything
above $1 million? That's a hor-
rible idea. But if people like Bill
Gates Sr. really want to avoid
"the Paris Hilton problem," they
should have the courage of their
convictions and demand a 100
percent death tax. After all, if
they want to force Paris Hilton
to join the productive sector,
would the prospect of eventually
acquiring a mere 45 percent of
the Hilton fortune really make
her update her resume?
Among many other reasons
to kill the tax, Americans spend
about as much to hide from it
as it generates, according to the
latest revenue data: $28.8 billion
in 2008.
"The compliance, or more
appropriately, the avoidance
costs of the transfer tax system
may well approach the revenue
yield," observed Alicia Munnell,
a member of President Bill
Clinton's Council of Economic
Advisers. The Congressional
Joint Economic Committee esti-
mated in 2006 that "for every
dollar of tax revenue raised by
the estate tax, another dollar is
wasted simply to comply with or

THE EDITOR
the Columbia High School Band
qualified for (the) state con-
test seven out of 10 years, and
four of those years, the band
achieved the highest rating in
concert playing, sight-reading,
and marching.
In those days all three events
were held on the same day,
since the number of bands
in the state was considerably
smaller than it is now, and to
achieve a superior rating out of
all three categories was consid-
ered to be a rarity.
I am submitting this informa-
tion on behalf of the former
students who played in the CHS
band, many of whom are still
around Lake City, and most of
them by this time are on Social
Security.
On their behalf, I would
simply like to set the record
straight, with no offense to Mr.
Schulz or the present band. He
is a fine musician, and I played
next to him in the local college
band for several years. He is to
be congratulated on the job he
has done.
Lenvil H. Dicks
Lake City


avoid the tax."
Economists call this a "dead-
weight loss." This money
should be devoted to productive
investment rather than prepaid,
posthumous tax-avoidance
schemes.
Death tax opponents need
not drag public opinion toward
repeal. The American people
already want to jackhammer a
stake into the death tax's heart
An April 2009 Tax Foundation/
Harris Interactive survey found
that among 2,002 adults polled,
67 percent want the death tax
interred. Respondents also
rated it the least-fair federal
levy, with an unfairness ranking
of 3.9 on a 1-to-5 scale, outpac-
ing the gas tax (3.6) and even
federal income and corporate
taxes (3.4).
Americans understand the
death tax's intolerable cruelty.
They believe that people of all
income levels should be free to
bury their loved ones in peace
without enduring family quar-
rels refereed by CPAs and finan-
cial advisers.
Bereavement is excruciat-
ing enough without having to
inspect spreadsheets and tax
schedules.
Sweden abolished its death
tax in 2005. As publisher Steve
Forbes puts it, Stockholm's
policy is "No taxation without
respiration."
As anyone with some horse
sense would ask: If life without
a death tax is good enough
for the cradle of Scandinavian
socialism, what is America's
excuse for keeping it alive?
0 New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.



Americans need
freedom, change
The people voted for jobs and
money and not to keep their
freedom.
What we need is freedom.
Freedom from invasion, free-
dom to live without fear. We
need to protect our country
from attack from without and
within. People (who) do not
stand up for their freedom will
lose it.
We need change. Change
means telling the people the
truth. Change means more free
speech, and not let the news
media to speak for us, but we
must speak for ourselves.
The United States could fall
from within like the Roman
Empire did. The western part of
the Roman Empire was invaded,
but had already collapsed from
the inside out. The Roman peo-
ple wanted more and even got
more, but in the end it did not
save them from themselves and
from invasion.
Andrew D. Mercer, Jr.
Live Oak


Betsy Hart.
betsysblog.com


The power

of sincere

apology

had to ask my children
again for forgive-
ness recently. It's some-
thing I said that had
wounded. My words
were thoughtless and they
stung. I was truly sorry.
I'm always amazed and
grateful at how quickly my
children forgive me when I
genuinely ask .them to do so.
But I shouldn't be surprised.
An apology is such a powerful
thing.
I confess that I didn't really
experience this much before I
had kids. Very often, my pride
was more important to me
than mending a relationship.
But I think having children
made me a little more vulner-
able than I'd ever been before
to another's pain, and that's
when things finally started to
change.
I found that one can't offer
a "but" or an "if' along with
an apology "I'm sorry if I
offended you ... I know what
I said was ugly, but ..." Nope.
Just: "I'm so sorry I said (or
did) an ugly thing. I'm going to
work hard not to do it again."
No, I don't believe one
should offer an apology when
one can't in good conscience.
I tell my children all the time
that the relationship with their
siblings is more important
than the thing they are fight-
ing over in the moment Surely
that has to .extend to egos, too.
G.K Chesterton wisely
said: "The injured party does
not want to be compensated
becausehe has been wronged;
he wants to be healed because
he has been hurt"
Healing. What a gift. Even
,when we didn't intend to hurt
another, if we have done so,
then why not heal with an apol-
ogy when we can?
Interestingly, a study from
the University of Illinois at
Chicago showed that when
officials at its medical center
instituted a policy of having
staff members apologize for
instances of malpractice, the
number of malpractice lawsuits
against the university, as well
as the liability costs for the
remaining lawsuits, dropped
dramatically.
Repentance, healing. If more
public figures made it part of
their vocabulary, how much
better off our world might be.
But I'm most concerned
with the small world of my
family.
I've noticed that my children
are quick to apologize to me
to very genuinely say, "I'm
so sorry, Mom." And I'm grate-
ful for that, too. I think that's
because they know that I'm
likely to say, 'Thanks for apolo-
gizing, honey," instead of, as
I might have said some years
ago, "Well, you SHOULD be
sorry." Who wants to apologize
if they are just going to walk
into that buzz saw?
They are not so good about
apologizing to each other, how-
ever, I think because a buzz-
saw response can be pretty
common from their siblings.
Sigh.
Still, the big picture is that
I hope, when my children are
adults, they will say, as writer
Margaret Laurence remem-
bered it: "In some families,
'please' is described as the
magic word. In our house,
however, it was 'sorry.'"

Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes
a Parent" radio show on WYLL-
AM 1160 in Chicago.


4A


i' I









LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE & NATION FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


Ex-State Senate leader's appeal back in court


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Appellate judges have
gone back and forth about
whether former Florida
Senate President W.D.
Childers should have been
convicted of bribery, and
now all 11 members of a
federal appeals court will
hear the case again.
In a rare move, the 11th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal
in Atlanta granted a request
by the state and agreed
Wednesday to rehear
Childers' appeal after they
vacated a three-judge pan-
el's decision to reverse his
bribery conviction.
The panel's 2-1 rul-
ing was issued in June
almost exactly a year after
Childers, now 76, was
released from state prison,
where he served most of a


3 1/2-year sentence.
The conviction stemmed
from his actions as an
Escambia County commis-
sioner.
The Pensacola
Republican was elected
to that office in 2000 after
term limits forced him out
of the Senate, where he'd
spent 30 years. A state
court jury found him guilty
of bribing a fellow commis-
sioner to vote for a county
land purchase.
Following the latest legal
twist, Childers' lawyer,
Nathan Dershowitz, said
his client's attitude is that
"we're just going to keep
the battle going and hope-
fully we'll prevail."
At stake is an estimated
$2,500 in monthly pen-
sion benefits Childers lost
because of his felony con-
viction, but Dershowitz said
Childers is mostly fighting


"He just believes that had he had a
fair trial and an opportunity to appro-
priately cross-examine, he would have
been acquitted."

Nathan Dershowitz
Lawyer


to clear his name.
"He just believes that
had he had a fair trial and
an opportunity to appro-
priately cross-examine, he
would have been acquit-
ted," Dershowitz said by
phone from his New York
City office.
The majority opinion in
June agreed that the late
Circuit Judge Jere Tolton
had deprived Childers of
that opportunity, which vio-
lated his constitutional right
to confront his accuser.
Tolton refused to let
Childers' defense law-
yer question County


CommissionerWillie Junior
about why he had changed
his testimony from what he
said at the trial of another
defendant who was acquit-
ted.
Junior, who claimed
Childers bribed him with
a cooking pot full of cash,
also has since died.
Authorities said Junior
committed suicide by drink-
ing antifreeze just before
he was to start serving a
prison term for bribery and
other crimes unrelated to
the land deal.
Federal Circuit Judge
Gerald Bard Tjoflat dis-


sented from the June opin-
ion. He argued that the
Antiterrorism and Effective
Death Penalty Act of 1996
prohibited a federal court
from reversing a state
appellate court in such a
case.
Florida's 1st District
Court of Appeal also had
rejected Childers' argu-
ment in a 10-4 full-court
opinion.
The full state court took
the case away from a three-
judge panel, which also had
split 2-1 in Childers' favor,
even before the panel's
decision could be released.
Dershowitz said Tjoflat's
dissent apparently caused
"an interrfal battle" within
the federal appellate court.
One judge who won't par-
ticipate in the rehearing is
Judith Barzilay, who wrote
panel's majority opinion.
She sits on the U.S. Court


of International Trade
but had been designated
to serve on the Childers
panel.
Only 11th Circuit judges
can take part in a rehear-
ing so just one of the panel
members who sided with
Childers will participate.
That's Judge Rosemary
Barkett, a former Florida
Supreme Court justice.
"It's an anomaly with-
in the system that I've
always found disturbing,"
Dershowitz said. "And it
happened to come back in
this situation to bite my cli-
ent in the butt."
While in the Legislature,
Childers was dubbed the
"Banty Rooster" because
of his feisty temperament
and short stature. He was a
Democrat when he served
as Senate president in 1980-
82 but changed parties in
the mid-1990s.


BRIEFS


Chrysler recalls Jeep SUVs;
GM recalls 14,000 sedans

WASHINGTON General Motors said
Thursday it is recalling nearly 14,000 sedans
to address potential problems with the power
steering. Chrysler, meanwhile, is recalling
about 16,000 Jeep Liberty SUVs to fix faulty
windshield wiper systems.
GM's recall involves certain 2010 and 2011
model year Cadillac DTS and Buick Lucerne
sedans with V8 engines.
The cars have alternator cables that can
wear through a power steering line, leading to
a fluid leak. A leak could cause a loss of power
steering and lead to a crash.
Chrysler's. recall involves certain 2008
model year Jeep Liberty SUVs. Water could
get into the windshield wiper motor and stop
the wipers, which could reduce a driver's vis-
ibility and lead to a crash.
Owners can contact Cadillac at 866-982-
2339 and Buick at 866-608-8080 or either
online at www.gmownercentercom.

