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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01445
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/06/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01445
System ID: UF00028308:01445
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






State Qualifier
Fort White beats
Bradford, 27-22.
Sport- I Q
00017 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007HISTOR
205 SMNA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Don't
forget!
Turn back your
clocks one hour.


Saturday, November 6, 2010


ry Reporter


www.lakecityrepor .com Vol. 136, No. 249 E 75 cents


LEARNING


HERE


FOOD COMES FROM


.I~ ~ P-


Law enforcement

warns about calls

for donations


Requests asking
for money to aid
police fraudulent.
From staff reports
Telephone calls solic-
iting donations for the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office and Lake City Police
Department don't give
funds to local law enforce-
ment agencies.
According to information
released by the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Friday, several concerned
citizens have'contacted the
sheriff's office about such
calls soliciting donations.
"Your state, county and
local law enforcement agen-
cies are publicly funded and


will never solicit donations
from the community," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.
"A fraternal law enforce-
ment organization may
state that the donations
they receive will benefit the
agencies; however, none of
this money is returned to
out local law enforcement
agencies."
Seifert said the Florida
Sheriff's Youth Ranches is
an endorsed charity by the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office and that organization
may send residents a packet
by mail, but will never solic-
it funds via telephone.
DONATIONS continued on 3A


Help is needed

to decorate for

the holidays


JASON MATTHEW.WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Pinemount Elementary School student Isabella Acevedo pets a Peking duck while Kaicie Chasteen, of the Clovers of
Columbia 4-H Club, makes a presentation during the From the Farm to Table program at the Columbia County Fairgrounds


Live Stock barns Thursday.

Program teaches
first-graders the
origins of food.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Most 6-year-
olds are
aware
that meat,
vegeta-
bles and other commodi-
ties are sold at grocery
stores. The source of such
products, however, might
not be so apparent.
Local first graders sat in
on classes at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds Live
Stock barns and stables
Thursday where they
learned about the true
origins of the foods they
consume on a daily basis.
Derek Barber, a
University of Florida IFAS
cooperative extension
office livestock and natural
resources agent, said the
children toured the area as
part of the program from


10 a.m. 1 p.m.
He said 32 classes,
with 517 first graders
from Summers, Eastside,
Niblack, Melrose Park,
Fort White and Pinemount
elementary schools
attended the event, as well


as students from Epiphany
Catholic School.
"The From the Farm
to Table program is an
educational program
where schools in Columbia
County can bring out their
first-grade class and basi-


cally learn about where
our food comes from,"
he said. "Unfortunately,
today a lot of youths don't
understand about the
importance of agriculture
FOOD continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter

Above: First-graders
Breann Wingate (from
left), Lyric Butler and
Diamond Coleman pet
Juliet, a 5-month-old goat
featured at the live stock
lessons.


Left: Students pet Piggy
while she rests as they
pass by.


CALLUS: Opinion ................ 4A
(386) 752-1293 6 Faith ................... 6A
SUBSCRIBE TO Sunny Obituaries .............. 5A
THE REPORTER: ", / Advice & Comics......... 4B
Voice: 755-5445
Fx. 75.2-900n WEATHER. 2A Puzzles ................. 2B


Volunteers will
get park ready for
Festival of Lights.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Spreading the holiday
cheer in Lake City is going
to take the help of commu-
nity volunteers and spon-
sors.
The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce is looking for
volunteers to help decorate
the low areas in Olustee
Park, said Dennille Folsom,
chamber executive direc-
tor. The City of Lake City
decorates the street lights
and trees.
As many people as pos-
sible 'are wanted for the
decorating.
"We're going to need a
lot of help," she said.
Decorating starts at
4 p.m. Monday but peo-
ple can come after work


and still get in on the fun,
Folsom said.
Volunteers will help put
up Christmas lights and
decorations in the park.
Any areas left over will be
finished on Tuesday.
The park will officially be
lit Nov. 27 for the Festival
of Lights, and decorations
will stay up through the
new year.
"You'll get to be a -part
of decorating the park and
helping put the city in the
Christmas spirit," Folsom
said. "It will be a good expe-
rience to meet new people
and have fun."
Also, the chamber still
needs sponsors for the
Festival of Lights and Santa
Photo Night.
Both holiday events are
enjoyed by the entire com-
munity, she said.
"It's a great way to asso-
ciate your business with a
positive community event,"
Folsom said.


Max Brod Trio to

perform as part

of concert series


Schubert, Dvorak
produced works
group recorded.
From staff reports
The Max Brod Trio will
perform at 7:30 p.m. Nov.
11 at First Presbyterian
Church.
The performance is the
last in the Friends of Music
Annual Concert Series, a
cultural outreach program
of the church. It features
chamber musicians or
groups from all over the
world.
Trio members are Petr


TODAY IN
FAITH
I he I-' ope :it:.
le :-_ ith-.:'. : ':.p,:l


Matejak on violin, Kerstin
Strassburg on piano and
Maximilian von Pfeil on
cello.
The members of the trio
joined to form a permanent
ensemble in 2005 during
the European Union spon-
sored and initiated intercul-
tural concerts.
The name, Max Brod,
refers to the historic per-
sonality, a renowned Czech
writer, composer and biog-
rapher/friend of German-
language novelist Frankz
Kafka, who combined
BROD continued on 3A


COMING
SUNDAY
, t I . .ii- iiI I


-


rax: / 1Vv


F


--.d - - -










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010


3 Friday:
Afternoon: 4-0-0
Evening: 0-8-3


Friday:
" Afternoon: 7-0-8-1
Evening: 4-4-7-1


" Thursday:
1-2-12-29-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Martin knows Shakespeare


NEW YORK
J esse L. Martin has achieved
a fair amount of fame from
roles in Broadway's "Rent"
and TV's "Law & Order" but
he is still awed around Al
Pacino. And that includes Al
Pacino's lunch.
The "Scarface" and "The
Godfather" star was often brought
a ridiculously large, overstuffed
sandwich during rehearsals for the
new Broadway production of "The
Merchant of Venice." Pacino gener-
ously let his fellow actors help them-
selves.
"I swear to God, there are proba-
bly four or five actors that eventually
would get over to that tuna sandwich
and take a big chunk and eat it and
say, 'I'm eating Al's sandwich! This
is Al's sandwich! He said we could
have it,"' Martin says, laughing. "We
get a little geeked out that we get to
eat Al Pacino's sandwich."
Martin, who is quick to smile and
looked jaunty in a flat cap and jeans
during an interview, hastbeen enjoy-
ing life since he ended his nine-year
stint as Detective Ed Green on "Law
& Order," in 2008. He's spent time
in South Africa for a TV show, done
an upcoming indie film in Texas
called "Puncture" and performed
Shakespeare in the Park. He doesn't
regret leaving behind his gold
shield.
"As interesting as you can be and
as hard as you can work, it starts
to feel the same after a while. So
I knew full well that if I didn't get
out of thatposition and get back on
stage or explore other roles, I'd be
really hurting myself. I'd be really
dimming myself as an actor," he
says.
Martin, 40, leapt at the chance
this summer to do two Shakespeare
plays in repertoire for the Public
Theaterin New York's Central


Actor Jesse L. Martin poses for a portrait in New York.


Park "Winter's Tale" and "The
Merchant of Venice." Reviews were
so good for "Merchant" that produc-
ers decided to mount it this month in
a Broadway theater.

Nuns sell Honus Wagner
card for $262,000
BALTIMORE A rare Honus
Wagner baseball card that was
bequeathed to an order of Roman
Catholic nuns has soldat a auction for
$262,000.
The Baltimore-based School
Sisters of Notre Dame put the card
up for sale after inheriting it from the
brother of a deceased nun. The sale
price exceeded the expectations of
auctioneers at Dallas-based Heritage
Auction Galleries.
The nuns will receive $220,000
from the sale. The total sale price
includes a 19.5 percent buyer's pre-
mium. Sister Virginia Muller, who
was entrusted with the card, says
the proceeds will go to the order's


ASSOCIATED PRESS


ministries in more than 30 countries
around the world.
Collector and card shop owner
Doug Walton of Knoxville, Tenn.,
bought the card.
About 60 of the T206 Honus
Wagner cards, produced between
1909 and 1911, are known to exist

Suge Knight to continue
lawsuit against West
MIAMI The attorney for
Marion "Suge" Knight says the rap
mogul plans to appeal a judge's
decision that dismissed his lawsuit
against Kanye West.
Knight was shot in the leg in 2005
at a Miami Beach party hosted by
West, and Knight blames West for
lax security. His lawsuit is seeking
more than $1 million in damages
from West
The shooter has never been identi-
fied.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Director Mike Nichols is
79.
* Country singer Stonewall
Jackson is 78.
* Singer Eugene Pitt (The
Jive Five) is 73.
* Actress Sally Field is 64.
* Pop singer-musician Glenn
Frey (The Eagles) is 62.
* Singer Rory Block is 61.
* TV host Catherine Crier is


56.
* California's first lady, Maria
Shriver, is 55.
* Actress Lori Singer is 53.
* Rock singer Corey Glover
is 46.
* Actor Peter DeLuise is 44.
* Actress Kelly Rutherford
is 42.
* Actor Ethan Hawke is 40.
* Actress Taryn Manning 32.


Daily Scripture



"This is also why you pay taxes,
for the authorities are God's
servants, who give their full
time to governing."

-Romans 13:6


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Hostage situation
a demand for ring

PENSACOLA Court
documents show that
a home invasion in the
Florida Panhandle where
three deputies were shot
began when the alleged
-gunman demanded the
return of a ring.
According to court fil-
ings released this week,
Jackie Rosenbloom called
911 as her ex-boyfriend,
Philip Monier, barged into
her Pensacola home Friday
to search for the ring.
An arrest report states
that the Escambia County
Sheriff's deputies entered
the home and found Monier
holding Rosenbloom
hostage. Authorities say
Monier ignored orders
to drop his gun and fired
several shots at the depu-
ties, using Rosenbloom as
a shield.
One deputy remains hos-
pitalized in intensive care.
Rosenbloom also was shot
and is hospitalized in fair
condition.
Monier is being held on
$2 million bond.

Leaders looking
at veto overrides

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's new Republican
leadership is taking their
newly elected governor at
his word. They're getting
to work.
Incoming Senate
President Mike
Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island, and the speaker
designate, Rep. Dean
Cannon, R-Winter Park,
said Thursday they will
take up several bills vetoed
by outgoing Gov. Charlie
Crist when they return for
an organizational session
Nov. 16.
The most notable include
Crist's veto of a $9.7 mil-
.lion budget item that would
s.pay for treating uninsured


THE WEATHER


-D


MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


HI72D 45 HI177iLO51 HI78LO54


REGIONAL R A MAP-fo'rSa,,ay,' ,N.I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Escambia County Sheriffs Office deputies try to pinpoint the
location of the home-invasion shooting scene from the com-
mand post using a laptop with a GPS Oct. 28 in Pensacola.
A gunman barged into a home, shot and wounded his former .
girlfriend and then exchanged shots with responding sheriffs
deputies, wounding three of them before he was shot and
captured, authorities said.


patients at Shands Hospital
at the University of Florida
and draw down federal
matching money.

Shuttle launch off
until end of month

CAPE CANAVERAL -
Space shuttle Discovery's
final voyage is off until at
least the end of the month
because of a large hydro-
gen gas leak that forced yet
another launch delay.
It's the fourth post-
ponement in a week for
Discovery's mission to the
International Space Station,
with six veteran astronauts
and the first humanoid
robot bound for orbit.
NASA tried to launch
Discovery on Friday, but
a potentially dangerous
hydrogen gas leak cropped
up midway through the
fueling process and the
countdown was halted.
The launch was ini-
tially put off until at least
Monday. But by early after-
noon, it was clear that more
time was needed to fix the
problem on the fuel tank.
"It's a machine and, every


now and then, machines
break," said launch direc-
tor Mike Leinbach. 'We're
not jinxed at all. We're just
dealing with one problem
after another."
NASA is now targeting
Nov. 30 at the earliest
- for Discovery's final lift-
off.
The space agency has to
wait until then because of
unacceptable solar angles
for most of November.
Those sun angles would
cause the shuttle to over-
heat while docked to the
station.
But the launch window
in December lasts just one
week and will jeopardize the
amount of science that can
be conducted. Only three
astronauts will be aboard the
space station then, rather
than the usual six.
When it does launch, it
will be the 39th and final
flight of Discovery, NASA's
oldest and most traveled
shuttle. The shuttle first
flew in 1984. NASA is retir-
ing the fleet and closing out
its shuttle program next
year after three decades.


63/38


Tallassee
62/33

63/39


Saldosta
61/33 e City
Lake3 Cis eill Cape Canaveral
62/3keCity /36 Daytona Beach
62/32 Ft. Lauderdale
\ainesille DanaBeach Fot. LaudMyerdale
,62/34 6 45 Galnesville
SOcala* Jacksonville
63/35 Key West
Orando Cape Canaveral ke City
66/44 6/46 Miami
S \ Naples
o68/ <' West Palm Bach Ocala
S 68/50 Orlando
Ft.L Lauderdal Panama City
Ft.Myers. 69/53 Pensacola
69/44 '* Naples" Tallahassee
'68/46 Miami Tampa
S7(0/51 Valdosta
/ KeyWe* W. Palm Beach


LAKE CITY AA A AC


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


64
46
77
54
90 in 1935
35 in 1945


0.00"
0.37"
38.79"
0.35"
43.98"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunnse torn.
Sunset torn.


7:49 a.m.
6:39 p.m.
6:49 a.m..
5;39 p.m.


MOON ultra-violet
Moonnse today 8:18 a.m. radiation risk
Moonset today 6:56 p.m. for the area om 0
Moonrise tom. 8:24 a.m. to 1 from
Moonset tom. 6:49 p.m.


Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. /, Fore
6 13 21 28 o'Ica,
New First Full Last U.C,


, I. '


Saturday .. ,. day r







--Fr.muit.M.pt,., -,,F,=ea"r ew


On this date in
1988. a strong
winter storm situ
ated over the Great
Lakes Region contain
ued to dump snow
over parts of thme
Onio Valley and the
Great Laies Region
Snow totals of 2-4
inrcnes ,were report
ed along the shores
of Lake Superior.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


casts, data and graph-
S2010 Weather Central
Madison, Wis.
w.weatherpubllsher.com


Ie Connected


* Associated Press


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Fax number .............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of(sbrannon@lakectyreportercom)
Community Newspapers' Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
wished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake CityReporte
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6:30 a.m
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:3(
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The Associated Press. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
All material herein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers shou
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service vice error for same day re-delivery. Afte
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lak'e City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home deliver
Lake City, Ra. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
(twlson@lakecyreporter.com) Circulation...............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
$ 1 12 Weeks................ $26.32
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Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417 12 Weeks.................. $41.40
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r,9 fa.. .. M... A.. .


