<%BANNER%>






The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01444
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/05/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01444
System ID: UF00028308:01444
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Showdown
Playoff spot on the line
c ooo A/ite.


CGA -V 15




LaI 32


Out with a bang
Columbia tries to put
painful October behind.
Sports, I B





reporter


X.A


Friday, November 5, 2010 Iwww.lakecir~reporter.com


Vo. 136, No. 248 0 75 cents


Commission moves IDA under county control


Board votes 3-2 to
end department's
autonomy.
'By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority staff will no
longer answer to its own
board of directors, but to
the county.


By a 3-2
vote, the
Columbia V[ 1
County I
Board of
County
C o mmi -
ssioners Weaver
approved
ending the IDA's autonomy
and will bring the group
under the county's umbrel-
la of supervision.
Dewey Weaver, Jody


DuPrDuPree the IDA
Stephen
Bailsupervision of the coun-y
voted ini
Weaver, whfavor of
mo ving
DuPree the IDA
under the
supervision of the coun-
ty. Commissioners Ron
Williams and Scarlet Frisina
dissented.
Weaver, who is retir-


ing and
sat for his
final board
meeting,
made the .
to make
the IDA Bailey
a county
department effective Jan.
15, 2011. Dale Williams,
county manager, will work
on a transition plan with
Jim Poole, IDA executive


director,
before the
consolida-
tion occurs.
Dale
Williams
will pre-
Poole side over
Poole and
the department will func-
tion similarly to the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council,
with Poole working for the


county first and the IDA
board second.
There will be no change
in the way the IDA is fund-
ed as a dependent taxing
authority but all actions
the IDA takes will fall under
the guidelines of county
policy, Dale Williams said.
The IDA has two employ-
ees, Poole and Deputy
Director Gina Reynolds.
IDA continued on 3A


,HONORING



OUR



VETERANS

20th anniversary of

domiciliary focuses

on World War II vets.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.corn
he re-dedica-
tion of the local
veterans' domi-
ciliary home
for its 20th
anniversary Thursday was
all about honor.
The Robert H. Jenkins,
Jr. Veterans' Domiciliary
Home of Florida in Lake
City held the ceremony at
its facility to remember the
veterans it serves and the
deceased veteran it is named
for Robert H. Jenkins, Jr.
At least 50 domiciliary resi-
dents, members of the com-
munity and local officials
were in attendance.
The event was a cel-
ebration of the upcoming
Veterans Day, with special
recognition given to the 28
World War II veterans living
at the domiciliary.
Its highlight was an unveil-
ing ceremony of a bust of
Jenkins, sculpted by Cliff

cr"'ir '


Leonard of Jacksonville.
Jenkins, a Medal of Honor
recipient, served as a private
first class in the U.S. Marine
Corps' 3rd Reconnaissance
Battalion. He died in the
Vietnam War protecting a
fellow Marine from a hand
grenade explosion.
Leonard usually sculpts
for Jacksonville families who
have lost loved Marines in
either Iraq or Afghanistan.
Leonard decided to ven-
ture out of that realm to
sculpt a bust for Jenkins'
family because in 1967, prior
to Jenkins' deployment, he
also served as a U.S. Marine
in Jenkins' unit
Members of Jenkins' fam-
ily including his sister,
Ruby Jenkins-Smith, and
father, Robert Jenkins Sr. -
were in attendance to accept
the bust Jenkins-Smith said
it should be kept in the domi-
ciliary.
"There's no better place to
put it than where his name
stands," she said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Cliff Leonard, 64, of Jacksonville, embraces Ruby Jenkins-
Smith, 59, after unveiling a ceramic bust of her older brother,
Marine Corps Pfc. Robert H. Jenkins Jr., who selflessly gave


his life to save a fellow soldier.
Steve Murray, Florida
Department of Veterans'
Affairs communi-cations
director, was the events
speaker.
The domiciliary, which
opened in 1990, is the only
Department of Veterans'
Affairs assisted-living facil-
ity out of its seven veterans'
homes.
Amber Baughman, dom-
iciliary activities director
and the event's master of
ceremonies, said this was a
way to serve the residents.
"It's an honor serving dur
veterans because they gave
so much and we're giving
back to them," she said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Retired U.S. Air Force Lt.
Col. Steve Murray, speaks
about the courageous act
that Jenkins committed in the
line of duty.


Sheriff's Office

returns $180,000

to the county


But only $10,000
is to be given
back to Sheriff.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
A fiscal year 2009 to 2010
budget close-out of more
than $180,000 was returned
to the county by the sheriff,
but only $10,000 was given
back to him.
The Columbia
County Board of C6unty,
Commissioners unanimous-
ly approved accepting the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office close-out of non-
recurring funds, but only
approved returning $10,000
requested for repairs and
maintenance because of an
ordinance in place.
That ordinance restricts
returning more than
$10,000 of non-recurring
money on a recurring
expense without a public
hearing and at least a four-
fifths vote. Sheriff Mark
Hunter had previously
requested close-out funds
be returned for overtime


expenses, expenses consid-
ered to be recurring.
The majority of commis-
sioners expressed they
did not want to spend non-
recurring funds on a recur-
ring expense.
Commissioner Scarlet
Frisina made a motion to
hold the necessary pub-
lic hearing to return the
money, but there was no
second.
"That means we've got
to find a different way
to address the Sheriff's
request," said Dale
Williams, county manager.
In other discussion and
action:
*The board unanimously
approved obtaining apprais-
als for purchasing mitiga-
tion bank credits.
The board unani-
mously approved accepting
more than $6,000 in fiscal
year 2009 to 2010 close-
outs from the Supervisor
of Elections Office. It voted
unanimously to deny the
office's request to return
the money to purchase bal-
lots because it was too early
to need to buy them.


Remembering

what it was like

in days gone by


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Friends and family members gaze at the life-size bust, which will be housed at the Domiciliary. Pictured are childhood friend
Helen Ware (from left), 61, brother-in-law Urban Guthrie, 55, father Robert Jenkins Sr., and sister Ruby Jenkins-Smith.


Old Tim eyDay
recreates life in
the 19th century.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
LIVE OAK All are
invited Saturday to a cel-
ebration of the way life was
lived in times past.
Shady Grove Baptist
Church is hosting its 17th
Annual Old Timey Day, an
all-day free event that will
demonstrate methods of
cooking and living from the
late 1800s to early 1900s.
"It's an old-fashioned day
to see things done the way
your great-grandfathers
did it," said Danny Linton,
event organizer.
Sample foods will be
cooked on a wood-burn-
ing stove from 10 a.m. to
about 3 p.m. Biscuits will
be baked in the stove, grits
and meal made of corn will


be made by grist mill, syrup
will be made from cane,
lima beans will be cooked
in a cast-iron kettles and
ice cream will be churned.
Desserts and refreshments
will also be available.
"It's living history,"
Linton said. "You may hear
a lot of things, but until you
see it, you can't get a real-
ization for it."
Various steam engines,
antique cars and antique
tractors will also be on dis-
play, in addition to a wind-
mill turning and pumping
water.
Other activities include
wood splitting, rock
crushing, cane grinding,
children's games and hay
rides.
The main reason he
helps to produce the event
each year is to pass the
knowledge of how life used
to operate on to younger
REMEMBER continued on 3A


CALL US: ,, .. ..
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO Sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445HER,
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
People .................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
STATE
c taLnet
c>'t a n, mes


COMING
SATURDAY
Frcomn the Fairm t',
the Table


1 I84i64000 1


,'-










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010


Pia v4)


Thursday:
Afternoon: 5-9-7
Evening: 8-5-0


Thursday:
Afternoon: 3-7-2-3
Evening: 0-9-6-6


'-ezratch.
'a A Wednesday:
S 10-11-25-31-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Franklin cancels appearances


DETROIT


Aretha Franklin is cancel-
ing all concert dates and
personal appearances
through May on the
orders of her doctors,
the singer's spokeswoman said
Thursday.
The news came two days after the
announcement that Franklin had
been released over the weekend
from a Detroit hospital following a
brief stay. Publicist Tracey Jordan
said Tuesday Franklin was "resting
comfortably at home, but is anxious
to get back on the road to perform
for her countless fans around the
world."
Jordan wouldn't say Thursday
whether the events were related, nor
did she offer any details about the
68-year-old Franklin's condition.
"Her doctors have required her"
to cancel the appearances, Jordan
told The Associated Press.
It's been a tumultuous several
months for the Queen of Soul, whose
hits include "(You Make Me Feel
Like) A Natural Woman," "Chain
of Fools" and her signature song,
"Respect."
Her adult son, Eddie, was beaten
by three men at a Detroit gas station
in September. And a month earlier,
she broke ribs in a fall, causing her
to miss two free concerts in New
York.
One of the shows now being
canceled is a Christmas concert
scheduled for Detroit's Fox Theatre
on Dec. 9. Theater operator Olympia
Entertainment said the show was
being called off "due to medical rea-
sons."
Franklin, one of the most honored
singers in American history, has won
numerous Grammys, the National
Medal of Arts, the Presidential
Medal of Freedom and has been
inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aretha Franklin is shown in Philadelphia. Franklin is canceling all concert dates
and personal appearances through May, her spokeswoman said Thursday.


of Fame.

Actor David Cassidy
charged with DUI
FORT PIERCE Former
"Partridge Family" heartthrob David
Cassidy has been charged with driv-
ing under the influence in Florida.
The Florida Highway Patrol said
his car was stopped around 6 p.m.
Wednesday for weaving and nearly
causing an accident.
Cassidy told a trooper that he had
a glass of wine at lunch and a pain
pill at 3:30 p.m. Troopers reported
finding a half-empty bottle of bour-
bon in the back seat.
The FHP said Cassidy failed a
field sobriety test and two breath,
tests. He was released from jail early
Thursday.
His spokeswoman, Jo-Ann Geffen,
told TMZ he took a pain pill and was
tired from attending a funeral, but
insists he was not drunk. She wrote
in an e-mail to The Associated Press


that Cassidy thanked family, friends
and fans for their love and support.

Tim McGraw joins the
fight against hunger
NASHVILLE, Tenn. When Tim
McGraw was a kid, he didn't always
know where he'd get his next meal..
"I remember my mom being a
single mom and working," said
McGraw in a recent interview. "I also
remember not really having enough
money for food sometimes."
Those memories are part of the
reason he taped public service
announcements that begin airing
this month to raise awareness of
hunger in America.
The charity Feeding America says
one in six Americans struggle to find
enough food to eat, and approximate-
ly 5.7 million people receive emer-
gency food assistance from them on
any given week.

* Associated Press,


Celebrity Birthdays


* Elke Sommer, actress, is
70.
* Art Garfunkel, singer/actor,
is 68.
M Peter Noone, rocker
(Herman's Hermits), is 63.
MRick Cobb, rocker, is 62
* Bill Walton, NBA center, TV
analyst, is 58.
* Tatum O'Neal, actress, is
47.

