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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01443
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/04/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01443
System ID: UF00028308:01443
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








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red hot Tornadoes.
S 000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


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.Lake


Thursday, November 4, 2010


www.Iakecity


Last Chance
Columbia must win.
for playoff shot.
Sports, I B






porter


S Vol. 136, No. 247 E 75 cents


Scott: 'Let's get to work'


Governor-elect gives

promise to shake up

'politics as usual'


MATT SEDENSKY and
MITCH STACY
Associated Press
* TAMPA Two power-
ful forces combined to give
Rick Scott just enough sup-
port to become Florida's
next governor: $73 mil-
lion of his own money,
plus a wave of voter anger


that delivered knockout
victories to many other
Republicans in the state.
A political unknown dis-
missed by some as a fringe
candidate when he elbowed
his way into the race just
seven months ago, Scott
narrowly beat Democrat
Alex Sink on Tuesday by
presenting himself as a


"conservative outsider,"
highlighting his credentials
as a successful business-
man, relentlessly sticking
to his message and tap-
ping into voter anger at the
government and President
Barack Obama.
In his victory speech,
Scott said he would focus
on creating jobs, reducing
the size of government
and shaking up "politics as
usual in Tallahassee," while
also working to bridge the
gap between his support-
ers and Sink's. But Scott
also took a jab at politicians,


experts and observers who
said he would never win.
"There were plenty of
pundits, politicians and
insiders who said this vic-
tory was impossible," said
Scott, flanked by his fam-
ily and his running mate,
Jennifer Carroll. "But the
people of Florida knew
exactly what they wanted.
They sent a message loud
and clear: they said, let's
get to work."
With 99 percent of
Tuesday's votes counted,
SCOTT continued on 3A


SPECIAL TIME,



SPECIAL KIDS


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake
Columbia County elementary school students enjoy the 'Go Gators' roller coaster at the fair Wednesday.


Kiwanis Club

sponsors a day at the

County Fair for kids

with special needs


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

M ore than
300 local
children
were the
guests
of honor at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Wednesday thanks to the
Kiwanis Club of Lake City.
The students,. Columbia
School District exceptional
education students, were
treated to a magic show,
carnival rides, lunch and
tours of the competition
livestock.
John Brown, Columbia
High School ESE/
Trainably Mentally
Handicap teacher, said the
event has been sponsored
annually by the Lake City
Kiwanis Club so that ESE
students can have a day at
the fair.
"Ifs traditionally for


those students who prob-
ably would not get an
opportunity to come out to
the fair with their parents,"
he said. "We just want to
give them an opportunity
to come out and see what
the fair is all about and
take advantage of the rides
and animals. The kids
seem to be having a great
time."
As part of the promo-
tion, fair rides were
open for high school and
elementary-aged ESE stu-
dents.
Sandy Swilley, secre-
tary and treasurer of the
Kiwanis Club of Lake City,
said the local organization
has sponsored the event
for ESE students for more
than 20 years.
"This gives an opportu-
nity for the children that
are specially challenged
to come out and have a
day at-the fair," she said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Parents, teachers and students form a line in front of the
Giant Expo Wheel as they await their turn to board.


"They can't do it any
other time because of the
crowds. It gives them a
chance to come out and
have a really good day at
the fair. Everythifig we do


at the Kiwanis Club is for
the kids and children of
Columbia County."
Swilley said the local
FAIR continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov.-elect Rick Scott waves to the crowd after his
acceptance speech Wednesday at the Ft. Lauderdale Hilton
in Ft. Lauderdale.


Columbia's Top

Talent auditions

start Monday


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County stu-
dents wishing to showcase
.. their musical talent in a
local singing competition
have four days left to pre-
pare.
Open auditions for the
Seventh annual Columbia's
Top Talent begin at 3:45
p.m. Monday and Tuesday
at Columbia High School's
chorus room. They will
also be held Wednesday at
4 p.m. at Fort White High
School's chorus room.
Columbia's Top Talent
is a competition that pits
student singers against one
another for the opportunity
to show their talents on
stage.
ST The show's preliminary


will be Dec. 17. Finalists
will continue to the final
show in March.
Any student in grades
nine through 12 in Columbia
County can audition. Bands
are also welcome to try
out.
Students should come
to auditions prepared with
the song they would like
to sing in the competition,
said Ronnie Collins, event
organizer. Music is not nec-
essary, but can be brought
if students so choose.
"We're just trying to lis-
ten to their voice," Collins
said.
A Top Talent junior high
show for students grades
six through eight will be
held in January, with
TALENT continued on 3A


City Reporter Local veterans
City Reporter

to receive special

* recognition


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Army Nurse Corps Ret.
Col. Melina LeDuc has
seen and treated her fair
share of battlefield wounds
during her military career
which lasted more than 20
years.
In fact, LeDuc was the
only nurse from the Cadet
Nurse Corps, which was
founded to train nurses dur-
ing World War II, to take
part in the first Gulf War.
For her service to her
country, LeDucwillbe one of
13 veterans from Columbia
County who will receive a
certificate of special recog-
nition from Congressman
Ander Crenshaw during a
10 a.m. ceremony Friday at
the Naval Station Mayport
Ocean Breeze Conference
Center.
During the ceremony,
veterans who served
between 1941-1970 will be
honored.
Crenshaw is sched-
uled to honor 140 veter-
ans from across the Forth
Congressional District at
his eighth annual Veterans


Courtesy photo
Melina LeDuc stands in uni-
form during her tour of duty in
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.


Special


Recognition


Ceremony.
"I'm very impressed,
thrilled and appreciative to
be recognized with the cer-
tificate," LeDuc said dur-
ing a telephone interview
Thursday evening. "I was
29 years in the military,
first in the Reserves and
then active duty."
LeDuc, who has lived
in Lake City since 1984,
signed on and joined the
Cadet Nurse Corps after
VETERANS continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


74 7 ,
Rain, Thunderstorms g.
WEATHER, 2A / .


Opinion ................
Health..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


4 "' V


TODAY IN
HEALTH
C'n-,meg._i-3 pill d:c'.n t
help Izh,:,ri.-?,".


COMING
FRIDAY
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


3o3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-8-4
Evening: 3-5-5


Play 4 Wednesday:
.-%. Afternoon: 9-9-2-8
'-*., Evening: 0-7-7-3


Tuesday:
1-2-3-7-16


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Swift's CD passes 1 million sold mark


NEW YORK
Taylor Swift fans have
spoken more than a
million times.
The country-pop
superstar sold more
than 1 million copies of her new
album "Speak Now" to debut at
the top of the Billboard album
chart this week. Billboard.com
said Wednesday that it's the big-
gest debut since 50 Cent's 'The
Massacre" five years ago.
"I... Can't... Believe... This... You
guys have absolutely lit up my
world. Thank you," Swift tweeted
Wednesday morning.
According to Nielsen SoundScan
figures, "Speak Now" sold
1,047,000 copies since it was
released last week. That's slightly
higher than the 1,006,000 posted
by Lil Wayne's "Tha Carter III" in
2008.
Craig Marks, the editor of
Billboard, said that Swift's feat
solidified her status as one of pop's
most important and influential
music superstars.,
"What she did now, maybe it's
the equivalent of selling 2 million
records, or even more, half a dozen
years ago," he said. "It's an incred-
ulous accomplishment."
"Speak Now" is only the 20-year-
old's third album. Scott Borchetta,
CEO Swifi's record label Big
Machine, said her most recent suc-
cess has been "almost surreal."
"Everybody has worked so hard
on this full release, and it's truly
been magical the last couple of
weeks," he said in an interview
Tuesday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this CD cover image released by Big Machine Records, Taylor Swift's "Speak
Now" is shown.


anti-Semitic views, the Academy of
Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is.
moving forward with plans to honor
the filmmaker at its second annual
Governors Awards.
Godard is to be honored alongside
film historian and preservationist
Kevin Brownlow, director-producer
Francis Ford Coppola and actor Eli
Wallach at a ceremony on Nov. 13.


TBS brings in Letterman
Academy honors Godard's veteran for Lopez show
art, not his ideology NEW YORK TBS has a veteran


LOS ANGELES Amid concerns
that Jean-Luc Godard may harbor


late-night producer who worked with
David Letterman on hand to work on


George Lopez's talk show.
The hiring of Robert Morton as
executive producer two months ago
has gone almost unnoticed with all
the attention paid to Conan O'Brien's
debut on the network next week. But
TBS wanted a makeover for "Lopez
Tonight" to cash in on the interest in
O'Brien.
Lopez's show is moving to midnight
to accommodate O'Brien an hour
earlier. Morton spent 14 years with
Letterman and won a Peabody Award.
He's also worked with Wayne Brady,
Drew Carey, Chris Rock and Jon
Stewart.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Doris Roberts is
80.
* Actress Loretta Swit is 73.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Harry Elston (Friends of
Distinction) is 72.
* Blues singer Delbert
McClinton is 70.
* Former first lady Laura
Bush is 64.
* Actress Markie Post is 60.

Daily Scripture


* Rock singer-musician
Chris Difford (Squeeze) is 56.
* Country singer Kim
Forester (The Forester
Sisters) is 50.
* Actress-comedian Kathy
Griffin is 50.
* Actor Ralph Macchio is 49.
* Actor Matthew
McConaughey is 41.
* Actress Heather Tom is 35.


"Let everyone be subject to the
governing authorities, for there
is no authority except that
which God has established.The
authorities that exist have been
established by God."

-Romans 13:1


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla: 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks. '.............. $26.32
24-Weeks. .............. $48.79
52 Weeks ..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tat
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Isabella Rossellini
talks about films
MIAMI Isabella
Rossellini is into seduc-
tion from cuttle fish to a
snake to a bedbug.
The actress has created
. 10 short films about how
various animals seduce each
other. "Seduce Me," on view
at the Sundance Channel
website, is the second such
series for Rossellini, who
will bring the project to
Art Basel Miami Beach in
December.
"They are humorous.
They are meant to be
funny," Rossellini said in an
interview from New York.
"I like to laugh and f wanted
to make comical films."
Rick Gilbert, who pro-
duced the films, said they
were designed just for the
Web and for cell phones.
"We wanted to make
them very graphic and col-
orful We felt that on-screen
that's what works," he said.
She chose paper cos-
tumes created by Andy
Byers, for the project,
commissioned by Robert
Redford, because the mate-
rial was cheap. Initially, she
did 18 two-minute films
for her first series called
"Green Porno," which was
about how animals mate.
"My interest in animals
has always existed, not spe-
cifically on sex, but I knew "
that most of the people are
interested in sex. So, I knew
that if I did the series on the
different ways of mating, we
would get more audience,"
Rossellini said.

Deputy revives
woman in court
GAINESVIILE An
Alachua County sheriffs
deputy is being credited
with reviving a woman
whose heart stopped beat-
ing shortly after testifying
Sin court
Deputy Dennis Pickering
says the woman was sitting


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HI 74L47 HI 67L35 HI6603 HI 68 41 HI 72 47
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated handout image made available by the Wolfsonian
Museum in Miami Beach, shows Isabella Rossellini acting in a
series of short videos named 'Seduce Me.'


at a table Tuesday when the
incident occurred. She had
just finished testifying in a
civil suit, and her husband
was on the stand.
The woman slumped
over and slid down her
chair.
* Pickering checked her
pulse but says she didn't
have one, He began doing
CPR and the woman, who
has not been identified
because of medical pri-
vacy laws, began breathing
again.
The woman reportedly has
a history of heart problems.
A mistrial was declared
because the incident
occurred in front of the jury.

Weather worsens
for shuttle
CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASA managers are meet-
ing to decide whether space
shuttle Discovery is safe to
lift off on its final mission
Thursday. The weather,
though, is getting worse.
Forecasters on
Wednesday said there is
now an 80 percent chance
that rain or thunderstorms
will interfere.
Wednesday's launch
attempt was called off 24
hours in advance because
of main engine controller
trouble. The computerized


controller was slow in start-
ing up, then had strange
voltage readings.
Mission managers at
the Florida launch site will
decide whether the problem
poses any threat to liftoff.
If repairs are needed, the
delay could be significant
Discovery will head to
the International Space
Station for its last trip into
orbit

Woman critical
after wasp attack
LAKELAND An 81-
year-old' Florida woman is
in critical condition after
being stung several hun-
dred times by yellow jacket
wasps from an underground-
nest in her yard.
Juanita Foshee, of
Lakeland, was in the back-
yard of her Lakeland home
Saturday evening when she
was attacked. Her family
said she was able to get
inside the home and call
her son.
A Lakeland Regional
emergency doctor esti-
mated that she was stung
more than 1,000 times. Her
husband said her liver and
kidneys are being affected
by poison she received from
the stings.


Tallahassee *
72/43 ,
73/45 Pa na City
73/47


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low '
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
,Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Sidesta
69/43
Lake City*
74/47
Gainesville *
\,76/49
Ocala
T78/50


81/60,'
<


* acksonde Cape Canaver
,,5/50 Daytona Bea<
Ft. Lauderdale
Da Fort Myers
82-,56 Galnesvllle
N* Jacksonville
O dad Cataveri Key West
80/57 8061 Lake City
80/57 861 Miami
Naples
West Pahn Bch Ocala
83/66, Orlando
*n FL Lauderdalt Panama City
mrs, 84/68 Pensacola
4 'Naples Tallahassee
82/66 Miami Tampa


MOON
Moonrise today 6:02 a.m.
Moonset today 5:24 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 7:10 a.m.
Moonset tom. 6:08 p.m.


Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.
6 13 21 28
New First Full Last


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


City


ral
ch
e


Friday
69.51,'pc
70/46/s
78/55/pc
73/48/pc
66/36/s
66/37/s
82/71/pc
67/35/s
77/56/pc
73/50/pc
67/37/s
70/45/s
66/42/s
64/40/s
64/35/s
70/48/pc
64/36/s
75/53/pc


Saturday
68, 54.'s
67/48/s
73/59/s

65/38/s
80/70/s
66/36/s
74/58/s
72/51/s
66/38/s
68/47/s
*66/44/s
65/42/s
67/36/s
71/51/s
64/36/s
71/52/s


FL Myo
82/6


S 84/69 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.,
Sunset tom.


7:47 a.m.
6:41 p.m.
7:48 a.m.
6:40 p.m.


82
64
.77
54
90 In 1929
29 in 1954

0.07"
0.26"
38.68"
0.21"
43.84"


2
LOt
60mnitobbIm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to :1.0+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weathercorn


j Forecasts, data and graph-
-' ,' Ics 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, WIs.
'V. www.weatherpubllsher.com


rs FIDJA


SATUR!AI


SUN~


~= '-- "--- --- ---- ----r -- -r I


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


1E8 MNDA


LAKE CITY ALMANAC


C2 IDEX


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1EMER lri-THE -HOURr












FAIR: Special needs kids enjoy the fair
Continued From Page 1A atdd -. I


organization raises
money for the children
of Columbia County and
she estimated that 316
children attended the fair
Wednesday as part of the
Kiwanis program.
She said a number of
Kiwanis Club members
also attended to spend


time with the children.
"We come out here and
greet the children as they
come in," she said. "We
like to see the children
because they are so excit-
ed. We're also out here to
help if they need us or if
they have any questions."
Marilyn Douglass, a


Fort White Elementary
School pre-kindergarten
teacher, chaperoned a
group of 10 students as
part of the program.
"The children are hav-
ing a blast and loving
every minute of the fair,
from the rides to the
food," she said. -


TALENT: Auditions for Top Talent
Continued From Page 1A


auditions preceding that
show in the same month.
Junior high finalists will
also proceed to the March
competition.
Collins said auditioning
for the show and compet-
ing will help students to
refine their showmanship.
"If they want to get into


the music industry, it gives
them an opportunity to see
what it's like to be on stage
and learn more about music
performance and showing
their talent," he said.
Columbia's Top Talent
encourages students to
pursue their musical abili-
ties while still pursuing aca-


demics, Collins said.
"It gives them an oppor-
tunity to share their talent
and go into music the right
way instead of quitting
school and joining a band
somewhere," Collins said.
"It gives them the oppor-
tunity to do it right here in
school."


VETERANS: Awards to be presented
Continued From Page 1A


World War II. She started
her military career in the
Cadet Nurse Corps, where
she received her first nurs-
ing school training. She
graduated from the Cadet
Nurses Corps in 1948.
"We were assigned a hos-
pital and go to ,the hospi-
tal, and live in the nurses'
residence and go to school
during the day, and work
four hours in the morning
and school all afternoon or
work night duty," she said.
'"We received our nurses'
training that way."
She was in the Army
Reserves from 1967 and
went into active duty in
1990. She served in Saudi
Arabia in the first Gulf


War.
"My unit was stationed
in Iran, Dhahran, Saudi
Arabia, where we called it
'SCUD City"', LeDuc said.
"We called it SCUD City
because we were bombed
with SCUD bombs every
night and day as a rou-
tine."
LeDuc also worked at the
Walter Reed Army Medical
Center. She retired from
the facility in April, 1996 as
a colonel. ,
Other Columbia County
residents slated to be hon-
ored during the service
are:
James D. Measel (U.S.
Navy)


Kevin R. Bringman
(U.S. Army)
Ronnie D. Bryan (U.S.
Army)
Mun Cauley Jr. (U.S.
Army)
Jesse F Fleming (U.S.
Air Force)
Donny Griffin (U.S. Air
Force)
James A- Keaton (U.S.
Air Force)
Walter E. Lee (U.S.
. Army)
John B. L Melum (U.S.
Air Force) '
James Luel Poole Jr.
(U.S. Air Force)
Robert G. Shepard
(U.S. Navy)
Deidre Stallings (U.S.
Air Force)


SCOTT: Close win over Sink
Continued From Page 1A


Scott had 49 percent to Sink's
48 percent a lead of about
53,000 votes. Even though
some counties were still
counting ballots Wednesday,


Sink said she didn't see a
way to eke out a win.
Scott had predicted
hours earlier that he would
win. Even so, a number of


counties, were still count-
ing ballots, including
Miami-Dade, Palm Beach
and Hillsborough counties
where Sink ran strongly.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter'


Van, pickup truck collide


Law enforcement officers conduct an investigation following a Wednesday morning wreck at
the corner of SW Wall Terrace and Baya Drive where a van and pickup truck collided. No inju-
ries were reported in the crash.



Board to discuss possible

personnel reorganization


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county could be
undergoing various per-
sonnel reorganization and
changes, including two new
positions that have not yet
been board-approved.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will discuss
those changes, among other
agenda items, at its regular
meeting today.
Dale Williams, county
manager, will give updates
on four. new positions he
previously presented to the
board.
Two were previously
approved; radio communica-
tions director and projects
superintendent A senior
staff assistant position and
a job to handle agenda
preparation,, public records
requests and a possible elec-
tronic records management
system will be up for discus-
sion and board action.
Williams noted that all
new positions approved by
the board cannot cause an
increase in the budget
'The county commission


agreed that they thought the
positions were beneficial,
but put a caveat that there
could be no negative budget
impact," he said. "In other
words, there could be no
increase in the budget So
we have to take the resourc-
es that we have and use
them to make the positions
work."
If approved, the senior
staff assistant would start
at about $55,000 annually.
Williams said it would be
funded by eliminating a
vacant assistant fire chiefs
position.
A salary has not yet been
decided on the job dealing
with record management,
Williams said, but it cannot
cost the county any extra
money.
Other personnel changes
on the agenda include elimi-
nating the assistant Public
Works director position
upon the current employ-
ee's retirement and filling
it as a tree crew foremen
with a starting annual sal-
ary of about $24,000; filling
the vacant Veterans Service
counselor/secretary posPi
tion at a starting annual sal-


* ary of almost $20,000; and
upgrading an Extension
Department secretary with
almost $3,000 more per year
and hiring a part-time secre-
tary at $7.87 hourly to make
up for the department's
office manager resigning.
In other discussion and
action:
By state law, the
Columbia County Sheriffs
Office and Supervisor of
Elections Office will account
for their 2009 to 2010 bud-
gets. The CCSO will return
more than $181,000 to the
county budget and the
Supervisor of Elections
Office will return more than
$6,000, monies that they
have requested be accepted
and given back either all or
in part
A one-year review
will be given to the eco-
nomic development pro-
gram overseen' by the
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority.
The board will meet at
4 p.m, at the Columbia
County School Board
Administrative Complex
" atditorittm, 372 W Duval
St.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Thursday, November 4, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Parties

must work

together


ter be the new buzz-
word in Washington.
The alternative is
a political stalemate
for the next two years until the
2012 presidential election, a
scenario no one wants outside
of maybe political party bosses.
The voters have spoken and
made Washington a closely
divided town. The Republicans
now control the House of
Representatives, the parties are
close to even in the U.S. Senate
(control is yet to be determined)
and Democrat President Obama
is in the White House.
Is it too much to ask for
Republicans and Democrats to
work together on a few issues?
Politically speaking, it
feels a lot like 1994, although
Republicans also won back the
Senate in that midterm election.
Americans will be watching and
judging to see whether President
Obama and Speaker-to-be John
Boehner (R-Ohio) can strike
the kind of deals to get the
nation fiscally back on track
that then President Bill Clinton
and Speaker of the House Newt
Gingrich did.
The first test will come quickly.
As most Americans are aware,
the Bush tax cuts expire at the
end of the year. They expire on
all Americans from the poorest
to the richest and in the midst
of a recession, a tax increase of
this magnitude will feel heavy-
handed.
If there is a compromise to be
-made, it's on taxes. Bolth parties
claim they are for the middle
class, and this is the best way to
prove it
Voters have shown their
frustration with incumbents of
both parties in this election.
Republican and Democratic lead-
ers should not misread the tea
leaves.
A government that does noth-
ing for the next two years will not
go over well. There are too many
pressing issues demanding seri-
ous attention.
In the best of times,
Republicans and Democrats in a
closely divided Washington have
found ways to come together,
especially on balancing budgets.
The best political strategy for all
Americans is compromise.
The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia apd surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of'
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


ine years ago, the
nation's capital was
transfixed by an
obscure California
congressman
named Gary Condit. The press
and especially cable TV covered
him obsessively. Reporters and
satellite-TV trucks jammed the
street outside his apartment in
the city's Adams Morgan neigh-
borhood.
The Democrat had unwill-
ingly found himself the leading
man in a familiar Washington
melodrama a naive and ambi-
tious young woman comes to
the capital and becomes infatu-
ated with an older man in a posi-
tion of relative power.
The relationship might have
ended as most do, sadly and
quietly. Chandra Levy, 24, had
finished an internship at the fed-
eral Bureau of Prisons and was
packing to return to her home
in California. Then, on May 1 of
that year, she disappeared.


www.lakecityreporter.com


The big lessons of these elections


0


ur look at the big
lessons of the 2010
Election begins
with the fact that
the critics of


Barack Obama were proven
dead wrong in their claim that
the president isn't half the lead-
er he promised he'd be.
Because he turned out to be
precisely that Barack Obama
promised us "Change You Can
Believe In" but he gave us
change you don't believe in.
We learned this from an Oct.
29 article on Bloomberg.com
that was probably the best jour-
nalistic analysis of Campaign
2010. A Bloomberg National
Poll, taken October 24-26, listed
a.number of negative economic
outcomes voters overwhelm-
ingly believed were true but
Bloomberg correspondents
Heidi Przybyla and John
McCormick showed us that
what voters believed was con-
trary to what actually occurred.
The Bloomberg poll reported
likely voters believed by a huge
two-to-one margin: 'Taxes have
gone up, the economy has
shrunk, and the billions lent to
banks as part of the Troubled
Asset Relief Program won't be
recovered."
But the economic reality,
Bloomberg reported, is: '"The
Obama administration cut taxes
for middle-class Americans,
expects to make a profit on the
hundreds of billions of dollars
spent to rescue Wall Street
banks and has overseen an
economy that has grown for the
past four quarters." But, as the
Bloomberg piece added: "Most
voters don't believe it."
Consider middle class taxes:
"The Obama administration
has cut taxes largely for the
middle class by $240 bil-
lion since taking office Jan. 20,
2009," Bloomberg reported. "A


Martin Schram
martin.schram@gmoii.com
program aimed at families earn-
ing less than $150,000 that was
contained in the stimulus pack-
age lowered the burden for 95
percent of working Americans
by $116 billion, or about $400
per year for individuals and
$800 for married couples.
Other measures include breaks
for college education, moder-
ate- income families and the
unemployed and incentives to
promote renewable energy."
But 52 percent of likely vot-
ers said federal income taxes
increased for the middle class
in the past two years, while
just 19 percent knew (or lucky-
guessed) this wasn't true. And
the news was worse for Obama
strategists among their pre-
sumed lower income middle
class voter base: 63 percent
of those earning $25,000 to ,
$49,999 said taxes increased
(compared to just 45 percent
of those earning $100,000 or
more). Half the independents
thought middle tax taxes
increased.
Why are Americans so wrong
about this? We have no short-
age of expert analysis and on
this; the experts run the gamut
from half-wrong to half-right
'The public view of the econ-
omy is at odds with the facts,
and the blame has to go to the
Democrats," said Bloomberg's .
pollster, J. Ann Selzer, president
of Selzer & Co. of Des Moines,
Iowa. "It does not matter much
if you make change, if you do


not communicate change."
Obama Democrats blame
Republicans for lying, distorting
and being unwilling to com-
promise. Republicans blame
Obama and Democrats for
being big taxers, big spenders
and being unwilling to compro-
mise.
Team Obama's political fail-
ure is the result of not just a
communications failure but also
a core beliefs failure. Obama's
presidency produced change
even his inner circle didn't
seem to believe in. Why else
would they have failed to give
us two years of visible, made-
for-TV presidential leadership
on voters' top concern jobs?
Most likely they didn't have
much faith in their ability to fix
it. But they were wrong. We
should have seen our president
convening can-do summits with
Fortune 500 CEOs and small
business owners. Obama roll-
ing up his sleeves and work-
ing with them. Obama saying
tell-us-what-we-can-do right
now! to convince you to stop
hoarding profits and start creat-
ing jobs.
Feeling leaderless or at least
leader-lite, Americans grew
to fear the fear itself of being
trapped in a jobless recovery.
It was a wave that swept the
nation and in the age of non-
stop cable and Internet news, it
seemed like a tsunami.
And the overarching lesson'
of Election 2010 became the
toppling of an iconic Speaker
of the House. No, not Nancy
Pelosi the late Tip O'Neill.
His credo of "All politics is
local" was just made obsolete.
Until further notice: All poli-
tics is national.
Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


