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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01440
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/31/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01440
System ID: UF00028308:01440
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







It's Here!
GLeta FREE copy of the
Lake City 2011 Guide.
000016 120,10 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA43
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


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friiLC) It


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www.lakecityreporter


ALL ABOARD!


COURTESY PHOTO
The U.S. Navy's USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, is shown'underway. From keel to mast
top, the ship is equivalent,to 25 stories in height and its flight deck is about four and a half acres, what the sailors call 'four
and a half acres of sovereign U.S. territory.'


Life on

the USS

Enterprise

requires

teamwork

By LEANNE TYO
'ltyo@iakecityreporter.com
ABOARD THE USS
ENTERPRISE
Life operates like
an industrial
machine on a
U.S. Navy air-
craft carrier out
to sea.
On the USS Enterprise
(CVN-65), every crew
member is a necessary
-mechanism for the machine
to work.
Glitches like living an
isolated life far from home
for months threaten the
machine's ability, but more
than 5,000 men and women
on board work together
persistently to keep the
ship running and accom-
plish its mission.
For about 24 hours on
Oct. 15 to 16, several jour-
nalists were invited on
embark on the nuclear-
powered aircraft carrier
for the rare opportunity
USS Enterprise [CVN-65)
facts and stats
USS Enterprise (CVN-
65) is the eighth ship to bear
the name and the first nucle-
ar-powered aircraft carrier in
the world.
The ship is home to
more than 5,000 crew mem-
bers, including its air wing.
About 20 percent of those
members are women.
The ship makes its


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Airmen wearing yellow shirts who direct movement of.aircraft on the flight deck guide an E-2C
Hawkeye as it readies to spread its wings in preparation for launching.


to live for a day like the
seamen and airmen on
board. A 45-minute flight
on a C-2 Greyhound cargo
plane carried two media
representatives, including
one from the Lake City
Reporter, about 100 miles
off the Florida coast to
the ship's location in the
* Atlantic Ocean.
After landing on the flight
deck at around 100 miles
per hour, the aircraft tail-
hook caught by an arresting
wire and abruptly stopping
within 350 feet. It's a flight
sailors themselves seldom
experience. The journalists
own water out of sea water
through evaporators.
Armament: Two NATO
.Sea Sparrow rocket launch-
ers, two 20mm Phalanx CIWS
mounts, an anti-ship missile
defense system; two RAM
surface-to-air launchers
The USS Enterprise was
commissioned on Nov. 25,
1961, and is scheduled to
decommission in November,
2012.
Propulsion: Eight nucle-


COURTESY PHOTO
Leanne Tyo, Lake City
Reporter staff writer, wears
a protective cranial helmet
on the flight deck of the USS
Enterprise.
had the chance to talk with
crew and air wing mem-
ar reactors, four sets geared
steam turbines and four
shafts, delivering more than
200,000 shaft horsepower.
Speed: More than 30
knots.
Length: 1,123,feet; 257
feet in extreme beam and
250 feet high from keel to
mast top.
Flight deck: 4.47 acres.
Aircraft carried: Holds
up to 90, normally carries
around. 70.


bers while exploring some
of the ship's 3,000 compart-
ments engineering spac-
es not included with
chaperones.
The ship and its 72 air-
craft are run by 3,000 offi-
cers, chiefs and sailors and
18,000 Carrier Air Wing
One pilots and personnel.
The air wing is composed
of eight squadrons and
both U.S. Navy and U.S.
Marines are on board..
Enterprise is deployed
as the flagship of a car-
rier strike group, which
comprises about 12 ships
that protect the carrier
from enemy attack, and is
exercising through fake
scenarios and war games
as training to prepare for
a six-month deployment in
January.
Everything about the
ship is a team effort.
"You probably have seen
over your time here that
there's no place where
more teamwork happens
and more great, mission-
focused sailors just all
ON BOARD continued on 3A


REDEEMED
Henry's overtime field goal
carries UF over Georgia.
Sports, I B





porter


Vol. 136, No. 244 U $1.00


Precincts open

Tuesday for

general election


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local voters have the
opportunity to make sev-
eral changes on the local
and state levels by cast-
ing ballots in Tuesday's
general election.
Voting precincts will
be open from 7 a.m. 7
p.m. to accommodate vot-
ers.
On the local level, vot-
ers will have the oppor-
tunity to cast ballots in
the Columbia County
Commission District
2 run-off race between
Rusty DePratter and
Marc Kazmierski.
At the state level, there


are races for governor,.
lieutenant governor, U.S.
Senate, Florida chief
financial officer, attorney
general, commissioner
of Agriculture, State
Senate District 14, State
Representative District
10, State Representative
of District 11, four Florida
Supreme Coqrt Judge
races and seven district
court judge races.
The ballot will also
feature six proposed
amendments to the
Florida Constitution, an
amendment for Columbia
County in which voters
get to decide whether to
VOTE continued on 5A


More than 6,000

cast their ballots

in early voting


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
More than 6,000 local
residents cast ballots
during the early voting
period for the upcoming
election, according to
Columbia County elec-
tions officials.
Saturday was the final
day where voters could
take part in early vot-
ing and 579 people voted
in the Lake City office,
while 172 people cast bal-
lots in the Fort White
office.
Early voting for the
upcoming election began
Oct. 18 and concluded
Saturday, with 6,472
Columbia County voters
casting ballots through
the early voting method.


Elections -officials said
Friday was one of the bus-
ier early voting days, with
approximately 725 people
casting ballots at the Lake
City office.
Liz Home, Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections, said she hopes
local residents who didn't
take part in early voting
will show up at election
precincts on Tuesday.
She said she does not
believe voter turnout will
be increased Tuesday
because of the numerous
questions on the ballot,
but because people want
to make their opinions
known.
"I hope we have a big-
ger turnout because peo-
ple really want to come
out and vote," she said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Margie Stanfield, left, and treasurer Pat McAlhany use drop
spindles to turn wool into yarn.


Re-enactment a

popular event at

Alligator Fest


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Hundreds of peo-
ple flocked to O'Leno
State Park Saturday for
Alligator Fest and were
treated to a re-enactment
of a Seminole war battle
as well as a "snapshot" of
early pioneer life.
Throughout the day,
park visitors were able to


walk through camps focus-
ing on life in the 1800s,
take part in a variety of
demonstrations and view
several exhibits.
However, at 2 p.m., most
of the crowd focused its
attention on the Seminole
War Battle of San Felasco
Hammock re-enactment,
which lasted close to 30
FEST continued on 5A


1 4264 00 1 8


CALL US:
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Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


82
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 12A


vi)


O pinion ................ 4A
Business ................ IC
Obituaries . . . . . 6A
Advice ................. 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
LIFE
Superstitions
and their affect.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
2010 Election
Results


Sunday, October 31, 2010










LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


46 Sf Cffi 3. Play u

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
21-22-30-34 2 9-14-26-28-33 Afternoon: 3-7-4 Afternoon: 7-4-2-5 8-11-14-25-33-39 20-24-25-53-59-15
Evening: 8-8-3 Evening: 1-2-7-9


AROUND FLORIDA



College quidditch team would please Potter


MICHAEL VASQUEZ
The Miami Herald
CORAL GABLES
uidditch is
part soccer,
part basket-
ball, part
dodgeball,
and all fantasy
- or at least it used to
be. The hybrid game was
invented by author J.K.
Rowling and, until recently,
only played by the imagi-
nary broom-flying wizards
of her popular Harry Potter
novels.
These days, a version
for us lowly humans or
"muggles," in Potter terms
- is popping up at more
than a dozen college cam-
puses in Florida.
"I can't tell you if there's
flying or not, that's a
secret," joked University of
Miami quidditch player Ally
Levy.
Truth be told, there are
brooms, but no gravity-defy-
ing co-eds. Instead, students
run around with a broom
tucked between their legs.
"You have to keep one
hand on it at all times
because we're simulat-
ing flight," explained UM
quidditch organizer Alex
Locust "If you take both
hands off, you 'fall.'" Potter
fans have always been a
fervent bunch. Five years
ago, students at Vermont's
Middlebury College invent-
ed this new brand of quid-
ditch, and the game took off
faster than, well, a real fly-
ing broomstick. There are
now more than 500 active
quidditch teams worldwide
- including teams in Brazil,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hernan Martinez, 19, a music major from Miami, runs with the ball during a quidditch game
on the University of Miami intramural fields. Students at the University of Miami have started
a club to play quidditch, a game based on the Harry Potter novels by J.K. Rowling, where
players run around with broomsticks between their legs and try to score points by throwing
balls through a group of hoops at either end of the field.


New Zealand and Colombia.

AN ASSOCIATION
In Florida, most of the
nearly 30 quidditch teams
that have registered with
the International Quidditch
Association a "magical
nonprofit organization" that
governs this fast-growing
sport are colleges. But
there's also a smattering of
high schools including
North Broward Preparatory
School in Coconut Creek
and Western High School in
Davie.
"Now we're starting to
get adult teams who are
interested in joining," said.


the IQA's Alicia Radford.
"Whatever age groups want
to play quidditch, we will
adapt"
Both the University
of Miami and Florida
International University
have launched quidditch
clubs this semester. In the
most eargerly anticipated
match since Slytherin vs.
Gryffindor, UM will take on
FIU in December.
Quidditch players
typically grew up reading
Harry Potter, and relish the
experience of playing even
a scaled-downversion of a
game they dreamt about as
children.
"Look at how many


books have been sold
across America, there's a lot
of kids interested in it," said
Bob Beloff, whose 18-year-
old son, Sean, plays quid-
ditch at UM.
"They're all in college
now."
Muggle quidditch
might not have any acro-
batic broom-flying, but that
doesn't mean it's for sissies.
There's plenty of bumping
and other physical contact
Men and women play side-
by side.
. "I've found the girls are
more vicious," said FIU
quidditch organizer Chelsea
Klaiber, adding that one
team practice featured a


snapped broom caused by a
female student tackling one
of the guys.
Ah, the brooms. This
detail is responsible for
much of the challenge that
comes with playing quid-
ditch: there's the predict-
able awkward running, but
holding the broom also
takes one arm permanently
out of play.

Alleged robber
dropped wallet
DESTIN Investigators
say they arrested a Florida
Panhandle bank robber
after he made a big mistake:
he dropped his wallet
The Okaloosa County
Sheriffs Office says 26-
year-old Jorman Sampaio
walked into Destin's Union
State Bank on Thursday,
brandished a handgun and
ordered the employees to
the floor. Deputies say he
fled with $6,000.
While investigators
searched the bank, awit-
ness found a wallet nearby.
Investigators showed the IDI)
photo to bank employees, who
thought it might be the robber.
They searched Sampaio's
house and say they found a
gun that appeared to be the
one the robber used and cash.
Sampaio was arrested.
He was being held Saturday
at the county jail without
bond.

Officials: Panther
attacks 4 calves
NAPLES Wildlife
officials are trying to cap-


ture an endangered Florida
panther that has attacked at'
least four calves at a ranch
near Naples.
Officials say that if they
capture the panther, they
will first check to see if it is
attacking the calves because
it is too sickly to chase wild.
prey like deer and hogs.
If it is healthy, a tracking
collar will be placed on it
and it will be moved away
from the ranch.
Scientists say between
100 and 120 panthers are
left in the wild, up from as
few as 30 in the 1980s. That.
has led to more conflicts
. with humans and livestock."

Police: Drunk
driver kills 2
TAMPA Two people
have died after a car driv-
en by an alleged drunken-
driver jumped a Tampa
sidewalk and struck
them.
Police say 24-year-old
Kate D. Kohlier and 23-
year-old Douglas J. Kozar
had just left work at the
Marriott Waterside Hotel'
early Saturday morning
when they were struck
from behind by a Cadillac
that jumped the curb.
A third person hurt his
ankle as he jumped away.,
Police say the car's driv-,
er, 33-year-old Matthew R.
Moye, has been charged -
with two counts of vehicu-
lar homicide, two counts of
DUI manslaughter and one
count of DUI with injury.

N Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Rally draws laughs, activism before election


WASHINGTON
n the shadow of the Capitol
and the election, comedians
Jon Stewart and Stephen
Colbert entertained a huge
throng Saturday at a "sanity"
rally poking fun at the nation's ill-
tempered politics, its fear-mongers
and doomsayers.
"We live now in hard times,"
Stewart said after all the shtick. "Not
end times."
Part comedy show, part pep talk,
the rally drew together tens of thou-
sands stretched across an expanse of
the National Mall, a festive congrega-
tion of the goofy and the politically
disenchanted. People carried signs
merrily protesting the existence of
protest signs. Some dressed like
bananas) wizards, Martians and
Uncle Sam.
Stewart, a satirist who makes his
living skewering the famous, came to
play nice. He decried the "extensive
effort it takes to hate" and declared
"we can have animus and not be
enemies."
Screens showed a variety of pun-
dits and politicians from the left and
right, engaged in divisive rhetoric.
Prominently shown: Glenn Beck,
whose conservative Restoring Honor
rally in Washington in August was
part of th motivation f e Stewart
and Colbert event, called the Rally
to Restore Sanity and/or Fear. It
appeared to rival Beck's rally in
attendance.
As part of the comedic routine,
Stewart and his associates asked
some in the audience to identify
themselves by category, eliciting
answers such as "half-Mexican, half-
white," "American woman single"
and "Asian-American from Taiwan."
"It's a perfect demographic
sampling of the American people,"
Stewart cracked to a crowd filled
with mostly younger whites. "As you
know, if you have too many white
people at a rally, your cause is racist.
If you have too many people of color,
then you must be asking for some-
thing special rights, like eating at
restaurants or piggy back rides."
With critical congressional elec-
tions looming Tuesday, Stewart and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Comedians Stephen Colbert, right, and Jon Stewart perform in front of the U.S.
Capitol during their Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear on the National Mall in
Washington Saturday. The 'sanity' rally, blending laughs and political activism,
drew thousands to the mall with Stewart and Colbert casting themselves as the
unlikely maestros of moderation and civility in polarized times.