Groups hope Pentagon study
on gays sways Congress
WASHINGTON Gay *rights advocates
said Thursday they hoped Congress will be
moved to repeal the law known as "don't ask,
don't tell" after a Pentagon study found it
could be done with little harm to the military.
The Senate is expected to vote next month
on ending the 17-year-old legislation barring
gays from serving openly in the armed forces.
Several senators, including Olympia Snowe,
R-Maine, and Jim Webb, D-Va., have said they
wanted to see the study's findings before
deciding how to vote.
"These results confirm what those of us
who actually know the modern military, espe-
cially the rank-and-file troops, have said all
along: The men and women of America's
armed forces are professionals who are capa-
ble of handling this policy change," said
Alexander Nicholson, executive director of
Servicemembers United.
Repeal opponents shot back, saying the
group leading the study, which has not been
released publicly, was biased and that select-
ed details were leaked to the media this week
in an effort to drum up public support for
repeal.
"It's laughable to argue that people who
anonymously leak one-sided information to
a reporter are less likely to mischaracterize
the findings of a 10-month study than are
people who wait to read that 370-page study
in full," Family Research Council President
Tony Perkins said.

Court: $1.73M award for man
denied care while in custody

LOS.ANGELES A jury has awarded
$1.73 million to the family of an illegal immi-
grant from El Salvador who died of penile
cancer that went undiagnosed for more than
a year while he was in state and federal cus-
tody.
The Los Angeles Superior Court jury said
state prisons were to blame, in part, for the
2007 death of Francisco Castaneda.
After he was convicted of methamphet-
amine possession in 2005, Castaneda spent
more than a year in state and federal facilities,
where he was repeatedly denied adequate
care for painful lesions on his penis, his law-
yer Conal Doyle said Thursday.
Doctors who examined Castaneda twice
ordered a biopsy, but he never got one. The
first time the procedure was ordered, it was
denied by a prison's chief physician. The pro-
cedure was apparently forgotten the second
time because a doctor failed to follow up.
A third time, a federal physician ordered a
biopsy but Castaneda was released before it
could be done.
Castaneda was given only pain pills and
clean boxer shorts every day, and his condi-
tion worsened until he had to have his penis
amputated in 2007. He died shortly afterward
at age 36.
* Associated Press


Travelers disembark 'nightmare' cruise


By ELLIOT SPAGAT
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO They
can call it a nightmare. A
cruise from hell. Even a
Spamcation.
Whatever they label it,
the grueling three-day jour-
ney of the crippled Carnival
Splendor is over, and the
nearly 4,500 passengers and
crew members can forget
about the backed-up toilets,
darkened, stuffy cabins and
bad food.
"I love being back on land,"
said passenger Ken King, 42,
of Los Angeles.
As the ship docked on
Thursday, people who had gath-
ered on the decks and about
100 waiting onshore cheered
loudly. Along the harbor, tour-
ists, joggers and fishermen
stopped to snap photos.
Passengers snapped up $20
T-shirts being sold on land with
*the phrase: "I survived the 2010
Carnival cruise Spamcation."
An engine fire aboard the
952-foot cruise liner on Monday
morning knocked out power
early in its seven-day trip to
the Mexican Riviera, setting
the ship adrift about 200 miles
south of San Diego and 44
miles off the coast of Mexico.
No one was hurt, but pas-
sengers said they were jolted
awake by the fire. Few of them
panicked.
Smoke filled hallways toward
the back of the ship, and a
smoky odor reached the front
cabins. Carnival said a crank-
case split on one of the ship's
six diesel engines, causing the
fire.
"It felt like an earthquake


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sabrina Klinge (right), a passenger who was onboard the Carnival Splendor cruise ship for her
honeymoon, leaves the cruise ship terminal in San Diego, Calif., Thursday.


and sounded like a jackham-
mer," said Amber Haslerud,
27, of Chula Vista.
The captain immediately
announced that there would
be no need to abandon ship,
said Amy Watts, 25, of Seattle,
Wash. "You think about the
Titanic," she said.
The fire left the ship with-
out air conditioning, hot water
or hot food. The casino was
closed and, for a time, the
bars. The swimming pool was
off-limits because there was
no way to pump chlorine.
* Navy helicopters flew in
Spam, Pop Tarts and canned
crab meat and other goods.
Passengers said they had
to climb nine flights of stairs


to get to the cafeteria only to
meet long lines that stretched
on for hours. By the time
those at the back of the line
got to the food, they were
left with tomatoes and lettuce,
Haslerud said.
Some passengers carried
food to those who used walkers
and canes and couldn't climb
stairs to reach the food lines.
"We have not had a hot cup
of coffee in four days," said
passenger Fahizah Alim, 26, of
Sacramento, who ate at night
by flashlight "This was my first
cruise and it was no luxury, no
fun."
Passengers ended up get-
ting by on a diet with lots of
bread, vegetables and, some-


times, sandwich meat
' 'If you could see the things
they put on sandwiches, seri-
ously," said Peg Fisher of
Las Vegas, who was on her
first cruise with her husband.
"This could be the only cruise
ever where people lost weight
instead of gaining weight"
For her, getting by without
working toilets on the first day
was the biggest challenge.
After 15 hours, she couldn't
wait any longer and hoped for
the best as she flushed her
cabin toilet
"I ran out in the halls, The
toilets flush!' People were
like, 'Are you kidding?' They
went running into their cab-
ins," she said.


Standoff with armed

man on Bay Bridge


briefly snarls traffic


By MARCUS WOHLSEN
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO -A police
standoff with an armed man who
reported having explosives in
his vehicle briefly halted traffic
on Northern California's busiest
bridge during Thursday's morn-
ing commute.
Craig Carlos-Valentino,
described by authorities as
mentally unstable, called 911
around 7 a.m. after pulling over
on the upper deck of the San
Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge
and threatened to blow it up,
California Highway Patrol inves-
tigators said.
Authorities halted all west-
bound traffic on the upper deck
as officers negotiated with the
man, who could be seen stand-
ing outside his SUV talking on a
cell phone.
His 16-year-old daughter man-
aged to escape from the vehicle
during the hourlong standoff.
Highway Patrol Sgt. Trent
Cross said Carlos-Valentino, an
emergency medical technician
from Antioch, reported being
upset over a family issue.
He brandished a gun, then
threw it over the railing into the
water.
After persuading him to sur-


render, officers passed him a
pair of handcuffs and he put
them on and turned himself in,
Cross said.
Authorities found no explo-
sives in the SUV.
A check of his' home in
Antioch also found no bombs
or bomb-making material, CHP
Officer Shawn Chase said.
. His wife was there and was
unharmed.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


FACES& PLACES


Scenes from the Sixth Annual Signature Chef's Auction hosted by the Suwannee Valley March of Dimes
on Thursday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds banquet hall.



Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Grant Chambers and Alyna Ohanmamooreni Nancy Huddleston and Pat Gaylord Emily Crabtree and Lindsay Krieg


Theresa Strickland and Jennifer Pescara Bette Forshsaw, Robert Carlson, Art Hutchison and Ann Bormolini


Shirley Lick and Glenda Bryan Virginia Harman and Bill Holzendorf Kenyata Williams and Shane Ward


OBITUARIES


Phillip Jerry Alford, Sr.
Phillip Jerry Alford, Sr., Passed
away Tuesday, November 9,
2010. He was born on October 1,
1948 in Lake City, FL, served in
the US Navy and .-
was a correc-
tions officer at -
the Department P w ,
of Corrections. __
He is survived by sons, Phil-
lip J. Alford, Jr., Robert G.
Alford; daughter, Michelle
Davis; brother. Steve Alford;
sister, Barbara Bebbington
and eleven grandchildren.
Visitation will be Friday, No-
vember 12, 2010 at Evans-Carter
Funeral Home in High Springs
from 6 to 8 PM and funeral ser-
vice on Saturday, November 13
at 11:00 AM, at Brooker Baptist
Church in Brooker, FL, with the
Reverend Dan-
iel Findley officiating.
Flowers are welcome, but those
who wish may make A donation
to: ATTN: Volunteer Services,


VA Hospice donate to Hospice
Unit, VA Medical Center, 619 S.
MarionAve., Lake City, FL32025
Arrangements are under the
care of EVANS-CARTER
FUNERAL HOME
220 North Main Street
High Springs, FL 32643

Ada Alvarez

Mrs. Ada Alvarez, 80, of Jasper,
Florida died Wednesday, No-
vember 10, 2010 in the Shands at
the University of Florida Health
Science Center in Gainesville,
Florida. Mrs. Alvarez was a na-
tive of Cuba and had been a
resident of Jasper for the past
eighteen years having moved
there from Lake City where she
had lived for several years. Mrs.
Alvarez was a registered nurse
and had worked with the Lake
City Medical Center and Mac-
clenny State Hospital for many
years prior to retiring. In her
spare time she enjoyed walkson


the beach, cooking, playing the
piano and more recently play-
ing solitaire on her computer.
Mrs. Alvarez was a Christian.
She is survived by her husband of
forty-seven years, CiriloAlvarez;
her daughter, Peggy Boston of
Jasper, Florida; her son, Nelson
Lopez of Dallas, Texas; a step-
son, Lazaro Alvarez of Miami,
Florida and a step-daughter, Ali-
na Benitez of Miami, Florida; a
brother, Raul Mollinedo of Tam-
pa, Florida and a sister, Lourdes
Rivera of Miami, Florida. Five
grandchildren and a great-
grand daughter also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Al-
varez will be conducted at 1:00
P.M. on Saturday, November
13, 2010 in the chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home with Rev. Roger Hutto
officiating. Interment will fol-
low in Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens. The family will receive
friends for one hour prior to the
service in the chapel of the fu-


neral home. Arrangements are
under the direction of DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the family guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Corinne "Corrie" Marie
(Bellotte) Buse