Sunday
68.'56.pc
66/51/s
72/65/s
72/52/s
63/38/s
62/40/s
.77/65/s
64/36/s
73/63/s
73/54/s
66/41/s
68/51/s
63/41/s
64/43/s
62/34/s
71/53/s
61/34/s
72/62/s


Monday
74,'64,/pc
73/59/s
79/70/pc
77/60/s
71/47/pc
69/48/pc
80/70/pc
72/45/pc
79/68/pc
79/62/pc
72/50/pc
75/57/s
70/49/s
71/50/s
72/41/s
76/60/s
72/38/s
78/67/pc


30nutesbllui
Today's


"


It ATUDAY


I - - --- --- L-


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


N MON Ely


mI UESg


Ki ODJiSl^


*


2 5 Weeks..................$179.4


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-

-





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2












POLICE REPORTS "


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.

Tuesday, Nov. 2
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Franklin Lamar Davis
Jr., 23, Hillcrest Motel,
driving while license sus-
pended/revoked (habitual)
and resisting arrest with-
out violence.
Kimberly Davis, 35,
150 NW Jupiter Court,
warrant Violation of pro-
bation on original charges
of uttering a forgery and
third-degree grand theft.
Debra Suzanne Ezell,
no age given, 942 SW
Sparrow Road, forgery,
uttering forged check,
resisting arrest without
violence and grand theft.
Daniel Ervin Fralick,
26, 10602 209th Road, Live
Oak, warrant Failure to
appear for felony petit theft
charges.
Shadesia A. Fracis, 21,
1120 Silas Dr., Live Oak,
warrant: Credit card fraud.
John L Fulton, 39,


346 NE Voss Road, war-
rant: Parole community
violation and trafficking
cocaine.
Sean M. Keenan, 42,
3865 NW Archer St., war-
rant: Dealing in stolen
property.
Angela Lorraine
Lawrence, 27, 22873 45th
Drive, warrant Failure
to appear on charges of
neglect of a child.
Joel Alan Little, no age
given, 846 NW Jake Glen,
giving false information to
law enforcement officer
during investigation and
uttering forged check.
William Patrick
Reckner II, 19, 1005 SE
Brock Glen, warrant:
Burglary of a dwelling,
petit theft over $100 and
dealing in stolen property
(trafficking).
Wednesday, Nov. 3
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Brian Anthony
Stalnaker, 23, 823 SW Old
Wire Road, Fort White,
burglary of dwelling, third-
degree grand theft and
dealing in stolen property
(trafficking).
Michael Allen, 43, 703
Amberwood Loop, war-
rant Violation of probation


on original charges of
uttering a forgery.
Joseph Michael
Brenton, 30, 113 SW
Sundown Place, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of neglect
of a child and child abuse
(intentional act).
Joshua W. Feagle,
23, 1776 SE County Road
245 A, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charges of burglary of a
structure/conveyance,
dealing in stolen property
and uttering a forgery.
Tammy Hicks, 49, 165
SW Sweet Gum Road, war-
rant: Attempted trafficking
in Oxycodone, introduction
contraband into correction-
al facility and possession of
a controlled substance.
Charles William
Knight IV, 20, 3806 NW
Huntsboro St., warrant:
Order revoking bond for
burglary of a structure
charges.
Tina Michelle
Register, 40, 445 SE April
Lane, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charges of dealing in sto-
len property.

From staff reports.


Agency defends 'Taj


Mahal' courthouse


BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's Department of
Management Services has
disputed an audit criticizing
construction of what crit-
ics dubbed the "Taj Mahal"
courthouse, saying it will be
finished on time and under
the $48.8 million' budget
Despite that point-by-
point rebuttal, incoming
Florida Senate President
Mike Haridopolos said
Friday that he still thinks
DMS Secretary Linda South
should resign.because of the
audit criticism. The Merritt
Island Republican made that
demand last month after
Chief Financial Officer Alex
Sink issued the scathing
review.
"I thought the audit was
accurate," Haridopolos said.
"Secretary South would have
a lot more respect in a lot of
places if she recognized, you
know, 'I made a mistake' as
opposed to the opposite."
South says she has long
planned to leave when Gov.
Charlie Crist's term ends on
Jan. 4, but will not resign
earlier. Crist appointed her
to the post


Sink said some judges
"bullied" the agency into
building opulent quarters
for the 1st District Court of
Appeal in Tallahassee, add-
ing it will cost taxpayers
about $11 million more than
it should have. She said the
building, now nearing com-
pletion, is filled with miles
of mahogany trim, etched
glass and granite desk and
counter tops.
Sink's office says it is
standing by the audit's 'fird-
ings.
The-.48-page ,response
says the agency met all of its
responsibilities and did so
"in 'a professional" manner
while building the facility in
accord with state law and
within appropriations set by
the Legislature. It also notes
the Legislature, not the agen-
cy, increased those appropri-
ations to expand the original
plans and lawmakers as well
as judges served on a panel
that advised department offi-
cials on the project
Even the audit acknowl-
edged the department
broke no laws except for a
$100,000 cap on artwork.
The response also disputes
that finding, arguing large
blow-ups of 400 historic pho-


tos in state archives being
placed on interior walls
should not be considered
"works of art"
Officials initially rejected
a proposal to put up the
framed reproductions, but
the building's architect per-
suaded them to approve
-it, the response says. The
architect argued it could be'
done within the building's
interior design rather than
art budget and similar pho-
tos appear throughout the
Capitol as well as House and
Senate office buildings.
Finally, the agency con-
tends what Sink released
isn't an audit at all because
it did not follow accepted
standards for performance
audits. That includes giv-
ing the agency a chance
to respond before it's
made public. Waiting for
a response, though, would
have delayed its release.
Sink, a Democrat who
ran for governor and lost,
issued the audit three
weeks before Election
Day.
The Legislature was at
odds with South and her
agency even before the
courthouse became news.


Investigation continues


into greyhound deaths


Associated Press

3 EBRO A total of 32
dogs were found dead at a
Panhandle greyhound race
track, some with duct tape
around their necks, accord-
ing to arrest reports filed
at the Washington County
Courthouse.
At least 20 dogs were
initially reported dead in
the kennel at the Ebro
Greyhound Park last week.
The dogs' trainer, Ronald
Williams, faces 37 counts
of animal cruelty one
for each dead dog, plus five
counts for emaciated ani-
mals that were still alive.
He was being held Friday
at the Washington County
jail on $74,000 bail. It was
unclear whether he was
being represented by an
attorney.
Sheriff's deputy Steve
Russ initially could not
enter the kennel because
the stench was overwhelm-
ing, he wrote in one of the
reports.
Russ and an official with
the Florida Department of
Business and Professional
Regulation were examining
the kennel. During their
investigation, Williams


arrived in a blue GMC
truck, Russ wrote.
Williams told them that
the dogs were all fine when
he had checked on them
two days earlier, and he
added that he believed the
kennel's air conditioner
had broken and caused the
animals' deaths, according
to Russ' report.
Williams also said he
split his time between Ebro
and a kennel he owned in
Mobile, Ala., Russ. wrote.
When an officer with a
breathing device walked
through the kennel, dead
dogs were found in cages
and plastic bags and five
dogs were still alive, accord-
ing to the reports.
Three of the living dogs
had duct tape wrapped


around their necks.
"The tape was tight
enough the dogs could bare-
ly breathe," Russ wrote.
Some of the dead dogs
also had tape wrapped
around their necks, accord-
ing to another report written
by Sgt Wade Boan.
Necropsies are planned
to determine what killed
the dogs found dead in the
kennel, said Chief Assistant
State Attorney Greg Wilson.
The investigation at the
Ebro park began after a
local greyhound adoption
group alerted authorities
that Williams had brought
in eight underweight dogs
on Oct 25.
Wilson said more charg-
es are expected against
Williams.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Fair's, Steer and Swine Sale Grand Champion

Fort White student Holly Polhill, 17, shows her 1,170-pound steer at the Steer and Swine Sale
at the Columbia County Fairgrounds on Thursday. Central States Enterprises bought the 16-
month-old steer for $3.10 a pound. 'It feels good,' Polhill said. 'This is my last year. I'm happy
I won Grand Champion and Senior Division Showmanship.'



FOOD: Kids learn about its origin

Continued From Page 1A


and Florida agriculture and
it's importance to our state
economy. So, we're trying
to show them where our
food comes from."
This year, six stations
were set up where the
students toured each sta-
tion and learned about
different animals. The
stations included animals
or foods where 4H stu-
dents, FFA members, 4H
volunteers or extension
service agents gave infor-
mation about cattle, pigs
and goats. In addition,
representatives from the
family and consumer sci-
ence department taught
children about the'food
pyramid, nutrition and hor-


ticulture.
Cindy Higgins,
University of Florida exten-
sion service director for
Columbia County and a 4H
coordinator, said the From
the Farm to Table program
has been held in Columbia
County for 15 years.
She said the program's
advisory committee deter-
mined it was important for
children to understand the
importance of agriculture,
starting with first-graders.
"Research shows that
the sooner the children
learn about where their
food comes, the longer
they retain the informa-
tioh, so first gradd seemed
like a good choice," she


said. '"This year's program
is going very well."
Barbara Royster, a Fort'
White Elementary School
first-grade teacher, said
the program gives the first-
graders an opportunity to
learn through experience.
"This is a very good
hands-on experience for
them and a lot of them
don't have farm animals,
so this is a brand new
opportunity for them," she
said. "We tie this program
into their reading and
process writing at school.
'They will'remember this "
more long term than any-
thing we could do out of
' "a 1Io'tkorrom a piece of
paper."


BROD: Trio to perform as part of series

Continued From Page 1A


German, Czech and Jewish
culture.
The trio have released
several CD recordings
including Beethoven and
Dvorak, and a recording of
Austrian composer Franz
Peter Schubert released by
AudioMax in 2010.
Supporters and friends of


the trio have created "Max
Brod Salons" that repre-
sent a platform for cultural
interaction and encounters
which continues the work.
and ideas of its namesake.
Other upcoming
Friends of Music perfor-
mances include: Grigorius
Zamparas, pianist, 7:30'


p.n. Feb. 18 and The Graffe
String Quartet, 7:30 p.m.
March 28.
A reception will follow
the concert, and admission
is free and open to the pub-
lic. The church is located
at 697 SW Baya Drive. Call
(386) 752-0670 for more
information.


DONATIONS: Calls are not for police

Continued From Page 1A


"The Florida
Department of
Agriculture, Department
of Consumer Services is
currently investigating
these solicitation'ss" he
said. "Columbia County
Sheriff Mark Hunter asks

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION


rDAYSp



fReg129.00
Front or Back
Brake Special
Includes pads &
(mpst vehicles)


Will 1 M j .;7j


that residents request the
packet to be sent via mail.
Residents are then asked
to call the Consumer
Services Hotline, at 1-
800-435-7352, to report
the solicitation. The con-
tractors that are making


JUST r lil(EA

EX oUi^iTE!hNE


WN OU nnS l l,
M iECES hE

WA hlir

zmw
V"4 Aua


these .calls are not in the
local community and their
call centers do not receive
incoming calls."
Anyone who receives
the soliciting phone calls
is asked to report it by
calling 1-800-435-7352.


n'tWaittil


'sToo late!


CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!


755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm



*^^"7


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Saturday, November 6, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Sunday

the clocks

fall back

In the wee hours of
Sunday, we pass another
of those mileposts that
indicate the year is wind-
ing down and we'll soon
be firmly in the grip of winter.
At 2 a.m. we fall back. We set
back our clocks an hour and
gain another hour of sleep at
the cost of an hour of daylight
at the end of the day. Not quite
all of us: Hawaii and most of
Arizona remain on standard
time year round.
Ben Franklin was one of the
first proponents of what came
to be daylight saving time. He
saw it as a way of saving on
candles and lamp oil; and ener-
gy savings are regularly cited
in support of DST, but mainly
Americans simply like having
more daylight in their leisure
hours.
If the beginning and end of
DST often cause Americans to
show up an hour early or late
the day after the change, it
might be because the govern-
ment has moved it approxi-
mately 10 times since it first
became national law in 1918. In
1974, during one of our ener-
gy crises, it began as early as
Jan. 6.
Starting in 2007, Congress
moved the end of DST from
the last Sunday in October to
the first Sunday in November
- postponing the extra hour
of darkness to make Halloween
safer for kids. DST resumes the
second Sunday in March.
The authorities urge people,
as they go around their homes
resetting clocks, to check the
batteries in their smoke and
'carbon monoxide detectors and
emergency flashlights.
Studies show that pedestrian
fatalities spike after the clocks
are reset, so be careful out
there. We want you back with
us next March 13, when we
spring forward.
* Scripps Howard News Service

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
: Today is Saturday, Nov. 6, the
:310th day of 2010. There are 55
days left in the year.
In 1861, Confederate President
Jefferson Davis was elected to a
]six-year term of office.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Colymbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
C We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


\\LAWD h" W2010


The losers will have the last laugh


It might be time for a
group hug. While I am
not much for hugging
myself, I understand
it's quite popular and it
would make a change from the
recent unpleasantness.
Not having clairvoyance
among my many gifts, I do not
know how your beloved candi-
dates performed.
But I do know a thing or two
about hangovers and disappoint-
ments, which is one thing a
career in journalism is good for.
So for those of you who feel
defeated, especially those of
you who counted your chick-
ens before they were hatched,
indeed before the rooster met
the hen, I have some encourag-
ing words to salve your pain.
Here is my list of reasons to
rejoice:
M The winning candidate will
soon be the incumbent. Can you
think of a worse possible fate?
There's only one thing worse
than losing and that is winning.
Everything that is wrong in
the world will now be his or
her fault the economy, the
national debt, the behavior of
North Korea and stink bugs.
Besides, your losing candi-
date can enjoy something better
than incumbency; he or she can
revel in recumbency and sleep
the whole thing off.
Your candidate lost
because he or she didn't lie
enough. Really, how hard is it to
make things up? The airwaves
this election cycle were full of
falsehoods.
It was as if Pinocchio was on
every ballot. It's a wonder the