Colbert refrained from taking politi-
cal sides on stage, even as many in
the crowd wore T-shirts that read
"Stewart-Colbert 2012."

18-year-old from Ky.
wins Miss World
BEIJING The newest Miss
World is from Louisville.
Alexandria Mills, a soft-spoken 18-
year-old, was named the winner in
Saturday night's contest in southern
China. The tall blonde was a relative
surprise winner after speculation
focused on other contestants.


Second place went to Emma
Wareus of Botswana, and Adriana
Vasini of Venezuela came third.
The host country's own contes-
tant, Tang Xiao, also was among the
final five.
According to a brief biography on
the Miss World website, Mills calls
Louisville, Ky., her hometown, and
she recently graduated from high
school. She would like to become a
teacher.
Mills takes over the title from
Kaiane Aldorino of Gibraltar, who
was named Miss World 2009.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former Cambodian King
Norodom Sihanouk is 88.
* Actress Lee Grant is 83.
* Movie critic Andrew Sarris
is 82.
* Former astronaut Michael
Collins is 80.
* Former CBS anchorman
Dan Rather is 79.
* Singer Tom Paxton is 73.


" Actor Ron Rifkin is 71.
" Actress Sally Kirkland is 69.
I Actor David Ogden Stiers
is 68.
0 Actor Stephen Rea is 64.
I Olympic gold medal dis-
tance runner Frank Shorter
is 63.
* Talk show host Jane
Pauley is 60.


Daily Scripture

"For it is by grace you have
been saved, through faith and
this not from yourselves, it is
the gift of God not by works,
so that no one can boast."



Ephesians 2:8-9


Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













ON BOARD: Life on the USS Enterprise requires teamwork

Continued From Page 1A


come together," said Rear
Adm. Terry Kraft, com-
mander of the Enterprise
Strike Group.
"And you've met them,"
he said. "They're great
Americans out here from
all over the United States."
Capt. O.P. Honors Jr., the
last commanding officer of
the USS Enterprise until
it decommissions in Nov.
2012, said the ship's mis-
sion is to haul its aircraft
and support the people on
board. It has everything its
crew needs, he said, such
as 30 days worth of food,
the necessary amount of
nuclear propulsion and
almost 3 million gallons of
fuel.
"So we're sort of a big
city," Honors said.
That floating city a
cashless society .where all
on board have to swipe U.S.
Navy cash cards for pur-
chases also has its own
barber shops, full medical
and dental facilities, fire
department, ship stores,
print shop, photo lab, bank,
ATMs, a Starbucks cof-
fee shop called "Starboard
Joe's" and two gyms.
"I've been on the ship
for two and a half years
and probably haven't even
seen half of it," said Airman
Christopher Douglas, 26, of
Trenton.
Living on the ship is
compact because of space,
Douglas said, who shares
a berth, or sleep area, with
about six or seven people
whose ages fall between
the ship's average of 18
to 24.
"Privacy's not really an
issue anymore," he said.
Making friends on the
ship is like making friends
at home, Douglas said. He
does it by talking to people
in the gym or when watch-
png football games on tele-
,vision in the crew's mess,
or eating area.
For 21-year-old William
Shipp, E3 electrician mate
fireman and Gainesville
native, the people he works
with daily are key to his
life on the ship, people he
calls friends instead of ship-


mates.
"We laugh, we do fight a
lot because we're so close,
but the friends that you
make on board is the best
thing," Shipp said. '"They
make the day go by fast-
er."
A sailor's usual day is
regimented, beginning at 6
a.m. with a whistle wake-up
call, then work that can last
15 to 20 hours a day.
Lt. Ian Lilyquist, 31,
of Grafton, Wis., who is
responsible for safely
launching all aircraft off
the flight deck, said unex-
pected maintenance on the
aircraft catapults can some-
times require 24 hours of
work from the 193 people
under him.
"So it's a difficult job,"
Lilyquist said, "but they
do it, and they don't com-
plain at all about it. They're
incredible."
Command Master Chief
Keith Oxley said the sail-
ors' schedules are busy as
they try to advance and
also earn the Enlisted
Surface Warfare Specialist
(ESWS) or Enlisted
Aviation Warfare Specialist
(EAWS), a mandatory
qualification that deems a
seaman or airman knowl-
edgeable of all the ship's
working aspects and its
mission as a whole.
Their work schedules
don't always allow for rec-
reation time, sailors said.
"As soon as you get off,
you prepare for the next
day," Shipp said. "You do it
all over again."
Shipp said he will go to
the ship's sposon, on the
edge of ship, if time allows
to watch the ship turn, see
the ocean and watch planes
land.
"It's relaxing, it gets'you
out of the skin of the ship,"
he said. "I mean, yeah,
you're.looking at water, but
just to get out and feel the
ocean breeze. It feels good.
I've taken so many pictures
up there at sunset."
Common recreation
activities include playing
video games or watching
movies, working out in the


S Special Interests Include:
.* Preventive Care/ Physicals
i Geriatric Care
l Women's Health
S'* Diabetes Management
M.n,,h Pai-, MD F.zabh ~ hy Most appointments in 24 hours
Newman, ARNP Most insurances accepted

A. .
; ;.
471 174'


gym and e-mailing or call-
ing family at home, options
provided through satellite.
Bill O'Bry, Quarter
Master 1st Class, 35, of
Inglis, has been in the Navy
for 17 years. He said it is
stressful being away from
his seven-month-old son
and wife, who he e-mails
several times a day.
Most of O'Bry's time is"
spent working with and
training the 18 junior sailors
under him and he hopes to
retire soon to return to his
family.
"It's -time to let the
younger generation take
the reins and protect, the
country," O'Bry said, "and
it's my time to spend it
at home with my wife and
kid raising him the way he
should be raised."


Douglas said living on
the ship has taught him
how much family means
and Kraft said his family at
home is the support sys-
tem.
"Navy spouses stay
home and do the hard
work of raising the kids,
fixing the car, which always
breaks the day after you
get underway, and all the
other things involved with
raising a family," Kraft said.
"So really the families do
the tough work that allow
us to come out here and
play and do our jobs."
Keeping morale up can
be tough, Douglas said, but
humorous e-mails, laugh-
ter and positive attitudes
are good cures.

ON BOARD continued on 5A


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LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Capt. O.P. Honors Jr., right, commanding officer of the USS
Enterprise, gestures as he talks with Nathan Carpenter, Mass
Communication Specialist 3rd Class, of Kijabe, Kenya, who
was named Sailor of the Day Oct. 15. Sailor of the Day is a
daily, rotating title given to sailors nominated for their service,
professionalism and dedication to duty. A reward of the title
is sitting in the captain's chair on the ship's bridge, where the
ship is navigated and driven, and chatting with the captain.


MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


3A


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


IBu:.
fi -.













OPINION


Sunday, October 31, 2010


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Make your

vote count,

exercise

your right


someone and now
its time. Go to the
polls on Tuesday
andvote.
Regardless of the volume
of negative campaigning that
we've all had to endure .during
this campaign season, the vot-
ers must rise above it, not get
discouraged by the negativity
of the state campaigns, and go
ahead and vote.
It does matter.
Also, there are many consti-
tutional amendments that have
the potential to change life as
we know it in Florida. Do your
research and choose wisely.
The things that separate
America from many other less-
attractive countries are free
and open elections and the
constitutional privilege to cast
ballots in these elections. We're
a Republic and we elect men
and women to represent us in
respective governing bodies.
So make the most of your
freedom.
Early voting totals have
been brisk and a large crowd
is expected on general election
day. The polls are open for 12
hours from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Polling places are listed inside
today's issue and are nearby to
where you live.
Voting is the single most
important thing an American
can do. Ifs a right that is too
precious to take for granted.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Oct 31, the
304th day of 2010. There are 61
days left in the year.

On Oct 31, 1517, Martin
Luther posted the 95 Theses
on the door of the Wittenberg
Palace church, marking the start
of the Protestant Reformation in
Germany.
In 1864, Nevada became the
36th state.
In 1926, magician Harry
Houdini died in Detroit of gan-
grene and peritonitis resulting
from a ruptured appendix.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of.
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Politicians spend obscene amounts


WASHINGTON
Never has the old
bromide about
America having
the best Congress
money can buy
been more valid than in the
current midterm elections. Of
course what the people are get-
ting isn't necessarily going to be
the "best" when all is said and
done.
More likely Capitol Hill will
remain a place of great divisions
and. disharmony with real states-
men still hard to find.
.The level of spending raises
serious questions about'the .
health of the electorate system -
whether the government for,, by
and of the people is exactly that
considering the potential power
of special interests providing
much of the money.
Latest accounting estimate
that when the final tally is in,
the campaigns for the House
and Senate will top $2 billion,
a record that exceeds the
amounts laid out for the last
presidential campaign.
According to press reports,
the House races will reach $1.8
billion if not more while the
Senate will add another $550
million or so. For the House
that means some $4 million for
each of the 435 contests when
averaged out
Obviously some races will
spend much more and others
less. But what does that matter?
The overall total is still stagger-
ingly obscene and downright
immoral considering the linger-
ing economic woes of much of
the electorate.
A torrent of cash has been let
loose by the Supreme Court's
decision freeing the restraints
on donations by outside groups
including corporations.
The amount in contribu-
tions allocated to tight races
actually is around $400 million
despite an excess in public-


LETTER


Dan K.Thomasson

ity. Analysts, however, charge
that the spending by outside
groups has caused candidates
to spend more responding to
attacks.
The rest of the grand total is
being raised and spent by can-
didates themselves.
This startling amount
doesn't ,count the gubernato-
rial races where candidates
are contributing to the bizarre
political spending orgy. Take
a look at California where
Republican billionaire Meg
Whitman, the former eBay
CEO, already has plopped
down the most money ever in
a non-presidential race $140
million, all of it hers, to run an
insane asylum.
The irony is that the new
Congress, perhaps as never
before, is going to have to do
something about the nation's
enormously resistant deficits
through .a number of down-
hold measures that may
include altering Social Security
'and Medicare (good luck on
that) while at the same time
pondering whether to extend
the tax cuts adopted during
the Bush administration.
A good question might be
whether a Congress elected
by such wildly uncontrolled
spending can change its hab-
its enough to take the steps
required to bring the nation
back to solvency or at least
closer to it.
The answer is probably not
even though one can expect
a serious amount of talk and
posturing from both sides of


the aisle.
The possibility of split con-
trol with the House Republican
and the Senate Democratic
doesn't bode well for serious
advances in the cause of debt
reduction.
The impact of the new
health care package still is
to be felt, but knowledgeable
observers believe the costs
have been substantially under-
estimated.
This is a sad tale.
The amount of money spent
this year is certain to increase
in the next election and the
next. Much of what members
of Congress do all yea"rotd id;
is raise money, tending to the
needs of their big donors so as
not to lose out to well -heeled
challengers.
This then leads to ethical
problems and even more seri-
ous difficulties. The cause of
campaign spending reform
was set back dramatically by
the Supreme Court, leaving
pretty much only average indi-
vidual donors with limits on
their contributions.
There must be some consti-
tutional means of restricting
the amount of money a can-
didate can spend running for
public office, even if it is his or
her own money.
But until that is found, the
path to the public trough will
become increasingly over-
grown with thistles.
Why one would want to
spend such amounts or ask
others to do so to win a public
office is beyond me.'
It probably has something
to do with ego and self worth,
a belief that one is the only
candidate who can bring order
into the chaos of Washington.
The "best!"

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


TO THE EDITOR


Arm hurts from taking out political trash


To the Editor:
Who hasn't been barraged
lately with piles of negative
postcards telling you why you
shouldn't vote for one candidate
or another.
I hurt my arm just taking out
the trash this week and I have
to wonder are they fact or fic-
tion? They tell you the negative
story of one candidate and then
list all of their proof sources at
the bottom so they can claim it's
official. .
I've noticed many of the post-
cards come from one party or
the other, but when both par-
ties voted for the same bill or
accepted funds from the same
industry group they have to use
a third-party group to send the
negative postcard.
They accuse candidate A of
doing something wrong so that
you will vote for candidate B,


but the truth is candidate B or
their party did the same thing as
candidate A. That's the purpose
of the third-party group. They
create the smokescreen so one
party or the other can gain a
seat.
Of the three postcards I got
today, my favorite was the one
about insurance, it came from
one of the third-party groups. I
noticed it because it dealt with
insurance and this is the indus- *
try I am in.
It stated that one candidate
voted to raise your insurance
rates. My first thought was,
what insurance rates are they
talking about life, auto, health,
homeowners? Maybe it's boats.
You could take the time to
look at the proof sources and
then look up all the bills and
try to determine what they are
talking about. I really don't have


time for that and I doubt you do
either. I do know currently the
Office for Insurance Regulation
is the only one that can approve
a rate increase for an insurance
company in Florida. Politicians
don't even get to vote on it. I
found the closest circular file
and filed the mail piece with all
of the others that claim this or
that about the candidates.
I wish the candidates and
their parties would focus their
time and energy telling us what
they believe in and how they
plan to make Florida a better
place to live. Soon it will all be
over and we won't have to break
a sweat just to bring in the mail
or hurt our arm taking out the
trash. Good luck to all of the
candidates and I hope everyone
takes time to vote.
John Kasak
Lake City


4A


Lisa Hbffman
lisahoffmon@shns.com


Ballistic

underwear

safeguards

US soldiers


jackets. Now there
are flak Jockeys.
A British firm has
come up with what
it calls ballistic underwear that
is designed to shield soldiers'
femoral arteries and, perhaps
more importantly, their nether
regions from the shrapnel and
flames that spew from a deto-
nated lED.
The Stars and Stripes news-
paper spotted the item on dis-
play at the annual Association
of the United States Army
convention in Washington
recently.
"Protection for your privates,
both literally and figuratively,"
is the way manufacturer BCB
International describes the
product
The boxers feature soft
panels that the company says
provide the same level of pro-
tection to the sensitive region
as standard safety glasses do
for the eyes.
The garment weighs less
than half a pound.
The British defense ministry
S'-is currently testing the under-
'wear, the company says.