Corinne "Corrie" Marie (Bel-
lotte) Buse, 50, died on Sunday
October 31st after an extended
illness. She was the daughter
of Thomas and Dorcas "Bil-
lie" Bellotte. She was born in
Midland, Michigan on Janu-
ary 13, 1960. She moved to
Columbia County in 1974 and
then to Pensacola in 1977.
She was a loving wife, mother,
granny, daughter and sister. She
was always the life of the party
and could make you laugh no
matter what. Her favorite pas-


time was spending time with her
grandchildren and playing bingo.
She is preceded in death by her
father, Thomas Bellotte, and
Grandmother Rubie Adkins.
Survivors include her husband
of 35 years, Everett Buse, of
Pensacola, FL; sons, Allen Buse
(Brandy) of Lake City, FL and
Everett Buse Jr. of Milton, FL;
daughters Christie DeWitt (John)
of Lake City, FL and Amanda
Buse (Dusty) of Pensacola, FL;
brothers Thomas Bellotte (Riva)
ofLawrenceville, GA and Robert
Bellotte (Vicki) of Ashland, KY;
sisters Gloria Hollers (Andy) of
Owosso, MI and Mary "Chris"
Eddings of Lake City, FL. She
also leaves behind seven grand-
children and dozens of nieces
and nephews. Corrie was deeply
loved and will be greatly missed.
In lieu of flowers, she would
love donations to be made to
the Lake City Animal Shelter.


Eula Mae Milton

Mrs. Eula Mae Milton, 71, of
Lake City passed away Thurs-
day, November 11, 2010 in the
Lake City Medical Center fol-
lowing a sudden illness. She
is survived by two sons, Lu-
ther Milton(Teresa) and Bruce
Milton(Jessica). A full obituary
with funeral arrangements will
appear in tomorrows edition of
the Lake City Reporter. The fam-
ily requests that any food that
you might want to have deliv-
ered to the family be brought to
the funeral home. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion St., Lake
City, FL 32025. 752-1234


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Page Editor:, Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Saturday
RHS Alumni meeting
The next RHS
Alumni meeting is at
12 p.m. Saturday at the ,
Richardson Community
Center. Call 752-0815.

Health fair
A Diabetes Health
Fair is at 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Saturday at Lake City Mall.
There will be many booths
offering information on
diabetes. Contact Michelle
Mattox at Randolph
Medical Practices at 386-
755-1440.

Veterans event
The United Daughters,
of the Confederacy will
host a special event hon-
ioring veterans for their
service and sacrifice at 10
a.m.- 2 p.m. Saturday at
Olustee Battlefield Historic
,State Park.

Sunday
Plow and Family Day
Old Fashioned Plow
and Family Day is at 10
am.4 p.m. Sunday at Tice
Farms. The farm is located
at 2145 SW Tustenuggee
Ave. Activities include
plowing, horse and mule
exhibitions, wagon rides,. .
*petting zoo, buggy rides
and chicken pilau din-
ners. Proceeds benefit
the Chances for Children
Christmas Program. Bring
an unwrapped new gift for
a child. For event or dinner
tickets call 386-6234732 or
623-7780. For team partici-
pation, call 386-754-0959.

Monday
Volunteers wanted
Hospice of the Nature


Army nurse receives certificate of ,recognition
Army nurse Melina LeDuc of Lake City accepts honors from Naval Station Mayport Capt. Douglas F. Cochrane (left), Rear
Admiral Tim Alexander (second from left) and Rep. Ander Crenshaw (R-Fla.). LeDuc is one of several local residents who
received a certificate of recognition from Crenshaw during a ceremony last week.


Coast is searching for
individuals who are inter-
ested in volunteering in
the Columbia county area.
There will be a Volunteer
Orientation Training
Opportunity at 9:30 a.m.-
11:30 a.m. Monday at the
Columbia County Library
308 N. Columbia Ave.Call
Ronnie Richardson, vol-
unteer services manager
at 386-935-4520 for more
information

Tuesday
NARFE Meeting
The next monthly
meeting of the National
Active and Retired Federal
Employees jsat Ip.m.
Tuesday at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center. --
Deborah Rivera Three
Rivers Legal Services
Inc. is the speaker. Call
Mariam Stanford at 755-
0907 or Jim Purvis at 752-
8570.

Thursday
Medicaid workshop
A workshop on the truti
about Medicaid planning
"Myths and Opportunities


is at 10 a.m. Thursday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Itwill be presented
by Teresa Byrd Morgan of
the Morgan Law Center.
Call Sharia at 386--755-1977.

Nov. 20
Benefit fundraiser
A benefit fundraiser
for Rick Harkness "Big
Daddy" is at. 8 a.m.-4
p.m. Nov. 20 at First Full
Gospel Church. A benefit
bike run starts at 10 a.m.
and costs $10 per rider
and $5 for extra rider. Yard
sale space is available for
1 $15. BBQ pork lunches
will be sold. Activities
will also include a gospel
Ssing. Call Janice at 623-
7375, Jackie at 984-0453 or
Michelle at 365-5780.

Every Monday
Squadron meeting
The Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron-Civil
Air Patrol meets at 6:30 to
9 p.m. on Mondays. For
h more information, please
call Maj. Grant Meadows,
" 386-365-1341.


Every 4th Monday
Bridge Club meeting
The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from
1 to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Court Call 755-
0235.

Every 1st Monday
Weight-loss group
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings at 7
p.m. on the first and third
Monday of every month
in the Classrooms at Lake
City Medical Center.
Meetings are for people
who have had weight loss
surgery, contemplating
stIrgery or just trying to
lose weight on their own.
E-mail thethinnerme@
gmail.com or call 386-288-
9153 and leave a message.

Every 3rd Monday
MS support group


of the month, at the Lake
City Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157
SE Hernando Ave. Call
Karen Cross at 386-755-
2950 or Jane Joubert at
386-755-5099 for more
information.

Every Tuesday
Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center are looking for
members. Meetings are
12:45-2 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Thursdays. Anyone
retired and interested
in becoming an actor or
actress is invited. Call
Frank at 752-8861.

Domestic violence
support group
A support group for
survivors of domestic vio-
lence meets at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Child care is
provided. Call Another
Way at 386-719-2700.

UF Master Gardeners


An MS support group The University of
meets every third Monday Florida Master Gardeners


are at the Columbia
County Extension Office
from 9 a.m. to noon
Tuesday. They answer
gardening questions and
conduct soil pH tests free
of charge.
Call 386-752-5384, or
stop at the UF/IFAS
Extension Office at the
Columbia County fair-
grounds for more informa-
tion.

Lake City Lions
to hold meeting
The Lake City Lions
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
at the Guangdong restau-
rant in the Lake City Mall.
Call Truett George at
386-497-2050 or Marshall
Barnard at 386-497-3536
for more information.

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers
weekly dance is held at
6:30 p.m. every Tuesday
at Teen Town Community
Center. The group does
square and round dancing.
Couples 12 and older are
welcome. Call 386-497-
2834.

Every 1st Tuesday
Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity
holds meetings at 7
p.m. the first Tuesday
of every month at Lake
City Medical Center. Call
Audre' J. Washington at
386-344-9915 for more
information.

Every 2nd Tuesday
Prostate cancer
support group
A support group for
prostate cancer patients
and survivors will.be.held
at 7 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of every month,
at Lake City Medical
Center. Call Ron Peacock
at 386-365-1359 for more
information.

LEC Photography Club
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center
Photography Club meets
from 2 to 4 p.m. every
second Tuesday. Call 755-
0235.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
-tion was provided'by local
'law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.
Tuesday, Nov. 9
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Danielle Renee
Bowles, 32, 125.SE
Endeavor St, warrant:-
Forgery.


James Dwight Brewer,
49, 5221 Long John Drive,
Panama City, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of fleeing a
police officer and resisting
arrest without violence.
Jeremy N. Hall, 33,
179 NW Bond Court,
White Springs, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of battery.
Data Michelle Odom,
24, 157 SW Shady Lane,
warrant: Filing false report


to law enforcement officer.
'" Alane James Williams
Jr., 50, 4128 SW Carpenter
Road, warrant,Violation
of probation on original
charges of felony driving
while license suspended/
revoked (two counts).
Lake City
Police Department
N Kervin A. Holland, no
age given, 150 NW Burk
Ave., felony battery.

* From staff reports


BRIEFS


Gas line explodes;
worker injured

FORT MYERS A
construction worker was
injured when a gas line
exploded along Florida's
Gulf coast.
The injured worker is in
critical condition and was
taken to a hospital.
The roads around the
area were closed to traffic
and black smoke poured
out of the ground where
the explosion occurred.

House fire kills
man in Jacksonville
JACKSONVILLE
- A man was killed in a
Jacksonville house fire,
officials said.
Firefighters said neigh-
bors called 911 to report


flames coming from the
home early Thursday
morning. It took firefight-
ers about 25 minutes to get
the blaze under control.
As firefighters dug
through the remains of the
home, they found the body
of 63-year-old Carl Lee
Adams in the debris.

3 dead, 1 injured
after plane crash
WEST PALM BEACH -
Palm Beach International
Airport officials said three
people were killed and
another was seriously
injured in a small plane
crash.
The Federal Aviation
Administration reported
that the twin-engine Piper
PA-44 crashed during
takeoff and caught fire
Thursday evening.


Neither the airport nor
the FAA could immediate-
ly identify the pilot or the
passengers. The survivor
was taken by helicopter to
an area hospital. Records
show the plane was owned
by FIT Aviation LLC, a
Melbourne flight school.