Daily Scripture


* Tim Blake Nelson,
American actor, is 46.
M Famke Janssen, Dutch
model and actress, is 45.
,1 Javy L6pez, baseball
player, is 40.
* Todd Collins, NFL quarter-
back, is 39.
* BoA, Korean singer, is 24.
* Kevin Jonas, member of
the Jonas Brothers, is 23.


"He has made us competent
as ministers of a new covenant
- not of the letter but of the
Spirit; for the letter kills, but
the Spirit gives life."


2 Corinthians 3:6


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6.30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates indude 7%/1 sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Scott appoints
transition team

FORT LAUDERDALE
Governor-elect Rick
Scott won by marketing
himself as an outsider, but
he appointed some decid-
edly insider names to his
transition team Thursday.
The Republican's tran-
sition advisory commit-
tee includes former Lt.
Gov. Toni Jennings; Sally
Bradshaw, the chief of staff
to former Gov. Jeb Bush;
and outgoing U.S. Sen.
George LeMieux, among
other figures well-known in
Tallahassee.
"We're rolling," Scott said
in his first press conference
as governor-elect.
Named as the head of his
transition was Washington
trial lawyer Enu Mainigi,
a longtime friend first
hired after Scott's ouster
from Columbia/HCA amid
a massive fraud investiga-
tion. Scott tapped Mary
Anne Carter, a.Tennessee
lawyer who headed his
Conservatives for Patients'
Rights initiative, as his
transition team's executive
director.
Scott defended, his
appointment of Tallahassee
insiders a term he
used to criticize both Bill
McCollum, whom he
defeated in the primary,
and Alex Sink, whom he
prevailed over with a razor-
thin win in the general elec-
tion.
"They're all going to have
ideas," Scott said. "They
know what's worked in the
past, what hasn't worked in
the past."
Also named to his tran-
sition team: Kathleen
Shanahan, Bush's former
chief of staff and a member
of Gov. Charlie Crist's tran-
sition team four years ago;
state Rep. Mike Weinstein;
state Sen. Paula Dockery;
former state Rep. Bill
Galvano; and Mayor Manny
Marono of Sweetwater.


MOSTLY SUNNY SUNNY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


H1I63.L033 H1i63L033 HI66L038 HI72LO 46 H177L052

*' Novmbr


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov.-elect Rick Scott, right, and Lt. Gov.-elect Jennifer
Carroll wave to the crowd after Scott's acceptance speech
Wednesday at the Fort Lauderdale Hilton.


He's also including at least
one Democrat in his transi-
tion, former Miami Mayor
Maurice Ferre, who unsuc-
cessfully ran for Senate and
crossed the aisle to support
Scott for governor.

Shuttle launch
delayed again

CAPE CANAVERAL
- Storms prevented
Discovery from blasting
off on its final journey
Thursday, the latest in a
series of postponements
for NASA's oldest and most
traveled space shuttle.
Just before daybreak,
mission managers called
off the afternoon liftoff and
said they would try again
Friday.
Rain was pounding the
area, and meteorologists
said there was little chance
the weather would break
in time for Thursday's
planned launch. The offi-
cial forecast was 80 percent
"no go."
On Friday, the weather
outlook improves. There is
a 60 percent chance that
conditions will be accept-
able for launch once the
cold front passes through,
although wind will be a
concern.
Managers will meet
again early Friday to evalu-
ate the weather. If they feel
they have a decent shot,
they will give the go-ahead


to fuel Discovery for liftoff.
Liftoff on Friday would be
at 3:04 p.m.
Discovery already has
been delayed by gas leaks
and an electrical problem.

Feds arrest 11 in
drug investigation

WEST PALM BEACH
Eleven South Florida
residents have been arrest-
ed in a federal investigation
into drug smuggling and
money laundering between
the U.S. and Mexico.
According to court
records, the 19-month
investigation led U.S.
Drug Enforcement
Administration agents to
raid a Palm Beach County
home Tuesday.
All 11 suspects were
charged with conspiracy
to distribute crack cocaine.
All were ordered held
without bond Wednesday.
According to a federal
complaint, agents watched
as members of the ring
met in restaurants, in
homes and in parking
lots around Palm Beach
County to talk about ship-
ments of cocaine from
Mexico and to trade drugs
and money.
The complaint does not
reveal whether agents
seized any drugs or money
during the raid.


Tallahassei
63/35
Pensacola 6/
62/37 mPanama
64/4


Valdosta
62/35
,, Lake City,
e 63/33
Gainesville *
City "6i3/35
0 Ocala
65/35

Tampa *


City
* Jaksnville Cape Canaveral
63/36 Daytona Beach
D B Ft. Lauderdale
Daytna Beach Fort Myers
67 42 Gainesville
\ 0 Jacksonville
Orlando Cap e Canaveral Key West
68/43 67/45 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala


73/48 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 75/52 Pensacola
72/47 e Naples Tallahassee
"71/51 Miami Tampa
Key West 7'"75/52 Valdosta
78/63 W. Palm Beach
78/63 "


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


MOON'
Moonrise today 7:10 a.m.
Moonset today 6:08 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 8:18 a.m.
Moonset tom. 6:56 p.m.


Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.
6 13 21 28
New First Full Last


On this date in'
2001, a strong low
pressure system
caused high winds
over the Aleutian
Islands, Alaska. At
the Coast Guard sta-
tion at Attu, Alaska,
winds blew from 69
to 104 mph for 18
hours.


Forecasts, data and graph-
S' Ics 2010 Weather Central
f -- LLC, Madison, Wis. ,
' www.weatherpubllsher.com


et Connect


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


68/46


Saturday
63/54/s
64/44/s
71/59/s
71/46/s
62/34/s
61/35/s
79/68/s
63/33/s
70/58/s
70/51/s
63/35/s
65/43/s
63/39/s
62/39/s
61/33/s
70/47/s
60/33/s
69/57/s


Sunday
71/58/pc
66/52/s
73/64/pc
73/53/s
64/39/s
63/41/s
80/70/s
66/38/s
73/63/s
73/56/s
65/42/s
67/49/s
64/43/s
63/44/s
65/36/s
71/54/s
62/35/s
72/61/s


SUN .
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:48 a.m.
6:40 p.m.
7:49 a.m.
6:39 p.m.


79
66
77:
54
90 in 1936
29 in 1966


0.09"
0.35"
38.77"
0.28"
43.91"


5
MOMDEPA
30 niutes to In
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
1. -


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



r_ _ _


7a Friday p 7p turday6a








-Frecastsitauarn.n *FelshtFstei imperatib


"~~-"-.L----Y--."urrrrrrrrrrr-.l - - -~r '


FRIIH


SAURA


I: ISUN


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


MON


12ES qz


tatftfALMANAC.j,K,,-


ER HIST TSPO3SRIDB


I


3.









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010


School nurse remembered


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
There is no scientific
way to measure the impact,
inspiration or initiative one
person can. give to their
loved ones.
*However, Wednesday
morning the students, fac-
ulty and staff at Niblack
Elementary School showed
how the school's nurse,
the late Verlinda Galloway,
impacted their lives as a
friend, companion and col-
league.
Galloway,, who had been
the school's nurse for the
last seven years, died last
week of complications asso--
ciated with breast cancer at
the local Haven Hospice.
She came to work at the
school after having worked
20 years and retiring from
the Lake City VA Medical..
Center.
Wednesday the school's
student's, faculty and staff
held a dedication program
in honor of Galloway where
they released 120 pink bal-


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Connie Wilson-Jones (from left), Norman Wilson and Bernard
Wilson release pink balloons in honor of their sister, Verlinda
Galloway, during a ceremony at Niblack Elementary School
Wednesday morning.


loons in her honor follow-
ing a brief ceremony.
"The program was held
just to let the family of Mrs.
Galloway know how much
the school, students and
the community. loved her
and how she touched all
of our lives," said Niblack
Elementary School princi-
pal William Murphy. "It was
just a celebration of her life
and how she touched the
lives of everyone here. She.


was a nurse, friend, family
member and a mother to
us. You just can't explain
it in words how much she
meant to this school. As
sick as she was, she always,
put someone else in front
of her."
During the 30-minute
ceremony, several staff
members were moved to
tears as they shared their
memories of Galloway..
Murphy said a plaque in


honor of Galloway will be
placed at the school and a
tree will be planted in her
honor.
Connie Wilson-Jones,
Galloway's sister, attended
the ceremony along with
several other family mem-
bers.
'This ceremony means
so much to this fam-
ily to know that Verlinda
Galloway touched so many
lives and her legacy will
live on because of the
way she touched the lives
of students, faculty and
everybody at Minnie J.
Niblack school," she said.
"She had a special touch
and that touch will forev-
er be remembered in all
of the lives of the people
here at Minnie J. Niblack
Elementary School. She
was just a special person."
Niblack teacher Shirley
Harris described Galloway
as a friend and said the cer-
emony was held because
the school's staff and stu-
dents needed closure.


IDA: Commission takes over group's supervision

Continued From Page 1A


At the meeting, the
IDA was up for a one-year
review by the county, which
was called for in Sept. 2009
when the commission
affirmed the IDA function-
ing separately under its
own board.
While Weaver commend-
ed the work the IDA has
accomplished during the
past year, he said there was
nothing reported that could
not also be accomplished
if the IDA was a county
department. He said com-
missioners currently have
responsibility for the IDA,
but no authority with the
group.
"I think for good govern-
ment, it should be a county
department," Weaver said.
Commissioner Jody
DuPree agreed and said
there is no problem with


the IDA's personnel.
"It just makes sense that
if we're going to have all
the responsibility by stat-
ute, then we should have
the authority," he said.
Commissioner Stephen
Bailey said perhaps the
IDA was in need of county
supervision because of a
$60,000 tax rebate over-
payment the IDA made,
recently revealed by an
audit. DuPree said he has'
felt the effects of the mis-
take when dealing with
New Millennium, one of
the overpaid companies.
Frisina and Ron Williams
disagreed.
Frisina said she did not
\want to take any action that
would hinder the IDA's
work. Ron Williams said
the IDA should remain sep-
arate because of confidenti-


allty when trying to entice
new businesses.
"I don't trust five coun-
ty commissioners," Ron
Williams said. "I don't trust
us."
Suzanne Norris, IDA
board chairwoman, said
the IDA is accountable
to the county with their
finances and decisions. It is
functioning well and mak-
ing strides as a separate
entity, she said.
"We are the model of eco-
nomic development in rural
Florida," Norris said. "I'm
at a loss to understand why
you want to change some-
thing so successful. ... I do
feel that any change at this
time could be perceived as
a step backwards."
Weaver asked: 'Tell me
how it's a. step backward?
It could be perceived as a


positive."
'This could be perceived
as Columbia County chang-
ing the way it does busi-
ness," Norris said. "You
would have to find someone
who perceives something
coming under government
as being a positive."
Ron Williams said
the board should not be
involved in the IDA's day-to-
day operations and Weaver
said his motion's intent was
to keep the IDA function-
ing independently, but with
county oversight.
"They will take their
marching orders from the
IDA board, but be under
county policy from A-Z,"
County Manager Dale
Williams said.
Publisher Todd Wilson
provided *information for
this article.