Proponents of a national
system to track arsonists and
bombers have tried since 2006
to convince Congress to set
one up.
But each term since then, a
measure to create a nationwide
registry of those convicted
of such .crimes has passed
the House, only to die in the
Senate.
This year, the House has
again passed the measure but
it currently sits moribund in a
Senate committee.
Supporters, however, think
they may have a good shot this
year.
Their best argument is that
arsonists, like sex criminals,
are often repeat offenders,
and, a registry would help law
enforcement narrow lists of
suspects and keep track of
those previously convicted.
The main opposition centers
around the cost of setting up
and maintaining a database,
which has been estimated at
about $4 million a year.
That would include funds
for states to use to comply
with the new record-keeping
burden.

In a first, a woman has
won the Army's Best Warrior
Competition, a 9-year-old con-
test considered the Army's
super bowl of soldiering.
Sgt. Sherri Jo Gallagher, of
Prescott, Ariz., who is also the
Army's Soldier of the Year,
beat 11 other contenders rep-
resenting the service's major
commands in an assortment of
skills. Among them: engaging
insurgents, tending wounded
soldiers in battle, "stress"
marksmanship while moving
under enemy fire, hand-to-
hand combat, urban orienteer-
ing and detainee operations.
Gallagher, 26, is stationed at
Fort Benning, Ga., where she
is an instructor and shooter
with the Marksmanship Unit
The daughter of a pair of
competitive shooters, she fired
her first gun at age 5.
Her goals: winning a gold
medal in marksmanship at the
Olympics and deploying with
her unit to Afghanistan.
Scripps Howard News Service


2,4D


ESTeii'loK.CoMus









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


FEST: Re-enactment

draws rave reviews
Continued From Page 1A
minutes and featured a Bob Carpenter, a free-
skirmish with black-powder lance photographer from
rifles and cannon fire. Germany, echoed Moore's
James Marshall, a re- comments, praising the
enactor, was interpreting event.
Col. John Warren of 1st "It was great," he said.
Florida Volunteer Regiment "I always enjoy things like
during Saturday's re-enact- that and being from a for-
ment. eign country, we don't have
"The re-enactment this history."
went well," Marshall said. Harvard Bernie por-
"Everybodyhadagoodtime trayed a Native American
and' most of the re-enac- warrior during Saturday's
tors are military history performance and spoke
enthusiasts. The Seminole with audience members
Wars are not a well-docu- about life during the 1830's
mented period in American afterwards.
history, but almost all of "I loved taking part in
us are local. We realize the re-enactment," he said.
these battles happened in "I've been doing this for 12
our backyards, so we have years at least."
an interest in interpreting Bernie, a Fanning
them to the public." Springs' resident, said he's
Barbara Moore, a researched the Seminole
Massachusetts resident, Wars for more than a dozen
came to the park to watch years and noted he's par-
the re-enactment. In ticipated in other research
Massachusetts, where she events at the park.
has donated more than "It's brand new and it's
3,000 volunteer hours, she's something we've never
known as "The White Wolf' done here before," he said
(teacher of the Great Spirit) of this year's re-enactment
with a Native American "It's fun to try to create a
tribe where she hosted sev- little bit of what happened
eral Native American sculp- back then and give the folks
ture contests. an idea of what really went
"The re-enactment was on in that time."
wonderful," she said. "It's' Activities for the remain-
a marvelous re-enactment der of this year's Alligator
We came down here espe- Fest will continue until 5
cially for this." p.m. at O'Leno State Park.

VOTE: Election Tuesday

Continued From Page 1A


continue tax abatements,
and three questions regard-
ing the City of Lake City's
charter.
Liz Horne, Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections, said residents
need to bring a valid driv-
er's license with a photo
identification or Florida
identification card with
their photograph or. credit
card with signature to vote
in the election.
There are 25 voting pre-
cincts in Columbia County.
Five voting precincts have
been moved fornthe general
election.
People in Precinct 1
last voted in the Mt Salem
Baptist Church. Now those
residents will be asked
to vote at Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church, 5056 SW
-State Road 47.
Precinct 7 voters who


last voted at the Mikesville
Club House are now asked
to cast ballots at the Mason
City Community Center,
11110 U.S. Highway 441
south.
Precinct 12 voters
voted in the Teen Town
building during the last
election, but are now being
asked to cast ballots at the
Parkview Baptist Church,
268 NW Lake Jeffery Road.
Precinct 19 voters who
cast ballots at the Pleasant
Grove Methodist Church
will be able to vote at the
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church, 5056 SW State
Road 47.
Precinct 23 voters
last voted in the Mt Salem
Baptist Church, but are
now asked to cast their bal-
lots at the Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church, 5056 SW
State Road 47.


ON BOARD: Teamwork
Continued From Page 3A


"That's about the best
way we keep morale up in
our shop," he said, "try to
make people laugh."
The ship's departments
match the support the sail-
ors provide to one another.
Capt. Steven Clarke, a
dentist on the ship, said the
dental department exists to
care for the sailors, enabling
them to do their work.
"Marines and 'the Navy
guys all work as a team and
are doing a great job," he
said. "It's kind of different
from .what you see on TV
sometimes or read in the
paper that all the young
kids are no good. That's not
the case here. These are all
superstars."
The sailors said they are
proud of their jobs and most
claimed theirs was the best
job on the ship.
John Maynard,
Boatswain Mate 3rd Class,
26, of Byron, Ga., said it
is an honor to serve in the
U.S. Navy and on the USS
Enterprise.
Recognitions like sit-
ting in the captain's chair
as Sailor of the Day a
daily, rotating title given to
certain sailors nominated
for their service, profes-
sionalism and dedication to
duty are rewards for the
relentless efforts put forth
by the crew and air wing.
Interacting with the sail-
ors is a privilege, Honors
said.
"Just dealing with the
sailors, it's awesome," he
said.
Honors said he would


trade places with a young
person entering into the
U.S. Navy if he could
because of the way the
branch has progressed.
"What a phenomenal
time to be getting into the
Navy," he said. "I envy
those people."
Kraft said the ship is run
by the hard work of its sail-
ors.
"It's a fantastic place with
great leadership and just a
lot of fun," he said. "Every
sailor will tell you that they
have the most important job
on the ship. And as long as
I've got people that believe
that, then the job's going
to get done. We call it tak-
ing ownership of whatever
you're doing. And when
they do that, they don't
need a lot of supervision.
They understand what they
need to do and they go out
and do it every single day."


HALLELUJAH
FESTIVAL

3:00pm-6:00pm
Olustee Park
Downtown Lake City
Sponsored by
Grace Harbor Ministries
G H M PRAISE BAND
GAMES PRIZES
FOOD LIVE MUSIC
V DANCE
Everything Is FREE!


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.

Wednesday
Lake City
Police Department
Kerry Todd Gill, no
age given, 493 SW Alamo
Drive, warrant Robbery.
Thursday, Oct. 28
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Ray J. Brooks, 19,
740 SE Brown St, warrant
Felony fleeing and eluding.
Jerry Mitchell Carter
Sr., 60, 303 E. Saturn Lane,
aggravated battery.
Charles Chiqui Reyes,
26, 231 SE Downing Drive,
High Springs, aggravated
assault (domestic violence)
and warrant Failure to
appear for arraignment for
expired tag of more than
six months).
Charles Runyan,


47, 1020 E. 13th St,
Jacksonville, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charges of lewd
and lascivious battery on
a child under 14 years of
age.
Alexander Paul
Waldron Sr., no age given,
125 SW Endeavor Court,
forging bank checks, utter-
ing forged checks and
theft.
Lake City
Police Department
Brian Daniel
Raulerson, no age given,
123 SE Rose Creek Loop,
burglary of a conveyance
and credit card fraud (less
than $100).
Friday
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Vickie Lynn
Mangrum, 29, 2457 SW
Daisy Road, Fort White,
warrant: Failure to appear
for arraignment for stop-
ping payment with intent
to defraud.
From staff reports.


DNLA GREENE MD
WOMEN S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


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C


Repairs delay again

Discovery's final

launch another day


MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL
- Last-minute leak repairs
have again pushed back
space shuttle Discovery's
final launch, this time until
Wednesday.
NASAdelayed Discovery's
flight to the International
Space Station yet another
day because more work was
needed than initially thought
to replace a pair of leaking
pipe hookups near the shut-
tie's tail, NASA test director
Jeff Spaulding said Saturday.
The problem cropped up
earlier in the week, forc-


ing NASA to give up on the
original Monday launch
attempt and aim instead for
Tuesday. That one-day slip
to Election Day which
was announced Friday -
had officials in neighboring
communities worried about
the massive traffic jams that
might result from hordes of
launch spectators and resi-
dents trying to vote.
Spaulding said the latest
delay gives shuttle team
members "a little bit more
breathing room" to get to the
polls. Space agency manag-
ers had been urging workers
to vote early to avoid inter-
fering with work.


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POLICE REPORTS


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


q l c; ,









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Fair festivities
The 56th Annual
Columbia County Fair is
through Nov. 6. Regular
fair admission is $5. Rides
are not included in the
price of admission.

7th Annual Family
Fall Festival
Christ Central is having
a fall festival as an alterna-
tive to trick or treating for
children 6-9 p.m. today.
The theme for the festival
is western roundup. There
will be a bounce house,
candy, entertainment, hay
rides and an entertainment
contest Call Leilani at 755-
2525.


begin at 9 a.m. Monday
at First Baptist Church
- Lake City, .182 NE Justice
St. Screenings identify
potential strokes or bone
fractures. Packages start
at $139. Call 1-800-697-9721
or visit www.lifelinescreen-
ing.com. Pre-registration is
required.

Community Concerts
series
Greg Giannascoli,
marimba master, performs
7:30 p.m. Monday at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. A special show
is at noon for students.
Any teachers wanting to
bring their classes to this
free show must contact
Barbara Carpenter at 752-
4630.


FAMU Alumni meeting Wednesda


The FAMU Alumni
Chapter is meeting 3 p.m.
today at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church annex,
541 NE Davis Avenue.
FAMU National Alumni
Association Pre'sident
Tommy Mitchell Sr. will be
present.

Monday
Life Line Screenings
Life Line Screenings


Visioning Workshop
A Visioning Workshop
for the Ichetucknee
Spring Restoration Plan
is 9:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Price Creek
Water Treatment Plan.

Thursday
Leads Clubs
An information meet-


ing on Leads Clubs is
5:30-6:30 p.m. Nov. 4 at
Holiday Inn & Suites Lake
City. The clubs are opened
to Chamber members.
Light refreshments will be
served. Cash bar available.
Call 386-754-1411.

Youth show at fair
The Youth Swine and
Steer Show is scheduled
for 7 p.m. Thursday at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Call 752-
8822.

Rural Folklife Days
The annual Rural
Folklife Days are 9
a.m.-2:30 p.m. Thursday
through Saturday at
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
More than 16 demon-
strators will be on hand
showcasing Florida tradi-
tions. Admission is $5 per
person. Call toll free 1-.
877-635-3655 or visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
phenfoster.


Saturday
Four Rivers Audubon
ALLI-Walk
The next monthly ALLI-
Walk: Bird /Butterfly /
Nature's Garden outing is


8-11 a.m. Saturday. Jerry
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder,
and others will share their
knowledge. Bring a hat,
sunscreen, water, binocu-
lars and a snack. No fee is
charged. All levels of par-
ticipation and knowledge
are welcome. Call Loye
Barnard at 497-3536.

2nd Annual Breast
Cancer Walk
The second annual
Breast Cancer Walk is
9 a.m.-12 p.m. Saturday
starting at Olustee Park.
Pink ribbons will be avail-
able for purchase and
donations are accepted.
Walking is not required.
Call Kelly at 386-365-7604.

Fundraiser benefit
A benefit for Pat
Kenwarthy is 9 a.m.-6
p.m. Saturday at Sunbelt
Chrysler Jeep/Dodge.
Activities will include
a carwash, bake sale,
silent auction, food and
a live performance form
Southern Justice.