Student found
with weapon
WEST PALM BEACH -
Authorities said a student
was found with a weapon at
a South Florida school.
Pahokee Middle-Senior
High was put on lock down
on Thursday after a report
of the weapon.
A Palm Beach County
school district spokeswom-
an said the student had
some type of gun, but could
not elaborate.
* Associated Press


U

YOURJ EX PIAN
[IREMEMBER,


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


Page Editor:, Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


C H S STA R S & ST R I P E S


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jayce Barber (5) drives into the end zone for a touchdown on a quarterback keeper.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High cheerleading squad perform as the football team returns to
the field on Friday.
2010 Tiger Football Schedule


CHS 38, Brooks County 13
CHS 30, South Lafourche 19
CHS 22, Buchholz 14
CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20
Madison 19, CHS 0
Ridgeview 16, CHS 9,
Godby 35, CHS 14
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jared Ogburn (79) celebrates after recovering a Wolfson High fumble in the Ed White 25, CHS 11
Tigers' 29-12 win on Friday.



All for a bucket


ow that Columbia High
has bounced back onto
the winning track, the
Tigers focus on closing
out 2010 with a winning
record.
It's been a roller coaster ride-
for the Tigers this season, as
Columbia opened up with
four consecutive wins before


falling in four straight.
Now, the Tigers want to cap off
the season on a two-game winning
streak after beating Wolfson
High, 29-12, in the last District
4-4A contest of the season.
A vwin would also keep coach
Craig Howard's undefeated
record against Suwannee High
alive.


The Tigers have pitched
consecutive shutouts against
the Bulldogs in the game known
as the battle for the Old Oaken
Bucket. Columbia hopes to keep
that streak alive in Howard's third
attempt against the Bulldogs.
Columbia welcomes in
Suwannee at 7:30 p.m. Friday at
Tiger Stadium.


CHS 29, Wolfson 12
Wk 10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreporter.com


SPORTS


Friday. November 12, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS







Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom

Kirkman

will sign

for kids

Michael
Kirkman
will
return
to one,
of the places where his
baseball career began.
Kirkman is in Lake
City for the offseason
after a professional
baseball season that
included a World Series
appearance with the
Texas Rangers.
Kirkman was called
up by the Rangers in
August and saw action in
14 games, plus playing
in the American League
Championship Series in
New York and the World
Series in San Francisco.
A veteran of the youth
leagues in Lake City
and a Columbia High
graduate, Kirkman will
sign autographs at the
Southside Baseball
Complex from
5:30-8 p.m. Monday.
Brian's Sports is
donating 120 baseballs
for children to get
autographed, plus they
can bring gloves, hats,
shirts, autograph books
and other memorabilia to
get signed.
Babe Ruth Baseball's
fall league games will be
going on at the time, but
everybody is invited to
the celebration. *
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
president Tad Cervantes
was one of Kirkman's
coaches in high school
and set up the signing
event.

In this week of rival
games Columbia High
vs. Suwannee High for
the Old Oaken Bucket
and Fort White High
vs. Santa Fe High in the
Battle for the Paddle it
is prudent to look back
on the purpose behind
the victor's spoils.
The "Bucket" was
instituted with the best of
intentions, back in 1951.
Joseph Massengill was
the student council
sponsor at Suwannee
who' spearheaded the
idea. It was inspired by
the trophy of the same
name that goes to the
winner of the
Purdue-Indiana game.
Bill(y) Gunter, later
insurance commissioner
in Florida, was the
Suwannee student
body president and
Eugene Johnson was the
Columbia student body
president, who met on
the field for the first
presentation by the
football team captains.
Bryon Hileman was
principal at Columbia
and T.A. Delagal was his
counterpart at Suwannee.
Henry Ramsey was
Student Council sponsor
at CHS.
The charge: In order
to create a friendly
spirit, a closer pupil
relationship, and a
wholesome rivalry
between the two schools.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


Indians take on
Santa Fe in Battle
for the Paddle.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE -
Sometimes the spring can
be wound too tight.
Fort White High head
coach Demetric Jackson
gave his team the day off
on Thursday, despite the
lingering Battle .for the
Paddle.
The Indians travel to
Santa Fe High today to play
for the "Paddle" trophy.
Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
* "Our guys really like foot-
ball and they were surprised
I gave them Thursday off,"
Jackson said. "All week,
they have been upbeat.
Getting back to the playoffs-
was a big deal."
Fort White has been
fighting for that playoff spot
for the two preceding weeks
and will travel to Pensacola
Catholic High on Nov. 19
for the first playoff game.
"Santa Fe is a big rival
game for us and we don't
want to lose that focus
there, but it is not as
intense," Jackson said. "It
is good for us. We needed
a game that is not for all
the marbles. We were real
uptight going against Perry
(Taylor County High); the
next week (Bradford High)
we relaxed a little bit, but it
was a game that if we didn't
win a lot of guys would have
deemed it an unsuccessful
season."
Fort White is 6-3, while
Santa Fe is 1-8 and facing
a second straight one-win
season.
"It is an emotional game
and we had enough focus
to prepare well," Jackson
said. "If we don't win this
game, it will hurt our chanc-
es in the playoffs as far as
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High linebacker Felix Woods (4) tackles a Wolfson High runner in a game on
Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White quarterback Andrew Baker (12) breaks a tackle to gain some yards against
Bradford High on Friday.


Columbia looks
for three straight
in Oaken Bucket.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Suwannee High may
enter tonight's game
against Columbia High at
4-5, but make no mistake,
the Bulldogs' record has
been thrown out the win-
dow in this one.
The Tigers come in at 5-4
with the playoffs out of the
picture and will treat this as
a bowl game. In many ways
it is.
The game has been played
under the name the Battle
for. the Old Oaken Bucket
since 1951 and carries a
special meaning for both
sides. Columbia's coaching
staff has three players that
have played in the game in
J.T. Clark, Doug Peeler and
Quinton Callum.
For them, it's easy to
describe what the Oaken
Bucket game means to the
Tigers.
"You hear Suwannee in
Lake City and you know
whatthatmeans," Clark said.
"It's a friendly or unfriendly
hatred. No matter what the
record is, it's going to be a
tough, hard-fought game.
We can't let them come into
Lake City and think they
run the place."
To coach Peeler, one
word describes what the
Suwannee game means to
the Tigers.
"Everything, it means
everything," Peeler said. "If
you grow up here, you hear
about it. My mom went to
Suwannee and my dad went
to CHS, so I grew up in
it. If we go there, we have
to take care of business. If
they come here, we have to
protect this house."
The Tigers will get
a chance to protect their
CHS continued on 2B


Cal, Georgia try to


take down top two


Gators face South
Carolina for East
Championship.

By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

If you can't be a con-
tender, you might as well
be a spoiler.
California and Georgia,
winding their ways through
mediocre seasons, can jolt
the national title chase and
give fans of No. 3 TCU and
No. 4 Boise State a huge
gift on Saturday.
The Golden Bears (5-4)
host No. 1 Oregon. The
Bulldogs (5-5) are at No. 2
Auburn.
Oddsmakers are expect-
ing the Tigers to have
tougher time than the
Ducks. Auburn is favored
by 8'/2 at home against
Georgia (5-5). Maybe the
guys in Las Vegas think
Cam Newton and the
Tigers will be distracted
by reports that the star
quarterback's recruitment
has drawn at least some
attention from the NCAA.
The Ducks are 19'!-point


favorites at a stadium
where they have lost three
straight games.
Oregon and Auburn
also hold the top two spots
in the BCS standings. It's
become apparent that no
matter how much win-
ning TCU and Boise State
do, they need the Ducks
or Tigers to lose to have
a shot at playing for the
national championship.
No. 1 in the AP poll has
been beaten twice this
season South Carolina
knocked off Alabama and
Wisconsin beat Ohio State.
Oklahoma was in first-
place in the BCS when it
lost to Missouri.
Yes, they were all upsets,
but all those top-ranked
teams lost on the road to
ranked opponents. The last
time the No. 1 team in the
AP poll lost to an unranked
team was Sept. 25, 2008,
when Oregon State upset
Southern California.
You'd have to go back to
2007 to find the last time
an unranked team beat
No. 1 in November. That
wild season it happened
twice, when Illinois beat


top-ranked Ohio State on
Nov. 11 and Arkansas beat
LSU on Nov. 23.
Illinois and Arkansas
each had seven victories
at the time of their big
wins. The Illini ended up in
the Rose Bowl that season
and Arkansas went to the
Cotton Bowl.
To find an upset that
would be more akin to
California knocking off
Oregon, turn back to
2002. Oklahoma was No.
1 on Nov. 9 when it went to
College Station, Texas, and
lost 30-26 to a Texas A&M
team that was 5-5.
As for No. 2 losing to
an unranked team, the last
time was in 2007, when it
happened on five separate
occasions.
The picks:
FRIDAY
No. 4 Boise State
(34/2) at Idaho
Don't for a second think
that everyone in Idaho
loves the Broncos ... BOISE
STATE 45-14.
SATURDAY
No. 1 Oregon (191') at
PICKS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Will Hill (10) drives down the field after intercepting a
pass against Georgia at EverBank Field in Jacksonville on
Oct. 30.


I'


r"










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, at Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for WYPALL 200, at
Avondale,Ariz.
2 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Kobalt Tools 500, atAvondale,
Ariz.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for WYPALL 200, at
Avondale,Ariz.
4:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Lucas Oil ISO, at Avondale,
Ariz.
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
pole qualifying for Kobalt Tools 500, at
Avondale,Ariz.
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Lucas Oil 150, atAvondale,Ariz.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Boise St. at Idaho
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Children's Miracle
Network Classic, second round, at Lake
BuenaVista
4 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Lorena Ochoa
Invitational, second round, at Guadalajara,
Mexico


TGC-
Masters,
Australia


I0 p.m.
- PGATourAustralasia,JBWere
third round, at Melbourne,


I a.m.
TGC- European PGATour,Singapore
Open, third round (delayed tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Utah at Atlanta
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Portland at Oklahoma City

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Thursday's Game
Baltimore at Atlanta (n)
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at Chicago, I p.m.
Tennessee at Miami, I p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, I p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay,
New Orleans

College games

Today
Ball St. (3-7) at Buffalo (2-7), 6 p.m.