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com


noses on some of these candi-
dates didn't knock over the cam-
eras. On the other hand, what is
an effective character trait in a
politician is a rotten thing for a
human being and no lie.
If you think about it, you will
say thank goodness your candi-
date lost. The temptation might
have proved fatal to his (or her)
fundamental goodness.
It is the lesser characters
who sell their birthright for a
Biblical mess of pottage or
pollage in this case, which is
like pottage but has more data
and talking points in it.
Your candidate mistakenly
thought this was the 21st cen-
tury, not the 18th. This was a
certain way to lose in the Tea
Party age. If only your candi-
date had promised to bring
back the stocks and pelt illegal
immigrants with vegetables,
he or she would be riding to
Washington, D.C., on a horse
right now. As it is, your candi-
date's butt can rest easy.
Your candidate liked reality
too much and was a reluctant
recruit to join the war on real-
ity. By contrast, the winner was .
able to persuade the voters that
if they did not support the war
. on reality, the realists would


win. The voters, who wanted
theories based on political fan-
tasies simple to understand,
believed your candidate to be
an elitist because of his (or her)
snobbish rationality.
Now that your candidate
has lost, you have no reason
to indulge in juvenile displays
of gloating. You won't have to
say "Whoo, whoo, whoo!" or
the traditional "Get over it!" -
indeed, you can reject all the
snide little sayings much loved
by old retired guys trying to
fire up a little testosterone for
nostalgia's sake.
Of course, you would not
have said any of those things
because you have too much
class, but thankfully you won't
even be tempted now that
your candidate has done a
Hindenburg impersonation.
Or was it the Titanic? In any
event, I am sure we can all
now agree that this defeat was
a blessing.
Your sense of humor has "
received a gift that will keep
on giving. This is something I
appreciate in my scratching and
laughing line of work.
Your opponent is a goof,
right? Excellent!
Congress and state govern-
ments are likely to be full of
goofs, each one with an idea
more crazy than the next.
While the country may suffer,
people with a sense of humor
will be set to howling.
Thank the Lord for passing
us this ammunition.
* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Random act of kindness creates joy


W e have been
subjected to the
recent barrage
of mud-slinging
that appears to
have become the pre-requisite
for running for political office.
My father once told me, 'If
you have nothing good to say
about somebody, it's best to
keep your mouth shut and say
nothing at all.'
I smile sometimes remem-
bering that advice, and even
wonder how peaceful and quiet
our life would become if we only
spoke words of praise about our
fellow man. And I must admit,
I'm still not a perfect example
of my father's wisdom, but I do
attempt to give a compliment or
a pat on the back if I am privi-
leged enough to see a 'random
act of kindness.'
A 'random act of kindness' is
when someone purposely steps
outside of a comfort zone and
with no ulterior motive creates
a moment of joy, a smile, and a
sense that the world still has at
least one compassionate human
being left in our cold and calcu-
lating society.


Last week, I was exiting the
Publix supermarket (impatiently
waiting for the light to turn'
green) when I noticed an elderly
woman exiting in the wrong
lane. She was just seconds away
from facing the head-on traffic
approaching her ini the entry
lane. I said a little prayer for
the Lord to help her, but I saw
her freeze in fright. She tried
to back up but she hit the curb.
Then, something amazing hap-
pened. I saw prayer begin to
walk (oh yes, the most effective
prayers do have legs).
The car in front of me stopped
and a young black man got
out on the passenger side. He
approached the woman and
smiled, explaining gently that
she was in the wrong lane and
he had come to guide her to
the proper route. He watched
patiently as she tried to position
her car, but again, she panicked.
So he helped her out of her
vehicle and she climbed into the
back seat while he turned her
misdirected car back around.
He then got her going in the
right lane, in the right direction,
exited her vehicle and climbed


back into his family's car.
One hero, in less than two
minutes, put a smile on my face
and appreciation in my heart.
I can only imagine the gift he
left in the mind and heart of the
wayward driver.
I still repeat this story,
although I never got the young
man's name, but I'm sure his
name is written down some-
where in heaven, pending a very
special blessing from the Lord
Himself.
For months, I've watched
the scowls on faces, the bitter-
ness in voices as the stories of
doubt and distrust and insecu-
rity plague our community. But
take heart, my friends! There
is still someone out there doing
'random acts of kindness.' And
I saw it with my own eyes. How
wonderful it would be to read
more of these people who aren't
too busy or wrapped up in their
own tangled world, those who
still have the seed of hope in
their heart to love their neigh-
bor and bring back memories of
the days that used to be.
Helen Hill
Lake City


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


8


Daughter

loves

Justin

Bieber

As a girl I was a char-
ter member 'of the
David Cassidy fan
club. I had a mem-
bership certificate
and a David Cassidy locket
necklace. Seriously. I don't
know what happened to either,
but I still feel a little tingle when
Cassidy's "I Think I Love You"
comes on the oldies channel.
(And his current legal trouble
doesn't change that)
The little fans don't fall far
from the teen-idol tree, appar-
ently. My oldest daughter, Tori,
14, is wild about a fellow named
.Justin Bieber.
If you are asking, "Who is
that?," then you have not lived
within 50 miles of a young girl
over the past 18 months. He's
the 16-year-old boy who has
achieved worldwide rock-star
status almost overnight, via
YouTube. He's on the cover, it
seems, of every teen magazine
every month. He's made the
other "JBs" (the Jonas Brothers,
the previous pop-star icons, for
the uninitiated) virtually irrel-
evant as far as I can tell.
Now he has a just-out auto-
biography, "Justin Bieber: First
Step 2 Forever: My Story"
(HarperCollins Children's,
$21.99). It is deemed to be
"100% official." Since this young
Canadian has invaded my home
via Tori's heart, I decided to
find out a little more. And once
I pried the book, most of which
is glossy photos and very large
print, out of her hands I found it
to be kind of sweet.
It's a wide-eyed story of suc-
cess from a clean-cut-looking
fellow who claims to be crazy
about his mom and family.
The story of Justin's life so
far is filled with words like
"dude," a few self-deprecating
stories such as not getting his
driver's permit the first time out
and aphorisms about making
the world a better place.
For the most part the book
is fluffy, and that's what I liked
about it. Thank goodness some-
one had the sense to encourage
Bieber (or rather his ghostwrit-
er) to not wax moralistic, nostal-
gic or all wise. Whew. Overall,
not much of a soapbox here,
and nothing jaded or tawdry.
Whew again.
Bieber comes across as a
fairly innocent kid who is sim-
ply enjoying a very fun ride.
Frankly, I'm less concerned
about the book's accuracy
than I am about the apparent
understanding by those who
developed and positioned the
book that that's exactly what
should be portrayed. There was
likely some strong temptation,
in our gritty culture, to make it
otherwise.
And I admit I love watching
Tori so enjoying following him
on his fun ride. I was a little
younger than she is when I
experienced my fan devotion
to David Cassidy. But there's
something about a young girl's
first famous-idol crush that's
just so endearing, so timeless.
In any event, I hope Justin
Bieber is nice to his mom and
others around him, I hope when
he fails, he'll be quick to say
"I'm sorry." I hope he doesn't
experience the pitfalls that so
many other teen idols do. And
I hope that 30 years from now,
when Tori hears "Baby" on
some oldies channel, she'll still
feel a little tingle of excitement.
Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
7th Heavenly Cooking
Community Day
The annual Heavenly
Cooking Community
Day in memory of Levi
Sheppard Sr. is at noon
today at Richardson
Community Center. Free
meals will be distributed.
There will also be an after-
noon of games and activi-
ties.

Veterans Day Parade
VFW Post 2206 is host-
ing the Veterans Day
Parade at 11 a.m. today.
The parade will start
at FDOT, travel north
on Marion Avenue to
Washington Street and end
at Young's Park. Call 752-
5001.

Color Lake City
The Annual Color Lake
City is 9 a.m-1 p.m. today
at the Lake City Reporter
parking lot Free chalk will
be provided.

Four Rivers Audubon
ALU-Walk
The next monthly ALLI-
Walk: Bird /Butterfly /
Nature's Garden outing
is 8-11 a.m. today. Jerry
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder


JASON MATIHEW WALKERILi* Crty epAie'i

Rountree Moore presents fundraiser check
George H. Hudson Jr., fleet manager with Rountree Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury, presents
a check for $3,140 on Friday to Jill Hunter, Columbia High School student activities director.
The money was for the 'Drive one 4 Ur School' event held on Oct. 2.


and others will share their
knowledge. Bring a hat,
sunscreen, water, binocu-
lars and a snack. No fee is
charged. All levels of par-
ticipation and knowledge
are welcome. Call Loye
Barnard at 497-3536.

Charity poker run
A charity poker run


begins at 9:30 a.m. today
at the Lake City Shrine
Club. Registration is 8:30
a.m. The ride ends at
Gainesville Shrine Club.
Cost is $20 per bike/hand
and $10 per additional
passenger/hand. All pro-
ceeds benefit the Shiner's
Children's Hospital and
Florida Masonic Home.
Pre-register by calling


Mark Szymanski at 352-
213-5069, e-mail onyx32@
juno.com or Roger Ward at
386-288-3425 or e-mail rog-
erwardus@yahoo. com.

2nd Annual Breast
Cancer Walk
The second annual
Breast Cancer Walk is 9
a.m.-12 p.m. today start-


ing at Olustee Park. Pink
ribbon products will be
available for purchase and
donations are accepted.
Walking is not required.
Call Kelly at 386-365-7604.

Fundraiser benefit
A benefit for Pat
Kenwarthy is 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
today at Sunbelt Chrysler ,
Jeep/Dodge. Activities will
include a carwash, bake
sale, silent auction, food
and a live performance
from Southern Justice.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations "are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Fair festivities
The 56th Annual
Columbia County Fair
ends today. Regular fair
admission is $5. Rides are
not included in the price of
admission.

Rural Folklife Days
The annual Rural
Folklife Days are 9 a.m.-


2:30 p.m. today at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park. More than 16
demonstrators will be on
hand showcasing Florida
traditions. Admission is $5
per person. Call toll free 1-
877-635-3655 or visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
phenfoster

Sunday
Zumba class
Zumba class will be
taking five non-perishable
food items instead of the
normal $5 fee from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Nov. 7 at Teen
Town. The food will be
donated to the City of Lake
City's food drive. Contact
lakecityzumba@gmail.com
or call 754-3607.

Tuesday
Love and Remembrance
The Haven Hospice
Love and Remembrance
Memorial is 6 p.m. Nov.
9. It is open to anyone in
the community who has
lost a loved one. Attendees
are encouraged to bring
pictures and mementos
of loved ones that can be
placed on the Table of
Memories. Refreshments
will be served. Registration
is not required. Call Haven
Hospice at 386-752-9191.


GOP seeks cuts to pay for renewed jobless benefits


ASSOCIATED PRESS
House Republican leader John Boehner of Ohio, right, and
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell swap positions
at the microphones to answer questions from reporters on
Wednesday. Republicans want spending cuts of $5 billion to
$6 billion a month as a condition for extending emergency
unemployment benefits for millions of Americans.


By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON--Newly
empowered Republicans
want spending cuts of $5
billion to $6 billion a month
as a condition for extending
emergency unemployment
benefits that are scheduled
to expire next month for
millions of Americans.
Up to 2 million people
could lose the benefits
- which average $310 a
week nationwide during
the holiday season if the
still Democratic-controlled
Congress doesn't act in the
postelection lame-duck ses-
sion. The expiration could
affect as many as 5 million
by the end of February.


With new employment
figures Friday showing 14
million Americans still out
of work last month and an
unemployment rate stuck
at 9.6 percent, President
Barack Obama renewed
his call for another exten-
sion "to help those hardest
hit by the' downturn while
. generating more demand
in the economy."
But there's no way that
Senate Republican Leader
Mitch McConnell and other
GOP senators would sup-
port an extension unless
they're accompanied by
equivalent spending cuts,
McConnell spokesman
Don Stewart said.
Every recession since
1950 has featured an


extended federal benefits
program financed with defi-
cit dollars. Thafs a prec-
edent Democrats refused
to break when battling with
Republicans for months
earlier this year to extend
the program through Nov.
30.
Two Maine Republicans,
Susan Collins and Olympia
Snowe, broke with their
party this summer to give
Democrats the needed
60 votes to pass the most
recent of several exten-
sions, which adds more
than $30 billion to the
national debt.
But newly elected
Republican Mark Kirk
of Illinois will be taking
over Obama's old Senate


seat sometime during the
lame-duck session, giving
McConnell one more vote
to block a debt-financed
extension.
The additional jobless
benefits programs began
,.in. 2008 under President
George W. Bush but were
made more generous
under last year's econom-
ic recovery act. Jobless
people are now eligible for
up to 99 weeks of benefits
in most states. The first 26
weeks of benefits are paid
for by states. About 3.7
million are drawing them
now.
"Our friends on the other
side simply refuse to pass a
bill that does not add to the
debt," McConnell said.


Pelosi vows

to stay as

Dem leader

Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Despite widespread com-
plaints about massive losses
that will put Democrats in
the minority, Speaker Nancy
Pelosi said Friday she will
try. to stay on as leader of
her party in the House.
The decision exposed a
rift between Pelosi's liberal
allies and the dwindling num-
ber of moderate Democrats,
who feel
besieged
and eager
for substan-
tive and
.symbolic
changes
in direc-
Pelosi tion after
Tuesday's Republican rout.
It also is likely to trigger lead-
ership battles farther down
the ladder.
Pelosi, the nation's first
female speaker, said many col-
leagues urged her to seek the
post of minority leader in the
new Congress that convenes
in January. That will be the
Democrats' top post, because
Republicans, who grabbed
more than 60 Democratic-held
seats Tuesday, will elect the
next speaker. It will be John
Boehner of Ohio, who will
swap titles with Pelosi if she
succeeds in her bid.
"We have no intention of
allowing our great achieve-
ments to be rolled back,"
Pelosi, 70, said.


Leon Gerald Porter
Mr. Leon Gerald Porter, age
69, of Lake City, Florida. died
Thursday, November 4, 2010, in
the Shands at Lake Shore Hos-
pital, Lake City, Florida follow-
ing a brief illness. He was born
in the Ellisville community and
resided in Columbia County
all of his life. He was the son
of the late Leon Hiram Porter
and Marguerite Annette Bailey
Porter. He retired in 2007 after
many years as owner of Porter
Trucking Company. He was a
graduate of Fort White High


OBITUARIES

School and of the Baptist faith.
He is survived by his wife of 46
years, Marilyn Porter of Lake
City, Florida.: Two daughters,
Shelley (Ronnie) Register and
Scarlett Porter both of Lake
City, Florida; Four grandchil-
dren, Wayne (Kristin) Register,
Rachel Register,'Micke Porter
Trowell and Dalton O'Dell:
One greategrandchild, Marlee
Trowell: Three sisters, Naomi
Koon and Elizabeth Home both
of Lake City, Florida and Mabel
Wiggins of West Palm Beach,
Florida: Two brothers, William
Porter of Trenton, Florida and


Russell Porter of Ocala, Flori-
da. Graveside funeral services
will be conducted at 2 P.M.
Saturday, November 6, in the
High Springs Cemetery, High
Springs, Florida with Rev. Fred
McCray, Pastor of Ft. White
Church of God, officiating. Vis-
itation will be from 11 A.M. to
1:30 P.M. Saturday at GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 S.W.
Main Blvd., Lake City, Florida.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Duval Street US 90
1_-10_E EDuv.3alrPeT La? City FL
YouSup ly he mainain p *w y aeCt eo-e


Reverse Mortgage

INCOME FOR LIFE



MCELHANEY'S
Frank McElhaney, GMA MORTGAGE SERVICES
PrincipalBroker Your Local Mortgage Connection
891 SW Sisters Welcome Rd. NAMBJ


Did You Hear About Peoples State Bank's
Thanksgiving Art Contest?