Charity poker run
A charity poker run
begins 9:30 am. Saturday
at the Lake City Shrine
Club. Registration is 8:30


OBITUARIES


Mrs. Marguerite T. Hunt

Mrs. Marguerite T. Hunt, 95, a
lifelong resident of Columbia
County went home to be with
the Lord on Saturday morning,
October 30, 2010. The last sur-
viving of six children born to the
late Madison and Mary Lipsey
Terry, Mrs. Hunt was preceded
in death by her five brothers,
Irwin, Colon, Aston, Carl and
Robert Terry. She was educated
in the Columbia county school
system and graduated from
Columbia High School in 1933.
She worked as a manager for the
school lunch system for twenty-
five years prior to retiring in
1970. She then volunteered for
fifteen years with the local V.A.
Medical Center. In her spare
time Mrs. Hunt enjoyed cooking,
sewing and reading. She was an
active member of the Siloam
United Methodist Church. Mrs.
Hunt was preceded in death by
her husband, George Herbert
Hunt.
Mrs. Hunt is survived by her
son and daughter-in-law, Bill
and Jean Hunt of Lake City;
her three grandchildren, 'Julie
Henry of Chicago, Illinois; Sean
Hunt of Crestview, Florida;
and Laura Hunt of Gainesville,
Florida; three great-grandchil-
dren, Scott Works, Michael
Works and Kameron Hunt all
of Lake City and her two great-
great grandchildren, Juliana and
Nathan Works both of Lake City.
Numerous nieces & nephews
and other family members and
friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Hunt
will be conducted at 2:00 P.M.
on Tuesday, November 2, 2010
in, the Siloam United Methodist
Church with Rev. Bill Peeler
officiating. Interment will fol-
low in the church cemetery. The
family will receive friends in
the chapel of the funeral home
from 5:00-7:00 Monday eve-
ning. Flowers are being accept-
ed but should you choose to
make a memorial donation
the family requests that you
direct it to the Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley, 6037
US Highway 90 West, Lake
City, FL 32055. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025. (386)752-1234 parrish-
familyfuneralhome. comr

Mrs. M. Frances Spurling

Mrs. M. Frances Spurling, 86, of
Lake City, passed away peace-
fully in her home on Friday,
October 29th, 2010. She had
been a resident of Lake City
since 1969 and was preceded in
death in January of 2004 by her
husband of fifty-six years, Mr.
Roy Taylor Spurling. Frances


was a homemaker and a loving,
caring Christian mother, grand-
mother and great-grandmother.
She was an active member of the
Parkview Baptist Church where
she served and took an active
part in a variety of ministries
through the years. She loved
working with flowers, cooking
and making candies and sweets.
Mrs. Spurling is survived by
her three children, Roy Dennis
Spurling, Terry James Spurling
both of Lake City and Darlene


Crawford of Savannah, Georgia.
Seven grandchildren and ten
great-grandchildren also sur-
vive.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Spurling will be conducted at
Noon on Monday, November
1, 2010 in the Parkview Baptist
Church with Rev. Bill Wood
officiating. Interment will follow
in the Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens. The family will receive
friends for two hours prior to the
service (10:00 A.M. until Noon)


at the church. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the on-line family guest-
book at parrishfamilyfuneral-
home. com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Lifelong resident of Columbia County
District 2 resident, for 17 years
Graduate of CHS and LCCC
I *9 Married with 2 children
Paramedic and registered nurse
Currently flight nurse at ShandsCair

10 A COMMON SENSE APPROACH

0 NOT A POLITICIAN

0 ADVOCATE FOR CONTROLLED GROWTH


VoMarc Kazmierski
& For County Commissioner District 2




immunity %ncerts Of Lake City Presents
At Levy Performing Arts Center Florida Gateway College

GREG GIANNASCOLI

MARIMBA MASTER
7:30 PM Monday November 1
Award winning Juilliard faculty member and world-class
marimbist & percussionist performs Gershwin, Pagannini,
Liszt, and his. riotous version of "Flight of the Bumblebee."
> THE NUTCRACKER BALLET 2:30 & 7:30 pm Sat Dec 11
This colorful Christmas classic returns with professional dancers from Dance
Alive National Ballet + fifty local dancers and tumblers. Two shows.
Guaranteed seating for members.
> THE DIAMONDS 2:30 pm Sat Jan 22
The real Diamonds revisit their classical pop music / Doo-Wop heritage from
the 50's 80's, singing their biggest hits, like "Little Darlin,"' "Why Do Fools
Fall in Love," and "The Stroll"
> JOHN DAVIDSON 2:30 pm Sun Feb 13
The real John Davidson star of TV, film,'and Broadway entertains with vocals,
humorous stories, & banjo. He produced 13 albums
and appears at major Las Vegas showrooms.
Join at the door, or website, or Lake City Chamber of Commerce
for all FOUR live programs: $50/Adult or ONLY $5/Student K-12 OW_ <
Members, please arrive by 7:10 pm for GUARANTEED SEATING
A limited number of single tickets are also available ONLY at the door one hour before
show: $18/Adult or $5/Student K-12, and FREE standby for FGC students w/current ID
Visit www.communityconcerts.info or call (386) 466-8999


a.m. The ride ends at
Gainesville Shrine Club.
Cost is $20 per bike/had
and $10 per additional
passenger/hand. All pro-
ceeds benefit the Shiner's
Children Hospital and
Florida Masonic Lodge.
Pre-register by calling Mark
Szymanski at 352-213-5069,
e-mail onyx32@juno.com or
Roger Ward at 386-288-3425
,or e-mail rogerwardus@
yahoo.com.

Tuesday, Nov. 9


pictures and mementos
of loved ones that can be
placed on the Table of
Memories. Refreshments
will be served. Registration
is not required. Call Haven
Hospice at 386-752-9191.

Dancing lessons
Square dance lessons
are at 6:45 p.m. every
Tuesday at Teen Town:
The first two lessons are
free. Call Ouida Taylor at
386-7524469.


Fall Love and Wednesday,
Remembrance Memorial Nov. 10


The Haven Hospice
Love and Remembrance
Memorial is 6 p.m. Nov.
9. It is open to anyone in
the community who has
lost a loved one. Attendees
are encouraged to bring


GDDA meeting
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association is
meeting at 5:30 p.m. Nov.
10. The meeting is spon-
sored by Pampered Chef.


^"H4lonor

.


'ill

.1'
p..


Heroes!


The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


re-I

PON


Shank you for your
years of service.
We Salute You


Love, Eileen
actual size


Your Name:
Address:
Town: ---State: Zip:
Daytime Phone:
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: Dales Served:
ring this in or Send to: Lake City Reporter, 18) F E. D)l Ulae (i; H l. 3205, .i- l for n on' ino.
Subhlissions nust he received t ly 3:30 pm.. MoMnty, No. 2010. All photos will be returned b) including SASE with your entry.


NOTICE
This notification is addressed to any
former patients of the deceased Dr.
Owen B.K. Osborne of Ramadan Hand
Institute. If you were a patient being
treated at the Lake City, Gainesville,
Palatka or Lake Butler location and
you need a copy of your medical re-
cord, you may contact the office staff
at 386-496-2461 Monday thru Friday,
8:30 a.m. -- 5:00 p.m. for assistance.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


rsrl
PER I


P ALIL-







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BakedGoods ,"
Livestock Sale '
tLivestock shows
Inm 4-H Horticulture :
Variety Entertainment
Canning and Food Preservation
Business & Commufity Displays
Contests Consisting of Home Arts


For more information: (386) 752-.8822 or www.columbiacbuntyfair.org


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31,2010


BRIEFS


Indonesian volcano unleashes powerful blast


Obama calls Saudi
King and Cameron

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
has called British Prime
Minister David Cameron
and Saudi Arabia's King
Abdullah to discuss the
thwarted mail bomb
attacks.
The White House says
Obama expressed his
appreciation to.Cameron for
the joint efforts of American
and British security servic-
es in stopping the plot.
Obama thanked the king
for the role played by Saudi
counterterrorism officials in
the matter. The leaders also
discussed the importance of
giving support to Lebanon's
pro-Western prime minister,
Saad Hariri.

Postal Service
nixes Yemen mail
WASHINGTON The
U.S. Postal Service says it's
temporarily stopped accept-
ing inbound international
mail that's originating in
Yemen.
The suspension is effec-
tive Saturday and comes
in response to the poten-
tial threat from suspicious
packages arriving in the
U.S. on international flights
originating in Yemen.
The Postal Service says
it could make other adjust-
ments to its international
mail transportation network
based on the recommenda-
tions of the Postal Inspection
Service and other federal
law enforcement agencies.


WASHINGTON The
walking dead have infiltrat-
ed the Energy Department.
Energy Secretary Steven
Chu shared a picture of
himself as-a zombie on his
Facebook page in an effort
to teach users about saving
electricity.
'To date, there is ho sci-
entific evidence about the
existence of zombies, but
what about vampires?" Chu'
asked in a Facebook note.
He went on to warn read-
ers about so called "vampire
appliances," such as com-
puters, stereos and DVD
players, which use power
in standby mode. Chu said
these types of appliances
could increase a house-
hold's monthly electricity
bills by at least 10 percent
To ward off these particular
vampires, Chu suggested
using power strips.
M Associated Press-


By SLAMET RIYADI
Associated Press
MOUNT MERAPI,
Indonesia Clouds of
gray ash rumbled down
the slopes of Indonesia's
most volatile volcano
Saturday in its most pow-
erful eruption of a deadly
week, prompting soldiers
to force reluctant villagers
to evacuate amid fears of a
larger blast.
On the other side of the
archipelago, storms again
prevented aid deliveries
to increasingly desperate
survivors of a tsunami
- including a teenage girl
with an open chest wound
- that killed 413 people
in the Mentawai islands.
Relief workers found
some comfort, however,
when the number of miss-
ing dropped by half to 163
as searchers discovered
'more survivors and villag-
ers who had fled to the
hills returned home.
The simultaneous catas-
trophes have severely test-
edtheemergencyresponse
network. Indonesia lies in
the Pacific "Ring of Fire," a
cluster of fault lines prone
to earthquakes and volca-
nic activity.
Mount Merapi, which
sprang back to life early
this week, unleashed a ter-
rifying 21-minute eruption
early Saturday, followed
by more than 350 volcanic
tremors and 33 ash bursts,
said Surono, chief of the
Center for Volcanology
and Geological Hazard
Mitigation.
The latest spewing of


I w


the notoriously unpre-
dictable volcano forced
the temporary closure of
an airport and claimed
another life, bringing the
death toll this week to
36.
At least 47,000 people
have fled the mountain's
wrath, according to
the National Disaster
Management Agency.
Government camps well
away from the base were
overflowing with refu-
gees, including most of
the 11,000 people who
live on the mountain's
fertile slopes. They
were told Saturday, with
signs the danger level
was climbing, that they
should expect to stay for
three more weeks.
Despite such warn-
ings, many people have
returned to their land to
check on precious crops
and livestock.
The new eruption
triggered a chaotic pre-
dawn exit, killing a 44-
year-old woman who was
fleeing by motorcycle,
said Rusdiyanto, head
of disaster management
office in the main city of
Yogyakarta.
For the first time
Saturday, -more than
2,000 troops were called
in to help keep villag-
ers clear of the mountain.
Camouflaged soldiers
stood guard in front of
ash-covered homes and
local television showed
one woman who refused
evacuation orders being
carried away as she
screamed in protest.


- 4-
- -


II


, remember
each dayv
Sso special


V and sweet,
AS* 111o


I4 iourhture v
v if youl ill
ManyMe!


Do You Need to

POP THE
QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!
755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm


>1i~


*


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Motorists ride on an ash-covered street during an ash fall from the eruption of Mount Merapi
in Pakem, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Saturday.



NOTICE
I do hereby certify that the 2010 Columbia County Tax Rolls have been duly certified to me by the
Columbia County Property Appraiser and will be open for the collection of Ad Valorem Taxes and
Non-Ad Valorem Assessment as assessed by the taxing authorities of Columbia County and the
City of Lake City on Monday, November 1, 2010.
The following discounts will apply:
4% if paid by November 30, 2010
3% if paid by December 31, 2010
2% if paid by January 31, 2011
1% if paid by February 28, 2011
Taxes may be paid in person or mailed to the Tax Collector's office located in the Courthouse
Annex at 135 NE Hernandc e., Suite 125, 1 ake City, Florida 32055-4006 between the hours
of 8:00 am and 4:30 pm or at the drive-thru from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
We also have a drop box for your convenience located in the front of the Courthouse Annex.
Taxes may also be paid at the Tax Collector's branch office located in the Sheriff's Sub-Station at
294 SW Bryant Ave. in the town of Ft. White, Florida 32038 every Wednesday between the hours
of 8:00 am and 4:30 pm.
Telephone calls should be directed to 386-758-1077, Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 5:30
pm.
Thank You,
Ronnie Brannon
Columbia County Tax Collector


"We would like to thank
the Lake City Reporter for
the advertising campaign
they have provided for the
school. It has increased
the awareness of The
Blake School in this


Gayle Delgado
Admissions / Guidance


FOR THE BLAKE SCHOOL


~s11=


Spread the word by
advertising in the
Lake City Reporter.


IkOm


THE BLAE SCHOOL
since 1967
WHEN IN DOUBT..CHECK US OUT
School has started. If your child is not
to the start you want, call us.n
We can custoumize a high school program
to include small class oga
enrollment for colle s instruction, dual
school for ege credit and virtual
school r a large range of courses.
Age 3 through grade 12.
Accredited by
AI.S.F, S.A.C.S. & N.C.PS.A
all today 386-752-8874


Find out ways we can help
by calling 752-1293.