Condit, who had a circum-
spect relationship with Levy,
was almost immediately singled
out as the prime, indeed the
only, suspect, despite passing
-a polygraph test. The police
still didn't believe him and '
threatened him with obstruc-
tion-of-justice charges. That
single-minded focus by the
police is considered one of the
reasons the crime took so long
to unravel.
Despite an extensive police
search of Rock Creek Park,
where Levy was known to jog
regularly, her remains weren't
discovered until a year later, and
then by a man walking his dog.
Eight years later, Ingmar
Guandique, now 29, was
charged with her murder
and rape. He had a pattern of
assaults on women in the park
and at the time of his arrest he
was serving a sentence for two
of those assaults.
Condit would go on to lose


his House seat and his mar-
riage. This past week.he was
back in Washington to testify in
the murder trial. He swore he
didn't kill Levy, which now no
one believes he did.
But just as he was nine years
ago, he would not elaborate on
the nature of his relationship
with the young intern, turning
away the defense attempt to find
out: "I don't believe it's relevant.
I am not going to respond to
that question out of privacy for
myself and Chandra."
The judge agreed that the
questioning was irrelevant and
the trial moved on.
Condit dropped out of the
spotlight as abruptly as he
entered.
One brilliant Tuesday morn-
ing, the reporters and TV
trucks abruptly abandoned the
street in front of Condit's build-
ing. It was Sept. 11, 2001.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com


Life is


good on


the lake


a cloudless
Carolina sky,
with several bil-
lion stars danc-
ing on the lake.
I was sitting on-a dock, bun-
dled up like an Eskimo matron,
waiting for the beaver that lives
under the boathouse to swim
out and slap his tail thwack!
like a crack of lightning on the
water.
In a self-imposed exile, near
the town where I grew up, this
passes for high entertainment
"No TV?" said my sister, when
I told her I'd rented a place for a
few weeks on a lake she calls the
"Witness Protection Program."
"I don't need a TV," I said.
'There's no radio or phone,
either, just my cell and the recep-
, tion's, like, pretty bad."
"Bad" is an understatement To
keep a cell-phone connection for
more than 30 seconds, I have to
sit on the dock facing west, close
my eyes, cross my fingers and
make no sudden moves.
My sister cannot fathom this.
"What on Earth will you do
without a TV?"
'Tve got Internet," I said. "I'll
be fine.":
I did not say I'd sit around wait-
ing for a beaver to slap its tail.
My husband flew out to join
me for the weekend. We went to
a Clemson game, then spent the
evening on the dock listening to
owls hoot and geese honk and
dogs bark in the distance.
That's when we first saw the
beaver. It came swimming out
from under the boathouse, cut-
ting a wide wake on the water in
the moonlight
"What the heck'is that?" said
my husband. He grew up in
California, knows a lot about sea
lions, but not much about over-
grown aquatic rodents.
"I don't know," I whispered.
"Ifs pretty big for a beaver."
Then it slapped its tail on the
water thwack! like a shot-
gun blast in an outhouse and we
nearly knocked each other into
the lake trying to get in the cabin.
The next day, before he flew
back to Las Vegas for work and
left me here to do some writing,
he bought me a flashlight
"Be careful," he said, and I
promised I would be.
So I've been spending my days
doing a little writing and a whole
lot of watching passing boats,
flying geese, falling leaves, bob-
bing ducks. You name it, I will
watch it
There's so much to see when
you have no distractions.
My sister calls daily to ask if
the ax murderer has gotten me
yet Occasionally she lures me off
the lake for dinner.
But I spend most evenings
writing, reading or waiting, yes,
for the beaver to slap its tail. It's
good sometimes to unplug, to be
still and hear yourself think.
Unless you happen to be a
baseball fan and your team is
playing in the World Series.
And that is how tonight, on
a tiny little screen in a cabin
on Lake Witness Protection
Program, I saw the Giants win
their first World Series since
before I was a Giants fan.
After the game, I went out on
the dock to think about it
I was still smiling when the
beaver swam by the dock and
slapped its tail on the water
thwack! like the crack of
Edgar Renteria's bat hitting a
three-run, Series-winning homer.

Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


OTHER OPINION


9/11 swept Condit out of spotlight


m











Page Editor; Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Thursday
Leads Clubs
An information meeting
on Leads Clubs is 5:30-
6:30 p.m. today at Holiday
Inn & Suites Lake City.
The clubs are opened
to Chamber members.
Light refreshments will be
served. Cash bar available.
Call 386-754-1411.

Rural Folklife Days
The annual Rural
Folklife Days are 9
a.m.-2:30 p.m. Nov. 4-6
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
More than 16 demon-
strators will be on hand
showcasing Florida tradi-
tions. Admission is $5 per
person. Call toll free 1-
877-635-3655 or visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
phenfoster.

Saturday
Four Rivers Audubon
ALJ-Walk
The next monthly ALLI-
Walk: Bird /Butterfly /
Nature's Garden outing is
8-11 a.m. Saturday. Jerry.
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder,
and others will share their
knowledge. Bring a hat,
sunscreen, water, binocu-
lars and a snack. No fee is
charged. All levels of par-
ticipation and knowledge
are welcome. Call Loye
Barnard at 497-3536.

2nd Annual Breast
Cancer Walk
The second annual
Breast Cancer Walk is
9 a.m.-12 p.m. Saturday
starting at Olustee Park.
Pink ribbons will be avail-
able for purchase and
donations are accepted.
Walking is not required.
Call Kelly at 386-365-7604.

Fundraiser benefit
A benefit for Pat
Kenwarthy is 9 a.m.-6
p.m. Saturday at Sunbelt
Chrysler Jeep/Dodge.
Activities will include
a carwash, bake sale,
silent auction, food and
a live performance from
Southern Justice.

Charity poker run
A charity poker run
begins 9:30 a.m. Saturday
at the Lake City Shrine
Club. Registration is 8:30
a.m. The ride ends at
Gainesville Shrine Club.
Cost is $20 per bike/hand
and $10 per additional
passenger/hand. All pro-
ceeds benefit the Shiner's
Children Hospital and


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Dictionary project spells out definition of helping and learning
Members of Rotary Club of Lake City and Columbia High School global logistics students pass out dictionaries to students in
Rebecca Stephens' third-grade class at Eastside Elementary School on Wednesday. More than 900 Columbia County third-
graders will receive the dictionaries for the organization's 'Dictionary Project.'


Florida Masonic Lodge.
Pre-register by calling
Mark Szymanski at 352-
213-5069, e-mail onyx32@
juno. corn or Roger Ward at
386-288-3425 or e-mail rog-
erwardus@yahoo.com.

Tuesday
Fall Love and
Remembrance Memorial
The Haven Hospice
Love and Remembrance
Memorial is 6 p.m.
Tuesday. It is open to
anyone in the community
who has lost a loved one.
Attendees are entour-
aged to bring pictures
and mementos of loved
ones that can be placed
on the Table of Memories.
Refreshments will be
served. Registration is
not required. Call Haven
Hospice at 386-752-9191.

Dancing lessons
Square dance lessons
are at 6:45 p.m. every
Tuesday at Teen Town.
The first two lessons are
free. Call Ouida Taylor at
386-752-1469.

Wednesday
GDDA meeting
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association is
meeting at 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday. The meeting
is sponsored by Pampered
Chef. There will be appe-


tizers and demonstrations
and a presentation on
"Cooking Healthy while
Saving Time and Money."
The meeting is a fundrais-
er to benefit our commu-
nity service and outreach
activities. Attendees can
receive 1 CEU. Visit www.
eatrightgainesville. org.

Thursday, Nov.'11
Friends of Music
The Max Brod Trio
performs 7:30 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, 697
SW Baya Drive. The event
is part of the Friends of
Music Annual Concert
Series. The concert is free.

Signature Chefs Auction
The March of Dimes
and Mercantile Bank are
presenting "Signature
Chefs Auction" 5:30 p.m.
Nov. 11 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Banquet Hall. There will
be live and silent auc-
tions with predecorated
Christmas trees, and
live entertainment by
"Harry, Sally, and Billy."
A selection of specialty
foods presented by area
restaurants and caterers,
along with complimen-
tary wine tasting will be
available. Call Maureen
Lloyd 752-4885. Tickets
are sold at all Mercantile
Bank offices, Rountree
Moore Toyota and
Ward's Jewelers and


First Street Music.

Dulcimer Retreat
The Stephen Foster
State Park Dulcimer
Retreat is Nov. 12-13
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
Concerts featuring instruc-
tors from the workshops
are 7 p.m. each night in
the park auditorium. The
event includes workshops,
jam sessions and more.
Dulcimer master David
Beede hosts the retreat.
Tickets for public admis-
sion are $10. Admission
to the two-day event is
$85, which includes all
workshops, jam sessions,
concerts and discussion
groups. To register, vis-
it www.FloridaStateParks.
org/stephenfoster/Events.
cfin. Call (386) 397-7009 or
toll free 1-877-635-3655.

Friday, Nov. 12
Inaugural performance
Tickets are now on
sale for the inaugural
Performances of the Live
Oak Theatre's "Anne of
Avonlea, The Musical"
at 8 p.m. Nov. 12-13 and
20 and 2 p.m. Nov. 31
at Weeki Wachee High
School auditorium,
12150 Vespa Way, Weeki
Wachee. All seats are
$15 and an optional des-
sert bar is available for
only $5. Go to www.
LiveOakTheatre.org or call


OBITUARIES


Magdalene Garner Thomas
Magdalene Garner Thomas, age
87 resident of Lake City, Florida,
departed this life Sunday Octo-
terminating an
extended ill-
ness. Born in
Adel, Georgia.
She was the
daughter of
the late Oliver
Garner and
Ida Maebell Garner. She was a
resident of Lake City (Columbia
County) most of her adult life and
WAs a faithful member of Oliv-
et Missionary Baptist Church,
Rev. Ronald Waters, pastor.
Survivors include a son, Rodney
L. Thomas; daughter, Jacquelyn
Thomas (deceased); brothers;
Rev. John Garner, Sr. and Ed-
die Garner, both deceased; and
Sylvester Garner. Sisters; Lil-
lie Pearl Sparks, Hazel Vernon,
Annie Garner, Doris Scott and
Flora Worlds, (all deceased).
Sisters-in-law, Frances Gamrner
and Fannie Garner. Grandchil-
dren, Russell A. Tomlin, Mad-
elyn Peterson (Christopher),
Timmy Tomlin, Tammy L. Sim-
mons (Carl), Glynell D. Tomlin
and Yolanda D. Parnell. Sixteen
great grandchildren; eight great,
great grandchildren; a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Magdalene
Garner Thomas, will be 11:00
a.m. Saturday, November 6,


2010 at Olivet Missionary Bap-
tist Church; Rev. Ronald Walters,
pastor; Rev. Joseph Simmons,
Eulogy. Interment will follow
in Garden of Rest Cemetery.
The family will receive friends


Friday, November 5, 2010 at
Cooper Funeral Home Chapel
from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.
Arrangements entrusted
to COOPER FUNERAL
HOME, 251 N.E. Washing-


ton Street, Lake City, Flori-
'da. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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. OE


9248 129th ROAD LIVE OAK
(386) 362-2333
Monday thru Friday 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Closed
"For Over 30 Years"
www.noblesgreenhouse.com


HWY 90

11TH STREET
F-


the box office at 352-593-'
0027.

Sunday, Nov. 14
Plow and Family Day
Old Fashioned Plow
and Family Day is 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 14 at Tice
Farms. The farm is located
at 2145 SWTustenuggee
Ave. Activities include
plowing, horse and mule
exhibitions, wagon rides,
petting zoo, buggy rides,
chicken pilau dinners and
more. Proceeds benefit
the Chances for Children
Christmas Program. Bring
an unwrapped new gift for


Call today to place a
surprise ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special day!


John A Kasak CLU CPCU
State Farm Agent
Lake City, FL 32025
Bus: 386-752-7521


Savings Accounts
$0 $24,999
$25,000- $49,999
$50,000 -$99,999
$100,000+


0.12% APY*
0.17% APY*
0.72% APY*
0.81% APY*


Bank with a good neighbors.
CALL ME TODAY FOR


MORE INFORMATION.


Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm

6Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to annearance in the Lake City Reporter.


3 ironirt 0 5, '. AF'
6 rmnnlh 14, u AP"
I- mouth 0.80% APi,
24 month 1.00% APY*
36 month 1.18%APY*
48 month 1.38% APY*
60 month 1.77% APY*


Money MarketAccount


$0-$99
$100 -$9,999
$10,000-$24,999
$25,000-$49,999
$50,000 -$99,999
$100,000 +


0.00% APY*
0.80% APY*
0.90% APY*
1.05% APY*
1.10% APY*
1.25% APY*


SBanks
LEA]IFI ^^


*Annual Percentage Yields as of 10/27/10. Rates subject to change without
notice. Minimum balance to open an account and obtain the stated APY is
$500. Rates apply to deposits less than $100,000. A penalty may be imposed
for a withdrawal prior to maturity. Certificates automatically renew at maturity
at the then-current rate for the same term.
94 State Farm Bank. FS.B.,Bloomington, IL IN F


- pp rr- ... ,- u-.....


I~ '~ '


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


Page Editor; Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


a child. For event or din-
ner tickets call 386-623-4732
or 623-7780. For team par-
ticipation call 386-754-0959.

Saturday, Nov. 20
Benefit fundraiser
A benefit fundraiser
for Rick Harkness "Big
Daddy" is 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Nov. 20 at First Full
Gospel Church. A benefit
bike run starts at 10 a.m.
and costs $10 per rider
and $5 for extra rider. Yard
sale space is available for
$15. BBQ pork lunches
will be sold. Activities
will also include a gospel
sing. Call Janice at 623-
7375, Jackie, 984-0453 or
Michelle, 365-5780.