20-70o
storewide, including special savings on
Rarely Discounted Bran
Not valid by phone or on Belk.com. Excludes Everyday Values


C


Color Lake City

in chalk Saturday

at the Reporter


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Chalk art will take cen-
ter stage on the asphalt
during Color Lake City,
which will be from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday at-the
Lake City Reporter.
This fifth-annual com-
munity event is spon-
sored by the Reporter
and is open to all ages,
especially children.
"We supply the chalk
and the kids come to
the back parking lot and
do chalk paintings," said
Dave Kimler, Lake City


Reporter's IT director.
Color Lake City is the
brainchild of Kimler.
"I used to participate
in street-painting fes-
tivals down in Naples,
Florida," he said. "That's
where the idea came
from. I thought it would
be a nice thing for Lake
City."
Typically as many as
70 different drawings
are created during the
event, Kimler said.
The event is free of
charge and there will
be "tons of chalk" avail-
able, he said.


REMEMBER: Old Timey
Continued From Page 1A


people, Linton said.
It has grown from about
25 attendees 17 years ago
to an expected crowd of
2,500 people from Florida
and Georgia attending this


Saturday, he added.
Old Timey Day will begin
at 8 a.m. and will last all
day at Shady Grove Baptist
Church, 585858 River Rd., in
Live Oak.


eSE.
MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.
< * '


ids


ari


Soft

your first purchase'
Saturday, Nov. 6, 6-10am when
you present your Charity Sale
ticket to your sales associate
No cash back.


-7ihours only! Saturday, NOV
6am- 10am
Through your generosity, Belk raised more than

$45 million for
5, c haritles
during the Spring 2010 local Charity Sale Event

'Ticket valid on ybur first regular, sale or clearance purchase, including Cosmetics & Fragrances. Excludes Brighton. Not valid on
phone orders or on belk.com. No cash back. Contact your store for a list of charities. All ticket proceeds benefit your favorite
participating local charities. All unclaimed money from the sale of Charity Sale tickets will be donated to a charity of Belk's choice
after 90 days. ,
RED DOT: "Limited exclusions in Brighton, designer handbags, and junior denirP. Juniors total savings are 55-75% off. ,
Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery and Men's Tallored Clothing total savings are 45-65%.
COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT
**"100 Belk gift cards per store valued anywhere from $5 to $1000 will be given away. One lucky person per Belk Division (for a total
of 3 winners) will walk away with a gift card worth $1000. No purchase necessary. One per adult customer, while supplies last. Not
valid by phone or on Belk.com. See a sales associate for details.


Sign up for mobile updates .,0r Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter a Learn more at
rtI JOIN r.:. BELK1 (23551) l.i iat facebook.com/belk twitter.com/BelkFashlonBuzz balk.comicommunity


WE




PoC .VETERANS

u Bell


LU 0ELL
ICE EAREAi
\ AssI. Flavors



PRICE


74 1w tonor


SOOur


S, Heroes!
The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.
That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


r-l


W 1




r- 4
PM


SnanK you ror
years of service.
We Salue You


Love, Eileen


acrua si ze


Your Name:
Address:
Town: State: Zip:
Daytime Phone:
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: Dates Served:
Bring this in or Send to: Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Dral lake Oty, FL 32055, 386-755-5440 for more i
Submissions must be received by 3:30 p.m. Monday, Nov 8,2010. All photos will be returned by Including SASE with your entry.
Lake City Reporter M-F 8am 5pm


~












OPINION


Friday, November 5, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


O T H E R________________________ ^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^^ _^^^


OPINION


Time to get

involved in

public life

o after an intense
S- midterm campaign,
you cast your vote
Tuesday and today
you are celebrating
or, well, not
Regardless of your mood,
please don't think your work is
done or even on hold until
the next election.
Whether this was your first
or 40th election, whether you're
Republican, Democrat, tea party
or unaffiliated, whether you are
happy, sad or indifferent about
the results, please get more
involved in your government.
Perhaps in good times an
ample gesture of citizenship is
voting on Election Day. Well,
even Tuesday's winners can
tell you that these are not good
times.
America's military is
stretched to the limit fighting in
Afghanistan, Iraq and helping
keep peace at many global hot
spots. On the domestic front,
ifs doesn't seem to matter if it's
the federal, state, county, school
or municipal level, the economy.
is posing countless challenges
as Americans wrestle with hard
times.
Amid all that, voting Tuesday
should be viewed not as the end
of your effort to effect change,
but as the first step toward mak-
ing sure the people elected are
held accountable.,
What are you going to do to
make sure the winners are held
to their respective words? What
legislation are you going to
champion, track or oppose?
Please understand we are not
suggesting a run for Congress.
There are many other ways you
can get involved.
Start at the local level. Check
with your city, county or school
district about being appointed
to boards, commissions or task
forces. If you are not a joiner,
pledge to yourself to become a
more dedicated watcher.
The bottom line? Sure,
Tuesday's elections marked the
culmination of some good, bad
and ugly campaigns. However,
they didn't solve any problems;
they only made clear who will
have to do that in the next few
years. Now it's up to you to make
sure the winners take action.
E St. Cloud (Minn.) Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
S Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
: POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
Sthe Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
: news@lakecityreporter.com


Obama is now what he ran against


The great American
humorist Will
Rogers once said of
Republican Calvin
Coolidge, "He was
the best Democrat we ever had
in the White House. He didn't
do anything and that's just what
we wanted done."
The anti-big government les-
son in this is what the current
Democratic president, Barack
Obama either through a
lack of governing experience
or a misunderstanding of the
nation's electorate or both -
apparently forgot. In his zeal for
"change" he tried to do far more
than the nation wanted in some
areas and not enough in oth-
ers. The result, of course, was a
major loss of the congressional
advantage he held and the pros-
pect of two very difficult years
before he must seek reelection.
The nation, of course, will
survive but that may not be
true of Obama if he is unable
to reach out to a recalcitrant
Republican Party mainly inter-
ested it seems in seeing that he
doesn't If he digs in his heels
with the new GOP majority in
the House and a much-dimin-
ished Democratic force in the
Senate, it would be a prescrip-
tion for disaster both in solving
the country's serious problems
and for his political future.
If on the other hand, he does
promote the bipartisanship
. he came into office promis-
ing but never fulfilling, there
is a chance the predictable
government gridlock will be
considerably less debilitating.
Republicans, whether they know
it or not, can't afford to reject
genuine overtures of coopera-
tion from the White House no
matter how much they wish to
nail down the lid on Obama's


Dan K.Thomasson
political coffin. The onus would
be on them in an electorate
that is notoriously fickle and
impatient as Tuesday's results
show with exit polls finding only
41 percent in favor of the GOP.
This obviously was a vote fueled
by more anger than usual.
Obama downed his chief
primary opponents including
Hillary Clinton by running
agaifist Washington. His victory
over a desultory Republican
Party whose candidate, Sen.
John McCain, was attractive to
many only because of his mav-
erick reputation wasn't really
much of a contest.
The newly elected president
somehow failed to grasp that
once in the Oval Office, he sud-
denly was the very Washington
he had run against so effective-
ly. Someone should have told
him that all those promises for
reforming government not only
would be hard to keep but also
weren't really to the nation's
advantage, that what the voters
wanted was a quick fix to the
economy, as unrealistic as that
may be. Continuing economic
doldrums, including high unem-
ployment, and a still struggling
housing market were now on
the shoulders of the party in
power.
Obama's obsession with total
-health care reform an initia-
tive that received only tepid
approval from many Americans
at best and absolute opposition


from a majority cost him
dearly in political capital. The
fact it finally was adopted by
the narrowest of margins after
all the arm-twisting his forces
could manage was a boost to
those who charged he was a lib-
eral out of touch with reality and
provided much of the ammuni-
tion necessary to pull off this
startling midterm victory. High
on the list of mistakes was
turning over the actual drafting
of this hugely costly proposal
to someone else, in this case
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a
give-no-quarter lawmaker who
became the best target outside
of Obama himself the presi-
dent's opponents had.
Obama's fortunes also have
taken a beating because of
his failure to find any solution
to the two wars he inherited
despite his campaign pledges to
do so. Instead of bringing about
disengagement, he followed his
predecessor's Iraq surge strat-
egy, pouring more troops into
Afghanistan but also setting a
deadline for withdrawal that has
negated much of the surge's
effectiveness.
So now, with his solid con-
gressional majority in tatters
and facing an uncomfortable
two years that soon will include
preparing for his own campaign,
Obama has little choice but to
finally recognize that he is no
longer Chicago but Washington
and that requires some major
overhaul of his own approach,
including relations with the
opposition (good luck on that)
and a better understanding of
what voters really want which
may be less, not more.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


W while public and
political atten-
tion is more and
more focused
on the new
Congress, with the Republicans
in control of the House and at
least six new GOP senators,
the fact is that we still have the
old Congress for another seven
weeks.
That Congress has a lot of
post-election work ahead of it,
mainly because it failed to get it
done pre-election.
For a start, there are the 12
spending bills that fund about
a third of the government and
were supposed to have been
passed by the Oct. 1 start of
the 2011 fiscal year. None has
reached final passage, largely
the fault of the Senate.
Instead, the Congress passed
a continuing resolution funding
government operations at their
2010 levels. That resolution
expires Dec. 3. The honorable
thing would be for the Senate
to finish up the 12 bills, square


them with the House's versions,
then send them to the president
for his signature. That would
require efficiency on the part of
the Democrats and cooperation
on the part of the Republicans,
but the past year has seen pre-
cious little evidence of either.
The easy way and this
would appeal to dispirited
Democrats is to pass another
continuing resolution, extending
the stopgap measure into the
New Year. It is unfair, in a way.
The new Congress comes to
town all charged up and ready
to go and finds that first it has to
clean up the mess left by the old
one. The Republicans did this to
the Democrats when the GOP
lost control of Congress in 2006.
Then there's the issue of the
tax cuts. The areas of disagree-'
ment are relatively small how
many of the tax cuts to extend
and for how long. This should
get done with a certain amount
of dispatch, because the cuts
expire automatically with the old
year. It would be reckless, even


suicidal, for a lawmaker to derail
the extension. Then again, a lot
of loopy things were said and
done during the campaign.
The lawmakers will also have
to head off a pending 23 per-
cent cut in doctors' Medicare
reimbursements plus another
6.5 percent cut scheduled for
Jan. 1. For all the tough talk
about curbing federal spend-
ing, no lawmaker wants to face
a physicians' uprising in one of
the government's most popular
programs.
The outgoing Congress could
spare the incoming Congress
considerable grief if the Senate
ratified the START treaty call-
ing for a one-fourth reduction
in the U.S. and Russian nuclear
arsenals and if the lawmakers
repealed "don't ask, don't tell"
on gays on the military since the
policy is headed for the scrap
heap eventually anyway.
Even a lame duck Congress
has its duties and responsibili-
ties.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com