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


Chu talks zombies
and vampires


g THE LIFESTVLE ENRICHMENT CENTER PRESENT Saturday, Nvb 6, 2 ( a The Move
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


i


I


1













Yemeni police arrest suspect in mailed bomb plot


By EILEEN SULUVAN
Associated Press

SAN'A, Yemen Yemeni
police arrested a woman on
suspicion of mailing a pair
of bombs powerful enough
to take down airplanes, offi-
cials said Saturday as details
emerged about a terrorist
plot aimed at the U.S. that
exploited security gaps in
the worldwide shipping sys-
tem.
Investigators were hunt-
ing Yemen for more suspects
tied to al-Qaida and several
U.S. officials identified the


terrorist group's top explo-
sives expert in Yemen as the
most likely bombmaker.
The explosives, addressed
to Chicago-area synagogues,
were pulled off airplanes in
England and the United Arab
Emirates early Friday morn-
ing, touching off a tense
search for other devices.
It still wasn't clear wheth-
er the bombs, which offi-
cials said were wired to cell
phones, timers and power
supplies, could have been
detonated remotely while
the planes were in the air,
or when the packages were


halfway around the world in
the U.S. But the fact that
they made it onto airplanes
showed that nearly a decade
since the Sept. 11, 2001
attacks, terrorists continue
to probe and find security
vulnerabilities.
The packages were ad-
dressed to two synagogues
in the Chicago area. But
British Prime Minister David
Cameron said Saturday that
he believes the explosive
device found at the East
Midlands Airport in central
England was intended to
detonate aboard the plane.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo released by the Dubai Police on Saturday claims to show parts of a computer printer
with explosives loaded into its toner cartridge found in a package onboard a cargo plane coming
from Yemen, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Dubai police say the bomb, bound for the United
States, contained the powerful explosive PETN and bore the hallmarks of al-Qaida.













Sat., Nov. 6

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


I P rl H,-r

FREE to


4 Participate
R Ieorter



Youh SupluTe I, .hIu n.I..





BEMBRY NAMED CO-CHAIR OF

FLORIDA SPORTSMEN'S CAUCUS

AND RECEIVES NRA "A" RATING


"It is an honor to serve the sportsmen
and women of our great state, by serving
as thlie House Co-Chair of tlihe
Sportsmen's Caucus," stated Rep.
Bembrv. ie added. "The people of
north Florida are avid hunters and fish-
ermen, and I look forward to helping
protect, and promote thie outdoors
heritage that we all enjoy so much. We
must all be involved in assuring that our
right to hunt is prolecled in thle legisla-
tive process.'"

The Florida Legislators' Sportsmen's
Caucus is modeled after the Congressional
Sportsmen's Caucus, and was created in
2003. The Caucus was formed when
several prominent sportsmen's groups
invited staff from hOe Congressional
Sportsmen's Foundation to visit Florida.
to help inform members about the impor-
lance of having a Caucus.


At the time the Caucus was formed
there were less than ten such groups
around the nation. Now, there are 38
state legislative sportsmen caucuses. In
2004, Florida played a leadership role in
helping to create the -Nati6nal
Assembly of Sportsmen's Caucuses
(NASC).





State Representative Leonard Bernbrv
also received an "A' rating from the
National Rifle Association (NRA).
When Rep. Beimbry was informed of
his rating he stated, "It's imperative we
protect he 2nd Amendment to
maintain our rights to bear arms and
protect our families."


POLITICAL ADVIRITIS1MI1NT PAID FOR AND APPROVE D BY L[ONARD BEMBRY,
DIMOCRA'I, FOR II ORIDA IH OUSt OF RlPRESIiNTATIVlS, DISTRICT 10


GENERAL ELECTION
NOVEMBER 2,.2010
POLLS OPEN: 7 A.M.
POLLS CLOSE: 7 P.M.
ELIZABETH "LIZ" P HORNE
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
COLUMBIA CO. FL.
971 W DUVALST. STE 102
LAKE CITY, FL 32055


2 Pinegrove Baptist Church
1989 N US Highway 441 L.C. 32055

3 (&11) Christ Central Ministries
359 SW Dyal Ave L.C. 32024

4 Lake City Shrine Club
771 NW Brown Road L.C. 32055

5 (&22) Gateway Baptist Church
3252 SW State Road 247 L.C. 32024

6 Fort White Comm. Ctr.
17579 SW State Road 47 F.W. 32038

7 (&8) Mason City Community Ctr
11110 S US Highway 441 L.C. 32025

8 (&7) Mason City Community Ctr
11110 S US Highway 441 L.C. 32025

9 Lulu Community Center
205 SE Community Dr. Lulu 32061

10 Richardson Community Center
255 NE Coach Anders Ln L.C. 32055

11 (&3) Christ Central Ministries
359 SW Dyal Ave L.C. 32024

12 Teen Town
533 NW Desoto St L.C. 32055

13 Wesley Mem United Meth Church
1272 SW McFarlane Ave L.C. 32025


You will be asked to show a photo and signature
identification when you go to Ihe polls to vote
Acceptable forms of photo identification include:
* Florida driver's license
* Florida identification card issued by the Dept. of
Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
* United States passports
* Debit or credit card
* Military identification
* Student identification
* Retirement center identification
* Neighborhood association identification
* Public assistance identification


15 (&24) Eastside Baptist Church
196 SE James Ave L.C. 32025


16 Bethel United Methodist Church
4843 S US Highway 441 L.C. 32025

17 Woodmen of the World Hall
1339 SW State Road 47 L.C. 32025

18 Lake City Christian Academy
3035 SW Pinemount Rd L.C. 32024

19 (1&23) Our Redeemer Lutheran Church
5056 SW State Road 47 L.C. 32024

20 Winfield Recreation Ctr
1324 NW Winfield St L.C. 32055

21 Parkview Baptist Church
268 NW Lake Jeffery Road L.C. 32055

22 (&5) Gateway Baptist Church
3252 SW State Road 247 L.C. 32024

23 (1&19) Our Redeemer Lutheran Church
5056 SW State Road 47 L.C. 32024

24 (&15) Eastside Baptist Church
196 SE James Ave L.C. 32025

25 Deep Creek Comm Center
11936 N US Highway 441 L.C. 32055
LIZ P. HORNE
Supervisor of Elections
www.votecolumbia.com
July 26, 2010 146th Revision


PURSUANT TO ARTICLE V, SECTION 512, OF THE
CHARTER OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN OF A CANVASSING BOARD
MEETING OF THE MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD
ON WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AT NOON IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND
FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION
AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, TO RECEIVE AND
CANVASS THE RETURNS OF THE NOVEMBER 2, 2010
REFERENDUM OF THE ELECTORS OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA ON PROPOSED AMENDMENTS
TO THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA.

THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING
ITEMS:

1. To receive and canvass the returns of the referendum election on proposed
Amendment Number One to the Charter of the City of Lake City, Florida

2. To receive and canvass the returns of the referendum election on proposed
Amendment Number Two to the Charter of the City of Lake City, Florida

3. To receive andcanvass the returns of the referendum election on proposed
Amendment Number Three to the Charter of the City of Lake City, Florida


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Article V, Section 512, of the
Charter of the City of Lake City, Florida, the City Council will hold a
Canvassing Board Meeting on Novembe" 3, 2010 at noofi for the purposes
outlined above.
AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


PRECINCT POLLING LOCATIONS
1 (19&23) Our Redeemer Lutheran Church 14 Southside Baptist Church
5056 SW State Road 47 L.C. 32024 388 SE Baya Dr L.C. 32025


LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424















Obama: Appeals for common ground, yet jabs GOP


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama walks to board Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in
Maryland outside Washington on Saturday. Obama is making a final get-out-the-vote push for
Democratic candidates in four states, just days before Tuesday's crucial midterm election.


By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Whatever the outcome of
Tuesday's election, it's time
to put aside partisanship,
President Barack Obama
is telling Democrats and
Republicans.
Yet his appeal for unity
includes a jab at GOP lead-
ers in the House and Senate
for comments that the pres-
ident said were troubling.
House Minority Leader
John Boehner of Ohio "actu-
ally said that 'this is not
the time for compromise,"'
Obama said Saturday in his
weekly radio and Internet
address. The president
added that Senate Minority
Leader Mitch McConnell
of Kentucky "said his main
goal after this election is


simply to win the next
one."
The address was
released shortly before
Obama left Washington for
a day of campaigning in
Philadelphia, Bridgeport,
Conn., and Chicago. The
three states have com-
petitive House and Senate
races, as does Ohio, where
the president will hold a
rally Sunday in Cleveland.
"I know that we're in the
final days of a campaign,"
Obama said in his weekly
address. "So it's not sur-
prising that we're seeing
this heated rhetoric. That's
politics. But when the bal-
lots are cast and the voting
is done, we need to put this
kind of partisanship aside
- win, lose or draw."
Voters angry and anxious
about the economy and job-


lessness are expected to
take their frustrations out
on Democratic lawmakers
Tuesday, possibly putting
Republicans back in control
of the House and maybe
even the Senate.
Boehner's comment that
"this is not a time for com-
promise" came during a
recent interview on a con-
servative radio show. He
was trying to rebut a GOP
senator's suggestion that
repealing the health care
law was not in the party's
best interest Republicans
have pledged to try to
repeal the health care law
or undo important parts of
it.
In the same interview,
Boehner said he'd welcome
Obama's involvement in
working toward Republican
goals.


OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT

GENERAL ELECTION

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FL

NOVEMBER 2, 2010


NEED AN ABSENTEE BALLOT?
CALL 758-1026
OR COME BY THE OFFICE


EARLY VOrING
Monday Saturday,
8:30 AM 4:30 PM
LAKE CITY. 971 W. DUVAL ST, SUITE 102
FORT WHITE: 17579 SW STATE ROAD 47
OCTOBER 18 30, 2010


THESE RACES APPEAR
ON ALL BALLOTS
EXCEPT WHERE INDICATED


THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS'
IN PRECINCTS: 1,3,5,6,7,8,9,11,13,14,
16,17,18,19, 22 AND 23
AND PART OF 15,21 AND 24'

STATE-SENATOR
DISTRICT 14
(Vote for One)

CD Steve Oelrich REP
- O .P.er'y C.C MqGriff, r.,r., ,.. ,, DEM.



THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS
IN PRECINCTS: 2,10 12, 20,24,25
AND PART OF 9,15 AND 21

STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 10
(Vote for One)

CD0 David A. Feigin REP
C Leonard L. Bembry DEM



THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS
IN PRECINCTS: 1,3,4,5,6,7,8,11,13,14,
16,17,18,19, 22AND 23
AND PART OF 9,15, AND 21

STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 11
(Vote for One)

0 Elizabeth Porter- REP
0 Debbie Boyd DEM
C John Ferentinos TEA


JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Charles T. Canady of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
O YES
CD NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Jorge Labarga of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?


CD YES
O NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice James E. C. Perry of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
O YES
CD NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Ricky L. Polston of the
Supreme Court be retained.in office?
C YES
CD NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Nikki Ann Clark of the First
District Court of Appeal be retained in
office?

0 YES
CDNO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Paul M. Hawkes of the First
District Court of Appeal be retained In
office?

CD YES
C NO


A VOTE is a terrible thing to waste.



Liz P Home


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS, COLUMBIA COUNTY


Office (386) 758-1026 Fax (386) 755-7233
971 W. Duval Street, Suite .102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3734
www.votecolumbia.com Email: election@votecolumbia.com
Branch Office:
17579 SW SR 47 Fort White, Florida 32038


DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Charles J: Kahn, Jr. of the
First District Court of Appeal be retained In
office?

O YES
CD NO


DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Phil Padovano of the First
District,Court. iof,.Appeal. be detained in
office?


CD YES
CD NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Lori S. Rowe of the. First
District Court of Appeal be retained in
office?

CD YES
O NO

DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Kent Wetherell of the
First District Court of Appeal be
retained in office?

-CD YES
CD NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Jim Wolf of the First
District Court of Appeal be retained In
office?

CD YES
CD NO


S THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS
IN PRECINCTS: 1,3,6, AND 18


NONPARTISAN


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 2
(Vote for One)

0 Rusty DePratter
0 Marc Kazmierski


Mark Ballot This Way
Completely fill in the oval opposite the
name of each candidate or issue you
wish to vote for.
USE ONLY THE MARKING PEN PROVIDED


VOTE BOTH SIDES OF THE BALLOT


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)

Q) Marco Rubio REP-
0 Kendrick B. Meek DEM
0 Alexander Andrew Snitker LBT
CD Bernie DeCastro CPF
0 Sue Askeland NPA
C Bruce Ray Riggs NPA
Bobbie Bean NPA
( Rick Tyler NPA
Charlie Crist NPA
) Lewis Jerome Armstrong NPA
Q Write-in
UNITED STATES
REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 4
(Vote for One)
Q Ander Crenshaw REP
( Troy D. Stanley NPA
Vwrite-in
GOVERNOR & LIEUTENANT
GOVERNOR
(Vote for One Pair)

0 Rick Scott REP
Jennifer Carroll

0 Alex Sink DEM
Rod Smith

O Peter Allen IDP
John E. Zanni

0 Michael E. Arth NPA
Al Krulick

0 Farid Khavari NPA
Darcy G. Richardson

0 C.C. Reed NPA
Larry Waldo, Sr.

O Daniel Imperato NPA
Karl C.C. Behm


Write-in
ATTORNEY GENERAL
(Vote for One)
C Pam Bondi REP
0 Dan Gelber DEM
O Jim Lewis NPA
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
(Vote for One)
CD Jeff Atwater REP
O Loranne Ausley DEM
0 Ken Mazzie NPA
0 Tom Steams NPA
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
(Vote for One)
C Adam H. Putnam REP
C Scott Maddox DEM
0 Ira Chester TEA
( Thad Hamilton NPA


I - '


,k , = I I! I = I i W


- -.. .; ,,


L/at~e~


10A


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010














Some may live in DC, but they vote somewhere else


By JESSICA GRESKO
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Alex lives
in Washington but votes at a
church in Virginia. Kathleen
signed a lease here but casts her
ballot in Pennsylvania. Nicolas
moved to the nation's capital a
year ago, but his polling place is
in Connecticut.
Washington may be a home
for some city dwellers, but it
isn't where their vote will count
during Tuesday's midterm elec-
tions. Some residents eligible to
vote in the city choose to vote in
another place they have a tie to,
saying one reason not to vote in
Washington is it would mean giv-
ing up their vote in Congress.
People who live in the nation's
capital can vote for president
and local offices like mayor. But
they have no senators represent-
ing them, and their one House


"I can't think of any of my friends who vote in D.C."