Peoples State ank is hosting a Thanksgiving
themed art contest for children between the ages
of 6 and 11. Children can draw, paint or sketch
Thanksgiving themed artwork and have a chance to
win a $ 250, $100 or $50 US Savings Bond for
their future. Visit one of Peoples' branches today
and pick up the official rules and submission form,
but you have to hurry all artwork submissions
are due by November 22, 2010. Peoples State
Bank. Now that's banking!



%-


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES
STATE BANK


SSat. Nov. 6
* g~ *A I A A P *A pPA












9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


FrEEgtoe Kids! 'eI
l:V 31k H,-fj5

F R E E to Nassau-- te
6.-sem.


Participate


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I













FAITH


Saturday, November 6, 2010 w


&


VALUES


vww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS BRIEFS


Angie Land
ongieland3@windstream.net


Clarifying

confusing

parts of

the Bible

"One day Naomi her
mother-in-law said to her,
'My daughter, should I not
try to find a home for you,
where you will be well pro-
vided for? Is not Boaz, with
whose servant girls you have
been, a kinsman of ours?
Tonight he will be winnow-
ing barley on the threshing
floor. Wash and perfume
yourself, and put on your
best clothes. Then go down
to the threshing floor, but
don't let him know you are
there until he has finished
eating and drinking. When
'he lies down, note the place
,where he is lying. Then go
and uncover his feet and lie
down. He will tell you what
to do.' 'I will do whatever
'you say,' Ruth answered. So
'she went down to the thresh-
'ing floor and did everything
;her mother-in-law told her to
'do." (Ruth 3:1-6)
I "can't wait to jump
into our story today.
So much of the Old
Testament that may
seem confusing at
first glance, comes alive
when we view it from the
perspective of-Hebrew-cul--
ture.
For example, it is not
.likely that many of your
:neighbors have a threshing
-floor in their backyard, so
let me offer a little explana-
tion.
We remember that Ruth
.and Naomi arrived in
:Bethlehem as the barley
'harvest was beginning,
:and now a few months
:have passed and it is time
'to "winnow" or scatter
.the barley. The threshing
floor, usually made of rock
'and located on top of a hill
:outside the village, was the
,place where the grain was
separated from the harvest-
ed wheat. The stalks were
crushed either by hand or
:by oxen and thrown into
the air where the wind
would blow away the light-
er chaff and the valuable
and heavier grain would fall
back onto the rock floor to
be easily gathered.
Boaz would likely have
spent the night at the
threshing floor for two rea-
sons: to prevent theft, and
to wait for his turn to use
the threshing floor.
Now that we have a
mental picture of our scen-
ery, what in. the world was
Naomi instructing Ruth
to do? From our modern
cultural perspective, all the
factors seem to point to
seduction.
Not so fast!
The advice was simply
to end her time of mourn-
ing over the death of her
husband and to let that be
known to Boaz. Nothing
seductive. In fact, the
original Hebrew transla-
tion of putting on her "best
.clothes," was more closely
.translated to put on her
'"outer garment." So instead
Sof revealing more, she
'advised her to cover up.
There's a new idea!

Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
"Life Ministries of the Lafayette
SBaptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
;leads marriage and family
' conferences, and offers bibli-
Scal counseling to individuals,
' couples and families.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Benedict XVI is framed by a Vatican Swiss guard during a mass to commemorate cardinals and bishops who died
in the past year, in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican.


Pope heads to a less Catholic


Spain amid church alienation


By DANIEL WOOLLS
Associated Press
MADRID Pope
Benedict XVI 'meets
Spain's Facebook genera-
tion this weekend, set-
ting up a clash of values
and lifestyles in a once-
staunchly Catholic nation
that has become one of
Europe's most liberal.
The visit is part of a
major Vatican push to
make increasingly secu-
lar Europe re-embrace its
Christian roots, but the
pope faces a big challenge
in a nation that has under-
gone an extraordinary
social transformation in
just the past few years
- with laws allowing
gay marriage, fast-track
divorce and easier abor-
tions.
These changes are the
latest, perhaps most dra-
matic, chapter in Spain's
reinvention after the
deeply conservative dicta-
torship of Gen. Francisco
Franco, who died in 1975.
After rigid social and
political constraints came
an explosion of hedonism
and cultural vigor that
caused the nation to stray
further and further from


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nuns walk through the Obradoiro square in front of the
Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, background,
Spain, on Friday. Pope Benedict XVI will visit the pilgrim-
age city of Santiago de Compostela on Nov. 6.


its religious heritage.
It has all horrified the
Vatican, which remem-
bers a not-so-distant age
when all public school-
rooms had a picture of
Franco and a crucifix
mounted on the wall. For
many liberal Spaniards,
on the other hand, it's
the church's association
with the Franco regime
that has been a cause for
much of the alienation.
'This is without a doubt


the least Catholic Spain in
history, and demographic
data suggest it will con-
tinue to become less and
less Catholic," sociolo-
gist Kerman Calvo said of
the country hosting Pope
Benedict Saturday for a
two-day visit.
Indeed, church atten-
dance is falling steadily
and at Mass on Sunday
most worshippers have
gray hair. Congregations
are fast losing young peo-


ple. And civil ceremonies
now outnumber church
marriages for the first
time.
Against that challeng-
ing backdrop, the pope's
tour starts in Santiago de
Compostela, a medieval
and present-day pilgrim-
age site whose ornate
cathedral is said to hold
the remains of St. James
the Apostle. It ends
Sunday in Barcelona,
where the pope will conse-
crate part of the Sagrada
Familia, or Holy Family,
church Antoni Gaudi's
unfinished architectural
marvel.
Tensions rose even
before the Pope arrived, as
riot police swinging trun-
cheons clashed Thursday
night with anti-papal pro-
testers in Santiago, some
of whom carried red ban-
ners reading "I am not
waiting for you."
In Barcelona, hun-
dreds of people staged a
peaceful nighttime rally
against the visit, with
banners decrying every-
thing from the cost of
hosting the pope to the
pedophile priest gcan-
dal that has rocked the
Vatican.


Churches play key,
controversial role
NEWARK, N.J. Law
enforcement officials say
a program that allows
people wanted by the law
to turn themselves in safely
wouldn't succeed without
the crucial participation of
local churches.
In NeW Jersey, the third.
"Fugitive Safe Surrender"
is taking place this week
at a church in Somerset.
The program is aimed at
nonviolent offenders. Many
are wanted for drug pos-
session, traffic violations or
unpaid child support
Across the country,
more than 25,000 people
have turned themselves in
at churches as part of safe-
surrender programs.

Baptist volunteers
provide meals
OKLAHOMA CITY
- Volunteers from the
Baptist General Convention
of Oklahoma are pro-
viding meal service to
inmates and workers at
the Oklahoma County jail
after a drain collapse in the
facility's kitchen.
Sheriff John Whetsel
says the kitchen will be
under repair until next
week. The Baptist con-
vention's disaster relief
teams stepped.in and
served 2,200 hot meals on
Monday.

Obama star fades
in Muslim world
ISTANBUL Euphoria
swept the world after
the election of President
Obama, a symbol of hope
and yearning for compro-
mise after years of war
and resentment toward his
predecessor's style and
policies. Today, after an
electoral rebuke at home,
Obama is still popular
among America's tradition-
al allies, but his star power
among Muslims a focus
of his international out-
reach is fading.
American unhappi-
ness with Obama and the
government, evident in
the staggering blow to
incumbents in midterm
elections Tuesday, stems
largely from concern about
the weak U.S. economy,
suggesting there will be a
basic continuity in U.S. for-
eign policy.
* Associated Press


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Fall festival, yard sale
An inaugural fall festi-
val and yard sale is today
at Cornerstone Baptist
Church. The yard sale is
at 8 a.m. and the festival
begins at 10 a.m. Festival
events include sack races,
face painting, horse riding
and more. Food will be
available.

Yard sale
An indoor yard sale
is at 8 a.m. today at Our
Redeemer Lutheran
Church. The church is
located on State Road 47,
one mile past 1-75.

Old Timey Day
The 17th Annual Old
Timey Day starts 8 a.m.
today at Shady Grove
Baptist Church in Live
Oak. There will be sample
food cooked on a wood-
burning stove from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m.

UCF choir performance
The University of
Central Florida Gospel


and Cultural Choir is
performing 6 p.m. today
at Union AME Church.
Choir president Jamaul
Thomas is from Lake
City, and is the past musi-
cian and choir director at
Union AME. Call Terri
Thomas, 386-344-3212
.or Patricia Carter, 386-
303-1507. The church is
located at 357 NW Queen
Road.

Pastor's anniversary
Jerusalem Missionary
Baptist Church is celebrat-
ing its third pastoral anni-
versary 7 p.m. today. The
Rev. Billy Simon of Great
Polar Springs Missionary
Baptist Church is the
speaker. The church is
located at 4637 NW Lake
Jeffery Road. Call 752-
5141.

Annual Fall Bazaar
Branford Presbyterian
Women's Annual Fall
Bazaar is 8 a.m. 2 p.m.
today. The bazaar will
feature handmade crafts,
baked goods and white
elephant yard sale. There
is a raffle for a queen-size
handmade quilt and black


powder rifle. Call 935-3371
or 935-1784 for quilt tick-
ets. Call 935-1773 or 466-
4930 for gun tickets. The
church is located on the
corner of Branford Hwy.
247 and Drane-Street
and Haines Avenue near
downtown Branford.

Sunday
Pastor's anniversary
Jerusalem Missionary
Baptist Church is cel-
ebrating its third pastoral
anniversary 3 p.m. Sunday.
The Rev. Major Franklin of
Sister Welcome Missionary
Baptist Church is the
speaker. The church is
located at 4637 NW Lake
Jeffery Road. Call 752-5141.

Philippi Baptist
Homecoming
The 133rd Homecoming
celebration is 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at Philippi Baptist
Church. Special music is
by Stephen Jones. The
guest speaker is the Rev.
Dan Williams. A covered
dish lunch and fellowship
is after the worship ser-
vice. Call Ralph Graham


386-752-5101.

Mt. Pleasant
Homecoming
The annual homecom-
ing celebration is Sunday.
at Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church in Wellborn.
Special music is by the
Believers from Adel, Ga.
Call 386-438-9848.

Pastor Appreciation
An appreciation celebra-
tion for Rev. Ulis Taylor is
Sunday at New Beginning
Church. A covered dish
luncheon is in the fellow-
ship hall after the morn-
ing worship service. Bring
a covered dish. Call 386-
935-6553.

Wellborn Homecoming
An annual homecom-
ing celebration is 10:30
a.m. Sunday at Wellborn
Church of God. James
Scott is the speaker. Bring
a covered dish lunch. The
church is located at 3330
US Hwy. 90.

Tuesday
The fall meeting with
Elder Ronald Lawrence


of Nashville, Tenn. is 6:30
p.m. Tuesday to Thursday
at Salem Primitive Baptist
Church. The church is
located 9 miles northwest
of Lake Jeffrey Road. Call
Pastor Herman Griffin at
752-4198.

Saturday, Nov. 13
Yard sale
Tabernacle Baptist
Church and Academy is
having a yard sale 7 a.m.-
1 p.m. on Nov. 13. The
yard sale is a fundraiser
for the academy and will
feature a little bit of every-
thing. The church is locat-
ed at 144 SE Montrose
Avenue. Call 752-4247.

Submit Church Notes
items in writing no later
than 5 p.m. Monday the
week prior to an event
by e-mail to arobinson@,
lakecityreporter.com,
fax to (386) 752-9400 or
drop-off at 180 E. Duval
St., Lake City. Call (386)
754-0425 with questions.
Church Notes run as
space is available each
Saturday.


6A









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010 7A


We
1i~wig~


Scnplures Selected by The Amercan Bible Society
Copynght 2010, Keisier-Williams Newspaper Services, P 0. Box 8187. Charlonesville, VA 22906. www kwnews com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Sene 0ou
Lial Cirr Ft tvhj~r, BranrL.rd
Chjctland M',laa Ke.-tone Heihih


GW


Cheron


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
Jobber


Holly Anectrc, Inc.
"Quality /work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all thgs through Chris ich srengtheneh me"
Phillppians 4.13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
3A6-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: ll.fLOAM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Wprship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed Fain Bibletudy 7.00PNf
"A church where J.FLUS s Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor:IanrryE Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave., 386-752-2860
Sun Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer MigtBible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G Win
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 1030AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6'00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6.15PM
Downtown Lake City* 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Airens, Pastor
OLIVET MISIONARV BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N E. Davis Street
(386) 752-19$j
Ronald V. Wallers. Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6.00PM
"In God's Word, Widl& Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake leffery Rd 752-0681
Lake Ciy. Flonda 32055
www pbclc.com
Sunday School 8 30, 9-45& IIAM
Sunday Worship 945 & IIAM&bPM


AWANA
Etening Worship
Wed Eie Schedule
Family Supper iReservaton)
Childies Ministry
Youth Worship
Prayer Meeting


5 30 PMNI
6 UU PNM

5PiM
6 Phi
6:uO Phi
6:00 PM


Thursday Evening Schedule SL 8121/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
l189 N US Hwy 441
386.752 2664
Sunday Bible Srudy 9:45AM
Sunday Worship I lAM & 6PM
Wed Kids & outhMinistry 6:30PM
Pastor Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVEBAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor Elder Herman Griffin
.52-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH'
388 S.E. Baya Dnve' 755-5553
Sunday;


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
AWANA ,
Prayer & BibleStudy


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM
5:45PM
6.15 Pg


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH -'
(Independent Bapdst)
144 SE Montrose Ave.' 752-1t274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun Mom Wurhip 11 A4M
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor. Mike Norman
THE VINEYARD
A Southern Baptst Church
2091 SW Main Blvd.* 623-0026
SundayWorship 10:00AM
Where Jesus is Preached
and jeans are appropriate.
Pastor, Bo Hammock

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 751-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247S.*755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun Mornm Worship 10:30AM
Wed Prayer Meeting 7 PM

NEW HORIZON
church of Lhnst
Direcrtions&'Times 755 1320
lack Exum,jr., Miruster

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine SL 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed Youth Service 7PM
Pasior Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen, 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10.50 & 6-30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Cubs
Bible Study
Pastor lohn R. Hathaday