GOP must

try to solve

problems

It should come as no
surprise to anyone that
Senate GOP leader Mitch
McConnell wants Barack
Obama to be a one-term
president.It is perplexing that
he would announce loudly this
would be the Republicans' top
priority for the next two years.
What about creating jobs and
boosting the economy? What
about working with the White
House to improve education,
move toward energy indepen-
dence, fix immigration laws,
restore civility and repair the
nation's infrastructure?
We soon will be able to tell
if Republicans who will control
the House next year and who
made large gains in the Senate
really want to walk the walk.
While demanding spending
cuts, are they going to vote
to increase the debt ceiling
to avoid having the nation go
into default? Are they going to
extend the Bush-era tax cuts for
the wealthy at a cost of $700 bil-
lion, which we don't have? Will
they try to kill the health care
law that hasn't fully taken effect
yet despite objective analysis
that it will cut costs? Will they
force companies to bring jobs
back to America? Will they
extend unemployment insur-
ance, which is about to expire?
It is true that many are puz-
zled by Obama's performance
as president. He says he finally
"gets it," although that remains
to be seen. He probably
shouldn't take advice on how
to connect with voters from
charisma-challenged Harry
Reid, who barely survived voter
frustration.
We still haven't heard from
Republicans who had a great
day on Tues4ay exactly what
spending cuts they want to
make or how they want to make
government smaller.
Obama has invited
Republican leaders to the
White House later this month
and indicated he is willing to
compromise on such issues as
achieving energy independence
and curtailing earmarks, or
special projects that benefit just
one district or state and often
aren't even voted on.
Bailouts saved us from a deep
depression. Stimulus spending
prevented thousands of jobs
from disappearing. Financial
regulation was imperative.
The status quo of 40 million
Americans without health insur'
ance was unsustainable.
Now we are eager to see how
Republicans plan to lower the
deficit, help the middle class
and expand the economy. We
can't wait to see how they cre-
ate jobs.
This election has been excit-
ing but exhausting. We all need
to catch up on our sleep and
recharge our batteries because
we are still in crisis.
Our national debt will triple
in 10 years. Our debt to gross
domestic product ratio will be
100 percent in seven years.
Retirees on Social Security and
Medicare soon will double to
70 million. Our children are
not learning as much as many
children in other countries. Our
energy bills have the potential
to bankrupt us.
Please, Senator Mitch, say it
ain't so. Promise you'll try to
solve our problems and work
with the president, the only one
we have.
There will be plenty of time
for politics in 2012. Give us a
break.
Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national


politics since 1986.


E 'STEiNilkCM As .i L


4A


OTHER OPINION

Lame-duck Congress still has plenty to do













FACES & PLACES

Scenes from the Columbia County Fair on Thursday.

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Kendall Hall (from left), 15, Jenna Deas, 16, and Kayla
Williams, 18.


Angela Putnel (from left), 14, Deanna Cordero, 13, and
Kamryn Pillars, 12.


Tasha Noe (from left), Kimberly Massey, 13, Austin Noe, 3,
and Bub Noe.


Joey Edge (left), 24, and Ryan Thomas, 16.


Mace Sheppard (left), 6, and Maceon Sheppard, 4. Jeremy Thomas (left), 19, and Nelton Marsh, 21.


COMMUITY ALENAR To9-submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Fair festivities
The 56th Annual
Columbia County Fair
continues through Nov. 6.
Regular fair admission is
$5. Rides are not included
in the price of admission.

Rural Folklife Days
The annual Rural
Folklife Days are 9
a.m.-2:30 p.m. Nov. 5-6
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
More than 16 demon-
strators will be on hand
showcasing Florida tradi-
tions. Admission is $5 per
person. Call toll free 1-
877-635-3655 or visit www.
FloridaStateParks. org/ste-
phenfoster

Saturday
Veterans Day Parade
VFW Post 2206 is host-


MEGAMIND IN REAL 3D EVENT
RICING (PG) (100) 320 540 800 1020
DUE DATE (R) ID REQD (130) 430 730 950
FOR COLORED GIRLS (R) ID REQ'D
(110) 410 710 1010
SAW IN REALD 3D- EVENT
PRICING (R) -ID REQ'D (140) 440 740 1005
PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) ID REQ'D
(150) 450 750 1030
RED (PG-13) (120) 420 720 1000



Hang On
a minute -/

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
picky. their cleaning


ing the Veterans Day
Parade at 11 a.m. Nov.
6. The parade will start
at FDOT, travel north
on Marion Avenue to
Washington Street and end
at Young's Park. Call 752-
5001.

Color Lake City
The Annual Color Lake
City is 9 a.m-1 p.m. Nov.
6 in the Lake City Reporter
parking lot Free chalk will
be provided.

Four Rivers Audubon
ALLI-Walk
The next monthly ALLI-
Walk: Bird /Butterfly /
Nature's Garden outing
is 8-11 a.m. Nov. 6. Jerry
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder,
and others will share their
knowledge.
Bring a hat, sunscreen,
water, binoculars and a
snack. No fee is charged.
All levels of participation
and knowledge are wel-
come. Call Loye Barnard
at 497-3536.


2nd Annual Breast
Cancer Walk
The second annual
Breast Cancer Walk is 9
a.m.-12 p.m. Nov. 6 start-
ing at Olustee Park. Pink
ribbon products will be
available for purchase and-
donations are accepted.
Walking is not required.
Call Kelly at 386-365-7604.

Fundraiser benefit
A benefit for Pat
Kenwarthy is 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Nov. 6 at Sunbelt Chrysler
Jeep/Dodge. Activities will
include a carwash, bake
sale, silent auction, food
and a live performance


from Southern Justice.

Charity poker run
A charity poker run
begins 9:30 a.m. Nov. 6
at the Lake City Shrine
Club. Registration is
8:30 a.m. The ride ends
at Gainesville Shrine
Club. Cost is $20 per
bike/hand and $10
per additional passen-
ger/hand. All proceeds
benefit'the Shiner's
Children's Hospital and
Florida Masonic Home.
Pre-register by calling
Mark Szymanski at 352-
213-5069, e-mail onyx32@
juno.com or Roger Ward
at 386-288-3425 or e-mail
rogerwardus@yahoo. corn.


Duval Srreet LIS 90)
We Su ply he C alk!180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, FL
Yo Sppy heImgiaton


Tuesday
Love and Remenmbrance
Memorial
The Haven Hospice
Love and Remembrance
Memorial is 6 p.m. Nov.
9. It is open to anyone in


the community who has
lost a loved one. Attendees
are encouraged to bring
pictures and mementos
of loved ones that can be
placed onr the Table of
Memories. Refreshments
will be served. Call Haven
Hospice at 386-752-9191.


2QtM tAnnual
Dwincwn festival & 4Iyt yiw


Award Winning Fine Arts Festival
Ranked as the 27th best fine art show in the nation.
Featuring 250 artists, live entertainment on 3 stages,
a hands-on art activity area for children and a Blues
Concert Friday at 7 pm. Fun for the whole family!
.


- -- .-,
by my side,now
" I'd like to know v

ifyoullbe
my bride.

Will Youp

4la Fy MVeo?
Liove Rob


Do You Need to

POP THE
QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Lovel
755-5440 or
755-5441
ber.,.een 8:00am & 5:00pm


6^v>v^1y


I Bringhe


Participate


3rdy prior to apearance i
DEADLN the Lak (iA RepoITT~l riter.^


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High senior JR Dixon (11) looks for daylight as he runs the ball against East
Gadsden High.


Playoff berth on the line


ort White High's
playoff plan
took a blow last
week, but not a
fatal one.
The Indians (5-3, 3-1)
host Bradford High (7-2,
3-1) at 7:30 Friday with the
District 2-2B runner-up
spot on -the line. The
winner will join district
champion Taylor County
High in the state playoffs.
Fort White was a district


player last year, finishing
third in the six-team field.
Bradford was knotted with
Union County High at the
bottom of the heap,
escaping last place by
virtue of a tiebreaker.
The Tornadoes brought
in new coach Derek
Chipoletti, and he has
them knocking on the
playoff door. After starting
the season 2-2, Bradford
has reeled off five straight


wins. District foes Union
County, Florida and East
Gadsden high schools
went down in that stretch.
Fort White made the
playoffs each of head
coach Demetric Jackson's
first two years, winning its
first playoff game in his
first season of 2007. The
Indians had a hiccup last
season, and want to get
back in the thick of the
postseason.



jsai^s


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kaitlyn Jdnes gallops through Arrowhead Stadium as she pays tribute to the United States
during the Indian Uprising opening ceremony.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Fort White High marching band takes to the field during a halftime performance.


2010 Indians Football Schedule


Wk 9 Bradford H 7:30 p.m.

Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


Get Connected




www- tkpyr.ftr pprtr.opm

ImRWffmLaBJ^


71J


Ai f ,W t ..e..n.& .4 ..-
~ ait 1:


A *,..-w .. .. .






i 110 .11c l %hl V I l [I.il,,ll L. l I i. I tl ll, .l ltli 1 Pl.tlllllll 1
458 S. Marion Ave, Lake City
752-1234 a www.)iirrislifimniilyliieralliome.com


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0

Fort White 14, Newberry 13

Fort White 52, Suwannee 22

Fort White 31 Union County 12

N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28

Fort White 30, Florida High 27

Fort White 28, East Gadsden 14

Taylor Co. 38, Fort White 21


S'


I i 11


tiss ^ ,. .;,*... ;, S*., .. r .


S Regular Size Half-Gallon
Buy lOn Assorted
S-- Get One 1 .

L .Of JN .v,, "; .. ,. 2.87oz. Bag











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@laokecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, November 5, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Out with a bang


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@!okectyreporter.com


Another

Major

Leaguer

Michael
and Lorie
Kirkman
should
be back
in Lake City, so give a
shout out when you see
them.
Kirkman was the first
player from Lake City to
make the World Series
and was kind enough to
share the experience.
Lorie sent pictures and
I understand there are
many more on Facebook.
The Dallas Morning
News also shared photos:
Lake City had another
Major Leaguer in John
Franklin "Stuffy" Stewart.
'Stewart was born in
Jasper in 1894 and played
eight seasons for several
teams between 1916 and
1929. His lifetime batting
average was .238.
Stewart lived around
the corner from the Lake
City Reporter office and
died in Lake City on
Sept. 30, 1980. He is
buried in Oaklawn
Cemetery.

Jacob Tillotson might
be Lake City's next entry
into the big leagues.
Tillotson signed with
Florida, after playing at
both Fort White High
and Columbia High.
The Division I fall
season doesn't offer
many possibilities for
fans to see a favorite
player, but there is a
chance this weekend.
Florida has its fall
Orange & Blue series
planned for 4:30 p.m.
today and 2 p.m. on
Saturday and Sunday.
Tillotson is playing
shortstop for the Blue
team. All three games
are scheduled for nine
innings.

