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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01442
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 11/03/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01442
System ID: UF00028308:01442
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Keep Swimmin'
CHS sends seven to regional
swim competition.

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LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA


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Ref
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Kirkman

Reflects
Lake City native talks about
World Series appearance.
Sports, I B


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Wednesday,


November 3, 2010


www.lakecityreportIr. om


Vol. 136, No. 246 0 75 cents


SRubio wins Senate seat


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
U.S. Senate candidate Marco Rubio speaks at a political rally
held at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City on Thursday.


Republican
candidate routs
Crist, Meek
By LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ
Associated Press
MIAMI Republican
Marco Rubio won election
Tuesday to the U.S. Senate,
capping his transformation
from dark-horse candidate
to tea-party darling by turn-
ing a three-way race into a
rout


Rubio kept the seat in the
GOP column by easily beat-
ing Gov. Charlie Crist, who
ran as an independent, and
Democrat Kendrick Meek.'
The result was so lop-
sided Rubio was declared
the winner shortly after
polls closed in Florida's
Panhandle.
With Florida facing
nearly 12 percent unem-
ployment and one of the
nation's highest foreclo-
sure rates, many voters
went to the polls frustrated


with Washington politics.
and glad election day had
finally arrived. Across the
state, lines formed at many
polling sites before the
doors opened.
Rubio made the election.
a referendum on govern-
ment size and spending.
His message: President
Barack Obama's policies
are a disaster.
At the outset, GOP lead-
ers tried to force Rubio out
of the race so Crist' could
claim the Republican nomi-


nation. But Rubio overtook
Crist in the polls by argu-
ing the governor wasn't a
principled conservative.
Crist then decided to run
as an independent, and as
the moderate in the race, he
siphoned away Democratic
votes from Meek.
As a result, Rubio eas-
ily won the seat held by
Republican Sen. George
LeMieux, who was appoint-
ed by Crist last year to
fill the remainder of Mel
Martinez's term.


PORTER TRIUMPHS


LC Republican takes District 11 race


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Lake City Republican Elizabeth Porter embraces her husband, Andrew Porter, as they await election results on Tuesday.
Porter defeated Debbie Boyd in the race for State Representative District 11.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
L ake City
Republican
Elizabeth Porter
cruised to vic-
tory in the State
Representative Dist. 11
race Tuesday by gather-
ing 54 percent of the votes
across the district.
Porter, a former
Columbia County
Commissioner, beat two-
term incumbent Debbie


Boyd (D-Newberry) in a
rematch from 2008.
Districtwide in the gen-
erl election on Tuesday,
Porter received 27,338
votes to Boyd's 20,061.
TEA Party candidate
John Ferentinos was a
nonfactor with 2,973 votes
in the race. Ballot totals
were gathered from the
Florida Department of
State Division of Elections
and are unofficial until bal-
lots are canvassed.
"It feels wonderful,"


Porter said "It's not my
win. It's a win for everyone
that helped out with the
campaign."
In Columbia County,
Porter received 8,427
votes, (54.19 percent),
compared to Boyd who
had 6,090 votes, (39.16
percent).
Ferentinos received
1,033 votes in Columbia
County.
A total of 15,550 votes
PORTER continued on 3A


Dist. 11 Results*
Columbia County
Porter ............... 8,427
Boyd ................ 6,090
Ferentinos .......... 1,033
Alachua County
Porter ................. 6,604
Boyd .................. 6,325
Ferentinos .......... 643
Suwannee County
Porter .............. 8,042
Boyd .............. 4,509
Ferentinos .......... 820
Ballot totals unofficial


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott (cen-
ter) smiles as he watches election results with? his daughter,
Allison Guimard (left) and his wife, Ann, on Tuesday in Fort
Lauderdale.


Scott maintains

slim lead in race

for governor


Contest too close
to call with 85
percent reporting.
By MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press
STAMPA Republican
gubernatorial candidate
Rick Scott was clinging
to a slim lead Tuesday
as Democrat Alex' Sink
pinned lher hopes on a
strong turnout for her in
South Florida counties
that were still counting.
At presstime, with 85
percent of the expected
vote counted, Scott had 50
percent, while Sink had 47
percent.
Through months of
attack ads and three
debates, polls released
in the campaign's final
days showed the bitter
race was still too close


to call.
The candidates are
both former CEOs who
ran on the claim that they
are the best person to
turn around Florida's dis-
mal economy and create
new jobs'.
After several days of
frenzied homestretch
campaigning, they cast
their ballots Tuesday
morning in their home-
towns Scott in
Naples and Sink in rural
Thonotosassa outside
Tampa.
Giddy supporters were
already addressing Scott
as governor as he did
some last-minute cam-
paigning Monday.
In Jacksonville, tea party
leader and Scott supporter
Billie Tucker wore red,
white and blue cowboy
boots adorned with "USA"
and stars.


DePratter defeats Kazmierski


Winner says
job creation top
priority for county.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Rusty DePratter col-
lected 60 percent of the
vote and rolled to victory
in the Columbia County
Commission District 2 race
Tuesday.
DePratter received 2,366
vote- and defeated Marc


Kazmierski, who received
1,556 votes during the elec-
tion. Both candidates were
vying for an open commis-
sion seat as Commissioner
Dewey Weaver is retiring.'.
"It feels great," DePratter
said, as he watched returns
come in at the Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections Office.
Total votes cast in
Columbia County in the
District 2 race numbered
3,922.
Ballot counts are unot-


ficial until they are can-
vassed.
"I'm overwhelmed,"
DePratter said, referring to
his election victory.
"It's been a long, hard
road," he said. "It's a lot of
work, but it's worth it. I get
the chance to help all the
citizens of the county and
to help District 2."
When he takes his seat
on the county commission
board, his priorities will
remain the same, DePratter
said, with job creation at


the top of the list.
"Jobs are still number
one," he said.
Kazmierski said he is dis-
appointed about the results
from the race, which show
he has more work ahead
of him if he decides to run
again in the future.
He said the experience
has been fruitful, allowing
him to meet new people.
"It's been amazing,"
Kazmierski said. "There
DePRATTER continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ILake City Reporter
Cori DePratter hugs her husband, Rusty DePratter, after
he won his bid for Columbia County District 2 County
Commissioner. DePratter won with 60 percent of the vote.


HIII0U0[


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


7859
T-storms 2
WEATHER, 2A ^


Opinion .. ... 4A
Obtuaries . 5A
Advice & Comics. . 2C
Puzzles . .. . . 2B
Around Florida . . 2A


DAILY
BRIEFING
NASA robots to
take 'giant leap.'


COMING
THURSDAY
The latest
health-related news.


/
,
&










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 4-7-7
Evening: 0-7-7


Ply Tuesday:
Afternoon: 2-2-2-3
Evening: 8-6-2-3


enmatdi -
?'- Monday:
4-6-20-25-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Quaid, wife miss court hearing


SANTA BARBARA, Calif


Randy Quaid and his wife
have failed to appear for
an arraignment in their
felony vandalism case in
California.
The couple did not appear in a
Santa Barbara court Tuesday morn-
ing and the Quaids' attorney said the
actor was required to stay in Canada
until he can appear for an immigra-
tion hearing there Nov. 8.
A judge issued a bench warrant
for Evi Quaid after determining
that she did not have a good reason
to miss Tuesday's hearing. Randy
Quaid is due back in court Nov. 16.
Each faces a felony vandalism
charge after their September arrest
for allegedly squatting in the guest
house of a home they used to own.
They have said they are seeking
asylum in Canada, claiming they
fear a group they have described as
"Hollywood star whackers."

Trial opens for accused
stalker of TV actress
NEW YORK A fan of "Law &
Order: Criminal Intent" relentlessly
harassed one of the television show's
stars, approaching her on filming
locations and composing creepy mis-
sives about her on the Internet, a
federal prosecutor said Tuesday in
opening statements at his trial.
Charles Nagel of Philadelphia is
charged with interstate stalking,
stemming from his "obsession" with
actress Kathryn Erbe, Assistant U.S.
Attorney Allon Lifshitz told jurors in
federal court in Brooklyn.
When Erbe tried to ignore Nagel,
he grew angry and tried to confront
her, the prosecutor said.
Defense attorney Robert Datner
called his client "an interesting char-
'acter" who meant no harm.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actor Randy Quaid, left, is escorted from an Immigration and Refugee Board hear-
ing in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday. Quaid told Canada's immigration board Friday
that he and his wife are seeking asylum from "the murderers of Hollywood" and will
therefore apply for refugee status in Canada, after they were arrested on U.S. war-
rants related to vandalism charges.


Nagel, who has pleaded not guilty,
merely "went to a public place seek-
ing autographs and photographs,"
the lawyer said.
Erbe, 44, has starred for nine sea-
sons as Detective Alexandra Eames
on the crime series.

'Lion King' actress dies
from leukemia
NEW YORK Shannon Tavarez,


the 11-year-old who starred on
Broadway in "The Lion King" and
whose battle with leukemia won
the hearts of many, including Alicia
Keys, Rihanna and 50 Cent, has died.
Tavarez died Monday afternoon
at Cohen Children's Medical Center
in New Hyde Park, on Long Island,
said Katharina Harf, co-founder
of the bone marrow donor center
DKMS.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Bob Feller is 92.
* Actress Lois Smith is 80.
* Former Massachusetts
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis is
77.
* Actor-dancer Ken Berry
is 77.
* Movie composer John
Barry is 77.
* Tony-winning playwright

Daily Scripture


Terrence McNally is 71.
* Actor Shadoe Stevens is
64.
* Singer Lulu is 62.
* Comedian-actress
Roseanne Barr is 58.
* Actress Kate Capshaw is
57.
* Comedian Dennis Miller
is 57.
* Singer Adam Ant is 56.


"But you are a chosen, people, a
royal priesthood, a holy nation,
God's special possession,.that
you may declare the praises of
him who called you out of dark-
ness into his wonderful light."

I Peter 2:9


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation .............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, RFla. 32055.,
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
* Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S: Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to L~ke City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED


Reporter
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6.30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(crculation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates induda 7% sales tax.
Mail rates.
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks......... ....... $82.80
52,Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Robot's space
debut 'giant leap'
CAPE CANAVERAL
- Space is about to get its
first humanoid from planet
Earth.
Robonaut 2 affection-
ately known as R2 is
hitching a one-way ride
to the International Space
Station this week aboard
the final flight of space
shuttle Discovery.
It's the first human-
oid robot ever bound
for space, a $2.5 million
mechanical and electrical
marvel that NASA hopes
one day will assist flesh-
and-bone astronauts in
orbit.
Imagine, its creators say,
a future where Robonaut
could take over space
station cleaning duties;
spend hours outside in the
extreme heat and cold,
patiently holding tools for
spacewalking astronauts;
and handle emergencies
like toxic leaks or fires.
Why, Robonaut's
descendants could even
scout out asteroids, Mars
and other worlds in the
decades ahead, paving
the way for humans.
The adventure begins
Wednesday afternoon,
with the planned final
launch of Discovery and
Robonaut's six human
crewmates. Mission
managers gave the green
light Monday for the new
launch date; shuttle gas
leaks had to be repaired
before the countdown
could begin and forced a
two-day delay.
"While it might be
just a single step for this
robot, it's really a giant
'leap forward for tinman-
kind," said Rob Ambrose,
acting chief of Johnson
Space Center's automa-
tion, robotics and simula-
tion division in Houston.
For now, R2 a col-
laboration between NASA
and General Motors -
exists only from the waist


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This picture provided by NASA shows two Robonaut 2 robots
in Houston. Robonaut 2 is hitching a one-way ride to the
International Space Station on the final flight of the space
shuttle Discovery scheduled for Wednesday. NASA hopes
one day they will assist flesh-and-bone astronauts in orbit.


up. It measures 3 feet 4
inches tall and weighs 330
pounds. Eacl arm is 2 feet
8 inches long.

Wesley Snipes to
argue for new trial
OCALA Actor Wesley
Snipes is heading back to
court, hoping to convince
a central Florida judge
he deserves a new trial
because he claims the jury
was biased.
U.S. District Court
Judge William Terrell
Hodges will hear argu-
ments Nov. 15.
Snipes argues some
jurors decided he was
guilty before hearing any,
evidence and prosecutors
hid damaging information
about a key witness.
Snipes faces a three-year
prison sentence for tax-
related crimes. Snipes was
found guilty of willfully
failing to file federal tax
returns.
Defense lawyers say
they received e-mails from
two jurors who claim that
three other members of
the jury made up their
minds before the 2008 trial
began. An e-mail said the
verdicts were a compro-
mise.
Snipes has been free on


bond while appealing.

Astronauts cast
early ballots
CAPE CANAVERAL
- Red states. Blue states.
And now voting from a
weightless state.
The three Americans
orbiting the planet on
Election Day have cast
their ballots.
Space station astronaut
Scott Kelly voted Sunday
via a secure e-mail system.
Douglas Wheelock and
Shannon Walker also voted
recently 200-plus-miles
up. Kelly said Tuesday
it was an "honor and a
privilege" to vote from
the International Space
Station.
As for the six shuttle
astronauts headed soon
to the space station,
they voted back home in
Houston before heading
to NASA's Florida launch
site last week. Discovery
is scheduled to lift off
Wednesday.
Texas legislators passed
a bill in 1997 allowing astro-
nauts to vote from orbit.
Space station residents have
taken advantage of that
many times since.


.. ... 73/
Tallahassee Lake
75/62 78.
R .'- '.Ga
Panama City
73/63


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


HI 67 LO 3 H67LO39 HI71L45


iY5, b/ ( Daytona Beach
/59 Ft. Lauderdale
minesville Dana Beach Fort Myers
80/61 83a67 Gainesville
83/63 ca Jacksonville
Orlando Cap Canaveral Key West
85/66 83168 MiLake C
Tamp' Naples
85/70 WestPalm Beach Ocala
84/73 Orlando
\ FLLauderdal Panama City
Ft. Myers 84/75 Pensacola
86/71 Naples Tallahassee
84/71 Miami Tampa
Key.Wet 84/74 Valdosta
83/74 W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today 7:46 a.m.
Sunset today 6:42 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 7:47 a.m.
Sunset tom. 6:41 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 4:54 a.m.
Moonset today 4:45 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 6.02 a.m.
Moonset tom. 5:24 p.m.


Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.
6 13 21 28
New First Full, Last


* Associated Press


Ha 3.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


-STORMS



'178 LO 59


FRA MAfWeea, i3
esi'hg/Wdedynih' o


ssta ~
'58 *i~dsenviIe
Ott. 7C~fl1


Pensacola
73/61


City
Cape Canaveral


Thursday
80/65/sh
82/60/t
84/71/t
83/66/t
76/51/t
75/50/sh
83/75/t
75/48/t
85/71/t
83/69/t
78/53/t
83/63/t
72/48/t
69/45/sh
74/48/t
81/64/t
72/46/sh
85/69/t


Friday
73/52/pc
73/46/pc
83/60/pc
77/53/pc
66/37/s
67/39/pc
82/71/sh
67/37/s
83/61/pc
79/53/pc
67/38/s
75/46/pc
65/42/s
65/41/s
68/37/s
75/50/pc
64/36/s
80/56/pc


79
61
77
54
89 in 1972
34 in 1963


0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
0.14"
43.77"


IMI
6

30 iutIhesno n
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

Unkg


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


U-
weather.com


, (,j, Forecasts, data and graph-
Ic 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


I-~----I -' ---r - '


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Is RIDJA


SATURDAm
JY


S U IDJAM


CITYALMANAC


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More than 48 percent of voters hit the polls


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

More than 48 percent of
Columbia County's regis-
tered voters cast ballots in
Tuesday's general election,
according to the Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections Office.
Reports indicate that of
the county's 40,003 regis-
tered voters, 19,220 cast
ballots during the election
period.
'The election went really
good. We had 48.5 per-
cent voter turnout," said
Elizabeth Horne, Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections.
Horne correctly antici-
pated there would be at
least 45 percent local voter.
turnout for the election.
"We only had one local
race and one candidate for
a state office, but I just
think that people wanted to
get out and express them-
selves in different catego-
ries," she said.
Jean Lear, Columbia
County assistant supervi-
sor of elections, said the
results from the election
won't be official for at least
10 days.
"We have 10 days to wait
from the election tonight
to wait on the military bal-
lots from overseas to come
in," she said. "The results
will become final that
Saturday."
Voters were also asked
to make decisions on six
proposed amendments to
the Florida constitution
during the election.
The following is a run-
down of ballots cast in
Columbia County:

Constitutional
Amendment 1
Yes 9,866 votes (54
percent)
No 8,397 votes (45
percent)

Constitutional
Amendment 2 ,i
Yes 14,454 vbtes (77
percent)


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Lake City Republican Elizabeth Porter (center) answers questions from Shane Beadles, Florida Gateway College field reporter, following Porter's win for State
Representative Dist. 11. Porter defeated incumbent Debbie Boyd on Tuesday.


No 4,152 votes (22
percent)

Constitutional
Amendment 4
Yes 3,960 votes (21
percent)
No 14,777 (78 per-
cent)

Constitutional
Amendment 5
Yes 10,131 (55 per-
cent)
No 8,249 (44 percent)

Constitutional
Amendment 6
Yes 10,184 (55 per-
cent)
No 8,179 (44 percent)

Constitutional
Amendment 8
Yes 9,616 (52 per-
cent)


No 8,843 (47 percent)
Non-binding statewide
advisory referendum.
Yes 13,933 votes (76
percent)
No 4,182 votes (23
percent)

A majority of local vot-
ers also voted in favor of
allowing Columbia County
officials to continue to offer
tax abatements to prospec-
tive businesses hoping to
locate in the area as part
of a Columbia County
Resolution.
Yes 10,344 votes (56,
percent)
No 8,059 votes (43
percent)

Selected voters also had
ballots which featured three
amendments on the City of
Lake City's charter.


City Amendment 1
Yes 2,209 votes (84
percent)
No 419 votes (15 per-
cent)

City Amendment 2
Yes 1,717 votes (67
percent)
No 832 votes (32 per-
cent)

City Amendment 3
Yes 2,110 votes (83
percent)
No 419 votes (16 per-
cent)

In the U.S. Senate race,
Marco Rubio collected
11,870 Columbia County
votes, roughly 62 per-
cent, to best the his lead-
ing opponents. Charlie
Crist garnered 3,867 local
votes, 20.3 percent, while


Kendrick B. Meqk col-
lected 3,055 votes, roughly
15.9 percent.
Inthe U.S. Representative
District 4 race, where Ander
Crenshaw was serving as
the incumbent, Crenshaw
collected a majority of
Columbia County votes.
Crenshaw garnered 13,863
local votes, roughly 76
percent. Troy D. Stanley
collected 4,196, roughly 23
percent of the local vote.
Columbia County resi-
dents gave a majority of
their governor/lieutenant
governor votes to Rick
Scott. Scott collected 11,085
votes, 58 percent, to best
Alex Sink, who collected
7,066 votes, 37 percent.
In the attorney general
race, Parn Bondi garnered
12,299 local votes, 65 per-
cent, besting Dan Gelber,-.


who collected 5,459 local
votes, 29 percent.
In the Commissioner
of Agriculture race, local
voters favored Adam H.
Putnam with 12,139 votes,
64 percent, while Scott
Maddox. collected 5,081
votes, 27 percent.
In the State Senate for
District 14 race where the
incumbent Steve Oelrich
faced-off against Perry C.
McGriff Jr., Oelrich tal-
lied 9,855 local votes, 70
percent. McGriff collected
4,079 votes, 29 percent.
The State Representative
District 10 race featured
incumbent Leonard L.
Bembry vying for his seat
against David A. Feigin.
Bembry garnered 1,918
local votes, 59 percent to
best Feigin, who collected
1,321 Yotes, 40 percent.


DePRATTER: Wins race
Continued From Page 1A


are lots of people I prob-
ably would not have met
for any other reason."
Both candidates thanked
the voters who supported
them.
"Thanks for all the sup-
port and thanks for every-
thing everybody's done
for me," Kazmierski said.


"We'll get it next time if I
choose to do it again."
"I want to thank all the
voters," DePratter said.
"It's been a very hum-
bling experience. I'm
thankful for all the voters
and all the people that
have helped me in this
race."


- a 48 percent turnout
- were cast in Columbia
County.
"I'm pleased to go to
Tallahassee for my con-
stituents and better the
district," she said.
Many voters had anti-
incumbent sentiments in
this election, Porter said.
She said she was a lot
wiser this year.
"It was a much smooth-
er campaign," Porter
said.
Boyd said she has no
regrets about the cam-
paign.
"At the end of the day,
the voters have spoken,
and I respect the will of
the voters," Boyd said.
"All I can really say is I
have been very, very hon-
ored by the opportunity
to serve for four years."
Boyd said she was
undecided on her politi-
cal future.
"Who knows," Boyd
said. "Doors close and
open for a reason."
Porter said her first goal
once she takes office is
to get more jobs to locate
into the district.
"We need that here,"
Porter said. "Getting jobs
will go a long way to kick-
start the economy."
Porter said she will
keep close contact with
the people in the district to


represent their wishes.
"Ultimately this is their
seat," she said.
Winning the election is
humbling, Porter said.
"Thank you to everyone
who supported me," she
said. "I look forward to
doing the best job I can."


9,Sat ov. 6

) !

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.




FREE to [ -


Participate


I vi lirk ifif .


Wexeval S p lsT e us ha

I ixntf ki Lak (.o, R i)Irie
S IHH BB|B ~ b~ |B | ___'.Drlt lfgiy ,_____


i' il I


Honor



vOur


Heroes!


The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
*Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


r-ll


Thank you for
years of service.
We Salue You


Lo\c. Eileen
actual size


p~ffiIIX^^:;'-::';-^-:7 ^

Your Name:
Address:
Town: State Zip:
Daytime Phone: .... .
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: Dotes Served:
llDring this in or S'd In. Lake City Reporter, 11'n I lI' d n. lk I. 3.OI'0 ,.l'i9 ,+i f r s r inlo.
SubinKsioiins nilst he rwtec il by3N hI'1 il,.t Moluth, \ N. 8. 2011) All pholobs vill b mrluned b, Inclvuding SASE with )ver eoin.
Lake City Reporter M-F Sam 5pm


PORTER: A lot wiser
Continued From Page 1A


OB/ "YN

DA NA GREENE_ MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH







/





*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


A.


I I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


C Ity^^
I Ilk^potrrt
. Offxe


rv-,i
pqI







POi












OPINION


Wednesday, November 3, 2010


MOTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Feeble

economy

will haunt

the GOP

The last major eco-
nomic statistic
before the elections
did the Democrats
no favors. When
the analysts describe the third
quarter growth in gross domes-
tic product as "weak," "anemic"
and "stuck in second gear"
although one giddy analyst
described it as "ordinary"
that's not good.
The U.S. Commerce
Department announced that.
from July to September the
economy grew 2 percent.
That's hardly robust, but it's
still better than the second
quarter when the economy
grew at 1.7 percent, a rate
widely described as "feeble."
For whatever consolation,
that was the fifth consecutive
quarter of growth, but unfor-
tunately not strong enough to
make.a dent in the politically
sensitive jobless rate, seem-
ingly stuck at 9.6 percent.
The average quarterly
growth in previous economic
recoveries has been 3.6 per-
cent. What the country really
needs is a 5 percent growth
rate, but no one is forecasting
it.
The third quarter growth
was largely due to business
investment, federal spend-
ing and consumer spending.
Consumer spending, on the
threshold of the critical holi-
day shopping season; was up
2.6 percent, the largest quar-
terly increase since the end of
2006.
The less-than-overwhelm-
1ng numbers with no inflation
ini sight means the Federal
Reserve will keep pumping
money into the economy. And
in the current political climate
that's the last tool left to the
government.
The economy has not been
kind to the Democrats. But
with a projected fourth quar-
ter growth rate, of 2.5 percent
and at 2.8 percent for all of
next year, it's likely to be no
kinder to the Republicans.
Marietta (Ga.) Daily News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
SDink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Referendum on working together


W hat now?
By the time
you read this,
the election
will be mostly
completed, and you will have
a much better sense than I do
currently of the magnitude of,
the shift in the political land-
scape.
One theory holds that
Americans prefer divided legis-
lative and executive branches;
Maybe we will like the new gov-
ernmental arrangements better
than we like the current ones.
But I doubt it Even though
we revere the principle of gov-
ernment "of the people, by the
people, and for the people,"
many of us are not in a govern-
able mood.... ,. ,
Thus the most energetic
strain of current American poli-
tics is the Tea Party movement,
whose essential principle is less
government or, in its most fun-
damental incarnation, virtually
no government, at all.
And thus we mount ironic
complaints against government
while many of us enjoy its ben-
efits, like Medicare, Medicaid,
Social Security, our extraordi-
nary interstate highway system,
and municipal fire departments
that stand ready to efficiently
extinguish our house fires at
any time of the day or night.
And much more.
In fact, such is our dissatis-
faction with government that
"Throw the Bums Out" can
pretty much constitute a sub-
stantial political platform on its
own, and the state of Nevada
provides ballots that include
the surly option "None of the
Above."
How did we get to be so
unhappy with the very concept


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu


of "government?" After all, the
primary, essential purpose of
the United States, by definition,
is to create and maintain a gov-
ernment.
We can argue about how
big it should be, but "limited
government" is a relative term,
and there's no question that
the shape of modern life calls.
for a much bigger government
than the Founders might have
imagined.
Republicans, and particularly
the Tea Party movement, talk a
lot about self-reliance.
But I suspect that very few
would enjoy practicing the self-
reliance required to survive in
our country even a hundred
years ago, much less at the time
of obr country's founding.
My hardscrabble grandpar-
ents raised, harvested, and
butchered their own food. If it
'made them sick, they had only
themselves to blame.
We pick up our beef and
chicken, neatly wrapped in cel-
lophane, at the supermarket
on our way home from work.
We give hardly a thought to
its safety because we're thor-
oughly accustomed to a depend-
able standard of governmental
inspection and regulation in
food production. The result is
a level of food safety that the
unfettered market could never
produce.


Furthermore, throughout
most of our history, citizens
who got sick or fell into unem-
ployment had little choice but
to depend on their own resourc-
es. Those without resources
died or were impoverished.
Unquestionably, government
has gotten bigger in the last
hundred years, but generally
the result has been a safer,
more secure, and more com-
fortable society.
And few of even the most
ardent Tea Partiers would want
to return to the self-reliance
required by the backbreaking
and uncertain life of a hundred
years ago.
Americans have a long
history of working together
- which is another way of say-'
ing "government" to create
a better society. It's unfortunate
that this sense of community
effort has largely fallen out of
favor.
After all, the biggest prob-
lems we face now will not
be solved by an unregulated
free market; in fact, it's easy
to argue that many of these
problems global warming,
the chaos in our economy, the
growing inequity of wealth -
have been caused by the lack of
attention to the common good.
In many respects, our com-
mitment to the common good
is what this election is all
about The extent to which
Republicans and Tea Partiers
are able to "take their country
back" back from the rest
of us, I suppose will be an
index on our continued willing-
ness as a nation to "promote the
General Welfare."

* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


OTHER OPINION

Methamphetamine spells f-a-t-a-1


You hear few if any
arguments that the
dangers and dev-
astating effects of
methamphetamine
are overstated. The evidence
,of meth's toll is everywhere.
Jails and prisons are increas-
ingly crowded with meth users
and meth makers.
The Georgia Meth Project's
dramatizations of meth trag-
edies are as graphic and
uncompromising as any public-
service spots that have ever
appeared on television; yet
nobody is saying as has.
been said of other, earlier anti-
drug campaigns that the
approach is hyperbolic to the
point of being counterproduc-
tive.
You don't hear people
accuse the anti-meth campaign
of crying wolf.
So why, in the name of
everything that makes sense,
does anybody still do meth?
"First of all, it's a great
drug," says Barry McCaffrey,


the retired four-star general
who served as President Bill
Clinton's drug czar "great,"
in this context, quite obviously
meaning powerful and seduc-
tive.
As drug problems go,
McCaffrey says, meth is "the
worst, hands down." One
reason is its almost instantly
addictive.
Another is its well-docu-
mented physical devastation:
permanent neurological dam-
age, personality disintegration,
rotting teeth. But even that can
pale next to meth's mental and
emotional toll: "It is destruc-
tive of the human spirit like
nothing we have ever seen,"
McCaffrey said.
Yet another frightening fact
about meth now is its ties to
the Mexican drug cartels.
The horrific drug violence of
those organizations is now
subsidized by a substantial
American market. McCaffrey
called Mexican meth suppliers
"the dominant criminal enter-


prise in America right now."
Meth also reflects the peren-
nial Catch-22 of illegal drug
use: When addictive drugs are
more expensive, addicts have
to commit more crime to get
the money to support their
habits.
Because meth is relatively
cheap far cheaper than
cocaine, and with a longer-last-
ing effect meth addicts can
get and use more, and thus do
more damage to themselves,
their lives, their loved ones
and everyone around them.
Lose-lose.
But the first approach to
fighting the meth epidemic,
says this career military man,
is not "battling cartels," but
education and prevention.
"Step No. 1 is go tell the
American people, watch your
children. Explain what meth is
and why it is a fatal option."
If Step No. 1 works, there is
no Step 2. Or any of the other,
bleaker ones that follow. .
* Columbus Ledger-Enquirer


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com


Funding


military

intel


activities

W watchdog
groups say it
has taken 30
years to get to
this point, but
the federal government has
voluntarily released how much
the United States spends on its
intelligence activities $80.1
billion for the fiscal year that
ended Sept 30.
Only the top line figure
was revealed there was no
program by program break-
down but it was enough to
begin prompting comparisons
with other security-related
spending: $51 billion on the
State Department and for-
eign aid; $42.6 billion on the
Department of Homeland
Security; $30 billion on the
Department of Justice.
The $80.1 billion was triple
what the government was
spending on intelligence in
1997 and 1998, when the gov-
ernment had to divulge the
total in response to a court
suit, and double what was
being spent at the -time of the
9/11 attacks.
The figure includes $53.1
-billion to .the .GIA and some

agenciessoime of whichrun iw
truly costly programs like the
National Security .Agency's
massive electronic eaves-
dropping and surveillance
network and the spy satellites
of the National Geospatial-
Intelligence Agency.
The new director of
national intelligence, James
Clapper, said when he took
office that the top line fig-
ure should be made public.
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates agreed and now the
number is to be disclosed
annually.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-
Calif., who as chairwoman
of the Senate Intelligence
Committee presumably had
some responsibility for the
level of spending, said it had
"blossomed to an unaccept-
able level in the past decade."
She said "cuts will be neces-
sary."
Gates, who has announced
plans to dut $100 billion out
of defense spending over five
years and hold the rate of
increase to 2 percent annu-
ally after that, took a more
measured approach and said
it makes sense to take a look
at the spending and say, "OK,
we've built tremendous capa-
bility, but do we have more
than we need?"
While it is nice to know
what we're spending, it would
be even better to know, con-
sistent with national security,
what we're getting for all that
money.
Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Wednesday, Nov. 3,
the 307th day of 2010. There
are 58 days left in the year.
On Nov. 3, 1900, the first
major U.S. automobile show
opened at New York's Madison
Square Garden under the aus-
pices of the Automobile Club of
America.
In 1936, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a
landslide election victory over
Republican challenger Alfred
M. "Alf" Lahdon.











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


STATE


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


Seven arrested in drug bust


Tip leads

police

to secret

meth lab
From staff reports

WHITE SPRINGS -
Seven people were arrested
Monday and face numerous
drug-related charges after
authorities found a secret
methamphetamine laborato-
ry after receiving a tip from
a concerned citizen, police
officials say. Additional
arrests are possible.
Arrested were:
Wendy Lee Hall, 29,
143 NW Bond Court, White
Springs. She was charged
with possession of meth-
amphetamine, manufacture
of methamphetamine, pos-
session of listed chemicals,
- child abuse and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
She was booked into the
Columbia County Detention
Facility on $56,000 bond;
Matthew Douglas
Jones, 25, 143 NW Bond
Court, White Springs. He
was charged with posses-
sion of methamphetamine,
manufacture of metham-
phetamine, possession
Sof listed chemicals, child
abuse and possession of
'drug paraphernalia. He was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $56,000 bond;
Clint Matthew Paulk,
19, 16601 Jewett St, White
Springs. He was charged
with possession of meth-
amphetamine, manufacture
of methamphetamine, pos-
session of listed chemicals
and possession- of drug
paraphernalia. He was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $56,000 bond;
Gregory S. Bond, 21,
143 NW Bond Court, White
Springs. He was charged
with possession of meth-
amphetamine with intent to


uregory tona


Jeremy nall


Matthew Jones


"The manufacture of methamphet-
amine is very dangerous.The chemi-
cals used in the process are explosive
and toxic.The fact there were chil-
dren present in the home made this
situation even more troubling."

Mark Hunter, Columbia County Sheriff


sell, manufacture of meth-
amphetamine, possession
of listed chemicals, child
abuse, possession of drug
paraphernalia and pos-
session of a firearm by a
convicted felon. He was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $66,000 bond.
Jeremy Nolan Hall, 33,
143 NW Bond Court, White
Springs. He was charged
with possession of meth-
amphetamine, manufacture
of methamphetamine, pos-
session of listed chemicals,
child abuse and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
He was booked into the
Columbia CountyDetention
Facility oil $56,000 bond;
Justin Wade Hendrix,
31, 3578 Hamp Hicks Road,
Bryceville. He was charged
with possession of meth-
amphetamine, manufac-
ture of methamphetamine,
possession of listed chemi-
cals, child abuse, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
and possession of a fire-
arm during "'the commis-
sion of a felony. He was


booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $66,000 bond; and
A 17-year-old juvenile
from Bryceville was also
charged with manufac-
ture of methamphetamine.
He was booked into the
Columbia County Detention
Facility on $10,000 bond.

According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports, the arrests were
made around 1 p.m. Monday
after deputies were called
to 143 NW Bond Court,
White Springs, in response
to a tip from a concerned
citizen regarding possible
drug activity at the home.
Although the home has a
White Springs' address,
its physical location is in
Columbia County.
When detectives from
the Multi-Jurisdictional Task
Force arrived, they report-
edly saw several items in the
yard that were consistent with
the clandestine manufacture
of methamphetamine.
"After obtaining a search
warrant detectives searched


the residence and the sur-
rounding property for evi-
dence," said Sgt Ed Seifert,
Columbia County Sheriffs
Office public information offi-
cer, in a prepared statement
"Multiple ingredients for mak-
ing methamphetamine, chem-
icals and other paraphernalia
were discovered on the prop-
-erty and in outbuildings."
Reports say deputies also
found a two-year-old child
inside the home where meth-
amphetamine was actively
being manufactured.
"The child belongs to two
of the defendants," Seifert
said. "Detectives summoned
Columbia County Fire
Rescue (personnel) to con-
duct a medical assessment of
the child. Columbia County
Fire Rescue transported the
child to a local medical facil-
ity for further evaluation.
The Florida Department of
Children and Families took
custody ofthe child."
Detectives later learned
that two other children lived
in the hdine but were in
a day care. DCF spoke to
those children as well and
took them into their care.
Seifer't d speally trained
and equipped Task Force
Detectives collected the hazard-
ous materials and evidence.
'"he dangerous and explo-
sive chemicals were retrieved
later in the evening by a
licensed contractor," he said.
"The dangerous items will
be property disposed of at an
approved site."
The seven people that were
airrestedwere allpresentwhen
deputies arrived, reports said.
Multi-jurisdictional task force
detectives are continuing the
investigation and additional
arrests are possible.
"The manufacture of
methamphetamine is very
dangerous," said Mark
Hunter, Columbia County
Sheriff, in a prepared state-
ment "The chemicals used
in the process are explosive
and toxic. The fact there
were children present in
the home made this situa-
tion even more troubling."


Teens facing

burglary charges

in theft of ATVs


From staff reports

FORT WHITE Three
Fort White teenagers were
arrested Monday and face
burglary charges in con-
nection with several ATV
thefts. Columbia County
Sheriff's Office officials say
the teens were arrested for
burglary and grand theft.
Two 16-year-old boys
and a 17-year-old girl were
arrested in connection with
the incident. Each face two
counts of burglary of a
structure and five counts of
grand theft.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports released Tuesday,
detectives Todd Green and
Joe Vargo were investigating
the theft of four all-terrain
vehicles (ATV) and a motor-
cycle that happened in the
Fort White area Oct. 29.
Detectives determined
that two ATVs and a motor-


cycle were reported stolen
from a home on Choctaw
Avenue and two other ATVs
were stolen from a home on
Old Wire Road.
Detectives were able to
match shoe and tire prints
from both crime scene.
On Monday, while can-
vassing the area for evi-
dence, Green was able to
find tire tracks at as home
on Quarry Circle that
matched those from the
crime scene.
- Green found a teenager
at the home and the teen
agreed to speak with the
detectives at the Columbia
County Sheriffs Office Fort
White substation. The teen
reportedly admitted to com-
mitting the thefts, along with
two other juveniles.
Detectives were able to
recover all of the stolen
property and return it to
the rightful owners, reports
say.


The following informa-
tion by local law enforce-
ment agencies. The fol-
lowing people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent unless proven
guilty.
Monday, Nov. 1
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Stephen F Bowden,
55, 2016 U.S. Highway 90,
warrant Grand theft and
dealing in stolen property.
Steven Lee Lines, 28,
203 SW Chugwater Glen,
Fort White, possession of
marijuana with intent to
sell, possession of more
than 20 grams of marijuana
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Willie Smith, 57, 603
Highland Road, Quitman,
Ga., warrant Failure to


appear for charges of bur-
glary of a structure, petit
theft and resisting a mer-
chant
Anthony L. Sweet,
31, 1160 NW Moore Road,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge.
of burglary of a dwelling,.
burglary of a structure
and felony criminal mis-
chief.
Kacey Clark Whitt,
28, 128 NE Menlo Glen,
warrant: Failure to appear .
for violation of probation
hearing on charges of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance (cocaine).
Lorraine Williams, 48,
9993 110th Terrace, Live.
Oak, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of grand theft. .

From staff reports.


OBITUARIES


Jerry Daniel Krauss
Jerry Daniel Krauss, 65, died
at his home Thursday, October
28, 2010 after a brief illness. He
was the son of the late Eddie &
Gwendolyn Boyle Krauss. Born
in Jacksonville, FL he had been a
resident of Lake City for the past
19 years. He was a loving hus-
band, father, and grandfather that
enjoyed wood working, garden-
ing, talking politics and spending
time with his family. Mr. Krauss
is preceded in death by his broth-,
ers, Neal and Luther Gillis.
Survivors include his wife of 14
years, Elizabeth "Leona" Krauss
of Lake City, FL; sons, Nathan
Daniel Krauss & Scott Daniel
Krauss both of GA; daughter,
Sara Danielle (Kevin) Krauss-
: Hasson of Ridge Manor, FL;
grandchildren, Chrissy & Rich-
ard Krauss, Cody Allen & Jor-
dan Alexis Hasson and, Ashley,
Justin, Elizabeth "Libby", Chris-
topher "Levi", Brandon, Chris-
topher Wayne Krauss, and a spe-
cial cousin that was as close as
a brother to Jerry, Charles Hart
of Camden, SC, also survive.
Private family services
will be held at a later date.
GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 U.S. Hwy 441 S.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-1954

Bobby Setney
Bobby Setney, 75, passed away
Saturday October 30,2010 at the
Suwannee Valley Care Center
(Haven Hospice)
in Lake City, f !
FL. He was the
son of the late .-
Lizzie Mae Lof- --'
ton. Bobby was born in Vidalia,
Georgia, on September 11, 1935,
moved to New Smyrna, FL
when he was 6, and lived there
until he finished high school.
He faithfully served 10 years
in the United States Air Force.
After his discharge from the
Air Force, he worked for Trans
World Airlines at the Kennedy
Space Center as an Engineer,
and then as a Facilities Manager
for American Hospital Supply
n Miami, and Vision Ease in
-' y t. Lauderdale. He worked in
sales for a few years after retir-
ing to Lake City 11 years ago.
He was preceded in death by
his son, Stanley Setney and a
grand daughter, Tanya Torres.
Survivors include his wife, Jan-
ice Setney of Lake City, FL; sons,


David (Lori) Setney, Bruce (Su-
zanna) both of Miami, FL; daugh-
ter, Brenda (Radcliffe) Sagram
of New Smyrna, FL; grandchil-
dren, Amanda & Kyle Setney of
Miami, FL, and Hailey Setney of
Modesto, CA; great grandchild,
Damian Brown of New Smyrna,
FL; sisters, Mary Ann Mellen of
Beaufort, SC, and Pauline Da-
vis of Climax, GA; uncle, Perry
H. Lofton of Folkston, GA; and
niece by marriage, Cindy Ford
of New Hope, PA also survives.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 12:00 p.m. on Thurs-
day, November 4, 2010 in the
chapel of GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 U.S. Hwy 441 S., Lake
City, Fl, 32025. Visitation with
the family will be held one hour
prior to service time. A private
family interment will follow
at the Jacksonville National
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers
the family requests that dona-
tions be made in Mr. Setney's
honor to the Columbia Coun-
ty/Lake City Humane Society
Animal Shelter at Shelter Drive
Lake City, FL. 1329 NW Shel-
ter Glen, Lake City, FL 32025


Charles V. Tillman
Mr. Charles V. Tillman, 66, a
lifelong resident of Columbia
County passed away Saturday,
October 30, 2010 in the V.A.
ter follow-
ing a lengthy
illness. Mr. V
Tillman was a
veteran of the
United States
Army and
served three
tours of duty in
Vietnam He ,
was awarded
two bronze stars
for his service in Vietnam Mr.
Tillman worked in construction
for many years prior to ill health
forcing him to retire. Mr. Tillman
was of the Baptist faith. In his
spare time he enjoyed fishing,
playing darts and singing kara-
oke. Mr. Tillman was preceded
in death by his father Alfred
Tillman, Sr., a brother, Alfred
Tillman, Jr., two sisters, Carol
Prescott and Anita Cromwell
and by his son Ashley Stephens.


Mr. Tillman is survived by his
mother, Sue Alford of Lake City;
three brothers, Glenn Tillman,
Bob Alford and Tony Coker; his
two sisters, Tammy Mullinax
and Lori Coker and his compan-
ion, Sue Nettles all of Lake City.
His grand-daughter, Autumn
also survives. Numerous niec-
es and nephews also survive.
Graveside funeral services with
Military Honors for Mr. Till-
man will be conducted at 1:00
P.M. on Thursday, November 4,
2010 in the Olustee Cemetery
with Rev. Jim Steele officiat-
ing. Interment will immediately
follow. The family will receive
friends froti-$500-7:00 Wednes-
day evening th the Chapel of the
funeral home. Arrangements are
under the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERALHOME,458 S.Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025
. (386)752-1234. Please sign
the on-line fl.mily guestbook at
parrishfamifuneralhome. cornm

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For dtalls, call the Lake
City Reportert) classified depart-
ment at 75211293.