Everyday
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday-Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

Every Monday
Composite Squadron
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron
- Civil Air Patrol. Meets
6:30 to 9 p.m. Monday.
For more information,
call Maj. Grant Meadows,
(386)365-1341.

Every Fourth
Monday
Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meeting
The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from
1 to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Court Call 755-
0235.









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


Patient needs


help on disease


known as AAA i


D EAR DR.
GOTr: It is
my fervent
prayer that
this letter
reaches your hand. One
cannot imagine the pleth-
ora of mail you receive
daily. Therefore, I have
attempted to keep my let-
ter as short as possible.
Three words abdom-
inal aortic aneurysm -
spoken to a patient con-
jures up one word: fear.
Please address AAA in
your daily column for the
sake and benefit of the
multitude of those aware
and unaware of potential
ramifications of this nefar-
ious disease. I have read
that 1,500 Americans lose
their lives to this condi-
tion every year.
Our doctor has failed
to satisfactorily address
my questions about my
husband's condition dur-
ing the past four years.
The only medication he
takes is Lovostatin daily
for slightly elevated cho-
lesterol. What causes
AAA? What causes fat in
the liver?
DEAR READER:
An AAA occurs when
a portion of the aorta,
the large blood vessel
that supplies oxygenrrich
blood to the abdomen,
pelvis and legs becomes
abnormally large or
bulges outward. The
aorta runs from the heart
uirough the chest and
abdomen.
An aneurysm can
develop anywhere along
the aorta. When they
occur in the upper por-
tion of the aorta, they are
known as thoracic aortic
aneurysms.
Similarly, when they
occur in the lower por-
tion of the aorta, they are
called abdominal aortic
aneurysms.
While an unusual
occurrence, when one
develops between the
upper and lower portion,
they are known as thora-
coabdominal aneurysms.
Most small and slow-
growing aneurysms will
not rupture; and there
will be few, if any, symp-
toms.
The larger the aneu-
rysm, the more likely it
will rupture.
Anyone can develop an
aneurysm, but they are
most commonly seen in
males over the age of 60
who have at least one risk
factor, such as high blood
pressure, obesity, high
cholesterol levels, a histo-
ry of smoking, atheroscle-
rosis, or specific genetic
factors such as Marfan
Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos
Syndrome, heart-valve
problems, and injury.
Symptoms of a rup-
turing AAA can include
nausea, vomiting, low


ON HEALTH

I'f I iP


Dr. Peter Gott
MD

blood pressure, loss of
consciousness, abdominal
or back pain that pres-
ents rather suddenly but
persistently, clammy skin
and a rapid heart rate.
While a physician
might be able to palpate
a mass, he or she may
choose to do nothing for
a nonrupturing one but
monitor its size to deter-
mine whether it enlarges.
If it is extremely slow
growing, the aneurysm
may not require any inter-
vention other than moni-
toring; however, should
blood from the aneurysm
leak mnto the abdominal
cavity or if it grows rap-
idly, surgical repair will
likely be necessary unless
the risks outweigh the
benefits.
If a physician deter-
.mmes surgery can be *
avoided, at least tempo-
rarily, he or she may pre-
scribe a beta blocker to
slow the rate of growth of
the aneurysm.
In your husband's case,
he was prescribed medi-
cation to lower his choles-
terol level.
High levels are asso-
ciated with plaque, fat
deposits (from dietary
choices or genetics) and
a build up of atherosclero-
sis and pressure on arter-
ies. If surgery is agreed
upon, there are two pos-
sibilities for repair.
The first and most com-
mon is grafting the abnor-
mal vessel with man-made
material, such as Dacron.
Prevention of anm
aneurysm can be accom-
plished through exercise,
eating a healthful, low-
cholesterol diet, avoiding
stress and treating hyper-
tension.
Most people diag-
nosed with an AAA live
symptom-free, healthy
lives.
Guidelines for surgery
are dependent on medi-
cal history, the size of an
aneurysm and the rate at
which it enlarges.
The decision is best
left to your husband's
physician.

* Dr. Peter Gott is a
retired physician and
the author of the book
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Diet," availadlle at
most chain and indepen-
dent bookstores, and the
recently published "Dr.
Gott's No Flour, No Sugar
* Cookbook."


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Program helps decrease stress for Alzheimer's caregivers
In this Oct. 4 photo, Leonard Georges and Jean Georges share a laugh in Henderson, Nev. Jean urges spouses of those
with Alzheimer's to enroll in a free Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health counseling program that is designed to
increase the coping skills of caregivers while also decreasing their stress.



Researchers: Omega-3 pills fail


to work in Alzheimer's patients


By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO Omega-3
pills promoted as boosting
memory didn't slow men-
tal and physical decline
in older patients with
Alzheimer's disease, a big
disappointment in a multi-
million-dollar government-
funded study.
"We had high hopes
that we'd see some effi-
cacy but we did not," said
Dr. Joseph Quinn, an
author of the $10 million
.study and a researcher at
Oregon Health and Science
University.
The 'results with pills
containing DHA, an omega-
3 fatty acid, highlight "the
continued frustration over
lack of effective interven-
tions" for the memory-
robbing disease, an edito-
rial said, published with
the study in Wednesday's
Journal of the American
Medical Association.
DHA occurs naturally in
the brain and is found in
reduced amounts in people
with Alzheimer's disease.
Some smaller, less rigor-
ous studies suggested that
mental decline could be
slowed or prevented by eat-
ing fish, the main dietary
source for omega-3 fatty
acids, or supplements like
fish oil pills that contain
fatty acids including DHA
The study used capsules
of DHA oil derived from
algae.
Omega-3 fatty acids in
fish or supplements have
been shown to help pro-
tect against heart disease
and are being studied for
possible effects on a range


of other illnesses including
cancer and depression.
The new research
involved nearly 300 men
and women aged 76 on
average with mild to mod-
erate Alzheimer's disease.
They were randomly
assigned to take either
DHAI pills or dummy pills
daily for 18 months.
Results were similar in
both groups; DHA provid-
ed no benefits in- slowing
Alzheimer's symptoms.
The pills also didn't work
even in a subgroup of par-
ticipants with the mildest
Alzheimer's symptoms.
"There is no basis for
recommending DHA sup-
plementation for patients
with Alzheimer disease,"
the authors concluded.
Given evidence that the
underlying process that
causes Alzheimer's begins
years, if not decades,
before diagnosis, starting
treatment after symptoms
appear may be too late,
said editorial author Dr.
Kristine Yaffe, a dementia
researcher at University
of California at San
Francisco.
The National Institute on
Aging paid for most of the
research. The rest came
from Martek Biosciences,


maker of the DHA pills
used in the study. Two
co-authors are Martek
employees and Quinn is an
unpaid consultant to the
company. Quinn and two
other study authors are
also inventors of a pat-
ent for using DHA pills
to treat Alzheimer with a
certain genetic variation.
Laurie Ryan, program
director of Alzheimer's
studies at the Institute on
Aging, called the results
discouraging. *
But she noted that the
institute is spending mil-
lions of dollars on research


into other possible treat-
ments including lifestyle
changes, drugs and bio-
markers that might lead
to more targeted drug
treatment.
William Thies, scientific
director of the Alzheimer's
Association, said the
results fit with new rec-
ommendations advocating
starting treatment in the
disease's earliest stages.
"It seems clear that
either we have to have
more powerful drugs or
they have to be used ear-
lier in the course of the
disease," Thies said.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424






LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010 7A





U.S. GOVERNMENT


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5 GOVERNMENT ISSUED GOLD COINS $756.85
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $31.00)
10 GOVERNMENT ISSUED GOLD COINS $1,513.70
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $36.00)
> DUE TO EXTREMELY HIGH GOLD DEMAND, GOLD COIN
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OFFER EXPIRES: DEC. 1, 2010


By Executive Order of Congress
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now buy new Government Issued Gold.


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AUTHRIZE BYCONGESSe OFICIA LEAL TNDE









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


BRIEFS

Pot activists vow
to push legalization

LOS ANGELES It
seemed an easy sell in
California: The state that
gave us medical marijuana
would allow pot for recre-
ation.
Then came the ads, news-
paper editorials and politi-
cians, warning of a world
where stoned drivers would
crash school buses, nurses
would show up at work high
and employers would be
helpless to fire drug-addled
workers.
A day after voters rejected
Proposition 19, marijuana
advocates wondered how
they failed in trendsetting,
liberal California.
Was it the fear of the
unknown? An older elector-
ate more likely to oppose
pot? Voters reluctant to
go any further than they
already had with the nation's
most lax pot laws? Fear of
crossing swords with a fed-
eral government still intent
on enforcing its ban on the
drug?
Whatever the reason,
activists vowed Wednesday
to push on in California,
as well as in states that
rejected other pot measures
Tuesday.

Box blades found
on Delta flight

PORTLAND, Ore.. -
Authorities said a Delta Air
Lines flight from Tokyo to
Oregon was searched upon
landing after its crew found
box cutter blades aboard.
Delta spokeswoman
Susan Elliott said the crew
of Delta Flight 90 requested
that authorities meet the air-
craft upon arrival at Portland
International Airport after
the blades were found in
the plane's cabin while en
route to Oregon.
She said the flight arrived
without incident Tuesday
morning.
FBI spokeswoman Beth
Anne Steele said all 155 pas-
sengers and 10 crew mem-
bers were interviewed as
baggage and the plane were
searched.

GOP bags at least
10 governorships
WASHINGTON Repub-
licans captured Democratic
governorships in at least 10
states on Tuesday, includ-
ing some prime presidential
battlegrounds, and hoped
for even more statehouse
gains.
The same tide sweeping
Republicans into office in
Congress was leaving its
mark on governors' man-
sions as well, especially in
the nation's industrial heart-
land.
Changing hands in the,
GOP onslaught: gover-
norships now held by
Democrats in Pennsylvania,
Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin,
Iowa, Tennessee, Kansas,
Oklahoma, New Mexico
and Wyoming.
In Ohio, a state viewed
by both parties as crucial
to the 2012 'presidential
election, former Rep. John
Kasich defeated Gov. Ted
Strickland. Republican
Susana Martinez won the
New Mexico governorship
she is the first Latina
chief executive of a state -
and will succeed Democratic
Gov. Bill Richardson.

Mountain lion seen
near bus stop

HELENA. Mont. A


group of children waitl-
ing for their school bus
Wednesday morning got a
shock when they spotted
a mountain lion in a field
just 200 feet from their stop
along a rural route.
The bus driver and the
children saw the wild ani-
mal at about the. same
time as the bus was pull-*
ing up to the stop south
of Missoula, said Robert
Mitchell, general manager
of the bus company, Beach
Transportation.
* Associated Press


Obama signals compromise with GOP


By DAVID ESPO
and JULIE PACE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
chastened President
Barack Obama signaled
a willingness to compro-
mise with Republicans on
tax cuts and energy policy
Wednesday, one day after
his party lost control of the
House and suffered deep
Senate losses in midterm
elections.
Obama ruefully called
the Republican victories "a
shellacking" and acknowl-
edged that his own con-
nection with the public had
frayed.
At a White House news
conference, the president
said that when Congress
returns,' "my goal is to
make sure we don't have
a huge spike in taxes for
middle class families." He
made no mention of his
campaign-long insistence
that tax cuts be permitted
to expire on upper-income
families, a position he said
would avoid swelling the
deficit but put him in con-
flict with Republicans.
He also virtually aban-
doned his legislation -
hopelessly stalled in the
Senate featuring eco-
nomic incentives to reduce
carbon emissions from
power plants, vehicles and
other sources.
"I'm going to be looking
for other means of address-
ing this problem," he said.
"Cap and trade was just one


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama answers questions during a news conference in the East Room of
the White House in Washington on Wednesday.


way of skinning the cat,"
he said, strongly implying
there will be others.
In the campaign,
Republicans slammed the
bill as a "national energy
tax" and jobs killer, and
numerous Democrats
sought to emphasize their
opposition to the measure
during their own re-elec-
tion races.
The president opened
his post-election news con-
ference by saying voters
who felt frustrated by the
sluggish pace of economic
recovery had dictated the
Republican takeover in the
House.


Asked to reflect on the
returns, he said, "I feel
bad," adding that many
Democrats who went
down to defeat had done
so knowing they risked
their careers to support his
agenda of economic stimu-
lus legislation and a land-
mark health care bill. He
blamed himself, in part.
"The relationship that
I've had with the American
people is one that built
slowly, peaked at this
incredible high, and then-
during the course of the
last two years, as we've
together gone through
some very difficult times,


has gotten rockier and
tougher," Obama said.
Criticized at times for
appearing detached and
aloof, Obama spoke about
the challenges he's faced
in engaging the American
people from the often insu-
lar White House.
"When I'm out of this
place, that's not an issue,"
Obama said. "When you're
in this place, it is hard not
to seem removed."
.The president said he
was eager to sit down with
the leaders of both politi-
cal parties "and figure out
how we can move forward
together."


"It won't be easy," he
said, noting the two parties
differ profoundly in some
key areas.
One controversial issue,
the president said he saw
a possibility that Congress
might agree to overturn
the military's ban on open-
ly gay service members
when lawmakers return
to the Capitol for -a post-
election session later this
month.
The election was a
humbling episode for the
once-high-flying president,
and the change. showed
during his news confer-
ence. Largely absent
were his smiles and buoy-
ant demeanor, replaced
by somberness and an
acknowledgment that his
policies may have alien-
ated some Americans.
"I think people started
looking at. all this, and it
felt.as if government was
getting much more intru-
sive into people's lives than
they were accustomed to,"
he conceded. But he wasn't
talking surrender either.
He sought to tread a
careful line, suggesting
he would cooperate with
Republicans where it was
possible and confront them
when it was not.
"No one party will be
able to dictate where we go
from here," he said, a clear
warning to Republicans
that he won't simply bow to
their demands for a sharp-
ly conservative switch in
economic policy.


Fed to buy $600B in bonds to aid economy


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON-
The Federal Reserve
announced a bold plan,
Wednesday to try to invig-
orate the economy by buy-
ing $600 billion, more in
Treasury'bonds.
The Fed said it would buy
about $75 billion a month
in long-term government
bonds through the middle
of 2011 to further drive
down interest rates on mort-
gages and other debt This
is in addition to an expected
$250 billion to $300 billion
in Fed purchases over the
same period from reinvest-
ing proceeds from its mort-
gage portfolio.
The idea is for cheap-
er loans to get people to
spend more and stimulate
hiring. The Fed said it will
monitor whether adjust-
ments are needed depend-
ing on how the economy
is performing.
Some worry the Fed
action will do little to boost
the economy because
interest rates are already
historically low. Others
fear the bond purchases


could drive inflation too
high over the long term and
unleash speculative buying
in assets like stocks.
The stock markets,
which had priced in the
Fed's move for weeks,
didn't move much after the
announcement. The Dow
Jones industrial average
fell 26 points soon after-
ward.
But the 30-year Treasury
bond, which will not be
among the bonds tar-
geted by the Fed's pur-
chases, sank more than a
point. It yield jumped to
4.02 percent, up from 3.86
percent shortly before the
announcement.
In announcing the action,


the Fed said the pace of the
economy continues to be
slow. Companies remain
reluctant to hire, housing
activity is depressed and
consumers are increasing
their spending only gradu-
ally.
Thomas Hoenig, presi-
dent of the Federal Reserve
Bank of Kansas City, dis-
sented for the seventh
straight meeting. He says
the risks of the Fed's
extra stimulus outweigh
the potential benefits.
With the economy
weak, the Fed is aim-
ing to avoid the kind of
economic stagnation and
deflation problems that
gripped Japan and led to


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a "lost decade" during the
1990s.
Deflation is a widespread
and prolonged drop in pric-
es of goods and services,
in wages and in the val-
ues of homes and stocks.
Deflation makes it harder
for people and companies
to pay their debts, push-


ing up home evictions and
bankruptcies.
Fed policymakers
expressed disappointment
that they haven't been able
to reduce unemployment
- now at 9.6 and raise
inflation to levels more in
line with a healthy econ-
omy.

I1


/-tionor


I 'Our



Th- menand womeneroes!
T he men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From -the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.












-I





Thank you for
ears of service.
We Salue You
Lote Eileen
actual size


YourName: ....... .... . .. .... .
Address: .... ..... .. ... .. .. .... ..
Town: ....Stae: .. Zip:- ..- .._
Daytime Phone: ...
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: Doles Served:
i i ,1 ... ..1. .. o ,, I a. h, | i i i.,n. r, I ) IS:. LDui;d& l;k [ iu t. I i Wi, .i )-i lH o( r nhI))more il]i).
Submiissions mistlbe received li y 3:31)Ipm., Mnds ay i. 11 pholo' A l h rlisruniud r tun ied nliiluing SASE 1li ynour eno .
Lake City Reporter M-F 8am 5pmn


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Lake City Reporter


'Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Thursday. November 4, 2010


Swww.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS FOOTBALL
Old Tigers
photos sought
The public is invited
to bring old Columbia
High football photos to
the Columbia County
Quarterback Club booth
at the Columbia County
Fair from 5-9 p.m. today.
Submissions will be used
in the 100 Years of Tiger
Football Celebration
planned in 2011. Photos
will be scanned at the
booth and returned.
For details, call Jen
Chasteen at 288-2500.
SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons plan
holiday bowl
The Lake City Falcons
.semi-pto football team is
sponsoring a
holiday bowl on Dec. 4 at
Memorial Stadium. The
Falcons will be joined
by seven teams, playing
for first-, second- and
third-place trophies.
Games begin at 10 a.m.
Admission is $5 for
adults, and $3 for seniors
and children younger
than 10. Conditioning
and practices are under
way for the Falcons at
5:30 p.m. Wednesday
and Sundays at the
Richardson Community
Center .field.
For details, call Elaine
Ortiz Harden at 292-3039
or (386) 438-5728, or Luis
Santiago at 292-4138.
TIGERS SOCCER
Breakfast at
Kazbor's Grille
Columbia High's
boys soccer team has a
breakfast fundraiser from
7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday
at Kazbor's Grille in Lake
City Commons. Tickets
are $6 at the door or
from team members.
For details, call
(386) 365-1877.
TRAINING
Outer Extreme
class offered
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department is
offering Outer Extreme,
a high intensity workout
using a combination
of training techniques.
Classes are 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays outside of
Teen Town Recreation
Center. Cost is $5 per
class or $45 per month.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
From staff reports

GAMES
Today
Fort White High
cross country in District
2-2A meet at Bishop
Kenny High, girls-
4:30 p.m., boys-5 p.m.
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
swimming in Region
1-2A meet at Panama City
Beach Aquatic Center,
9 a.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Wolfson High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
cross country in District
2-3A meet at Ridgeview
High, girls-8 a.m.,


boys-8:45 a.m.


Tornado



warnings


Bradford riding
five-game
winning streak.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE It has
been a season of up-and-
down performances for
Bradford High, but the
Tornadoes have come out
on top most of the time.
Fort White High (5-3,
3-1) hosts Bradford (7-2,
3-1) at 7:30 p.m. Friday with
the District 2-2B runner-up
spot on the line.
Fort White dominated


the game last year in Starke,
winning 35-7. Alex Gilmer
had a couple of touchdown
passes to Alexis Blake and
Blake also ran 'in a score.
Both Kevin Calhoun and
Edward Jachin Alexander
recovered bad snaps on
punts for touchdowns.
Donelle Williams was
the offense for Bradford
with 152 yards on 16 car-
ries and two catches for 30
yards. He is but one of the
players in the offense
installed by new head coach
Derek Chipoletti.
Chipoletti was brought
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Soron Williams (21) and Adonis Simmons (50) look to sack East Gadsden High's
quarterback during a game on Oct. 22.


Pop Warner




celebrates season


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Pop Warner Association had its 2010 football banquet on Tuesday. Association members and guests are
secretary Kim Stephens (from left), president Mario Coppock, guest speaker Craig Howard, master of ceremonies Alvin
Baker and Peewees head coach Richard Keen.

Association has year-end banquet at Hopeful


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Pop
Warner Association
celebrated its football
season with a banquet at
Hopeful Baptist Church on
Tuesday.
Pastor Alvin Baker of
New Bethel Missionary


Baptist Church served
as master of ceremonies.
Baker also is president of
the Richardson Community
Center Annie Mattox North
Advisory Council, which
is a sponsor of the Pop
Warner program.
The program expanded
from two teams to four
teams this season and all


the players, coaches, team
moms and "spotters" were
introduced. All the play-
ers received trophies, and
several special awards were
presented.
Unard Johnsbn, school
board member and board
member of the RCC/AMN
council, welcomed the
crowd.


"Football develops the
idea of family as it relates
to teamwork," Johnson
said. "It teaches play-
ers to be disciplined and
determined."
Columbia High head
coach Craig Howard was
guest speaker.
BANQUET continued on 2B


CHS

falls in

home

opener

Lady Tigers'
soccer even at 1-1
early into. season.
By BRANDON FINLEY-'"
bfinley.@lakecityreporter.com
.Columbia High's Lady
Tiger soccer program
opened the regular sea-
son with a win, but fell 0-4
against Gainesville High on
Tuesday to even its mark
at 1-1.
The Lady Tigers picked
up a 2-1 victory at Hamilton
County High on Tuesday
with 'goals from Joanne
Ortiz and and Lucie Faris.
Haley Dicks had an assist
on the Ortiz goal.
In the first district match
of the season and the home
opener, the Lady Tigers
didn't hold up as well.
Columbia held strong
until the final minutes after
a 1-0 halftime lead by the
Lady Hurricanes off a goal
in the first two minutes by
Megan Foster.
Foster scored against
with 14 minutes remaining
for a 2-0 lead and Gainesville
was able to run away with
the game at the end.
Sydney Kruljac and Casey
Troano added late goals
for the Lady Hurricane
program.


Columbia saying *

enough is enough p
-Is


tigers take on
Wolfson in final
district game.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The chances remain slim,
but Columbia High's play-
off chances remain alive.
As the final week arrives
in District 4-4A play, the
Tigers need a win coupled
with a Ridgeview High loss
in order to remain alive.
Ridgeview takes on Lee
High in a district matchup
that the Tigers will have
their eye on. The Tigers
defeated Lee earlier this sea-
son, but lost to Ridgeview.
If Lee comes out on top
Friday, the three teams will
be involved in a playoff tie-
breaker.


But first, Columbia must
take care of Wolfson High at
7:30 p.m. Friday in its final
district contest. In order to
win, the Tigers must find a
way to correct the mistakes
on offense that have led to a
four-game losing streak.
"We keep getting bit by
the turnover bug," Columbia
coach Craig Howard said.
"We've got a lot of youth,
but after a while youth isn't
youth anymore. Wolfson is
as young as we are. We've
got to get to a point where
enough is enough. Pride
must matter."
Howard points to the
University of Florida as an
example of what the Tigers
are going through.
"It's just like the Gators,"
he said. "They had to
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members from Columbia High and Ridgeview High converge into a pile in the middle of the
field as a Ridgeview High player attempts to gain yards on Oct. 8.


'











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN Georgia Tech atVirginia Tech
GOLF
4:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Charles
Schwab Cup Championship, first round,
at San Francisco
12 Midnight
TGC -- PGA Tour/WGC, HSBC
Champions, second round, at Shanghai
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT New York at Chicago
10:30 p.m.
TNT Oklahoma City at Portland
SOCCER
8 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, playoffs, conference
semifinals, second leg, San Jose at New
York

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Sunday's Games
Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p.m.
N.Y Jets at Detroit, I p.m.
Miami at Baltimore, I p.m.
Sin Diego at Houston, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
New England at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota, I p.m".
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis,
Jacksonville, San Francisco, Tennessee
Thursday's Game
Baltimore at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 14
Minnesota at Chicago, I p.m.
Tennessee at Miami, I p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. I5
Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay,
New Orleans

College scores

Tuesday
Arkansas St. 51, Middle Tennessee 24

College games
Today
Georgia Tech (5-3) at Virginia Tech
(6-2), 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo (2-6) at Ohio (6-3), 7:30 p.m.
Friday
W. Michigan (3-5) at Cent. Michigan
(I-8),6 p.m.


UCF (6-2) at Houston (5-3),
8 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
AAA Texas 500
Site: Fort Worth,Texas:
Schedule: Friday,. practice (Speed,
3-4:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 4:30-
6 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed,
9:30 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race, 3. p.m.
(ESPN, 2-7 p.m.).
Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 501 miles, 334 laps.
Next race: Kobalt Tools 500, Nov. 14,
Phoenix International Raceway, Avondale,
Ariz.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
O'Reilly Auto Parts Challenge
Site: Fort Worth,Texas.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
10-11:30 a.m., 1:30-3 p.m.), qualifying;
Saturday, race, 12:55 p.m. (ESPN2, noon-
3:30 p.m.).
Track:Texas Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: WYPALL 200, Nov. 13,
Phoenix International Raceway, Avondale,
Ariz.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
WinStarWorld Casino 350K
Site: Fort Worth,Texas.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualify-
ing,; Friday, race, 9 p.m. (Speed, 8:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 220.5 miles, 147 laps.
Next race: Lucas Oil 150, Nov. 12,
Phoenix International Raceway, Avondale,
Ariz.
FORMULA ONE
Brazilian Grand Prix
Site: Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
noon- 1:30 p.m.), Saturday, practice,
qualifying (Speed, noon- 1:30 p.m.); Sunday,
race, II a.m. (Speed, 10:30-1 p.m.).
Track: Interlagos, Autodromo Jose
Carlos Pace (road course, 2.677 miles).
Race distance: 190:08 miles, 71 laps.
Next race: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix,
Nov. 14, Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates.
Online: http://www.ormulo l.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Next event: Automobile Club of
Southern California NHRA Finals,
Nov. 11-14, Auto Club Raceway at
Pomona, Pomona, Calif.
Online: http://www.nhra.com

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Atlanta 100, Cleveland 88
Washington 116, Philadelphia 1I15, OT
Boston 109, Detroit 86
Miami 129, Minnesota 97
Orlando at New York, ppd.
Portland 90, Milwaukee 76
LA. Lakert 124, Memphis 105 .
Wednesday's Games
Detroit at Atlanta (n)
Charlotte at New Jersey (n)
Minnesota at Orlando (n)


Indiana at Philadelphia (n)
Milwaukee at Boston (n)
New Orleans at Houston (n)
Dallas at Denver (n)
Toronto at Utah (n)
San Antonio at Phoenix (n)
Memphis at Golden State (n)
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers (n)
LA. Lakers at Sacramento (n)
Today's Games
New York at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Miami at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Boston, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Toronto at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Ottawa 3,Toronto 2
Columbus 3, Montreal 0
Minnesota I, San Jose 0
Vancouver 4, Edmonton 3
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Buffalo (n)
Toronto at Washington (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Carolina (n)
Atlanta at Florida (n)
New Jersey at Chicago (n)
Pittsburgh at Dallas (n)
Detroit at Calgary (n)
Nashville at Phoenix (n)
Tampa Bay ataAnaheim (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Boston atWashington, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Anaheim, 10 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS playoffs

Semifinals
EASTERN CONFERENCE
NewYork vs. San Jose
NewYork I, San Jose 0
Today
New York vs San Jose, 8 p.m.
Columbus vs. Colorado
'Colorado'I,Columbus 0
Saturday
Columbus vs. Colorado, 4 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas
FC Dallas 2, Real Salt Lake I.
Saturday
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles vs. Seattle
Los Angeles I, Seattle 0


Results of final slate of 2010 points
races at Columbia Motorsports Park
on Oct. 30:
SPORTSMAN
1. #07 Jeff Prescott, 2. #16m
Patrick Mennenga, 3. #16 Brian
Hull, 4. #11 Cody Clark, 5. #14, Oral
Tanner, 6. #06 Josh Wise, 7. #1m Matt
Walker, 8. #1F Robert Ford, 9. #15
Jim Higginbotham.
Heat winners: Prescott,
Mennenga.
PURE STOCK
1. #12 Jason Garver, 2. #39 Tim
Alldredge, 3. #18 John Roling, 4. #16
Mike Johnson, 5. #96 Don Cruce, 6.
#22 Randy O'Neal.
Heat winner: Garver.
V8 BOMBERS
1. #58 Larry Welter Jr., 2. #85 Larry
Welter Sr., 3. #28 Tony Deas, 4. #54
Eric Hoffman, 5. #77 Dan Berkowitz,
6. #76 Andy Nichols-DNS.
Heat winner: Welter Jr.


HORNETS 96 Don Cruce 589
1. #98 Tony Kuhr, 2. #69 Mark 15 Justin Ellison 280
Copeland, 3. #46 Kimberly Alldredge, 27 Nathan Huffingharn 46
4. #7 Tyler Prescott, 5. #60 Doyle E-MODS
O'Bryant, 6. #02 Mike Creech, 7. #11 01 J.F.McClellan 636 (10)
Preston Fletcher. 6 Mickey Wright 466
Heat winner: Kuhr. 31 Heather Bell 240 (1)
85 Wayne Parker 180 (1)
The final FASCAR points at 26 Jason Garver 118 (1)
Columbia Motorsports Park: FV-8 BOMBERS
SPORTSMAN 76 Andy Nichols 721(4)
16 Brian Hull 967(3) 27 Nathan Huffingham 603 (3)
8 Wesley Keller 781 (8) 22 Stan Lang 546 (5)
06 Josh Wise 471 16 Brian Hull 283 (1)
76 Jim Higginbotham 415 3 A.C.Morrow 227
1F Bobby Ford 392 54 Eric Hofmann 215
1M Matt Walker 301 76 Tony Kuhr 37
121 Gordon Cade 178 HORNETS
20 Tony Kuhr 121 2 Bert Daugherty 631 (7)
74 Jason Garver 53 46 Kim Alldredge 584 (1)
90 Jeff Cole 5 1 Donald Davis 269
PURE STOCK 44 Carl Taylor 240
39 Tim Alldredge 973 (7) 46 Tony Kuhr 67
12 Jason Garver 792 (12) 06 Josh Wise 16


BANQUET Players invited to CHS game


Continued From Page 1B

Howard told the players
to view their trophies with
an eye to the future.
"Let the trophy signify
the greater things you can
achieve through playing
football," Howard said. "It
can open doors for you.
The first thing is to be
great in academics. That
is the door that allows us
to play."
Howard advised the
young athletes to play as
many sports as they can
and for as long as they
can.
"Always be involved in
sports," Howard said. "Be
the hardest worker, best
hustler and most coachable
player you can be. Be the
MVP on your team. With


spirit, enthusiasm and love
for the game, you can make
those around you better."
Howard said everyone
can't be a (Columbia High
Division I prospect) Tim,
Jernigan or (Heisman
Trophy winner) Tim
Tebow, both of whom he
coached.
"It takes doing the extra
things," Howard said.
"You don't see all the hard
work they do behind the
scenes."
Howard invited all the
players and families to the
Tigers game on Friday.
Players wearing their jer-
seys will be admitted free.
The Tiny Mites team will
play an exhibition game
during halftime.


All American Scholar
Award winners were
Ronnie Collins Jr., Ethan
Goodrich, Kaleb Thomas,
Aaron Barber and Henry
Godbolt The Pop Warner
award is for fifth-graders or
older who achieve 95 per-
cent of their Grade Point
Average.
Association president
Mario Coppock presented a
special award to Stephens,
who in turn gave a.recogni-
tion award to Richardson
Community Center
secretary Nicole Smith.
Richard Keen received a
special award for years of
.coaching and his Peewee
Tigers placing second in
the league championship
game.


CHS: Scout team giving extra looks


Continued From Page 1E

make big plays to beat
-Georgia. They got to the
point where enough was
enough."
Howard knows that the
playoff chances are dwin-
dling, but that doesn't mean
the Tigers lack goals with
the remaining two games
of the season.
"We can still finish 6-4
and perhaps as the run-
ner-up," he said. "We have
to go out and play the last
two games. We've had good
practices. The young guys


are laying it all on the line.
I'm proud of our players
and staff."
Howard believes that the
time the young players are
putting in with the scout
team will help the Tigers
in preparation. Some play-
ers might even see playing
time.
"Braxton Stockton is
doing a fantastic job," he
said. "Among the scout
players, the young quarter-
back J.T. Bradley is doing
well. You've got Dougan


Dotson and David Pierce
doing a good job. The goal
is to get as much experi-
ence for these guys as we
can. I believe we'll play like
we practice."
With the extra players
helping out, Columbia
should have a better look
at Wolfson due to the
scout team. It could be the
extra look the Tigers need
to get back, on the win-
ning track after slipping to
a 4-4 record and 1-2 in the
district.


INDIANS: Winner makes state playoffs


Continued From Page 1B


in from Williston High by
Bradford athletic director
and dad, Neal Chipoletti.
The senior Chipoletti was a
head coach at Orange Park
and Fleming Island high
schools, and is handling the
defense for the Tornadoes.
To complete the genera-
tional juggernaut, Austin
Chipoletti is running the
offense.
Bradford opened the
season with wins over
Keystone Heights and
Fernandina Beach high
schools, then dropped a pair
to Baker County High and
Taylor County High. Taylor
County blocked a punt out
of the end zone with 43 sec-
onds left in the game for the
go-ahead points in a 16-14
win.
Five victories have fol-
lowed, but some not so
impressive.
Bradford beat one-win
Santa Fe High,'20-10, and
had to overcome an 18-7
halftime deficit (24-13 in the
fourth quarter) to nip Union
'County High, 25-24.
The Tornadoes avoid-
ed overtime against P.K.
Yonge School when the
Blue Wave's two-point pass
conversion was negated by
a penalty. Bradford won 21-
19 against the school that
forfeited several games
because of lack of players.
Bradford had a solid 18-
3 home win over Florida
High and outscored East
Gadsden High, 42-34, on
the road to set up the game
with Fort White. The win-
ner advances to the state
playoffs.
Dexter Clayton, who
picked off a pass against
Fort White last year, has
handled much of the run-


ning. He had 153 yards
against Fernandina and 146
yards against both Santa
Fe and Union County (two
touchdowns).
Williams scored the win-
ning touchdown against
Union County on a five-
yard run with 2:33 left in
the game. He had touch-
down runs against Santa Fe
and Florida High and ran
back an interception for a
touchdown against Taylor
County.
Ya'Keem Griner, who
committed to Florida
International, has been a
favorite receiver. He had a
49-yard touchdown catch
against EK. Yonge and
two TD catches against
Santa Fe.
Tramaine Harris had
punt-return touchdowns
against Fernandina Beach



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

I SLURY I


BRUMEN I



SHUBLE
7" ^" st "


and Taylor County. He had
touchdown catches against;
Fernandina Behch and
Union County, and lastweek
caught seven passes for 178
yards and two touchdowns.
Chipoletti was 12 of
13 in the East Gadsden
game, for 227 yards and
three touchdowns. He
had 100-yard passing
games against Keystone
Heights and Union County.
Cameron Moore and Dylan
Manning are on the offen-
sive line.
John Clark and Adrian
Mosley are returning
linebackers, along with
Williams. Devon Paulk had
an interception for a touch-
down.
Isaiah Jamison had a
92-yard kickoff return
for a touchdown against
Fernandina Beach.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


I'WHAT THE CITY
FATHERS U5EP TO
CLEAN UP AFTER THEE
WINTER 5TORM,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GROIN DOUBT INDOOR SEPTIC
I Answer: Why some coffee tastes like mud -
IT'S "GROUND"


ACROSS 39
40
1 Tableau 42
6 Long, thin cuts 44
11 Volcano fea-
ture 46
12 Crusty roll 51
13 Fast-food free- 54
bies 55
14 Rock
tumbler stones 56
15 Likes and dis-
likes 57
16 Way off
17 Canal 58
device
19 Location
23 Interest amt
26 One on a string
28 Apprehend 1
29 South Seas 2
paradise 3
31 Houston pro 4
33 Consummate 5
34 Stone of 6
"Basic 7
Instinct" 8
35 Monk's title 9
36 Bronze coin 10


Period
Honor in style
Toe pain
"Make" or
"break"
Should
Outfit
Silk source
Team
symbol
Finally
(2 wds.)
Byron and
Browning
Largest mam-
mal

, DOWN

Tijuana Ms.
Gas-guzzlers
Coup d'-


Answer to Previous Puzzle

TOME SHARD
DEBARK LOANED
OLIVER UNZ IPS
GLEE IAN ELS
RASCAL
IS TRACTS
ERISPOOHS
TENE




MU FFIN ESTATE
ERRORS KEENER
MOOSE ADAM


Banister post
Hosp. areas 11 Iowa hrs.
Long story 12 "The Trial"
Fibbers, plus author
Ego ending 16 Queen beater
Peg for Woods 18 Ginza
12th-graders purchase


Want more puzzles?.
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI
11 12 13 14 15 @ 6 17 18 19 110 I


20 Survey course
21 Fortune-tell-
er's card
22 Deep black
23 Chaplain
24 Dishonest one
25 Aunt, in
Madrid
27 Telegraph syl-
lable
,29 Squabble
30 RNs' supply
32 Like some
excuses
34 R-V connector
37 Long-legged
bird
38 San Francisco
hill
41 Remove a
renter
43 Fang
45 Psyche's suit-
or
47 Bruins sch.
48 Objective
49 Vacuum part
50 Explosive let-
ters
51 Fuse word
52 Cosmic force
53 Mao -tung
54 Raven's call


11-4 2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


CMP RESULTS, POINTS WINNERS


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor. Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010 3B


DILBERT
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BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
BUMSTEAD, YEAH, GUESS
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SAY THAT I'M JUST BACK
YOU'O LIKE TO FROM MY COFFEE
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HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


B.C.


Ij Dlt. byCretors Syndicate


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Family tie is abruptly cut

for no apparent reason


DEAR ABBY: I am
writing about the letter
you printed from "Haven't
a Clue in New York" (Sept.
10), whose friend "Pam"
stopped speaking to her
with no explanation. A
member of my family,
"Trish," did that to my hus-
band and me three years
ago. We tried to find out
what we had done, but
Trish's husband my hus-
band's brother kept mak-
ing excuses and insisting
everything was fine.
Trish had told me pre-
viously that she had cut
people out of' her life, so
I guess this is just some-
thing that she does. Re-
gardless, it hurts.
She and her husband
were very kind and help-
ful to us when we. moved
to this area. I valued her
friendship and had great
respect for her. Even now I
feel more pain and sadness
for the loss of Trish in our
lives than anger toward
her.
-"Haven't a Clue" must
try to not take it personally.
What happened is probably
more about Pam than it is
about her. DUMPED
IN DIXIE
DEAR DUMPED: I


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
agree and thank you for
your comments. I received
many thoughtful replies
from readers who, like
you, have "been there."
Read on:
DEAR ABBY: If
"Haven't a Clue" just lets
things lie, further dam-
age might be done to their
friendship that could be
avoided. She should send
her friend a letter explain-
ing that she has no idea
what might have happened
to cause the rift, that the
relationship is important
to her and she hopes Pam
will tell her what happened
sb she'll have the opportu-
nity to resolve the issue.
Letting things stay as
they are and not contact-
ing Pam could cause her to
stew angrily on the issue
until the friendship is dam-
aged beyond repair. Better
to reach out to her friend
now to see if the situation
can be improved, than to
hope the storm blows over


on its own. REBECCA
IN NORTH CAROLINA
DEAR ABBY: In her
letter, "Haven't" said her
neighbors suspected an
infidelity issue was at the
heart of the rift. In my
case, my friend's husband
HAD made a pass at me
which I rejected. Shortly
after, she stopped speak-
ing to me. When mutual
friends intervened, she
would change the subject.
I continued to send
birthday and holiday
cards (with no response)
and moved several states
away. After a few years, I
called. When I asked what-
the problem was and what
could we do to resolve it, I
was told, "I can't deal with
your drama!" and she hung
up.
Abby, I had seen her
through two marriages, a
divorce, her father's death
and many other stressful
life experiences. I finally
realized, as you have ad-
vised many times in your
column, I'm better off with-
out her. MOVED ON
IN NASHVILLE
* Write Dear Abby at
www.7DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't stop be-
lieving in who you are and
what you can do. Serious
hard work will lead to a
partnership that will con-
tribute to your professional
and personal well-being.
Success is heading your
way. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Shake off any
feelings of insecurity and
bravely move forward.
Take aggressive action to-
ward your goal. Love is in
the stars. Don't be fooled
by someone asking for too_
much. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Smart, swift and
serviceable will be what's
required. Focus on what's
important to you. Disci-
pline, coupled with under-
standing and empathy will
help you keep emotional
things running smoothly.
Your creativity will separate
you from the competition.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You have lots of
opportunities if you are will-
ing to implement a couple of
changes into your current
lifestyle. Don't let someone
else's burden stop you from
following a path that can
bring happiness and satis-
faction. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Chances are, you
missed a very small but