Fort White graduate
Robert Hartley, now at
Florida A&M, was named
Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference Offensive
Lineman of the Week for
the Rattlers' 31-17 win
over Morgan State on
Saturday.
Hartley graded out at
95 percent and recorded
five pancake blocks.

Blayne Barber was
co-medalist in the recent
Bridgestone Collegiate
tournament at Forest
Oaks Country Club in
Greensboro, Ga. Barber's
14-under 202 is tied for
second for the lowest
54-hole score in Auburn
University history.
The No. 8 Tigers
placed second in the
tournament, the last of
four events in the fall
schedule. Next up is
the Gator Invitational in
Gainesville on Feb. 12.
In a round during the
Gary Koch Invitational
at Old Memorial Golf
Club in Tampa, Barber
had a double bogey on
No. 3 then reeled off six
straight birdies.

Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake pity Reporter
Columbia High's Barnabus Madison tries to avoid a Brooks County (Ga.) High defender in a
game played earlier this season at Tiger Stadium.


Columbia tries
to put painful
October behind.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

The month of October
wasn't good to the Columbia
High football team, but
November is here. While
Columbia comes in on a
four-game losing streak, the
Wolfson High Wolfpack ride
a two-game losing streak of
their own. Tonight, some-
thing's got to give.
Wolfson (2-6, 0-3 district)
has been ruled out of the
playoffs, but Columbia (4-4,
1-2 district) has a chance
to make the playoffs with
a win coupled with a Lee
High win against Ridgeview
High.


Still, the focus for the
Tigers is getting back on
the winning track.
"We want to go out with
a bang and not a whimper,"
coach Craig Howard said.
"Losing is a habit, but so is
winning. When you win, it
gets easier to win. Losing
is the same way. It's been a
month and we need to get
a win."
. Despite the Wolfpack's
record, Howard sees some
athleticism in Wolfson.
"They have good speed
and quickness under their
new coach (Greg Meyer),"
Howard said. "He's done
a good job with the kids.
It should be a very good
game, and we won't take
any team lightly."
The biggest dilemma
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A group of Fort White defenders join in a scrum for the ball against North Florida Christian earlier this season at Arrowhead Stadium in Fort White.


Playoff spot on the line for Fort White


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort White
High football lost an emotional
game last week, but this is no time
to lick any wounds.
In Showdown II, the Indians host
Bradford High at 7:30 p.m. today.
Taylor County High won,


38-21, over Fort White last week to
nail down the District 2-2B cham-
pionship. The winner between the
Indians (5-3, 3-1) and the Tornadoes
(7-2, 3-1) will take second place,
and join Taylor County in the state
playoffs.
'We had a real good week of
practice," Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson said on Thursday.


"The guys responded well, espe-
cially after a tough loss. Their spir-
its are up. They know what is at
stake and are anxious to get back
to the playoffs."
The return of Wesley Pitts should
give the Indians a lift. Pitts was the
slated starter at quarterback in
August, but was hurt before the
first game.


Mountain West showcase Saturday


LSU, Alabama
highlight SEC
action Saturday.

By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

The most important
game in the history of the
Mountain West Conference
feels more like a grand fina-
le than the start of some-
thing big.
When No. 4 TCU plays at
No. 6 Utah it will be the first
time in the league's 11-year
history that it will have a
matchup of top-10 teams.
It's a game with national
title and BCS implications.
Sure, there are ranked
teams squaring off against
each other Saturday in
the Big 12, Big Ten and
Southeastern Conference,
but none of those games
have as much at stake as
the one going on in Salt
Lake City.
Imagine that.
The Horned Frogs and


Utes have become the
MWC's marquee programs,
each with a BCS appear-
ance the past two seasons.
Their accomplishments are
exhibit A in commissioner
Craig Thompson's fight for
an automatic BCS bid for
his conference.
The picks:
SATURDAY
Washington (plus 35)
at No. 1 Oregon
Even with Jake Locker,
Huskies are in for a world
of trouble ... OREGON
58-14.
Hawaii (plus 21) at
No. 2 Boise State
Broncos are 8-1 against
Warriors ... BOISE STATE
45-21.
Chattanooga (no line)
at No. 3 Auburn
Better than an off week
for Tigers ... AUBURN
55-0.
No. 4 TCU (minus 4'/2)
at No. 6 Utah
TCU's last regular-sea-
son loss and road loss came
at Rice-Eccles in 2008 ...


TCU 28-21.
No. 5 Alabama (minus
6) at No. 12 LSU
Is Tide still vulner-
able? Maybe ... ALABAMA
21-17.
No. 7 Wisconsin
(minus 20) at Purdue
Badgers average 35.6
points per game, on pace
to set a school record ...
WISCONSIN. 38-14.
No. 9 Nebraska (minus
19) at Iowa State
Cornhuskers had school-
record eight turnovers in
loss to Cyclones last year ....
NEBRASKA 45-17.
No. 13 Arizona (plus
9'2) at No. 10 Stanford
Wildcats could creep
into national title picture
if they keep winning ...
STANFORD 31-23.
No. 11 Oklahoma
(minus 31/) at Texas A&M
Sooners have won seven
straightvs. Aggies, scored
173 points in last three ...
OKLAHOMA 35-28.
No. 14 Missouri
(minus 4) at Texas Tech


Tigers take aim at
worst defense in Big 12 ...
MISSOURI 38-28.
No. 15 Iowa (plus 17)
at Indiana
Ricky Stanzi is nation's
second-most efficient pass-
er ... IOWA 49-14.
Minnesota (plus 24) at
No. 16 Michigan State
Spartans still in prime
contention for BCS bid ...
MICHIGAN STATE 41-10.
No. 17 Arkansas
(plus 3) at No. 18 South
Carolina
Ryan Mallett should find
Gamecocks' pass defense
appealing ... ARKANSAS
31-27.
No. 22 Baylor (plus 7)
at No. 19 Oklahoma St.
Last time Baylor had seven
victories entering November
was 1985 ... OKLAHOMA ST.
45-35.
No. 23 North Carolina
St. (plus 3) at Clemson
Tigers have won six
straight against Wolfpack ...
PICKS continued on 2B


'We are definitely going to give
him a shot," Jackson said. "He
hasn't played a lot, but this isn't the
first time he has played. We have
got to be cautious' with his injury;
we will spot-play him in situations
where he can be successful."
Pitts will play in the defensive
INDIANS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Sept. 28, 2009, file
photo shows Sparky
Anderson during a
celebration in Detroit.
Anderson
dies at 76;
managed 2
champions
By JOE KAY
Associated Press

Reds fans were taken
aback when Sparky
Anderson showed up in
Cincinnati for his first day
SPARKY continued on 2B










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for O'Reilly Auto Parts
Challenge, at Fort Worth,Texas
Noon
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Brazilian Grand Prix, at SaoPaolo
1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for O'Reilly Auto
Parts Challenge, at Fort Worth, Texas
. (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Texas 500, at Fort Worth,
Texas (same-day tape)
4:30 p.m..
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Texas 500, at Fort Worth,
Texas
9 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
WinStar World Casino 350K. at Fort
Worth,Texas
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 UCF at Houston
GOLF
4:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Charles
Schwab Cup Championship, second
round, at San Francisco
II p.m.
rTGC PGA Tour/WGC, HSBC
Champions, third round, at Shanghai
HORSE RACING
4 p.m.
ESPN2 NTRA, Breeders' Cup
World Championships, at Louisville, Ky.
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Boston
10:30 p.m.
ESPN LA. Clippers at Denver

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Sunday's Games
Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Detroit, I p.m.
Miami at Baltimore, I p.m.
San Diego at Houston, I.p.m.
Tampa Bay atAtlanta, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
New England at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:05. p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis,
Jacksonville,San Francisco,Tennessee
Thursday's Game
Baltimore at Adtlhti, 8:20 p.m.' '
,, Sunday, Noy. 14
Minnesota at Chicago, I p.m.
Tennessee at Miami, I p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, I p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Carolina atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle atArizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh;,8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 15
Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m.


Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay,
New Orleans

College scores
Wednesday
South Florida 28, Rutgers 27

College games
Today
W. Michigan (3-5) at Cent. Michigan
(I-8), 6 p.m.
UCF (6-2) at Houston (5-3),
8 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
AAA Texas 500
Site: Fort Worth,Texas.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
3-4:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 4:30-
6 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed,
9:30 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race, 3 p.m.
(ESPN, 2-7 p:m.).
Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 501 miles, 334 laps.
NATIONWIDE
O'ReillyAuto Parts Challenge
Site: Fort Worth,Texas.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
10-11:30 a.m., 1:30-3 p.m.), qualifying;
Saturday, race, 12:55 p.m. (ESPN2, noon-
3:30 p.m.).
Track:Texas Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
WinStarWorld Casino 350K
Site: Fort Worth,Texas.
Schedule:Today,race,9p.m.(Speed,8:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 220.5 miles, 147 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Brazilian Grand Prix
Site: Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
noon-1:30 p.m.), Saturday, practice,
qualifying (Speed, noon- 1:30 p.m.); Sunday,
race, II a.m. (Speed, 10:30-I p.m.).
Track: Interlagos, Autodromo Jose
Carlos Pace (road course, 2.677 miles).
Race distance: 190.08 miles, 71 laps.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 94, Detroit 85
Charlotte 85, New Jersey 83
Orlando 128, Minnesota 86
Philadelphia 101, Indiana 75
Boston 105, Milwaukee 102, OT
New Orleans 107, Houston 99
Dallas 102, Denver 101,
Utah 125,Tdronto 108
San ntoPlo I 112, Phoenix 110
Golden State 115, Memphis 109
LA. Clippers 107,.lkdhoma City 92
LA. Lakers 112, Sacramento 100
Thursday's dames
New York at Chicago (n)
Oklahoma City at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Miami at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Boston, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 10 p.m.


BRIEFS

CHS BASEBALL team members.
Dugout Club plans For details, call 365-1877.
golf tournament YOUTH BASEBALL
U . L . I


The CHS Dugout Club
has a golf tournament
planned at The Country
Club at Lake City on
Nov. 20 (8 a.m. shotgun
start). Single players may
enter for $60; a foursome
receives a discounted price
of $200 for the team. Hole
sponsorships are available.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754.

CLUB VOLLEYBALL
Travel team
meeting planned
The North Florida
Fusion volleyball club
program has an
information meeting set
for 6 p.m. Nov. 22 at the
Columbia High auditorium.
Girls interested in
playing travel volleyball
and their parents are urged
to attend. Tryout dates,
cost of participation and
general information will be
discussed.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 755-8080.