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POLICE REPORTS










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424
---


BRIEFS

BP reports profits
amid oil spill costs
BILOXI, Miss. BP
PLC is once again report-
ing profits even with an
estimated $40 billion price
tag for the response to its .
blown out well in the Gulf
of Mexico.
In this waterfront city,
where many lost their live-.
lihoods to the summer of
oil, a mixture of relief and
melancholy greeted the
news Tuesday.. A financially
healthy BP means jobs and
compensation, but resi-
.dents still reeling' from the
worst offshore oil spill in
U.S. history are waiting for
some good news of their
own.
BP said that costs
related to the April 20 oil
spill dragged down its
third-quarter profit by
more than 60 percent. The
London-based company
earned $1.79 billion from
July through September,
compared with $5.3 billion
a year earlier. But the fact
that BP returned to profits
at all, coming after a loss of
$17.2 billion in the second
quarter, indicated the com-
pany's operations remain
solid despite the spill.


Court hears sides
on video games
WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court on Tuesday
expressed sympathy for a
California law that aims to
keep children from buying
ultra-violent video games in
which players maim, kill or
sexually assault images of
people.
But justices seemed
closely split on whether the
restrictions are constitu-
tional.
California officials argue
that they should be allowed
to limit minors' ability to
pick up violent video games
.on their own at retailers
because of the purported
damage they cause to the
mental development of
children. Some justices
appeared to agree.
'We do not have a tradi-
tion in this country of tell-
ing children they should
watch people actively
hitting schoolgirls over
the head with a shovel so
. they'll beg with mercy,
being merciless and decapi-
tating them, shooting peo-
ple in the leg so they fall
down," Chief Justice John
Roberts said.


COLUMBIA VOTES

Scenes from the Supervisor of Election's Office in Lake City Tuesday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Report
Marc Kazmierski (right) speaks with Gayle Cannon (center) about the final votes for County Commission District 2.
/


JASON MATTHEW WALKER'L :.r' Fep,:.ner
From top left, clockwise: Lake City residents Wayne (from left), Kyle and
Kyler Keen, 1. look over the preliminary results from the elections: Steve Smith
of the Chamber of Commerce speaks with Shane Beadles about Leadership
Lake City; and Linda Ramirez awaits for the final results at the Supervisor of
Elections Office on Tuesday.


Mail bombs larger
than Christmas plot


WASHINGTON -Al-
Qaida's top bombmaker
raised his game, officials
believe, by following his
miss on a crowded U.S.-
bound passenger jet last
Christmas with four times
more explosives packed
into bombs hidden last
week on flights from
Yemen.
The two bombs con-
tained 300 and 400 grams
of the industrial explosive
PETN, according to a
German security official.
By comparison, the bomb
stuffed into a terrorist
suspect's underwear on the
Detroit-bound plane con-
tained about 80 grams.
* Associated Press


2Qtsinnuol

PD Mi O n 5(esthiil & t i













Award Winning Fine Arts Festival
Ranked as the 27th best fine art show in the nation.
Featuring 250 artists,, live entertainment on 3 stages,
hands-on art activity area for children and a Blues
Concert Friday at 7 pm. Fun for the whole family!


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Tillany Renee
Murphy
DOB: 8/11/89
Height: 5' 07'
Weight: 140 Ibs.
Hair: Black
Eyes: Green
Wanted for: VOP 2 Counts
-r nn.irny in Oxycodone


Tammy K.
Hicks
AKA: Tammy Mathis, Tammy
Williamson
DOB: 3/20/61
Height: 5'02"2 Weight: 122 lbs.
Hair; Brown Eyes: Green
Wanted For: Vop 2 Counts
Attempted Trafficking in
Oxycodone


WANTED AS OF 11/1/10
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
FCLMI A ICHNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


MERCANTILE BAN W



COLUMBIA COUNTY FAIR *U '
BANQUET HALL
November 11th, 2010 SI


Saonoraqy Chairmran



-Chef Specialty Foods
-Complimentary Wine Tasting
t-Live Music "Harry, Sally,& Billy"i
1.Uve & Silent Auction
-Festival of Trees & Wreaths
w Ow 40 Oft do ww M J


S Gulf Coast Financial Services
ht
State Farm Insurance (John Burns III)
Columbia Bank
CCA-Lake City Correctional Facility
Columbia Grain & Ingredients
Momex Foods "Taco Bell. Krystal'
S Campus USA Credit Inon
-h-andsLakeShore


Contact Info:- -; '%
(386) 623-1505 or -; :
kmccallister@marchofdimes.c
www.marchofdimes.corh/flr.,
Tickets $50) available at.
Jasper News
Ward's Jewelers
First Street Music
Suwannee Democrat
Pountree Moore Toyota '4"
Mercantile Bank (All Locations)
.< ''*


rntintg Sponsor
Mercantile Bank
Sat.CrporateSponmor
Publix
Bs ,.j P arin.a ,
Lake City Medical Cenimr ,,ihijrv'
Maureen and '.'er, LIc.,d
Edward Jones lnvestmeniSi_ .-e Jo.r,n.
SiTEL
North Florida Pediatricz
Dees-Parrish Fam.l, Funeral HomEn


Media Sponsors
Lake iity Reporter
LaIe Cir, A.dvErtser
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. .. .- ,
"* i .yJu- # %









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkjrby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, November 3, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GATORS
Grill Gamecocks
on Nov. 11
The North Florida
Gator Club is sponsoring
a "Grill the Gamecocks"
social at 6 p.m. Nov. 11
at the home of Mike and
Terri Millikin on State
Road 47. Steve Russell
of WRUF radio is guest
speaker and the club will
provide dinner. Bring a
lawn chair. All Gator fans
are invited.
For details, call Ian at
(352) 316-4305, Bob at
752-3333, Ron at
(386) 397-3378 or Angela
at 758-8801.

Packages for
football games
"Journey to the
Swamp" is a Columbia
County Tourist
Development Council
initiative with Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites and
Fabulous Coach Lines
to provide
transportation from Lake
City to the Florida game
against South Carolina
on Nov. 13. Holiday Inn
is offering a two-night
package, and Fabulous
Coach Lines will provide
motor coach
transportation. Local fans
can take advantage of the
transportation.
For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or call
. the Holiday Inn at
754-1411.
CHS FOOTBALL
Old Tigers
photos sought
The public is invited
to bring old Columbia
High football photos to
the Columbia County
Quarterback Club booth
at the Columbia County
Fair from
5-9 p.m. today and
Thursday. Submissions,
anything associated
with Tiger football, will
be used in the 100
Years of Tiger Football
Celebration publication
planned in 2011. Photos
will be scanned at the
booth and immediately
returned.
For details, call Jen
Chasteen at (386)
288-2500 or e-mail
chstigerslOO@atlantic. net.
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
volleyball at ,Trinity
Catholic High in region
quarterfinal, 7 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Gainesville
High at CYSA field,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
cross country in District
2-2A meet at Bishop
Kenny High, girls-
4:30 p.m., boys-5 p.m.
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
swimming in Region
1-2A meet at Panama City
Beach Aquatic Center,
9 a.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Wolfson High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
cross country in District


2-3A meet at Ridgeview
High, girls-8 a.m., boys-
8:45 a.m.


Kirkman reflects on Series


Lake City native
first to compete
in fall classic.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
The Texas Rangers had
to watch the wrong team
celebrate a World Series
win.
San Francisco polished
off a 4-1 win in the Series
with a 3-1 victory on
Monday.
"The whole bullpen sat
and watched for 3-4 min-
utes in disbelief," Rangers
reliever Michael Kirkman
said Tuesday. "We were try-
ing to imagine what it was
like."
Kirkman also was with
the Texas bullpen for the
AL Division Series and AL


Championship Series, and
had seen the other side of
the celebration.
"There was a letdown,
but the feeling in the club-
house was there was noth-
ing to hang our heads
about," Kirkman said. "We
went cold at the wrong
time."
San Francisco deserved
the praise for breaking its
Series drought, but the
Rangers got to the World
Series for the first time in
their 50-year history.
"We still feel like we are
the best team in baseball,"
Kirkman said. "When we
were pitching, we were not
hitting; when we were hit-
ting, we were not pitching."
Kirkman said the play-
ers met with manager Ron
Washington, who expressed
the same sentiments.


"All the coaches had a
little something to say,"
Kirkman said. "We said our
good-byes and everybody
was packing their bags,
then the media shower
came."
Kirkman said he and wife
Lorie would return to Lake
City for the offseason.
'We could leave as early
as this afternoon," Kirkman
said. "This is Tuesday,
right. You lose touch all
season. Every day, you ask
what day is it."
Kirkman has a meet-
ing in Fort Worth before
returning home today or
Thursday.
Kirkman will return as
an even bigger hometown
hero the first Lake City
native to appear in the
World Series.
"I want to thank every-


T .
DiamondDiary
World Series notes fiom
- 'KhK Michad1Kiman


AiJ


body for all the support on Michael Kirkman is a 2005
Facebook and the texts," graduate of Columbia High.
Kirkman said. "People who The left-hander was called
have known me for a long up by the Texas Rangers
time reached out and sup- in August and has pitched
ported me and I appreciate in relief. He is sharing his
it." World Series experience
with readers of the Lake
E Lake City native City Reporter. .


COURTESY PHOTO
Michael Kirkman peers in for the sign from the catcher, as he pitches against the Yankees
during the American League Championship Series in New York.


COURTESY PHOTO
Scott and Lisa Kirkman (from left) of Lake City join Texas Rangers rookie Michael Kirkman
and wife Lorie in Arlington, Texas, for the World Series. Michael is holding his nephew,
Caden Kirkman, who naturally dressed as a Ranger for Halloween.


Just keep swimming


CHS sends seven
to regional swim
meet on Friday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
,bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Like the famous fish
from Disney's "Finding
Nemo," Columbia High
just keeps swimming. Five
swimmers qualified for the
regional meet at the District
2-2A swim meet hosted by
Ridgeview High.
Columbia's Dave Morse
will represent the boys,
while Katherine Mathis,
Lauren Lee, Lindsay Lee
and Heather Burns take
part for the girls.
Two swimmers were able
to better school records in
the district meet. Burns fin-
ished with a time of 5:19.38
in the 500 freestyle for a
third-place finish, which
helped her qualify for
regionals.
Lindsay Lee bettered her
school-record mark in the
100 backstroke with a time
of 1:00.15 for a second-place
finish.
Lauren Lee had high
remarks for her fellow
CHS continued on 2B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High swimmers that qualified for the regional
meet are (front row, from left) Lauren Lee, Heather Burns,
Katherine Mathis and Micheala Polhumus. Sitting from
bottom are Jordy Smith, Lindsay Lee and David Morse.


COURTESY PHOTO
Michael Kirkman looks up from the dugout at Yankee Stadium
during the American League Championship Series.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
CHS's Timmy Jernigan looks on at practice on Tuesday.

Jernigan to be honored


Tiger named to
Alf-American
game for play.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn

Columbia High's
Timmy Jernigan is taking
his talents to a national


audience. Jernigan makes
his U.S. Army All-American
Bowl selection official at
11 a.m. Friday.
The presentation at
Columbia High will honor
Jernigan for his play on
the football field as he'll
make up one member of
JERNIGAN continued on 3B


I - I - -- I I












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Rutgers at South Florida
GOLF
12 Midnight
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, HSBC
Champions, first round, at Shanghai
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Milwaukee at Boston
10:30 p.m.
ESPN LA. Lakers at Sacramento

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
Cincinnati


Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


East
W L
6 I
5 2
4 3
0 7
South
W L
5 2
5 3
4 3
4 4
North
W L
5 2
5 2
2 5
2 5
West
W L
5 2
4 4
3 5
2 6


T Pct PF PA
0.857205 154
0.714159 110
0.571 133 149
0.000131 211

T Pct PF PA
0.714 193 142
0.625 224 150
0.571 170 197
0.500 165 226

TPct PF PA
0.714 149 129
0.714 147 102
0.286 118 142
0.286 146 163

TPct PF PA
0.714163 122
0.500212 168
0.375210 174
0.250 154 223


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPc& PF PA
N.Y.Giants 5 2 0.714 175 153
Philadelphia 4 3 0.571 172 157
Washington 4 4 0.500 155 170
Dallas I 6 0.143 154 187
South
W L TPct PF PA
Atlanta 5 2 0.714 169 133
Tampa Bay 5 2 0.714136 163
New Orleans 5 3 0.625 167 148
Carolina I 6 0.143 85 150
North
W L TPct PF PA
Green Bay 5 3 0.625 176 136
Chicago 4 3 0.571 126 114
Minnesota 2 5 0.286 129 144
Detroit 2 5 0.286 183 165
West
W L TPct PF PA
Seattle 4 3 0.571 123 140
St.Louis 4 4 0.500140 141
Arizona 3 4 0.429 133 198
San Francisco 2 6 0.250 137 178
Monday's Game
Indianapolis 30, Houston 1.7
Sunday's Games
Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Detroit, I p.m.
Miami at Baltimore, I p.m.
San Diego at Houston, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
New England at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 8
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis,
Jacksonville, San Francisco,Tennessee

AP Top 25 schedule

Thursday
No. 20 Virginia Tech vs. Georgia Tech,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday's Gaimes
No. I Oregon vs. Washington,
3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Boise State vs. Hawaii, 3:30 p.m.
No. 3 Auburn vs. Chattanooga, I p.m.
No.4 TCU at No.6 Utah, 3:30 p.m.
No. 5 Alabama at No. 12 LSU,
3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Wisconsin at Purdue, Noon
No. 9 Nebraska at Iowa State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Stanford vs. No. 13 Arizona,
8 p.m.
No. II Oklahoma at Texas A&M,
7 p.m.
No. 14 Missouri at Texas Tech, 8 p.m.
No. IS Iowa at Indiana, Noon
No. 16 Michigan State vs. Minnesota,
Noon
No. 17 Arkansas at. No. 18 South
Carolina, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Oklahoma State vs. No. 22
Baylor, 12:30 p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina State at
Clemson, Noon
No. 24 Florida State vs. North
Carolina, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Nevada at Idaho, 5 p.m.