INDIANS
Continued From Page 1B
momentum. It is a good
game for our seniors."
Jackson said he and Santa
Fe coach Shea Showers did
a television interview on
Tuesday and spent some
time together. The two old
University of Florida room-
mates talked about Steve
Spurrier bringing the
Gamecocks to Gainesville
with the East Division of
the line.
."Santa Fe has got some
decent players, but they are
making a lot of mistakes,"
Jackson said. "Shea real-
izes a whole season could
change with a win against
us, as far as fans and par-
ents' support."
Jackson is 3-0 against the
Raiders and Fort White has
been home of the "Paddle"
for five consecutive sea-
sons. He doesn't want that
to change.
"Once a team starts win-
ning in a rivalry, they want
to keep it rolling," Jackson
said. "A big win against
a rival will cover up a lot
of losses. Shea is a good
friend of mine, but we are
not going to help him out in
that regard."
Directions: Take U.S.
Highway 441 south; Santa
Fe is on the left a couple of
miles before the Interstate-
75 crossing at Alachua.


Boise St. (8-0) at Idaho (4-5), 9 p.m.

College scores
Wednesday
Miami (Ohio) 24, Bowling Green 21

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
Kobalt Tools 500
Site:Avqndale,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
2-3:30 p.m.). qualifying (Speed, 5:30-
7:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed, 1:30-
2:30 p.m.; ESPN2, 3-4 p.m.); Sunday, race,
3 p.m. (ESPN, 2-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway
(oval, I mile).
Race distance: 312 miles, 312 laps.
NATIONWIDE
WYPALL 200
Site: Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, noon-
2 p.m., 3:30-4:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying
(Speed, noon-1:30 p.m.), race, 4:30 p.m.
(ESPN2,4-7 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Lucas Oil 150
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed,
4:30-5:30 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-
10:30 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway.
Race distance: 150 miles, 150 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
Site:Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m.).
Track:Yas Marina Circuit (road course,
S3.45 miles).
Race distance; 189.8 miles, 55 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Automobile Club of Southern
California NHRA Finals
Site:.Pomona, Calif.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 10:30 p.m.-
12:30a.m.);Sunday,final eliminations (ESPN,
9-11:30 p.m.).
Track:Auto Club Raceway at Pomona.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Milwaukee 108,Atlanta 91
Utah 104. Orlando 94
Charlotte 101,Toronto 96
Washington 98, Houston 91
New Jersey 95, Cleveland 87
Golden State 122, NewYork 117
Dallas 106, Memphis 91
Oklahoma City 109, Philadelphia 103
San Antonio 107, LA. Clippers 95
Minnesota 98, Sacramento 89
Thursday's Games
Golden State at Chicago (n)
Boston at Miami (n)
L.A. Lakers at Denver (n)
Today's Games
Utah at Adanta, 7 p.m.
Houston at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Washington, 7 p.m.
New York at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m.


Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Utah at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Orlando at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland. 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 games

Today
No. 2 Michigan State vs. Eastern
Michigan, 8:30 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas State vs. James Madison,
9 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State vs. North Carolina
A&T, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Villanova vs. Bucknell, 8 p.m.
No. 7 Kansas vs. Longwood, 8 p.m.
No. 8 North Carolina vs. Lipscomb,
7 p.m.
No. 9 Florida vs. North Carolina
Wilmington, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Syracuse vs. Northern Iowa,
7 p.m.
No. II Kentucky vs. ETSU, 7 p.m.
No. 12 Gonzaga vs. Southern U.,
9 p.m.
No. 16 Baylor vs. Grambling State,
9:30 p.m.
No. 19 Memphis vs. Centenary, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Georgetown at Old Dominion,
7 p.m.
No. 21 Virginia Tech vs. Campbell,
7:30 p.m.
No. 22 Temple vs. Seton Hall, 7:30 p.m.
No. 23 Tennessee vs. Chattanooga,
9 p.m.
No. 24 BYU vs. Fresno State, 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Buffalo 5, New Jersey 4, SO
Boston 7, Pittsburgh 4
Columbus 8, St. Louis I
Florida 4,Toronto I
Phoenix 2, Chicago I
Anaheim I, N.Y. Islanders 0
Thursday's Games
Montreal at Boston (n)
Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Tampa Bay atWashington (n)
Philadelphia at Carolina (n)
Minnesota at Atlanta (n)
Edmonton at Detroit (n)
Vancouver at Ottawa (n)
Nashville at St. Louis (n)
Dallas at Los Angeles (n)
N.Y. Islanders at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Edmonton at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
'OitOwa'at BostoAri7'.nis. . ....-
Washington at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Detroit, 7 p.rm.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
St. Louis it Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at San Jose, 10 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Los Angeles,
10:30 p.m.


COURTESY PHOTO

5K flying

Emma Tucker of Lake City competes in a 5K event in
Athens, Ga. Tucker ran a 19:50, and will lead the Eye of
the Tiger cross country team at the Florida Middle School
State Championship in Lakeland on Saturday.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
E Tryus with
VIL It o C coupon ____ I


CRAFTO 1 \\2- -
7. ^ WHAT THE NEW
AIRLINE USEP TO
O ET NU51NE 55 TO
BAFLLE TAKE OFF. '
---- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: L I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GAVEL FUNNY POPLIN HEIFER
I Answer: When the comedian gained weight, he tried
to LAUGH IT OFF


PICKS: Gamecocks to upset Gators


SCOREBOARD


Continued From Page 1B


California
Ducks had three points
with 5 minutes left in first
half last week, ended up
with 53 ... OREGON 45-31.
Georgia (8'1) at No. 2
Auburn
Will Newton and Tigers
be distracted or angry?
... AUBURN 38-21.
San Diego State (plus
261/2) at No. 3 TCU
Aztecs have second-
best offense, third-ranked
defense in Mountain West
... TCU 41-10.
Louisiana-Monroe
(plus 32'/2 ) at No. 5
LSU
Does Les Miles only
graze during big games? ...
LSU 48-10.
Indiana (plus 21) at
No. 6 Wisconsin
Badgers have won
five straight meetings ...
WISCONSIN 45-17.
No. 7 Stanford (minus
5/2) at Arizona State
Andrew Luck making late
push to be Heisman finalist
... STANFORD 38-14.
Penn State (plus 171h)
at No. 8 Ohio State
JoePa goes for two
straight in Columbus; only
one team has done that
during Tressel era ... OHIO
STATE 34-14.
Kansas (plus 35) at


No. 9 Nebraska
QB Taylor Martinez
should be back for
Cornhuskers ...
NEBRASKA 50-10.
No. 17 Mississippi
State (plus 131') at No.
11 Alabama
Bulldogs' Dan Mullen
leads SEC coach of the year
race ... ALABAMA 28-17.
No. 12 Oklahoma
State (minus 6) at Texas
Can Longhorns really be
this bad? ... OKLAHOMA
STATE 38-24.
No. 13 Iowa (minus
10I) at Northwestern
Wildcats handed
Hawkeyes first loss last
season ... IOWA 34-17.
UTEP (plus 281') at
No. 14 Arkansas
Teams have met once. In
1989, Razorbacks won 39-7
... ARKANSAS 39-7.
No. 15 Utah (minus
55) at Notre Dame
Another first-time visitor
gets to celebrate on Irish
turf ... UTAH 31-14.
No. 16 Virginia Tech
(minus 3%) at North
Carolina
Tech's Tyrod Taylor,
Tar Heels' Tyler Yates
are top passers in ACC ...
VIRGINIA TECH 28-24.
USC (plus 4) at No.
18 Arizona


CHS: Tigers fight for Oaken Bucket


Continued From Page 1B


house and the Oaken
Bucket, which Columbia
has possessed for the last
two seasons in combined
96-0 victories.
Callum has lost to
Suwannee as a player, and
he knows it's a feeling that
the Tigers don't want to
leave the 2010 season with.
"I lost to them once as a
sophomore," he said. "We
won the next two, and it's
as close as you get to win-
.-ning a district champion-
ship. It meant everything.
I mean, it meant a whole
lot. Even in middle school
it means something to this"
community and town."
Suwannee lost four
of their first six contests
this season, but has since-


ACROSS

1 Farm animal
4 Mattress
extra
7 PBS relative
10 Flair for music
11 Great Barrier

13 Auel's heroine
14 Frat letter
15 Willy or Shamu
16 Secluded val-
ley
17 Hobgoblins
19 Freeway
20 Spider's quar-
ters
21 Flow
23 Horrid-tasting
26 Debatetopic
28 Move side to
side
29 Environmental
prefix
30 Consummate
34 Golfer Sam
36 Term of
endearment


rebounded to win their last
two games. The Bulldogs
picked up an 18-14 win
against Baker County and
a 22-8 win against Baldwin.
The Bulldogs and the
Tigers have two like-oppo-
nents, having both played
Fort White and Madison
County High schools. Both
teams fell to Madison in
shutout losses, while the
Tigers defeated Fort White
in the kickoff classic. The
Indians of Fort White have
since rebounded in a playoff
season that includes a 52-22
drumming of the Bulldogs.
Suwannee will use most
of it's players on offense
and defense, according to
coach Craig Howard.
'"They'll have a lot of two-


38 Cold War org.
39 Copier brand
41 Turns right
42 Lobster
exporter
44 Hostel
46 Short note
47 Tent dwellers
52 List detail
53 Quit flying
54 Southeast
Asian
55 Bilks
56 Demolish
57 Aunts and
uncles
58 Mortar trough
59 Mr. Beatty
60 Furtive

DOWN

1 Dagwood's
neighbor
2 Maui neighbor
3 Hot rum drink
4 Unmanned
spacecraft
5 Kind of exercise


way players under first year
coach Willie Spears," he
said.
Among their most dan-
gerous players is Greg
Swinson, who ran for 140
yards and two touchdowns
against Fort White.
The Tigers are 23-7 in
the last 30 games against
the Bulldogs and 2-0 under
coach Craig Howard. The
fact that coaches have lost
their jobs after a loss in this
game says enough about
what the rivalry means. The
fact that many Columbia
players will take the field
for the last time in their
lives makes the game even
more important.
Kickoff is at 7:30 p.m. at
Tiger Stadium.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


YEAR LY ENS
CRI REA
VEIN ASTA JSUS
ADAGE TEM OTT
TAT MER YOKUM
SRA SLAB PERT
Vl~E_
-I


Retro art style
Chute material
Beseech
Writer Ayn
Goes without
food


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


NIT


EL
I LI


13 Came to terms
18 Floor
22 Undoing
23 German "bee-
tles"
24 Holm or
Fleming
25 Not sm. or
med.
27 London dis-
trict
29 Churchill suc-
cessor
31 Barely man-
age
32 Census info
33 UPS units
35 Principles
37 Get rusty
40 Concrete rein-
forcer
41 Lion's prey
42 Ditto (2 wds.)
43 Make better
45 Renowned
46 Wisc. neigh-
bor
48 Gusto
49 Sorts
50 Brad
51 Camera brand


@2010 by UFS, Inc.