TIGERS SOCCER
Breakfast at
Kazbor's Grille
Columbia High's boys
soccer team has a
breakfast fundraiser from
7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday
at Kazbor's Grille in Lake
City Commons. Tickets are
$6 at the door and may be
purchased in advance from


Travel team tryout
set for Nov. 13
An open tryout for


Utah at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Toronto at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Orlando at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland atWashington, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at-Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Toronto at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule.
Today's Games
No. 2 Michigan State vs. Eastern
Michigan, 8:30 p.m.
No. 3 .Kansas State vs. James Madison,
9 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State vs. North Carolina
A&T, 7 p.m.
No. 6Villanova vs. Bucknell, 8 p.m.
No. 7 Kansas vs. Longwood, 8 p.m.
No. 8 North Carolina vs. Upscomb,
7 p.m.
No. 9 Florida vs. North Carolina
Wilmington, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Syracuse vs. Northern Iowa;
7 p.m.
No. II Kentucky vs. ETSU, 7 p.m. ,
No. 12 Gonzaga vs. Southern U.,
9 p.m.
No. 16 Baylor vs. Grambling State,
9:30 p.m.
No. 19 Memphis vs. Centenary, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Georgetown at Old Dominion,
7 p.m.
No. 21 Virginia Tech vs. Campbell,
7:30 p.m.
No. 22 Temple vs. Seton Hall,
7:30 p.m.
No. 23 Tennessee vs. Chattanooga,
9 p.m.
No..24 BYU vs. Fresno State, 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Wednesday's Games
Washington 5,Toronto 4, SO
Boston 5, Buffalo 2
Carolina 7, N.Y. Islanders 2
Atlanta 4, Florida 3
New Jersey 5, Chicago 3
Dallas 5, Pittsburgh 2
Detroit 2, Calgary I
Phoenix 4, Nashville 3
Anaheim 3,Tampa Bay 2, OT
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia (n)
Columbus at Atlanta (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa (n)
San Jose at St. Louis (n)
Vancouver at Colorado (n)
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Boston at Washington. 7 p.m.
Montreal at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Florida. 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Minnesota, 8 p.m. .
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m,
Detroit at Edmonton, 9 mp.n.
Pittsburgh at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
St. Louis at Boston, 7 p.m.
:Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
OttavWa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Florida at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m. .
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Detroit at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Jose, 10 p.m.


9-under travel baseball
team players is 10 a.m.
Nov. 13 at the Southside
Recreation Complex
practice fields.
For details, call Todd
Gustavson at 365-2133.

* From staff reports


Lady Indians end season


From staff reports

Fort White High's vol-
leyball team lost to Trinity
Catholic High of Ocala
in Wednesday's opening
round of the Class 3A state
playoffs.
. The Celtics. (23-1) won 25-
14,25-10,25-14 and will meet
Santa Fe High in the second
round on Tuesday. The Lady
Raiders beat Crystal River
High in four sets.
Fort White finished the


season 13-15.

Memorial Bowl


The Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department's
Memorial Bowl begins
Saturday.
Saturday's schedule is
APAC Falcons vs. Madison
Lions at 9 a.m., and Ron
David's Plastering Cowboys
vs. Madison Saints at
10:15 a.m.
Admission is $2.'


Lady Indians soccer

Fort White opened the
regular season with a 1-1
tie against Madison County
High at home Thursday.
The Lady Indians con-
trolled the first half, but
only found goal once.
Rebecca Onorati scored
with 11:38 remaining in the
first half to take a 1-0 lead.
Madison tied the game
with 6:24 remaining for the
1-1 final.


INDIANS: District runner-up for grabs

Continued From Page 1B


backfield. Bradford runs
the spread, similar to Taylor
County, and the Indians
gave up 211 yards passing
to the Bulldogs.
"We had a couple of
breakdowns last week and
we hope to get that shored
up," Jackson said. "Wesley
is a gamer and we hope he
will make plays for us."
Jackson said Bradford's


tendency is to run out of
the spread and he was
impressed with the way the
Tornadoes were finding
ways to win.
"One thing in our advan-
tage is we have played
tougher opponents,"
Jackson said. "They are a
little smaller on defense
and we are a running team.
We have got to take care of


the ball."
Jackson said Bradford
runs a lot of plays similar
to Taylor County, so the
defense knows what to
expect.
What Jackson expects
is another tough
showdown.
"Theyplayhard,"Jackson
said. "We have got to match
their intensity."


facing the Tigers has
been lack of production
on offense, but Howard is,
quick to point out that its a
combination of things lead-
ing to Columbia's lack of
production.
'"We're trying as hard as
we can, to get the offense
rolling," he said. "We're


looking at the film, and a
lot of times 10 guys are
doing their job. You have
one guy mess up and the
play breaks down. A lot
gets blamed on the quar-
terback, but it's not always
his fault. We've got to have
11 guys in unison."
Disruptive plays have


also been something to
plague the Tigers as penal-
ties and sacks have led to
drives stalling.
"Missing a block and hold-
ing are things that are hard
to overcome," Howard said.
"One drive can mess up if we
miss a block and the other
can stall with a penalty."


PICKS: FSU bounces back over UNC


Continued From Page 11
N.C. STATE 27-21,
North Carolina (plus
10) at No. 24 FSU
Even as a few players
return,- hope fades for Tar
Heels ... FSU 28-10.


No. 25 Nevada (minus
i11) at Idaho
Wolf Pack is 5-0 in WAC
.games against Vandals,
averaging 53 points ...
NEVADA 38-28.


Lastweek: 12-5 (straight);
8-8 (vs. points).
Season: 124-38 (straight);
78-78-3 (vs. points).
Best bets: 3-2. Upset spe-
cials: 2-3.


SPARKY: Led Big Red Machine, Tigers


Continued From Page 1E
as a, big league manager,
an unknown taking over
baseball's first professional
team. Sparky who? Really?,
By the time he was


ACROSS

1 ClUmp
of dirt
5 Ice-cream serv-
ing
8 Groovy
11 Jetties
13 Jackie's
tycoon
14 Fiesta cheer
15 Chaucer's
month
16 Scarlet bird
18 Tree trunk
20 Rendezvous
21 Hot topic,
23 Slump
24 A Bach
25 Pesky bug
27 Squashed cir-
cle
31 Promise
to pay
32 Big Island port
33 Driftwood
bringer
34 Wearing some-
thing


done, this man with the
shock of white hair and
schoolboy nickname would
produce a considerable list
of achievements that fea-


36 Jacket style
38 Hwys.
39 Nick and
Nora's dog
40 Twig juncture
41 Fetched
42 Angkor-
44 Eggs'
partner
46 Fern leaf
49 Bronte
governess
50 Do biology lab
52 Camel kin
56 -advised
57 Grassy field
58 Safecrackers
59 Business VIP
60 Moray
61 "- Sides Now"

DOWN


Books pro
Sass
Above,
to a bard
- and drabs
See each other


tured three World Series
titles including crowns
in each league and a
Hall of Fame entry on his
resume.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SCENE SLIT S
RATHER KA1I S E R
TRAW AGAT E S
TAS E AF R
iP- LOC K SIsTE~
PClT BEAD NAB
AHIT ASTR
i L


F RA C|E|N|T DO)T
F ETE GOUT
VER B OU H T
I E 0 CUG I
AT TI RE OCOO
MAS'COTB L AS
POETS WHALE


401(k) cousin
One of
Columbus'
ships
Fuddy-duddy
Malt beverages


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


f
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I LAG ED


Answer here: A "
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: SURLY FRAUD NUMBER BUSHEL
Answer: What the city fathers used to clean up after
the winter storm A "SLUSH" FUND


10 One of the
Muppets
12 Swampy place
17 Jargon
19 Easygoing
21 Pagoda fig-
ures
22 Hunker down
23 Adhered to (2
wds.)
24 Typewriter
type
26 Choir member
28 Late-summer
sign
29 Supplement
(hyph.)
30 Perchance
35 Night
followers
37 Just about
43 Astaire
sister
45 Glitterati mem-
ber
46 Bank
protector
47 Miff
48 Peace Prize
city
49 Footnote abbr.
(2 wds.)
51 So-so mark
53 Back when
54 Execs
55 Blond shade


11-5 2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


CHS: Tigers play Wolfson in district
Continued From Page 1B











PaeEitr mgeeGahm 5-01 AK IYREOTR D IE& O IS RDYNOEBR ,21


DILBERT


BABY BLUES
LEAL,


BLONDIE


ISN'T THIS EXCITING, OEAR? NOW I PREDICT VOUR BUSINESS WILL
CUSTOMERS CAN PLACE ONLINE OUBLE!
ORDERS TO 'BLONOIE'S CATERING' .



CATER IN A
wOw! wEE'rDEAR./ S
RATI | ANK 'IfYOU!A

HONE/


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.

H iY, JAK, --
c F cs< oUT MY






02010John L. Hart FLP
FRANK & ERNEST


4


DIst. by Creators Syndicate


WALL 0ooo 0-)o 0 T eYve
WA 1.-4 IIus 0uT

410YNMVE IVs NTM T
5L P POgTrOLO. O.



FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY


Working smoke alarm is

best defense against fire


DEAR ABBY: Approxi-
mately every three hours, a
home fire death occurs some-
where in the U.S. These fatali-
ties occur because there wasn't
a functioning smoke detector
in the house.
According to the National
Fire Protection Association,
96 percent of American homes
have at least one smoke alarm.
However, an estimated 19 per-
cent of them do not work, pri-
marily because of missing or
dead batteries.
Please join me this year
in urging your readers when
they set their clocks back to
standard time this Sunday to
use the extra hour they gain
to change and test the batter-
ies in their smoke alarms and
carbon monoxide detectors. It
only takes a moment, and they
offer the best defense a family
has against the, devastating ef-
fects of a home fire.
No one should be hurt or
potentially lose a life for want
of a working smoke alarm, yet
death strikes nearly 3,000 peo-
ple every year in home fires. A
working smoke alarm will pro-
vide individuals and families
precious extra seconds to get
out safely.
Thank you for printing this,
Abby. Together, we can make
a difference and, hopefully,
save a life. JACK PAROW,
PRESIDENT, INTERNA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION OF
FIRE CHIEFS
DEAR MR. PAROW: I
hope my readers will take to


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
heart your suggestion. This is
a ritual I perform when I set
my clocks back every year.
And readers, please be aware
that smoke alarnis should be
replaced every 10 years and
there should be a mix of both
ionization and photoelectric
smoke alarms in your home so
that you and your loved ones
will be alerted to all types of
home fires. This was news to
me, and I hope you will men-
tion it to your friends and
loved ones!
DEAR ABBY: I have been
unhappy for more than a year.
People tell me my teens should
be a happy time in my life, but
they aren't. I have a pretty
good life with no major prob-
lems. But because it's not per-
fect, I tend to take little things
and agonize over them. My
emotions are affecting my re-
lationships with other people,
my self-esteem and, most of
all, my mind.
After doing some research
and a lot of thinking, I lnow I
need to see a therapist, but my
problem is my parents. At first,
I was terrified to tell them. But
I finally told my mom. I'm still
afraid to tell my dad.