Harris Top 25

The Top 25 teams in the Harris
Interactive College Football Poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Oct. 30, total points and prior
ranking:


Ri
I. Oregon (92)
2.Auburn (10)
3. Boise State (12)
4.TCU
5.Alabama
6. Utah
7.Wisconsin


ec


cord Pts Pv
8-0, 2,823 I
9-0 2,683 3
7-0 2,635 2
9-0 2,529 4
7-1 2,346 6
8-0 2,171 7
7-1 2,041 9


R, nIT


8. Ohio State
9. Oklahoma
10. Stanford
I I. Nebraska
12. LSU
13.Arizona
14. Iowa
15. Missouri
16. Michigan State
17.Arkansas
18. Oklahoma State
19. South Carolina
20.Virginia Tech
21. Mississippi State
22. Baylor
23. Nevada
24. Florida State
25. NC State


1,986 10
1,891 I I
1,797 13
1,793 14
1,705 12
1,378 15
1,307 17
1,293 8
1,279 5
971 18
925 20
903 19
631 21
574 23
422 25
288 24
252 16
139 NR


Other teams receiving votes: Hawaii
73; Florida 54; Syracuse 53; Oregon
State 28; Northwestern 16; Maryland 13;
Miami 10; San Diego State 10; Michigan
9; UCF 7;Temple 4;Texas A&M 4;Virglnla
4; Navy I; Pittsburgh I;WestVirginia'1.

College games

Today
Rutgers (4-3) at South Florida
(4-3), 7 p.m.
Thursday
Buffalo (2-6) at Ohio (6-3), 7:30 p.m.
Friday
W. Michigan (3-5) at Cent. Michigan
(I-8),6 p.m.
UCF (6-2) at Houston (5-3),
8 p.m.
GOLF

Golf week

WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS
HSBC Champions
Site: Shanghai.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sheshan International Golf
Club (7,143 yards, par 72).
Purse: $7 million. Winner's share: $1.2
million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
midnight-4 a.m., 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Friday,
midnght-4 a.m., 8 a.m.-4 p.m., I I p.m.-
4 am.; Saturday, 7 a.m.-4 p.m., I I p.m.-
3 a.m.; Sunday, 7 a.m.-4 p.m.).
Online: httpJlwww.worldgolfchampion

PGA Tour site: http'J/www.pgatour.com
PGA European Tour site http'llwww.
europeontour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Charles Schwab Cup Championship
Site: San Francisco.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Harding Park Golf Course
(6,743 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.5 million. Winner's share:
$440,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday. 4:30-7 p.m., 7:30-10 p.m.).
LPGA TOUR/JAPAN LPGA TOUR
Mizuno Classic
Site: Shima Japan.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Kintetsu Kashikojima Country
Club (6,506 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.2 million. Winner's share:
$180,000.
Television: None.
Online: hytp'/www.lpgo.com
Japan LPGA Tour site: httpJ1www.lpgo.
or.jp

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Chicago 110, Portland 98
Sacramento II I,Toronto 108
San Antonio 97, LA. Clippers 88
Tuesday's Games
Atlanta at Cleveland (n)
Philadelphia atWashington (n)
Boston at Detroit (n)
Minnesota at Miami (n)
Orlando at NewYork (n)
Portland at Milwaukee (n)
Memphis at LA. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Detroit at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at Denver,9 p.m.
Toronto at Utah, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers,
10:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
New York at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. Illinois-Chicago,
7 p.m.
No. 13 Illinois vs.Toledo, 8 p.m.
Friday's Games



Unscrambfe these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

GINOR
"1 V 1 I

@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All RIghts Reserved.

TUBOD /




DROINOI




TOPICS
?^s--^-


No. 2 Michigan State vs. Eastern
Michigan. 8:30 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas State vs.James Madison.
9 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State vs. North Carolina
A&T, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Villanova vs. Bucknell, 8 p.m.
No. 7 Kansas vs. Longwood, 8 p.m.
No. 8 North Carolina vs. Lipscomb,
7 p.m.
No. 9 Florida vs. North Carolina
Wilmington, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Syracuse vs. Northern Iowa,
7 p.m.
No. II Kentucky vs. ETSU, 7 p.m.
No. 12 Gonzaga vs. Southern U.,
9. p.m.
No. 16 Baylor vs. Grambling State,
9:30 p.m.
No. 19 Memphis vs. Centenary, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Georgetown at Old Dominion,
7 p.m.
No. 21 Virginia Tech vs. Campbell,
7:30 p.m.
No. 22 Temple vs. Seton Hall.
7:30 p.m.
No. 23 Tennessee vs. Chattanooga,
9 p.m.
No. 24 BYU vs. Fresno State, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. North
Florida, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Illinois vs. Southern Illinois,
8 p.m.
No. 17 Butler vs. Marian, Ind., 2 p.m.
No. 18Washington vs. McNeese State,
4 p.m.
No. 25 San Diego State at Long Beach
State, 7:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. I Duke vs. Princeton, 5 p.m.
No. 10 Syracuse vs. Canisius, 3 p.m.
No. 12 Gonzaga vs. IUPUI, 4 p.m.
No. 14 Purdue vs. Howard, 5 p.m.
No. 22 Temple vs.Toledo, 3 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3, Chicago 2
Philadelphia 3, Carolina 2
Vancouver 3, New Jersey 0
Tuesday's Games
Ottawa at Toronto (n)
Montreal at Columbus (n)
San Jose at Minnesota (n)
Vancouver at Edmonton (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Tampa Bay atAnaheim, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS playoffs

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Semifinals
NewYork vs. San Jose
NewYork I, San Jose 0
Thursday
New York vs San Jose, 8 p.m.
Columbus Vs. Colorado
Colorado I, Columbus 0
Saturday
Columbus vs. Colorado, 4 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Semifinals
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas
FC Dallas 2, Real Salt Lake I
Saturday
Real Salt Lake vs. Dallas, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles vs. Seattle
Los Angeles I, Seattle 0
Sunday
Los Angeles vs. Seattle, 9 p.m. .

BASEBALL

Baseball calendar

Through Saturday Free agent peri-
od to sign exclusively with former teams,
first five days after World Series ends.
Nov. 16-17 General managers'
meetings, Orlando
Nov. 17-18 Owners' meetings,
Orlando
Nov. 23 Last day for teams to offer
salary arbitration to their former players
who became free agents.
Nov. 29-Dec. 2 Major League
Baseball Players Association executive
board meeting, Orlando
Nov. 30 Last day for free agents
offered salary arbitration to accept the
offers.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME |
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek I


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: L I "I"
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PEACH HENNA DEVOUR FEWEST
I Answer: What the indecisive forecaster worried
about THE "WHETHER"


GOLF REPORTS



Watts team wins Moon Golf


Moon Golf on Saturday
was a huge success.
There was a spectacular
meal with lots of treats, and
as the sun set you could
see the glowing of the
flagsticks. Everyone set out
to have fun.
The team of Jason Watts,


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey


PhillipRussell,TomBridges
and Danny Harrington won
with a 2-undervpar.
This Saturday, Quail


Heights is hosting the
Covenant Community
School Tournament to help
raise money for the school.
The event is a four-person
scramble with a 1 p.m.
shotgun start
For details, call the pro
shop at 752-3339.


Hale cashes in on pot hole


Finally! Fifteen weeks
after reaching the maxi-
mum level, Wednesday's
big pot hole prize found a
taker.
Jordan Hale's birdie
on the tough 10th hole
was good for a skin and
the big reward. Dwight
Rhodes, Mike McCranie,
Chad Hunter and Donnie
Thomas claimed the other
skins last Wednesday.
Randy VanVleck turned
a comfortable lead into a
rout with a birdie on the
final hole in the Wednesday
Blitz. His +12 total outdis-
tanced Charlie Timmons
by six strokes. Buddy Slay
took third at +2.
Dave Mehl came out of
the pack with two late bird-
ies to join Don Combs and
Dennis Hendershott in a
three-way tie for first place
in the Saturday Blitz. All
three finished at +9.
Eddy Brown picked, up a
winner in the skins game to
match one each by Combs


World Golf Ranking


Through Oct. 31
I. Lee Westwood Eng
2.TigerWoods USA
3. Martin Kaymer Ger
4. Phil Mickelson USA
5. Steve Stricker USA
6.Jim Furyk USA
7. Paul Casey Eng
8. Luke Donald Eng
9. Rory Mcllroy NIr
10. Gr. McDowell NIr
I I. Matt Kuchar USA
12. Ernie Els SAf
13. Dustin Johnson USA
14. lan Poulter Eng
15. Hunter Mahan USA
16. Edoardo Molinari Ita
17. Retief G6osen SAf
18. Zach Johnson USA
19. Pad. Harrington Irl
20.'Louis Oosthuizen SAf
21. Robert Allenby Aus
22.Anthony Kim USA


1
5 .

10

12
13
14
4

15
16


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

and Mehl.
The LGA honored
Halloween with a spook
match by "spooking" out
scores on the odd-num-
bered holes. Total strokes
needed on even-numbered
holes modified by half the
players' handicaps were
used to compute final
scores.
Faye Warren and Nancy
Edgar finished in a dead-
lock for first at 38. Warren
claimed the victory in a
scorecard tiebreaker.
Roberta Whitaker and
Caroline Stevens tied for
third, one stroke back.'
The first Good Old Boys
match was close with little
scoring. Mark Risk, Carl
Wilson, Jim Bell and Mike
Spenser finally prevailed,
4-3, over Stan Woolbert,
Eli Witt, Nick Whitehurst


23.Justin Rose Eng 3.71
24. M.Angel Jimenez Esp 3.67
25. Bubba Watson USA 3.66
26. Nick Watney USA 3.53
27. Ross Fisher Eng 3.53
28. Rickie Fowler USA 3.53
29. Camilo Villegas Col 3.47
30. F'ncesco Molinari Ita 3.43

Number I rankings

History of the No. I ranking in golf
since Tiger Woods turned pro on Aug.
27, 1996:
Aug. 27, 1996: Greg Norman
(33 weeks)-x
April 20, 1997:Tom Lehman (I week)
April 27, 1997: Greg Norman
(7 weeks)
June 15, 1997:Tiger Woods (I week)
June 22, 1997: Ernie Els (I week)
June 29, 1997: Greg Norman
(I week)
July 6, 1997:Tiger Woods (9 weeks)
Sept. 7, 1997: Greg Norman


ACROSS 38 Shrimp entrde
40 Perfume label
Sizable book word
Pottery frag- 43 Crude metal
ment 44 Dove into sec-
Leave, as a ond
ship 48 Bakery goody
Let borrow 50 Ritzy property
Hardy or 52 Foul-ups
Cromwell 53 More quick-wit-
Opens, ted
as a parka 54 North Woods
Unbounded joy animal
John, in 55 "Waterboy"
Aberdeen Sandier


18 Loop trains
19 Rogue
22 Calf-length
skirts
25 Leaflets
29 Fromm and
Sevareid
30 Makes light of
32 Wolfgang's
thanks
33 Doctrine
34 Tabloids "mon-
ster"
37 Rust or patina


DOWN

1 Not keep a
secret
2 Oscar's cousin
3 Noncon-
formists
4 Before, poeti-
cally
5 Dad's lad
6 Thin fog
7 Dye-yielding
plant


Want more puzzles
Check out the "Just Right Crossword
* at QuillDriverBooks.co


and Don Christensen.
Match 2 saw lots of scor-
ing topped by the team
of Monty Montgomery,
Bobby Simmons, Howard
Whitaker and Dan
Stephens in a 10-7 triumph
over Ed Snow, Steve Peters,
Joe Persons and Merle
Hibbard.
Montgomery took indi-
vidual honors with a 35-36-
71. Risk (39-37-76),Woolbert
(38-39-77) and' Snow (40-
39-79) rounded out the top
18-hole scorers.
Nine-hole honors went
to Christensen (38) over
Simmons (39) on the front,
and Whitaker (38) over
Stephens (39) on the back.
Upcoming events:
Nov. 12, Students In
Transition benefit scramble
sponsored by Suwannee
Correctional Institution.
(registration 7 a.m., shot-
gun start at 8 a.m.);
Nov. 20, Columbia
High Dugout Club scram-
ble (8 a.m. shotgun start).


(18 weeks)
Jan. I I, 1998:Tiger Woods (13 weeks)
April 12, 1998: Ernie Els (4 week)
May 10, 1998:TigerWoods (I week)
May 17, 1998: Ernie Els (4 weeks)
June 14, 1998: Tiger Woods
(41 weeks)
March 28, 1999: David Duval
(14 weeks)
July 4, 1999:Tiger Woods (5 weeks)
Aug. 8, 1999: David Duval (I week)
Aug. 15, 1999: Tiger Woods
(264 weeks)
Sept. 6, 2004:Vijay Singh (26 weeks)
March 6, 2005: Tiger Woods
(2 weeks)
March 20, 2005:Vijay Singh (3 weeks)
April 10, 2005: Tiger Woods
(6 weeks)
May 22, 2005:Vijay Singh (3 weeks)
June 12, 2005: Tiger Woods
(281 weeks)
Oct. 31,2010: Lee Westwood

Note: Norman had been No. I since
June 18, 1995.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

T IKI MIIN Y OIGII
DIA A K A E R A
S IN TIST R AD Z IE
M A A|A cAR E EIR]

WT[ A1 NlY J lI
WEE SULTAN
ORA|L NE'E D|EWS
SOLE TATSKl IP

--MjOOR ElD) EPA
|J U MfP|p AIDES
OS I ER D N
OD IN OD YS EU
RI NG TENN ELMO
MEGS SGEs E TlfIP S


8 Agents 12 Pertaining to
9 Tooth fixer's the moon
deg. 17 Perform
10 Vet patient 20 Impose taxes
11 Singer Kristoff- 21 Notebook rela-
erson tive
22 Kind of stu-
s? dent
d Puzzles" books
3m1 23 Where Tehran


is
24 Sup well
26 Got along
peacefully
27 R&B's Braxton
28 Lean-to
31 Sault Marie
35 Holy images
36 Hearing aid?
39 Overly sub-
missive
40 EEC currency
41 Dated hairdo
42 Roswell sight-
ings, briefly
45 A Turner
46 Article
47 Van Waals
force
48 Dues payer,
for short
49 Umbrage
51 Shark habitat


11-3 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


.)MlI


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I I
















After loss, Rangers waiting on Lee


By STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas
- Minutes after the World
Series ended, the grounds
crew for the Texas Rangers
started fixing the pitching
mound while the visiting
San Francisco Giants cel-
ebrated nearby.
One of the biggest ques-
tions going into the shortest
winter ever for the Rangers
is whether ace left-hander
Cliff Lee will be on that
mound in five months, when
they begin the 2011 sea-
son as defending American
League champions.
"It goes without saying
we want him here," third
baseman Michael Young
said. "We want him pitching
opening day for the Rangers
next year."
Texas defeated the New
York Yankees in the AL
championship series to get
to its first World Series.
Beating the deep-pocketed
Yankees again this time
for free-agent Lee could
come at a very high cost
Lee was traded July 9
from Seattle to Texas, his
fourth team in less than
year. This time, the 2008
AL Cy Young Award winner
gets to decide where he will
pitch.
"I know I enjoyed it from
Day One 'til now. It was a
very fun ride and a great
group of guys. I can't say
enough about that It was
very fun," Lee said. "Right
now, the season's over. I'm


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas Rangers' Cliff Lee lobs the ball to first base on a bunt by San Francisco Giants' Aubrey Huff during the seventh inning
of Game 5 of baseball's World Series Monday, Nov. 1, 2010, in Arlington, Texas.


going to spend time with
iny family, relax a little bit
and that stuff will take care
of itself later on."
While Lee helped the
Rangers get to the World
Series, he lost both of his
starts to the San Francisco
Giants in the Fall Classic
after looking invincible in
the postseason until then.
That included Game 5 on
Monday night, a 3-1 loss
in a rematch of the Series
opener against two-time NL
Cy Young Award winner
Tim Lincecum.
Still, the Rangers got fur-
ther than ever before in the
franchise's 50th season.
"It was a special season,"


Josh Hamilton said. 'We
were the' best team in the
American League. There's
something to be said for
that. We know what kind of
team we are. We know how
we can possibly be in the
future."
The Rangers. had never
won a postseason series,
or even a* home playoff
game, before this year.
This was only the 17th win-
ning record in 39 seasons
since moving to Texas after
the franchise started as
the expansion .Washington
Senators in 1961.
"The most exciting part
is that we set .the bar high
now," said Young, the


team's career hits leader
and longest-tenured player
after 10 seasons. "There's
a completely different level
of expectation for this team
and this organization, and
that's what we all want to be
a part of."
What remains unclear is
if that will include Lee, the
most prominent of seven
free agents.
General manager Jon
Daniels indicated there
will be more money than
in recent years to address
such matters. That comes
courtesy of the new own-
ership group headed by
Chuck Greenberg and
Nolan Ryan that acquired


the team during a feder-
al bankruptcy auction in
August, seven months after
agreeing to buy the team
from Tom Hicks.
It will take a lot of cash to
keep Lee deep in the heart
of Texas, not far from his
Arkansas home.
"We think we've got a lot
of great things to offer here.
He and his family have cer-
tainly gotten a taste of that,"
Greenberg, the team's man-
aging partner, said in the
clubhouse after the Series.
"We've got a great future as
an organization and we're
going to be prepared to be
aggressive to help make his,
decision easier."


Greenberg wasn't specif-
ic about what kind of offers
the Rangers could rhake to
Lee.
"He's been great for us
here," Daniels said of Lee.
"I don't know how you can
really say exactly what that
value is, but it's been pretty
significant for us."
Hamilton, who led the
majors' with a .359 batting
average but went 2 for 20
with one RBI in the World
Series, slugger Nelson
Cruz and reliever-turned-
starter C.J. Wilson, a 15-
game winner, are eligible
for arbitration. But they are
under the team's control for
next season.
Joining Lee in free
agency are designated hit-
ter Vladimir Guerrero, pri-
mary setup reliever Frank
Francisco, catchers Bengie
Molina and Matt Treanor,
and infielders Jorge Cantu
and Cristian Guzman.
Guerrero had quite a
comeback year after an
injury-plagued 2009 sea-
son with the Los Angeles
Angels, who didn't re-sign
the 2004 AL MVP The 35-
year-old slugger hit .300
with 29 homers and 115
RBIs in 152 regular-season
games before going 1 for 14
in his first World Series.
"There were some
that doubted him coming
off last year. I think he's
proved some of those peo-
ple wrong, had a very good
year for us," Daniels said.
"Obviously we'll look at it
all in context."


39- JERNIGAN: Honored
Dow4.on~tinued From Page 1B


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Lake City Pop Warner Pee Wee team with their trophy are (front row, from left) Ethan Goodrich,
Marcell Bell, Kenny Steele, Ryan Raymer, Logan Lowery and Aaron Barber. Second row (from left) are coach Larry Keen
Jaquez Dunmore, Kaleb Thomas, Jordan Culp, Tyius Duffy, Reggie Sharpe, Davin Schuck, Derrek Simpson and coach
Trent Steedley. Back row (from left) are head coach Richard Keen, Mike Williams, Josh Manning, Ronnie Collins Jr.,
Jake Stephens, AJ James, Marcel Edmond, Teon Dollard and coach Russell Thomas.



Close call in championship


From staff reports

The Lake City Pop
Warner Pee Wee team
fell to Santa Fe, 13-12,
in the Putnam Athletic
Association Pop Warner
league championship game
in Starke on Saturday.
Lake City took a 6-0 lead


in the first quarter on a
10-yard touchdown run by
Ronnie Collins.
A procedure penalty
stopped the next scoring
opportunity for Lake City
and Santa Fe drove the
length of the field for a
touchdown and 6-6 tie at
the half.


The defenses took con-
trol early in the second
half. Lake City was twice
turned away near the goal
and returned the favor by
stopping Santa Fe three
times inside the 10.
Collins broke a 15-yard
sweep for a touchdown and
a 12-6 Lake City lead with


6:05 left in the third quarter.
The game returned to
a defensive battle until
late when Jeremy Lawson
broke a long run and fol-
lowed with a three-yard
TD burst for Santa Fe. The
extra point with 3:37 left on
the clock proved to be the
difference.


Fort White faces tough competition

at Bishop Kenny cross country meet


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High's cross coun-
try team will compete in
the District 2-2A meet at
Bishop Kenny High on
Thursday. The girls start at
4:30 p.m., followed by the
boys at 5 p.m.
The 18-team District 2 is
likely the toughest 2A field
in the state. It includes


2009 state champions
Bolles School for the girls
and Bishop Kenny for the
boys. The Bishop Kenny
girls placed second.
Fourteen of the 15 girls
advancing from region to
state last year were from
District 2. This year, the
top 19 seeds in the region
are from District 2.
The top four Lady Indians
runners are Sydni Jones
(seventh-grader), Ashley


Jones (eighth-grader),
Seaira Fletcher (eighth-
grader) and Carolee
Morrow (sophomore).
At fifth through ninth are
juniors Marissa Fletcher
and Taylor Douglass, soph-
omore Sitia Martinez, and
eighth-graders Kayleigh
Stokes and Hannah
Chamberlain.
Senior Matt Waddington
and sixth-grader Andy Hart
are the top Fort White boys.


Rounding out the team are
senior Caleb Regar, fresh-
men Brandon Lam and Alex
Southerland, and sixth-
graders Dillon Mosley and
Wesley Blakley.
Seven runners can com-
pete in the meet, with the
top five scoring for the
team. From 6-8 teams will
advance to region (depend-
ing on the number in the
field), and the top 15 indi-
viduals also advance.


Hamilton looking for big season at FSU


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE After
successive fourth place fin-
ishes in the Atlantic Coast
Conference, Florida State
basketball coach Leonard
Hamilton believes the


Seminoles are ready to
move up a notch or two.
The 62-year-old coach
heads into his ninth sea-
son at Florida State with
the nucleus of a team that
has gone 47-20 the past
two seasons but was elimi-
nated both years in the first


round of NCAAtournament
play.
Hamilton is confident
that this year's team
could be his best one yet
at Florida State. It will be
the deepest and certain-
ly tallest with four play-
ers scheduled for regular


action ranging between 6-9
and 7-foot.
The home schedule
features homes games
against defending nation-
al champion Duke and
nonconference visits
by Florida and Ohio
State.


the 2011 game which will
be played on Jan. 11. In all,
there are 90 football players
from across the country to
receive that recognition.
"It's just an honor,"
Jernigan said. "I sit black
and tfink 4bo'ut how blessed
I,am. Only a handful of play-
ers from around the coun-
try, not just Florida or the
county, receive that honor."
With just days remaining
until the announcement,
Jernigan, who has known
of his selection, said the
nerves are starting to catch
up with him. ,
"At first it didn't really
hit me," he said. "It's just a
dream come true."
The U.S. Army All-
American Bowl is a grand
stage for top-rated recruits
to announce their inten-
tions for playing at the next
level. Jernigan still isn't
sure when he'll make that
choice.
"It could happen there,"
he said. "My original plans
were to go deep into the
playoffs, but now our hopes
are slim. The sooner that I
can make that decision, the
better."
Prospects are allowed five
official visits to college stadi-
ums and Jernigan has already
went on two. The star visited
Michigan and USC recently


and will make the trip to LSU
this weekend.
"It only took about five
hours to get to USC and
a couple hours to get to
Michigan," Jernigan said.
"I leave -Saturday morning
to go to LSU, and-T'll-visit
Alabama in January."
One of the biggest nerve-
racking points for Jernigan
is the size of the crowd he'll
be playing in front of next
year.
"You go from playing in
front of 600 or 700 people
and next year I might be
playing in front of 100,000,"
Jernigan said.
Jernigan said that he's
not sure of what Friday will
hold, but is pretty sure that
it will involve the presenta-
tion of his jersey for the
football game. It's a jersey
that he can't wait to hold
after watching star-caliber
players compete in the
game while growing up.
"I can remember watch-
ing (Tim) Tebow and Glenn
Dorsey," he said. "I just
always looked at the game.
I'm just so happy to go rep-
resent myself, my family,
my team and Lake City. A
lot of players are just happy
to be there and they go look
at the sights, which is all
good, but I'm trying to go
win that joker."


CHS: Swimmers move on
Continued From Page 1B


swimmers.
"We've broke the record
and want to do it again,"
she said. "They just have
to stay focused. We should
drop time in both, especial-
ly with the excitement of
regionals."
Lee is also a part of the
women's 200-yard Medley
along with Mathis, Burns
and Lindsay Lee.
That team will be
seeded in the No. 8 posi-
tion at regionals after a
second-place finish at
districts.
Other individual advance-
ments for the girls at the
regional meet are Burns in
the 200 freestyle, Mathis in
the 200 individual medley,
and Lindsay Lee in the 50
freestyle.
The 400 free relay team of
Mathis, Lauren Lee, Burns
and Micheala Polhamus
will also compete ps the
No. 13 seed.
Jordyn Smith is an


alternate.
Morse will represent the
boys in regionals after a
solid showing at the district'
tournament. Morse finished
eighth in the 100 breast and
will be seeded No. 20 at the
regional meet.
Though his hopes are
not high, Morse feels its an
honor to advance this far.
'"The times I'm compet-
ing against are really good,"
he said. "The girls have a
chance to do really good
and go to state. There's
probably about two of our
people that can advance
to state. Still, it's really
exciting."
Among those Morse feels
can advance to state was
Burns, though it was hard
to get her to reveal her
chances.
"I don't want to say
too much in case I don't
advance, but I feel like I
have a pretty good chance,"
she said.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


X ''.. .



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High senior JR Dixon (11) looks for daylight as he runs the ball against East
Gadsden High.

Playoff berth on the line


Fort White High's
playoff plan
took a blow last
week, but not a
fatal one.
The Indians (5-3, 3-1)
host Bradford High (7-2,
3-1) at 7:30 Friday with the
District 2-2B runner-up
spot on the line. The
winner will join district
champion Taylor County
High in the state playoffs.
Fort White was a district


player last year, finishing
third in the six-team field.
Bradford was knotted with
Union County High at the
bottom of the heap,
escaping last place by
virtue of a tiebreaker.
The Tornadoes brought
in new coach Derek
Chipoletti, and he has
them knocking on the
playoff door. After starting
the season 2-2, Bradford
has reeled off five straight


wins. District foes Union
County, Florida and East
Gadsden high schools
went down in that stretch.
Fort White made the
playoffs each of head
coach Demetric Jackson's
first two years, winning its
first playoff game in his
first season of 2007. The
Indians had a hiccup last
season, and want to get
back in the thick of the
postseason.


india t


of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kaitlyn Jones gallops through Arrowhead Stadium as she pays tribute to the United States
during the Indian Uprising opening ceremony.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Fort White High marching band takes to the field during a halftime performance.


2010 Indians Football Schedule


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0
Fort White 14, Newberry 13
Fort White 52, Suwannee 22
Fort White 31 Union County 12
N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28
Fort White 30, Florida High 27
Fort White 28, East Gadsden 14
Taylor Co. 38, Fort White 21


Wk 9 Bradford H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


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www.lakeciyreporter.com
I'll ie Citv Rcportcr'


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Phone (386) 752-0580
Lic # RR282811326
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olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City


znd Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010



Island Shack brings sunless tanning in LC


L ocal sunbath-
ers can still get
a just-off-the-
beach look,
despite the cool
fall and winter weather,
at Island Shack Tanning
Salon in Lake City.
The salon is run by
mother-and-daughter team
Susan Brown, owner, and
Jean Frost, assistant man-
ager.
With 10 lie-down tan-
ning beds and two stand-up
tanning booths, the salon
offers regular, intensive
and high-intensive tanning
and also specializes in sun-
less, airbrush spray-tan-
ning done by Frost.
"Jean is the spray-tan
guru," Brown said.
Brown said both she
and Frost are certified
sunless tanning special-
ists and Frost's spray tans
are becoming increasingly
popular.
'To get that down and be
able to do it with optimum
results, it takes an art to do
that," Brown said.
Frost said she uses a
high-end machine with
brand-name Norvell prod-
ucts and can spray-tan a
customer in 20 minutes.
Different levels of color are
also available for a realistic-
looking tan.
"We don't do orange
here," Brown said.
Spray tans can be done
for weddings, proms,
homecomings, gradua-
tions, spring breaks or pag-
eants.
"Jean's done many-a-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jean Frost, the assistant manager of the Island Shack Tanning Salon, is seen on one of the facility's Lumina tanning beds.
The salon offers 10 tanning stations, including two stand-up tanning booths, as well as natural-looking spray tans.


bride, so you know she can't
mess up," Brown said.
The salon also carries a
large selection of quality
brand-name tanning lotions,
moisturizers, skin-care
products, sunless tanning
products and cosmetics in
addition to body stickers
and protective nail-savers
to protect acrylic nails.
Products customers are
seeking that are not rou-
tinely carried in stock can
also be special-ordered,
Brown said.
"It just all depends on
what our customers need
and choice is," she said.


Island Shack Tanning
opened in October 2004
and recently celebrated its
sixth anniversary.
Brown said both she and
Frost have always enjoyed
tanning.
With Brown's experi-
ence as a retired nurse and
education in skin problems,
they took the opportunity
to open amid growing con-
cerns with tanning salons
and ultraviolet light expo-
sure.
"I thought with my back-
ground that somehow we
could help with those con-
cerns by educating myself


even more and educating
my staff and educating
our clients in reasonable
and responsible tanning,"
Brown said.
Brown said she under-
stands the concerns sur-
rounding UV exposure and
promotes responsible tan-
ning rather than overex-
posure. The salon's staff
members are well-trained,
knowledgeable and certi-
fied as indoor tanning spe-
cialists, Brown said.
The salon also focuses
on educating younger cli-
ents and preventing over-
exposure.


'We like moms and dads
to be able to trust us to
watch over those younger
clients," Brown said. "And
we have many of them. We
take great pride in that."
All customers are treat-
ed with respect at the salon
and customer service is
maintained at a high level,
Brown said.
"Our customers are the
main reason that we're
here," she said.
"If they're having a bad
day, we want to make sure
that when they leave here
it's a good day," Frost said.
Offering complimentary


fruit smoothies once or
twice a week is just one
way the salon serves its
customers. Others include
learning their likes, dis-
likes, needs and developing
relationships, Brown said.
"We have so many cli-
ents that are loyal to us
and we just really enjoy
interacting with them on a
day-to-day basis," she said.
"It's just a lot of fun. We're
just like one big happy fam-
ily here."
Advertising exclusively
with the Lake City Reporter
has been successful for the
salon, Brown said, and new
customers say ,they were
referred by the ads.
"I strictly advertise with
the Reporter and have so
for six years," she said.
"Definitely every time I run
an ad in the paper we always
get a boost. We always get
an influx of people who
haven't been here."
The salon usually runs
specials during the summer
months and mega-deals on
its October anniversary cel-
ebration day, Brown said.
"That will take us up to
the beginning of the tan-
ning season, which is the
beginning of winter, and
then it's standing-room-
only in here," she said.
Island Shack Tanning
Salon is located at 265 SW
Malone Street, Suite 101.
Hours open are Monday
through Friday from 8 a.m.
to 8 p.m., Saturday from 9
a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Call (386) 7524970.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.
LF-Es -TFFAL; 1- THESE NL3F'S
H F- Fa WFCA &AT
THM THiS WiTE-r I


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Cousin's wedding invitation

brings back painful past


DEAR ABBY: A male
cousin sent me an invita-
tion to his wedding. I have
met his fiancee a few times
at family reunions and wed-
dings, and she seems very
sweet. The problem is my
cousin sexually abused me
for many years when I was
younger. I have no desire to
attend his wedding.
Am I obligated to send a
card or a gift? I don't want his
fiancee to think I don't like
her, but it makes me sick to
think of celebrating his mar-
riage after what he did. What
do I say when other family
members ask why I'm not
going? Am I obligated to tell
her what he did? NEEDS
TO KNOW IN TEXAS
DEAR NEEDS TO
KNOW: A young man who
sexually abuses someone
"for years" is a predator. And
while the news may not be
greeted warmly, you should
say something to your cous-
in's fiancee before she mar-
ries him.
You could benefit from
talking to a counselor who
specializes in sexual abuse
to make sure the effects of
what happened to you don't
affect you in the future. The
counselor can help you de-
cide what to do from there.
If you don't attend the wed-
ding, you are under no ob-
ligation to send a gift or a
card.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR ABBY: I could
never figure out why "Mar-
garet," my wife of 20 years,,
married me. After our wed-
ding she tried to give me an
image makeover. She'd buy
me clothes I left hanging in
the closet. She'd contradict
and correct me in public. In
general, she'd find fault with
almost everything I did. She
put me down often, and if I
reacted, she would either
claim it wasn't what she
meant to say or tell me, "You
do it, too." I finally gave up
and left her.
Margaret has an excel-
lent reputation, so people
try to pry into why I left her.
When I tell them I won't bad-
mouth her, they tell me she
says plenty about me. My re-
sponse is, 'Then you know
all there is to know, don't
you?"
Two women close to my
age, plus one college-age
girl, are trying to pursue
me. I'm afraid if I don't leave
this area, Margaret will al-
lege that I left her for one of
them.


Your thoughts, please.
- KEEPING MUM IN
CLEVELAND
DEARKEEPING MUM:
You didn't mention how long
ago your marriage ended
or whether your divorce is
final. But regardless, aren't
you tired of worrying about
what your ex is saying about
you? The marriage is over
- kaput! A move isn't nec-
essary. An effective way to
ensure that no one spreads a
rumor that you left Margaret
for one woman would be to
spend time being seen dat-
ing ALL of them.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I have been togeth-
er for two years, and he still
doesn't know my mother's
last name (it's different from
my maiden name), nor does
he know the' names of all of
my siblings. He doesn't think
it's a big deal. What is your
opinion? NAME GAME
IN KNOXVILLE, TENN.
DEAR NAME GAME:
Either your husband is not
much of a family man or he's
not detail-oriented. Remem-
bering someone's name is
a sign of respect, and it ap-
pears your husband of two
years has little of that for
your family.

0 Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Charm will be your
greatest weapon and will
allow you to get what you
want but not give more than
-what you want to give. It's
about being fair and striv-
ing for equality. You'll only
get ahead if you:put a price
on what you have to offer.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You have to meet your
opponent halfway if you
want to get something ac-
complished. Love and ro-
mance can be the highlight
of your day, so socialize, if
you are single, or make spe-
cial plans for you and your
current partner. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Get serious about your
personal life and future.
Don't let someone cause
you grief or make you feel
unloved or unwanted. There
is someone special waiting
for you in the wings. Hon-
esty can spare your making
a huge mistake. *****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You will have every-
thing at your fingertips but,
if you allow someone to rail-
road you into taking on an
added responsibility, you
will miss possibilities that
lead to personal and profes-
sional advancement. This
time, change will be for the
best. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Resist any desire to cause
trouble or to make some-
one displeased. Get what's
required of you out of the
way so you can move on to
activities, events or hobbies
you enjoy. Discipline and a
sense of responsibility will
be the name of the game.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Opportunity knocks
but, if you don't open the
door, nothing good will
come of it. A short trip, a
group, club or organization
can contribute to what you
are trying to accomplish
and bring you an enhanced
reputation. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Uncertainty will cloud your
day. Decipher what it is you
want and what you can actu-
ally have. Once that is clear,
you will be able to make a
better decision. Problems
at home will escalate. You'll
achieve more by working
alone. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Take an interest in
friends, family and chil-
dren's activities and you
will improve your relation-
ships. Think big and you
will accomplish more and
impress the people you are
trying to get to know better


or work alongside. Creative
input will be constructive.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Anything less
than hard work and doing
your best will not be accept-
able and can result in com-
plaints and criticism. Know
your boundaries and move
swiftly. Being mature and
responsible will be the key
to making a lasting impres-
sion. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): As soon as you get
mixed up in someone else's
dilemma, you will lose time
and ground. Refuse to take
on burdens that aren'tyours
to bear. Focus on what will
help you get ahead. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take care of per-
sonal paperwork. Problems
with friends, relatives and
authority figures will leave
you in a compromising po-
sition. Listen and observe
but do not get involved.
Strive to get ahead and you
will please everyone who
cares about you. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You've got everything
going for you, so don't take
a break. Love is heightened
and the opportunity to
make a decision regarding
a commitment will be pos-
sible. It's a new day and a
new beginning. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: J equals B
"N KCRUPHHX, DRBRTYEOKBI YUERT
P I FOHH VKBEOBPR EK C T K ERVE,
C-T RIRTLR, YBS HKKA YUERT ENOI


FKBSRTU PH HYBS."


F OH U KT S


J T 0 G H R X
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "This race is tight like a too-small bathing suit on a
too-long ride home from the beach." Dan Rather
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-3


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


-. 4~.&~&t -~


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._ .,,z --"i .Cg..ec',_


Nettles Pork Cho Box


NOVEMBER 5TH
-,.:, .j';.I '


~*~---


W....... ........... .p. ,..a....a............ -rNew 4rop
Ribeye 6 LBS $12.00 Each Fresh Link Sausage Sweet Potatoes
$4.39 LB 10 LB Box $22.00
Whole Semi Boneless Nettles Sugar Cured Realtree Quail No 1 Grade
Kansas City Strips Smoked Picnics 12 Count Box 40 LB Box $20.00
$3.99 LB $1.49 LB $15.49 Each Fresh Frozen Vegetables
Whole Boneless Nettles Smoked Turkeys Seabest IQF 4 for $10.00
New York Strips $24.99 Each Tilapia Fillets
$4.39 LB 5 LB Bag $14.99 Baby Lima Beans, California
Whole Boneless Nettles Sugar Cured Bar S Corn Dogs Mix, Corn on the Cob, Cut
Top Sirloins Smoked Hams 3 LB Box 2 for $8.00 kra. Cut Squash, Field Peas,
$2.69 LB Whole Only $1.69 LB Otalian Green Beans, Mixed
80/20 Ground Chuck Whole Boneless Nettles Country V t ce B Mied
10 LB Tubes $1.79 LB Pork Loins Ham Slices vegetables, Speckled Beans,
$2.19 LB 5 LB Pack $10.00 Stew Mix, Stir Fry Veggies.
Clifty Farms Boston Butt Cooked Crawfish White Acre Peas and Vegetable
Real Pulled Pork Barbeque Pork Roast 5 LB Bag $10.50 Gubo
18o0. Tub $1.49 LB
2 for $10.00 Clifty Farms
Fryer Leg Quarters Fresh Pork Boneless Skinless Country Ham
10 LB Bag $4.99 Spare Ribs Fryer Breast 1/6 Ham 2 LB Pack
40 LB Box $19.99 2 pack- $1.89 LB 10 LB Bag $15.99 ."9ah
40 LB Box $63.50 $6.99 Each


inr1 1nte1
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NOVEMBER 4TH &


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To advett"se Y, ,R
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please 1 752.;;... 3
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CLASSIFIED


LAKE CITY REPORTER


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


Whole Semi Boneless


Nettles Smoked or












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


ad$250
4 lines 6 days ch additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
This Is a non-retundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days ach ddtlonal
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $50 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
This lea non-refundable rate.





lines 6 days $ad1d tonal






One Item per ad $ 3
4 lines 6 days ashad4t ional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totallsing $2,500 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Eachadditional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each item must Include a price.
This Isa non-refundable rate.




|One Hin per ad $|
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate appie ti private Indiiduana selg
,pe..nal merchandise totalling $6,000 orless.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable ate.m


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....192.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.

-S

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday ri., 10:00a.m. fri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 anm. Fri.9:00 am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.coin


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Clarinet I, LLC of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1037
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 5S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 03751-217
LOT 17 SOUTH WIND S/D. ORB
932-2424 1
Name in which assessed: DAVID P
HALL III
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 22nd day
of November, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542020
October 29, 2010
November 3, 10, 17, 2010


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Dar-
rell Crews of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 2113
Year of Issuance: 2003
Description of Property: SEC 22
TWN 5S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 09340-057 NW 1/4 OF
BLQCK 50 MASON CITY S/D, EX
THE E 10 FT.
Name in which assessed: ERNEST
& GAIL PEACOCK
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 22nd day
of November, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542014
October 27, 2010
November 3, 10, 17, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2009-48-DP
M. N. T. DOB:12/12/2006
MINOR CHILD.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
* VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO:Shakera Tillman
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


Legal

Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse. Lake
City. Florida, on NOVEMBER 10,
2010. at 11 A.M., for a Termination
of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED HEREIN.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT.*****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 12th day of Octo-
ber 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: T. Brewington
Deputy Clerk

James W. Kirkconnell, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 21044
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437

Special Accommodations. In accord-
ance with the Americans with Disa-
bilities Act, if you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.

05524143
October 13, 20,27, 2010
November 3, 2010

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Clari-
net I, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1022
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 30
TWN 5S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 03742-003
5 AC IN NW COR OF SW 1/4 OF
SW 1/4, ALSO DESC AS FOL-
LOWS: BEG AT NW COR OF SW
1/4 OF SW 1/4, RUN E 466.69 FT,
S 466.69 FT, W 466.69 FT, N
466.69 FT TO POB. ORB 682-481,
792-1621, 995-1906
Name in which assessed: JAMES
RICHARDSON
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 22nd day
of November, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542019
October 27, 2010
November 3, 10, 17, 2010
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Dar-
rell Crews of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 276
Year of Issuance: 2003
Description of Property: SEC 00
TWN 00 RNG 00 PARCEL NUM-
BER 01438-116
LOT 16. BLOCK 5, UNIT 23
THREE RIVERS ESTATES, ORB
606-247, 812-997
Name in which assessed: MARGAR-
ET A. AUTORINO
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-


Legal

da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 22nd day
of November, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542015
October 27, 2010
November 3, 10, 17, 2010

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Clari-
net I, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 209
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 00
TWN 00 RNG 00 PARCEL NUM-
BER 00900-016
LOT 15 & 16 UNIT 14 THREE
RIVERS ESTATES. ORB 816-1896,
923-1886. POA TO T LAVENDER
ORB 925-343, POA 980-786, 980-
790
Name in which assessed: THE
BANK OF NEW YORK
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 22nd day
of November, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you area person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact tlhe
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-7 t9-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542016
October 27, 2010
November 3, 10, 17, 2010


010 Announcements


020 Lost & Found

Lost Chihuahua
Much loved, white with light
brown spots, Red Collar,
near Walmart 386-288-3024

o00 Job
Opportunities

04542128
The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
positions available:
(2) Digital Court Reporters,
Lake City
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org

04542232
Dietary Aide, Dietary Cook
Part time positions
Must have prior exp in a
healthcare facility or other
institution. Please apply at Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025.

Operations/MGR Position
Exceptional people skills,
Proficient with Quickbooks req,
Marketing exp req, M-F, some
travel, job demanding but reward-
ing, fast paced medical industry,
fax resumes to 386-758-9047

Accepting applications for
Housekeeping/Weekend Breakfast
attendant.. Apply in person at
Cabot Lodge 3525 US
Hwy 90W. No phone calls.


100 Job
Opportunities

05524367
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
For mature individual seeking
long-term employment. MUST
be a people person with great
customer service skills, strong
work ethic, good communica-
tion, typing skills, and willing-
ness to learn. Must be a team
player and be able to work a
flexible schedule including
weekends, holidays, and nights.
NIGHT AUDITOR (P/T)
FRONT DESK (P/T/F/T)
POSITION
Excellent work environment.
Hotel experience preferred
but not required.
Apply in person at:
Redroof Inn
414 SW Florida Gateway Drive
U.S. 90 and 1-75, exit 427
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Elementary School teacher
needed. Private Christian School
BA req'd Great working environ-
ment Fax resume: 386-755-3609
I need a BABYSITTER
locally. Must be able to work
flexible hours. License Preferred.
(229)300-0580 for info.
License CDL Driver
w/2 yrs Logging Exp.
Must have Clean CDL.
386-365-6966
Lily Pad is Hiring!
Looking for Outgoing Sales
Associates for Seasonal Positions!
Bring in Resume Today!
Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
3 days a week. Please fax resume
to 386-719-9662






SAINT LEOk
U N IVE 1SITY
What you need for where you're going
Founded 1889
Saint Leo University, Florida's oldest
Catholic education institution in the
Benedictine tradition, currently enrolls
more than 15,000 students in 17
regional centers throughout Florida,
the Southeastern United States
and through our Center for Online
Learning. University Campus is located
approximately 20 miles north of Tampa,
Florida.
We are currently seeking qualified
applicants for a Staff Assistant for
Lake City Center location in Lake City,
Florida. The Staff Assistant would
provide administrative support in
application, maintenance and process
of student, faculty and/or staff policies
and procedures.
The minimum requirement is a high
school diploma and two (2) years
administrative experience.
For additional information and appli-
cation instructions, please visit: www.
saintleo.edu/jobs or for a direct link to
the position: http://www.saintleo.jobs/
postings/6605

Saint Leo University is an equal opportunity
employer. Catholics, women and minorities
are encouraged to apply.



FLORIDA
GATEWAY
,[COLLEGE
* * *

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2011
*college Level Mathematics
Online and/or evening classes, Master's
degree in mathematics or a Master's degree
with 18 graduate semester hours in
mathematics. Contact Paula Cifuentes at
gula cifuJentes@fi. edo_
*Chemistry
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree in chemistry or a Master's plus 18
graduate hours in chemistry. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at .pula cifuentes@fac aed
*statistics
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree in statistics or a Master's plus 18
graduate hours In statistics.,Contact Paula
Cifuentes atpi pi!laciientes fqk1c.e A d
*Programmable Logic Control (PLC)
At least five years of full-time, in-field work
experience and expertise in the installation,
maintenance, operation and troubleshooting
of current technology automated process
controls and associated systems including
PLC's, variable frequency drives,
Instrumentation and process control
systems, hydraulic and pneumatic systems.
Experience in training both factory
technicians and operations personnel. For
additional information contact Bob Deckon at
386-754-4442 or iobtil.deckunC'tifu.c edu
*Lean Six Sigma
Must have Six Sigma Black Belt with multiple
projects. Must have Master's degree in
engineering, management or quality, or
Master's degree with 18 graduate hours in
some combination of the above fields.
Bachelor's degree with PE certification or
five years experience as a practitioner, will
be considered. Teaching experience and/or
curriculum development preferred. For more
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-754-
4442 or robert deckon[ftc,,r ad LI
*Developmental Mathematics
Gitchrist Center. Minimum requirement is a
Bachelor's degree in mathematics or a
mathematics-relaled field. Contact Carrie
Rodesiler at corrie.rodesiler.fcqc aedu
*Medical Billing and Insurance
Classes meet on Monday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is at least two
years of experience in'Medical Insurance/
Billing with a certificate in this or related
area. AA or AS degree and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to trr c, yikmr@r., ficdi
*Basic Medical Coding
Classes meet on Wednesday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is certified
medical coder with at least two years of
experience in Medical Coding. AA or AS
degree with certification and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to tracy _i.ck an1.rtc. edui
*Nursing Clinical
BSN Required. Master's degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent
clinical experience required. Contact Mattie
Jones at 386-754-4368 or


('oltle iappl'atnui andd ',i t' otIu't'rca tt
rwqtimet tl. ijrlgqftrn rmii \cripl iui.i. he
ihniltedil' wth a tratltonini and evaiianon.
Applicalioni .a itubl iiii r at lan .sj,, n
VP 'A D II I )I I I.ioi l..i...o, .i iii '


100 Job
Opportunities
Meclanic Needed
Heavy truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the
right person, Southern Specialized
Truck & Trailer, US 41 N
386-752-9754
P/T Class A CDL
Drivers needed. A CLEAN record
and a flexible schedule required.
Call 386-935-1705 to apply.
Wanted Forestry machinery
operator. with 2 yrs. exp.
Must have valid DL.
Koon Timber 386-365-6966

120 Medical
12v Employment

04542183
Director of Human Resources
Small Critical Access Hospital
seeks experienced Human
Resources Director to lead HR
functions. Responsible for all
1R functions including
recruitment, retention,
regulatory compliance, benefits,
organizational development,
employee relations, and
State/Federal Survey ,
preparedness. Comprehensive
benefit package, salary
commensurate with
experience. Bachelor's degree;
PHR or SPHR preferred.
Hospital/Healthcare
experience preferred.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-223 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace

05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp. Call Cindi: (850)253-1906

Busy Family Practice Office

for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494


190 Mortgage Money

FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
240 U Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 11/08/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

AKC Registered Lab puppies.
Black labs & Yellow labs. Has
Health Certs. DOB 09/02/10, POP
Call for info. 386-752-2117
Black and White Skunk. about 1.5
years old. Has been spayed and
glands removed. All shots are up
to date. $100. 386-623-2443
CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

360 Feed, Seed
& Plants
Perrenial Peanut Hay,
wholesale prices direct from the
farm. $3-$9 per bale,
Madison 850-464-3947


401 Antiques

Antique Table,
Ten sided, 30" high and wide
$50
386-758-9205
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?




o rk ..

S .)VYour sklls.-
and -
posirive utnitude







Apply Online or In Persont 1152 SW Business Point Dr
(a Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
SJg iwww.sitel.com EOE


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


ii~iM
gnnUYI


SEhLiL Ti











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


402 Appliances
Slide in 30" Electric Range
$100
386-292-3927 or
386-754-9295

408 Furniture
7 PIECE SOLID OAK QUEEN
Bedroom Set, good condition,
must sell $450 OBO.
Call 386-752-5345 after 3:00 p.m.
Ceramic Table Lamp,
Maroon, 28" high,
$20
386-758-9205
Dual reclining
Love seat.
$100.
86-752-3720
Floor Lamp, 65" high,
Brass finish base,
$20
386-758-9205
FOR SALE
Queen Bed.
$80.
386-758-3574
FUTON BED
Queen Size
Wood Frame $75.00
386758-3574
MUST SEE!! Sofa & Loveseat.
Navy Blue & Black. Plush &
comfortable. Immaculate condi-
tion $200 Call 386-935-0654
410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman Rider
42" cut, good condition,
$385
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295
Nice Craftsman Push Mower,
6.5 HP, runs good,
$85 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

412 Medical
Supplies
Medical potty Chair.
Brand new $50.
386-752-3720


416 Sporting Goods
Inversion Table,
had to move,
'only a few months old $75
386-719-8886
Sportcraft TX, 4.9 Treadmill,
almost new
$100
386-758-9205

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
10' X 3'Inflatable Pool,
pump and all still in box
$60
386-292-3927or 386-154-9295
Need Holiday cash? Make 75% of
selling price at 3 day consignment
sale. Accepting gently used name
brand clothing, shoes & handbags.
Call 386-752-3631 or 755-1759
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231
Rug Doctor
w/Attachments
$400 firm
386-719-8886


White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $60
386-935-0654


450 GoodThings
450 to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DWMH, in beautiful area, pri-
vate dr, appliances included, Need
to see to appreciate! By appt only
386-752-5617, leave message pls
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
lv message if no answer.


630 oMobile Homes
630 for Rent
Kingsley Lake: $800/moy
rent your own year-round p
Kingsley Lake! 2/2 remoi
ch/a. Private Dock. 386-75:
Lots of Room! 3br/2ba. M.
your own land later. You c
in where it sits tempora
McAlpin. $28,000. 386-36
Mobile Homes for ren
White Springs, Lake City
White Contact 386-623.
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five
NO PETS, also 3 bd ho
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent
IQOQ1 a1AC2


Quiet Setting w/lots-of
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2
$550. Includes water & s
No Pets! 386-961-00
Very clean & well maintain
units in nice park. Move I
cial. 1st mo $575. then $65
incl water, sewer, trash p/u
to town 386-623-7547 or 98
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, ii
country, Branford area, $50
386-867-1833 ,386-590-1
www.suwanneevalleyproperti
640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale


4/2 DWMH in Retiremeni
reduced to $38,500.
Must Sell, many extra
386-752-4258


Fully Furnished in park.
2br/1.5ba. Washer & Dr
Micro, TV, Clean. $8,900.
by non-smoker 386-755-

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
D/W Homes of Merit, alm
acre, on Branford Hwy, Ap
ces included, Asking $55
Call today-386-208-066
386-466-2825
FSBO 5 acres in Enisvill
w/3br DWMH ready to mc
Plus .20X24 workshop. $:
down $675 per mo. 386-75

71 0 Unfurnished
710 For Rent
5523977
Voted Best of the Be
Unbeatable specials
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartment
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage
hook up, $540 month
no pets 1 month sec
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
Large & clean. lbr/lba
CH/A lg walk in closet. C]
town. $395. mo and $350
(904)563-6208
Move in specials availa
1 & 2 bedroom units
starting at $350 per mot
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Manage
Upgraded "Live in Lake C
Apartments, 1,2 or 3 Bedr
-Starting @ $385, 386-719-
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, d
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D ho
CH/A, $600 plus dep & bc
chk, 352-514-2332 / 352-37
The Lakes Apts. Studios 9
from $125/wk. Util. & cable
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, m
rates avail Call 386-752-
Updated apartments w/til.
& fresh paint. Excellent lo
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-96:

720 Furnished Apt
2I For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest,
Columbia. All furnished. E
cable, fridge, microwave. V
or monthly rates. 1 person
2 persons $150. week
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Ren


04542205
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2/1 w/den, on west side, 1 wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water and
trash included, $650 month +
security pet ok 386-719-9702
2bedroom/lbath in city
$550. mo. plus deposit
No Pets! Call Buckey
386-758-0057
3/2 big, in town, small indoor pet
ok, W/D hook-up, hard wood
floors, $650 mo, plus $200 sec,
386-397-3568
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
Completely remodeled 4/2 plus
study wit h carport in quiet area.
$1100 mo plus last and security.
386-867-2283
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, and
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619


0 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
you can White Sprgs, 3/1 house, CH/A,
place at wood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
deled, fenced, small housetrained pet ok,
2-4339. non smoking environment,
$750/M, 1st, last, $300 sec dep &
love to pet fee, drive by 10623 Wesson St,
an live then call 352-377-0720
rily.
4-4940 0a Business &
tin 50 Office Rentals
& Ft.
-2465 Great Opportunity
Sunoco Convenient Store for lease
3554 N Hwy 441, Lake City.
. Points, 813-495-8461
)me
& dep OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A.Bar Sales
oaks
bafrom 790 Vacation Rentals

SHorseshoe Beach Fall Special
ned 2/2 Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
n Spe- front porch, dock, fish sink.
0. Rent Avail wkends5.$345. or wk $795.
. Close (352)498-5986/386-235-3633
84-8448
n the 805 Lots for Sale
0 mo.,
0642
ies.com 5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
t Park, All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
as housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
12X54. on race, color, religion, sex,
ryer, disability, familial status or nation-
Owned al origin; or any intention to make
0110 such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
ost 1/2 people securing custody of chil-
pplian- dren under the age of 18. This
>,000, newspaper will not knowingly
5 or accept any advertising for real es-
S tate which is in violation of the
earea .law. Our readers are hereby in-
ove in. formed that all dwellings adver-
2000. tised in this newspaper are availa-
2-4597 ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9,777,
Lpt. the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
7 impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
st
1 810 Home for Sale
ts FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
ge, W/D floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
h, 810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
04542115
3/2 on 4 acres, "Like New"
Sapt. Brick home w/18'X20'
lose to concrete block
Idep. workshop. $139,900.
Call Susan Eagle/
able, Daniel Crapps Agency,
3, Realtor 386-623-6612
nth,

meant 820 Farms &
City" 0 Acreage
8813 4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
luplex Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
)ok up, $69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
:kgmd www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
77-7652 4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
i IBr's Power. Owner Financing!
le incl., NO DOWN! $69,900.
monthly Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
2741 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
e floors WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
cation. lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
26 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

ts. ,



Weel 1Contactus
$135,
ly at the paper.


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

S 386-752-1293


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Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat
here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within
those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for an
additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description
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6C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010


................................. .. ..... .... ....r .*... o .;
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:i'" % '.*.. ": ^ -& "; J" "'.. : :',, ". h* -' -, ,7-r ;',:, ":" ,


& STRIPES


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan (8) returns to the sideline after helping to stop the
Ridgeview High offense on Oct. 8.


tiger ,


of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High marching band take to the field for a halftime performance.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
High school football referees discuss a ruling during the game against Ridgeview High.


2010 Tiger Football Schedule


CHS 38, Brooks County 13
CHS 30, South Lafourche 19
CHS 22, Buchholz 14
CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20
Madison 19, CHS 0
Ridgeview 16, CHS 9
Godby 35, CHS 14
Ed White 25, CHS 11


Wk 9 Wolfson H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.


Playing for pride


Columbia High has lost
four straight games,
and the last one put the
Tigers out of contention
for the District 4-4A
championship after winning it last
season.
Still, the Tigers' message after
the game was that Columbia will not
play for next season. Columbia is


focused on finishing out the season
the right way, and that could start
with a win this week against Wolfson
High in the final district contest of
the season.
While the Tigers are not
mathematically eliminated from
playoff contention, they would need
help and a win against the Wolfpack
to stay alive.


The Tigers easily dismantled
Wolfson last season on the road,
and the home-field advantage might
be just what Columbia needs to fix
an offense that has been unable to
break the 20-point barrier over the
last four contests.
Columbia welcomes Wolfson at
7:30 p.m. Friday at Tiger Stadium in
Lake City.


SOoodwrench


Ronsonet Buick GMC Service Features:
* Factory Trained and
ASE Certified Technicians
* Early Morning/Late Night Drop Off
* We Use Genuine GM Parts / r
* Full Service Tire and Battery Center
* On Site Wash, Wax & Detail Service
SOvQ 50 of S isfi


L -- t I h..e'E"B- |
The Predator
$48,900
4BR/2BA, 1800sqft
(386) 754-8844


C H S STARS


Come & See the Newest Store! NOW
Pinemount Road & Birley Ave. Lake City, FL. OPENI


You'll Love Our New Look!
Milk Shakes! Go Tigers!
I Located Inside S&S Store (#29), Highway 47 South & 1-75 Lake City, Florida WE CATER 386-755-3082


We ServIce A I makes andi MoId, l r e'.' Servic'- ,llMakesandMoidesii!


"~~~-s-




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