ST. IAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bastom Norris Di, Lake
City, Fl 32025. -386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun, 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev.Mchael Anustrong
Deacon:The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
S 1. miles S. of l-75*onSR847
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided) ,
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor. Rel BruceAlkue

SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 175.752.3807
Sunday Worship 10.00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441Southd
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Service 8 30 & 1-00AM
386.755 1353
mybeihelumc corn
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8:30AM
Tradinonal Service I-00AM
Program oppormunines available in all
areas for all ages
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFailane, 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers Schooli
Sunday School 9.00AM
Worship 8:00 & 10.OOAM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6-:0PM
AWANA starts 9115 Wed 5:00PM
Pastor. The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. rum od Cortez (nex to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun.Worship 1IAM&6PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbura

DKIoff:ll-opl:l
LAKE CITYCHUORCH OFTHENAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM, 6-30PM
Wednesday 6Wd 0PM
Adult, Youih Miistry Children's Minisy
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRSTPRESBYRERIANCHURMIN'
629 SW&ya DrNie 75T07W
M SundayConwmporary._.,;' 9010AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
Traditional Service 11-00AM
NURSEY PROVIDED
PastorDr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Cones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10.00AM
MomingWorshi 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6-00 PM
Youth $ervices- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service- Wednesday 7.00 PM
For info call 755 3408, EveryoneVWelcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 1100AM
Wednesday Service 700PM
217 Dyal Ave., for mHwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd:, go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755 .2525
Lead Pasror: Lonnie lohns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle'
Sunday Celebraton 10 30 AM
PastorChnsjones,75291 19
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falhng Creek Road, 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9"10 A.M
Second and Founh Sundays 3 00 PM.
Pastor: Rev Cheryl R Pingel
IGLESLA EVANGIEUCA
APOSENTO ALTO
17077 25th Rd LIC FL 32055
Service fri 7:00PM, Sun: h:OOPM
Arnuro Suaaez, 38t.754-1836
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:0UAM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:O0PM
A Full Gospel Church. Everyone Welcomed
1386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir:Hwy .17 ti Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM


No Nuisery Available
Spirit FilledWorship
Heahng and Dehveranee


To List




Your







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on the





Church


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752m1293!


ToavertseinthiChurchIrcyCl754


CIay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectrlc.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
.752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

@ ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
SASPHAT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

SES HARRY'S
.. 1 Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Herry Mosley, President

PgR 752-2308 Iub

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELES POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
I152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098





S..t 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

BAYWAYaniorial Senices
FIRE & Water Restoranon
Floor & Carpet Care
RhiiJl':nu' i 1 & 'ai n1tij
755-6142


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010


FACES & PLACES

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter

Fans at the Fort White High football game against Bradford County High on Friday:


Matthew Childs, 19, Samantha Selgas, 14. Thomas Diedeman, 20, and Julia Young, 68.


Lisey Jolley, 12, and Kellie Jolley, 39. Shelbl Lee, 18, and Caitlin Jones, 17.


Fans at the Columbia High football game against Wolfson High on Friday:
%.


Lauren Domene, 22, and Bethany Harrell, 23. Katherine Witt, 20, and Caroline Witt, 17.


Justin Truesdale, 12, Patience Colston, 13, and Shane Wadford, 14.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Breanna Black, 17, and Kelli Roberts, 17.









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


SPORTS


Saturday, November 6, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


One in the win column


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinleyJakecityreporter.com

UF'adds

another

against

Vandy
after last
week's
thrilling
finish against
Georgia,
Florida fans might have
a hard time finding
excitement in this week's
game, no matter who the
opponent is.
Add to the fact that the
Gators visit Vanderbilt,
and ifs easy to see why
this game might be a
little blah for Florida.
That's why the Gators
must guard against a
potential letdown with a
chance to go to the SEC
Championship on the
line in a night game at
home next week.
But first, the Gators
must get past a
Commodores team that
typically plays Florida
tight Worse yet, ifs an
early-afternoon game
with a 12:21 p.m. kickoff,
and Florida generally
doesn't play well in those
games.
Could this be a
Commodores team
primed for an upset?
Who am I kidding?
The Commodores are
the worst defensive team
in the SEC and it could
be the kind of opponent
Florida needs after last
weekend's emotional
victory. The Gators need
to keep the ball rolling and
regain some confidence
that was lost in a three-
game losing streak.
Florida rides a
19-game winning streak
against the Commodores
with the last loss coming
at Vanderbilt in 1988.
Don't look for that trend
to end this season.

Florida 48
Vanderbilt 10
Florida State was in
the driver's seat for an
ACC Championship
Game appearance until
North Carolina State
pulled off a stunning
upset to bring the
Seminoles back to reality.
Now, Florida State gets
another Atlantic Coast
school from North
Carolina in the Tar
Heels and will need a
little help along the way
for a shot at the ACC
Championship.
North Carolina was
expected to be one of
the premiere teams
in the conference, but
recruiting violations
crushed those thoughts
early in the season. The
Tar Heels, as it stands,
are just mediocre and
that's exactly the kind
of opponent Florida
State needs after the
heartbreaking loss.
The Seminoles are out
to show that they're close
to being back to the team
they were in the 90s and
a convincing win here
would help that case.
It'd not only show that
Florida State can bounce
PICKS continued on 2B


CHS defense
dominates in
29-12 victory.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It won't show up on the
scoreboard, but Columbia
High's defense pitched a
shutout against Wolfson
High on Friday in the
Tigers' 29-12 win at Tiger
Stadium. '
Columbia fell behind 6-0
early as Darrin McPhereson
recovered a lateral from
NigelAtkinson and returned
it 56 yards for a touchdown
on the second play of the
game. Nick Ottivani's PAT
was no good.
Columbia received one of
two interceptions by Darius
Williams on Wolfson's first
drive and the Tigers took


advantage. Columbia faked
a punt on fourth-and-9
with Jayce Barber hitting
Rakeem Battle for 46 yards
and a score.
Columbia drove the ball
to the Wolfpack 1-yard line
after a Ben Bell intercep-
tion in the second quarter,
but couldn't punch it in.
The defense forced a safety
on a Wolfpack punt, how-
ever, with Devonte Bell and
Solomon Bell combining for
the tackle on Ottivani's punt
attempt for an 8-6 lead.
After another botched
punt, Columbia took over
near the end zone, but
was forced to settle for a
Hayden Lunde field goal
from 22-yards away and an
11-6 halftime lead.
A fumble on the first play
of the second half gave the
Tigers good field position
once again, and Atkinson


scored on the third play
from 13 yards out to give
Columbia a 17-6 lead.
Another fumble, this time
recovered by Quaysean
Monismith, set up Barber's
second touchdown pass of
the night. Shaq Johnson
got into the action this
time with a six-yard scoring
reception and the Tigers
led 23-6.
After a couple of fumbles
to set up scores, the Tigers'
forced their fourth intercep-
tion of the night. Devontae
Levy gave Columbia the
ball at its 42-yard line with
the pick, but a tipped pass
gave the Wolfpack six
more points. Barber's pass
intended for Alex Sromalski
was tipped and caught in
the end zone by Jasper
Sesser, who returned it 102
yards for a score to pull the
Wolfpack within 23-12 with


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High running back Rakeem Battle (3) evades a
tackle attempt by Wolfson High's Larry Walker (23) on Friday.


9:10 remaining.
Columbia responded with
seven plays for 39 yards and
a touchdown after Anjre
Caldwell set the Tigers
up in Wolfpack territory
on a kick return. Barber
added his third touchdown,
this time on the ground,
from six yards away and
Columbia capped off a


Returning to


Fort White beats
Bradford 27-22 in
District 2-2B.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High bounced back
from a tough loss to play
one of its best games.
The Indians (6-3, 4-1)
beat Bradford High, 27-22,
at Arrowhead Stadium to
nail down the runner-up
spot in District 2-2B and
the playoff berth that goes
with it. The loss snapped a
five-game win streak for the
Tornadoes, who finished
the season 7-3. overall and
3-2 in district play.
"Our goal was to get to
the playoffs and we are
there," Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said. "It feels great."
JR Dixon led the surge,
rushing for 204 yards and
scoring four touchdowns.
Fort White got an early
touchdown following a
fumble recovery by Dalton
O'Dell at the Bradford 32.
On the fourth play, Dixon
fired into the end zone from
17 yards out just 2'! minutes
into the game.
The rest of the half was
a feeling-out time, as the
teams combined for only
four passes.
Fort White partially
blocked a punt late in the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon (11) runs into the end zone as he is being chased by Bradford
High's Xavier Riles (10) in a game on Friday.


second quarter to set up
a scoring opportunity.
Quarterback Andrew Baker
scampered for 17 yards and
a first-and-goal at the 3, but
Dixon lost a fumble on the
next play and the Indians
settled for a 7-0 lead at the
half.


Fort White made up for
the lapse with a 58-yard
scoring drive to start the
second half. Soron Williams
set the stage by returning
the kickoff 31 yards.
Baker converted two
first downs on passes to
Trey Phillips and Donnell


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Army honors Columbia High students
Columbia High football player Timmy Jernigan (second from left) and band member
Colleen Heeney (far right) are presented a game jersey and jacket from Jacksonville Army
Recruiting Battalion, Lt. Col. Daniel E. O'Grady, battalion commander (far left) and Lt. Col.
Robert Quint, University of Florida ROTC, recruitment officer during a presentation for the
U.S. Army All-American Bowl Friday at Columbia High. Jernigan and Heeney discuss the
accomplishment in Sunday's Lake City Reporter.


Sanders, then broke a
17-yard run. Dixon scored
from four yards out and
Colton Jones added his sec-
ond PAT.
The Indians smothered
the Tornadoes on the next
series, but gave them new
life with a roughing-the-


29-12 victory.
"It's funny, we scored all
the points on our side of the
ball," Columbia coach Craig
Howard said. "The defense
played so well all night
and it wasn't just Timmy
Jernigan. They pitched a
shutout It doesn't show up
on the scoreboard, but they
pitched a shutout"


state


kicker personal foul.
Trailing by 14 points,
BradfordquarterbackAustin
Chipoletti took to the air.
He completed 8 of 9 passes,
the last one a 10-yard touch-
down to Tramaine Harris.
Spencer Bunch's PAT cut
the lead in half at 2:10 of the
third quarter.
Dixon had runs of 29 and
21 yards in Fort White's
"next possession. "The
21-yard run went for a
touchdown and the lead
was back to 14 points with
1:13 left in the quarter.
Bradford got a safety after
a bad snap on a punt, and
scored a touchdown follow-
ing the free kick. Chipoletti
hit Ya'keem Griner from
three yards out and the
lead was cut to five points,
21-16.
Dixon broke a 45-yard
touchdown run on the third
play of the next series.
Phillips had an intercep-
tion for the Indians, but
Chipoletti connected with
Harris for a 61-yard scoring
play to keep it close.
Xavier Wyche recovered
the onside kick to send the
Indians to state.
"We have got to shore
some things up," Jackson
said. "We played great, but
we have to work on disci-
pline in some areas. Give
our guys credit. They came
out Monday with a great
attitude and I am proud of
what they did."


State bound


Columbia
bowlers place
2nd in district.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's bowl-
ing team qualified for state
with a second-place finish
at the District 2 tourna-
ment in Ocala on Tuesday.
The district team of
Linden Barney, Christine
Peters, Courtney Schmitt,
Shea Spears, Tori Wise
and Jordan Williams will
compete in the FHSAA
Finals at Boardwalk Bowl
in Orlando, beginning
Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers earned
the third seed (2,271 total)
for team play following the
individual rounds. Schmitt
led Columbia with a 545
series, which placed her
second overall in the dis-
trict field.


Peters bowled a 474
series, with Wise at 445
and Williams at 384.
Barney bowled games of
148 and 140, then Spears
substituted and bowled a
135 game.
"We are going as a team,
but the girls will still com-
pete as individuals," said
coach Brian Saunders, who
is taking his third team to
state. Schmitt and Peters
qualified for state last year
as individuals.
Forest High was the top
seed, with Vanguard High
No. 2 and Belleview High
No. 4. The team champion-
ship was determined using
Baker scoring and a dou-
ble-elimination format
Columbia opened
against Vanguard and won
three games to two. Forest
defeated Belleview.
Columbia took a
2-1 lead against Forest
BOWLERS continued on 2B


- II













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
9:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Texas 500, at Fort Worth,
Texas
II a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series'," final practice for
Texas 500, at FortWorth,Texas
Noon
SPEED Formula Qne, qualifying for
Brazilian Grand Prix, at Sao Paolo
12:55 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, O'Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, at
FortWorth,Texas
8 p.m.
SPEED World of Outlaws, at
Concord, N.C.
BOXING
11:15 p.m.
HBO Lightweights, Robert
Guerrero (27-I 1) vs. Vicente Escobedo
(22-2-0);'Zab Judah (39-6-0) vs. Lucas
Matthysse (27-0-0), for vacant NABO
junior welterweight tite, at Newark, N.J.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Illinois at Michigan
12:30 p.m.
FSN Baylor at Oklahoma State
3 p.m.
VERSUS Penn at Princeton
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, North
Carolina at Florida State, Northwestern
at Penn State, Nebraska at Iowa State or
Washington at Oregon
CBS -Alabama at LSU
ESPN2 Northwestern at Penn
State orWashington at Oregon
7 p.m.
ESPN -Arkansas at South Carolina
FSN Oklahoma at Texas A&M
VERSUS Oregon St. at UCLA
8 p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas at Kansas State
8:07 p.m.
ABC -. Split, national coverage,
Missouri at Texas Tech or Arizona at
Stanford
10:30 p.m.
FSN -Arizona St at Southern Cal
GOLF
4:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Charles
Schwab Cup Championship, third round,
at San Francisco
II p.m.
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, HSBC
Champions, final round, at Shanghai
HORSE RACING
1:30 p.m.
ABC NTRA, Breeders' Cup World
Championships, at Louisville, Ky.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN NTRA, Breeders' Cup World
Championships, at Louisville, Ky.
SOCCER.
8:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League,Tottenham
at Bolton
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
I11 p.m.
VERSUS Sacramento at LasVegas

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday's Games
Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Detroit, I p.m.
Miami at Baltimore, I p.m.
San Diego at Houston, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
New England at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis,
Jacksonville, San Francisco, Tennessee
Thursday's Game
Baltimore at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 14
Minnesota at Chicago, I p.m.
Tennessee at Miami, I p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, I p.m.


Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Carolina atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:05 p.m..
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 15
Philadelphia atWashington, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Oakland, San Diegq, Green Bay,
New Orleans

College scores

Thursday
Virginia Tech 28, Georgia Tech 21
Ohio 34, Buffalo 17

AP Top 25, schedule

Today's Games
No. I Oregon vs. Washington,
3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Boise State vs. Hawaii, 3:30 p.m.
No. 3 Auburn vs. Chattanooga, I p.m.
No. 4 TCU at No.6 Utah, 3:30 p.m.
No. 5 Alabama at No. 12 LSU,
3:80 p.m.
No. 7 Wisconsin at Purdue, Noon
No. 9 Nebraska at, Iowa State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Stanford vs. No. 13 Arizona,
8 p.m.
No. II Oklahoma at Texas A&M,
7 p.m.
No. 14 Missouri at Texas Tech, 8 p.m.
No. 15 Iowa at Indiana, Noon
No. 16 Michigan State vs. Minnesota,
Noon
No. 17 Arkansas at No. 18 South
Carolina, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Oklahoma State vs. No. 22
Baylor, 12:30 p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina State at
Clemson, Noon
No. 24 Florida State vs. North
Carolina, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Nevada at Idaho, 5 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
AAA Texas 500,
Site: Fort Worth,Texas.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
9:30 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race, 3 p.m.
(ESPN, 2-7 p.m.).
Track Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 501 miles, 334 laps.
NATIONWIDE
O'Reilly Auto Parts Challenge
Site: Fort Worth.Texas.
Schedule: Today, race, 12:55 p.m.
(ESPN2, noon-3:30 p.m.). '
Track-Texas Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Brazilian Grand Prix
Site: Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Schedule: Today, practice,
qualifying (Speed, noon- 1:30 p.m.); Sunday,
race, II a.m. (Speed, 10:30-1I p.m.).
Track: Interlagos, Autodromo Jose
Carlos Pace (road course, 2.677 miles).
Race distance: 190.08 miles, 71 laps.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule-

Thursday's Games
NewYork 120, Chicago 112
Oklahoma City 107, Portland 106, OT
Friday's Games
Milwaukee at Indiana (n)
New Jersey at Orlando (n)
Cleveland at Philadelphia (n)
Charlotte at Detroit (n)
Washington at New York (n)
Atlanta at Minnesota (n)
Miami at New Orleans (n)
Chicago at Boston (n)
Memphis at Phoenix (n)
Utah at Golden State (n)
Toronto at LA. Lakers (n)
L.A. Clippers at Denver (n)
Today's Games
Orlando at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Washington, 7 p.m.
New Jedsey at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.


LA. Clippers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Toronto at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at NewYork, 12 p.m.
Phoenix at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
Golden State at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m.
Boston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Portland at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. North
Florida, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Illinois vs. Southern Illinois,
8 p.m.
No. 17 Butler vs. Marian, Ind., 2 p.m.
No. 18Washington vs. McNeese State,
4 p.m.
No. 25 San Diego State at Long Beach
State, 7:05 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers I
Columbus 3,Atlanta 0
Ottawa 4, N.Y. Islanders I
St. Louis 2, San Jose 0
Vancouver 3, Colorado I
Los Angeles I,Tampa Bay 0
Friday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey (n)
Boston at Washington (n)
Montreal at Buffalo (n)
Carolina at Florida (n)
Calgary at Minnesota (n)
Phoenix at Dallas (n)
Detroit at Edmonton (n)
Pittsburgh atAnaheim (n)
Today's Games
St. Louis at Boston, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Florida at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Detroit at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 5 p.m.
St. Louis at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Nashville atAnaheim, 8 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS playoffs

Semifinals
EASTERN CONFERENCE
NewYork I, San Jose I
NewYork 1, San Jose 0
Thursday
San Jose 3, New York I, San Jose
advances on aggregate 3-2
Columbus vs; Colorado
Colorado I, Columbus 0
Today
Columbus vs. Colorado, 4 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas
FC Dallas 2, Real Salt Lake I
Today
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles vs. Seattle
Los Angeles I, Seattle 0
Sunday
Los Angeles vs. Seattle, 9 p.m.

BASEBALL

Manager's all-time wins


(x-active)
I. Connie Mack
2.John McGraw
3.x-Tony La Russa
4. Bobby Cox
5.Joe Torre
6. Sparky Anderson
7. Bucky Harris
8.Joe McCarthy
9. Walter Alston
10. Leo Durocher
I I. Casey Stengel
12. Gene Mauch


BRIEFS


TIGERS SOCCER

Breakfast today

at Kazbor's Grille

Columbia High's boys
soccer team has a
breakfast fundraiser from
7:30-10:30 a.m. today at
Kazbor's Grille in Lake
Gity. Tickets are $6 at the
.door.
For details, call 365-1877.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Travel team tryout

set for Nov. 13

An open tryout for
9-under travel baseball
team players is 10 a.m.
Nov. 13 at the Southside
Recreation Complex
practice fields.
Fdr details, call Todd
Gustavson at 365-2133.

TRAINING

Outer Extreme

class offered

Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department is
offering Outer Extreme,
a high intensity, full-body


workout using a
combination of training
techniques. Classes are
5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays
outside of Teen Town
Recreation Center.
Instructors are Tara Black,



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

AVVLE I








CLEBUKE
2010 Tnbune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.


STRON' I





___________________z


Nikki Griswold and Alesha
Waller. Cost is $5 per class
or $45 per month.
For details, call Black at
(386) 697-3947 6r Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

* From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirlon and Jeff Knurek


IL '
WHAT TH
STOREKEEPER
WANTED FOR A KEG


RANHOP OF EER' ,
-- -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon,
A 7'~ " ON " " '
Ans: THEN ;L
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GLADE DUSKY BABIED HYMNAL
I Answer: When her client was arrested for forgery, the
clairvoyant said it was A BAD "SIGN'


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the state-bound Columbia High bowling team are Jordan Williams (from left),
Tori Wise, coach Brian Saunders, Courtney Schmitt, Shea Spears, Linden Barney and.
Christine Peters. I


BOWLERS: Leaves Monday for state

Continued From Page 1B


in the second round, but
the Wildcats won the last
two games. Vanguard
eliminated Belleview.
In the third round,
Columbia beat Vanguard,
3-1, to set up a re-match
with Forest.
Forest won the final,
3-1, with both champion
and runner-up advancing
to state.
Suwannee High's Sara
Sykes qualified for state as


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATER'GUARD
High scratch, game: 1.. Gloria
Dennis 213; 2. Susie Flick 168;
3. Lod Davis 166. 1. Willie Frazler 240;
2. Mark Davis 224; 3.,,Tom Sewejkis
223.
High scratch series: 1.' Gloria
Dennis 498; 2. Lori Davis 458;
a. Susie Flick 423. 1. Mark Davis
629; 2. Tom Sewejkis .596; 3. Bill
Dolly 589.
High handicap game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 248; 2. Beth Koppa 239;
3. Terry Wayne 223. 1, Vemrnon Black
262; 2. Michael Mclnally 239; 3. Steve
Greaves 238. r
High handicap series: 1. Amanda
Meng 628; 2. Pat* Fennell 612;
3. Debbie Walters 611.1. Willle Frazier
67b; 2. Mark Davjs 668; 3.George
Walters 662.
High average: 1, Mary Lobaugh
176. 1. Tom Sewejkls 200.
(results from Oct. 26)


1
51
9
12
13

14
15
16

18
20
21
22


one of the three top indi-
viduals not on one-of the
qualifying teams.
"I felt going into the
tournament we would be
one of the top four teams,"
Saunders said. "We did a
lot more practicing in the
Baker format this year and
I felt a lot more confident
We are stronger top to bot-
tom than last year."
The team will leave
Monday and practice at


BOWLING

HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Legal Ladies
(31-13); 2. Lucky Strikers (27-17);
3. Spare Us (24-20).
High handicap game: 1. Karen
Gardner 243; 2. Shirley Highsmith
226; 3. (tie) Sandra Peterson, Susan
Newborn 221.
High handicap series: 1. Sandra
Peterson 629; 2. Karen Gardner 607;
3. Karen Clampett 601.
(results from Nov. 2)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(33-11); 2. Farmers (25-19); 3. Pink
Panthers (24-20).
High scratch game: 1. Louise
Atwood 178; 2. Yvonne Finley 171;
3. Louise Atwood 169. 1. Johnnie
Croft 233; 2. Johnnie Croft 215;
3. Ross Meyers 195.
High scratch series: 1. Louise
Atwood 499; 2. Betty Brown 464;
3. Joanne Denton 449. 1. Johnnie
Croft 621; 2. Ross Meyers 513; 3. Art
Joubert 502.
(results from Nov. 2)
GOLDEN ROLLERS


ACROSS 41 Corolla part
43 Alta. neighbor
Martin's bill 45 Ticket price
Pen points 48 Where Madras
Building site is
Calcutta nanny 51 Crete's sea
Bassoon 53 Transfer
cousin 56 Uptight
Freudian topic 57 Boring tool
Circle dance 58 Course of
Not a picky action
eater 59 Deli loaves
Furnace tender 60 No.
Poker pair 61 Slalomer's
Camelot lady need
Wine cateaorv 62 Desiccated


23 Creep about
26 Horde
30 Surf duo -
and Dean
33 "Judith" com-
poser
34 Nerve network
35 Limburger fea-
ture
37 Sporty trucks
39 Baseball award
40 Senate attire,
once


DOWN


1 Derisive snorts
2 Overexpress
one's feelings


the 80-lane alley in the
afternoon.
"I feel like I am tak-
ing my best team and
one or two of the better
'individuals," Saunders
said. "Another positive is
four of these girls have
bowled at Boardwalk
quite often. They have
competed at that level
and know the envi-
ronment and love the
conditions."


Team standings: 1. Shiners (25-15);
,2. Wild Things (24-16); 3. Gamblers
(22-18).
High scratch game: 1. Dee Dee
Young 180; 2. Vy Ritter 169; 3. Joanne
Denton 158. 1. Earl Hayward 210;
2. George Walters 209; 3. George
Mulligan 192.
High scratch series: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 541; 2. Louise Atwood
499; 3. Elaine Nemeth 458. 1. Ross
Meyers 606; 2. Lee McKinney 561;
3. David Duncan 555.
High handicap game: 1. Dolores
Porter 237; 2. Janie Posey 217;
3. Bertha Black 216. 1. Jerry Ellis
249; 2. Vernon Black 229; 3. Jack
Stanfield 227.
High handicap series: 1. Pat
Hale 650; 2. Roberta Giordano 602;
3. Ruth Lott 598. 1. Jim Hawkins
645; 2. Thomas Young 632; 3. Dan
Ritter 612.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
152.52; 2. Bea Purdy 151.17; 3. Elaine
Nemeth 149.4. 1. David Duncan
190.57; 2. Bill Dolly 183.3; 3. George
Mulligan .180.3.
(results from Oct. 28)


Answer to Previous Puzzle

D D/IEP
PI RS AR I OL
AP L ER
T ST


PDQ Gg-T-OVA

CLA E O RDS

ASTA NODEGOT



DISS C L MA

I LL LEA YEG GS
CEO0 E EL B OTIH


3 Burr or
Spelling 8 Fishing net
4 Tan slacks 9 Ponce de -
5 Koh-i- dia- 10 Horrible boss
mond 11 Sock parts
6 Apple rival 17 Country parson
7 appetite! 19 Ferber or Best


22 Clay-target
sport
24 Spew ash
25 Poker pot
primer
27 Dream
acronym
28 Rock
network
29 Nope
opposite
30 Scribble down
31 Excitement
32 Fruitcake go-
with
36 Rajahs'
spouses
38 Not at risk
42 Some drafts
44 Yellow
jackets
46 Tint again
47 Gung-ho
48 Kuwait neigh-
bor
49 Salamander
50 "What's My
Line" host
51 Blyth and
Landers
52 NASDAQ
rival
54 Genre
55 Moo goo -
pan


11-6 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421














FSU seeks better play from wideouts


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-Jimbo
Fisher has heard enough
criticism of his senior quar-
terback, and the Florida
State coach says Christian
Ponder hasn't gotten
enough help from his wide
receivers.
Fisher said it's time for
his receivers to get on the
same page as the rest of
the team.
"The other guys are
doing a good job," said
Fisher, whose 24th-ranked
Seminoles host North
Carolina on Saturday. "The
other guys are focused."
Two-thirds of the way
through his first season as
a head coach, Fisher called
out his receiver corps to
step. up and make some
plays to take some of the
pressure off Ponder, who
hasn't had a reliable deep
threat all season.
For starters, Fisherwould
be happy if they would sim-
ply run good routes.
"It's hard to zip a ball
when you're not sure
where somebody's going
to be and throw with con-
fidence," Fisher said. "If
everybody practiced like
seven (Ponder wears No.
7) and played like seven, we
wouldn't have any issues.
The rest of them guys need


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Willie Haulstead (82) can't make the reception on a pass in front of North Carolina State defender Brandan
Bishop during the first half of an NCAA college football game in Raleigh, N.C., Oct. 28.


to take his lead."
Ponder has thrown three
interceptions and lost three
fumbles in Florida State's
last two games, attracting
the ire of some fans who
came into the season with


high expectations for a play-
er the school was promot-
ing as a Heisman Trophy
candidate.
But his longest pass has
gone for 38 yards and he's
thrown for an average of


172 per game, -a big drop-off
from last season, when he,
averaged 302 yards passing
until he suffered a season-
ending injury at Clemson
in the ninth game of the
season.


Speedsters Rod Owens
and Richard Goodman grad-
uated, and Jarmon Forston
was kicked off the team
in August, leaving posses-
sion receivers Bert Reed
and Taiwan Easterling as


the only returning wideouts
with experience.
Reed leads the Seminoles
with 40 catches, but is aver-
aging just 9.8 yards a catch
with one TD reception,
while Easterling ranks sec-
ond with 369 yards and two
scores on 23 catches.
Sophomore Willie
Haulstead has four of the
nine touchdowns receptions
made by Fisher's wideouts.
Rodney Smith, who is 6-
foot-6, was supposed to be
the next Greg Carr, but
has only 15 catches and
one touchdown midway
through his sophomore
season. Carr, who gradu-
ated two years ago, had 21
TD catches after his sopho-
more year at Florida State.
Florida State's wideouts
this .season have averaged
13.5 catches a game for an
average of just over 12 yards
a catch and one touchdown
a game numbers that
longtime Seminoles great
Ron Sellers routinely pro-
duced by himself.
And no one knows any
better than Fisher and his
banged-up quarterback that
things will only get tough-
er for the Seminoles if the
receivers don't get things
turned around.
The receivers "have got
to make plays," Fisher said.
"You've got to get open;
you've got to run routes."


Gators remain focused,


not overlooking Vanderbilt


By TERESA M. WALKER
Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
For the first time in years,
Florida visits Vanderbilt
not ranked in the Top 25.
The Gators' goals remain
the same: Get back to the
Southeastern Conference
title game.
The Gators, fresh off
their 34-31 overtime win
over Georgia, insist they
aren't about to overlook a
team that has lost three
straight and hasn't beat-
en Florida since 1988 in
a skid now at 19 straight
games.
Florida quarterback John
Brantley said it doesn't
matter what Vanderbilfs
record is.
"Just because we beat
Georgia doesn't mean
we're world beaters,"
Brantley said. "We've just
got to keep going, keep
practicing hard like we did
this past two weeks with
that little chip on our shoul-
ders. Just keep fighting and
practicing hard."
That's because the
Gators (5-3, 3-3) can play
for the Eastern Division
title that looked long gone
after a three-game skid that
knocked them out of the
Top 25 for the first time
since coach Urban Meyer
took over in Gainesville.
First, they must take care
of Vanderbilt (2-6, 1-4) and
then host No. 18 South
Carolina with the East up
for grabs along with a trip
to Atlanta.
Florida also must. deal
with a morning kickoff with
temperatures expected to
dip into the mid-20s a few
hours before kickoff.
"It is a concern because
you know that the team
you are playing is one of
those teams that is look-
ing to get you, and they
have the talent to get you,"


JASON MATTMHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida punter Chas Henry (17) kicks the game-winning field goal in overtime against
Georgia at EverBank Field in Jacksonville on Oct. 30. The Gators beat Georgia 34-31 in
overtime.


Meyer said. "They run that
offense where they have
an athletic quarterback. So
yes, that is uncomfortable.
I think the last time (play-
ing so early) was Ole Miss,
down at Ole Miss and that
was bizarre."
That game was back
in 2007, and the Gators
escaped that road trip with
a 30-24 win thanks to Tim
Tebow.
He's no longer around,
so Meyer went to a no-
huddle, hurry-up approach
on offense during the
Gators' open date before
playing Georgia. He also
has Brantley switching up
with Trey Burton at quar-
terback.
It worked as Burton
ran for 110 yards, and the'
Gators rolled up a season-
high 77 plays for 450 yards
in their win over Georgia.
"Everybody seems to
be getting at their best
when we take them on,"
Vanderbilt coach Robbie


Caldwell said.
He took note of the
offensive changes Meyer
made, and Caldwell said
the Gators seem to be back
on track.
"They seem to have it
going pretty good now. I
know that was a big win
down there beating Georgia
in overtime," Caldwell
said.
The Commodores,
who use a no-huddle type
offense, have been trying
to find that improvement
too. Florida has played 17,
freshmen, tied for most in
the nation, and Vanderbilt
isn't far behind having
played 13: But they have
been outscored 113-21 in
their past three games -
all losses.
Caldwell handed the
coordinator job to Des
Kitchings before last
week's 49-13 loss to then-
No. 19 Arkansas. It worked
as Vandy scored on its first
two drives, then managed


only 13 yards the rest of the
.game. The Commodores
rank 114th out of 120 teams
averaging 286.8 yards per
game, and they lost top
rusher Warren Norman to
a dislocated right wrist for
the season.
"It's always hard to lose
one of your best play-
makers on the team,"
Vanderbilt running back
Zac Stacy said. "I just hate
it for Warren. He's a great
athlete, a great player. But
we just got to go on."
Vanderbilt does have
Casey Hayward, tied for
the NCAA lead with five
interceptions, and defen-
sive end Tim Fugger ranks
third with four forced
fumbles.
The Gators will have to
take care of the ball like
they did against Georgia
when they had only one
turnover. Meyer also tried
to make Vanderbilt prepare
for more than just Brantley
and Burton. -


PICKS: Seminoles ground game should shine


Continued From Page 1B

back from a loss, but a
convincing win could show
they know how to respond
to one.
North Carolina-gave the
'Noles some trouble last
season, leading 24-6 at one
point before FSU rallied to
win 30-27.
This year, the Tar Heels
lack the depth up front


that they possessed last
season, and FSU will match
up well. With a three-
headed monster at running
back, expect the 'Noles to
dominate the ground and
the scoreboard.

FSU 34, UNC 13
Others. ...Miami


rebounds after tough
loss with win against
Maryland. ...Clemson
upsets North Carolina
State in early action. ...The
Fighting Zookers of Illinois
pull off a big upset win
at Michigan. ...Could the
Baylor Bears be for real? A
win over Oklahoma State
says so. ...Utah in a tight


home win against fourth-
ranked TCU. ...Alabama
rolls into LSU and comes
out on top. ...South
Carolina beats Arkansas
to set up showdown in the
Swamp.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Penn State head football coach Joe Paterno enters his
weekly news conference on Tuesday, Nov 2, 2010 in State
College, Pa. Paterno has enough things to worry about
beside going after his 400th career victory. So in typical
'fashion, Penn State's Hall of Fame coach downplayed
questions Tuesday at Beaver Stadium about approaching his
latest milestone when the Nittany Lions face Northwestern
this weekend.


JoePa on cusp of

400-win plateau


By GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
- The remarkable career
of Joe Paterno can reach
another pinnacle Saturday.:
Penn State's iconic lead-
er is. just a win away from'.
his 400th victory, a mile-
stone no other FBS coach
has ever reached. Only
Northwestern stands in the
way when the Wildcats (6-
2, 2-2 Big Ten) visit Beaver
Stadium on Saturday.
Not one to promote his
own accomplishments,
Paterno pleaded this week
to keep the focus on the
game and not his 45-year
tenure on the sideline with
the Nittany Lions (5-3, 2-2).
"You're going to win a
couple of games in that time.
I really don't give it much
thought," said Paterno, who
turns 84 next month. "It's
not going to make a differ-
ence if I win 390 or 400 wins
or how ever many."
But whether he likes it
or not, JoePa is the talk of
Happy Valley and much
of the rest of the college
football world, too. He's got
one especially big fan in the
South.


"Joe is going to reach a
goal that I wanted to reach,"
former Florida State coach
and fellow Hall of Famer
Bobby Bowden said in a
phone interview Thursday
from his Florida home. "I'm
pulling for Joe to make it.
There's a lot of pressure
on this game. Everybody's
expecting him to get his
400th win in this game."
Bowden at one time
was locked in a duel with
Paterno for the most wins
among major college
coaches before a messy
split with school adminis-
trators had Bowden leaving
as Seminoles coach after
the 2009 season following
34 years.
Nowadays, Bowden is
busy promoting his new
book, "Called to 'Coach," in
which good friend Paterno
wrote a foreword. Bowden
finished with 389 wins,
though 12 were vacated by
Florida State following an
academic cheating scandal.
After Paterno, only Eddie
Robinson (408) atGrambling
State of the FCS and John
Gagliardi (476) at St. John's,
Minn., have more victories
among coaches in all NCAA
levels.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Serious student seeks time

out from friends' chitchat


DEAR ABBY: I'm a junior
in high school and taking mul-
tiple AP classes. With all the
homework we're assigned, I
sometimes need to use lunch-
time to finish assignments.
My problem is my friends fol-
low me into the school library
and talk to me while I'm work-
ing. Their constant chatter is
distracting and prevents me
from concentrating on my as-
signments.
I don't neglect my friends. I
spend hours outside of school
with them every week. But I'd
rather be left alone when I'm
trying to work. My friends
don't understand that I'm
more focused on academics
and long-term goals than my
short-term social life.
How can I politely get them
to leave me alone when I'm
working? FOCUSED ON
MY GOALS IN LOS ANGE-
LES
DEAR FOCUSED ON
YOUR GOALS: If you haven't
told your friends plainly how
you feel and clearly drawn a
line, you shouldn't blame them
for being clueless when they
cross it. Tell them you:need to
concentrate when you're in the
library and that they are creat-
ing a problem for you. Not
only will you be helping your-
self, you'll be doing a favor for
other students who are trying
to study and who are also be-
ing distracted.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 34-
year-old woman, and still sin-
gle. Many people like me enjoy
their lives, but I don't. I long to


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
be married and to have a fam-
ily. But because of my failures
in the dating world I'm not op-
timistic about my chances.
The thought of marriage
and family late in life frightens
me, and I don't want to raise a
child as a single parent. So, at
my age, is it likely I may never
be married?
I would appreciate it if your
readers could share how they
were able to change circum-
stances like mine. SINGLE
STILL IN LITTLE ROCK
DEAR SINGLE STILL
Please do not resign your-
self to singlehood quite yet.
People are settling down and
marrying later today for many
reasons. Because you men-
tioned that the thought of mar-
riage and family "later in life"
frightens you, my inclination
is to suggest that you discuss
it with a psychologist or other
licensed professional to see
whether your fear may have
been instrumental in causing
your relationships to fail.
However, because you re-
quested reader input regard-
ing late marriage, I'm sure
we'll hear from them, gener-
ously sharing their experi-


ences. I know several couples
who married later in life, and
they are compatible and hap-
py. Readers, what do you have
to say?
DEAR ABBY: I was re-
cently promoted to a new posi-
tion at work, doing something
I have always wanted to do.
My supervisor and I are very
different almost polar oppo-
sites, in fact. But we get along
great and work well together.
Because we have started
working more closely, she is
now beginning to consider
me her friend, asking me
to "hang out" and occasion-
ally offering me recreational
drugs. I love working with
her, but I don't want to hang
out with her outside of work
because of our differences. If
something were to go wrong
outside the office, it would
affect our work relationship.
How do I keep things strictly
professional without offend-
ing her? WARY ASSIS-
TANT IN ARIZONA
DEAR WARY ASSIS-
TANT: By telling her (with
a smile) that your time to
socialize is extremely limited
and, as much as you enjoy
working with her, you prefer
to keep your work relation-
ships strictly professional.
And should the woman offer
you a controlled substance,-
simply say, "No thank you."

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.
I reAR 'oL
iHAVE CHtcEPM Is-s.


FRANK & ERNEST


A6, LEA6T r cl


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Taking on a
challenge will test your
stamina but raise your
level of awareness regard-
ing your motives. A money
venture ,has he, ptentiaL.
to turn sour if you let your
emotions get ihvolved2 'Do
the necessary research.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You will make
some adjustments to a rela-
tionship, ensuring a better
understanding of your ex-
pectations. Long, heart-to-
heart discussions will make
you realize what life is truly
about. Love is on the rise
and a promise you've been
waiting for will be made.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Criticism can be
expected if you forget to do
something you promised
you'd take care of. Don't
jeopardize your position
because you are careless
and do a sloppy job. A lack
of trust will leave you in a
no-win situation. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Utilize your
time wisely and you will ac-
complish on all fronts. Do
something that will boost
your ego and make you feel
good about the way you
look. Socialize with friends
or spend quality time with
someone special. You are in
a romantic cycle. --****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You may have ener-
gy but, if you, don't direct
it properly, you are likely
to end up in trouble with*
someone expecting some-
thing from you. A financial
situation is bound to crop
up if you or someone you
love have overspent or hid-
den the cost of something.
**k-
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Talk, share and make
plans with someone you
care about. Be careful while
doing odd jobs or working
with power tools, equip-
ment or anything with the
potential to cause injury.
Add to your knowledge
regarding different beliefs
and lifestyles. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Look into professional
possibilities and consider
what you have to offer. Pick
up information or skills that
will make you more em-
ployable. Don't let anyone
you live with or are close
to dictate what you can and
cannot do. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take charge
and be creative and you
will attract followers. Don't
let anything deter you from
moving in a direction that is
right for you. Professional
and personal partnerships


are looking good. Make a
deal, a promise or a vow.

SAGITTARIUS' (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Divulging
information you've been
given in secrecy will come
back to haunt you. You will
face a change at home or
within your personal life
that takes you by surprise
and leaves you empty-hand-
ed. You may have to back-
track, regroup and rethink
your next move. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Your tim-
ing is impeccable and your
ability to outmaneuver the
competition is outstand-
ing. Speak from the heart
and share your thoughts. A
false impression can lead to
a costly mistake. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb: 18): As long as you
give everyone his or her
space, you will be able to do
your own thing. A little hard
work and discipline will pay
off when the time comes to
present what you've been
working on. You'll reap fi-
nancial rewards for what
you've completed. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Money is
heading in your direction
along with gifts, contracts
and opportunities that can
change your life. Mingle
with people in your field. A
proposal you offered some
time ago will be reconsid-
ered. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals Y
" SYC FZ LV I WI D E IO L WY I L "
D Y R I D L RDYJG FGS F''PI J DFLLIG
ZYBI WYILDN F CYG'L XGCIDZLTGC


B N Z I K E "


- OTDK ZTGCRXDS


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "You want to be a writer, don't know how or when?
Find a quiet place, use a humble pen." Paul Simon.
c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-6


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for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lilkecityrlcporter.coiii


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-1108-SC
CURTIS PARKER OR PATSY
SCOTT
6349 SW SR 47
LAKE CITY, FL 32024
Plaintiff
VS
OPAL DAVIS KING
16601 JEWETTSTAPT. 105
WHITE SPRINGS, FL 32096
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1991 SUZI
with serial # 2S2AC35S2M6601940
located in Lake City, Columbia
County, Florida.
The following persons) may claim
some right, title or interest therein:
CURTIS PARKER OR PATSY
SCOTT
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written answer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within 10 days.
CLERK OF COURTS
BY: /s/ D. Watkins
Deputy Clerk
04542184
October 30, 2010
November 6, 2010

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE TO WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on Thursday, No-
vember 18, 2010, in the Columbia
County School Board Administration
Building, 372 West Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. con-
sider the adoption of an ordinance
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING
FOR THE CREATION OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY ECONOM-
IC DEVELOPMENT AD VALOR-
EM TAX EXEMPTION TO IN-
DUCE BUSINESS DEVELOP-
MENT WITHIN COLUMBIA
COUNTY; PROVIDING ENACT-
MENT AUTHORITY; PROVIDING
FOR LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS;
PROVIDING NAMES; PROVID-
ING DEFINITIONS; ESTABLISH-
MENT OF ECONOMIC DEVEL-
OPMENT AD VALOREM TAX
EXEMPTION; PROVIDING AD-
MINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES,
INCLUDING APPLICATION FOR
EXEMPTION AND BOARD CON-
SIDERATION OF APPLICA-
TIONS; PROVIDING FOR REVO-
CATION OF EXEMPTION AND
RECOVERY OF FUNDS; PRO-
VIDING FOR APPEALS AND AP-
PLICABILITY OF ORDINANCE;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILI-
TY; PROVIDING FOR INCLU-
SION IN THE COUNTY CODE OF
ORDINANCES, REPEAL OF LAW
AND CONFLICT; AND PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
of the proceeding may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 4th day of November,
2010.
/s/ P. DeWitt Cason by P.A. Perry ,
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
04542263
November 6, 2010

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

'Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lie & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 09000257CA
WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL
SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC.
Plaintiff
vs.
CHARLES B. BROWN, III; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES
B. BROWN, I; HOMETOWN
BROKERS, INC.; and UNKNOWN
OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWN-
ERS, and OTHER UNKNOWN
PARTIES, including, if a named de-
fendant is deceased, the personal rep-
resentatives, the surviving spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
and all other parties claiming by,
through, under or against that de-
fendant and the several and respec-
tive unknown assigns, successors in
interest, trustees or other persons
claiming by, through, under or
against any corporation or other legal
entity named as defendant, and all
claimants, persons or parties, natural
or corporate, or whose exact legal
status is unknown, claiming under
any of the above named or described
defendants
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to the Order or Final Judgment en-
tered in this cause, in the Circuit
Court of Columbia County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in Co-
lumbia County, Florida, described
as: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "A"
EXHIBIT "A"
ALL that certain land, situate In Co-
lumbia County, State of Florida, viz:
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH-RANGE 17
EAST
Section 8: Begin at the Northeast
comer of SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Sec-
tion 8, and run East along the North
boundary line of said SW 1/4 of NW
1/4 to the West right-of-way line of
U.S. Highway 441; then run South
along said right-of-way line of U.S.
Highway 441, 420 feet; then run
West parallel to the North boundary
line of said SW 1/4 of NW 1/4, 420
feet; then run South parallel to the
West boundary line of the SW 1/4 of
NW 1/4 210 feet; then run South par-
allel to the North boundary line of
SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 630 feet; thence
run South parallel to the West boun-
dary line of the SW 1/4 of NW 1/4,
420 feet; thence run West parallel to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of the NW 1/4, 270 feet; then run
North 270 feet to the West boundary
line of the SW 1/4 of NW 1/4; then
run North along the West boundary
line of the SW 1/4 of NW 1/4, 11020
feet to a point 30 feet South of the
North boundary line of the SW 1/4
of NW 1/4.; then run East parallel to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4, 280 feet; then run
North parallel to the West boundary
line of SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 30 feet to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4; then run East along
the North boundary, line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4, a distance of 1040
feet, more or less, to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. Lying ing in Columbia
County, Florida:
LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOL-
LOWING LANDS:
Begin at the Northeast comer of the
SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 8, then
run East to the West right-of-way
line of U.S. Highway 441; then run
South along said right-of-way line of
(U.S. Highway 441, 110 feet; than
run West parallel to the North boun-
dary line of the ; SW 1/4 of NW 1/4,
1320 feet, more or less, to a point on
the West boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4 which is 110 feet
South of the line of the SW 1/4 of
NW 1/4; then run North along the
West boundary line of the SW 1/4 of
the KNW 1/4 280 feet; then run North
parallel to the West boundary line of
the SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4, 30 feet to
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4; then run East along
the North boundary line of the SW
1/4 of NW 1/4, 1040 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING,
Together with all the tenements, he-'
reditaments and appurtenances there-
to belonging or in anywise appertain-
ing
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, on the third floor of
the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32056 at 11:00 A.M. on
December 1, 2010.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST TO THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTH-
ER THAN THE PROPERTY OWN-
ER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITH THE CLERK OF COURT'
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED this 28th day of October,
2010
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
By:/s/B.Scippio
DeputyClerk
ENRICO G. GONZALEZ, P.A.
Attorney at Law
ENRICO G. GONZALEZ, ES-
QUIRE
6255 East Fowler Avenue
Temple Terrace, FL 33617
Florida Bar #861472
(813)980-6302
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not
later than seven (7) days prior to the
proceeding via the Florida Relay
Service at 1-800-955-8771.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a copy of
the foregoing has been mailed to En-
rico G. Gonzalez, Esquire, 6255 East
Fowler Avenue, Temple Terrace,
Florida 33617; Charles B. Brown,
III, c/o Eddie M. Anderson, Esquire,
Post Office Box 1179, Lake City, FlI
32056-1179; and Hometowne Brok-
ers, Inc., 487 N.W. Casterline Glen,
Lake City, FL 32055 this 28th day of
October, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court


By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04542210
November 6, 13, 2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION NO.
PLANTATION AT DEEP
CREEK, LLC, a Florida limited
liability company,
16525 Temple Boulevard
Loxahatchee, FL 33470
Plaintiff,
vs.
ADVERSE POSSESSION,
QUIET TITLE
P.G. BROWN, LULA HARDEE
BROWN,
E.V. BROWN, W.S. BROWN, JAN-
IE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B.
SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN, JR.,
E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH B.
HEATH,
addresses unknown, and their un-
known spouses and children, their
heirs, devisees, and personal repre-
sentatives and their or any of their
heirs, devisees, executors, adminis-
trators, grantees, trustees, assigns, or
successors in right, title, or interest to
the hereinafter described property
and any and all persons claiming by
or through them or any of them; and
all claimants, persons or parties, nat-
ural or corporate, or whose exact le-
gal status is unknown, claiming un-
der any of the above named or de-
scribed defendants, claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in and to
the lands hereinafter described, the
addresses of whom are unknown;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: P.G. BROWN, LULA
HARDEE BROWN, E.V. BROWN,
W.S. BROWN, JANIE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B. SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN,
JR., E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH
B. HEATH, addresses unknown, and
their unknown spouses and children,
their heirs, devisees, and personal
representatives and their or any of
their heirs, devisees, executors, ad-
ministrators, grantees, trustees, as-
signs, or successors in right, title, or
interest t6 the hereinafter described
property and any and all persons
claiming by or through them or any
of them; and all claimants, persons
or parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under'any of the above
named or described defendants,
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in and to the lands herein-
after described, the addresses of
whom are unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action seeking an order of ad-
verse possession for and to quiet the
title of the following property in Co-
lumbia County, Florida:
A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF
(W 1/2) OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER (NE 1/4),OF SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE
17 EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING THOSE LANDS
DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1007,
PAGE 2420 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF
SAID SECTION 31; THENCE
NORTH 0005'09" WEST ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF SAID NE 1/4
A DISTANCE OF 825.05 FEET TO
THE INTERSECTION OF SAID
WEST LINE WITH THE NORTH-
ERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF NORTHWEST
CANSA ROAD AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL;
THENCE CONTINUE NORTH
00205'09" WEST ALONG SAID
WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF
566.67 FEET TO THE SOUTH
LINE OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1021,
PAGE 826 OF THE AFORESAID
RECORDS; THENCE SOUTH
61907'42" EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE A DISTANCE OF
353.29 FEET TO A REBAR ON
THE AFORESAID NORTHERLY
MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE; THENCE SOUTH 3755'01"
WEST ALONG SAID NORTHER-
LY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF
502.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
CONTAINING 2.01 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
SAID LANDS SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Clay
A. Schnitker, Davis, Schnitker,
Reeves & Browning, PA., Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Drawer 652, Madison, Florida
32341, on or before November 24,
2010, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
Dated October 21, 2010.
P. DEWIT CASON, Clerk of Court
By:B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04542045
October 23, 30, 2010
November 6, 13, 2010


010 Announcements








020 Lost & Found


Lost Chihuahua
Much loved, white with light
brown spots, Red Collar,
near Walmart 386-288-3024


ioo0 Job
Opportunities

04542232
Dietary Aide, Dietary Cook
Part time positions
Must have prior exp in a
healthcare facility or other
institution. Please apply at Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025.

04542257
First Federal Bank of
Florida has a position available
for a full-time Collector in Lake
City. Solid understanding of
financial institution policies and
procedures. Experience prefer-
red dealing with delinquent
accounts. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Turbeville.J(a)ffsb.com
or mailed to Human Resources,
SP.O. Box 2029, Lake City FL
32056. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.


05524388
Teacher Positions
FT Early Head Start Lake
City: min. HS Diploma/GED
and DCF 40 hours, $8.65/hr. if
have FCCPC/CDA credential.

PT Head Start and FT Early
Head Start Jasper:
min. HS Diploma/GED and
DCF 40 hours, FCCPC/CDA re-
quired for FT position, $8.65/hr.

Sick and annual leave, holiday
pay, health insurance, retirement
+ add'l benefits. Bilingual
preferred. Must pass physical
and DCF background
requirements, current
1st Aide/CPR pref.
To apply, e-mail:
arobinson@sv4cs.org,
call (386) 754-2222, fax resume
to (386) 754-2220, or apply in
person @ 236 SW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City, or 843 SW
Marymac St., Live Oak, FL
EOE

All around handy person needed.
Multiple duties in local sewing
factory. Call Hafner's
386-755-6481

Electrician/Traffic Signal instal-
ler w/bucket experience. CDL
preferred. Good pay and benefits.
EOE. Bobby 813-433-7851
Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St, Lake City, FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record,
386-963-5026, Drug Test.
License CDL Driver
w/2 yrs Logging Exp.
Must have Clean CDL.
386-365-6966
Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
5 days a week. Please fax resume
to 386-719-9662
Mechanic Needed
Heavy truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the
right person, Southern Specialized
Truck & Trailer, US 41 N
386-752-9754
P/T Class A CDL
Drivers needed. A CLEAN record
and a flexible schedule required.
Call 386-935-1705 to apply.
Wanted Forestry machinery
operator. with 2 yrs. exp.
Must have valid DL.
Koon Timber 386-365-6966

120 Medical
J120 Employment

05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp. Call Cindi: (850)253-1906

05524375

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of CNA/MA/LPN
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494

2 Schools &
240 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 11/08/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11


310 Pets & Supplies

2 yr old male Siberian husky
w/papers. Black/white w/blue
eyes. He has not been neutered.
Asking $150. (352)949-8322
Black and White Skunk. about 1.5
years old. Has been spayed and
glands removed. All shots are up
to date. $100. 386-623-2443
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they.
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

4 10 Lawn & Garden
S Equipment
Riding
Lawn Mower
$200
386-344-1783


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick.Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Fri & Sat 8 am, Multi Family,
furn, glassware, clothes, books,
collectables/antiques & more!
433 S Marion Ave
Fri & Sat, 9am ?,Multi Family,
tools, rug, furniture, golf clubs
494 NW Clubview Cir,
(Lake City Country Club)
MULTI FAMILY Sat. 8-? Comer
of Herlong & Choctaw, S Hwy 47.
Holiday items, power tools, house-
hold, games, toys, much more!!.-.
Multi-Family Sat. Oct. 6., 8-2
Retired Teacher, lots of classroom
decor & more 192 SW Dante Terr
Off hwy 242 Lots of plus size
men/womens(2X up)&kids
clothes, toys, & much more.
Nov. 6, Saturday 8-? 183 SW
Mockingbird Way (242/47).
Household items, jewelry, tools,
yard'equip., more. Look for signs
= 93 YUL A& I.U t 9tIiIN


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat & Sun at 8am Rain or shine
Forest Terr. off Country Club.
Primitive fum., bakelite items,
jewelry, computer, collectible bar-
bies, dining/living room sets more.
Sat only, 7:30 am Sharp!
Multi Family Sale,
behind Sonic Restaurant
1326 SW Castle Heights Terr
Sat only, 8 am noon, miscellane-
ous, computer eq, household items
2213 SW Birley Ave, off Pine-
mount Hwy 386-755-0661
SAT. 10-2. 6243 NW 31ST Circle
Jennings. off Hwy 141 in
Timberlake Est?
Lots and lots of misc.
SAT. 7:30-? 41 S. turn left on
131C, follow signs. Tools, prin-
cess house, Christmas dishes, Ig
leather chest lots of household, etc
Sat.& Sun 9-? Hsehold items from
3 storage units. Fum., Queen bed-
room set. Lazy boys, lots of books
& more. 14373 S Hwy 441.
SAT., 8-1, 2673 SW. Tustenuggee
Ave, hshold, paintings, furnishing
decor., electronics, trampoline,
clothes, exerc. equip. 288-6254


440 Miscellaneous

NATURAL GAS heater. Large
black, free standing w/open flame.
Cost $500 new, asking $250. obo.
386-719-3942
Need Holiday cash? Make 75% of
selling price at 3 day consignment
sale. Accepting gently used name
brand clothing, shoes & handbags.
Call 386-752-3631 or 755-17.59
Swimming Pool
15 x 48
Like New $100
386-344-1783

450 Good Things
450 to Eat g

Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

60 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

1,2,3 Br MH's for rent. All you
need is $200 to move you in. Rv's
also avl. 6 mo min.lease Water,
mowing garbage container
provided for home or RV.
No pets. No Washers. Bkgrd Ck
done on all tenants. 386-755-5488


* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


iSELLITTI


FIND2I

iLisn


I


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


63 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DWMH, in beautiful area, pri-
vate dr, appliances included, Need
to see to appreciate! By appt only
386-752-5617, leave message pls
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
Kingsley Lake: $800/mo you can
rent your own year-round place at
. Kingsley Lake! 2/2 remodeled,
ch/a. Private Dock. 386-752-4339.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017.
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. $575. mo (reg. $650.) Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-86-7-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Fully Furnished in park. 14X56.
2br/1.5ba. Washer & Dryer,
Micro, TV, Clean. $8,900. Owned
by non-smoker 386-755-0110
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940
650 Mobile Home
0 & Land
D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825
7tin Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
5523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 Apt in duplex for rent. $560
mo. w/$560 dep. no pets,
w/carport, off Branford Hwy
386-752-7578
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $540 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $650 plus dep & bckgrnd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

p720 Furnished Apts.
2V For Rent
1 Room Efficiency Apt. Private.
$450. mo plus $50. deposit
Everything furnished. No pets.
386-965-0778
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates., 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
V Home For Rent
04542205
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2/1 w/den, on west side, 1 wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water and
trash included, $650 month +
security pet ok 386-719-9702
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old3Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3 possible 4 br/1 ba home
located in Lake City (90west)
$800.00 first & last required
386-623-9686 or 386-288-0120
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/1.5ba house
close to town.
$750. mo plus deposit.
386-752-8653


730 Unfurnished
I7U Home For Rent
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Completely remodeled 4/2 plus
study with carport in quiet area.
$1100 mo plus last and security.
386-867-2283
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Lg 4 br/2ba home on Old Country
Club Rd. Living Rm, Family
Rm/Dining Rm/Kitchen; Recrea-
tion Rm; Fenced Yd. $800/mo;
Sec Dep $800; 386-623-2642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1stat,, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

750 Business&
5 Office Rentals
Great Opportunity
Sunoco Convenient Store for lease
3554 N Hwy 441, Lake City.
813-495-8461
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

1200 sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
.7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Build a brand new home on your
land for only $69,000!!!
Includes 1 yr warranty and only
75 day turn around time!
Call Aaron Simque Homes
for details and plans today
386-755-0841
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&
OAU Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFlnancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

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