My mother refuses to deal
with it. When I ask her to find
a therapist, she either won't
talk about it, hoping I will for-
get about it, or she makes an
excuse or makes it sound like
I don't need one.
Abby, I'm only 15; I have no
power. How can I get my par-
ents to understand that I need
a therapist and. they should
help me get some help? AL-
WAYS SAD IN ST. PETERS-
BURG, FIA.
DEAR ALWAYS SAD:
You appear to be a bright
young lady who is very much
in touch with your emotions.
When someone is consistently
depressed for more than a few
weeks, it's a sign that profes-
sional help may be needed.
There may be many reasons
for your mother's reluctance
to accept this from concern
about the cost to fear that see-
ing a therapist might cause
you to be labeled as having
emotional problems.
However, because your
sadness is persistent, the per-
son who should decide if you
need therapy (or medication)
should be a licensed mental
health professional. Because
you can't get your mother to
take you seriously, discuss
what has been going on with a
counselor at school.
N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
.P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): A partnership
that means a lot to you will
contribute to your financial
well-being. Deal with insti-
tutions, large corporations
and red tape issues swiftly.
Property investments and
contractual proposals will
work in your favor. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Put effort into
making your relationships
work better. The. more
aware you are of other peo-
ple's needs, the easier it will
be to accommodate and, in
return, get what you need.,
Love is in the picture, so go
all out. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): It's important
to live up to your promises
and to make sure you col-
lect what is owed you in
return. Your sincerity, cou-
pled with your no-nonsense
way of approaching life, will
help you get to the bottom
of any situation. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Relax, have
some fun and enjoy what-
ever and whoever comes
your way. Travel may be
costly but it will give you
a better idea of the possi-
bilities that exist in other
geographical locations. A
chance to get ahead is ap-
parent. ***** .
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Stop before you make
a grave mistake. Someone
is misleading you or feed-
ing you false information.
Go to the source 'and find
out first hand what's going
on. Don't leave anything to
chance if you want to suc-
ceed. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): You will pick up
information and new skills
easily and can make some
better choices for future
success. There is a change
apparent in your financial
situation that will come out
of nowhere and offer you a
little more leeway. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): So much will depend
on what you've done in the
past and how you have re-
lated to people with whom
you have done business.
Readdress some of your
old goals and projects
and you will find common
ground and new possibili-
ties. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't wait for
change to happen. Make
the alterations you want and
get on with your day. Be the
one who shows strength of
character and the ability to
follow through with ,your
ideas and plans. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Do what's
asked of you if it will keep
you out of trouble. Don't
share your thoughts or
information that someone
has shared with you in
confidence. Unexpected
changes will leave you with
too much responsibility
and not enough time. Ask
for assistance. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You have a
lot more going for you than
you realize. Take on a chal-
lenge and you will see how
quickly people will step
aside and let you take over.
Someone who owes you a
favor will come through at
the last minute, position-
ing you for advancement.
**** '
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can spin
your wheels' and go no-
where or you can take baby
steps that will slowly but
surely lead to a better qual-
ity of life. Self-deception is
the enemy. You must see
yourself clearly. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Put effort
into your surroundings,
your investments and your
personal well-being. The
sky is the limit if you put
your mind to it. Love is in
the stars, so take action.


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals C
"ZNW VJRM MN SG J VHAMGH,
XNR'M ERNV LNV NH VLGR? YARX J
BWAGM UPJKG, WCG J LWOSPG
UGR." UJWP CAON R
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I don't think it's a good attitude in your life to feel that
you have to be rich to have self-esteem." Tom Petty
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-5


CLASSIC PEANUTS


THIS CAN'T BE RIGHT! WE JUST'
>GSOT AN ONLINE OROER FOR
2 REUiBENS, A CUBAN, ANO A
TURKEY OELUXE-ASAP TO YOUR

^^dte00"65!.o 1


-- m


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5,2010











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


N!^
I BUY I


E L L I T


Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Il Each Item must include a price.





4 lines 6 days ine i$1.10
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
oam totalling S5to or less.
Each item must Include a price thi
-refundable rate. i




One Item per ad aJn p s
4 lines 6 days ach addional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each item must Include a rice.




One item per ad o J
4 lines 6 da Each additional



y linet t Ro er in 1.5
Rateappliesto private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.



Each Item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.






One It per ad 1co
4 lines 6 days ch additional
Rateapplies toprivatendividuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,000 or less.
Each Item must include a price,
ISl Thiss i a non-refunJdable rate.











One item per ad rad vy r
line f days Each additional
We lccen resp*onsibilinty fo o









onl Each Item must Includ e a price.











in ear Pal as a l 755-5440,
This is a non-refundable rate.







e3 days 50
Idai el2Signs aoi caill r irpllbr' -



Limited to service type advertis-


















ment
ing only.s
4 lines, mo nth...'92.00
a10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their

ad categories wil require prepay-

ment. Our office is located at 180












Easti Duvalo Street.nse ti a
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department. n


























Deulic aclcommoainse.sandard
EMAIL: classifuieds@lakecityre-


porter.com
AdistoAppear: Call by: Fax/Emal by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thiurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri, 10:00 a.m. Frli., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri, 10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without police




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.

deadlines apply for cancellation.




feared to the accounting depart-





















abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

in Printi and O1nine
W W 1 hl.1i, ;I I 1t i1 f-' i' 1 **.',


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
File No. 10-228-CP
DARYL C. WILSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DARYL C. WILSON, deceased,
whose date of death was January 27,
2010; File Number 10-228-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City
FL, 32055. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: Wednesday, November 3,
2010.
Robert D. Hines
Attorney for Personal Representative
Email: rhines@hnh-law.com
Florida Bar No. 0413550
Hines, Norman, Hines P.L.
1312 W. Fletcher Ave
Suite B
Tampa, FL 33612
Telephone: 813-265-0100
Sherese Talley Reid
Personal Representative
1135 SW Lake Montgomery Ave
Lake City, FL 32025
04542191
November 5, 12, 2010
PUBLIC AUCTION
Type of Ad Legal
1996 JEEP
VIN# 1J4FT68S9TL295154
1998 JEEP
VIN# 1J4GZ58Y3WC288822
1998 NISS
VIN# JN8AR05SXWW287037
2003 DODGE
VIN# 1D7HA16K43J593302
2002 FORD
VIN# 1FMYU01142KA91727
To be held 11/15/2010, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
04542241
November 5, 2010
PUBLIC AUCTION
Type of Ad Legal
1994 NISSAN
VIN# 1N4BU31D6RC184197
1999 MITZ
VIN#4A3AA46G6XE0469 11
To be held 11/30/2010, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
04542242
November 5, 2010

010 Announcements








020 Lost & Found
Lost Chihuahua
Much loved, white with light
brown spots, Red Collar,
near Walmart 386-288-3024
100 Job
Opportunities

Electrician/Traffic Signal instal-
ler w/bucket experience. CDL
preferred. Good pay and benefits.
EOE. Bobby 813-433-7851







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
- ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services


100 Job
Opportunities

04542232
Dietary Aide, Dietary Cook
Part time positions
Must have prior exp in a
healthcare facility or other
institution. Please apply at Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl'32025.

04542257
First Federal Bank of
Florida has a position available
for a full-time Collector in Lake
City. Solid understanding of
financial institution policies and
procedures. Experience prefer-
red dealing with delinquent
accounts. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Turbeville.J(&ffsb.com
or mailed to Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake City FL
32056. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.


05524367
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
For mature individual seeking
long-term employment. MUST
be a people person with great
customer service skills, strong
work ethic, good communica-
tion, typing skills, and willing-
ness to learn. Must be a team
player and be able to work a
flexible schedule including
weekends, holidays, and nights.
NIGHT AUDITOR (P/T)
FRONT DESK (P/T/F/T)
POSITION
Excellent work environment.
Hotel experience preferred
but not required.
Apply in person at:
Redroof Inn
414 SW Florida Gateway Drive
U.S. 90 and 1-75, exit 427
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

05524388
Teacher Positions
FT Early Head Start Lake
City: min. HS Diploma/GED
and DCF 40 hours, $8.65/hr. if
have FCCPC/CDA credential.

PT Head Start and FT Early
Head Start Jasper:
min. HS Diploma/GED and
DCF 40 hours, FCCPC/CDA re-
quired for FT position, $8.65/hr.

Sick and annual leave, holiday
pay, health insurance, retirement
+ add'l benefits. Bilingual
preferred. Must pass physical
and DCF background
requirements, current
1st Aide/CPR pref.
To apply, e-mail:
arobinson@sv4cs.org,
call (386) 754-2222, fax resume
to (386) 754-2220, or apply in
person @ 236 SW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City, or 843 SW
Marymac St., Live Oak, FL
EOE

Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609

Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including litigation
Mail resume to
318 E Duval St, Lake City, FL
32055 or email to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com

GroundmanfFruck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record,
386-963-5026, Drug Test.

License CDL. Driver
w/2 yrs Logging Exp.
Must have Clean CDL.
386-365-6966
Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
3 days a week. Please fax resume
to 386-719-9662

Mechanic Needed
Heavy truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the
right person, Southern Specialized
Truck & Trailer, US 41 N
386-752-9754

P/T Class A CDL
Drivers needed. A CLEAN record
and a flexible schedule required.
Call 386-935-1705 to apply.

Wanted Forestry machinery
operator, with 2 yrs. exp.
Must have valid DL.
Koon Timber 386-365-6966

120 Medical
120 Employment

05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp. Call Cindi: (850)253-1906

05524375

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988


Busy Family Practice Office
in need of CNA/MA/LPN
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494


240\ Schools &
240 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/08/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com '



310 Pets & Supplies
2 yr old male Siberian husky
w/papers. Black/white w/blue
eyes. He has not been neutered.
Asking $150. (352)949-8322
AKC Registered Lab puppies.
Black labs & Yellow labs. Has
Health Certs: DOB 09/02/10. POP
Call for info. 386-752-2117
Black and White Skunk. about 1.5
years old. Has been spayed and
glands removed. All shots are up
to date. $100. 386-623-2443
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old nd have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

Antique Table,
Ten sided, 30" high and wide
$50
386-758-9205
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


403 Auctions

04542238
Public Auction
Sat. Nov. 5, 2010 @12:30 A.M.
Location: Davis Street &
105th Rd, Live Oak, FL
7.05 ac. Zoned 1 dwelling per ac
For More Info Call: John Hill
386-362-3300 Lic.Re.Bkr.



408 Furniture

Ceramic Table Lamp,
Maroon, 28" high,
$20
386-758-9205
Floor Lamp, 65" high,
Brass finish base,
$20
386-758-9205

410 Lawn & Garden
TIUv Equipment

Riding
Lawn Mower
$200
386-344-1783


416 Sporting Goods


Inversion Table,
had to move,
only a few months old $75
386-719-8886
Sportcraft TX, 4.9 Treadmill,
almost new
$100
386-758-9205.