Wildcats snapped seven-
game skid to Trojans last
year ... ARIZONA 38-31.
Texas Tech (plus 15)
at No. 19 Oklahoma
Norman sweet Norman
for Sooners... OKLAHOMA
42-21.
Kansas State (plus 13)
at No. 20 Missouri
Wildcats will have to
complete more than two
passes to win this week ...
MISSOURI 28-14.
No. 21 Nevada (minus
81) at Fresno State
Wolf Pack's offense had
844 yards last week ...
NEVADA 42-35.
No. 22 S. Carolina (plus
6W) at No. 24 Florida
Gators trying to reach
third straight SEC title
game, Gamecocks try-
ing for first ... SOUTH
CAROLINA 24-20.
No. 23 Texas A&M
(minus 3) at Baylor
Aggies playing some
defense again, rank third in
Big 12 ... BAYLOR 34-28.
Southern Miss (plus
9) at No. 25 UCF
Knights' first game as
ranked team ... UCF 31-24.

Lastweek: 13-5 (straight);
7-10 (vs. points).
Season: 13743 (straight);
85-88-3 (vs. points).


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


11-12











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 12, 2010


DILBERT

YOU'RE I WAS I LIKE TO BANG OUT
TWLAO DOING E A FEW HOURS OF WORK
HOURS E-MAIL BEFORE SOME IDIOT
LATE. IN THE STARTS ASKING ME
SPARKING DUMB QUESTIONS.

_i


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


IT'S A.LL I
PtO TI OU


( j


DEAR ABBY


Family dreads repeating last

year's vegan thanksgiving


DEAR ABBY: Last year
for Thanksgiving, I made a
special effort to get the en-
tire family together for the
traditional meal. All 13 of us
met at my mother's home
and everyone was to bring a
dish or two to share.
One of my brothers has
two college-age daughters.
Both are vegan, and he in-
sisted that all the dishes we
brought be vegan! I did it,
but I resented it because I
felt that two out of 13 peo-
ple should not decide the
menu. If they wanted vegan
dishes, they should bring
something for themselves,
while the rest of us brought
My brother and nieces are
now asking what we're do-
ing this year for Thanksgiv-
ing. Frankly, I don't want to
go through that again. Am
I wrong in thinking every-
one should not bend over
backward for the vegan
meal? I don't mind some of
the menu accommodating
them, but I don't think the
whole dinner should be al-
tered. TURKEY EATER
IN TEXAS
DEAR TURKEY EAT-
ER- Neither do I. And the re-
sponse you should give your
brother (and his daughters)
is that you'll be serving a
traditional Thanksgiving
dinner this year, so they can
either bring something they
will enjoy or make other
plans.
DEAR ABBY: I read


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
your column every day
and find it interesting and
useful. Many of the writers
have the same emotions and
problems as I do. I'm always
pleased to see that I am not
too far off.
I am a woman who mar-
ried for the second time
after 54 years of marriage.
I was 71 and had been a wid-
ow for only one year. I had
married my late husband at
16, and thought I could not
live alone.
Do you have any words of
wisdom for someone such
as myself? Older people
are so set in their ways that
blending is so very difficult.
- HAVING TROUBLE
IN FLORIDA
DEAR HAVING TROU-
BLE: If you remarried only
because you were afraid of
living alone, then you did it
for the wrong reason. There
are worse things than living
alone and one of them is
being married to a person
who is unwilling to com-
promise. The keys to a suc-
cessful union are affection,
communication, respect
and compromise. If both


parties sincerely care about
and respect each other, the
union will be successful'and
lasting.
DEAR ABBY: My wife
recently attended her 35th
high school reunion alone.
Her high school sweetheart
was there, and they talked
and exchanged e-mail ad-
dresses. As the night wore
on, he started making ad-
vances and my wife rebuffed
him somewhatrudely. Three
days later, she e-mailed him
an apology and they started
an eight-week exchange.
I suspected something
was wrong and checked her
e-mails, where I discovered
some pretty torrid messages
and a dinner meeting being
planned. When I confronted
my wife, she denied every-
thing until I gave her cop-
ies of the e-mails. She says
they never met, but I say the
intent was there. To me, this
is the same as a physical af-
fair. She disagrees. Who is
right? DECEIVED IN
LOUISIANA
DEAR DECEIVED: You
are. The only thing that pre-
vented things from proceed-
ing further was the fact that
you intervened. And if your
wife had been proud of what
she was doing she wouldn't
have lied to you.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


LW'RE AR6UIN6 AN IMPORTANT AGE-
S -t DISCRIMINATION
Q?,CAS6,, gNiE,---
STOP CALWtNG
IT A
"gRTHDAY UIT"I!


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Compromise,
but in doing so, be sure your
negotiations leave room for
you to manage your expens-
es. There is money to be
made if you utilize all the re-
sources you have and come
up with a workable arrange-
ment for everyone involved.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't trust ev-
eryone with your personal
information. A partnership
can work if you are both on
the same page. It isn't likely
you'll be able to work with
someone in whom you have
an emotional interest **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Focus on what you
want and how to get it Don't
delay. By working alongside
someone as enthusiastic as
you, achievements beyond
your expectations can be
made. Help will be offered
by the most unexpected
source. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): A serious attitude
about money will help you
to stick to your budget, even
if you are being enticed to
spend more on entertain-
ment or an investment Tak-
ing an innovative approach
to a hobby or an activity you
participate in will lead to
an interesting proposition.
***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Chill out and plan to
have some fun. Love is on
-the rise and a promise will
be made regarding an emo-
tional situation. Making
some changes to your home
or lifestyle will be pleasing
and will benefit you in many
ways. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Get out with friends.
You need to avoid people
who criticize and nag and
embrace those who get
,what you are trying to ac-
complish. An idea you have
can turn into 4 moneymak-
ing venture with the right
input from someone with
experience. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): An emotional quest for
change will lead to an inter-
esting alternative to the way
you've been living. Keep all
avenues open until you have
viewed every .'possibility
available. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Hard work will
pay off and underhanded-
ness will work against you.
You can strive to reach your
goals and push others to fol-
low suit, but in the end it will
be your contribution that
brings you the greatest ad-
vancement **


SAGHTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Resurrect
old ideas or goals. You will
have the discipline to see
matters through. Love is
on the rise and events will
develop between you and
someone you've know for
some time. A residential
change may be necessary.
****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Sign up for a
course or spend time with
a mentor who will help you
polish whatyou have to offer.
Recognition and success are
within reach. A geographi-
cal move will enhance your
chances. Open your mind to
the possibilities. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take care of le-
gal, financial or contractual
matters and you will win.
There is a chance you will,
come into cash or a gift.
Your ability to communicate
effectively will bring .about
favors and opportunities
that can change your cur-
rent situation. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Someone will
.criticize you if you fall short
or don't come through with a
promise you made. Pushing
someone who isn't ready to
reveal the information you
want will not help matters.
Bide your time and offer as-
sistance. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals C
"F M V C P X MPNP SF B HF V O W -


HRVAFOB MVOEN.


F T P P R RF P F


NMWIRE SP HF-GLFOB HWXVXWPN."
- NVOEZV SIRR W G L
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The service meant so much to me. You don't know
how privileged I feel and how lucky I am to have served." Tony Curtis
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-12


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12,2010












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


-D





Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
This isa nonrefundable rate.




One Item per ad 1 6
4 lines 6 days additional
4 ines* 6 days line $1.10
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalng $500 or less.
Each Item must Include a price .
This is a non-refundable rate.





Si ne$1.15






S One Htem per ad

personal merchandise totalling $1,00 or less.
Each Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One item per ad $ 7
4 lines 6 days ch additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totallng $2,500 or less.
Each item must include a price.




This Is a non-refundable rate




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Each item must Include a price.
S ThisoI.sanon-refundab ee..













4 lines 2 6 daystEach adi ditnal Isre11 U
S Each Item must Include a price













Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office-is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emal by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs,, 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadhnes'are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.laltccityrepotlr.teoii


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
File No. 10-228-CP
DARYL C. WILSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DARYL C. WILSON, deceased,
whose date of death was January 27,
2010; File Number 10-228-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City
FL, 32055. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED..
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: Wednesday, November 3,
2010.
Robert D. Hines
Attorney for Personal Representative
Email: rhines@hnh-law.com
Florida Bar No. 0413550
Hines, Norman, Hines P.L.
1312 W. Fletcher Ave
Suite B
Tampa, FL 33612
Telephone: 813-265-0100
Sherese Talley. Reid
Personal Representative
1135 SW Lake Montgomery Ave
Lake City, FL 32025

04542191
November 5, 12, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT
TO THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY
THE PLANNING AND ZONING
BOARD OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO
AS THE LOCAL PLANNING
AGENCY OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HERE-
BY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sec-
tions 163.3161 through 163.3215,
Florida Statutes, as amended, and the
Columbia County Land Develop-
ment Regulations, as amended, here-
inafter referred to as the Land Devel-
opment Regulations, objections, rec-
ommendations and comments con-
ceming an amendment, as described
below, will be heard by the Planning
and Zoning Board of Columbia
County, Florida, serving also as the
Local Planning Agency of Columbia
County, Florida, at a public hearing
on November 22, 2010 at 7:15 p.m.,
or as soon thereafter as the matter
can be heard, in the School Board
Administrative Complex located at.
372 West Duval Street, Lake City,
Florida.
CPA 0203, an application by Lenvil
H. Dicks, to amend the Future Land
Use Plan Map of the Comprehensive
Plan by changing the future land use
classification from RESIDENTIAL,
LOW DENSITY (less than or equal
to 2 dwelling units per acre) to
COMMERCIAL for the property de-
scribed, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
25, Township 3 South, Range 16
East, Columbia County, Flo6rida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Commence at the Northeast
comer of said Section 25; thence
South 00058'32" East, along the East
line of said Section 25 a distance of
2,053.57 feet to the North right-of-
way line of Northwest Lake Jeffery
Road (County Road 250); thence
North 6547'10" West, along said
the North right-of-way line of North-
west. Lake Jeffery Road (County
Road 250) a distance of 1,088.23 feet
to the Point of Beginning; thence
continue North 6547'10" West, still


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions,.Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
m ents. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

WE FIX IT SHOP
Cars, Truck, welding, etc.
Implement Repair.
386-623-3200


Legal

along said the North right-of-way
line of Northwest Lake Jeffery Road
(County Road 250) a distance of
719.80 feet to the East right-of-way
line of Northwest Bascom Norris
Drive; thence North 10o40'19" West,
along said East right-of-way line of
Northwest Bascom Norris Drive
45.75 feet; thence North 44o26'32"
East, still along said East right-of-
way line of Northwest Bascom Nor-
ris Drive 184.15 feet to the point of
curve of a curve concave to the
Southeast, having a radius of
1,849.86 feet and a central angle of
03038'38"; thence continue North-
easterly, along the arc of said curve,
also being said East right-of-way line
of Northwest Bascom Norris Drive
117.64 feet; thence South 6546'50"
East 606.32 feet; thence South
1831'21" West 320.86 feet to Point
of Beginning.
Containing 5.00 acres, more or less.
TIhe public hearing may be continued
to one or more future date. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
calendar weeks from the date of the
above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the
amendment.
Copies of the amendment are availa-
ble for public inspection at the Office
of the County Planner, County Ad-
ministrative Offices located at 135
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. .
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.

04542317
November 12, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-02-DP
B. D., DOB: 9/24/2008
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Brian Johnson
Address Unknown
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
,has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
' clerk of court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on DECEMBER 8,
2010, at 10 A.M., for a Termination
of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT********
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 9th day of No-
vember 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Trish Brewington
Deputy Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In accord-
ance with the Americans With Disa-
bilities Act, if you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or.imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.

04542321
November 12, 19, 26, 2010
December 3, 2010



Set Connected


Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT TO RE-
QUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS
November 12, 2010
Columbia County
P. 0. Box 1529
Lake City, FL 32056-1529
(386) 755-4100
On or about November 22, 2010, Co-
lumbia County will submit a request
to the Florida Department of Com-
munity Affairs for the release of
Community Development Block
Grant funds under Title I of the
Housing and Community Develop-
ment (HCD) Act of 1974, as amend-
ed, to undertake a project to rehabili-
tate, including demolition and re-
placement of eight dwelling units for
low- to moderate-income families
and provide water hook ups for 30
low- to moderate- income families in
the Ellisville Utility District. Other
related activities include temporary
relocation and administration. Fund-
ing for this project is the Florida
Small Cities Community Develop-
ment Block Grant Program, FY09,
DCA grant number 11DB-L4-03-22-
01-H20, funds in the amount of
$750,000.
Columbia County has determined
that the activities proposed in the
Unspecified Site Strategy are catego-
rically excluded under U. S. Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban Devel-
opment regulations at 24 Code of
Federal Regulations Part 58 from the
National Environmental .Policy Act
of 1969 requirements. As eligible
sites are located, site specificecheck-
list will be completed prior to the
commitment of funds for each unit.
Additional project information is
contained in the Environmental Re-
view Record on file at the Columbia
County Administration offices, locat-
ed at 135 NE Hemando Street, Lake
City, Florida.
Any individual, group, or agency
may submit written comments on the
Environmental Review Record to
Dale Williams, Office of the County
Manager. Additional project infor-
mation is contained in the Environ-
mental Review Record on file at the
Office of the County Manager, 135
NE Hemando Street, Lake City,
Florida and may be examined or cop-
ied weekdays 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
All comments must be received by
November 19, 2010. Comments will
be considered prior to Columbia
County requesting a release of
funds.
Columbia County certifies to the
Florida Department of Community
Affairs and U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development
that Ronald Williams in his capacity
as Chair consents to accept the juris-
diction of the Federal Courts if an
action is brought to enforce responsi-
bilities in relation to the environmen-
tal review process and that these re-
sponsibilities. have been. satisfied-
The State's approval of the certifica-
tion satisfies its responsibilities un-
der National Environmental Policy
Act and related laws and authorities
and allows the Columbia County to
use the Community Development
Block Grant funds.
The Florida Department of Com-
munity Affairs will accept objections
to its release of funds and Columbia
County certification for a period of
15 days following the anticipated
submission date or its actual receipt
of the request (whichever is later)
only if they are on one of the follow-
ing bases: (a) the certification was
not executed by the Certifying Offi-
cer of the Columbia County; (b) Co-
lumbia County has omitted a step or
failed to make a decision or finding
required by U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development
regulations at 24 Code of Federal
Regulations part 58; (c) the grant re-
cipient has committed funds or in-
curred costs not authorized by 24
Code of Federal Regulations Part 58
before approval of a release of funds
by the State; or (d) another Federal
agency acting pursuant to 40 Code of
Federal Regulations Part 1504 has
submitted a written finding that the
project is unsatisfactory from the
standpoint of environmental quality.
Objections must be prepared and
submitted in accordance with the re-
quired procedures at 24 Code of Fed-
eral Regulations Part 58, Sec. 58.76
and shall be addressed to the Florida
Department of Community Affairs,
Community Development Block
Grant Program, 2555 Shumard Oak
Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-2100. Potential objectors
should contact Columbia County to
verify the actual last day of the ob-
jection period.
Ronald Williams,
Chair
Columbia County
Environmental Certifying Offi-
cer
P. 0. Box 1529
Lake City, FL 32056-1529
04542323
November 12, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A SPECIAL EX-
CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENT OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that, pursuant to the Colum-
bia County Land Development Reg-
ulations as amended, hereinafter re-
ferred to as the Land Development
Regulations, comments, objections
and recommendations concerning the
special exception as described be-
low, will be heard by the Board of
Adjustment of Columbia County,
Florida, at a public hearing on No-
vember 22, 2010 at 7:00 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, in the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex, located at 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida.
SE 0508, a petition by Freeman De-
sign Group, Inc., as agent for Jona-
than Ferrer, to request a special ex-


ception be granted as provided for in
Section 4.5.7 of the Land Develop-
ment Regulations to allow for a day
camp as a recreational activity within
an AGRICULTURAL -1 (A-I) zon-
ing district in accordance with a site
plan dated October 11, 2010 and
submitted as part of a petition dated
October 22, 2(110, to be located on
property described, as follows:


Legal


A parcel of land lying within Section
5, Township 1 South, Range 17 East,
Columbia County, Florida. Being
more particularly described, as fol-
lows: Commence at the Northeast
comer of the Southeast 1/4 of said
Section 5; thence South 8809'53"
West, along the North line of said
Southeast 1/4 of Section 35 a dis-
tance of 655.00 feet; thence South
01o57'24" East 1,334.08 feet;
thence; North 88014914" East 655.00
feet to the East line of said Section 5;
thence North 0157'24" West, along
said East line of Section 5 a distance'
of 1,334.91 feet to Point of Begin-
ning.
Containing 20.00 acres, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published.
At the aforementioned public heaf'-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the spe-
cial exception.
Copies of the special exception are
available for public inspection at the
Office of the County Planner, Coun-
ty Administrative Offices, 135
Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.

04542318
November 12, 2010



010 Announcements


020 Lost & Found

Found German Shepard.
Southwest Lake City area.
Please call to identify.
386-438-5515


100 Job
Opportunities

04542333
Route Driver Needed: If you've
got the motivation We have the emotion
opportunity. You will be
employed by an up and coming
Medical Waste Transportation
Company. Must be drug-free,
healthy, hardworking with Valid
Drivers License and excellent
driving record. No CDL
required. Experience preferred.
Will be some warehouse labor
involved. If experienced,
Starting Salary $120.00 per
route day. Will be a 90 day
probationary period.
Please ONLY apply if you are
professional and can
communicate well,with our
customers. Contact:
dmdvanettaf@aol.com or
904-583-7517 leave voicemail

05524408
DETAILER
Large Manufacturing Company
has the following position
available in the Lake City,
Florida, facility:
DETAILER/CHECKER
Graduate with AS degree or
experience in the steel joist
industry. Responsibilitities
include drafting and detailing of
joist and deck drawings. Must
have AutoCAD experience, and
structural background is prefer-
red. Company offers a highly
professional environment with
tremendous growth opportunity
and competitive salary commen-
surate with experience. Excel-
lent benefit package. Qualified
applicants submit cover letter
and resume in confidence to:
Jan Tryon
jan.tryon@newmill.com


100 OOpportunities


05524447
Packinghouse Supervisor
Quality Kid Packaging, Inc., is
seeking a Packinghouse Super-
visor for our vegetable packing
facility in White Springs. This
individual will be responsible
for overseeing the packing, ship-
ping and quality assurance. This
person must be self-motivated
and seek perfection. Key
respon-
sibilities include all aspects of
daily packing, shipping and stor-
age facilities. They will have
day to day responsibility for
direct management of labor,
receiving, packing inventory
control, loading, shipping and
order fulfillment. Extensive
daily interaction and coordina-
tion between growers, sales and
order fulfillment td ensure con-
tinuity and customer satisfaction
are required. Five plus years of
packinghouse or produce ware-
house experience required.
Bilingual (English/Spanish) is
preferred. This individual must
be flexible as days and hours
vary as schedules are often
determined by mother nature
and season. EOE. Please submit
resume and salary requirements
to Quality Kid, P O Box 269,
White Springs, FL 32096 or
email to jenn@qkproduce.com

ACCOUNTANT/AUDITOR.
Full time position at local
CPA Audit Firm.
Accounting or closely related
degree required. Email resume
with salary history to:
richard@PowellandJonesCPA.com

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412
102 Temporary Farm Workers
needed 12/10/2010 10/10/2011.
Workers will perform a variety of
duties associated w/ growing
peaches: planting, thinning,
pruning, cultivating, harvesting, &
packing peaches. Guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. All tools, sup-
plies, & equipment provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $9.1 1/hr. Worksites in
Edgefield & Saluda Co's SC.
Applicants should report or send a
resume to the nearest FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
reference job # 490580.
Carolina Farms & Harvesting, Inc.
Johnston, SC
Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St, Lake City, FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com


3 Temp. Nursery Workers needed
12/13/10 9/1/11. 3 months
verifiable exp. operating 27+ HP
diesel farm equip. Worksite in
George Co. MS. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, propagate,
grade, store & ship container &
field grown horticultural products.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
All tools, supplies, equip, provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
for non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon com-
pletion of 50% of contract.
Pay is $9.10/hr. Applicants should
report/send a resume to the nearest
FL Agency of Workforce Innova-
tion office & ref. job # MS 24832.
JDS Nursery Lucedale, MS
Local mortgage company is
looking for an outbound phone
salesperson. Please don't apply
unless highly motivated & strong
salesperson. Call 386-243-0878.

120 ^Medical
120v Employment

Homecare LPN's needed 9a-6p
and CNA's needed 8p-8a
for client in Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare 352-291-4888

O5524375

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus.
877-630-6988


EDUCAT1DN/TRAINING


IBUYI^


gSELL T


MIgNDIIJ











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED


1 Medical
120 Employment
05523522
HANDS LAKE SHORE
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER
has the following immediate
openings
Marketing &
Communication Director
Physical Therapists
Inpatient Coder
Surgical Technologist
Payroll Specialist
Competitive salary and
benefit package.
Apply online @
shandslakeshore.com
EOE, M/F/V/D,
Drug Free Workplace.

F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
MA needed M-F for busy medical
practice. Send reply to Box 05058,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City. FL, 32056


141 Babysitters
Babysitting in my home, lots of
experience, will provide lots of
love and attention, F/T or PiT,
located near the center of town.
Will accept one to two children
Call Cindy at 610-348-0336

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 11/29/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being-sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species o wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you ire
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
33O Livestock &
S Supplies
Black Limousine Bull
polled, great disposition,
$1,350 obo
386-755-3541
Mini Mare-wv/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Glass Top Stove
Self cleaning
White $150
386-344-1783
White Refrigerator
Freezer on top $125
Call
386-344-1783

407 Computers
Computer set, loaded, XP-Pro,
plus printer, scanner, web-cam, &
more. Everything up-to-date,
$275 386-961-9171
E-MACHINE
$75.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture

Tempur-Pedic, double size bed
w/frame, like new,
paid $2000 asking $500
call 386-755-9271

411 Machinery&

10" Craftsman Table Saw '
Extra blades, good condition
$30 obo
386-755-3541
Craftsman Joiner/Belt Sander
Commercial model,
good condition $150 obo
386-755-3541

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.


$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
8am Callaway S/D, off 247. Wil-
shire Dr. Follow signs. Household,
twin bed, boys clothing. Too
much to list. NO EARLY BIRDS.
Estate Sale (Inside) Sat. 8-? off
242 & 47 on Blueberry Place.
Look for signs. Furn., antiques,
pool table, etc. glassware & more.
Final Sale All must go, Fri only
8a-2p, hshold, clothes, antiques,
Christmas Deco, off Lake Jeffrey,
597 NW Spring Hollow Blvd


430 Garage Sales
Fri & Sat, 8-?,
Miscellaneous items, Next to
Hopeful Baptist Church, comer
of Hopeful Dr & Rhett Place
Fri & Sat. 7:30 -? 129, right be-
tween Scaffs & Badcocks to end,
left on Green, right, 138 Hillcrest
Cr. Lots of stuff. Look for signs
Fri & Sat. 9-? 247 to Kirby, left in-
to Woodcrest, 1 blk turn right,
look for signs.Christmas deco,
clothing, misc household, more.
Fri & Sat. on CR 245 about 1/8
mile South of the 252 intersection.
Lots of misc. items. Too much to
list. Cleaning 2 households.
FRI. 7A-12P. FHP on Hwy 90.
All the proceeds will benefit the
Florida State Employee
charitable Campaign.
*] W RV iWIM Iu


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat only, 8-?, Multi Family Sale,
New and Used Items
588 NW Harris Lake Dr,
(Lake City Country Club)
Sat only, 8a 2p, exer equip,
Christmas deco, collectibles
304 SW Bambi Lane (off of
Marvin Burnett Rd near ballfields)
SAT. ONLY. 8-2.S. S. on 41 left on
238 at the top of the hill. Horace
Witt Way. Christmas deco, misc
house wares, sm tools, much more.

440 Miscellaneous

05524413
Rudolph's Christmas
Tree Farm
2000 Shaped, Ceder and
Leyland Cypress
US 90 E to Sanderson, left on
Hwy 127 go 8 miles,left on
H*y 125 at caution light. Go
6/10 mile, turn right at Noah
Raulerson Rd., 3 miles to farm
For more info call
904-259-7703
1902 Singer Sewing machine
excel cond. Waterbed w/oak frame
and headboard w/ 6 storage draw-
ers. Schwinn exercise bike
excellent cond. Delivery extra.
386-963-3410 Pics avail, at
kcfussell@windstream.net
For Sale, Trade or make offer.
Handicap scooter, gas stove, queen
bed and for jet bath tub w/sliding
doors, toilet & cabinet. After 35
yrs. lots of goodies. 386-697-4421
Need Holiday cash? Make 75% of
selling price at 3 day consignment
sale. Accepting gently used name
brand clothing, shoes & handbags.
Call 386-752-3631 or 755-1759

450 Good Things
450 toEat -
Pecan House in Ellisville
available for buying & selling,
Several good varieties
386-752-6896 386-697-6420

530 Marine Supplies
2010 Minn-kota Trolling motor.
Digital, 551b thrust, 12volt,
variable speeds, electronic foot
control. New, under warranty.
$500 FIRM. 386-758-6098

630 Mobile Homes
6J3 for Rent
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
S$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/t. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/I BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-867-1833,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras
386-752-4258
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940


Mobile Home
650 & Land


D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825


71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
T5523977
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 /1 Apt in duplex for rent. $560
mo. w/$560 dep. no pets,
w/carport, off Branford Hwy
386-752-7578
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $530,month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage, spacious, 2/1,,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,-
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile-floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
1 Room Efficiency. Private.
$400. mo plus deposit
Everything furnished. No pets.
386-965-0778
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542288
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

04542291
For Rent-
3/2 home on Baya Ave.
convenient to shopping, schools
and churches. $790./mo with
$790./security. First month's
rent reduced to $395.00
for qualified tenant.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
386-365-5884.

05524415
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $700 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750: mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Large 3/2, in town, near schools,
shopping, doctors, banks. Large
living & family rooms, spacious
closet space/storage throughout. 2
car carport, covered patio, W/D
hook-up, lawn care provided, city
util., lease $985 mo, 1st & sec dep
call 386-397-3335
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Rural beauty and privacy near
1- 10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
Two available houses, 3/2,
back yard, $900 month, off of
Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

740 gFurnished
74V Homes for Rent
Completely Renovated furnished
1 bdrm house on private property.
Water included. No pets, $400. mo
plus $50. Deposit 386-752-8755


750 Business &
5/ Office Rentals
Great Opportunity
Sunoco Convenient Store for lease
3554 N Hwy 441, Lake City.
813-495-8461
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


$25 Prize Weekly Winner

Contest rules and official entry blank in Tuesday's paper.


Lake City Reporter


750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
Retail/Commercial/OfTice
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal .
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an eqpal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!!!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841

Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
2 Acreage

05524416 %
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


820 Farms &
S Acreage

5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures


850 Waterfront
O85 Property
Own your own comfortable water-
front retreat at friendly Old Pavi-
lion RV Park, Keaton Beach, FL
28 Ft Cougar 5th Wheel. excellent
condition, located on full hook-up,
Gulf front lot$ 14, 000
Call 386-752-0941


386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

386-752-1293


and e ash CTRONIC ADS SEND %l

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(386) 755-5440










ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad.
Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the
picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.

ForMoe Dtals al
Mar at 36-7540


Contact usls


at the paper.'



\:: --i'




-LASSIFIED ADS1

386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION


I I


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2010


L -, e *S ,,
.,,r-ut

.--' r -.5"s
-'*t.8^ -.., sn e


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Adonis Simmons (50) closes in on Bradford High quarterback Austin
Chipoletti at Arrowhead Stadium on Friday.


Battle for the Paddle


ith a state
playoff
spot
secured,
Fort White
High can turn its attention
to keeping the "Paddle" in
its trophy case.
The Indians travel to
Santa Fe High for a
7:30 p.m. kickoff on Friday
in an annual game deemed
*the Battle for the Paddle.
Fort White (6-3) has


won the last five games in
the series, and seems to
have the upper hand again
as the Raiders have
struggled to a 1-8 record.
Santa Fe has lost to
Newberry, Suwannee and
Bradford, all high schools
that Fort White has beaten
this season.
Santa Fe won't lay down
for the Indians.
The Raiders are coached
by Shea Showers, who


roomed with Indians head
coach Demetric Jackson
when both played at the
University of Florida.
A Santa Fe win would
put a large dose of salve on
a disappointing season.
This game will end the
season for Santa Fe,
while Fort White is
looking ahead to a playoff
meeting with Pensacola
Catholic High.
Round 1 begins Nov. 19.


indian

photos
of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High players keep an eye on the action in the Indians' 27-22 win over Bradford
High on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Indians signal they are ready to play with the raised helmets.


2010 Indians Football Schedule


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0

Fort White 14, Newberry 13

Fort White 52, Suwannee 22

Fort White 31 Union County 12

N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28

Fort White 30, Florida High 27

Fort White 28, East Gadsden 14

Taylor Co. 38, Fort White 21


Fort White 27, Bradford 22

Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


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