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

important detail that could
cost you financially or emo-
tionally. Don't take any-
one's word when it comes
to contractual agreements,
especially if it has to do
with your home, family or
finances. Do your own re-
search. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Take on a new pas-
time or pick up skills that
will help you get ahead pro-
fessionally, personally or fi-
nancially. There is a change
heading your way regard-
ing the way you handle
others as well as h5w you
handle your money. Better
times are ahead. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't allow anyone
to stifle your actions or si-
lence you when you have
something important to
contribute. Stand up for
your beliefs, opinions and
what you want to pursue.
Once you eliminate what is
making life so complicated,
you will find success. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Put a little fun
back into your life. Life
is about balance. You'll
make a better impression
on friends and colleagues
if you share a little down-
time. Get to know people
better and you will succeed.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll find
it difficult to sit still, so get
out your to-do list and start
checking off your accom-
plishments. Idle time will
result in discord. Rely on
your stamina and know-
how to impress, and your
diplomacy to keep you out
of trouble. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Put your
emotions on the back burn-
er and look at whatever you
face practically. There is a
logical answer for every-
thing. Use past references
to make the right decision
now. Look up an old friend
with something to contrib-
ute to a project. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): It's better to do
what you can to get ahead
and to finish what you start
before sharing what you are
up to. Discipline will build
your confidence and add
to your credentials. Work
and money will go hand in
hand. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't get
angry or tie yourself up in
arguments that will lead
nowhere. Concentrate on
deals and financial gains.
There is money heading
your way. Love is promi-
nent. Consider making a
move. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: 0 equals C
"S ZBX'K KTSXU SK'J N DBBZ
NKKSKCZY SX ABCM WSEY KB EYYW
KTNK ABC TNGY KB PY MSOT KB


TNGY JYWE-YJKYYI. "


K BI LY K K A


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Hopefully, generations after us will continue to
protect, preserve, and look after this wonderful land." Wilford Brimley
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-4


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
I'M So GL-RD THIT \ IT FEELS SO GOOD
DEC DED TO GO BAiCK, TO E. DOING SOME
STCO :aCOL. rTHINKING- RGRIN;


CLASSIC PEANUTS


THE CAFFEINE C'MON, BOSS! I
TALKING? TrAT MUST'VE USED
HAS TO BE YOUR HUNDREDS OF
LAMEST EXCUSE LAMER EXCUSES
EVER! 7 THAN THAT ONE





..4 I


'LL TAKE APPARENTLY THE
YOUR WOD CAFFEINE NEVER.
FOI, KNOWS WHEN TO
MY 5OY SHUT UP

*117,


i


MY' HMWSAMAN sPeAr oue HoPe-nEYMOOM
FULJO ON4 A N4eW' FETL,
W-AT sIAouL-D r .o .P




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MAIe I IT eN HIs uPerVWAR-
Pf-AWe .,









LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


Race: AAA Texas 500
Where: Texas Motor Speedway
When: Sunday, 3:00 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN
2009 winner: Kurt Busch (right)


Race: O'Reilly Auto Parts Challenge
Where: Texas Motor Speedway
When: Saturday, 12:00 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN2
2009 winner: Kyle Busch


k10.1II 1d J i KJI 1W K L'"l
Race: WinStar World Casino 350K
Where: Texas Motor Speedway
When: Friday, 8:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2009 winner: Kyle Busch


Cars drive four lanes wide in turn three during Sunday's AMP Energy Juice 500 atTalladega Superspeedway. (NASCAR photo)

Close in points, top three drive on to final three


The Talladega wild card has been
played, and there's still a close battle
for the 2010 Chase for the Sprint Cup.
After the top three drivers in the points
standings all finished in the top 10 in the
Amp Energy Juice 500 at Talladega
Superspeedway, the series heads into the
final three events with Jimmie Johnson
leading Denny Hamlin by 14 and Kevin
Harvick by 38.
That's the closest points margin among
the top three with three races to go since the
Chase format was adopted in 2004, and it's
exactly what NASCAR officials were looking
for when they instituted the 12-driver, 10-
race season-ending method of determining a
champion.
And as Harvick said, while sitting next to
Johnson in the press room after the race, it
opens the door for something that many of
the sport's fans badly want to see a differ-
ent champion.
"No offense to him, but somebody else
needs to win," Harvick said, looking over at
Johnson.
"Says who?" Johnson replied, laughing.
Then Harvick laid it out, laughing at
times but completely serious otherwise.
"Everybody but [Johnson and his team]
wants somebody else to win," Harvick said.
"I like Jimmie as good as anybody. But for
the sake of the sport, one of-the two of us
[Harvick or Hamlin] needs to make some-
thing happen. I can promise you that."
But Harvick said it won't be easy to knock
off a team that has won four straight titles
and has finishes of first, second, third, third,
fifth and seventh in the past six races.


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"When these guys have done what they've
done over the last four years ... the Chase
started, they're right back on track, it was
important for the two of us as teams -
speaking of the 29 and the 11 to go out
and knock those top fives off and not make
any mistakes," Harvick said. "When you go
back and look at the stats over the last four
years, top 10s do not cut it. You got to be in
the top five and being up front every week.
"It's the same pace that [Johnson's] had
this year, it's just the two of us have done a
lot of the same things ... It's important to'
continue to do that over the next three
weeks."
Johnson said he's not surprised the points
race is shaking out like it is.
"The way [Harvick] ran through the first
26 [regular season races], I would definitely
have picked [him]," Johnson said. "A lot of
people argued the point that us and


Clint Bowyer's Sunday win atTalladega still won't boost
him from twelfth place in Chase points. (NASCAR photo)


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[Hamlin's No. 11 team] were kind of out of
sorts when the Chase started. I think inside
the garage area, we all expected the 48 and
the 11 to be where they needed to. We ran
good the last couple races to show that
before the Chase started.
"These guys have been so consistent all
year, didn't matter if it was a short track, big
track, superspeedways. I'm not surprised to
be racing these two."
The way previous championship battles
have gone, it looks like there's a good chance
the title won't be decided until the final lap
of the final race at Homestead-Miami
Speedway, and it looks like the three now at
the top of the heap are the only ones left
with a realistic chance to win the title.
The 12th-place driver in the Chase, Clint
Bowyer, got the victory at Talladega, one
that took officials some time to determine as
the race ended under caution for a wreck in
Turn One on the last lap, but he's out of the
title hunt after being docked 150 points for a
problem on his car following his victory in
the Chase opener at New Hampshire.
His win didn't even move him out of the
12th spot in the standings.
Fourth-place Jeff Gordon is 207 points out
of the lead, and fifth-place Kyle Busch is 230
back. From Tony Stewart in seventh on
down, the rest of the Chasers are more than
300 points behind.
"We really have been out of it the last few ,
weeks," Gordon said. "So I feel like you are
going to have guys like us trying to win, and
then you are going to have those three
[Johnson, Hamlin and Harvick] really bat-
tling it out."


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2010 CHASE

CONTENDERS
Points standings, race results from Sundovy'
AMP Energy Juice 500 at Talladega
and commentary by Rick Minter
1. Jimmie Johnson 6,149 (finished seventh)
He rode around in the back for most of the
race, but was as high as first late in the race A
lack of drafting partners hurt him at the end
but he still added eight points to his lead with
three races to go.
2. Denny Hamlin -14 (finished ninth)
He got a lap down at one point but got the
"Lucky Dog" free pass and returned to lead the
race. But in the end, like Johnson, he couldn't
find a fast drafting partner for the finish
3. Kevin Harvick -38 (finished second)
He's become one of the sport's best restric-
tor-plate racers, and it looked for a time lke
he'd won another one. "It's just one of those
deals where we've won a few by a few inches
and we've lost a few."
4. Jeff Gordon -207 (finished eighth)
He pushed his teammate Johnson to the
front late in the race, but an apparent prob-
lem with his engine kept him from challeng-
ing for the win, which is what he was shoot-
ing for since he's too far back realistically to
worn' about winning the Chase.
5. Kyle Busch -230 (finished 25th)
He had a much faster car than the results
show. "We could lead. We could push really
good, but circumstances at the end just did-
n't work out for us," said crew chief Dave
Rogers.
6. Carl Edwards -247 (finished 17th)
He said it was a hard-fought battle all day.
"The points are so close, not just among the
leaders, but the rest of us as well. It's high
stakes, high stress and a very, very small
race track."
7. Tony Stewart -317 (finished 31st)
He got more than two laps down early
because of an unscheduled pit stop for a fat tire,
then battled back and was in position to win
before being collected in a last-lap crash.
8. Matt Kenseth -324 (finished 16th)
At times he looked pretty strong "It seemed
like we could be pretty competitive in exactly
, the right spot, but I had a real hard tune
maneuvering and rd get stalled out real bad."
9. Kurt Busch -350 (finished 30th)
Another disappointing day for a driver
many picked to make a strong bid for the title.
He was ready to rumble at the end, but got
shuffled back.
10. Jeff Burton--352 (finished 41st)
He's had one of the fastest cars most weeks
during the Chase, but doesn't have the finishes
to show for it.This time he was wrecked by Dale
Earnhardt Jr
11. GregBiffle-361 (finished 19th)
He was at the front late, but afterward about
the best he could say was that he didn't wreck.
T"I'm just happy I wasn't involved in anything.
We escaped that, but we wanted a better finish
than where we ended up"
12. Clint Bowyer -367 (finished first)
The race winner can only think about
"what if" he hadn't been penalized at New
Hampshire and had his Chase hopes dashed
before the title run had gotten into high gear.


MMMM


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 09-000535-CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB
Plaintiff,
vs.
PAUL P. SCANDIZZO AKA PAUL
SCANDIZZO, et. al.
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated October 25, 2010, and en-
tered in Case No. 09-000535-CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein FLAG-
STAR BANK, FSB, is a Plaintiff
and PAUL P. SCANDIZZO AKA
PAUL SCANDIZZO; DONA S.
SCANDIZZO AKA SHERRY
SCANDIZZO; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2
are the Defendants. P. DeWITT CA-
SON as The Clerk of the Circuit
Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at 173 NE HER-
NANDO AVENUE, COURT
ROOM 1, LAKE CITY, FL 32055,
at 11:00 a.m on January, 5th 2011,
the following described property as
set forth in said'Final Judgment, to
wit:
THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 9, HI-
DRI ACRES, UIT 1, ACCORDING
TO THE MAP OR PLAT THERE-
OF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 6, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
ckaim' within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 25th day of October,
2010.
P. DEWIT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 25th day of October,
2010.
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329

04542129
November 4, 11, 2010


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on No-
vember 12, 2010 at 9:00 am at Mini-
Storage & Record Storage of Lake
City, 442 SW Saint Margaret Street,
Lake. City, FL 32025; will, sell at
public sale by competitive bidding,
the personal property heretofore stor-
ed with the undersigned:
E-32 Aaron Rainbolt
E-33 Ester Brandon
F-07 Ron Schoeffler
F-10 Linda Jackson
G-01 Chavalla L Owens
H-01 Sharlene Williams
1-20 Nicole Harrelson
J-10 Brenda E Jefferson
K-25 Beverly Willis
L-01 Cathy Harry
L-07 Eduardo A Aymond
0-12 J David Clevenger
R-03 Lorida Cruz
R-19 Lavennia Hamilton
R-34 Wanda Gibson
S-07 Judith DeCoff
T-07 Brenda Johnson
T-19 Jeffery Williams
T-30 Joe Nelson
T-33 David Burkhalter
V-18 Brandon Brown
V-20 Rurmell McGee
W-10 Marty Moseley
W-13 Lisa Pendleton
X-28 Sheryl MacKay
Y-23 Raymond Meeks
Z-20 Celia Martinez
Z-25 Megen Rohrer
BB-32 David Wetherington
BB-37 Raymond Newton
CC-02 Dwane Dandy
CC-22 Kim Newton
EE-14 Kim Newton
FF-12 Ashley L Killebrew

04542094
October 28, 2010
November 04, 2010







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000475
DIVISION:
UCN: 122010CA000475XXCICI
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
TRACY A. WALTMAN A/K/A
TRACY A. COSTON;
Defendant
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO THE FOLLOWING DEFEND-
ANT:
TRACY A. WALTMAN A/K/A
TRACY A. COSTON
1281 SW BOBCAT DRIVE -FT.
WHITE, FL 46167
TRACY A. WALTMAN A/K/A
TRACY A. COSTON
121 MAPLE ST PITTSBORO, IN
46167
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
LOT SIXTY-NINE (69), SASSAF-
RAS ACRES, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
, THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGES 8 AND 8A, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on the
attorney for the Plaintiff:
VESCHIO LAW GROUP, LLC
2001 W. KENNEDY BLVD.
Tampa, FL 33606
on or before November 19, 2010, or
within 30 days of the first publica-
tion of this notice of action, and file
the Original with the Clerk of the
Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorneys or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
DATED ON October, 19, 2010
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
COLUMBIA County
P.O. DRAWER 2069
LAKE CITY, FL 32056
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE A.D.A.
ADMINISTRATOR FOR THE
CLERK OF THE COURT NOT
LATER THAN 7 DAYS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDING, AT

* IF HEARING IMPAIRED, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, VOICE 1-800-955-
8770. THIS IS NOT A COURT IN-
FORMATION LINE.

05524279
October 28, 2010
November 4, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM RUFUS SULLIVAN
Deceased,
File No. 10-233-CP
Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
WILLIAM RUFUS SULLIVAN, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
September 2, 2010, is pending in the
Circuit Court for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER T HE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is November 4, 2010
Personal Representative:
/s/ James E. Sullivan Jr.
117 Sharon Street
Interlachen, Florida 32148
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ 'John F. Sproull
Attorney for JAMES E. SULLIVAN,
JR.
Florida Bar Number 116239
314 St. Johns Avenue
Palatka, FL 32177
Telephone (386)325-5301
Fax: (386) 325-3049
E-Mail: SproullJohnFJr@Bell
South.net

05524352
November 4, 11, 2010
Public Auction
1996 Mercury 4 Dr
Vin#1MELM53S4TA605289
at Auto Emporium of Lake City Inc.
2832 SE Main Blvd
Lake City FL. 32025
in Columbia Co. at 10:00 AM on
November 15, 2010

04542217
November 4, 2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000578
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff
vs.
KENNETH F. AVINQN, el,al,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:KENNETH F. AVINON
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
12860 SW STATE ROAD 47
FORT WHITE, FL 32038
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWNP-
CYNTHIA R. AVINON
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
12860 SW STATE ROAD 47
FORT WHITE, FL 32038
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
ANYAND ND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
LOT 4, COUNTRY MEADOWS,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 154,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND
APPURTENANCE THERETO:
2006, MERIT, VIN#
FLTCHT32031088A &
FLTHLCT32031088B
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after
the first publication, if any, on Flori-
da Default Law Group, P.L., Plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is 9119
Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the
original with this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for two consecutive
weeks in the Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on this 20th day of Octo-
ber, 2010.
P. D Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
NMNC-FHA-R-UNASSIGNED-
F10064982
** See Americans with Disabilities
Act
NOTICE
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
05524300
October 28, 2010
November 4, 2010
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Runway
Fashion at 319 N Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Fl 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-344-
2116 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Jasmine Johnson
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ Jasmine Johnson
Name: Shamar Davis
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ Shamar Davis

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 2nd day of November, A.D.
2010.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05524379
November 4, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-98CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
NORTH FLORIDA, a trade name of
TD Bank, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
MISAEL CABANAS, a single man,
Defendant
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MISAEL CABANAS AND
ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUST-
EES, OR OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST MISAEL CAB-
ANAS

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the prop-
erty in Columbia County, Florida de-
scribed on Exhibit A


Apart of the West 1/2 of Section 31,
Township 6 South, Range 17 East,
Columbia County, Florida, being
more particularly described as fol-
lows:
"Commence at the Southwest comer
of said Section 31, and run thence


Legal

North 00*25'56"East, along the West
boundary of said Section, 1385.24
feet; thence South 85*39'38"East,
37.71 feet to the point of beginning;
thence continue South 85*39'38"
East along the North right of way
line of a graded county road, 785.63
feet; thence South 8336'19"East,
along said North right of way line,
242.87 feet; thence North
07"12'45"East, 740.66 feet; thence
North 03'50'13" East, 217.83 feet;
thence South 86'45'56" East,
1507.63 feet to the East boundary
line of-said West 1/2 of Section 31;
thence North 01'03'49"East, along
said East boundary line 467.73 feet;
thence North 8842'50"West,
2627.34 feet to the Easterly right of
way line of a graded county road;
thence South 00"51'23"West, along
said Easterly right of way line
1307.34 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning."
has been filed against Misael Caba-
nas and the unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors creditors,
trustees, or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against Misael
Cabanas. You are required to serve a
copy of written defenses, if any, to it
on Katherine G. Jones, Upchurch,
Bailey and Upchurch, P.A., Plain-
tiff's attorneys, whose address is
Post Office Drawer 3007, St. Augus-
tine, Florida 32085-3007, on or be-
fore November, 19, 2010, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
mand in the complaint.
DATED October 19, 2010.
P. DEWfIT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Katherine'G. Jones
Florida Bar No. 0772951
Upchurch, Bailey and Upchurch,
P.A.
Post Office Box 3007
St. Augustine, Florida 32085-3007
Telephone No. (904) 829-9066
Facsimile No. (904) 825-4862
Attorneys for Plaintiff First Federal
Bank of North Florida, a trade name
of TD Bank, N.A.

05524282
October 28, 2010
November 4, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-376-CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-.
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.,
RONALD L. TYSON; any and all
unknown parties claiming by,
through, under, or against the herein
named individual Defendant(s) who
are not known to be dead or alive,
*whether said unknown parties may
claim an interest as spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees or other claimants;
John Doe and Jane Doe as unknown
tenants in possession,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit of Columbia County, Florida,
will on the 1st day of December,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, in the City of Lake City,
Florida, offer for sale and sell at pub-
lic outcry to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, the following described
property situated in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, to-wit:
SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED
HERETO AND BY REFERENCE
MADE A PART HEREOF.
EXHIBIT "A"
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH RANGE
16 EAST
SECTION 24: Commence at the SW
comer of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said
Section and run along the West line
of said SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, N
00-47'36" W, 1080.68 feet; thence N
88"31'00"E, 220.00 feet to the East
line of Randall Street; thence S
00"47'36"E, along said East line of
Randall Street; 392.65 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING; continue
along said East line of Randall
Street, S 00'47'36"E 170.67 feet;
thence N 88'31'00"E, 170.00 feet;
thence N 00*47'36"W, 170.67 feet;
thence S 88"31'00"W, 170.00 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING. CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 10-376-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 28th day of
October. 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04542193
November 4, 11,2010



010 Announcements










020 Lost & Found


Lost Chihuahua
Much loved, white with light
brown spots, Red Collar,
near Walmart 386-288-3024


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

04542232
Dietary Aide, Dietary Cook
Part time positions
Must have prior exp in a
healthcare facility or other
institution. Please apply at Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025.

05524367
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
For mature individual seeking
long-term employment. MUST
be a people person with great
customer service skills, strong
work ethic, good communica-
tion, typing skills, and willing-
ness to learn. Must be a team
player and be able to work a
flexible schedule including
weekends, holidays, and nights.
NIGHT AUDITOR (P/T)
FRONT DESK (P/T/F/T)
POSITION
Excellent work environment.
Hotel experience preferred
buotnot required.
Apply in person at:
Redroof Inn
414 SW Florida Gateway Drive
U.S. 90 and 1-75, exit 427
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record,
386-963-5026, Drug Test.

I need a BABYSITTER
locally. Must be able to work
flexible hours. License Preferred.
(229)300-0580 for info.

License CDL Driver
w/2 yrs Logging Exp.
Must have Clean CDL.
386-365-6966
Lily Pad is Hiring!
Looking for Outgoing Sales
Associates for Seasonal Positions!
Bring in Resume Today!

Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
3 days a week. Please fax resume
to 386-719-9662

Mechanic Needed
Heavy truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the,
right person, So6ithern'Specializea
Truck & Trailer, US 41 N
386-752-9754

P/T Class A CDL
Drivers needed. A CLEAN record
and a flexible schedule required.
Call 386-935-1705 to apply.

Wanted Forestry machinery
operator, with 2 yrs. exp.
Must have valid DL.
Koon Timber 386-365-6966

1 Medical
120 Employiment

05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp. Call Cindi: (850)253-1906

05524375

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of CNA/MA/LPN
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/08/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

SContinuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

AKC Registered Lab puppies.
Black labs & Yellow labs. Has
Health Certs. DOB 09/02/10. POP
Call for info. 386-752-2117

Black and White Skunk. about 1.5
years old. Has been spayed and
glands removed. All shots are up
to date. $100. 386-623-2443

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external


parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


To place your
classified ad call

75I5-5440


I









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010


360 Feed, Seed
360 & Plants
Perrenial Peanut Hay,
wholesale prices direct from the
farm. $3-$9 per bale,
Madison 850-464-3947

401 Antiques
Antique Table,
Ten sided. 30" high and wide
$50
386-758-9205
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Slide in 30" Electric Range
$100
386-292-3927 or
386-754-9295

403 Auctions

04542238
Public Auction
Sat. Nov. 5, 2010 @12:30 A.M.
Location: Davis Street &
105th Rd, Live Oak, FL
7.05 ac. Zoned 1 dwelling per ac
For More Info Call: John Hill
386-362-3300 Lic.Re.Bkr.


408 Furniture
7 PIECE SOLID OAK QUEEN
Bedroom Set, good condition,
must sell $450 OBO.
Call 386-752-5345 after 3:00 p.m.
Ceramic Table Lamp,
Maroon, 28" high,
$20
386-758-9205
Dual reclining '
Love seat.
$100.
86-752-3720
Floor Lamp. 65" fiigh,
Brass finish base,
$20
386-758-9205

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman Rider
42" cut, good condition,
$385
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295
Nice Craftsman Push Mower,
.6.5 HP, runs good,
.$85 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295
Riding
Lawn Mower
$200
386-344-1783

S412 Medical
S Supplies
Medical potty Chair.
Brand new $50.
386-752-3720


416 Sporting Goods
Inversion Table,
had to move,
only a few months old $75
386-719-8886
Sportcraft TX, 4.9 Treadmill,,
almost new
$100
386-758-9205

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Fri & Sat, 9am ?,Multi Family,
tools, rug, furniture, golf clubs
494 NW Clubview Cir,
(Lake City Country Club)
MULTI FAMILY Sat. 8-? Corner
of Herlong & Choctaw, S Hwy 47.
Holiday items, power tools, house-
hold, games, toys, much more!!
Multi-Family Sat. Oct. 6., 8-2
Retired Teacher, lots of classroom
decor & more-192 SW Dante Terr
Off hwy 242 Lots of plus size
men/womens(2X up)&kids
clothes, toys, & much more.
Nov. 6, Saturday 8-? 183 SW
Mockingbird Way (242/47).
Household items, jewelry, tools,
yard equip., more.'Look for signs
*. aW.'aB irflB, L MIMu


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat only, 7:30 am Sharp!
Multi Family Sale,
behind Sonic Restaurant
1326 SW Castle Heights Terr
Sat only, 8 am noon, miscellane-
ous, computer eq, household items
2213 SW Birley Ave, off Pine-
mount Hwy 386-755-0661
SAT. 10-2. 6243 NW 31ST Circle
Jennings. off Hwy 141 in
Timberlake Est.
Lots and lots of misc.
SAT. 7:30-? 41 S. turn left on
131C, follow signs. Tools, prin-
cess house, Christmas dishes, Ig
leather chest lots of household, etc
Sat.& Sun 9-? Hsehold items from
3 storage units. Fum., Queen bed-
room set. Lazy boys, lots of books
& more. 14373 S Hwy 441.
SAT., 8-1, 2673 SW. Tustenuggee
Ave, hshold, paintings, furnishing
decor., electronics, trampoline,
clothes, exerc. equip. 288-6254


440 Miscellaneous
10' X 3' Inflatable Pool,
pump and all still in box
$60
386-292-3927or 386-154-9295
NATURAL GAS heater. Large
Cost $500 new, asking $250. obo.
386-719-3942
Need Holiday cash? Make 75% of
selling price at 3 day consignment
sale. Accepting gently used name
brand clothing, shoes & handbags.
Call 386-752-3631 or 755-1759
Rug Doctor
w/Attachments
$400 firm
386-719-8886
Swimming Pool
15 x 48
Like New $100
386-344-1783

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1,2,3 Br MH's for rent. All you
need is $200 to move you in. Rv's
also avl. 6 mo min.lease Water,
mowing garbage container
provided for home or RV.
No pets. No Washers. Bkgrd Ck
done on all tenants. 386-755-5488
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, mall park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $5752 o 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DWMH, in beautiful area, pri-
vate dr, appliances included, Need
to see to appreciate! By appt only
386-752-5617, leave message pls
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
Kingsley Lake: $800/mo you can
rent your own year-round place at
Kingsley Lake! 2/2 remodeled,
ch/a. Private Dock. 386-752-4339.
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. Move to
your own land later. You can live
in where it sits temporarily.
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-364-4940
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






units in nice park. Moye In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $575. then $650. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

640j Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extras,
386-752-4258
Fully Furnished in park. 12X54.
2br/1.5ba. Washer & Dryer,
Micro, TV, Clean. $8,900. Owned
by non-smoker 386-755-0110

650 Mobile Home
6-0U & Landni
D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825
"FSBO 5 acres in Ellisville area
w/3br DWMH ready to move in.
Plus 20X24 workshop. $2000.
down $675 per mo. 386-752-4597

710( Unfurnished Apt.
lIv For Rent
Wi523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1.bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $540 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,


starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting@ $385, 386-719-8813
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $650 plus dep & bckgmd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

t Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542205
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2/1 w/den, on west side, 1 wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water and
trash included, $650 month +

3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Lg 4 br/2ba home on Old Country
Club Rd. Living Rm, Family
Rm/Dining Rm/Kitchen; Recrea-
tion Rm; Fenced Yd. $800/mo;
Sec Dep $800; 386-623-2642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
non smoking environment,
,$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
then call 352-377-0720

750 Business &
Office Rentals
Great Opportunity
Sunoco Convenient Store for lease
3554 N Hwy 441, Lake City.
813-495-8461
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

82O Farms &
OU Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.


Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner FinancingJ.
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks


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