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &'
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Fri & Sat 8 am, Multi Family,
fum, glassware, clothes, books,
collectables/antiques & more!
433 S Marion Ave
Fri & Sat, 9am ?,Multi Family,
tools, rug, furniture, golf clubs
494 NW Clubview Cir,
(Lake City Country Club)


MULTI FAMILY Sat. 8-? Corner
of Herlong & Choctaw, S Hwy 47.
Holiday items, power tools, house-
hold, games, toys, much more!!
Multi-Family Sat. Oct. 6., 8-2
Retired Teacher, lots of classroom
decor & more 192 SW Dante Terr
Off hwy 242 Lots of plus size
men/womens(2X up)&kids
clothes, toys, & much more.
Nov. 6, Saturday 8-? 183 SW
Mockingbird Way (242/47).
Household items, jewelry, tools,
yard equip., more. Look for signs






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


430 Garage Sales

Sat & Sun at 8am Rain or shine
Forest Terr. off Country Club.
Primitive fum., bakelite items,
jewelry, computer, collectible bar-
bies, dining/living room sets more.
Sat only, 7:30 am Sharp!
Multi Family Sale,
behind Sonic Restaurant
1326 SW Castle Heights Terr
Sat only, 8 am noon, miscellane-
ous, computer eq, household items
2213 SW Birley Ave, off Pine-
mount Hwy 386-755-0661
SAT. 10-2. 6243 NW 31ST Circle
Jennings. off Hwy 141 in
Timberlake Est.
Lots and lots of misc.
SAT. 7:30-? 41 S. turn left on
131C, follow signs. Tools, prin-
cess house, Christmas dishes, Ig
leather chest lots of household, etc
Sat.& Sun 9-? Hsehold itAns from
3 storage units. Fum., Queen bed-
room set. Lazy boys, lots of books
& more. 14373 S Hwy 441.
SAT., 8-1, 2673 SW. Tustenuggee
Ave, hshold, paintings, furnishing
decor., electronics, trampoline,
clothes, exerc. equip. 288-6254


440 Miscellaneous

NATURAL GAS heater. Large
black, free standing w/open flame.
Cost $500 new, asking $250. obo.
386-719-3942
Need Holiday cash? Make 75% of
selling price at 3 day consignment
sale. Accepting gently used name
brand clothing, shoes & handbags.
Call 386-752-3631 or 755-1759
Rug Doctor
w/Attachments
$400 firm
386-719-8886
Swimming Pool
15 xm48
Like New $100
386-344-1783

450 Good Things
5 U to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
1,2,3 Br MH's for rent. All you
need is $200 to move you in. Rv's
also avl. 6 mo min.lease. Water,
mowing garbage container
provided for home or RV.
No pets. No Washers. Bkgrd Ck
done on all tenants. 386-755-5488
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
('352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500'
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DWMH, in beautiful area, pri-
vate dr, appliances included, Need
to see to appreciate! By appt only
386-752-5617, leave message pls


3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
Kingsley Lake: $800/mo you can
rent your own year-round place at
Kingsley Lake! 2/2 remodeled,
ch/a. Private Dock. 386-752-4339.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/l5ba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017


Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $575. then $650. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras
386-752-4258
Fully Furnished in park. 14X56.
2br/1.5ba. Washer & Dryer,
Micro, TV, Clean. $8,900. Owned
by non-smoker 386-755-0110
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940


a6 0 Mobile Home
650 & Land

D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825
FSBO 5 acres in Ellisville area
w/3br DWMH ready to move in.
Plus 20X24 workshop. $2000.
down $675 per mo. 386-752-4597

1 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
[5523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $540 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
.386-755-2423
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $650 plus dep & bckgmd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

7 0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

1 Room Efficiency Apt. Private.
$450. mo plus $50. deposit
Everything furnished. No pets.
386-758-5671
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

t Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542205
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2/1 w/den, on west side, 1 wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water and
trash included, $650 month +
security pet ok 386-719-9702
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/1.5ba house
close to town.
$750. mo plus deposit.
386-752-8653
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Completely remodeled 4/2 plus
study with carport in quiet area.
$1100 mo plus last and security.
386-867-2283
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch,all all appliances,
lg garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Lg 4 br/2ba home on Old Country
Club Rd. Living Rm, Family
Rm/,ining Rm/Kitchen; Recrea-
tion Rm; Fenced Yd. $800/mo;
Sec Dep $800; 386-623-2642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok.
non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St.
then call 352-377-0720

750 Business &
Office Rentals
Great Opportunity
Sunoco Convenient Store for lease
3554 N Hwy 441, Lake City.
813-495-8461
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

790 Vacation Rentals


Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


SADvantage









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents, or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this. newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.,

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner-Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&.
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd '
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LatidOwnerFinancing.com


Contact us

at the paper.







AF 386-755-5440
4 -

SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS


ADVERTISE IT HERE:
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days, for an additional,$15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad.
Your ad must be prepaid with cash,'check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the
picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.
ForMoe Dtals al
Maya B-755-5440.


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445



REM =1ii


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.



-SUBSCRIBERS-

Sign up today for EasyPay* and receive
one month FREE added to your subscription.

e qm de .dfd 386.755.5445

















It's quick and easy.


1.) Go to www.lakecityreporter.com


2.)


Click the "Share Photos" icon


Your Comm ity


Share Photos
of your family,
friends and '
community



3.) Click:


Submit Events
to be posted on
our online
calendar


Comment and.
connect with
other local
online users on
our guest, book


Submit Photo


4.) Attach your photo (ChooseFile)

5.) Select the best album for your photo

6.) Complete the form and Submit
Albums will change during the year.
Most photos will remain online for at least one month.

Photo Gallery 0 Submit a Photo
Please submit your photo to our online photo gallery. All photos -,i; i t ac, o. r., our t ..a ti ricr. they will appear on th
Web site.
Submit a photo to this Galleryl (Currently we only accept images in the Jpeg format, thank youl)
Ch File) no file selected
Pet Photos Birds __________________
Name:

Email:

Title: The title is the name of your photo.

Photographer,


Caption:


SThe caption is the description of your photo
that will be seen by viewers.
. ~~ ~ ~~... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . ..... .......... . .. . ............. ................. .................................. ......... ..................... ...... . ..


I S
i"


..... ..... ...


4 Photo Gallery Home


Send in your favorite photos

and share them with everyone!



L aki Rr


Tentative Five Year Work Program
District Two
Fiscal Years Beginning July 1, 2011 June 30, 2016
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District Two, is conducting public
hearings pursuant to Section 339.135(4)(c), Florida Statutes, to consider the
Department's Tentative Work Program for the Fiscal Years 2011/2012 through 2015/2016,
and to consider the necessity of making any changes to the Work Program, to which all
persons are invited to attend and be heard.
1. Live Oak Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the County Commissions for
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee and Taylor counties serving as the Metropolitan
Planning Organization (MPO) for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, December 2, 2010 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: Suwannee River Water Management District, Board Room #103
9225 County Road 49, Live Oak, FL

2. Lake City Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the Gainesville Metropolitan
Transportation Planning Organization (MTPO) and the County Commissions forAlachua,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Levy and Union counties serving as the Metropolitan
Planning Organization (MPO) for.their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT District Two Office, Madison Room
1109 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL

3. Jacksonville Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the North Florida
Transportation Planning Organization (TPO), the Jacksonville City Council and the County
Commissions for Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Putnam and St. Johns counties serving as
the Metropolitan Planning Organization for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT Jacksonville Urban Office, Training Facility
2198 Edison Avenue, Jacksonville, FL

Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national
origin, disability or family status. Persons who require accommodations under the
Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of
charge) should contact Mr. Bill Henderson, District Planning & Environmental Manager,
Lake City District Office at 1-800-749-2967 at least seven (7) days in advance of the
Public Hearings.
Written comments from the Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO's), County
Commissions and other interested parties will be received by the Department at the Public
Hearings and up to December 30, 2010 following the hearing. Comments should be
addressed to:
Mr. Alan R. Mosley, RE., District Two Secretary
Florida Department of Transportation, District Two
1109 South Marion Ave. Mail Station 2000
Lake City, FL 32025-5874
Telephone 1-800-749-2967
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


11-olic City Ileporter








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2010


- ,. /. .... ... !
Im
*ts: .

.-., i .. . -.
- STRIPE
:.*: -. : ;
r-" / ,, .- .. -: :
.' .,,, ; .i, .: ,... -,..:, .

i -e=.T. :'"" .'4 -. :. T" .... -''. "-- . ,., .,_ , ." ... .

& S T R I P E


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan (8) retums to the sideline after helping to stop the
Ridgeview High offense on Oct. 8.


.. . ,'. it. .'{, e l', ,-'
*, tilde&*
14,
'" '"' : L .PU_ ,, ,,


tiger


of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High marching band take to the field for a halftime performance.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
High school football referees discuss a ruling during the game against Ridgeview High.


2010 Tiger Football Schedule


CHS 38, Brooks County 13
CHS 30, South Lafourche 19
CHS 22, Buchholz 14
CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20
Madison 19, CHS 0
Ridgeview 16, CHS 9
Godby 35, CHS 14
Ed White 25, CHS 11


Wk 9 Wolfson H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.




This Week
7:30 p.m.
IWolfson High
--.


Playing for pride


Columbia High has lost
four straight games,
ahd the last one put the
Tigers out of contention
for the District 4-4A
championship after winning it last
season.
Still, the Tigers' message after
the game was that Columbia will not
play for next season. Columbia is


focused on finishing out the season
the right way, and that could start
with a win this week against Wolfson
High in the final district contest of
the season.
While the Tigers are not
mathematically eliminated from
playoff contention, they would need
help and a win against the Wolfpack
to stay alive.


The Tigers easily dismantled
Wolfson last season on the road,
and the home-field advantage might
be just what Columbia needs to fix
an offense that has been unable to
break the 20-point barrier over the
last four contests.
Columbia welcomes Wolfson at
7:30 p.m. Friday at Tiger Stadium in
Lake City.


J! Ooodwrench


Ronsonet Buick GMC Service Features:
* Factory Trained and
ASE Certified Technicians sr
* Early Morning/Late Night Drop Off E c
* We Use Genuine GM Parts 1
S Full Service Tire and Battery Center
* On Site Wash, Wax & Detail Service

(Ov 5 Oes of SvASwi S
ServlceHoue:Moi iay-Friday7:30am-:30pm
OJI, Wm~ a


9 1 2.99 | ru I
For 2 Adult MEAL .,
Buffets Ages 3-6 T[ d *t- r L
atu r d y N i g h t s Pa t o48 9 O O
with purchase The Predator

I ,of22 drinks $48
Not valid with any other coupon Not valid with any other coupon
or special. Not valid on Friday and or special. Not valid on Friday and
Saturday Nights Saturday Nights 4BR/2BA, 1800sqft
Alwia. raw ^ w w3silS Expires 11-30-10 Expires 11-30-10
___ __ __ ____ l(386) 754-8844
UI___10_ I_ IIII_,_III


-,-Come & See the Newest Store! NOW
Pinemount Road & Birley Ave. Lake City, FL. OPEN!


er You'll Love Our New Look!

:lI, I Milkshakes! Go Tigerss!
Located Inside S&S Store (#29), 2366 SW Pinemount Rd., Lake City, Florida WE CATER 386-752-3984


C H S STARS


-LiMIC


We erice All Maes nd odls W Srv'ice lfl Make and odel




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM