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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01446
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/07/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01446
System ID: UF00028308:01446
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Playoff Bound
Fort White takes second
2-2B -
Sp


Lake


1,-
LI


Sunday, November 7, 2010


w


rww.lakecityreporte m


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Brannon: Tax notices mailed


()Ollectors office
offers discounts
for early payment.

By TONY BRITT

Tax nlotic-- for 010
wf.er mriailed to re-idelnt,
la-t mw-e k listing ad valoremn
taxe-, and non-ad valoren


"The tax notices were
nailed out Oct(Jt 29 and the
tax rolls opened for col-
h action on Nov. 1," said
Columbia County Tax
C .;! ...r Ronnie Brannon.
"We don't want to start
collecting prior to Nov. 1,
that's always our target
date. We'll be <..(lh- ll nL
taxes through the last day
of May."
Tihe tax collectors office
offers a percentage dis-


count to residents who pay
early.
To receive a 4 percent
discount on the tax notices,
residents must pay their
taxes by the final day of
the month. To receive a 3
percent discount, residents
must pay by the final day
of December; to receive a
2 percent discount, resi-
dents must pay their bill
in full by the final day of
January and to receive a


1 percent discount. resi-
dents must have their bill
paid in full by the final day
of February. There is no
discount offered in March
and tax payments received
after March 31 are consid-
ered delinquent and a 3
percent statutory penalty
is assessed -. unless the
payment was postmarked
by March 31.
TAX continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER .i.i : H;<
Columbia County Tax Collector Ronnie Brannon reviews tax
notices in his office prior to posting.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Linda Taylor prepares a plate for Stephanie Stephens at the
annual Sick and Shut-in Day Saturday.


Communi event

peppered dinners

with togetherness


Volunteers help
prepare free meals
in spirit of giving.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
,irohitnson(,il ikt'c( tyreporter.coni
ood., fellowship and a
community togetherness
were at the core of the
Seventh Annual Sheppard's
Sick and Shut-in Dinner
Saturday at Richardson
Community Center.
The event is in memory
of IAvi Sheppard Sr., who
was known as a g.I.iiIL per-
son.
"N''. father used- to feed


people in the community
when he was living," said
Levi Sheppard Jr., event
coordinator.
More than 1,500 meals
were served and delivered
at last year's event.
Sheppard said a large
amount of people received
meals this year. The meals
included fish, rice and veg-
etables.
More than 50 volunteers
helped to bring the event
t,,io lhi-r. Sheppard said.
Gospel music was also
provided for entertain-
ment.
The togetherness at the
DINNER continued on 3A


Williams tasked
to develop plan
for transition.
By TONY BRITT

The decision by county
officials to move the Colum-n
bia County Industrial Deve-
lopmlent .Authority under
their county's umllnrella of
supervision will be a work
in progress. officials said.
Columbia County manag-
er Dale Williamis said in hisi
27 yearrs as a county employ-
ce. economic development
has never been a county
department. Economic
devo loppllintl V was ithi(r
cike trIcttd tlt rolu i ~h tilt'
Idkce Cily-Columnbi. Countv


II


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 75S-S445
Fax: 752-9400


Chamber of Commerce or,
most recently, tinder the
Industrial Development
Authority members.
"I don't have a blueprint
for this." Williams said on
Friday. referring to the deci-
sion to add
the IDA as
a counting
d e p a r t-
ment. "I
in t e n d
to meet
Swith the
Williams Economic
Development staff,. sit down
and make sure I have an
understanding as to where
they're currently at and
what projects they're cur-
rently -... I ieL on. My role
IDA rontinucd on .3A1


65
Sunny
WEATHER, IOA


PAYING TRIBUTE


Parade honors veterans past and present


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake oCl R.v,_,e
The Lake City Police Department honor guard leads the way followed by command staff during the Veterans Day parade
Saturday.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
More than
20 groups
paid trib-
ute to
America's
soldiers during the annual
Veterans Day Parade in
Lake City on Saturday.
The parade is spon-
sored by VVW Post 2"i,.
and featured participants
from White Sprlrihc-
United Methodist Church.
the Lake City Police
Department and local high
schools.
"I think it went very
well." sid Jerry Horton,
a Marine Corps Vietnam
War veteran. "It was short.
but it went v.,' 1 -
All of the participants
in the parade were really
good. he said.
"I enjoyed them and I'm
glad people came out to
say. Thank you to veter-
ans.'-" Horton said.
If it wasn't for veterans.
America wouldn't have its

Op on .. .
A-"
"at "-'" ObtJ anes . .
S .Adv ce .
-... .-. Puzz es .


freedoms, he said.
"We should let them
know we appreciate them,"
Horton said.
Ashley Lucas of Lake
City said the parade fea-
tured some of her family
members.
Veterans put their lives
on the line for Americans,
she said, acknowledging
that the least she could do
was come to the parade.
More people should come
out to the parade next year.
she said.
Karen and Mark Cross
of Lake City came to the
parade to pay tribute to
veterans everywhere.
-We love to honor our
vets." Karen Cross said.
"It's the land of the free
because of the brave."
Mark Cross said. The
parade needs more com-
munity involvement and
support next year. he
added.
"It was too short." he
said.
"Please tell a vet. Thank
you."" Karen Cross said.


ANTONIA ROBINSOW.- "- =
The Columbia High School marching band plays a tune for
parade onlookers.


ANTONIA ROBINSOK N/ '---"
Parade patrapants show. e' support for veterans .*.r, e on
b-a-rd tck cni er'ed to took like a steam locomotive


TODAY IN
LIFE


COMING
TUESDAY


County manager

says no blueprint

on IDA structure


AllI-Americans
-. CHS students earn national honor.
Sports, I B






porter



Vol. 136, No. 250 E $1.00









LAKE 0 SUNDAY REPORT s..-. ., EYBER P


Friday:
5-29-32-39 11


natd.ch

Friday:
3-17-23-25-25


Saturday:
Ever-'' I'. -A-


Ptay4.

Saturday:
Atern.oon S-5--3
Ever Ng- 6--


Wednesday:
'5-29-38-47-50-51


Wednesday:
34-38-39-45-50


AROUND FLORIDA



Rubio answers Obama: No compromise on cuts


WILL LESTER
Associatfed Press
WASHINGTON
resident
Barack Obama
is appealing
to victorious
Republicans to
go along with his plan to
extend tax cuts for the mid-
dle class, saying the elec-
tion is over and it's time to
down to business.
But it's not fair, he says, to
make permanent the Bush-
era cuts for the -wealthiest
because that would require
the U.S. to borrow $700 bil-
lion more to pay for it.
"The campaign season is
over," the president said
Saturday in his weekly
radio and online address.
"And it's time to focus on
our shared responsibilities
and work together."
Obama's long-stand-
ing position has been that
individuals with incomes
less than $200,000 a year
and couples making less
than $250,000 should con-
tinue to enjoy the tax cuts
enacted during George W.
Bush's presidency but that
those making more should
4 return to the higher rates
before Bush took office.
The cuts, enacted in 2001
and 2003, are due to expire
Dec. 31.
"We'd be digging our-
selves.into an even deeper
fiscal hole and passing
the burden onto our chil-
dren," he said, referring
to permanent extension of
the tax cuts for wealthier
Americans.
Republicans said this
week they strongly favor


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Sen.-elect Republican Marco Rubio holds a press
conference at the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables Wednesday.
Rubio defeated Charlie Crist and Kendrick Meek to retain the
seat for the GOP.

renewing all the Bush tax Obama has invited
cuts, given the struggling Republican and Democratic
economy. congressional leaders
The White House said to meet with him on the
this past week after sting- economy and jobs after he
ing midterm elections for returns from his 10-day trip
Democrats that Obama is to Asia.
willing to consider a com- "I believe there's room
promise for a one- or two- for us to compromise
year extension of all the tax and get it done together,"
cuts, even for families earn- Obama said in his address.
ing more than $25,4000,a- .: -Sen.-elect Marco -Rubio
year. -... of Florida*-.s aidwai the


Republican address that
lawmakers owe it to the vot-
ers to make a course cor-
rection from government
spending and deficits.
"The past two years pro-
vided a frightening glimpse
at what could become of
our great nation if we con-
tinue down the current
path; wasteful spending, a
growing debt and a govern-
ment reaching ever further
into our lives, even into
our health care decisions,"
Rubio said.
Rubio said during the
campaign that he opposes
any compromise that does
not extend current tax poli-
cies to all taxpayers. He
said he does not support
any tax increases with the
economy in its current con-
dition.
Florida's new senator-
elect says both parties have
been to blame for out-of-
control government spend-
ing and that lawmakers
owe it to the voters to make
a course correction.
In the weekly Republican
radio and Internet address,
Rubio says the midterm
elections were a "loud and
clear" message from voters
that "enough is enough."
Rubio says it would be
a mistake for Republicans
to misread the election as
an embrace of the GOP He
says it's actually "a second
chance for Republicans to
be what we said we were
going to be."
He says America's cur-
rent direction "is nothing
short of a path to ruin."
Rubio promised that
Republicans will behave
as "public servants -who


understand that re-election
is simply a byproduct of
good public service and
good ideas."

Suspect fatally
shot trying to flee

DAVIE Deputies in
South Florida have shot
and killed a suspect they
say was trying to flee.
The Broward Sheriff's
Office said a deputy was
making a traffic stop in
a criminal investigation
Friday afternoon when it
turned violent.
A sheriffs spokesman said
shots were fired but wouldn't
say whether officers or the
suspect fired first.
The sheriff's office said
the suspect tried to flee in
his car, ramming several
patrol cars and prompting
deputies to again open fire.
The suspect died. Police
haven't identified him yet
or elaborate on his alleged
crimes', though they did say
a large amount of drugs
was found in his car.

Judge delays arms
dealer sentencing

MIAMI A federal
judge has again delayed
sentencing for a Miami
Beach arms dealer con-
victed of fraud conspiracy
in a $300 million Pentagon
contract.
Sentencing had been
set Monday for 24-year-old
Efraim Diveroli. But U.S.
District Judge Joan Lenard
decided to postpone sen-
tencing, with no new date


set. Diveroli pleaded guilty
in August 2009 but sen-
tencing has been delayed
several times. He faces up
to five years in prison.
Matters have been com-
plicated by Diveroli's guilty
plea last month ni a sepa-
rate Orlando federal case
to charges that he illegally
possessed firearms as a
felon. He faces up to 10
years in that case.
In the Miami case,
Diveroli admitted to illegal-
ly shipping Chinese-made
ammunition to Afghan sol-
diers under the Pentagon
contract.

Student got into
school computer

LARGO A high school
student in Largo has been
arrested and accused of
hacking into the school
district's computer system
to change grades.
The Pinellas County
Sheriff's Office said the
17-year-old Bayside High
School student got a user
name and password by
watching a teacher typing
the information into the
system. He is accused of
logging onto the network
at home and repeatedly
changing grades.
Investigators said the
crime was discovered when
a teacher at the school was
denied access because of
a password change. When
confronted, the student
confessed.
He is charged with orie
count of computer fraud.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



MSNBC suspends Olbermann


NEW YORK
MSNBC has suspended
prime-time host Keith
Olbermann indefi-
nitely without pay for
contributing to the
campaigns of three Democratic can-
didates this election season.
Olbermann acknowledged to NBC
that he donated $2,400 apiece to
the campaigns of Kentucky Senate
candidate Jack Conway and Arizona
Reps. Raul Grivalva and Gabrielle
Giffords.
NBC News prohibits its employ-
ees from working on, or donating to,
political campaigns unless a special
exception is granted by the news
division president effectively a
ban. Olbermann's bosses did not
find out about the donations until
after they were made. The website
Politico first reported the donations.
"I became aware of Keith's politi-
cal contributions late last night," Phil
Griffin, MSNBC's chief executive,
said Friday. "Mindful of NBC News
policy and standards, I have sus-
pended him indefinitely without pay."
Olbermann was not immediately
available for comment.
His "Countdown" show, which
airs at 8 p.m. ET, is MSNBC's most
popular program. His on-the-air
transformation from the host of a
straight news program to a liberal
commentator led the network itself
to go in the same direction, filling its
prime-time lineup with left-leaning
hosts and doing better in the ratings
than anytime since its 1996 launch.
The rise in opinionated cable news
programming has called into question
whether the traditional rules of news
organizations to preserve the appear-
ance of impartiality should apply to
people who have their jobs in part
because of a clear point of view.
Sean Hannity, a conservative
radio talk show host with a popular
hour on Fox News Channel each
weeknight donated $2,400 to the
congressional campaign of New
York Republican John Gomez in
May. In August, he donated $5,000
to Michelepac, or Many Individual
Conservatives Helping Elect Leaders


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Keith Olbermann of MSNBC poses at the Ronald Reagan Library
in Simi Valley, Calif.


Everywhere, according to the
Federal Election Commission. The
PAC is associated with Minnesota
Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann.
Fox's Bill Shine, senior vice
president of programming, told the
Twin Cities Pioneer Press after the
Bachmann donation that "it's always
good to remember that he's not a
journalist; he's a conservative TV
host. If he wants to donate to a can-
didate, he certainly can."
Fox's parent company. News
Corp., gave $1 million this sum-
mer to the Republican Governors
Association, which helps elect GOP
gubernatorial candidates nationally.
Fox host Neil Cavuto paid $1.000 in
2002 for a ticket to a dinner benefit-
ing the Republican senatorial and
congressional campaign committees.-

Oscar-nominated Jill
Clayburgh dies at 66
Jill Clayburgh. an Oscar-nomi-
nated actress who starred on
Broadway. TV and films including
"An Unmarried Woman" and "Dirty
Sexy Money," has died. She was h(.
Her husband, playwright David
Rabe, says Clayburgh was surround-
ed by her family and brother when


she died Friday morning at her
home in Lakeville, Conn., after a 21-
year battle with chronic lymphocytic
leukemia.
She was nominated for an Oscar
for "An Unmarried Woman" and
"Starting Over."

Coroner: 'Bachelorette'
contestant Hug shot self
PALM DESERT, Calif. The
Riverside County coroner has deter-
mined that the one-time contestant
on "The Bachelorette" reality TV
show whose body was found off a
highway in Southern California died
of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.
A family spokeswoman, Audrey
Doherty, said Friday that Julien Hug
left his parents a letter explaining he
was suffering from depression and
felt suicide was the only way out.
Hug's body was found Wednesday
in the remote Pinyon Pines area off
Highway 74 in Riverside County,
about 90 miles east of Los Angeles.
Hug was a contestant on the ABC
show, a spinoff of the network's com-
petitive dating show "The Bachelor."
in May 2009.
a* -s -c- ,'s, e ss


Celebrity Birthdays


* Evangelist Billy Graham
is 92.
E Actor Barry Newman is 72.
0 Singer Johnny Rivers is 68.
E Singer-songwriter Joni
Mitchell is 67.
N Singer Nick Gilder is 59.
0 Gen. David Petraeus is 58.
N Actor Christopher Knight
("The Brady Bunch") is 53.


* Rock musician Tommy
Thayer (KISS) is 50.
* Actress Julie Pinson is 43.
* Rock musician Greg
Tribbett (Mudvayne) is 42.
* Actor Christopher Daniel
Barnes is 38.
* Actors Jeremy and Jason
London are 38.
* Actress Yunjin Kim is 37.


Daily Scripture

"He made known to us the
mystery of his will, which he
purposed in Christ, to be put
into effect when the times
reach their fulfillment to
bring unity to all things in heav-
en and on earth under Christ."
Ephesians 1:9- I 0


HO
Main
Fax
Circ
Onli
The
Corn
ishe
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Mern
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Ai m
cty
saon
No.
POS
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Pub

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CLA
To pa


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern. question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lake City Reporter
W TO REACH US
n number ........(386)752-1293 BUSINESS
number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
dilation ...............755-5445 (strannon@ eatyreporte.m)
ne ... ctyrporter CIRCULATION
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Page Editor: C J Risak. 754-0427


. I -









Page Editor: Ro,! Tsoa'-res 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


SUNDAY NOVEMBER 7 2010 3A


TAXES: Payment plan also available


Concrete example of a masterpiece
Aaron Helton, 15, works on his chalk masterpiece during the annual Color Lake City at the
Lake City Reporter. Chalk artists of all ages decorated the back parking lot during the event.



IDA: Expected to operate like the TDC
Continued From Page 1A


is to give them the support
they need to do their jobs."
County officials autho-
rized Williams to meet with
the IDA staff and develop
a transition plan for when
the IDA becomes a county
department on Jan. 15.
The Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority's staff is com-
posed of its executive direc-
tor, Jim Poole, and its depu-
ty director, Gina Reynolds.
"As far as the nuts and
bolts oi how it will work,
I can really only guess,"
Williams said. "I would think
in the end it's going to work
very similar to the Tourist
Development Council and
tourism marketing staff.
From a management per-
spective, I intend to man-
age the department like I


manage the other county
departments."
Poole did not attend
Thursday night's County
Commission meeting and
declined comment on the
board's decision.
As a county department,
all of the county commis-
sion's rules, regulations
and policies will now gov-
ern the IDA and its staff.
The IDA Board of
Directors, as a result of
Thursday night's decision,
will become a board that
makes recommendations
and suggestions, similar to
the Tourist Development
Council.
The IDA's budget for
2010-2011 is $540,258. The
budget was adopted and
approved in September by
county commissioners, fol-


lowing public hearings.
"I don't think the bud-
get will be reviewed, unless
necessary, until next bud-
get year," Williams said.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners levies the
millage for the IDA.
"The IDA is a dependent-
taxing authority, they do
not have the authority to
levy a tax on their own,"
Williams said.
As part of the change,
Poole will be the county's
department head for the
IDA.
"I don't see where Jim's
title is going to change at
all," Williams said. "He is
going to function in the
same capacity. He will
continue to be the IDA
director."'


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Members of the Sheppard family work to keep the legacy of Levi Sheppard Sr. alive each
year by serving food at the annual Sick and Shut-in Day. From left Ella Mae Sheppard, Levi
Sheppard Jr., Florine Roberts and Taylor-Faith Foster.

DINNER: Music served with free meals
Continued From Page 1A


event was "awesome," said year. There is always fel-
Nikki Claridy of Lake City. lowship and more for the
Her pastor, the Rev. Charles community to enjoy.
Martin of Compassion Love "It grows every year,"
Center. performed during she said.
the day. The event provides food
Anita Goolsby of Lake for a lot of people who
City came to the event last wouldn't have been able




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she said.


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Continued From Page L

Columbia County has
five local taxing authori-
ties City of Lake City,
Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners,
Columbia County Schools.
Suwannee River Water
Management District
and the Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority.
Brannon said there is
a tax bill for every piece
of property in Columbia
County. The tax collec-
tors office mailed out
bills for 39,000 parcels in
Columbia County.
The 2010 total tax roll
ad valorem tax amount
is down roughly 8.5 per-
cent lower than last year's
amount.
In 2010, the total tax
roll is expected to gener-
ate more than $56.4 mil-
lion. Ad Valorem taxes


are expected to generate
more than S47.5 million.
while the non-ad valorem
assessment (fire, solid
waste and two county pav-
ing districts and one light-
ing district assessment)
are expected to generate
more than $8.9 million.
According to records
from the tax collector's
office, officials expected
to generate more than
$60.7 million in the 2009
certified tax roll
For the second consec-
utive year, residents can
take part in a partial plan.
"We have a partial
payment plan, which is
statutory, where resi-
dents can make payments
against the gross amount
from now until April 1,"
Brannon said.
The payments can be
made in any amount or


NOTICE


length of time. as long
as the entire bill is paid
before April 1.
There are no discounts
as part of the partial pay-
ment program.
Residents who plan to
take part in the tax office's
quarterly payment plans.
must sign-up for the plan
prior to May 1.
The quarterly install-
ment plan has been
around for more than 25
years.
"Under that plan we'll
bill you for four payments
- in June. September,
December and then
March," Brannon said.
If you miss the first
June installment, you
are taken out of the pro-
gram and you'll go back
to making one payment
or the partial payment
plan."


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Tammy Hartley, a deputy clerk with the Columbia County Tax Collector's Office, speaks with
Lake City resident Marqueze Coker, 20, about property tax forms.
R[ 12 I6 0


DEPARTMENT
OF REVENUE


Rule 12D-16.002
TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD ,i.~ ci



Columbia County Tax Year 2 0 1 0


Members of the Board

SHonorable Jody DuPree Board of County Commissioners, District No. 3

Honorable Scarlet Frisina Board of County Commissioners, District No. 5

Honorable Charles Maxwell School Board, District No. 2

Citizen Member Brad Dicks Business owner within the school district

Citizen Member Huey Hawkins Homestead property owner

The Value Adjustment Board (VAB) meets each year to hear petitions and make decisions relating
to property tax assessments, exemptions, classifications, and tax deferrals.

Summary of Years Actions,
Number of Parcels Reduction in Shift in

Type of Property Exemptions Assessments Both County Taxable Vaue Taxes

ad s Due to Board Action Due to Board Actions

Residential 0 10 0 1 11 $ $ 0.00
commercial 0 0 4 3 0.00
I adustnal and
S0 0 0 6 6 $ 0$ 0.OO
miscellaneous 0 0 0 6 6$$

rlor 0 15 0 0 14 $ 0$ 0.00!
lassifieduse
Highaterrecharge 0 0 0 0 0 $ 0 0.00
Historiccommercial 3 0 0 3
O 3 0 0 3 $ 0$ 000i
ornonproft

0 0 0 9 9 1$ 05 000
andequipmnent
0 0 0 0 0 i$ o 00

TOTALS 0 2 0 48 46 000

Ai values shoud be county taxable values. School and other tag au ity vaes may Wfo.
indude transe of assessment ilerence (portabity) requests.


Ify hue a i nabo m action t mnm Chair or s Clerk ofthe Value Acstnet Board.

Chairs name Jody DuPree Phone 386.754-5678 e~

clerk's name P.DeWitCason Phone 386-758-1041 e


R. 129


'` ~` -~x~*Y R--m-`:3-














OPINION


Sunday, November 7, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Europeans

complain

about US

security


Americans aren't the
only ones who think
that our airline pas-
senger screenings
are too onerous,
time-consuming and inflexible.
The Europeans think so too.
In unusually strong language,
Martin Broughton, the chair-
man of British Airways told
a conference of U.K airport
officials that having passengers
remove their shoes and take
their laptops out of bags was
"completely redundant."
And, he said, "America does
not do internally what a lot of
the things they demand that we
do." He called on European avi-
ation authorities not to "kowtow
to the Americans every time
they wanted something done."
We hope U.S. officials
haven't been heavy-handed and
demanding with their European
counterparts. But after all,
Europe was where the shoe
bomber originated and where
British authorities came upon
a plot to mix explosive from
containers brought on board
in carry-on bags. That's why
shoes now have to be removed
and containers in carry-on bags
have to be under a certain size.
But something we've done in
regards to security has clearly
irritated the Europeans. The
Associated Press reports that
within 24 hours Broughton
was echoed by British pilots,
the owner of Heathrow airport,
other airlines and the European
Union.
The European Union has
already formally complained
to the United States about a
requirement that citizens of
the 35 nations that can enter
the U.S. without visas complete
an online security clearance in
advance of their flight.
'The EU said the system was
burdensome and an invasion of
privacy.
They might have a point
because privacy increasingly
seems like a lost concept in the
U.S. anymore.
The Europeans may just have
to get used to it.
We did.
E Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -'Newspapers
get things done!"
Our pnmary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessanly that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056: or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Claude Fralick: A good principal


The late Claude
Fralick, one of the
most respected and
longest serving local
principals, retired in
1973, some 37 years ago.
He was the esteemed principal
at Central Elementary from 1952
to its closing in 1964, then served
faithfully as founding principal of
Summers Elementary from 1964
to 1973.
Claude was a good person
all his life. A graduate of Union
County High in Lake Butler,
people who knew him back then
all agreed he was a fine, clean cut
young man.
In his hometown of
Providence, he was known as a
blue ribbon guy and they espe-
cially admired the way he took
care of his handicapped brother.
His fellow principals also
remembered that Claude always
put his brother's needs first For
example, when the principals
drove out of town to some distant
city for an overnight school meet-
ing, they all headed for a motel
for a meal and a good night's rest
at the end of the day.
Not Claude. He went to his
car and drove all the way back
to Providence where he could
personally see to his brother's
needs. Then he'd get up early the
next day and drive back to the
meeting. That's the kind of man
Claude was.
And that's the kind of principal
Claude was too, always putting
his school, his students, and his
faculty as his top priority. So, that
was why Claude's faculty wanted
to give him a first class retire-
ment party, complete with going
away gifts and glowing tributes.
However, a small problem
arose when the teachers' were
planning his retirement party
and the gifts. The problem was
School Board policy 841.2 which
said, "It is therefore the policy
of this district that the giving of
personal gift.. from teachers to


LETTER


Thanking a true
community advocate
I would like to thank John
Wheeler, as well as all the
businesses and organizations
that supported his efforts, in
the campaign to vote "no" on
Amendment 4.
John worked on a volunteer


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
willams_h2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City FL 32055
supervisors in the administrative
hierarchy shall be strongly dis-
couraged".
Did this mean the Summer's
faculty could not give Claude
the retirement gifts they had
planned? The Superintendent,
the School Board, and the School
Board attorney all looked at each
other and quickly decided the
policy did not apply to a retir-
ing principal, especially if that
principal was Claude Fralick, so
the retirement party went on as
scheduled.
The high point of the festive
party was when the faculty reso-
lution, signed by all 60 Summers
Elementary employees, was read
aloud. It said in part, "Whereas
Claude Fralick's service has been
invaluable to students, to their
parents, and to the teachers, and
Whereas his service has been
unceasing and inspired by a deep
sense of dedication, this faculty
hereby recognizes and com-
mends him."
Thus ended the honorable
professional career of an out-
standing principal and a good,
good man.

Past Voices
When Dr. Frank Phillips
was our School Superintendent
(1972-76), he assigned various
school employees to present a
weekly radio program to keep
the public informed on various
new school programs.
These programs were pre-

WAIVWAYDi'L


served on cassette tapes and
recently I found one of those
tapes from 1973. The sound qual-
ity was still excellent and it was
intriguing to hear those voices
from over 30 years ago: Marilyn
Little, David Cogshall, Florence
Pearce, the late Roy Sloan,
Sharon Richards, Margaret
Craft, Judy McCullers, Hank
Snyder, Evelyn Clayton, the late
Jim Hanna, and, of course, Dr.
Phillips himself
Time marches on and there
'have been five superintendents
since Dr. Phillips' staff made
that tape: Dr. Silas Pittman, Dr.
Dianne Lane, Michael Flanagan,
Sam Markham, and current Supt
Mike Millikin.

Always been so
The name of Tampa's
Hillsborough High School
yearbook is "The Hilsborean."
Our School Museum has a
copy, so I was curious as to why
'Hillsborough' has two l's but
7The Hilsborean' has only one '1
so I e-mailed the school principal,
Dr. William T.Orr Jr.
Here is his brief reply: "The
Hilsborean has only one '1'
because it has always been so."
Local translation: "We've always
done it that way."
By the way, Hillsborough High
School has been recognized by
Newsweek magazine six years
running as "One of America's 100
Best High Schools".
With that exemplary academic
record, they are entitled to spell
their yearbook's name any way
they want to.

Makes sense
Friend Henry Sawyer says,
"A day without sunshine is like
- well, night"

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


TO THE EDITOR


basis to educate our commu-
nity on Amendment 4 and the
importance of voting no for the
past several years.
His efforts paid off when
the results came back that
this was the only amendment
defeated in Columbia County
- and at a rate of 78.8 per-
cent'
John tirelessly worked to


get many organizations to sign
resolutions and businesses to
put signs on their lawns.
We should all thank John
when we see him for being a
true advocate for the future of
Columbia County.
Jenny Scaff Drawdy
President
Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce


Dale McFeatters


Where


the deer


and cars


play


If you are a city dweller,
you take certain kinds
of wildlife for granted
pigeons, squirrels,
rats, raccoons, maybe
the odd possum.
Geese have recently
added themselves to that
number, especially here in
the Washington area, where
they've colonized decora-
tive bodies of water like the
Lincoln Memorial Reflecting
Pool, generously providing
a carpet of droppings for the
tourists to step in.
But now urban deer
have entered the bargain.
"Infestation" may be too strong
a word for it, but in my neigh-
borhood they're everywhere.
We do not live in a tranquil
rural community. We live in
what the real-estate people
like to call a "close-in suburb,"
meaning busy highways and
within walking distance of a
largish shopping center and a
large government spy agency.
(For peace and quiet and peo-
ple who keep to themselves,
it's tough to beat a spy agency
for a neighbor.)
This isn't or shouldn't be
- deer habitat Yet, coming
back from the store, we had to
follow a large buck nonchalant-
ly strolling down the middle of
the street until he crossed over
a front yard and went behind
a house. There was no forest
back there, just more houses.
All deer look alike to me, so
I couldn't say whether this is
the same buck that occasional-
ly watches me from his resting
place in our side yard when
I come out to get the papers
in the morning. I can identify.
one particular deer because it
has three legs. I felt sorry for
it until, having finished eat-
ing our flowers, he gracefully
soared over a chest-high chain-
link fence.
We frequently have pairs
and trios of deer parading
through the cul-de-sac. They
seem to know where they're
going.
Considering the number of
deer wandering around our
area, I've only hit one once.
I was driving a big GMC
Suburban that, fortunately, has
a large, blunt front end. If I had
been driving the Taurus wagon
with its sloping front end, the
deer would have come through
the windshield and there would
have been two of us on the casu-
alty list
I've never seen deer car-
nage like the carcasses strewn
along 1-81 when my son was
going to school in northeast-
ern Pennsylvania. This was no
fluke. According to figures com-
piled by The Washington Post,
Pennsylvania leads the nation
in deer-vehicle collisions, with
102,165 doing .'S342.6 million in
damage.
The District of Columbia,
which with the exception of
some lovely parks is all city,
still managed to have .Y5X deer-
vehicle collisions at a cost of
S1.7 million.
Maybe, if Darwin is right,
one day natural selection will
weed out the deer that are poor
judges of traffic and we will have
deer that know enough not to
get in front of moving vehicles.
That however, won't save our
flowers and shrubs.
Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A








Page Editor: C J Risai 754-r427


WORLD


Obama calls


India creator


of US jobs


Trade deal could
create 54,000 new
jobs at home.
BEN FELLER
AP White HojSe Correospondr'
MIMBAI, India -
S.arching for help half a
world away, President
Barack Obama on Saturday
embraced India as the next
jobs-creating giant for
hurting Americans, not a
cheap-labor rival that out-
sources opportunity from
the United States.
Fresh off a political
trouncing at home, Obama
was determined to show tan-
gible, economic results on
his long Asia trip, and that
was apparent from almost
the moment he set foot on
a steamy afternoon in the
world's largest democracy.
By the end of the first of
his three days in India, he
was promoting $10 billion
in trade deals completed
in time for his visit that
the White House says will
create about 54,000 jobs at
home.
That's a modest gain
compared with the extent
of the enduring jobless cri-
sis in the United States.
Economists say it would
require on the level of
300,000 new jobs a month
to put a real dent in an
unemployment rate stuck


near 10 percent.
Yet to Obama, the bigger
picture was the lucrative
poJtential of an unleashed
trading relationship
between India and the
United States. He seemed
comfortable and energized
away from Washington,
days removed from the
(OP's election thumping.
"For America, this is a
jobs strategy," Obama said
of his emphasis on trade,
although it could stand as
a motto for his 10-day trip.
He is spending Sunday with
young people in Mumbai
and then heading onto
meetings in New Delhi,
the capital, before shifting
later in the week ahead to
Indonesia and economic
talks in South Korea and
Japan,
In India for the first time,
Obama quickly got a sense
of riches and poverty, his-
tory and tragedy.
His helicopter ride into
this bustling financial cen-
ter took in some of the
country's slums. His lux-
ury accommodation for
the night, the Taj Mahal
hotel, was one of the sites
of a terrorist rampage in
Mumbai that killed 166 peo-
ple. Obama and his wife,
Michelle, paid quiet trib-
ute to the 31 people slain
at the hotel, looking over
their names inscribed in a
memorial before meeting


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Activists of All India Students Federation shout slogans dur-
ing a protest against U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to
India, in Hyderabad, India, Saturday. Obama began a 10-day
trip through Asia on Saturday.


with victims' families and
survivors of the shootings.
"We visit here to send
a very clear message that
in our determination to
give our people a future
of security and prosperity,
the United States and India
stand united," Obama said
from an outdoor plaza, the
soaring Gateway of India
and the Arabian Sea behind
him. "Well never forget."
Indian commentators


seized on the president's
failure to mention Pakistan,
India's neighbor and bitter
rival. Pakistan was home to
the 10 assailants.
The president also cel-
ebrated the life of a per-
sonal hero, Mohandas K.
Gandhi, a father of Indian
independence and model
of peaceful activism. The
Obamas spent time at the
home-turned-museum
where Gandhi once lived.


Fear of volcanic ash cancels flights


SARAH DILORENZO
Associated Press
MOUNT -MERAPI,
Indonesia International
airlines fearful of volca-
nic ash canceled flights
Saturday into Indonesia's
capital, while the closure
of airports nearest Mount
Merapi has delayed the
arrival of burn cream
and ventilators for those
whose skin and lungs
were singed by searing
gases. The series of erup-
tions, including the deadli-
est in decades, has killed
138 people.
In the area's only burn
unit, one patient lies mum-
mified in thick, white ban-
dages from neck to toe, his
face a patchwork of black
and ashen splotches. He
never blinks his milky gray
eyes. The only sign of life
is the shallow rising and *
falling of his chest.
He has little company: Of
the 31 burn victims taken to
Sardjito hospital, at the foot
of the volcano, the burn
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unit has room for just nine.
Of those, only eight get a
ventilator.
With nearby airports
closed because of poor vis-
ibility, .hospital officials said
lots of supplies including
burn cream, oxygen masks
and saline solution for IVs
- were stuck in Jakarta. Dr.
Ishandono Dahlan said he
needed at least four more
ventilators to protect the
delicate, inflamed lung tis-
sue of patients from the ash
hanging in the air. In the
meantime, nursing students
were pumping emergency
respirators normally only
used in short ambulance
trips by hand.
Indonesia's most vola-
tile mountain unleashed
nearly two billion cubic
feet of gas, rocks and ash
Friday that raced down its
slopes at highway speeds,
mowing down a slope-
side village and leaving a
trail of charred corpses
in its path. Photos taken
by a disaster management
team afterward showed


bodies frozen in their
last moments, covered in
a thick charcoal-like ash.
Several showed .bodies
welded together, as moth-
ers and fathers clutched
their children.
The number of people
killed by Mount Merapi in
the last two weeks climbed
to 138, according to Sigit
Priohutomo, a senior hos-
pital official. The volcano
continued to rumble and
groan Saturday, at times
spitting ash up to five
miles in the air, dusting
windshields, rooftops and
leaves on trees hundreds
of miles away.
Just days before
President Barack Obama's
visit to Indonesia, interna-
tional carriers canceled
flights to the capital,
Jakarta, over concerns
about the volcano, 280
miles away.
"The volcanic ash pres-
ence in the airways sur-
rounding Jakarta could
cause severe damage to our
aircraft and engines which


could impair the safety
of our operations includ-
ing passengers and crew,"
said Azharuddin Osman,
director of operations for
Malaysia Airlines.


Interpol publicizes
details of bombs

PARIS Interpol
released on Saturday
details and photographs of
t'Ao Lt'.S.-bound mail bombs
intercepted by authori-
ties in Dubai and United
Kingdom, to help police
and the public look out for
such devices in the future.
The France-based inter-
national police agency said
it alerted its 188 member
countries about the devices
sent from Yemen and inter-
cepted Oct 29, "to encour-
age greater vigilance."
Interpol secretary-gener-
al Ronald K. Noble said the
move was designed to help
law enforcement agencies
"take all appropriate mea-
sures to identify potentially
lethal devices."
He said the agency decid-
ed to release the pictures of
the devices for the wider
public as well, because it
was tips from the public
that led to the arrest of the
Times Square bomb sus-
pect in the U.S. in May.
The police agency posted
a four-page warning, where
it listed a number of signs
that indicate the packages
should be treated with sus-
picion: unbalanced packag-
ing; uneven weight; exces-
sive use of sealing tape;
stains, discoloration or
other wrapping markings;
strange odors; protruding
wires; excess postage paid.

US, Australia aim
to influence China
MELBOURNE, Australia
The United States and
Australia pledged Saturday
to tighten security ties aid
work together to influence
the behavior of an increas-
ingly assertive China.
U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton and
Australian Foreign Minister
Kevin Rudd said their coun-
tries would enhance their
military and defense coop-'


ration by expanding joint
exersises and thew u-se of each
other's tra.iing facilities.
Flex ,so d agreed to
coper-ate in trying to push
China to take a more positive
approach in its backyard.
lThe couninents caune at a
joint news conference ahead
of annual talks between the
L .S. and Austrdalia set for
Monday. Joining Clinton and
Rudd will be U.S. Defense
Secretary Robert Gates and
Australian Defense Minister
Stephen Smith.
Neither Clinton nor
Rudd offered details of the
expanded defense relation-
ship. Rudd said Australia
would "welcome the United
States making greater use
of our ports and our train-
ing facilities, our test-firing
ranges. That has been the
case in decades past and
will be the case for decades
in the future."
A senior U.S. defense offi-
cials said the partnership
could include shared use
of some existing Australian
military bases.

Accused pirates
headed to trial
NORFOLK, Va. Five
Somali men accused of fir-
ing assault rifles at a Navy
ship off the coast of Africa
are set to face the first U.S.
piracy trial in more than
100 years.
The suspected pirates are
accused of shooting at the
USS Nicholas in an attempt
to plunder what they
thought was a merchant
ship. Instead, they fired on
a battle-tested, 453-foot ship
patrolling the pirate-infest-
ed waters, which shot back,
forcing the men to flee in
their small skiff, prosecu-
tors said.
The men accused in the
April 1 attack face a much
stiffer punishment if con-
victed of piracy, which car-
ries a mandatory life sen-
tence.
* Associated Press


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Page Editor: 7 sa, 54-0427

0 CT.'rcS'!'
Ca.e':za, :er .c: l Anicna
Rcc 'Ss" a: -5-ta.45 r tay
e-ra. at ar-c 's":-
_3Mec .'_'e,: Tr *.. -7


Sunday
Zumba class
Zumrba clais will be
taking five non-perishable
food itrm' instead of the
normal .5 fee from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. today at Teen
'Iown. 'The food will bx:
donated to the City of Lake
City's food drive. Contact
lakerityzumba Mgmail corn
or (all 74-;I/)7.

Monday
Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 75&8-1069.

Tuesday
Fall Love and
Remembrance Memorial
the lHaven Hospice
Love and Remembrance
Memorial is 6 p.m.
Tuesday. It is open to
anyone in the community
who has lost a loved one.
Attendees are encour-
aged to bring pictures
and mementos of loved
ones that can be placed
on the Table of Memories.
Refreshments will be
-,,- -1 p,, tr ,,tfir,;,.. :
not i equireu. Call Haven
Hospice at 386-752-9191.

Dancing lessons
Square dance lessons
are at 6:45 p.m. every
Tuesday at Teen Town.
The first two lessons are
free. Call Ouida Taylor at
386-752-1469.

Wednesday

GDDA meeting
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association is
meeting at 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday. The meeting
is sponsored by Pampered


Richard M. Arnold
Richard M. Arnold had a pas-
sion for ham radios as a kid and
he continued that passion in his
retirement years as past presi-
dent of C.A.R.S. Ham Radio
Club Lake City. Rick grew up in
Miami and had a 30 year career
with IBM. Six years ago he left
Boca Raton and retired to Lake
City with his wife Debra. He
graduated Hialeah High School
and the George T. Baker Aviation
School in 1960. In the Air Force,
Rick was assigned to the 682nd
Radar Squad in Goose Bay Lab-
rador from 1960 to 1963. Elec-
tronics and -
radios always
fascinated
him. lie could
lix radios.
ers and en-
to.ed an% kind
of electronic
tinkering. Rick's most recent
hobby %as buying old ham radios
on --Ba-y from the 40's-60 and
restoring them. Rick passed away
November 2nd at Haven Hospice
from complications from diabe-
tes that led to liver failure. Good
friends like Charlie Flanagan will
miss him. as ,will his surviving
family members, including his
wilfe of 25 years Debra Arnold.
his sister. Kay Stelling of Or-
lando. his brothers and his son
Alan Arnold and family; Amy.
Cod\. TonN. Brandon and Haleyv.


Chef. There will be appe-
tizers and demonstrations
and a presentation on
-Cooking Healthy while
Saving Time and Money."
The meeting is a fundrais-
er to benefit our commu-
nity service and outreach
activities. Attendees can
receive 1 CEL'. Visit wuu:w
eatrightgainesville.org.

Newcomers monthly
meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake
City Newcomers Club
is 11 a.m. Wednesday at
Guangdong Restaurant
in Lake City Mall. The
program is arts, crafts
and collectibles. The lun-
cheon is $10. All members,
guests and newcomers to
the area are welcome. Call
961-9335.

Thursday
Medicaid planning
workshop
A workshop on the truth
about Medicaid planning
"Myths and Opportunities"
is 10 a.m. Nov. 18 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. It is presented by
Teresa Byrd Morgan of
the Morgan Law Center.
Reserve a seat by Thursday.
Call Shana at 386 -755-1977.

DAR monthly meeting
The Edward Rutledge
DAR Chapter's monthly
meeting is 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at Guangdong
Chinese Restaurant in
the Lake City Mall. The
program topic is "Early
Childhood Toys in your
Attic," which will feature
a slide presentation of
early childhood toys
from the DAR Museum
in Washington, D.C.
The guest speaker is
Beverly Gentry, DAR
Correspondent Docent.
She will be bringing a dis-
play of toys dating back
to the Revolutionary War.
Guests are welcome to
the meeting. Guests and
members are encouraged
to bring their favorite child-
hood toy or a reproduction.


from Elcho Wisconsin, as well
as his many nieces and nephews.
Family and friends Memo-
rial service will be held at Lake
City Baptist Temple, 361 SW
State Road 47, Lake City at
11:00 am Wednesday Novem-
ber 10th. In lieu of flowers do-
nations may be made in Rick
Arnold's name to Haven Hos-
pice-6037 US Hwy W, Lake
City 32055. Condolences can
be sent to ramold366@aol.com

Earl Sheppard

Mr. Earl Sheppard passed
away in the VA Medi-
cal Center, Miami, Florida.
Funeral Services will be Tues-
day. November 9. 2010, 11:00
A.M. at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church. 901 NE Da-
vis Street, Lake City, Florida.
The -family will receive
friends Monday, November 8,
2010 from 6:00 8:00 P.M.
at Combs Funeral Home.
Full obituary will be published
Tuesday. November 9. 2010.
Arrangements entrusted to
Combs Funeral Home, 292
NE Washington Street. Lake
City. Florida. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals."
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


"meeting is a
Nov. 13 Rich
Communitun


H Keath fair


JASO- MATTHEW WAL KER : e-. = -

Showing how things were done

Sharlene Lane. of Green Cove Springs, hand weaves a shawl
on a triangle loom. which is the same way residents during
the 1830s did it.


Landlord's meeting
The next landlord's
meeting is 6 p.m.
Thursday at Lake Shore
Hospital Conference
Room. All realtors, manag-
ers and landlords are wel-
come. Call 755-0110.

Garden Club meeting
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its monthly
meeting 10 a.m. Thursday
at the Woman's Club. The
program will be "Making
Contrived Flowers" by
Martha Ann Ronsonet.
Visitors are welcome.

Friends of Music
The Max Brod Trio per-
forms 7:30 p.m. Thursday
at First Presbyterian
Church, 697 SW Baya
Drive. The event is part
of the Friends of Music
Annual Concert Series.
The concert is free.

March of Dimes
Signature Chefs Auction
The March of Dimes
and Mercantile Bank are
presenting "Signature
Chefs Auction" 5:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Banquet Hall. There will
be live and silent auc-
tions with pre-decorated
Christmas trees, and live
entertainment by "Harry,
Sally, and Billy." Tickets
are sold at all Mercantile
Bank offices, Rountree
Moore Toyota and Ward's
Jewelers and First Street
Music.


Dulcimer Retreat
The Stephen Foster
State Park Dulcimer
Retreat is Nov. 12-13
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park. Concerts featur-
ing instructors from the
workshops are 7 p.m.
each night in the park
auditorium. The event
includes workshops,
jam sessions and more.
Dulcimer master David
Beede hosts the retreat.
Tickets for public admis-
sion are $10. Admission
to the two-day event is
$85, which includes all
workshops, jam sessions,
concerts and discus-
sion groups. Visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/
stephenfoster/Events. cfm.
Call (386) 397-7009 or toll
free 1-877-635-3655.

Friday
Anne of Avonlea
Performances of the
Live Oak Theatre's "Anne
of Avonlea, The Musical"
are 8 p.m. Nov. 12-13 and
20 and 2 p.m. Nov. 21
at Weeki Wachee High
School auditorium, 12150
Vespa Way, Weeki Wachee.
All seats are only $15 and
an optional dessert bar is
available for only $5. Go
to www.LiveOakTheatre.
org or call the box office at
352-593-0027.

Saturday
RHS Alumni meeting
The next RHS Alumni


I .0 O5% APY*
lff-2v15month CD


John A Kasak CLU CPCU
State Fa-- L"e-
Lake Co, FL 32325
B.s 386-752-75'
ohr

Limited time offer.
Hurry in for a great rate on our
featured Certificate of Deposit
through State Farm BankV.
Bank with a good neighbor'.
CALL ME TODAY FOR
MORE INFORMATION.






F D^Ml*


'Annual Percentage Yieids as of 11/03/10. Aer" se: rates subject to change at the
Bank's discretion The m'ini'm balance reqred tc ear the stated APY is $500 (rates
apply to deoosts !ess ta S' !00,000) A penalty -i De imposed for withdrawals poor
to maturity Ce-tfcaes act -att.al!l- renew at r-a'-ty at te thte-enrei rate fcr
the next longer starea'd term Swme product ar. ser.-ces not ava laWe in a", areas.
' xiza7 i':_:. -5 -5.-. ;-;: .- .X MM,


t 12 p.m.
tardson
Center. Call


A Diabetes Health Fair
is li a.nm.-2 p.m. Saturday
at Lake City Mall. There
will be many booths with
diabetes education avail-
able. Contact Michelle
Mattox at Randolph
Medical Practices at 386-
755-1440.

Veterans event
The United Daughters
of the Confederacy will
host a special event hon-
oring veterans for their
service and sacrifice 10
a-m.-2 p.m. Nov. 13 at
Olustee Battlefield Historic
State Park.

Sunday, Nov. 14
Plow and Family Day
Old Fashioned Plow
and Family Day is 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 14 at Tice
Farms. The farm is located
at 2145 SW Tustenuggee


I -.


Avenue Activities include
plowing. horse and mule
exhibitions,. agon rides.
petting zoo. bugg'I rides.
chicken pilau diinnrs ;udn
nore. Proceeds benefit
the Chiuices for Children
Christmas Progrm. H Bring
an unwrapped new gift
for a child. For event or
dinner tickets call 386-623-
4732 or 623-7760. For team
participation call 386-754-
0959.

Monday, Nov. 15
Hospice of the Nature
Coast
Hospice of the Nature
Coast is searching for
individuals who uare inter-
ested in volunteering
in the Columbia county
area. Ilere will be a
Volunteer Orientation
Training Opportunity
9:3(0-11 :3t0 a.m. Monday,
Nov. 15 at the Columbia
County Libnury, 308 N.
Columbia Ave. Call Ronnie
Richardson, Volunteer
Services manager at 386-
935-4520 for more informa-
tion.


F: '*:~


Dana Andrew Helton, Jr
"Andrew" "Drew" "Bubba"
Whatever you may have called him, he was wonderful.
We just want to Thank everyone for the special things
each one of you did to help us with Drew's Homegoing.
Just to name a few because there are so many...
Bro. Larry & Ms. Sandra Carl & Rose
Debbie & Jason Evans Our church Family
at Berea Baptist *The Family at Living Springs
Drew's precious Friends that played his music.
*And each and every one of you that has been there.
As hard as it is to let him go, we can be assured
that he is with the Father and enjoying his new
body in Christ.
Most of all we would like to thank you for sharing
in the life of such A very special person


NMic Pu1tl, MD


SSpecial Interests Include:
Preventive Care/ Physicals
Geriatric Care
*Women's Health
Diabetes Management
E~hbdh -Khy- Most appointments in 24 hours
- n. ARNP Most Insurances accepted


CAMO FOR ADULTS

& CHILDREN


BRo NI SItTS



W. a 514.OES FIW"1LOAS


OBITUARIES


REGULAR MEETING
LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
BOARD OF TRUSTEES

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of the Lake Shore Hospital Authorit- ,ill hold their
Regular Meeting on Monday, November 8, 2010 at 5:15 pm at the LSHA Administratixe Complex. Conference
Room. 25;) NE Franklin Street, Lake City. Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to take action on regular
business. All interested persons are invited to attend.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or sen tices for the .mee:ine identified ahoxe. as addressed
in the American Disabilities Act, please contact Sue Fraze at O3sX) --1i'9,.

KOB B ADA MIS
Chairman


FIREPLACE MAKEOVER
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LAKE CITY REPO-EP ADVERTISEMENT


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Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
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Friday 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.

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8A LArKE C' -RE -.- NATION & WORLD ', ',- C.E-.:E 20'0


Drug cartels disrupt basic services in Mexico


Killings and
disappearances
plague country.
MARK STEVENSON
A ttso ,'.. r C ,, "*
MEXICO clnY U iI -
Perm -x 'orker-, 'A-rlt to
their job-. at a gv-errmi-ret-
owrr-d gas oiipre-'--in
plant near the l- xa bor-
d#-r -ix uiionthi- ago and
nr-vi-r returned. Ma-,k,-d
fi1rn, appar-ently rn-mbinb rs
of a drug (art-l 'o,, -rating
there, had warnf-d e-mploy-
ecs of Petroleos Mexicanos
that the-y w-re no longer
allowed to enter the area.
Around the -,ame- time in
May, three inspectors for
the Mexican Environment
Department headed into the
wooded mountains west of
Mexico City to investigate


a pAiution complaint Their
tortured bodies were found
the next day. Authorities
said they stumbled onto a
drug lab.
With killings and disap-
peoarances to assert their
authority, Mexico's drug
cartels are beginning to
interfere with everyday
government activities in
pockets of the country,
keeping workers off their
turf and interrupting some
of the most basic services.
Not only do they maintain
checkpoints and kill police
or mayors to control terri-
tory, they now try to keep
everyone from midlevel
officials to delivery truck
drivers and meter readers
out of rural areas they use
to transport drugs, stash
weapons and kidnap vic-
tims, and hide from author-
ities. In the process, they


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A gas static, s srow,- cr te side of the highway from Saltillo
"to Monterrey !.ex:c With .' ,ngs and disappearances to
assert their autnon:y Mexico s drug cartels are beginning to
interfere with everyday government activities in pockets of the
country. keeping workers off their turf and interrupting some
of the most basic services.


are blocking deliveries of
gasoline, pension checks.
farm aid and other services
to Mexicans.
Cartels also rob or extort
people receiving govern-


ment checks, as organized
crime branches out from
drug running into other
illegal businesses.
These interruptions have
even affected the U.S., as


agricultural inspections at
the border have slowed.
The recent search for the
body of a missing American
tourist on a border lake
% a., suspended under
:hreats of drug-cartel vio-
lence and the assassination
of the police commander in
charge of the search.
"Everything's stopped."
said Maria Luz Hopkins.
a 69-year-old retiree in
Tubutama, south of the
Arizona border city of
Nogales. MThere's no con-
struction. Nobody is work-
ing the fields because they
don't have gasoline or die-
sel. The people that used to
bring gasoline, they don't
come. How can people
work?"
Hopkins complained to
officials in the Sonora state
capitol, Hermosillo, when
the government stopped


delivering pension checks
She said they came last
month in a convoy of about
2u heavily armed trucks
after missing a binmonthl.
payment over the summer.
Federal officials say these
are isolated incidents. and
deny there is any area of
the country where the gov-
ernment can't operate: as
evidence, they point to the
2009 congressional elec-
tions and the 2010 census.
"There might have been
incidents, but this doesn't
mean that government
business is stopping any-
place in the country," said
federal security spokesman
Alejandro Poire, while add-
ing, "If and when it hap-
pens, federal forces, if need
be. will be there to enforce
the law and keep govern-
ment business operating
normally."


Textbook rentals

no cure for rising

costs of college


CRISTIAN SALAZAR
Associated Press
NEW YORK-Textbook
rental programs at many
of the nation's colleges
touted as money-savers
for students are limited
by the number of avail-
able titles, publishers who
release frequent new edi-
tions and professors who
believe their right to'choose
course materials is essen-
tial to academic freedom.
About half the nation's
:major college and univer-
,sity bookstores offered
textbook rentals this fall,
according to the National
Association of College
Stores, hoping to cut the
-600-$900 students spend
:buying books each year.
-That's roughly a fivefold


increase from around 300
stores a year ago.
But schools and publish-
ing experts say the pro-
grams are expensive to
start up and difficult to
operate. In addition, there
are complaints that rental
prices are still too high,
even though they can be as
much as half the cost of a
new book.
Federal lawmakers,
increasingly concerned
that textbook costs create a
barrier to affordable higher
education, have endorsed
a pilot program for rent-
als. Twelve schools were
awarded up to $1 million
each this fall under a con-
gressionally mandated U.S.
Department of Education
program this fall to create
rental programs.


New Lower Rates.



STILL NO FEES.



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FOR 24 MONTHS FOR 60 MONTHS


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\ car loan. Just come to VyStar. With rates as low as 2.49% APR*
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JACKSONVILLE AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES 904-777-6000
OUTSIDE OFJACKSONVILLE 1-800-445-6289

GAINESVILLE 352-372-1645 LAKE CITY 386-719-6767
PALATKA 386-328-3303 PALM COAST 386-445-7079 STARKE 904-368-9955


VYSTAR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN TO ALL PEOPLE WHO LIVE OR WORK IN THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES:
ALachua Baker -Bradford C.ay Columbia Duvat FRagter Gichnst Hamilton Ley Putnam Marion Nassau SL Johns Suwannee Union Votusia
........................................................?..................................


NOTICE
This notification is addressed to any
former patients of the deceased Dr.
Owen B.K. Osborne of Ramadan Hand
Institute. If you were a patient being

treated at the Lake City, Gainesville,
Palatka or Lake Butler location and
you need a copy of your medical re-
cord, you may contact the office staff
at 386-496-2461 Monday thru Friday,
8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m. for assistance.





Page Editor: C R sa., 754-0C2-





LAKE Ci rEPORTER ADVERTISEMENTS s5.A,. s.CVE -. : 9

Grace Harbor Minishies
Would like to thank all thoCe involved in making the

HALLELUJAH


FESTiVAL
The grest ever 1 1
The greatest ever Tn2010!


May everyone that donated, worked, prayed,
encouraged, sang, signed, danced, and gave a smile
be abundantly blessed. Thank you tO each one that
attended andilM:at d i p provided.

We would like towffer speal invitaion to all those
looking to renltheir fg In Christ be our guest at
Grace Harbo Mi st accept dand love are
primary attr s. ofoura-vior.- Come and experience
the joy of w ding new
purpose in e li waiting or you!
SatrDerely,
Si Pastor Dawn Johns


SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE 1 0:30 A.N
SUNDAY EVEN C WORSHIP SERVICE 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAYPRAYER AND PRAISE 6:30 P.M.

Grate Harbor Ministries
Country b Plaza (next to ubway)
168.E Baya Dr, Sui t101
"A-.0t -I ke City, FL 3202
*"


I .


,Come nto me, all that labor and are heavy laden,
Sand I will give you rest.
Matthew 11:28 '
"- * ^ * * ' ^ ''*" "*!^ l O :O M


-s'












w, WIATHER .-c- -. =-


Page Editor: ;- T; ares 754-'-2-.


THE WEATHER





) SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


HI 65Lo 172LO- H177DL
^.^ ___ __i- -W- i


-J r.J


%ATIONAL FORECAST: =. 3-: -e e e "e - ",,,r>',es5
*' -e- -L -. -t b 4 -' L :-_ *e "e r ,-e : s 4 '~."e >r s s.

!~~4


SUNNY




HI 79LO


MOS.Y
. SUNY



! LD


il 5 .-7 i.i '.4


LA*I'


4l *


63/42


*,


63/43 ..i. i
7



69/50


63/17


t^5;


FL*
FL~t. r


Key West
I' ",3 1


City
Cape Canaverm
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville


Jacksonvtlle
SCap Key West
do Ca /5 C~ Lake Cfty
Miami
Naples
West Pa Bead Ocala
74/63 Ortando
Ft LaWdrdak Panama City
73/66 0 Pensacola


Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta


Mo-na. Tuei.O-J






. -- s ..




1 --'9's 7.' 5 1


2 36 77
75 575 796(


W Palm Beach


-~ **


W0s


it 744


a.


140s



S.. 4 50s

Atimeb
*-i l3 -3
'!-< ~ g ^ -


Oranedo
* 6950

7414


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Cod Fwt

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r 3-T
wLIJL


.0*- w~..a. .~i~at. .~v'-r t.C..S* A. ;--Ab' ~. a.. 4...Th


ISTERDAYS Nm IOAL REMEES

Saturday Today


High: 88. Mesa. Aiz. Low: 12, Raco. Mich.


Saturday Today


Saturday Today


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to date
Normal year-to-date


61
38
77
53
89 in 1935
31 in 1976


0.00"
0.37"
38.79"
0.42"
44.05"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


6:49 a.m.
5:39 p.m.
6:50 a.m.
5:38 p.m.


8:24 am.
6:49 p.m.
9:25 a.m.
7:46 p.m.


Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec.
13 21 28 5
First Full Last New


MOO .

T .. ,:,l, .
?r : ,i t .r, -
l,:,r irfi:. y':--j ,:,r, *

uo l ,

Seatliei romrr

S Forecasts, data and graph-
S Ics 2010 Weather Central
SLLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Alban Y 44/320
Albuqeque 66 *0 0
Anche p 34/32 01
Atlant 50 -3 0
Baltimre 53/37 ,0
Billing 62 48 0
Birmlnkam 52 30/0
BIsmark 72/30 0
Boise 57/46/0
Boston 48, 45 0
Buffalo 40/34/0
Charieson SC 59137 0
Chademn WV 44/30/.33
Charotb 54/36/0
Cheyene 11/36/0
Chicagc 45/25/0
Cincinnd 44/28/0
Clevelart 41/35/0
ColumblWSC 55/35/0
dallas 64/38,/0
Daytona each 62/41/0
Denver 76/49/L


I,,


On this date in
1996, rare southerly
winds over Hawaii
blocked the north-
easterly trade winds
and allowed humid
air to move across
the state from the
south, triggering
heavy rain.


ktComec~dI


CITY
Acapulc-
Amsterdm
Athens
Aucklan
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos$lres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kng
SKingsto


Saturday Today
HI Lo Pcp. H Lo W
:2 0 &, 74 4
1. J'; JE 7: :r
7i4,4 0 ; 4,;59,
63/54/0 66/53/s
64/36/0 62/33/pc
50/39/0 44/37/pc
84/54/0 88/55/s
82/66/0 79/62/s
63/41/0 49/40/r
72/68/0 78/61/pc
39/28/.04 37/32/sh
70/63/1.28 81/68/s
t81 P rff- -~ t7~p.


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI Lo'Pcp.
63 36 0
r.F. .q 1 .,
54, 45, .30
66/43/0
. 68/28/0
41/30/.04
39/34/.02
77/61/.08
77/70/0
70/70/0
39/27/0
88/77/ 70
59/50/.30


Today
HI Lo W
63 36 u

46, 40, srh
58/41/pc
68/40/s
42/28/pc
40/33/sh
77/59/t
79/70/sh
86/63/s
34/23/s
85/75/t
48/39/sn


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI La Pcp.


86/77/.38
88/54/0
61/46/0
90/75/.87
64/57/0
86/64/0
64/52/0
41/30/0
66/46/0
52/45/.81


,- KEYTO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, r-drizzfe, f-fair, fp-f y h-hay ,-ice, pc-partly cloudy. r=rain, s-sunny.
sh-showers, sn-snow, ": r ,-.,-,-i..,.T:, w-w indy.


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EQUALS


Membership Isop4n to4everone in Alachua, Clay, ColumbiaBLake Marionan Sumer counies!"


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51, 34/s
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61/33 s
66 35 s
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58 37 s
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73/51/s
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CITY
Des Mohes
Detroit
8 Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapols
Jackson MS
Jackkonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
57, 29/0
43 26 0
71/38/0
930
52/38/0
51 311()
82/74/0
68 40 0
45/27/0
60 31/0
59/34/0
61/31/0
76/58/0
59/30/0
70/62/0
56/32/0
67/54/0
56/31/0
60/34/0
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58/35/s
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63/35/s
66/43/s
50/39/s
75/49/s


CITY
Omaha
Orando
PtladelpNa
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.

, i 46 ).
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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, November 7, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS Pl
.ATORS
Grill Gamecocks Iort \'
on Thursday second(
*I- \rd Floria jpplavol
; i fi(, ll .t (,an i-oE-:' By TIM KIF
-ocial at ) ap.f. IL ur day .,t,3
;it th- hioni- ot Mik f arnd
-rri '.! on statl F (ORT '
Road 17. utev.e Rus-ll their tear
of WRI ;t radio is guest put the In
i-p-ak--r and the club will playoffs.
pr lawn chair. All Gator fans its spot
ar- invited. with a 27-.
IFor details,. :1l Mike Bradford
at 75-.104098 STniior Ni1
Fort WV1
Packages for gaim, thr,
and built
football games yards in
"Journey to the Bradford
Swaip" is a (Columbia
( county Tourist
)ev(-lopielnt Council
initiative with l.iak City
Holiday Inn & Suites and
I'abllouhs Coach lines A
to provide
transportation from l.ake
City to the Florida game
against South Carolina
on Saturday. holiday Inn
is offering a two i ,hii
package, and Fabulous
Coach Lines will provide
motor coach
transportation. L-ocal fans
can take advantage of the
transportation.
For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or call
the Holiday Inn at
754-1411.

ADULT BASKETBAU1.
Men's games at
Richardson
Open basketball games
S. . . I t) .. 1 _i. . .


lor men 10 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call John
lHenry Young Jr. at
623 1-.17 or Mario
Coppock at 754-'. i',".
From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Tuesday
Columbia High
bowling in FHSAA Finals
at Boardwalk Bowl in
Orlando, 8 a.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Fort White
High at CYSA fields,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Ridgeview
High. 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Wednesday
Columbia High
bowling in FHSAA Finals
at P..:, -r..-i., ,ii Bowl in
Orlando. 8:30 a.m.
Columbia High High
JV girls soccer vs. Fort
White High at CYSA
fields. 5 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
boys soccer at -3ar;i'.',n
County High, 6 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee
High at CYSA fields.
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Fleming Island
High at CYSA fields.
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High
fo .~ vs. Suwannee
High. 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
".:.'r-i at Santa Fe H -.
7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. St. Francis
C r:*,i. High. 10 a.m.
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Williston High.
2 p.m.


ayoff bound


rhite takes
d 2-2B
I Spot.
RBY

WHITE Having
nmate s back has
dians back in the
white High secured
n the state field
22 home win over
High on Friday's
lght.
white controlled the
ough 2. quarters
a 14-0 lead. Thirty
penalties helped
get on the board


lat,- in '. hired quarter.
1i' T,4rna :--, -'or(-d two
to'uciido'Ans and a saf-ty in
the: fourth quarter to keep
it clos-e.
"The defense came out
and dominated and the
offense did its thing.-
Indians head coach
Demetric Jackson said. "We
have -611 got to shore some
things up."
One constant was the
running of JR Dixon, who
had his third -' -plus game
in four outings. He finished
with 204 yards on 27 car-
ries and scored four touch-
downs. Dixon has 14 touch-
downs on the season, 12
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKERL..Ie C R;*v-
Fort White quarterback Andrew Baker (12) attempts to cut in front of Bradford High's Xavier
Riles (10) in order to gain more yards on a quarterback keeper.


s Tigers


lII- Americans edged

out


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Colleen Heeney (right) and Timmy Jernigan (middle) answer questions from reporters at Friday's
announcement that both students were selected to participate in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl in San Antonio, Texas on
Jan. 8.

CHS students earn national honor


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@ilakecityreporter.com
C ome January two
students from Columbia
High will take the
national stage. Timmy
Jernigan and Colleen
Heeney were selected to be part of
the U.S. Army All-American Bowl in
San Antonio, Texas
Jernigan is one of the nation's
top-rated defensive tackles and was
selected to take part in the game,
while Heeney was selected as a
member of the marching band for
the game. She will take part as part
of the color guard.
Jernigan was selected by the U.S.
Army All-American Bowl Selection
Committee. which consists of
All American Games' network of
regional directors, Rirals.com and


Tom Lemming. He joins the likes
of Adrian Peterson, Tim Tebow and
Percy Harvin as players to compete
in the game.
Heeney will join the U.S. Army
All-American Marching Band,
which recognizes the top 125 high
school senior marching musicians
and color guard members from
throughout the country.
The game takes place at 1 p.m.
Jan. 8 and will be televised on NBC.
Columbia will be one of only
three high schools throughout the
nation with both a football player
and a marching band member in the
game.
"To me this means everything,"
Jernigan said at the presentation on
Friday. "I was more excited for this
than my birthday. It was like the
night before Christmas as a little kid
when you can't go to sleep. I had to


write a speech, and I've never given
a speech before. I'm just so thankful
and humbled. I get to go represent
Columbia County, because this
isn't just for me. It's for the people
around me."
Heeney was equally excited to be
a part of the special event.
"It was like wow," she said.
"For me to be selected as one of
only 24 color guard members was
just amazing. I hope that I make
everyone proud and boost the
involvement in band in general.
Everyone knows what football is,
but it's just as much of an honor for
me to go as Timmy."
Both received amazing reviews
from their coach and band director.
"She's a go-getter," Columbia
High band director Ryan Schulz


Ridgeview's win
eliminates CHS
from playoffs.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

One point was enough
to keep Columbia High out
of the playoffs. Despite a
29-12 victory against
Wolfson High on Friday, the
Tigers fell out of the runner-
up position in District 4-4A
as Ridgeview High defeated
Lee High, 21-20.
"It's funny that the play-
offs can come down to one
point, but that's what hap-
pens when you're not in
control," Columbia coach
Craig Howard said.
Despite being out of the
playoffs, the Tigers played
their best ball in a month
during Friday's convincing
win. Columbia's defense
didn't allow a point, held the
Wolfpack to minus-1 yards
in the first half, forced six
turnovers and recorded a
safety on special teams.
"The entire squad just
played our philosophy of
football," Howard said. "We
were an ala, kini. swarm-
ing defense. Everyone was
swarming to the ball."
Columbia gave up 12
points, but both came off
fluke-ish offensive plays.
Wolfson's first score came
on the second play of the
game as a NiM.-1 Atkinson
pass was ruled a lateral
and Darrin McPhereson
returned it 56 yards for a
score. In the second half,


ALL-AMERICANS continued on 3B CHS continued on 2B


BRANDON FINLEY'-_,-' e-r-
Members of 1 t0-11' Columbta H'g" soccer eam are :'.- ro.', fr et Ccd : + N < Swacp Dy an Sess ons. Dakota Waters. C.J, McRae
Cameron h ,i and Bryce '. Secor-c row, from eft, are Snane Hanoc. Ccc e -a Ty.e Rx/ Grysco Housc. Josh Davis. Kyle Katona. Caleb Hill
and C;:- Marvin Back row rom eft a-e -ead oacr: Tre.cr Tyier cach Brpa Ca e: immy B ake!y. Hunter Grow. Nick Tuttle,
Drew Waler. Conner.'.' -- Ky e Dcc.e. manager Tras Berry manarage s ~"'. a coa- TO~ dd Luss'er Story on 3B


- - - -- - --i


`~' j''~II~___,_











SPORTS SDAY O.'.'BER 22 P


SCOREBOARD


INDIANS: Dixon runs wild on Bradford

Continued From Page 1B


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
10-O anm.
SPEED Fwr-'..a O Z0aii.r-,
GraSnd Prr. .at Sa Pan
3 pssm.
E5PN NASCAA. Srint Cr. TrA
soo,a Fort Worth. Texas

4.30 p.m.
TGC Oc ampns Tour, Che-.
Sd"wab Cup Cha nprs p. ra ir
at Swi FraniKsco
MOTORSPORTS
a .m.
SPEED MotoGP Wrij
Championship,. xValr S p-m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2. Vane Grand Prx. at Vakenca. Spain mfsam-,ay
tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
Ip.m.i
CBS Rgional coverage

4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
*:Is p.m.
NBC Dallas at Green Bay
RUNNING
2 p.m.
NBC New York City Marathon
(-un-day tape)
SOCCER
I p.m.
FSN Big 12 Conference.
championship match, at San Antonio
9 p.m.
ESPN MLS. playoffs, conference
semifinals, second le. Seattle at Los
Angeles

Monday
BOXING
I p.m.
ESPN2 Super bantamweight.
Rico Ramos (17-0-0) vs. Henberto Runz
(44-9.2), at Jacksonville. N.C.
NFL FOOTBALL
:30 p.m.
ESPN Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Phoenix at Detroit

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
N.Y. jets
Miami
Buffalo


Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
Cincinnati


Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


N.Y
Phil;
Was
Dall


Ada
Tam
N'.
Car


East
W L
6 I
5 2
4 3
0 7
South
W L
5 2
5 3
4 3
4 4
North
W L
5 2
5 2
2 5
2 5
West
W L
5 2
4 4
3 5
2 6


T Pct PF PA
0.857 205 154
0.714 159 110
0.571 133 149
0.000131 211

T Pct PF PA
0.714 193 142
0.625224 150
0.571 170 197
0.500 165 226

TPct PF PA
0.714 149 129
0.714147 102
0.286118 142
0.286146 163

T Pct PF PA
0.714 163 122
0.500212 168
0.375210 174
0.250 154 223


PA
53
57
70
87

PA
33
63
48
50


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF I
.Glants 5 2 0.714 175 I
adelphia 4 3 0.571 172 1
shington 4 4 0.500 155 1
as I 6 0.143 154 1
South
W L TPct PF I
anta 5 2 0.714 169 1
pa Bay 5 2 0.714 136 1
w Orleans 5 3 0.625 167 1
olina 1 6 0.143 85 I
North


Green Bay
Chk ago
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona
San Francisco


W L
5 3
4 3
2 5
2 5
West
W L
4 3
4 4
3 4
2 6


TPct PF PA
0.625 176 136
0.571 126 114
0.286129 144
0.286 183 165

T Pct PF PA
0.571 123 140
0.500 140 141
0.429 133 198
0.250137 178


Today's Games
Chkiago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p m
N Y.Jet at Detrot. I p.m
Miami at Baltimore. I pm.
San Diego at Houston. I p m
Tampa Bay at Atlanta. I p.m
New Orleans at Carolina. I p m.
New England at Cleveland. I p.m.
Arzona at Minnesota. I p.m.



BRIEFS

TRAINING

Outer Extreme

class offered

Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department is
offering Outer Extreme,
a high intensity, full-body
workout using a combina-
tion of training techniques.
Classes are 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday outside of Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Instructors are Tara Black.
Nikki Griswold and Alesha
Waller. Cost is $5 per class
or $45 per month.
For details, call Black at
(386) 697-3947 or Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.


* From staff reports


Monday's G amne



Thursday's Gan*
&aafr-e -t At Am Wt. 6 2.' : r-
Sundy, Nov. 14
Ft.rrv-esc'a at Okca&c. I p r
Ter-eise.e at Miami. I pm
Detrort at Buffalo. I p
Hoston at Jacksonvil. I pm
Y ;eWsa Clevetand. p m
C rcmrwi at Indsanapois. pm
C Aroira at Tampa Bay, I p m
K.asa-s Cty at Denver. 405 p m
D-ias at N Y Gants. 4 15 pm
St Lc.%.s at San Fran m o.4 15 p m
Seatrie atAnrzona. 4 1 S pm
New Entand at Pttsburglh. 8 20 p m
Monday, Nov. 15
Ph.adelpha nWWashinon.8:30 p.m

College scores

Friday
C. Michigan 26,W Michigan 22
UCF 40, Houston 33

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
AAA Texas 500
Site Fort Worth.Texas
Schedule Today, race, 3 pm. (ESPN.
2-7 pm)
Track Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
I 5 miles)
Race distance: 501 miles. 334 laps
FORMULA ONE
Brazilian Grand Prix
Site" Sao Paulo. Brazil.
Schedule Today, race, 11I am. (Speed,
1030-1 pm).
Track: Interlagos, Autodromo Jose
Carlos Pace (road course, 2.677 miles).
Race distance: 190.08 miles. 71 laps.

Texas 500 qualifying

At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth,Texas
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 195.397.
2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 193.653.
3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 193.646.
4. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
193.479.
5. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 193.424.
6.(2) Kurt Busch. Dodge, 193.375.
7. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet.
193.32.
8. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
193.216.
9. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet.
193.175.
10. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford.
193.092.
11. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
193.078.
12. (98). Paul Menard, Ford, 192.775.
13. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford. 192.603.
14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
192.369.
15. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
191.993.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
191.986.
17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
191.939.
18. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
191.891.
19. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 191.884.
20. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 191.768.
21. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
191.748.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet.
191.741.
23 (82) Scott Speed.Toyota. 191.673.
24. (83) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 191.598.
25. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet.
191.564.
26. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.
191.557.
27. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
191.53.
28. (21) Trevor Bayne. Ford, 191.09.
29. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota. 191.056.
30. (I I) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
190.968.
31. (10) Bobby Labonte. Chevrolet,
190.846.
32. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
190.833.
33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 190.201.
34 (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota.
190.121.
35. (13) Casey Mears.Toyota, 189.72.
36 (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge.
189 633.
37 (26) Patrick Carpentier. Ford.,
189 255.
38 (66) Mike Bliss.Toyota, 189.201.
39. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota.
188.851.
40 (71) Andy Lally. Chevrolet, Owner
Points
41 (34) Travis Kvapil. Ford. Owner




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square.
to form four ordinary words.

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BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
M,Oauke 94. Irdm.a 9r0
Orlandc 105. New Jersey 90
Cleveland 123. Philad pha 116
Detroit 97. Charlot 90
New York 112. Washington91
Atlana 113. Min-soa 103
New Orleans 96. Marrn 93
Boston I 10, Chicago 105.OT
Phoenix 123. Memphes I8.20T`
Golden State 85. Utah 78
LA. Lakers 108.Toronto 103
Denver III.LA Clippers 104
Saturday's Games
Orlando at Charlotte (n)
Cleveland at Washington (n)
New Jersey at Miami (n)
New Orleans at Milwaukee (n)
Houston at San Antonio (n)
LA. Clippers at Utah (n)
Denver at Dallas (n)
Toronto at Portland (n)
Memphis at Sacramento (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at New York 12 p.m.
Phoenix at Atlanta 5 p.m.
Golden State at Detroit. 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m.
Boston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Portland at LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Antonio at Charlotte. 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Orlando. 7 p.m.
Golden State at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Denver at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. Princeton, 5 p.m.
No. 10 Syracuse vs. Canisius, 3 p.r
No. 12 Gonzaga vs. IUPUI,4 p.m.
No. 14 Purdue vs. Howard, 5 p.m.
No. 22 Temple vs.Toledo, 3 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3, New Jersey 0
Washington 5, Boston 3
Montreal 3. Buffalo 2
Florida 7, Carolina 4
Minnesota 2, Calgary I
Dallas 6. Phoenix 3
Detroit 3, Edmonton I
Anaheim 3, Pittsburgh 2
Saturday's Games
St. Louis at Boston (n)
Buffalo at Toronto (n)
Ottawa at Montreal (n)
Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Florida at Carolina (n) *
Chicago at Atlanta (n)
Minnesota at Columbus (n)
Dallas at Colorado (n)
Pittsburgh at Phoenix (n)
Nashville at Los Angeles (n)
Detroit at Vancouver (n)
Tampa Bay at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia atWashington, 5 p.m.
St. Louis at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago. 7 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Game
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS playoffs

Semifinals
EASTERN CONFERENCE
New York I, San Jose I. San
advanced on aggregate 3-2
Columbus vs. Colorado
Colorado I, Columbus 0
Saturday
Columbus vs. Colorado (n)
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas
FC Dallas 2, Real Salt Lake I
Saturday
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas (n)
Los Angeles vs. Seattle
Los Angeles I. Seattle 0
Today
Los Angeles vs Seattle, 9 pm.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAl
by Mike Argiron and Jeff Knu


HE 'y *. _, 1"
A: W AS
(Arnswe's :ornc-row)
Saturday Jumbles: VALVE SNORT BUCKLE ORPHAN
I Answer What the slorekeeoer wanted for a keg o'
beer CASH ON THE BARREL


since fellow running back
Alexis Blake went out with
an injury.
Bradford held Dixon to
5o yards in the first half.
which is when quarterback
Andrew Baker picked up
the slack- Calling his num-
ber for the most times this
season. Baker rushed for
77 yards with 49 coming
in the first half when the
Tornadoes were geared up
to stop Dixon.
'The main idea is to get
it to the running back. but
I was able to fake it and
get outside and run," Baker
said. "When we have got a
good play called and good
timing, I can pull it when
I need to and get yards.
And don't forget about the
offensive line."
The O-line took a hit
when center Jonathan
Dupree went down early
in the second quarter. He
was not able to return to
the game, but expects to be
back this week. .
"It felt like a whole bunch
of blood just rushed to my
foot," Dupree said. "It's a
high ankle sprain and I
should be back by Monday.
I knew my players would
get my back."
Zack Bentley moved to
center from right tackle


and the Indians kept grind-
ing. Dixon had runs of '29,
21 and 45 yards in the sec-
ond half. while responding
with touchdowns to two of
Bradford's scores.
The first thing Bentley
asked about was whether
Dixon got his 1.000 yards.
With 912 yards in the last
five games. Dixon easily
went over the mark with
1.096 yards for the season.
Bentley then turned to
the playoffs.
"It feels really good," the
senior said. "We missed
last year and I saw how it
hurt the seniors and knew
we would have to step up.
We had some young guys.
but we knew they could
play."
Fort White's defense had
a shutout going until the
Tornadoes got new life on
a roughing penalty when
punting from their 17. The
Indians had allowed 52
yards to that point, midway
through the third quarter.
Dalton O'Dell had a
fumble recovery for the
Indians to set up a short
field for the first touch-
down. Trey Phillips had an
interception to slow down
Bradford's passing game
in the fourth quarter.
Soron Williams, Donnell


Sanders and Phillips
recorded sacks. Williams
had kickoff returns of 31
and 21 yards.
Fort White travels
to Santa Fe High for a
7:30 p.m. kickoff on Friday.


BFor c
For-. i'' e


00 7 22
S0 14 27


First Quarter
Fw--Dxon 17 run jones kick). 927
Third Quarter
FW-DOxon 4 run iJones kick), 8 I 5
B-4-arr.s 10 pass f-om Chipoleri
iBunch kicxl.2 10
FW-ODxon 21 run jones kick). I 13
Fourth Quarter
B-Safety, ball kicked out of end zone,
947
B-Grinner 8 pass from Chipoleri
(Bunch kick. 7 13
FVw-Oxon 45 run (kick blocked).
620
B--Harris 61 pass from Chipoletti
(pass failed). 2 01

Bradford Fort White
First downs 10 IS
Rushes-yards 26-49 42-286
Passing 182 40
Comp-Atrt-Int 15-25-1 4-6-0
Punts-Avg 3-35 2.28 5
Fumbles-Lost 2.1 1-I
Penaltues-Yards 4-28 6-46
INDIVIDUAL-STATISTICS
RUSHING-Bradford. Clayton 10-29.
Williams 3-13. Chipoletti 13-7 Fort White.
Dixon 27-204. Baker 12-77, Cormier 3.-5
PASSING-Bradford. Chipolerti 15-25-
182-1 Fort White. Baker 4-6-40-0
RECEIVING--Bradford. Harris 4-Q9.
Griner 4-44. Thomas 2-25, Clayton 2-9.
Mosely 2-2, Buxton 1.13 Fort White.
Dixon 1-20, Phillips 1-9, Cormier 1-6.
Sanders I-5


CHS: Tigers focus on Suwannee


Continued From Page 11


a tipped pass off the hands
of Alex Sromalski from'
quarterback Jayce Barber
was returned 102 yards by
Jasper Sasser for Wolfson's
other touchdown.
Offensively, the Tigers
had one of their most pro-
ductive games of the season
behind a dual-quarterback
system where Atkinson and
Barber rotated each play
throughout the contest.
"I think the rotation
worked well," Howard said.
"We could have had more
if not for the 100-yard inter-
ception return. We didn't
decide until Thursday to
rotate them, and we weren't
sure how we were going to
do it. Rotating them every
play helped speed up the


ACROSS


1 Fourth
planet
5 Understood
8 Mr. Reitman
12 Bogus butter
13 Smog
monitor
14 Warm-hearted
15 Homeless child
16 Museum
officials
18 Munchies
20 High winds
21 Personal history
22 NASA
go-ahead
(hyph.)
Jose 23 Faked out the
goalie
26 Microscopic
animal
29 Bone-dry
30 Went down
31 Sun, poetically
33 Coal mine
34 No different
35 Heard the alarm


offense and it was easier
to communicate with the
quarterbacks with a no-
huddle offense. It's better
than we've played in four
weeks."
It showed, as Barber
-accounted for three
touchdowns (two pass-
ing and one rushing) and
Atkinson rushed for anoth-
er.
Atkinson finished the
game 14 of 19 for 162 yards
and an interception. Barber
completed 6 of 12 for 116
yards and two touchdowns.
"I think with the com-
petition, each was trying
to outdo the other one,"


Howard said.
Whatever
worked.


36 Big pieces
38 Out of style
39 Previously
40 A-Team mem-
ber (2 wds.)
41 Oater extras
44 Political stance
47 Powerful
punch
49 Tackle box
item
51 Costa-
52 Fruit drink
53 Poet Pound
54 Genuine
55 Sunburned
56 Highway hauler

DOWN

1 Shorten ,
2 Woe is me!


it was, it


Now, Columbia must try
to incorporate that against
Suwannee High in the
Battle for the Old Oaken
Bucket on Friday.
"It's the biggest game
of the year," Howard said.
"We're still excited. The
fans don't want to miss this
one. It is always exciting,
no matter what the record.
It's the kind of game that
if you lose, they'll fire you.
It's that important. You
don't want to lose. It means
everything on a year-round
basis."
The Tigers welcome
the Bulldogs into Tiger
Stadium at 7:30 p.m. on
Friday for the last game of
the 2010 season and Senior
Night.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BEAK NIBS LOLT
AMAHMOBOE EGO
HO R'A OMO NIV OR E


EN D S C
SE AK ARM
J AN ARNE RERTE
ODOR U T ES MVP
TGA PE TAL
NWT FAR E
IND A AEGEFAN
REAISSIG N EDG Y
A WL PLAN R YES

QOTY SKIS SERE]


3 Bridle part
4 Guest 7 Pothole filler
accommoda- 8 Air shaft
tion 9 Cello kin
5 Sticky-footed 10 North-forty unit
lizard 11 Famous Loch
6 Comics penguin 17 Have -- day!


IWant more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
_1__4__ at QuillDriverBooks.com 9 _01I
12 13 4 5 6 7g9 10 1=1


19 British FBI
22 Pierre's girl
23 Drop bait on
water
24 Mr. Sevareid
25 Kin's
partner
26 Beggar's cry
27 Catcalls
28 Scroll holders
30 For argu-
ment's -
32 Drone or
worker
34 Villain's smile
35 Keeps vigil
37 Open a letter
38 Major leaguer
40 Doled out
41 Happy
rumble
42 Sheriff Andy's
kid
43 Pet lovers'
grp.
44 Renoir model
45 Flow slowly
46 Benchmark
48 Jalopy
50 Chiang -
shek


Page Editor: Branac" F:riey 754-0420


-KE CI -e EP PG -:ER









P tEJ CIT REPORTED SPORTS s .' .:*.' -


Youth movement



for Tigers' soccer


By BRANDON FINLEY
trnryft../a<-ciyrepo
Columbia High is young
on the soccer field this sea-
son, but that's not necessar-
ily a bad thing according to
coach Trevor Tyler.
The Tigers begin the sea-
son against Fort White at
the CYSA fields on Tuesday.
Kickoff is at 7 p.m.
When the Tigers take
the field, Tyler expects
the team to be a work in
progress, but one that will
continually improve as the
season continues.
"The cohesiveness isn't
there yet,"Tyler said. "Some
of these guys haven't played
since last year. Well get up
to speed together and know
what to do. Their progres-
sion has come along well.
We expect to see growth
and we'll get better as we
go along."
Tyler inherits a cou-
ple of players from
Suwannee High that he
expects to make instant
contributions to this year's
squad.
The brother duo of
Cameron and Cooper Hall


said. "She grabs attention.
She's skillful at what she
does. The inexperienced
girls have watched her,
and she does most of the
teaching for color guard."
Football coach Craig
Howard had coached two
U.S. Army All-Americans at
Nease in Tim Tebow and
James Wilson, but this is
the first player in Columbia
history to make the game.
To Howard, it was a special
moment.
"It's the first time in the
history of CHS and what
makes it so special is the
Colleen was selected as
well," he said.
But what separates
Jernigan from the rest of
the talented high school
players that weren't
selected?
"He's got a passion
to play," Howard said.
"He plays like he's on a
mission and sometimes
he can't be blocked. He
believes in himself and
can be unstoppable with


will play goalie and midfield
for the Tigers.
"They're solid players,"
Tyler said. "Both are very
good. Cooper will play in
the midfield and play some
striker. Cameron will be our
keeper and will probably
also see some time at the
midfield."
Of course, this season's
captains are among the
small number of return-
ing players that will take
the field for the Tigers.
Drew Waller and Nick
Tuttle were selected by
their teammates, and Tyler
expects both of them to take
leadership roles for the
Tigers.
"They want to win," Tyler
said. "They'll do what it
takes to win games. I don't
know what their weakness
is, but they must find a way
to bring the level of play
up. That's their challenge.
We know what they can do,
but we don't know what the
team can do. They'll step
in as leaders and hopefully
help make us better earlier
in the season."
The honor is one that
neither will take lightly.


his ability when he turns
it on. It doesn't matter if
there's one guy blocking
him, two 'guys or three
guys. He's going to get to
the quarterback or ball
carrier."
The recognition is not
only big for the players, but
it also has a fair amount of
significance for the school.
"It puts us on the
national map," Howard
said. "I hope that some of
the kids today that were
here from the middle
schools see that they can
put in the hard work and
weight room and maybe
one day accomplish what
they have."
Heeney went through
a selection process that
included sending in a video
of her talents, but she
won't have much time to
perfect the routine for the
performance at halftime.
"They're going to send
us a video online, but we
won't actually be able to
practice it together until


"Being a captain make-s
me a leader and I have to
show the younger players
how to do things the right
way," Waller said. "I want to
make them better."
Neither player expects
the Tigers to take a step
back this season.
"We expect the same
even though we're a lot
younger," Tuttle said. "We
expect the younger guys to
step in and fill those posi-
tions."
Both players also admit
to a competitive nature that
they hope rubs off on the
younger Tigers.
"We're very competitive,"
Tuttle said. "I try to play
smart and keep a cool head.
I don't want to be too hot
headed."
Waller admits that his
competitive spirit will some-
times put his body at risk.
"I'm not afraid to put my
body in a position that I
might get hurt to keep the
other team from scoring,"
he said.
It's that kind of attitude
from the couple that gives
the Tigers an edge this
season.


we get there," she said..
"Basically the whole week
we'll be there will be spent
practicing. It should be
interesting."
And what makes the
color guard such a special
role for Heeney to play?
"I fell in love with it,"
she said. "You have to be
athletic, love to perform
and its the ultimate activity.
It just ties everything into
one."
Jernigan hopes the
opportunity gives him a
chance to give back to the
younger players on the
Tigers after so much was
given to him in the past
He named former players
Chris Martinez, Marquis
Davis, Brach Bessant,
Tiger Powell and Jamaal
Montague as influences.
"I just want to give back
to what has been given to
me," he said.
And the one thing
that both had to say to
Columbia County was
thanks for the support.


Florida wide receiver Deonte Thompson, center, catches a touchdown pass ahead of
Vanderbilt cornerback Casey Hayward (19) in the second quarter of Saturday's game.


Gators coast into SEC


East showdown with


win over Vanderbilt


TERESA M. WALKER
AP Sports Writer

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
- The Florida Gators
and coach Urban Meyer
have what they wanted:
A one-game playoff for
the right to play for the
Southeastern Conference
title.
Chris Rainey blocked
two punts and caught a
40-yard touchdown pass
from John Brantley as
Florida routed Vanderbilt
55-14 Saturday, setting up
a showdown with South
Carolina for the SEC
Eastern Division title next
week.
"It's not how you start,
it's how you finish, and
I think we're finish-
ing strong," Meyer said.
"Obviously, it's champion-
ship week in Gainesville,


Fla. So we're going to get
back to work as soon as
we can, and everybody's
excited about it."
The Gators (6-3, 4-3)
will host the Gamecocks
with the winner advancing
to the SEC championship
in Atlanta. Florida is try-
ing to get back for a third
straight year.
Vanderbilt (2-7, 1-5) lost
its fourth straight, ensur-
ing a second straight los-
ing season under first-year
coach Robbie Caldwell.
The Commodores trailed
41-0 when Ryan van
Rensberg blocked a punt
Javon Marshall recovered
and ran in for a touch-
down.
"Rough day at the
office," Caldwell said. "We
got beat in every phase."
The Gators started
a little slow with a rare


morning kickoff with a
temperature of a chilly 44
degrees that was the cold-
est yet in Meyer's tenure
with Florida. But they still
rolled up a season-high in
points while winning their
20th straight game in this
series even sitting out Jeff
Demps to let his sprained
foot heal up even more for
the Gamecocks.
The starters spent most
of the second half looking
ahead to South Carolina.
They also had season
highs with 88 plays for
480 yards. The defense
had four sacks and forced
three turnovers in hold-
ing Vandy to 109 yards.
Terron Sanders returned
a fumble 45 yards for a
TD and Solomon Patton
returned a blocked punt
42 yards for another
score.


COLLEGE SCOREBOARD


LSU rallies to upend Alabama


BATON ROUGE, La. -
LSU twice rallied from sec-
ond-half deficits and once
again coach Les Miles
employed a little trickery
on fourth down, this time
to deal a crushing blow
to Alabama's national title
hopes, 24-21.
Rueben Randle had
125 yards receiving to
lead LSU (8-1, 5-1 SEC),


including a 75-yard score
on a pass from Jordan
Jefferson.
The Tigers trailed 14-
13 when Miles called an
audacious reverse on
fourth-and-1 in the fourth
quarter. The 23-yard gain
set up Stevan Ridley's go-
ahead 1-yard plunge.
Alabama (7-2, 4-2) could
not recover.


Penn State 35,
Northwestern 21

STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
- Backup. quarterback
Matt McGloin threw for
four touchdowns and the
Nittany Lions shut down
Wildcats quarterback Dan
Persa in the second half to
get 83-year-old coach Joe
Paterno his 400th win.


YUR FLX LA



[ EEBR


Gold oo Mercantile Bank MaSno
Gulf Coast Financial Servces Lake Crty er
to~ ov ,Publix. Suwanee Democrat
Florida Powe ghtPublix. Newman Broadcasting
Holiday Inn 96.5 The Jet
State Farm Insurance (John BuPs I1.) rmacy Newman Media
Columbia Bark Lalke City Medcal Center Auxiliary Mix 94.3
CCA-Lake City Correctiona Facilty Maureen and Vem Loyd Oldies 97.1
Columbia Grain & Ingredients Edward Jones lmTestments(Steve Jones) Oldies 1340
Momex Foods "Taco Be641 Campus USA Credit Union North Florida Pediatrics
ShandsLakeShore Dees-Parrsh Family Funeral Home


ALL-AMERICANS: Thank Columbia
Continued From Page 1B


Page Editor: Brandr. Fin;ef 754-%'420








4B -_E --- COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Florvda State running back Lonnie v lunges forward for a touchdown aga ns ',*""
Carolina Saturday at Doak Carrp..e Stadium


Late FG gives UNC a


37-35 win over FSU


BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE T.J.
Yates threw for 439 yards
and three touchdowns
and Casey Barth kicked
his third field goal of the
game with 55 seconds left
Saturday as North Carolina
overcame a fourth-quarter
turnover to surprise No. 24
Florida State 37-35.
Florida State's Dustin
Hopkins missed two field
goal tries in the fourth
quarter, including a p)os-
sible game-winner from 40
yards with seven seconds
left wide right, natural-
ly. He's missed a 42-yard
attempt with 7:51 left.
Barth hit all three of his
tries in the game, including
the 22-yarder that won it.
Florida State (6-3, 4-2
Atlantic Coast Conference)
took a 35-34 lead with 5:49
left on Lonnie Pryor's sec-
ond touchdown, which
was set up by a botched
North Carolina snap. The
Seminoles got the ball at
the North Carolina 1 after
Mark House's snap sailed
over the head of punter C.J.


Feagles, who then illegally
kicked the ball out of the
end zone.
But North Carolina (6-3,
3-2) managed a big win in
a season plagued by eligi-
bility questions for some
of its players, while keep-
ing Florida State from gain-
ing control of the ACC's
Atlantic Division.
Florida State's secondary
had no answers for North
Carolina's Dwight Jones,
who caught eight passes for
233 yards, one on a 67 touch-
down bomb from Yates.
lThe early part of the
game shaped up as a duel
between Yates and Florida
State's Christian Ponder.
The two fifth-year seniors
combined to throw for 422
yards and five touchdowns
by halftime.
But Yates kept it up in
the second half. to steer,
while Florida State's offense
nearly disappeared.
Yates started fast, com-
pleting a 38-yard throw to
Jones on the game's first
play to ignite a 60-yard scor-
ing drive culminated by a
6-yard TD run by Johnny
White, who was knocked


out of the game moments
later with a shoulder inju-
ry.
Jermaine Thomas' 18-
yard run set up a 5-yard
touchdown pass from
Ponder to Willie Haulstead
as Florida State tied the
game 7-7 midway through
the first period.
Jones blew past Florida
State cornerback Greg Reid
to haul in a 67-yard scor-
ing pass from Yates, giving
the Tar Heels a 14-7 lead
with 2:39 left in the opening
quarter.
Ponder's 27-yard touch-
down throw to Rodney
Smith tied the game at 14
and Taiwan Easterling
scooted 7 yards with a short
pass from Ponder to give the
Seminoles a short-lived 21-
14 lead as Yates countered
with a 14-yard scoring pass
to Anthony Elzy.
Pryor's 5-yard scoring run
gave Florida State a 28-21
halftime lead.
The loss was new coach
Jimbo Fisher's first at home
since replacing the longtime
Seminoles leader Bobby
Bowden earlier this year.


A lifetime of experiences to enjoy.

Cancer keep me down?

Not if I have anything to say about it.





COMMUNITY
CANCER CENTER
OF NORTH FLORIDA
0(^,
(386) 755-0601 cccnf.com


Seminoles again

go wide right and

miss a chance


The words wide
right have lived
in the head of
Florida State
fans for years.
After Saturday's 37-35 loss
to North Carolina, the
Seminoles will add one
more heartbreak to their
resume.
In a game where
Christian Ponder desper-
ately needed to bounce
back from a sub-par per-
formance against North
Carolina State, the quar-
terback did all he could
to lead the Seminoles to
victory. Down 37-35 with
55 seconds remaining,
Ponder moved Florida
State down to the 22-yard
line. but Dustin Hopkins'
field goal attempt went
wide right.
It was that kind of
day for the Seminoles.
Anytime that Florida
State was able to move
into the lead. North
Carolina matched with
an outstanding perfor-
mance from T.J. Yates.
The Tar Heel shredded
the Florida State second-
ary. which resembled
the crew from -'2,ii.
for 437 yards and three
touchdowns. His bigI* ,-t
target was Dwight Jones.
who went over 200.
The Seminoles were
in the driver's seat of the
ACC Atlantic Division
entering the game after
Clemson upset North
Carolina State earlier in
the day to give Florida
State a chance to control
its own destiny. Destiny
seems to always fall
on wide right for the
Seminoles.
Down six with 5:49


FROM THE SIDELINE







Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
b ,re',e, remaining in the game,
the Seminoles took over
at the 1-yard line and
took the lead on a Lonnie
Pryor run after a snap
went over North Carolina
punter C.J. Feagles' head
to result in a 42-yard loss.
It gave the Seminoles
a 35-34 lead, but Yates
continued to roll up the
Seminoles' defense. The
quarterback engineered
a clock-killing drive
that gave Casey Barth
a chance to send the
Seminoles to their sec-
ond-consecutive loss to
a North Carolina school.
Barth connected from 22
yards, but the Seminoles
still had life.
Greg Reid returned the
following kickoff 50 yards
and Ponder followed tiup
his example by setting up
Hopkins for the game-win-
ning try.
The kicker had never
made a game-winning try
in his life entering the
game. and as has hap-
tpened so many times to
Seminole kickers in the
past. he was left collect-
ing his thoughts after-
wards.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter


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Lake (ity Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak


BUSINESS


Sunday, November 7, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


It's more than rides:


County Fair impacts


Columbia economy


By TONY BRITT


F or mnor) than
the Columbia
Courity fair ha-
flouris-hed in
ith reputation of creating a
ouilnd ommiuunit.y e-ventl
All...r 'l thfe county fair
is known for the smile-s
and i.. memnorie(- it
crcaths, fair officials said
lh<- 56th Annual Columbia
( county Fair als,< }had a
positive financial impact
on thli local busi'ne s COll-
munity.
Mike Nelson, Columbia
County Resoiircs presi-
(1'nt, said this year's fair
hlad a significant local mon-
etary rcl 'rc.ussion.
hh' said fair vendors
-lI.. .I at local hotels andl
motels, providing incomeI
for area businesses.
"We had a lot of vendors
stay at the Cabot I odge,"
he said. "All these other
vendors have to eat here
and, yes, we do have some
that come in motor homes,
but they go out and eat at
our local restaurants. All
these vendors who stayed
with us here for the whole
week were going out to
restaurants, .iiing and
trying to give back to the
community."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
LRsuces'/ se;re
Fort White Elementary
School pre-K student Jordan
H -er 4, takes a bite out of
a clump of cotton candy at
the Columbia County Fair on
Wednesday.

Wanda Jones, Columbia
County Resources secre-
tary and treasurer, said
attendance numbers for
this year's fair were up and
that the Columbia County
Fair was drawing people
from surrounding coun-
ties.
"There are people
who came here from
Gainesville," Nelson said,
noting Alachua County or
Gainesville didn't host a
fair this year, which-ben-...
efited local fair attendance


numbers. "We had a lot
of Alachua County people
here. Our numbers are up
and in this economy it's a
great thing."
, Jones said the
Columbia County Fair
traditionally averages
approximately 27.000-
28,000 people durini the
week of the event.
Nelson was pleased the
fair continued to attract
patrons at an increasing
rate.
"The fair has always
been a big thing here,"
Nelson said. "I've been in
Columbia County since
I was 13 years old and
the fair is something you
look forward to all year.
It's part of the Columbia
County tradition."
Although there is an
attendance increase,
Nelson said there are no
plans for expansion at the
fairgrounds.
"We would hope to
increase in size, but
we're limited with what
space we have," he
said. "Columbia County
Resources owns this
property and we're kind
of strapped-out with what
property we have espe-
cially with all the new road
additions going through
our property. It changes
things a little bit."


JASON MATTHEW WALKERl.ae Cty Rwc-e
Fort White Elementary School :.jr--grade teacher Jill Hager downs a handful of curly fries
during the Columbia County Fair Thursday.



Crist appoints LC Most of us LIvein

business owner rncnJy rIaces and

to LSHA board


Nettles Sausage
- =i --


holds Monster Meat Sale

S' e Sausage con-
ducted a Monster Meat
f e Sale Nov. 4-5 at its
S190 SW County Rd.
240 iocaton ; sorts
of items were on sale,
S and in: .- from re,e
S' steaks to a 6-pound
box of pork chops.
smoked'jr e,s a 12-
count box of quail. 5
pounds of crawfish, 3
l 4 ",1 pounds of corn j:-,,
and an 18-ounce tub of
pulled pork barbecue.
For more information,
call 752-2510.


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the 5outh for a Keason...

j 5weet Tea. of (course.


By TONY BRITT

Stephen iA. Dou glas as
been appointed to serve )on
the Lakt Shore Hospital
Authority Board b y Gov.
Charlie Crist's office. Ite
apixI)ilttllent was ailnde ear-
hiCr in tlIhe c'ek.
"I look towVa.rd tIo V.ork-
ing wit.l thte existing board
lmemlbers, -- tprtbably halt
of them I knotw trlm par-
ticipatiltig on other hoardls.."
he said. 'Tiitm as looki.
forward to working w4thi
Jack Berry. the adminis-
trator of the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority board.
I'm just very excited about
what we can do to improve


the hospital and the com-
In it,."
mITe I.1ake Shore Hospital
Authority is an independent
special district of Florida.
an inde-
p e nad e n t
special pur
pose g 4v-
ernmnent. It
Swas estab-
lished ,riL-
inallv to
Douglas construct
ind op cratc Lake Shore
11t t p;Td Ill1 board tntut-
at p, 11 1 Ow ccond
Monday each Itunlh.
Douglas replaces
Dorothy Pattison. who
LSHA c>intinucd ,on 2C


Peoples State bank's customers still receive the same
good ol fashioed friendly service from local professionals
they're known for. That's right. Peoples' customers receive
great service and products. topy Peoples today and ex-
perience friendly service and etter nk for yourself.
Peoples State U anL Now that's anking!







350 SW MaBd..Lake Ct.FL 312025 EOPLES
382 W S Hy 90. L e iyL25 S BANK
Telephone 36.7540002
wwwpsbba Memer C

.I F
if












L.AKE CT EPOR-P BUSINESS SDAY EBER7 2C


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he MAodv Fool k-&s the tuth aaboui wesl-
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The Motey 6Fol6Take


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drinks a bansta can work
on at the same time and is
requiring milk to be -
steamed for each drink -
no more using a pitcher of
milk for multiple lattes.
Following rapid store expan-
sion in the 1 990s through early
2000s, Starbucks' coffee competi-
tor McDonald's found itself in a
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launched in 2003 focusing on
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rejuvenated the brand and the
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the stock could be a long-term
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name of my flagship, red-starred "'"'* '"'" '''''""*........ ....0"""*
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dale's stores and employ more than control systems. By the early 1900s I was regulating indoor climates
160,000 people. My private brands in America, Japan, Poland, Spain and Canada. Today, based in Milwau-
include Alfani, American Rag, The Cellar, kee, I'm a global giant focused on making commercial and residential
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0 2010 THE MoIUY 0FooDSr. BY UmVE ALUCUC (FOR RELEASE 11/4/2010)


Hiring spurt in October eases jobs crisis a bit


By JEANNINE AVERSA and
CHRISTOPHER RUGABER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
jobs crisis eased a bit in
October as companies
stepped up hiring, suggest-
ing further gains ahead.
Hiring remains far too
weak to drive down unem-
ployment, now stuck at 9.6
percent. And the newly
elected Congress will
come under pressure to
take steps to accelerate job
growth.
Still, the burst of hiring
- 159,000 net jobs added
by private employers -
raised hopes that compa-
nies are finally emerging
from the hiring stall seen
during much of the sum-
mer.
The previous big spurt
of job growth a healthy
241,000 came in April.
Private companies have
now added jobs for 10
straight months. That
shows that recession-bat-
tered companies have
regained some appetite to
hire after slashing jobs for
nearly two straight years
in a row.
While saying he was
pleased with the improve-


ment, President Barack
Obama conceded the
economy still isn't creating
enough jobs for the nearly
15 million people out of
work.
Offering an olive branch
to the new Congress, which
convenes in January, the
president said he is "open
to any idea, any proposal,
any way we can get the
economy growing faster so
that people who need work
can find it faster."
Earlier this week, voters
angry over the jobs short-
age handed control of the
House to Republicans.
The Senate stayed in
Democrats' hands. The
split will make it harder
for Obama to enact any
new major economic initia-
tives. There's little appetite
among Republicans to pro-
vide a fresh dose of govern-
ment spending to stimulate
the economy. They warn
against further swelling the
nation's $1.3 trillion budget
deficit.
House Speaker-to-be
John Boehner of Ohio said
the top of his to-do list is
extending Bush-era tax
cuts that expire at the end
of the year and cutting gov-
ernment spending.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 4, photo, a job openings board is seen at a career solutions center in Metairie,
La. Employers added the most jobs in five months in October, with the education and health
care sectors leading the way. But the unemployment rate, measured by a separate survey of
households, refused to budge. It remained stuck at 9.6 percent for the third straight month.


"Our economy will ulti-
mately recover, but it will
do so because of hard
work and entrepreneur-
ship, not more of the same
Washington spending
sprees and job-killing poli-


cies the American people
have repudiated so loudly
and clearly," Boehner said
after the latest employment
figures were released.
When government job
cuts which totaled 8,000


last month are factored
in, the economy added
151,000 jobs in October,
the Labor Department's
report showed Friday. It
marked the first increase
in total payrolls in five


months. All the momen-
tum came from private
companies.
"Companies are start-
ing to deploy their cash
stash and increase hiring,
as consumers are open-
ing .their wallets a little
wider," said .Sal Guatieri,
economist at BMO Capital
Markets Inc.
That all bodes well for
helping energize the frag-
ile economy. The Federal
Reserve's announcement
that it will buy $600 bil-
lion in bonds, to lower
interest rates and try to
get Americans to spend
more, might also give the
economy a lift.
Even so, unemploy-
ment isn't expected to
budge much this year.
Economists think it could
take until near the end of
this decade to drop the
jobless rate closer to a
more normal 6 percent
There were 14.8 mil-
lion people unemployed
in October. Adding those
people to others who are
working part time but
would prefer full-time jobs
and those who have given
up looking for work, near-
ly 27 million are "under-
employed."


LSHA: Business owner appointed


Consumer borrowing posts rare gain


Continued From Page 1(
served the board from
Sept. 10, 2002-July 20,
2010.
His term began Nov.
1 and concludes July 20,
2014.
Douglas said he was
notified that he was
appointed to the board
Nov. 2 when he received
a telephone call from the
governor's office.
Douglas, 44, is a Lake
City native. This is his first


time serving as a member
of the Lake Shore Hospital
Authority Board.
"I've served on other
boards. The last board I
was active with was the
Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce," he said. "I've
been off that board for a
year, so I'm very excited
about getting back on and
serving the public."
Douglas said he applied


to serve on the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board
several months ago and
recently received word of
his appointment
"I applied and my appli-
cation has been. in for 8-
10 months," he said. "I
was asked to apply and
I guess that's the normal
process."
Douglas is the owner of
Mini-Storage and Record
Storage of Lake City.


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Consumer borrowing
increased in September for
the first time since January
even though the category
that includes credit cards
dropped for a record 25th
straight month.
The Federal Reserve
said Friday that consum-
er credit increased at an
annual rate of $2.1 billion


in September after having
fallen at a rate of $4.9 bil-
lion in August It was only
the second increase in the
past 20 months.
Americans have been'
reducing their borrowing
for nearly two years as they
try to repair their balance
sheets in the wake of a
steep recession and high
unemployment.
For September, revolv-
ing credit, the category
that includes credit cards,


fell for a record 25th con-
secutive month, dropping
by an annual rate of $8.3
billion, or 12.1 percent The
category that includes stu-
dent loans and auto loans,
rose by $10.4 billion, or an
annual rate of 7.9 percent.
The $2.1 billion rise in
overall borrowing pushed
consumer debt to a season-
ally adjusted $2.4 trillion in
September, down 2.9 per-
cent from where consumer
credit stood a year ago.


The Motley Foolu

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


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KE IT = BUSINESS


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


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NYSE Amex asdaq
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Advanced 2.559 AdOanced 361
Decled 575 Dedcned 171
New H"i 764 New HOis 79
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Volume 24.023,923,6801 Volume 692,491,836


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Oualco n 1252924 48.33 +3.17
ArtTedl 1242962 597+1.77
Delnc 989920 14.46 +07

Diary
Advanced 2,026
Declined 796
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NewLows 101
Total issues 2.879
Unchanged 57
Volume 10,373,665,141


Thp Week in Review
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MoneRates
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Discount Rate 075 0.75
Federal Funrs Rate 00-.29 .00-25
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10-year 2.53 261
30-year 4.00


Currencies
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Canada 1.0004 1.0034
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Switzernd .9612 .9583
British pound expressed in U S dollars. A oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Ci
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American Funds IncAmerA m WS
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AES Corp
AFLAC 120
AKSleel 20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1688
AbiLab 176
AberFitc 70
AMO
Aetna 04
AirTran
AlcatelLuc
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BHP BilU 1.74
BakrHu .60
BcBdVArg .57
BcoBrades .51
BcoSantand .80
BcoSBrasil 33
BkolAm .04
Bklreind 1.04
BkNYMel 36
BarVixShT
BarrickG .48
BeazerHm
BerkH Bs
BesBuy 60
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonS .
BrMyS 1.28
CBL Asc 80
CBSB 20
CMSEng 84
CSX 1.04
CVS Care .35
Cameron
CapOne 20
CardrnHIth .78
Carreal .40
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78
CniryLjn 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chiwnera 69 1
Cmigrp
ClifflNRs .56
Clorox 2.20
Coach 60
CocaCE 48
CocaO 176
Comenca 20


15 -.18 -116
12 +1.87 +249
39 +128 -35.0
.. +.98 +14.7
8 +.75 +4.4
13 -40 -5.7
36 +417 +349
5 +.71 -16.9
8 +1.17 -2.1
23 +.07 +43.1
.. -.20 -1.2
... +.89 -13.2
... -1.54 +12.5
-.19 -76.4
15 +.78 +4.1
52 -.72 +2.5
14 +.69 +33.0
1 -.33 -39.6
17 -3.71 -5.5
8 +.89 +26.1
20 +.46 -2.9
14 +.26 +8.4
14 +2.61 +8.8
... +3.60 +52.1
14 -1.15 +21.5
38 +6.04 +8.3
18 +1.86 +12.5
13 +.23 +3.2
17 +2.03 +9.0
13 +7.67 +5.4
28 +3.74 -21.0
37 +3.71 +27.2
11 -1.97 +.1
14 +.96 +3.4
23 +2.18 +5.1
20 -.67 -5.5
22 +2.17 +.8
... +9.56 +20.3
33 +3.52 +23.4.
-.88 -32.0
+1.71 +A.5
-.87 -27.4
+.91 +9.8
18 +.91 -17.9
... -.50 -56.8
14 +3.11 +.7
.. -1.96 -67.3
17 +1.12 +25.0
3 +.45 -6.8
17 +4.16 +27.4
14 +1.77 +13.4
9 +.44 -46.0
15 +1.05 +31.7
... +.53 -23.1
13 -.21 +5.7
... +2.79 +91.0
27 +.08 +21.1
15 +21 +17.4
17 +.35 +27.4
12 +.81 -39
22 +2.38 +10.4
8 +3.09 +5.3
13 +.52 +9.2
19 +1.53 +41.1
28 +4.94 +46.6
... +.89 -15.0
15 +.12 +15.0
12 +1.19 +17.6
15 +.59 -13.9
10 +2.38 +10.4
18 +.79 -25.2
6 -.05 +4.4
... +32 +35.6
12 +590 +54.3
13 -397 +2.6
21 +292 +449
15 +60 +6893
19 +126 +98
+2.86 +30.7


Nam DIv
ConScop
ConocPhi 2.20
ConsolEngy.40
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
DeanFds ...
DeltaAir ...
DevelDiv .08
DevonE .64
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBull s ...
DinrSCBull 4.77
DirxLCBear...
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
Dynegy rs ...
EMC Cp ..
EOG Res .62
EPasoCp .04
EldorGIdg .05
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCana g s .80
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMb 1.76
FstHorizon .72
FirstEngy 2.20
RagstB rs ...
Fluor .50
FordM
FMCG 2.00
FrontierCm .75
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenMarit .04
GenMills s 1.12
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrpg .36
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAPac
HCPInc 1.86
HSBC 1.70
Hallibrn .36
HartdFn .20

HedaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
Honwillntl 1.21
HostHolls .04
Huwtsmn .40
lAMGIdg .06
iShGolds
SAstla .81
iShBraz 2.58
iShHK .48
iShJapn .16
iShSing .38
iSTaiwn 21
iShShver ...
iShCh5ia25 .68
S4Mlt.s 591
ShB20 T 3.83
iSEafe 1.38
iShR2K .79
IShREsI 1.88


SYTD Wk y
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... 98 -.21 +18.5 31.45
3.6 10 +2.42 +21.0 61.81
1.0 19 +2.54 -21.1 39.30
4.7 15 +1.28 +12.3 51.00
3.1 1 +.48 -12.7 30.72
1.1 9 +.60 -2.2 18.88
5.6 ... -.04 -1.0 4.97
1.3 ... +1.55 +10.2 11.98
4.8 14 +.07 +7.4 46.83
... 10 +.15 -41.5 10.55
... 30 +.38 +25.3 14.26
.6 ... +1.16 +52.1 14.08
.9 7 +5.76 -3.7 70.78
... ... -3.19 -60.6 19.42
... ... -2.17 -46.4 10.42
.. +4.30 +7.2 26.48
.2 ... +8.06 +42.0 60.69
... ... -1.12 -42.5 9.84
.4 16 +1.26 +28.6 18.91
.9 18 +1.08 +15.3 37.20
4.2 15 +.04 +11.8 43.50
1.8 22 +1.66 +17.6 32.50
5.3 13 +.28 +7.4 18.49
...... -.20 -50.9 4.44
... 27 +.55 .23.5 21.57.
.7 44-7.11 -8.9 88.61
.3 10 +.20 +36.9 13.46
50 +1.90' +32.9 18.83'
2.4 21 +2.38 +34.5 57.28
2.8 15 +.8f -10.4 29.03
.9 9 +3.51 -13.6 18.34
5.1 11 +.35 -15.8 41.17
2.5 12 +3.51 +2.7 70.00
... ... +.31 -20.1 10.40
6.1 13 +.12 -22.7 35.89
... ... ... -78.8 1.27
.9 23 +6.34 +21.1 54.53
... 8 +2.08 +62.1 16.21
1.9 13+10.05 +30.6 104.84
8.3 13 +.22 +15.2 9.00
1.3 5 +.61 -16.1 12.46
1.9 12 +1.80 -.2 20.81
.9 ... +.38 -39.6 4.22
3.1 16 -1.03 +3.2 36.53
... 19 +1.10 +9.5 12.43
1.6 ... +.35 -20.9 13.39
.9 3 +1.09 +28.6 16.86
.8 ... +1.64 +17.5 46.23
.8 10 +9.94 +1.3 171.07
37 +.25 -25.7 10.47
+.34 -67.9 3.78
5.1 56 +.85 +19.2 36.39
3.1 ... +3.44 -2.7 55.55
1.1 20 +.06 +6.1 31.92
.8 9 +2.47 +13.6 26.42
14 +.62 +18.7 8.63
... 79 +1.04 +28.3 7.93
36 +.97 +3.1 12.29
.6 9 +6.95 +15.7 69.98
.7 12 +1.68 -15.1 43.72
3.0 18 +1.02 +10.3 31.92
2.5 19 +2.17 +25.7 49.28
.2 ... +1.23 +46.7 17.12
2.9 19 -.14 +21.4 13.71
35 +.22 +18.3 18.50
... +.37 +27.1 13.65
3.1 ... +1.80 +15.0 26.27
32 ... +4.12 +8.8 81.16
2.4 ... +1.45 +28.9 20.18
1.5 ... +.32 +6.2 10.34
2.7 ... +.67 +24.5 14.31
... ... +.51 +11.1 14.41
...... +2.03 +58.4 26.20
1.4 ... +2.86 +13.2 47.83
1.2 ... +2.37 +16.8 48.49
3.9 ... -2.12 +9.0 97.98
2.3 ... +2.19 +7.1 59.20
1.1 ... +3.47 +18.1 73.77
3.3 ... +2.66 +255 57.62


..-I .,


wy YTo Wmy
Nam Dtv Yd PE Chg %Chg t


Name
rrITW
IBM
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Invesco
ItauUrtbH
JPMorgCh
JanusCap
JinkoSol n
JohnJn
JohnsnCtl
JnprNtwk
Kellogg
Keycorp
Kimco
KingPhrm
Kinross g
Kohls
Kraft
LDK Solar
LSI Corp
LVSands
LennarA
UlyEli
Limited
UncNat
LloydBkg
LyonBas A
M&T Bk
MBIA
MEMC


Wky YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


15 +2.68 +.8
13 +3.32 +12.2
27 +.96 -11.8
53 +1.16 -1.3
33 +.29 +44.2
30 +1.24 +3.2
... +1.69 +14.9
12 +3.31 -1.6
17 +1.68 -9.0
... +5.84 +226.9
13 +.91 +.4
17 +1.68 +35.1
46 +2.00 +28.9
15 -.94 -7.3
... +.20 +51.4
62 +.87 +33.6
83 +.01 +15.3
28 +.89 +2.4
15 +2.08 -1.2
11 -1.19 +14.3
... +1.81 +88.0
31 +.37 -6.7
... +6.10+247.9
29 +1.34 +24.1
8 +.52
19 +2.42 +65.3
12 +.95 +2.2
+.16 +38.8
+1 49 +28.9
18 +7.95 +23.6
+1.13 +210.1
-.09 -6.5


Name Div
MGIC
MGMRsts
Macys .20
Manpwl .74
Manulie g .52
MarathonO I.00
MarinerEn ...
MkldVGold .11
MarlntA .35
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn 24
McKesson .72
MedcoHth ...h
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ..
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola ...
NCR Corp ..
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.17
NOlVarco .40
NatSemi .40
NYCrmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .60


Yid


Wky YTD Wdy
PE Chg %Ch Last


... ... +.85 +67.3 9.67
... +1.18 +32.8 12.11
.8 18 +1.90 +52.6 25.57
1.3 37 +2.77 +5.3 57.50
... ... +2.06 -19.5 14.76
2.9 11 -1.85 +8.6 33.92
... 26 +1.36+126.4 26.28
...... +2.79 +30.0 60.09
.9 38 +2.50 +45.1 39.55
.7 ... -.41 +1.7 5.54
2.6 ... +.90 -16.3 11.56
.5 ...+4.87 +11.7 46.94
1.1 14 +.32 +6.1 66.30
... 19 +6.59 -7.5 59.12
2.5 11 +.12 -19.6 35.35
4.3 18 -.61 -2.3 35.70
1.8 12 +2.51 +19.1 42.10
... 20 +1.32 +53.6 11.72
1.8 28 +2.85 -23.8 62.27
... ... +1.74 +13.8 19.80
.7 11 +2.41 -7.8 2728
.3 31-2.33 +18.5 70.78
... 39 +.04 +5.7 8.20
11 +1.11 +33.2 14.83
94 +.80 -.9 21.70
-.13 -53.9 2.13
6.1 ... +.75 -1.2 4823
.7 15 +5.01 +33.3 58.77
2.9 13 +.28 -9.0 13.97
5.8 13 +.48 +18.3 17.16
1.1 13 -.18 +16.4 17.47
1.0 15 +.76 +30.2 61.62


NewpkRes ...
NexlEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .90
NokiaCp .56
NorflkSo 1.44
Novartis 1.99
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 2.66
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMi Grp .,.
PNC .40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PeltbrsA 1.12
Petrobras 1.12
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
Pridell ...
PrinFncl .55
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ...
ProUltSP .43
ProUShL20 ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUFmn rs .09
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUtCrude...
ProUShCrude...
ProgsvCp 1.16
ProLogis .45
Prudenti .70
PulteGrp
QuantaSvc ...
OntmODSS ...
OwestCm .32
RRIEngy
RadianGrp .01
RadioShk .25
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola ...
RepubSvc .80
RiteAud
Rowan
RyfCarb .
SpdrDJlA 2.55

SP Mid 1.54
S&P500ETF2.31
SpdHome .12
SpdrKbwBk .11
SpdrtKbwRB.30
SpdrReUl .57
SpdOGEx 20
SpdrMetM .35
Safeway .48
SUude
Saks
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .46
Sdlnbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemnHTr .60
SiderNacs .58
SlvWhtng ...
SvrrCMg .08
SouthnCo 1.82


22 -.15 +35.5 5.73
14 -.31 +3.6 54.73
14 +.32 +14.6 17.63
8 +1.95 -10.7 36.34
... +.07 -162 10.77
16 +1.18 +18.9 62.31
14 +.68 +7.7 58.63
63 +2.18 -13.4 40.40
16 +5.60 +3.5 84.23
.... +.20 '-27.3 4.69
... +6.89 +6.1 126.09
14 +.76 +8.8 48.58
... +.27 +43.3 3.61
9 +4.51 +10.6 58.41
15 +.14 -16.4 27.00
... +1.83 -.9 15.32
24 +4.94 +27.7 57.75
26 +1.41 +22.5 32.59
16 -.22 +7.0 65.08
21 -.09 -29.6 16.90
... +1.97 -22.2 32.99
... +2.18 -24.2 36.13
9 -.06 -5.6 17.18
16 +1.93 +25.4 60.44
27 -4.03 +30.0 141.06
... -19 -3.9 22.18
43 +2.97 +4.3 33,29
16 +2.96 +24.0 29.80
...-1.69 -13.8 45.32
...-1.90 -27.4 25.43
... +4.18 +32.9 79.05
-.72 -36.1 12.16
... +3.07 +18.8 45.42
... +1.29 -29.3 35.28
... -2.30 -30.9 16.75
... +7.35 +12.9 63.54
... -1.56 -42.6 14.47
... -2.48 -40.7 21.53
.+1.43 -8.0 11.66
-1.82 -17.5 11.26
13 +.78 +22.0 21.94
... +.94 +6.4 14.57
9 +3.06 +11.8 55.64
... .01 -21.4 7.86
22 -1.81 -14.3 17.85
... +.09 +18.4 3.47
49 +.19 +61.5 6.80
... +.10 -32.5 3.86
... +2.36 +36.1 9.95
12 +.45 +5.5 20.57
8 +2.07 -8.5 48.15
.. +.15 +21.9 6.45
.. +99+1723 12.96
23 -.77 +2.8 29.04
... +.04 -36.6 .96
13 -.72 +42.1 32.18
24 +334 +69.6 42.88
+3.23 +10.1 114.54
+3.76 +27.1 136.38
... +5.93 +18.8 156.46
... +4.24 +10.1 122.73
... +1.16 +10.3 16.66
... +1.60 +14.3 24.19
... +1.32 +7.8 23.99
... +1.69 +272 45.30
... +2.79 +132 46.64
... +4.71 +17.6 60.70
+.84 +11.5 23.74
14 +.39 +5.2 38.69
... +.98 +84.8 12.12
.:. -.31 -45.3 5.16
16 +38 +20.8 14.71
30 +5.77 +162 75.66
33 +.69 -14.5 16.10
... +1.73 +11.7 31.19
... +1.10 +12.6 17.96
60 +420+119.4 32.95
... +2.54 +802 11.89
15 +.60 +15.5 38.47


Nmn Mv Y~m PE %CL t


SwstAs .02
SwnEngy ...

SpriltNex ...
SP Malls 1.05
SPHIhC .58
SP CnSI .77
SP Consume .43
SPEngy 1.00
SPDRFncd .16
SP Inds .60
SP Tech .31
SP UtI 1.27
StarwdHtI .20
StateStr .04
Suncorgs .40r
Suntech ...
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Syniverse ...
Synovus .04
TJX .60
TaiwSemni .47
TalismEg .25
Target 1.00
TerietHlth .:.
Teradyn ...
Tesoro
TexInst .52
Textron .08
ThomCrkg ...
3MCo -2.10
TimeWam .85
Total SA 3.13
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSols ...'
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
USAirwy ...
UnionPac 1.32
UtdConti
USBancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
USOlFd ...
USSIeel .20
UldMthGp .50
Vale SA .76
VateSApf .76
ValeaPh .38
ValeroE 20
VangEmg .55
VatzonCmn1.95
Vi rpeCn ..
Visa .60
VYhayint ...
Vonage ...
Wabash ..
Waigm .70
Weattln" ...
WePon ....
WelsFargo 20
WendyAiby.06
WDigital ...
WstnUnion 24
Weyerl 20
WmsCos .50
WinTr .04
Wyrham .48
XLGrp .40
Xerox .17
Yamana g .12
YrigfiGrn ...
Zimmfo- -


26 +.43 +24.1
21 +2.25 -25.1
13 -2.37 -3.0
-.14 +9.0
... +1.52 +10.1
... +28 +12
... +34 +10.0
+1.25 +22.6
... +3.07 +9.3
... +1.02 +82
... +125 +20.3
.. +.75 +9.5
... +.3 +3.3
60 +5.15 +62.1
.. +3.71 +4.4
... +3.67 +1.0
... +.81 -44.1
... +1.46 +30.5
.. -.04 -15.4
26 -.08 +74.0
... -.05 +2.9
14 +120 +28.8
... +.27 -2.3
...+1.76 +6.8
15 +3.21 +14.0
2 +.17 -16.0
8 +.62 +10.5
27 +1.21 +4.6
13 +1.90 +20.8
... +1.79 +20.2
36 +1.09 +11.9
15 +2.12 +4.4
14 -1.17 +7.5
+2.67 -10.8
7 +.56 -22.8
9 +2.24 +15.2
11 +1.87 +6.1
56 -.45 +23.1
... +1.03 +16.4
7 -.22+139.0
18 +3.54 +42.8
... -1.18 +115.8
17 +1.90 +15.9
... -.16 -43.8
+2.48 -4.1
... +5.83 -11.9
9 +.81 +20.9
.. +1.68 +16.5
.. +1.16 +20.4
18 -.46 +94.5
.. +1.19 +14.3
... +2.37 +20.1
+.95 +8.0
... +.66 -13.4
20 +1.64 -8.8
11 +2.54 +84.5
14 -.22 466.4
... +1.18 +388.9
18 +1.26 -4.3
87 +2.23 +6.3
5 +3.01 -1.6
11 +321 +8.3
29 +.41 +6.8
6 +2.75 -21.3
14 +.65 -32
... +133 +10.5
31 +.83 +6.0
... -2.80 -65.1
18 +1.32 +49.1
20 -35 +13.5
17 +20 +40.7
28 +.72 +2.9
27 +1.16 -18.9
15 +4.37 -12.3


Nasdaq Most Active


Wy YTD WkMt
Name Div Yid PE Ch Chg Lat
Aastrom rs +80 +14.9 2.83
Actvs8z 15 13 16 -16 +1.7 1130
AdceSy 32 +99 -208 29.14
AkamaT 63 +161+1103 53.28
A.leraCp f 24 7 16 +2.01 +469 33.25
Amaon 69 +554 +26.9 17077
AmCapLkd 6 + 68 +213.9 766
Amgen 12 -1.77 -2.0 5542
AknorT If 6 -.44 -52 679
AknW +.02 -80 1305
A123 Sys +24 -556 996
AioGrip 10 -1 75 -410 35.73
Appie c 21+1615 +505 31713
Ac a 28 2.2 27 +63 -6.9 12.96
AreaPt -10 -563 155
Akm'id '2 7 --42.1016 1726
A'lTec 54 *1 ~ *32.4 597
Atmel .1 42 +1230 10 28
,aodesk 48 -52 +404 3568
ALt0ata '136 30 19 .135 +71 4584
Awac*rsPhn 2.37. 152.1 49
Basc s 93 -12' .1646 10680
Be&~alf 17 .123 .169 4513
-1 75 -567 188
BogerAdc 16 .07 -'73 6278
BngExE 80 .20' .710 2317
Broadcom 32 8 26 .15' .34 5 42.3.
Bro eCm 20 -29 -206 606
CA Irc 6 7 '6 -.6 .45 23,4
Caoece 15 '4 437 86
Ceigere 31 -8' .99 6122
CwnaCcro -56 .32.6 1437
Crts 12 1 C3 .103.7 1389
CscoG 18 *40 -13 2426
tzeph -03 -54 65
OCearwre -16 .25 693
CogrizTech 29 -1 83 -39 8 63 361
Corrcast 38 18 16 -.4 .255 21.04


Nume Dtv
Comc spd .38
ConrltC ...
Costla .82
Creenc ...
Crocs
Ct.1comr s
CypSen .
Dee inc
Ondreon
DrecTV A
DshNetwk 2.00
DryShls
ETrade rs
eBay
BecAts .
ErtropCom
EncsnTel 28
EvrgrSir h
ExactSoh
Epedia 28
ExpScaps
Fiftht d 04
Ftaem
FoMrtret n
FosW N .
FresKab It .

GarIn 150

GdeadSo
Google
Greer Cs

*rasCty 60
:snGen

Hiet 63
IJA Sctar


MWy YT
Yld PE Chd %Chg


1.9 16 +.50 +24.8
... 2 -1.20 -707
1.3 22 +2.63 +10.5
31 +3.20 -33
23 +.53 +151.5
...... -454 +32.3
32 +1.23 +45.2
17 +.07 +.7
... -143 +33.4
268 -73 +281
12 +94 +2
18 +58 -194
.. +100 -131
16 +1.01 +31.2
+51 -80
42 +78+1980
26 -09 +185
+00 -381
34 +92.3
10 17 -165 -81
27 +425 .22.1
3 +47 .336
21 +04 -1 4
.. +129 .78 1
12 +377 -76
-o01 -880


48 9 -167
-56
11 -72
25+1' 38
68 .164
39 -20
50 11 *4.9
-1 5"7
40 .42
30 11 +135
21 +1 10


Widy
Last Name Div YId
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4












LAKE CITY PEPORTEP CLASSIFIED S s cv s 2:':

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


I'akc AD)\ antac of the
Rcpjxrtcr ClasMietcds!

755-5440


SADvantage


a= 1 .==17


;! $1750
*E1011 io E ehilkusl'


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.

-e

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
am to 5 00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also tax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX. 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





MaIsAlwer Cdb FaxEtalCby.
Tuesday er. I0im. Mon Holin.
Wednesday Ymr. iOtim Mn.HOaim.








Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Caplllations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation
BIllng- Inquiries- Call 755-5440
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the nght to edit. reflect.
or dassify all advertisements under
appropriate headings Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
Ilcatlon. Credit for published errors
wil be altewed for the first inserton
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect Further the
Publisher shall not be ablee for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published nor for any general
special or consequential damages
Advertising language must comply
with Federal State or local laws
regarding the orohibiton cf d'scnrrm-
nation in emroyrent, housing and
public accommodations Standard
abbreviatcns are acceptable how-
ever. the first 'aord of each ad may
not be abbreviated

In Print and Online
1 '.ltklit rLeportxr.coni


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
IHIRD JUDICIAL CIRCLIT OF-
FL.ORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
IA ( OUNY-Y
(AS:. NO 101 JI109CA
NOTICE. Ot- FORECLOSURE
SALJ
DOFt s('CHEt: BANK NATIONAL
I[RLST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE
FOR AMERICAN HOME MORT-
GAGt. ASSETS TRUST 2(007-3
MOKRGAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES. SER-
IES 2007- 3,
Plaintiff.

MICHAEL LIENEMANN A/K/A
MIKE LIENEMANN et. al.
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated October 25, 2010, and en-
tered in Case No. 10000109CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County. Florida, wherein DEUT-
SCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2007-3 MORT-
GAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-3. is a Plaintiff and MI-
CHAEL LIENEMANN A/K/A
MIKE LIENEMANN; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MICHAEL LIENE-
MANN A/K/A MIKE LIENE-
MANN; WESTFIELD INVEST-
MENT GROUP. LLP; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 are the Defendants. P.
DeWITT CASON as The Clerk of
the Circuit Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
173 NE HERNANDO AVENUE,
COURT ROOM 1, LAKE CITY, FL
32055. at I1:00 a.m on December
8th, 2010. the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
ALL OF BLOCK 97, ACCORDING
TO E.L. SNOWDEN'S SURVEY
OF THE TOWN OF COLUMBIA
CITY. FLORIDA AND BEING SIT-
UATED IN SECTION 10, TOWN-
SHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
LESS AND EXCEPT THE NORTH
8.52 FEET FOR RIGHT OF WAY
FOR STATE ROAD NO. S-240,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 26th day of October,
2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 26th day of October,
2010.
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329

04542120
October 31, 2010
November 7, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-497-CA
DEAS BULLARD PROPERTIES
a Florida general partnership
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHEN SCOTT SOMERS and
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 3. Cedar Hills, a subdivision as
recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 134.
public records of COLUMBIA
County. Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated October 27, 2010, at the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da. at 11:00 A.M.. on Wednesday,
December 1. 2010, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale. other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
Its pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal in
the State and County aforesaid this


Home Improvements

Carpentry. remodeling, paint,
repairs. additions. Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Lam,
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care. trimming.
sod,. design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY.
RESUMES.
other court approved form-s-
386-961-5896.


Legal

27th da r -t (X ,-cr 2.:C.'
P DEW-ITT ( ASON
Clerk ut C,..-r.
B' ,, B Ss:pp
Deputl Clerk

04542119
O(-tobcr ;1, 2:010
November 21J0I
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY FLORIDA
The School District of Columbia
County. Flonda announce, the' will
hold a workshop. to htuch all per-
sons are invited to attend as follow s:
DATE: Monday. November 22.
2010
TIME: 4:30 p.m.
PLACE: Columbia Counti School
District
Administrative Complex Auditorium
372 West Duval Street
Lake City. FL 32055
PURPOSE: Workshop to discuss
budget issues.
No action will be taken at this meet-
ing.
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County.
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools

04542221
November 7, 20(10
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS -
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF FLORIDA GATE-
WAY COLLEGE WILL RECEIVE
BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING:
F.G.C. BID NO. 11-1-01
ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION
OVERHEAD TO UNDER-
GROUND CONVERSION -
PHASE 2 JONES EDMUNDS
PROJECT NO. 12040-013-02
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The general scope of work for the
base bid is described as converting
approximately 1/4 of the 13.2-kV
distribution system from overhead to
underground at the FGC Main Cam-
pus. This portion of the system is lo-
cated between the north side of
Building 14 and SE College Place
along SE Student Way and is ap-
proximately 1,200 feet in length.
Conduit for future communications
will be installed as part of this work
along the same corridor.
This will involve, but not limited to,
removing overhead primary and sec-
ondary conductors, three concrete
poles, four wood poles, one pole-
mounted 3-ph transformer bank, one
single-phase pole-mounted trans-
former, and several riser assemblies.
Additional work will be bid as Add-
Altemrnates, subject to award at the
discretion of the College. The addi-
tional work will include installation
of two conduit and manhole systems
for future communications.
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS:
Only those General Contractors de-
fined in Section 489.105(3)(a), Flori-
da Statutes or Electrical Contractors
defined in Section 489.505(12), Flor-
ida Statutes and who are licensed and
registered to conduct business in
Florida may submit a bid on this
project.
PREQUALIFICATION OF CON-
TRACTORS:
ALL ELIGIBLE BIDDERS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to prequalify with
Florida Gateway College must re-
quest a prequalification package
from the College's Director of Pur-
chasing, Bill Brown at (386) 754-
4360 or by email at
Bill.Brown@fgc.edu. COMPLETED
prequalification packages must be re-
turned to the College's Purchasing
office not later than 10:00 A.M.
E.S.T. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER
23, 2010.
TIME AND DATE FOR RECEIV-
ING BIDS:
2:00 P.M. E.S.T. TUESDAY DE-
CEMBER 14,2010
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Departmewt
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138 Lake City. Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid opening date/time The College
will not be responsible for Postal or
other delivery service delays that
cause a bid to arrve at Room 138.
Building 001 after the designated bid
opening date/time. Bids that are
mailed must be clearly marked on
the outside of the envelope
BID # 11-1-01. ELECTRICAL DIS-
TRIBUTION OVERHEAD TO UN-
DERGROUND CONVERSION -
PHASE 2 JONES EDMUNDS
PROJECT NO. 12040-013-02
DECEMBER 14. 2010
PRE-BID CONFERENCE
There will be a MANDATORY pre-
bid meeting beginning at 10:00 AM
TUESDAY. November 30. 2010 in
the Board Room located in the Ad-
ministration Building (0011. on the
main campus of Flonda Gateway
College
BID DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE
FROM
Carly Roach
Jones Edmunds & Asscaates. Inc.
730 NE Waldo Rd.
Gainesville. FlHonda 326-i
Telephone i352. 3--'-5,21
E-Mail croach('jone-.edmunds.com
COST FOR BID DOCUMfENTS:
To ensure that BAddir' reci'.e all ad-
denda and or clanfica', n. to the


Bidding Document in a timeRl man-
ner, it is mandatory. that all bidders
obtain at last one of Bidding
Documents from the Engineer to be
eligible to bid on this project
Bid documents are a'.ailable at a cost
of S12500 per v et which includes
shipping Bid dx-uments ma'. nl%


Legal

v. .a.-i.c mc.! crt..re'. U: C [T
- .z -' :: I :- -
RIGHT TU NhAI E IRREGIL I_-ARI
TI' I AND T.CIINICAL.TIESI
F. -n. A G C.a C\, ,.',!CC r c ,cn s
:.c c c: t!o sa;c m un.r ;rTcg l.'-

*ith thss h,.i:.anoin The Diuc,:or of
Purcha.mng of Florida Gate,,a% Col-
lege shall be the final autahont' re-
garding ,waner' of irrezulanrmis and
tech!ncalhites.
FOR FLORIDA GATEWAY COL-
LEGE
Bill Brown. Director of Purchasming

04542269
November 7. 14.21. 2010


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Lost Chihuahua
Much loved, white with light
brown spots, Red Collar,
near Walmart 386-288-3024

100 Job
Opportunities

(0454200)
BAKER TRANSPORT needs
owner operators with wedge
trailers to deliver cargo trailers
across Southeast. Must have
CDL-A and a one ton
truck or larger.
Call 1-866-764-1601
for pay rates and more info.

04542232
Dietary Aide, Dietary Cook
Part time positions
Must have prior exp in a
healthcare facility or other
institution. Please apply at Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, FI 32025.

04542257
First Federal Bank of
Florida has a position available
for a full-time Collector in Lake
City. Solid.understanding of
financial institution policies and
procedures. Experience prefer-
red dealing with delinquent
accounts. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Turbeville.J(@ffsb.com
or mailed to Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake City FL
32056. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.


05524388
Teacher Positions
FT Early Head Start Lake
City: min. HS Diploma/GED
and DCF 40 hours, $8.65/hr. if
have FCCPC/CDA credential.

PT Head Start and FT Early
Head Start Jasper:
min. HS Diploma/GED and
DCF 40 hours, FCCPC/CDA re-
quired for FT position, $8.65/hr.

Sick and annual leave, holiday
pay, health insurance, retirement
+ add'l benefits. Bilingual
preferred. Must pass physical
and DCF background
requirements, current
1st Aide/CPR pref.
To apply, e-mail:
arobinson@sv4cs.org,
call (386) 754-2222, fax resume
to (386) 754-2220, or apply in
person @ 236 SW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City, or 843 SW
Marymac St., Live Oak, FL
EOE

All around handy person needed.
Multiple duties in local sewing
factory. Call Hafner's
386-755-6481
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of S60K+ Annually. 401 K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Electrician/Traffic Signal instal-
ler w/bucket experience. CDL
preferred. Good pay and benefits.
EOE. Bobby 813-433-7851
Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609
Experienced LegaL
SecretaryfParalegal
5 yrs exp. including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St. Lake City. FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroofa yahoo.corn
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean dnrivine record.
386-963-5026. Drug Test.
License CDL Driver
wv2 Trs Logging Exp.
Must'have Clean CDL.
386-365-6966
Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
5 days a -.eek. Please fax resume
to 386-719-9662


100 Job
Opportunities
PT :A-ss A CDL
L'T\ cr neecdd A CLEA record
. x -a lielbie schedulee required
C.I1 1 31 5 1-(05 to appl%
a.unted Forestr. machine'
operator 'A ith 2 yrs exp
Mult ha\e valid DL.
Koon Timber 3t6-365-6966

Medical
120 Employment


Director of Human Resources
Small Critical Access Hospital
seeks experienced Human
Resources Director to lead HR
functions. Responsible for all
HR functions including
recruitment, retention.
regulatory compliance, benefits.
organizational development.
employee relations, and
State/Feder.ial Survey
preparedness. Comprehensive
benefit package. salary
commensurate with
experience. Bachelor's degree:
PHR or SPHR preferred.
Hospital/Healthcare
experience preferred.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace

05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp. Call Cindi: (850)253-1906

05524399

Medical Personnel

RN
Needed for ICU & Med-Surg
Top pay, Instant pay,
Sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

05524403




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
1Lake City
RN's & LPN's
P/T & PRN 1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center

Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke

Case Manager
Child/Adult
G'Ville/Trenton
Live Oak/Starke/LakeCity

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Therapist
LCSW/LMHC/Preferred
Masters/CAP Required
Discharge
Planner/Addictions
Emergency
Screener/Outpatient
Therapeutic Foster
Care/Residential
Day Treatment
$35-$57 K
G'Ville/Lake City
Bronson/Trenton/Starke

Counselor
(Bachelors in Human Srvcs)
F/T & PRN
Residential /Rehab/Outpatient
G'Ville & Lake City
Custodial
Lake City
Cook
PRN & P/T

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFVS P


1 M medical
120 Empioiment

Bus t .inulk i'.'ctic Otice
in need o, C'NA \A .PN
lor fuil-lnie posit'tion
Must h.isc c epenence in
patient care tin.igc and in)ictlions
Fa.\ resume to. St-- 1-0.0404



^Senior Home Care

HEALTHCARE
OPPORTUNITIES
You kno what \our patients
need And \ ou a lwa.is to the
extra mile to take sure the\
know\ ho\w iu0Ihk \ on care
Htealth.re professional like
\ou thrin\e here .at Senior Hlotme
('are. a t.ifal-growitIn iidustr,
leader that's itning the healih-
care needs o i oda.i s seniors

OTs-Full-Timne
Lucrative Sign-On Bonus!

PTS, OTs &
SLPs-PRN

RN Supervisor

Appls online
'\,w w w.seniorliomiec.re net
or call 8) 6(>70-5627
F.OIl rug-lFree Workplace
( >'11 'i !." q/ i'I




240 Schools &
2 Education
(1454224S
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-I11/08/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

2 yr old male Siberian husky
w/papers. Black/white w/blue
eyes. He has not been neutered.
Asking $150. (352)949-8322
Black and White Skunk. about 1.5
years old. Has been spayed and
glands removed. All shots are up
to date. $100. 386-623-2443
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China. Silver. Glassware.
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment

Riding
Lawn Mower
$200
386-344-1783


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwxood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars. Trucks. Vans.
$225 & up CASH' Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


Fri & Sat 8 am. Multi Family,
fum. glassw.are, clothes, books.
collectables/antiques & more'
433 S Marion A\e


Mechanic Needed
Hea', truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the
night person. Southern Specialized
Truck & Trailer. IS 41 N
386-752-9754


IBUYI~l


I S E L L T


FEDIJIr IT










Classified Department: 755-5Z440


LAKE C;T REPO E CLASSIFIED ,,-. .


430 Garage Sales
Pl.BBlLSHt.R'S 'OIF.
Ali! IaJd Sa!e Ads
.Milt Rre -Pald

Sat & Sun at 8am R.a:n or hinc
F'-rc-st [-rr of Crourtr, C ('1.h
Prnnlt' : turn hak lth r: iffiT1
)e*clry conrnpultr coll-crible ba:
hlci.s dlni iij '.rr n sets trnfc

440 Miscellaneous
NATI"'RAL (AS heater large
black, free standing '*/opn tlatrra
Sot $50 ie.-., .inrig 5250 obtxj
386-719- 3942
N'(d itoiday cash? Make 75", ,ft
.-riling price at 3' o,' ,In gnrrf nt
sale ALcceptr gen;ctitl, ucd natric
brand clothing sheli & handbag
Call 3M6-752- 6l1 or 755-1759

I ; ..
Likc NeC-* SI(J
ti6- (44-1783

45 Good Things
450 to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp.
$3 a lb, Call to order
9(4-509-3337 or
904485-6853
630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1,2,3 Br MH s for rent. All you
need is $200 to move you in. Rv's
also avl 6 mo mn lease. Water.
mowing garbage container
provided for home or RV
No pets. No Washers Bkgrd Ck
done on all tenants 386-755-5488
I bedm/ hth $150 mo ,Residential
RV lots Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
152)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, I acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep. $(X) month,
386-62 1-22(13 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MIl's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DWMH. in beautiful area, pri-
vate dr, appliances included, Need
to see to appreciate! By appt only
386-752-5617. leave message pls
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1 st and last.
386-365-7402
Kingsley Lake: $800/mo you can
rent your own year-round place at
Kingsley Lake! 2/2 remodeled,
ch/a. Private Dock. 386-752-4339.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/I ba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes waler & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-(X)17
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/I BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 .386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
0iA Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Fully Furnished in park. 14X56.
2br/1.5ba. Washer & Dryer.
Micro. TV. Clean. $8.900. Owned
by non-smoker 386-755-0110
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28.000. 386-364-4940

SMobile Home

D/W Homes of Merit. almost 1/2
acre. on Branford Hwy. Applian-
ces included. Asking $55,000.
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825
710 Unfurnished Apt.
l For Rent


710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
2 1 A;'. e : nd ':, fj"fo S'.'fi
.,r... $S^J ?r :. ;.=.io-


2bdrm I bath ..F i a.:zc a D
"h..A, up S -r-

*2 1 *-/ ;'
\\ l.-t &a. c.
~ 55 .9;5,,
A Landlord You (an l.ose!
2 br Apt% 550 & up -, Greatl
a.ca CH, A a shcr/dry cr hoAup.
3~>-758-9351/352-208-2421
Move in specials available
I & 2 edroomr units
takingng at S350 per renrith
866-755-2421
Reduced, spaious, 2/1. duplex
gaega. I 1300 sq ft. W/D h(ak up.

Tht Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from S125/w,k. Until. & cable incl..
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
I Room Efficiency Apt. Private.
$450. mo plus $50. deposit
Everything furnished. No pets.
386-965-0778
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$ 1.2(X) mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2/1 w/den, on west side, I wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water and
trash included, $650 month +
security pet ok 386-719-9702
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3 possible 4 br/I ba home
located in Lake City (90west)
386-623-9686 or 386-288-0120
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/1.5ba house
close to town.
$750. mo plus deposit.
386-752-8653
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Completely remodeled 4/2 plus
study with carport in quiet area.
$1100 mo plus last and security.
386-867-2283
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Lg 4 br/2ba home on Old Country
Club Rd. Living Rm, Family
Rm/Dining Rm/Kitchen; Recrea-
tion Rm; Fenced Yd. $800/mo;
Sec Dep $800; 386-623-2642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors. W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok.
non smoking environment,
$750/M. 1st, last. $300 sec dep &
pet fee. drive by 10623 Wesson St.
then call 352-377-0720
750l Business&
75 Office Rentals
Great Opportunity
Sunoco Convenient Store for lease
3554 N Hwy 441. Lake City.
813-495-8461
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car. truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days. for an additional $15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
of your vehicle. The pnce of the vehicle must be listed in the ad.
Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bnng your vehicle by and we will take the
picture for you. Private party only'
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.

Fo MreDeais al


790 Vacation Rental'

*,' ; '- F '" r - -:




805 LotI for Sale
5 Acre-s .- L.,, (_ . FL



Pt. BI IHERS \OTiK
All real cta': .7., :n- .,.
nc paperr L, subcA -!o the lair
housing .act 'ahih mrnAi :: ilic-: i
to adiscrtse an. prfc'!cr-Kc
hini lon r i Jo a;."- ra:*. <'a d
')n rA'c ..! r :... c. <
dil-iabilit tjnill.i .:-, or n. -n n-
l origin, or Anl. intcntion to make
such preference lim:rtaon or
discrmunation. Fanlihal status
includes children under the age of
18 Living ith parents or legal
custodians. pregnant omen and
people securing cuatody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper w ill not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are aaila-
ble on an equal opportunity basis
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!"!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1. $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof.
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet. fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

82O Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks'Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


820 --i4




S E FIN %\(.-E! H :: - -.Te
e-- 5E_3 -" B.KL rc ---"-


940 Trucks









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anM 'fMake scffne


SUBSCRIP1ONm


ca$h


ADVERTISE YOUR


GARAGE SALE

WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER


386-755-5445 Only


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293
-1.

ONIC ADS SEN 4 LINES 3 DAYS
eci reO 2 FREE SIGNS!I


(386) 755-5440


SREPORTER Classifieds

m In Print and On Line


' www.lakecityreporter.com


PLA TOWNLCL ITCRS

H -- W-1:---


LEArVES


1-(


3322 W US Hwy 90
386-755-2502


TIMEALL

FALL


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u~iI
~ Ii


BACk

HOUR


Eagle

Properties
(386) 752-9226
Updated Apartments w/
tile floors & fresh pain.
Excellent Location.
From $425 + Sec.
Call for info


I
I
CLOCkS
a
I m11


Martin
OR I HODONTICS
( 1 1.1\ \kRII\ DM D
755-1001
701 SW Si 47 Lk. City. R. 3202S


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IF V N K C A B B T I M E W
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n7 FALL BACK!
Find all 18 of the 'Fall Back' related words hidden in the
word search above. Words can be found in the banners
on the ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and return it
to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, FL
I by 5:00pm, for your chance to win

ENTRY FORM
Name:


Phone Number:__________
Address:

Subscriber: -- Yes I No
Deadline is Honday, lowember 8, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.
Lake City Reporter


"AAA" Help Bail Bonds
Ac hpe ". 'u ne'- er need Ls.
Mut in. C .:. ) d
"Help- is a phone call away!
Office: (904) 397-9111
Cell: (904) 318-0118
Email: antjames a helpbail.net
wii.helpbail.net






COLP


AU~htAh


GAINEY


AIITOMOIVE

&TOWING










Dees-Parrish
Famil Fiuneral Home



*>s.. ^

458 Su"a Mwnm Awum
Lat C"p. Fiarn 32025
f,:0S6)75 '32-1234 Fu3S6)752-70



I 'PAR -



FANTASTIC

FENCING


Randy
386-454-9630
f ". Elliot
386-961-8744






CLASSIFIED


AR ', Q T Buy One Pizza .


rW!.r
FAM LY SR.EI ALS' betUne : "A f I







H FAEE I V .





LA C F Ii
4 -- 2- -' OO
i iji ,fi.i ,


WITNESS
-CENTER


E m .


p r nN \\ Ir1, ( 1011
J \pirr, % ,.t-ibl r 10 ':(1(I


www.aspontakecIty.com


I v
Rountree
( 4, TOYOTA

Parts & Service
4310 W US Hwy ,),
(386) 755-0631
Monday-Friday 7ant-5pPn


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Must cair & truck,
Plus tax & supphes
Not valId with any other offer
expires 11 30 10


--l a e-c l,


r:.


I MONTH MEMBERSHIP
Now Reg.
Only30 s50
Or as low as $20 a month for longer term.
* No Key Ilepoiil # No enrollmerrt Fee
Other restrictions may apply
Westfield Square LAKE QT..
386-752-0749 -
"Lake City's Best Since 1. .I


MOVE IN FOR ONLY $49.A

One Month FREE Rent! (Wile Supplies Lost


GREENTREE TOWNHOUSE


AMBERWOOD HILLS
, v IM aVn-


2 BEDROOM / 1 BATH
OR 2 BEDROOM & 1 12 BATH
Free water/sewer, laundry facility


WINDSOR ARMS


WAYNE MANOR


1 BEDROOM / 1 BATH
OR 2 BEDROOM & 1 BATH
Washer & Dryer Hookups
Free water/sewer


COLUMBIA ARMS


2 BEDROOM / 1 BATH
Washer & Dryer Hookups


r'. -.

2 BEDROOM / 1 BATH/11/2 BATH/ 2 BATH
FREE 200 Channels Dish Network, Gated
Community, pool, fitness facility, washer &
dryer hookups, tankless hot water heater,
energy efficient appliances


1 BEDROOM / 1 BATH
OR 2 BEDROOM & 1 BATH
Pool, picnic area, playground,
laundry facility


PRIC I NOG B 10 "7

CALL NOW! 754-1800 or 758-8029


MoSt cars & trucks
vyires 11'30' lE)


- I- - g w__=_ am -cvr~a,


..^ c l|i l|~i.~im .ii i-i .100S


z -I -1 1- z


- ---------------


Redwicle










Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, November 7, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest


Watch out

for Brown

Patch lawn

disease

Water is vital-
Wly impor-
tant to a
healthy
lawn, but
many homnieowners use too
much of a good thing.
'The result of regularly
overwatering is a lawn
that cannot comni)ete well
for dominance in its own
space.
'he root systems remain
very shallow and can't seek
out lower level nutrients
and moisture. During times
of drought or freezes,
weeds are much more
likely to outcomnpete grass
with feeble roots. Some
weeds that prefer moist
areas, such as dollarweed
and r.dg -' thrive in over-
watered yards.
During the fall months,
lawns require about l-
inch water once a week.
As winter sets in, cooler
temperatures slow the
growth of grass and lessen
the water requirements.
Throughout the winter,
lawns will thrive on %-inch
of water every other week.
Water your plants during
the early morning hours
because there is less loss
from evaporation.
Be on the watch for
the disease Brown Patch
in your lawn. It spreads
when the temperatures
cool down, so it can be a
problem from November
through May. You may
first notice it ,ilier a heavy
rain or a stretch of highIl
humid days.
The disease first appears
as small patches in the
grass about a foot across,
but can spread to several
feet across. The grass first
turns yellow, then reddish-
brown or light brown as it
(lies. The fungus attacks
the grass deep down by the
soil line so that nutrients
and water cannot move up
the blades.
There are some things
you can do to help avoid
Brown Patch in your lawn.
Excess moisture hastens
the spread, so don't forget
to reduce irrigation in the
fall and winter.
Don't apply fertilizer in
the fall or winter, either.
Extra nitrogen will make
the grass more susceptible
to disease.
Finally, when it is nec-
essary to mow, raise the
mower deck so the grass
has strength to 'fight back.'
For a healthy lawn and
responsible water conser-
vation, let you lawn tell you
when to irrigate.
For more information on
how to determine your irri-
gation needs, visit http:
edis. itas. ufl. cdu IJ-025
The Columbia County
Master Gardeners can help
you with lawn problems.
Call 7 2 -.
Join them at the down-
town library ait 2 p.m. on
Nov. 20 lor a presentation
on Trees and Shrub Care.

* D N;chelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent w'th the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences


. Scenes from the Columbia County Fair on Wednesday.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter

1: People are seen visiting vendors, rides and other attractions on the midway.
2: Nicole Rivera, 7, sinks her teeth into a blue raspberry snow cone while visiting the fair.
3: A couple waits to board the 'Gravitron Alien Abduction' ride.
4: Lake City residents enjoy a ride on the Merry-Go-Round. Pictured are Kane Albritton
(from left), 2, his aunt Maralisa Reed and her daughter Nevaeh, 4.
5: Melrose Park Elementary School pre-K students Wyatt Gialbrach (left), 4, and Jeremy
Calhoun, 4, ride the 'Thunder Birds.'
6: Carolina Nock, of Sarasota, performs about 30 feet above the ground during a Pirates
of the Sky aerial show.








2D P^"'E C .TEPR. LIFE SNDAY NOVEMBER "7 2010


Lawn maintenance: If the grass is green, mow it


I know, it is late fall
and the warm season
grasses are going
dormant, so you are
not worried about
mowing your lawn unless
you have over-seeded with
ryegrass to keep a green
lawn all winter which we
can do here in the south.
Most people do not
over-seed as they like the
break from mowing, and
not maintaining a lawn all
year saves money. In a few
months, however, it will
be spring again and the
start of a new growing and
mowing season.
People often ask me
about weeds in their yard
when I give seminars on
home lawn maintenance
or even when I see them
around town.
In a half-joking man-
ner, I ask, "What color are
the weed?" The slightly
amazed response I usually
get is, "Why, it's green" to
which I respond, "Then
mow them."
It is not the answer usu-


ally desired until I explain.
The questioner usually
wants me to mention a list
of herbicides that will rid
their lawn of all but the
desired grass.
It is difficult to main-
tain a pure monoculture
of one grass type. There
are safe herbicides that
can be used, but one has
to be vigilant in their use,
and such treatment can be
expensive.
Sometimes the best
thing to do is to let nature
run her course and just
mow what you have,
depending on how bad the
weed infestation is and
what type of weeds are
present.
If you have a decent
stand of a warm season
grass like St. Augustine,
bahiagrass, or centipede
with some weeds inter-
spersed, the easiest, less
costly, and most environ-
mentally-friendly thing to
do is to just mow what you
have.
In most cases, after


John R. Piersol
john.poerso4Vgc ec-
mowing at the right height
with sharp mower blades,
the lawn will look very
good, and the weeds will
not be that noticeable.
A case in point is my
own yard. I seeded with
Argentine Bahiagrass in
the spring of 1988. I never
watered, but I was lucky
enough to catch enough
spring rains to get good
germination.
I had a decent stand
of bahiagrass with some
native common bermudag-
rass mixed with it.
Over the years, my
lawn evolved and I never
watered, did minimal
fertilization, and I just let
nature take over.


It really was interesting
to watch the transition of
grasses depending on the
, weather. During hot, dry
summers, the rugged and
heat-tolerant bahiagrass
and bermudagrass would
- dominate with, of course. a
mix of a few weeds.
During wet periods, I
had good stands of native
carpetgrass and centi-
pede and the bahia and
Bermuda were suppressed
as the wet environment
encouraged the carpet and
centipede.
Remember, I only plant-
ed bahiagrass, so how did
the other grasses get in
my lawn?
Centipede, common
Bermuda, and carpetgrass
are quite common in
native turf areas, so they
were there, and took off
when the environment was
right for them.
Last year, we had
enough rain for most of
the spring and summer.
I had a great stand of
centipede in both the back


and front yard. again with
other grasses and weeds
mixed in. but the dominant
grass was centipede and it
looked good.
So what main mainte-
nance practice did I do over
the years?
I just mowed what I had,
and with sharp blades on
my mower and mowing
the right height, and with a
changing mowing pattern,
my yard, at least to me,
looked good.
I have given talks at our
local Lake City Garden
Club, and I have mentioned
the "If it is green, mow it"
method of lawn mainte-
nance, and the ladies always
received my explanation
with interest.
In fact, longtime and very
active garden club member
Martha Ann Ronsonet told
me recently she was writing
a gardening book and that
she used a quote from me.
I was flattered, and I
thought that she was going
to include some brilliant
horticultural technique I


had mentioned. Martha
Ann said she was going
to include. -f it is green.
mow it." I still was flattered.
because t hat is me; keep it
simple.
With our current environ-
mental concerns, the "if it
is green, mow it" technique
for home lawn maintenance
makes more sense than
ever.
It results in less water-
ing, less fertilization, and
no herbicide use except
in extreme cases, where
one might want to use a
non-selective herbicide like
Round-Up to kill out a small
section of a noxious weed.
So, next spring. get your
mower in good operat-
ing condition, keep your
mower blades sharp, cut at
the right height, and just
mow what you have and be
happy.

* John R. Piersol is direc-
tor of Golf and Landscape
Operations at Florida
Gateway College. He can be
reached at 386-754-4225.


March of Dimes to give away diamond necklace


By TODD WILSON
twIlson@lakectyreporter.coti

A new fundraiser is in
place for Thursday night's
March of Dimes Holiday
Magic event A custom dia-
mond necklace and match-
ing earrings will be won by
a lucky patron at the event.
The Suwannee Valley
Board of Directors of the
March of Dimes is conduct-
ing a drawing for the dia-
monds. Tickets are avail-
able now and at the door
the night of the event for
$25 each.
The Holiday Magic
fundraiser event is set
for 5:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet hall.
"Peter Francis at Joye's


Gems designed and donat-
ed the necklace and ear-
rings for the March of
Dimes specific mission
funding," said Maureen
Lloyd, March of Dimes
Suwannee Valley board
member. "We have a Fund
the Mission call every year
at our event to help raise
money and awareness for
the March of Dimes."
Francis' design, called the
"Circle of Love," is a round
diamond necklace made of
white gold. It is valued at


$2,500, said Ferne Mann,
March of Dimes Suwannee
Valley board member.
"We heard about the
Ocala group doing some-
thing similar to raise money
and we thought this would
be something very similar
to our Fund the Mission
event," Mann said.
Fund .the Mission has
been a traditional seg-
ment of the annual March
of Dimes Holiday Magic
event. Besides- the- silnt
auction, the Fund the


Mission event usually sees
a large cash donation, then
has a cash match from
another donor.
Mann and Lloyd said this
year, the group wanted to
take a different approach
and decided on the draw-
ing fundraiser instead.
"This is a great fund-
raiser," Uoyd said. "You
can spend $25 for a ticket
and you might win the dia-
monds."
Tickets are available
in advance from Ward's
Jewelers, Rountree-Moore
Toyota, 1st Street Music
& Sound Co., First Federal
Bank of Florida and all loca-
tions of Mercantile Bank.
For more information,
call Maureen Lloyd at 752-
4885 .


COURTESY PHOTO
A diamond necklace and matching earrings valued at $2,500
will be given away Thursday night as part of the March of
Dimes Holiday Magic fundraiser.


ENGAGEMENT


Williams-Spradley
Virginia Dixon of Branford
announces the engagement and
approaching marriage of her daugh-
ter Delaine Diane Williams of Lake
City to Jonathan Michael Spradley of
Lake City. He is the son of Michael
and Natasha Spradley of Lake City.
The bride-elect is a 2006 graduate
of Bell High School. She is currently
enrolled at Florida Gateway College
pursuing multiple degrees: an A.S. in
graphic design technology and a gen-
eral studies A.A degree. She plans to
graduate in 2011. She is employed
at Remax Professionals Inc. in Lake


COURTESY PHOTO
Delaine Diane Williams and Jonathan
Michael Spradley
City as an IT assistant to Realtors.
Her hobbies include photography


and all outdoor activities.
The future groom is a 2003 graduate
of Columbia High School. He earned
a HVAC certification from LCCC
then earned an apprenticeship cer-
tificate from Santa Fe College where
he obtained the honor of top appren-
tice of his class. He is employed at
Country Comfort Heating and Air-
conditioning as a service technician.
His hobbies include hunting, fishing
and many other outdoor activities.
The wedding is planed for 4:30 p.m.
Nov. 20 at Hopeful Baptist Church in
Lake City.
A reception will fallow at Hopeful
Life Center.


Hedges-Franks
Heather Denise Hedges
of Lake City and David
Junior Franks of Lake City
were united in marriage
Nov. 4 at the Christian
Service Center in Lake
City. The bride is the
daughter of Angela and
Philip Douglas of Lulu.
The groom is the son of
David and the late Janet
Franks of Hamilton, Ala.
Bill Peeler officiated the
ceremony. Flower girls were
Alexus and Alyssa. The cou-
ple will live in Lake City.


Heather Denise Hedges and
David Junior Franks


WEDDING


Smith-Haase
Dana Michelle Smith of Simpsonville,
S.C. and Keith Michael Haase of Lake
City were united in marriage Sept 18 at
Simpsonville United Methodist Chdrch in
Simpsonville, S.C.
The bride is the daughter of Garry and
Brenda Smith of Simpsonville, S.C. The
groom is the soft of Richard and Mary Ann
Haase of Lake City.
The bride was given in marriage by her
father, Garry R. Smith.
The Rev. Roland Smith, grandfather of
the bride, and Rev. Nelson Stokes offici-
ated the ceremony.
Alex Wilcox of Columbia, S.C. was the
man of honor. Carolyn Quarles of Rock
Hill, S.C. was the maid of honor.
kBridesmaids were: Sara Kelley of
Maulding, S.C., friend of the bride; Elena
Oksanish of Boston, Mass., friend of'the
bride; Melanie Sarkissian of West Chester
Penn., friend of the bride; and Arika Smith
of Columbia, S.C., sister-in-law of the
bride.
Justin Pierce of Phoenix, Ariz. was the
best man.
Groomsmen were: Brian Calkins of
Philip, Neb., friend of the groom: Matthew
Haase of Germany, brother of the groom;
Michael Smith of Columbia, S.C., brother
of the groom; and Eric Wright of Grand
Island, Neb., friend of the groom.
The ringbearer was Kenton Haase, son of
the groom. Elaine Owens of Simpsonville.
S.C. was the wedding director.
Musicians were Beverly Stabler, pianist;
and Mr. and Mrs. John Center, vocalists,
all of Simpsonville, S.C.
The reception was held at Holly Tree


Dana Michelle Smith and Keith Michael Haase

County Club in Simpsonville. S.C.
After a honeymoon in Sedona, Ariz. the
couple will live in Lake City.
The bride graduated from Hillcrest
High School in Simpsonville. S.C. She
graduated from Winthrop University and
Valdosta State University with a master's
degree in speech/language pathology. She
is employed by Suwannee Bend Services
in Jonesville.
The groom graduated from Rushville
High School in Nebraska. He graduated
from Lake City Community College with a
degree in nursing. He is employed by the
Health Center of Lake City.


1. -' --rPI J i .J


"This is a great fundraiser.
You can spend $25 for a ticket and
you might win the diamonds."

Maureen Lloyd
March of Dimes Suwannee Valley board member


WEDDING


Page Editor. Roni Tc danes 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD S ,,-- E 2010


DEAR ABBY


HOROSCOPES


Driver's distraction is sure


sign of trouble on the road


DEAR ABBY: A woman
driving the car ahead of me
was swerving and weaving in
anid out of the next lane. She
would slow down, then speed
up, and I thought she might
have been drunk-
As I pulled up beside her.
I realized she was using sign
language to communicate with
her passenger. She would turn
her head toward the passen-
ger, signing with both hands
and ignoring her responsibili-
ties of being a good driver. Is
this legal?
That woman was driving
recklessly, and I don't think
she should have been driving
if she couldn't pay attention to
the road. SAFE DRIVER
IN LEXINGTON, S.C.
DEAR SAFE DRIVER:
According to the Beverly Hills,
Calif., Police Department, the
use of sign language is legal as
long as it doesn't interfere with
safe driving. The state of Cali-
fornia has a basic speed law
that states: "No person shall
drive a vehicle upon a state
highway at a speed greater
than is reasonable or prudent
having due regard for weather,
visibility, the traffic on, and the
surface and width of, the high-
way, and in no event which en-
dangers the safety of persons
or property."
In the case you have de-
scribed, the person who was
signing to her passenger was
in violation of this law. I'm sure
your state has similar regula-


Abigail Van Buren
www dearobby comr

tions.
DEAR ABBY: When my
father-in-law, "Herb," comes
to visit, he rummages through
our personal belongings
whether they be in the garage,
basement or storage closet. He
feels compelled to "fix" any-
thing he thinks needs fixing or
rearranging. I am certain Herb
thinks.he's being helpful, but
we have addressed this issue
with him many times and we're
always met with defensiveness
and lack of understanding. He
justifies his actions by listing
all of the good deeds he does
for us some of which are
legit.
My husband and I are at a
loss. We love Herb and want
him to be a part of our lives
and the lives of our children,
but this makes us very uncom-
fortable. At times, we even
feel violated in our own home.
Where do we go from here?
- HERB'S FAMILY IN
WISCONSIN
DEAR FAMILY: Your
father-in-law may feel so com-
fortable at your place that he
has it confused with HIS place.
From here, you install a lock


on every door in your home
that you do not want Herb to
enter without supervision-
And so he won't be bored, plan
ahead and consider setting
aside some projects that do
need fixing, so be won't be sit-
ting around with nothing to do
that makes him feel usefuL
DEAR ABBY: I recently
had a dinner party in my con-
do. One of my guests brought
along his new roommate,
whom I had never met. During
the evening, the young man
kept placing his foot on my
coffee table and rubbing the
sole of his shoe over the edge
and corner. I didn't say any-
thing because I didn't want to
make him feel uncomfortable.
After the party ended, I real-
ized my coffee table had been
damaged by what he did.
What is a polite way to tell
someone to remove his or her
foot from my table without
causing a scene or embarrass-
ing him? MITCH IN CHI-
CAGO
DEAR MflTCH: Offer the
person a footstool or some-
thing to place under the of-
fending foot that would protect
your table. Or, take an even
more direct approach and say
to the person in a calm man-
ner, "Please don't put your foot
there because the finish on
my coffee table is easily dam-
aged."
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): F.d -a way .:o _u_,,
your t m.e and skill-. n suc
a way thai you carn s-nimuL:e
your earning pu'.c'-cZ '.-
ting up a budget w*il help but
you must disciplne y'.iur-li
and stick to the limit yuu e-t
for unnecessary purcha-s-

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Take care of any unlin-
ished business. A relation-
ship you have with someone
can be enhanced with a little
tender loving care. Consider
starting a small business that
can help bring your income
up a notch. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Get serious before
someone objects to the way
you are handling personal and
emotional matters. You must
address situations and act
responsibly if you want to be
taken seriously in the future.
Don't lose out because you
did too little, too late. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You have plenty
to gain both personally and
professionally by being true
to your word. Taking care of
personal needs will help to


1 -- .',D
Eugenia Word
--'. stress Focus on love
and r:a-nce in the evening.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You !:may have the energy to
lake On a challenge but don't
be --o. sure you can win. You
-w.ill b- up against someone
with stamina. determination
and a strong will. You are bet-
ter off joining forcing than
fighting. There is strength in
numbers. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Put more thought into
what you want to do. You
may need to pick up some
information, knowledge or
experience in order to move
forward. Mixing what you
know with what you learn will
increase your earning poten-
tial. ****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Put your heart and soul
into whatever you take on to-
day and you will bypass some-
one trying to make your life
difficult. Focus on your needs
and follow through with your
plans, regardless of what any-
one does or says. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luls Campos
CaIOpt y C ephr cryptoa-,tgn a, 1 c -at! ,o0 quou1isob y l-r6o to p l. p1-x a.sI R'a tn
.a ...', "r s d. .r h I o-a h'r
Today's clue 0 equls P
"Z LS J F Y HZ LYIZ F D AFX Y WZJ FGE
DSLYSOGY M SR WZ J Y Z HIRDW SO
BZNHWFGE MSR CISL ZCZI MSR
OIY NYGT FN'D GSN NWYIY. TZIMA
W Z G Z W
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "God is the perfect poet." Robert Browning "I've
written some poetry I don't understand myself." Carl Sandburg
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-8


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Be creative. inuaginative
and spontaneous. Romance is
looking good. so engage in a
speciAl night. It promises to
bring you high returns, in-
stant gratification and some
interesting personal changes.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Your ability to
take hold and get things done
will interest someone who will
offer you a proposition. The
changes you've been waiting
for are within reach but you
may have to go about getting
what you want by taking an
unorthodox route. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't feel pres-
sured or put pressure on
someone. Slow down and
wait until the moment is right
for everyone involved. Unless
motives are right, it will be a
waste of time. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): There is value in
what you have to offer, so har-
ness your skills and market
strategically. Believe in your
ability. A passionate approach
will help build a support
group and the confidence
to follow through with your
plans. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't lose sight of your
goals. Sitting back and relax-
ing with people who share a
common interest will help
you flush out ideas that have
the potential to make money.
Reveal a secret you've been
keeping if it will help you close
a deal or earn you a place in
someone's heart. **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


FANGS FOR THE MEMORY By Elizabeth C. Gorski / Edited by Will Shortz 1- 2 3 41 | 11

NOTE: WHEN THIS PUZZLE IS COMPLETED, CONNECT THE CIRCLED LETTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER 16 1 718 1920 '21
FROM A TO R TO SHOW THE OUTLINE OF AN 84-ACRoss. 0J


Across
1 Home of
"Hardball"1
6 "Love is blind,"
e.g.
11 Moolah
16 Even
17 Doltish
21 Odd Fellows'
meeting place
22 Kind of acid
23 1922 Max
Schreck film
24 Words of
empathy
25 Heavyweight
26 High-water mark
27 "Enough, Jorge!"
28 Super ___ (old
game console)
30 It might come
after you
31 Balls
(Hostess snack
food)
32 As written
33 Tijuana table
36 Parking spot
38 Actor McGregor
40 "Beetle Bailey"
dog
44 Lover of Isolde
46 Oodles
50 Cozy place?
52 Wagnerian opera
setting
54 Crime scene
matter
55 Saturnalia
participants
56 1995 Eddie
Murphy film
59 Tech whiz
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hhone: 1-900-285-5656.
1.49 each minute; or.
with a credit card. 1-800-
814-5554.


61 Athenian porch
62 Some gravesite
decorations
63 Arctic herder
66 Composer Ned
68 1931 Bela Lugosi
film
72 Fix, as laces
73 Coolers, for short
74 System of beliefs
77 "The Rights of
Man" writer
78 Mauna ___
80 Argentine article
81 Furry adoptee
82 Water brand
84 [See
instructions]
85 Cobb of "12
Angry Men"
86 A bit of cheer?
87 Like some fondue
pots
89 Halloween cry
90 Compel
92 When Italian
ghouls come
out?
93 Poodle's greeting
95 Bygone flightless
bird
96 ___ Bator
97 1979 George
Hamilton film
105 "Fine"
108 Stage direction
that means
"alone"
109 Ring figures
113 1987 Adrian
Pasdar film
116 ___Tin Tin
117 2008 Robert
Pattinson film
119 Bones also
called cubiti
120 "Piece of cake!"


Pianist/composer
Schumann
124 Tandem
.. twosome
125 1986 Brad
Davis film
126 George who
wrote "The
Spanish Gypsy"
127 Walk the earth
128 "___ Ben
Adhem"
129 Belonging to
you and me
130 Many visitors to
Legoland

Down
I Coconut filler
2 Acreage fig.
3 When French
ghouls come
out?
4 Fruit-based
fountain treat
5 Make a copy of
6 Sucks up
7 Crusoe's creator
8 Breezed through
9 Grade school door
sign
10 Noted New York
eatery
11 Russian pancakes
12 What
Chippendale
furniture was
made in
13 Cheese ball?
14 "Slumdog
Millionaire"
locale
15 Subpar grades
17 Gershwin's
"Concerto __
18 Canine cousin
19 "Dd ___!" ("Stop
procrastinating!"


20 Maestro's sign
29 Skull caps?
32 Sly sorts
33 "Jersey Shore"
airer
34 All alternative
35 Medal of valor
37 Like the inside of
a coffin
39 Used, as a dinner
tray
41 Bernard
Malamud's first
novel
42 Rocky pinnacle
43 Saturn's wife
45 Souvenir from
Scotland
47 Early fifth-
century year
48 "Slander" author
Coulter
49 Bit of Vaseline
51 Communication
syst.
53 Longtime Yankee
nickname
55 Roman squares
57 O.K. Corral
figure
58 Exclude, with
"out"
59 Bunch at a
grocery store
60 Epoch in which
mammals arose
64 One getting hit
on at a party?
65 Female fowl
67 Selfish person's
cry before and
after "all"
69 Common rhyme
scheme
70 "Later!"
71 Biblical
preposition
72 N.F.L. defensive
lineman B. J.


75 ___ soda
76 "... And I'm the
queen of
England!"
78 Serving on a
stick
79 Sushi bar order
83 Sarah McLachlan
hit
85 It may be hidden
at a hideout
88 Shopping center
regulars
91 Kind of warfare


94 Units of cream:
Abbr.
95 Slush pile
contents: Abbr.
98 Least typical
99 Cold war
broadcasting
inits.
100 Gift giver's
words
101 Epic translated
by Alexander
Pope
102 Reaches
altogether


103 "Vous etes ___
104 Sprinkled with
baby powder
105 Like a locked
lavatory
106 Old-style fax.
107 Hawaiian
veranda
110 Question
shouted in
exasperation
11 Spasm
112 Some of the fine
print on sports
pages


114 1988 #1 country
album
115 Newsman
Marvin
117 Layer
118 Jazz
saxophonist/fluti
st Frank
121 Ontario's ___
Canals
122 "A ___ tardi"
("See you later."
in Italy)


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.


A L M S T H A T C H T O E P l


BACH H 0 RAT SUNDAN CE
SOTBINENGLAND ATTORN EY
AVENUE T AN TI L
NT HOLDEMCAULFIELD
DAL TOROID RAN S
USA ORNATE PANARAkBj !
CRAPSSUZETTE JON NERNA
T CC T O TAC
OT OE NOS0 SLOTSOFL UICK
ADENI ABEAM TO OS

E RRRI E E IE EDA
EED PET M8URTB8ACICARAT
STSAND LENORENHIO1TA

DONTROULETTE0UT TOG A'S
IOR ABBA UPSTART
CROAT IAN STAKEPLATTER
T E NDERE P E RG0L OHISO0
ASiEiNTS 11[D ENE MIATS


9 8 L 9 1 6 L Z V


6 LLZ 8 9 c9


9 Z E L 9 L 6 8


L 97 8 L 9 9 61


8 69 1V7L LS 9 ZL


C L 9 Z 6 9 IV 8 L


L 9 8 6 v z9 LE


L 6 C 9 L 8 1 9


89 L6J LJ


863


64 7 2


5 8


4 2 7 3


7 1


5 6 2 1


9 1 3


82 49


2 9 3 1


t


Page Editor: Emogene Grahnam 754-0415


CTKl








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"My family's been fishing for eight generations. It's just a way of life.
That's why we've got to get this cleaned up."
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Commercial Fisherman,
Pascagoula, Mississippi



When the spill hit, a lot of people said it would be the end. BP said
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Putting People to Work
The first thing they did was rent my boat and hire me to help with
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Staying for the Long Haul
When they capped the well in July and finally killed it, we were all
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Getting Back to Normal
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~i191~




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