Kathleen Danielson


member can't vote on the House
floor. Close races in November
are virtually unheard of in the
overwhelmingly Democratic city.
So some of the city's 600,000
residents go out of their way to
vote somewhere they think they
can make more of a difference.
It may seem like manipulating
the system but it can be legal,
depending on a person's circum-
stances and the laws in the states
where they vote.
"I can't think of any of my
friends who vote in D.C.," said
Kathleen Danielson, 22, who grad-
uated from George Washington
University earlier this year and
now lives in the city's Columbia
Heights neighborhood, about two
miles from the White House.


Danielson hasn't changed
her voter registration from the
Pennsylvania town where she
grew up, where corn grows in
local fields and there are dairy
farms nearby. She says she just
hasn't gotten around to switching
her residency since graduating
and doesn't like that she'd lose
her representation in Congress if
she switched.
. For people like Danielson, just
out of school or perhaps in a
temporary job, it can be hard to
know where it's OK to vote. In
Michigan, for instance, state law
suggests a person must regularly
sleep in the state and keep their
possessions there to be eligible
to vote.
Other states have broader defi-


nations, saying people can vote
there if they intend to return or
haven't decided that their new
residence will be permanent.
Figuring out intent can be sub-
jective and tricky, though where
a person gets a driver's license,
pays taxes and owns property are
telling clues.
A voter's intent can also change
over time, said Myrna Perez, a
lawyer at the Brennan Center for
Justice in New York whose work
focuses on voting access and
election law. But Perez said elec-
tion laws are "not supposed to be
exploited and used for games-
manship purposes."
"They're supposed to be a true
reflection of where the voter
intends at that time to be a part


of," she said.
For voters, the effort required
to cast a ballot elsewhere varies.
Some out-of-state voters have an
absentee ballot sent to their fam-.
ily's house, and a relative then'
sends it to them. Others have
absentee ballots sent directly to
their D.C. address.
. Some, like Virginia voter Alex
Bea, 27, don't have to travel
far and simply go back to their
hometowns.
"I knew that if I moved into
D.C. ... I wouldn't want to lose
that voice in Congress, that rep-
resentation," said Bea, who has
had a D.C. address for about: a
year and does advocacy work for
an environmental campaign.
For voters who do bend the truth
to register elsewhere there is likely
little consequence. Ballots can be
challenged and votes disqualified,
but that's rare and punishments
rarer still.


THE CONSTITUTIONALAMENDMENTS
AND THE COUNTY RESOLUTION
APPEARS ON ALL BALLOTS


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

http://election.dos.state.fl.uSfintiativesfinitivelist.asp?year=initstatus=
ALL&MadeBallot=y&ElecType=Gen

http://edr.state.fl.us/conferences/constitutionalimpacti/tizensinitative.htm


Mark Ballot This Way
Completely fill in the oval opposite the
name of each candidate or issue you
wish to vote for.
USE ONLY THE MARKING PEN PROVIDED


NO. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE II, SECTION 7
Referenda required for adoption and
amendment of local government
comprehensive land use plans
Establishes that before a local
government may adopt a new
comprehensive land use plan, or amend a
comprehensive land use plan, the
proposed plan or amendment shall be
subject to vote of the electors of the local
government by referendum, following
preparation by the local planning agency,
consideration by the governing body and
notice. Provides definitions.
The amendment's :impact on local
government expenditures cannot be
estimated precisely. Local govcmmonto
will incur additional costs due to the
requirement to conduct referenda In order
to adopt comprehensive plans or
amendments thereto. The amount of such
costs depends upon the frequency, timing
and method of the referenda, and includes
the costs of ballot preparation, election
administration, and associated expenses..
The impact on state government
expenditures will be insignificant.

CD YES
CD NO
NO. 5
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 21
Standards for legislature to follow In
legislative redistricting
Legislative districts or districting plans
may not be drawn to favor or disfavor an |
incumbent or political party. Districts shall
not be drawn to deny racial or language
minorities the equal opportunity to
participate in the political- process and
elect representatives of their choice.
Districts must be contiguous. Unless
otherwise required, districts must be
compact, as equal in population as.
feasible, and where feasible must make
use of existing dity, county and
geographical boundaries.
The fiscal impact cannot be determined
precisely. Slate government and state
courts may incur additional costs if
litigation Increases beyond the number or
complexity of cases which would have
occurred in the amendment's absence.

O YES
CD NO


NO. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 20
Standards for legislature to follow In
congressional redistricting
Congressional districts or districting plans
may not be drawn to favor or disfavor an
incumbent or political party. Districts shall
not be drawn to deny racial or' language
minorities the equal opportunity to
participate in the political process and
elect representatives of. their choice.
Districts must be contiguous. Unless
otherwise required, 'districts must be
compact, as equal in population as
feasible, and where feasible must make
use of existing city, county and
geographical boundaries.
The fiscal impact cannot be determined
precisely. State government and state
courts may incur additional costs if
litigation increases beyond the number or
complexity of cases which would have
occurred in the amendment's absence.


O YES
CD NO


NO. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE IX, SECTION 1
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 31
Revision of the class size requirements
for public schools
The Florida Constitution currently limits
the maximum number of students
assigned to each teacher In public school
classrooms in the following grade
groupings: for prekindergarten through
grade 3,18 students; for grades 4 through
8, 22 students; and for grades 9 through
12, 25 students. Under this amendment,
the current limits on the maximum number
of students assigned to each teacher in
public school classrooms would become
limits on the average number of students
assigned per class to each teacher, by
specified grade grouping, in each public
school. This amendment also adopts new
limits on the maximum number of students
assigned to each teacher in an individual
classroom as follows: for prekindergarten
through grade 3, 21 students; for grades 4
through 8, 27 students; and for grades 9
through 12, 30 students. This amendment
specifies that class size limits do not apply
to virtual classes, requires the Legislature
to provide sufficient funds to maintain the
average number of students required'by
this amendment, and schedules these
revisions to take effect. upon approval by
the electors of this state and to operate
retroactively to the beginning of the 2010-
.2011 school year.

CD YES
CD NO"
Nonbinding Statewide Advisory
Referendum
Balancing the Federal Budget
A Nonbinding Referendum Calling for
an Amendment to the United States
Constitution
In order to stop the uncontrolled growth of
.our national debt and prevent excessive
borrowing by the Federal Government,
which threatens our economy and national
security, should the United States
Constitution be amended to require a
balanced federal budget without raising
taxes?

CD YES
CD NO
COUNTY RESOLUTION


COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
RESOLUTION NO. 201QR-7
Shall the Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County be authorized to
grant, pursuant to Section 3, Article VII of
the State Constitution, Property Tax
Exemptions to New Businesses and
Expansions of Existing Businesses?
CD YES
CD NO


A VOTE is a terrible thing to waste.




Liz P. Home


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS,


TflESEAMENDMENTSAPfEARON
BALLS IN PRECINCTS 12 AND 13
AND PART OF 10,14,21,22 AND 24

LAKE CITY AMENDMENTS


CITY CHARTER AMENDENDMENT ONE
Composition; eligibility; districts;
election and terms of office.
That Section 301(b) of the City Charter be
amended to provide that only qualified
voters who have resided in the City for
one or more years prior to qualifying for a
seat on the City Council, and are eighteen
years or older, shall be eligible to hold
office, and all Council members, except
the Mayor, shall have resided in the
district which they represent at least one
year prior to qualifying for office.


C YES
O NO

CITY CHARTER AMENDMENT TWO
Appointment, Qualification and
Compensation of City Manager.
That Section 401 of the City Charter
be amended to provide that the City
Council shall appoint a City Manager
for an indefinite term whose
compensation shall be fixed by the
Council and who shall hold a
Bachelor's Degree from an accredited
four year college or university and
have either ten years of progressively
responsible experience in municipal or
corporate management in a senior
management position 'or any
equivalent combination of training and
experience.
CD YES
CD NO
CITY CHARTER AMENDENDMENT
THREE
Assumption of Office
That Section 509 of the City Charter
be amended to provide that
Candidates elected at either the
regular or runoff election to the
designated seats shall take and
subscribe to the required 'oath or
affirmation and assume office at the
first regularly scheduled City Council
Meeting following the immediate
preceding November state general
election.


CD YES
CD NO


COLUMBIA GUUN IT


Office (386) 758-1026 Fax (386) 755-7233
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3734
www.votecolumbia.com Email: election@votecolumbia.com


VOTE BOTH SIDES OF THE BALLOT


PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENTS

NO.1
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE V.I, SECTION 7
Repeal of public campaign
finIncing requirement
Proposing, the repeal of the provision
in the -State Constitution that requires
public financing of campaigns of
candidates *for elective, statewide
office who agree to campaign
spending limits.


CD YES
Q NO
NO. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 3
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 31
Homestead ad valorem tax credit
for deployed military personnel,
Proposing an amendment to the State.
Constitution to require the Legislature
to provide an additional homestead
property tax exemption by law for
members of the United States military
or military reserves, the United States
Coast Guard or its reserves, or the
Florida National Guard who receive a
homestead exemption and were
deployed in the previous year on
active duty outside the continental
United States, Alaska, or Hawaii in
support of military operations
designated by the Legislature. The
exempt amount will be based upon
the number of days in the previous
calendar year that the person was
deployed on active duty outside the
continental United States, Alaska, or
Hawaii in support of military
operations designated by the
Legislature. The amendment is
scheduled to take effect January 1,
2011.

CD YES
CD NO


'


---- ------


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


THE WEATHER
A-RH I -EI


CHCOI "-. CHC OF'


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers will push inland across the Northwest today as a weak
frontal boundary passes through the region, but snow is expected over the Cascades and
northern Rockies. Look for a few showers over the Northern Plains, as well. Meanwhile, snow
showers will be likely in northern New England. Dry weather will prevail over the remainder of
the nation.


1D T 710:13-4111


a .,. I


Taliassee.*
80/49 ,
Pinsacola /
78/61 Pnaa ity
78/58


* Vdesta
81/49
Lake City,
82/53
Cainesville e
.82/54
Ocala
83/56


Ta8mpa
83/65


a cksonvle City
*Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
80/57 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
83/59 Gainesville
6 Jacksonville
Oriando Cape Canaveral Key City
86/60 80/62 Lake City
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
84/71 Orlando


Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Myers, 85/73 4
86/65 Naples
87/67 Miami
8/72'
Key West. .. /72
84/76


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


83
50,
78
55
89 in 1917
34 in 1973


0.00"
trace
38.42",
2.43"
43.56"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today


7:44 a.m.
6:44 p.m.


Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


6 1.4


Monday
81/63/s
82/63/s
85/74/pc
87/67/s
82/56/s
80/59/s
85/75/s
82/55/pc
85/73/pc
87/68/pc
83/58/s
85/62/s
"79/63/pc
80/64/pc
81/53/s
85/65/s
81/54/s
84/71/pc


Tuesday
80 65 r
81 65,pc
84/75/s
87/66/pc
80/56/pc
77/58/pc
83/74/t
79/55/pc
85/74/pc
86/70/pc
81/57/pc
84/64/pc
77/61/pc
79/60/t
81/58/pc
86/67/pc
81/55/pc
84/72/pc


brought to


Sunrise tom. 7:45 a.m. HIt our readers
Sunset tom. 6:43 p.m. 30Mniieioliu bby
Today's '
MOON ultra-violet The WeadtieF
Moonrise today 1:37 a.m. radiation risk Channel.
Moonset today 2:55 p.m. for the area on
Moonset today 2:55 p.m. a scale from 0
Moonise tom. 2:42 a.m. to o0+,
Moonset tom. 3:32 p.m. -



Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. .Forecasts, data and graph-
6 13 21 F 28 IcsC ~010 Weather Central
New First Full Last LLC,Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES ..


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 53/32/0
Albuquerque 70/45/0
Anchorage 33/26/0
Atlanta 71/42/0
Baltimore 59/35/0
BIllIIngs 56/35/0
Birmingham 72/40/0
Bismarck 39/30/0
Bolse 52/39/0
Boston 57/40/0
Buffalo 54/43/0
Charleston SC 72/44/0
Charleston WV 66/30/0
pharlotte 66A J1 0
Cheyenne '64.39'0
Chicago 62/42/0
Cincinnati 66/29/p
Cleveland 57/38/0
Columbia SC 71,40/0
Dallis 79/44/0
Daytona Beach 81/67/0
Denver 73/42/0


HI/Lo/W
48/27/c
69/37/pc
33/27/c
74/52/s
61/37/pc
63/35/pc
75 51 s
45 3: ,:
57/38/c
56/34/pc
44/31/pc
80/57/s
60/35/s
73/45/s
59. 38.pc
52/40/s
60. 35.s
50 34 v:
7,49's
83/56/s
S83/59/s
65/41/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
E Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami :
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


l- 'HGSar,'Ail ; 1 ,MtND.


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
69/46/0 51/34/pc Omah
60/39/0 51/35/s Oriani
81/49/0 81/50/s Philad
25/21/0 18/1/pc Phoel
62/37/0 71/43/s Pittsb
58/41/0 54/29/pc Portla
81 73 0 8c. 0j s Portla
78/45/0 84/68/s Raleli
63/35/0 58/35/s Rapid
74/36/0 78/56/s Reno
79/50/0 80/57/s Rjchn
66/47/0 62/43/pc Sacra
69/55/0 70/51/s St. Lo
71/34/0 76/51/s Salt I
65, 57' 36 66E.S's, SanA
68/38/0 7557 '. SanE
87.'75/0 85. 72,',. San F
,1 40L 48/31/s Seatt
76,44,0 80,60,s Spoki
~6 50.0 81/62/s Tampa
57142'0 57'36/pc Tucso
. 77/46/0 74/45/s. Wash


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/WV
88177/0 88,77 '
57 J48 55/47/c
64-46,.0 66 54.-
66/52/0 58/44/s
68, 36'0 65/39/s.
59 43 0 58/42/pc
64.,460 68/50/sh
77/64/0 77/63/s
55,43, 04 55/47/sh
86/70/0 87/68/s
48/39/.01 50/38/pc
73/61/0 77/64/s
.86/77/0 85/76.-,c
KEYTO CONDmONS: =-d


INTER NATaONAL


' Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/WI
La Paz 64,37'0 62,'38 sh
ULma 68'61-0 68/59/pc
London 5?/461 29 57.'4..'sn
Madrid 54 50 10 57 4 r
Mexico City 73, 48/0 -76, 50,prC
Montreal 1 36 0 39. 30 sit
SMoscow 45/37,'Q 44. 33,'rs
Nairobi 82/54/0 80/60/Dc
Nassau 86.13,0 86174J-oc
s New Delhi 84/64/0 .86/62/s
SOslo '48/45/.34 4f, 40;.pc
s Panama 82/77/0 86. ;i, i
Parsp 59/45,437L .5. w..
3 . '; ,,, A,. 'r -_ Z,


CITY
RIo
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan P
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo!/Pcp. HI,'LoW
99 72 0 7T9 71.
70/43/0 70/53/sh
s VI 86/77/.08 85/77/t
)R 88/76/0 85/78/t
75, 370 9,.47.s
64/39/0 62/41/s
88/73/.69 87/76/t
79/61/0 71/55/sh
77/66/.08 77/63/s
61/54/0 65/58/sh
57/43/0 45/28/sh
55/39/0 58/43/pc
54 36.0 57/38/s
rain; s-sunny,


s 1

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c-6-we




Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
69/41/0
84/62/0
56/41/0
83/61/0
54/33/0
48/33/0
52/45/.04
64/36/0
61/35/0
56/43/0
60/35/0
61/55/.01
73/38/0
62/46/0
76/38/0
68/61/.15
61/52/.06
47/39/.04
43/37/0
85/64/0
86.55,0
59/40/0


a
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nix
burgh
and ME
and OR
gh
City
nond
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Duls
ake City
Antonlo
Diego
Francisco
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ington


Today
HI/Lo/W
54/?3/pc
86/60/s
60/34/pc
81/57/s
50/31/pc
52/32/c
57/51/sh,
73/43/s
53/36/sh
60/37/pc
70/40/pc
68/49/pc
63,.45,s
55/39/c
86/60/s
68/58/s
63. 54 oc
56/48/sh
50/38/sh
83/65/s
80/48/s
63/39/pc


I S :RE B


I


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BeUlng
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


75


years.


::::::: 2U~-~ u~-- II72 - J~ _.L '_ '_ ----- ----- -----


1 s.. .. .. .. .... . .. . ... ...... ... .


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAK CITY0 ALANAC


Saturday Today i


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby.
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, October 31, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
event Monday
Columbia High's
soccer teams have a
Moe's Night
fundraiser planned from
5-8 p.m. Monday at
Moe's Southwest Grill
on U.S. Highway 90 west
in Lake City. The soccer
program will receive a
percentage of the sales.
For details, call
(386) 365-1877.
GATORS
Grill Gamecocks
social Nov. 11
The North Florida
Gator Club is sponsoring
a "Grill the Gamecocks"
social at 6 p.m. Nov. 11
at the home of Mike and
Terri Millikin on State
Road 47. Steve Russell
of WRUF radio is guest
speaker and the club will
provide dinner. Bring a
lawn chair. All Gatorfans
are invited.
For details, call Ian at
(352) 3164305, Bob at
752-3333, Ron at
(386) 397-3378 or
Angela at 758-8801.

Packages for
football games
"Journey to the
Swamp" is a Columbia
County Tourist
Development Council
initiative with Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites and
Fabulous Coach Lines
to provide
transportation from Lake
City to the Florida game
against South Carolina
on Nov. 13. Holiday Inn
is offering a two-night
package, and Fabulous
Coach Lines will provide
motor coach
transportation. Local fans
can take advantage of the
transportation.
For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or call
the Holiday Inn at
754-1411.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Tuesday
Columbia High, Fort
White High bowling in
District 2 tournament at
AMF Galaxy East Lanes
in Ocala', 8 a.m.
Columbia High
girls soccer at Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5)
Wednesday
Fort White High
volleyball at Trinity
Catholic High in region
quarterfinal, 7 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Gainesville
High at CYSA field,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
cross country in District
2-2A meet at Bishop
Kenny High, girls-
4:30 p.m., boys-5 p.m.
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
swimming in Region
1-2A meet at Panama City
Beach Aquatic Center,
9 a.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Wolfson High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
cross country in District


2-3A meet at Ridgeview
High, girls-8 a.m., boys-
8:45 a.m.


Kirkmans get visit from family


Michael's parents
head to Texas for
World Series.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
Not only are
the Rangers
back home
in Arlington,
Texas,
Michael and Lorie Kirkman
are getting a visit from
home.
Michael's mom and dad,
Lisa and Scott Kirkman,
were expected in Saturday
morning to go to the game.
The Kirkmans may bring
the good luck needed by
Texas to get back in the

KIRKMAN continued on 3B


Home sweet for
Rangers with 4-2
win on Saturday
From staff reports

The Texas Rangers
blasted back into the World
Series with a 4-2 win over
San Francisco on Saturday,
as play moved to Arlington,
Texas, for three games.
Mitch Moreland hit a
three-run home run in the
second inning and Josh
Hamilton added a solo shot
in the fifth.
C.J. Lewis pitched 72A
innings. Darren O'Day and
Nafteli Feliz finished, allow-
ing no base runners.
Madison Bumgardner
will face Tommy Hunter at
8:20 p.m. today.


Redeemed

Henry's overtime contention.
field goal carries This one will go down as
one of the best in the 95-year
UF over Georgia. history of the series, the first
overtime game between
By MARK LONG the Gators and Bulldogs.
Associated Press 'The difference, much like
the last two meetings, were,
JACKSONVILLE- Chas turnovers. Florida had one,
Henry, a punter thrust into while Georgia finished with
kicking duties, drilled a a season-high four.
37-yard field goal in over- The final one was the
time to lift Florida to a 34-31 most crucial. Georgia had
victory over rival Georgia been moving the ball at
on Saturday. : .,,,;vwiU in,,;#,kig d half and
Aaron Murray's third scored on four straight
interception his fourth possessions, the last one a
turnover of the game 15-yard strike from Murray
nearly ended it four plays to A.J. Green in triple cover-
earlier. Jelani Jenkins tipped age. That evened the score
Murray's pass over the mid- with 4:36 remaining after
dle. Will Hill intercepted Trey Burton's 51-yard TD


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida punter Chas Henry (17) is hoisted on the shoulders of his teammates following his
game winning field goal against Georgia at EverBank Field in Jacksonville on Saturday.


it and nearly returned it
for the winning score. Hill
stepped out at the 4.
The Gators (5-3, 3-3
Southeastern Conference)
did little with their turn and
settled for Henry's winner.
It was a redeeming moment
for Henry, who missed three
field goals in close losses to
LSU and Mississippi State
while filling in for injured
kicker Caleb Sturgis:.
Florida snapped a three-
game losing streak and
extended its dominance in
the series. Georgia (4-5,
3-4) has lost 18 of the last 21
meetings and this one was
especially damaging.
The Gators stayed in the
hunt for the SEC's Eastern
Division title, while elimi-
nating the Bulldogs from


scamper.
The Gators had a final
chance in regulation, but
instead of attempting a long
field goal, coach Urban
Meyer settled for the extra
frame.
Georgia players stood
arm-in-arm on the sideline
and swayed back and forth
during the coin toss, show-
ing all the confidence of a
team that entered the game
with a three-game winning
streak and dominated the
second half.
Murray threw incomplete
to Kris Durham deep on
first down, then Caleb King
was stopped for a yard on
second. Murray's next pass
was tipped, then picked.
Florida was celebrating
again a few plays later.


Indians come up short


Fort White falls
short of title; still
in playoff picture.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
PERRY Playing from
behind is not Fort White
High's game, but that is the
position the Indians were
put in at Perry on Friday.
Taylor County High
took a 10-0 lead and had
an answer every time Fort
White closed within three
points.
The Bulldogs won, 38-21,
to nail down the District
2-2B championship.
After the loss of Alexis
Blake, Fort White has
depended on the running of
JR Dixon. That has worked
well in the last two district
wins, and Dixon gained 152
yards against the Bulldogs.
But the firepower was
not enough, despite quar-
terback Andrew Baker


having his most productive
game passing 7 of 12 for
110 yards, no interceptions,
and a touchdown.
"We are more of a
methodical offense and
we couldn't get the big
plays," Indians head coach
Demetric Jackson said.
"Every time we would get
a good run early, we got a
penalty."
With Fort White trailing
10-0, Baker's option keeper
from the Bulldogs 25 to a
potential first-and-goal was
negated by a chop,block.
That was early in the
second quarter and it took
the rest of the period for
Fort White to get on the
scoreboard.
The defense forced a sec-
ond punt and Trey Phillips
returned it 14 yards to the
Indians 44. Baker convert-
ed two third downs with
completions to A.J. Legree
and the Bulldogs were
flagged for pass interfer-
ence when they tried to


hook up a third time.
With a first-and-goal at
the 7, Dixon needed two
plays to get in the end zone.
It looked like a happy half-
time when Colton Jones'
PAT cut the lead to 10-7
with 36 seconds left before
intermission.
There was no taking a
knee for Taylor County.
Eli Grambling hit James
Houston for 64 yards and
his second touchdown of
the half. Eleven seconds
were left.
Fort White took the
second-half kickoff and
went 59 yards in six plays.
Tight end Donnell Sanders
zipped downfield and caught
a throw from Baker. He cut
off a block by Phillips and
sped 53 yards to a touch-
down. The Indians were
back within three points.
The kickoff coverage
boys pinned Taylor County
at its 12, but it only took the
INDIANS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High running back JR Dixon ran for 152 yards at
Taylor County High orn Friday. Dixon has rushed for 708 yrds
in the last four games.


I -













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR. Sprint Cup, Amp
Energy 500, at Talladega, Ala.
9 p.m.
ESPN NHRA, Las Vegas Nationals,
final eliminations (same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATourAndalucia
Masters, final round, at Sotogrande, Spain
Noon
TGC LPGA; Hana Bank
Championship, final round, at Incheon,
South Korea (same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour
Championship, final round, at Charleston,
S.C.
4:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, AT&T
Championship, final round, at San
Antonio
7:30 p.m.
TGC Asia Pacific Classic Malaysia,'
final round, at Selangor, Malaysia (same-
day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
FOX World Series, game '4, San
Francisco at Texas
MOTORSPORTS
5 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, at Estoril, Portugal (same-
day tape)
6 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, at Estoril,
Portugal (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC Pittsburgh at New Orleans
SOCCER
8 p.m.
ESPN2-- MLS, playoffs, conference.
semifinals, first leg, Los Angeles at Seattle
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Sony Ericsson
Championships, championship match, at
Doha, Qatar (same-day tape)

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 5, San
Francisco at Texas (if necessary)
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Houston at Indianapolis

BASEBALL

World Series

San Francisco I I.Texas 7
San Francisco 9,Texas 0
Saturday
Texas 4, San Francisco 2, San Francisco
leads series 2-1
Today
San Francisco (Bumgarner 7-6) at
Texas (Hunter 13-4), 8:20 p.m.
Monday
San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10) at
Texas (Lee 12-9), 7:57 p.m.
Wednesday
Texas at San Francisco, if necessary,
7:57 p.m.
Thursday
Texas at San Francisco, If necessary,
7:57 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
N.Y.Jets 5 I 0.833,159 101
New England 5 I 0.833 177 136
Miami 3 3 0.500111 135
Buffalo 0 6 0.000 121 198
South


Tennessee
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


W L TPct PF PA
5 2 0.714 199 117
4 2 0.667153 167
4 2 0.667 163 125
3 4 0.429 130 209
North
W L TPct PF PA
5 I 0.833 137 82
5 2 0.714 149 129
2 4 0.333 132 141
2 5 0.286 118 142
West
W L TPat PF PA
4 2 0.667150 112
3 4 0.429 179 165
2 5 0.286 177 149
2 5 0.286 138 199


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
Y. Giants 5 2 0.714175 153
shington 4 3 0.571 130 '133
ladelphia 4 3 0.571 172 157
las I 5 0.167 137 152
South
W L TPct PF PA
anta 5 2 0.714 169 1"33
npaBay 4 2 0.667 98 128
w Orleans 4 3 0.571 147 138
rolina 1 5 0.167 75 130
North


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis
San Francisco


W L
4 3
4 3
2 4
I 5
West
W L
4 2
3 3
3 4
1 6


Green Bay at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: N.Y. Giants, Philadelphia,
Chicago,Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland
Sunday, Nov. 7
Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Detroit, I p.m.
Miami at Baltimore, I p.m.
San Diego at Houston; I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
New England at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 8
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis,
Jacksonville, San Francisco, Tennessee

College scores

Saturday
EAST
Army 29,VMI 7
Boston College 16, Clemson 10
Duke 34, Navy 31
Pittsburgh 20, Louisville 3
SOUTH
Auburn 51, Mississippi 31
Florida 34, Georgia 31, OT
Florida A&M 31, Morgan St. 17
Florida Atlantic 21, Florida
International 9
Jacksonville 61, Morehead St. 17
Louisiana-Monroe 28,Troy 14
Marshall 16, UTEP 12
Maryland 62,Wake Forest 14
N.C. Central 20, Edward Waters 7
North Carolina 21,William & Mary 17
Samford 20, Georgia Southern 13
South Alabama 39, Georgia St. 34
South Carolina 38,Tennessee 24
UAB 50, Southern Miss. 49,20T
UCF 49, East Carolina 35
Virginia 24, Miami 19
MIDWEST
Illinois 44, Purdue 10
Iowa 37, Michigan St. 6
Iowa St.28, Kansas 16
Kent St. 33, Ball St. 14
Nebraska 31, Missouri 17
Northwestern 20, Indiana 17
Ohio 38, Louisiana-Lafayette 31 I
Oklahoma St. 24, Kansas St. 14
Syracuse 31, Cincinnati 7
Tulsa 28, Notre Dame 27
WEST
Texas A&M 45,Texas Tech 27
Arizona 29, UCLA 21
New Mexico St. 29, San Jose St. 27
Oregon St. 35, California 7

Friday
Connecticut 16,WestVirginia 13, OT

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Amp Energy Juice 500
Site:Talladega, Ala.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (ESPN2,
noon-I p.m., ESPN, I-5 p.m.).
Track: Talladega Superspeedway (oval,
2.66 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 188 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA LasVegas Nationals
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN, 9-11:30 p.m.).
Track: The Strip at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.

Amp Energy qualifying

At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Saturday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
184.64.
2. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
184.498.
3. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 184.388.
4. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
184.253.
5. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
184.161.
6. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
183.906.
7. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
183.885.
8. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
183.762.
9. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 183.621.
10. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
183.614.
II. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
183.561..
12. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
183.543.
13. (97) Jeff Fuller,Toyota, 183.406.
14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

MUSIN I


TPct PF PA
0.571 126 114
0.571 167 136
0.333 11I 116
0.167 146 140

T Pct PF PA
0.667120 107
0.500 98 160
0.429 120 131
0.143 113 162


Today's Games
Denver vs. San Francisco at London,
1 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, I p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Dallas, I p.m.


URIADSI




TALPEA a
= I/
*^ *^^ __ __


183.375.
15. (46) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet,
183.273.
16.(83) Kasey Kahne,Toyota. 183.245.
17. (I I) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
183.052.
18. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
183.01.
19. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
183.
20. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota,
182.919.
21. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
182.863.
22. (71) Chad McCumbee, Chevrolet,
182.839.
23. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 182.821.
24. (09) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
182.8.
25. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 182.79.
26. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
182.786.
27. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 182.786.
28. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 182.65.
29. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 182.598.
30. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
182.522.
31. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 182.4.
32. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 182.365.
33. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 182.306.
34.(16)'Greg Biffle, Ford, 182.258.
35. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
181.998.
36. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
181.88.
37. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 181.673.
38. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 181.653.
39. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
181.367.
40. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner
Points.
41. (34) Robert Richardson Jr., Ford,
Owner Points.
42. (7) Robby Gordon,Toyota, Owner
Points.
43. (26) Bill Elliott, Ford, Past
Champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (64) Landon Cassill, Toyota,
181.615.
45. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 180.46 1.
46. (66) Johnny Sauter, Toyota,
177.117.


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Indiana 104, Charlotte 101
New Jersey 106, Sacramento 100
Atlanta 104, Philadelphia 101
Toronto 101, .Cleveland 81
Boston 105, NewYork 101
Minnesota 96, Milwaukee 85
New Orleans 101, Denver 95
Oklahoma City 105, Detroit 104
Miami 96, Orlando 70
Memphis 9 1, Dallas 90
Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 91.
SL.A. Lakers 114, Phoenix 106 .
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 99,Washington 95
Sacramento 107, Cleveland 104
Portland at NewYork (n)
Minnesota at Memphis (n)
Detroit at Chicago (n)
Philadelphia at Indiana (n)
Denver at Houston (n)
Charlotte at Milwaukee (n)
New Orleans at San Antonio (n)
Today's Games
Miami at New Jersey, I p.m.
Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Utah at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Portland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Clippers,
10:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
Montreal 3, N.Y. Islanders I
Carolina 4, N.Y. Rangers 3
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2
Atlanta 4, Buffalo 3, OT
Edmonton 7, Chicago 4
New Jersey 2,Anaheim I
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 2,Toronto 0
Florida 3, Montreal I
Boston 4, Ottawa 0
Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Islanders I
Pittsburgh 3, Carolina 0
Detroit 5, Nashville 2
Atlanta at St. Louis (n)
Chicago at Minnesota (n)
Buffalo at Dallas (n)
Columbus at Colorado (n)
Tampa Bay at Phoenix (n)
Washington at Calgary (n)
New Jersey at Los Angeles (n)
Anaheim at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Monday's Games
Chicago at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New Jersey atVancouver, 10 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


THE PRINCE
BECAME THE RUL-ER
BECAU5se HE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday I Jumbles: OLDER KNOWN THORAX FACIAL
Answer: What the chain gang got when they
worked HARD "ROCK"


COURTESY PHOTO


Lady Indians playoff bound

Fort White High's volleyball team shows off its District 5-3A runner-up trophy at Santa Fe
High on Thursday. Santa Fe won the final 25-15, 25-17, 25-12 and repeated as district
champions. The Lady Indians return to the state playoffs and will play at Trinity Christian
High in Ocala at 7 p.m. Wednesday.


LAKE CITY POP WARNER


COURTESY PHOTO
\

Junior Peewee Tigers

Team members are (front row, from left) Jaedyn Thomas, Nate Owens, Chase Bonds,
Zane McCranie and Willard Coles. Second row (from left) are Anferney Mixon,
Darrell Brown, Maleak Miller-Gaskins, D'Angelo Perry, Henry Godbolt, Ca.l Gilliam and
'Micah Krieghauser. Third row (from left) are Jaylan Mills, Cody Collins, Ta'Davius Freeland,
Latorrence Jones, Jeremiah Mobley, Trevarios Oliver, Stephen Pilkington and
Dedrick Vanover. Back row coaches (from left) are Steve Pilkington, Timmy Collins and
head coach Dean Paukune. Not pictured is Marcell Quince.




Montoya wins pole at Talladega


Associated Press


TALLADEGA, Ala.
- Juan Pablo Montoya
grabbed a sliver of the
spotlight focused on the
three championship con-


1

5
8
11

12
14-
15
17

18


tending drivers by win-
ning the pole at Talladega
Supeispeedway.
Montoya, who is not in
the Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship, turned
a lap at 184.640 mph to


ACROSS 39 Borscht veg-
gies
Chief god of 41 All-terrain
Memphis vehicle
P.O. service 43 Apparel
Plant sci. 45 Array
Use a 47 100 kopecks
keyboard 50 Rhea cousin
Periods 51 Bargain
- tree 54 Guided
Cheapskate 55 Wildebeests
Reservoir 56 Pedro's son
boundary 57 Compass dir.
World-weari- 58 Did lunch
ness 59 Part of G.T.O.


19 Brand of e-
book reader
21 Fly ball paths
23 Low-lying
islands
24 Restless
27 Grills, maybe
29 Female rabbit
30 Rustling, as
silk
34 Lobby furnish-
ing
37 Trophy, often
38 Rhine port


DOWN


Qt. parts
Day-care
attendee
Neat as--
Redheads'
tints
Antique
TGIF part
Cold and damp
Boon
companion


better Clint Bowyer, Kurt
Busch.
"If you are in the Chase
and you are not in the
top three (in standings),
nobody even cares,"
Montoya said.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

S IIPIS Q T I.PIS
SHOS EN MU ESILI
APOT ATO DEA L E R
iML UEHS a
MU G ERCS
U LGiH MAT iAG.O
PIRIOMPT S CRAMS

STR MPOE TIN
',ALA I C H A I NI




AILTF I T LOP
GIUI-DD EURE KA
ALLURE DRE AR Y
UM B ET NA


9 Fiery gems
10 Not the least bit
exciting
13 Boonies
16 Wrath
20 1940s auto


22 Carpentry
chore
24 Lord Byron's
daughter
25 Fjord terr.
26 Speaker pro

28 Polite word
30 Andreas
Fault
31 Winter hazard
32 Protein source
33 AMA mem-
bers
35 Trucker,
often
36 Expecting
39 Dry, as cham-
pagne
40 On the wane
41 Trumpet play-
er Harry
42 Liszt opus
44 Developed
45 Brooks and
Gibson
46 Lawless role
48 Cougar's pad
49 Vulcan's forge
52 Kind
of instinct
53 L-o-n-g time


11-1 @ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


N.Y
Wa
Phil
Dal


Atl
Tan
Nev
Car


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421













S--il ALLIGATOR LAKE MILE


COURTESY PHOTO
NASCAR driver David Reutimann (right) autographs his namesake trophy for Devin Walker during the Walker family's recent
visit to Charlotte, N.C.



Meeting with Reutimann


From staff reports

Devin Walker won the David
Reutimann Most Likely to Succeed
at Racing Award from Reutimann and
Mike Peters of Ocala Speedway last
year, and recently got to meet the
namesake driver of the award.
As part of the award, the 14-year-
old racer received a personal tour at
Michael Waltrip Racing, conducted
by Reutimann, and suite tickets to the
Nationwide and Sprint Car races in
Charlotte, N.C.
Devin and his mom and dad,
Stephanie and Heath Walker, made
the trip the weekend of Oct. 15-17 and
went to the Dollar General 300 and
Bank of America 500. The family met
Tim Brown of the Madhouse televi-
sion show about modified racing.
Reutimann showed up and asked,


"Where's my boy?," and Walker intro-
duced himself. Reutimann gave a tour
of the shop and then told Walker to
load up in one of the cars, where he
explained all the switches, buttons
and knobs.
Walker gave Reutimann' a picture
of him receiving the award and the
NASCAR driver turned the tables by
asking Walker to autograph it -for
him.
Reutimann then autographed
Walker's plaque to put the finishing
touches on the trip.
Walker has run his No. 55JR ride
(daddy is No. 55) in the Gladiator
Division at Ocala Speedway this year
and is currently second in the points
race. He won his race last week.
Walker also runs at North Florida
Speedway in the Box Stock Division.
He has won twice and is fourth in the


points race. The last win came the day
before Walker's 14th birthday.
"It was really cool meeting David in
his garage," Walker said.
Walker expressed thanks to
Reutimann for his time and Peters for
the award, and mentioned his biggest
fans.
"I want to thank mama arid daddy
and my grandparents (Charlie and
Robin Walk)," Walker said.
Walker's sponsors are World
of Outlaw sprint car driver Danny
Lasoski, B & B Auto, Byrds Power
Equipment, Suwannee Salvage,
Henderson Lawn Care, Advance
Auto Parts of Ocala, O'Neal Roofing,
Columbia Cycles, LJ's Steak and
BBQ, Walker Farms, D & T Graphics
and A-3 Graphics.
To follow Devin on YouTube, go to
devin@ocalaspeedway.


MSU, Missouri unbeaten no more


Associated Press

A couple more unde-
feated seasons got run off
the road. Michigan State
and Missouri were soundly
beaten away from home
by conference rivals on a
Saturday.

No. 3 Auburn 51,
Mississippi 31
OXFORD, Miss. Cam
Newton caught a touch-
down pass and threw two
scoring passes, and Mike
Dyer ran for 180 yards, help-
ing No. 3 Auburn power
past Mississippi.
The Tigers (9-0, 6-0
Southeastern Conference)
are ranked atop the BCS
standings for the first time.
Newton passed for
199 yards and caught a
20-yard touchdown pass
from receiver Kodi Burns.

No. 18 Iowa 37,
No. 5 Michigan State 6
IOWA CITY, Iowa -
Ricky Stanzi threw three
touchdown passes for
Iowa.
Adam Robinson added a
pair of touchdowns for the
charged-up Hawkeyes, who
rolled ouit to a 30-0 half-
time lead and dealt a crush-
ing blow to the Spartans'
national title hopes.
Iowa (6-2, 3-1 Big Ten)
jumped ahead 17-0 when'
Micah Hyde went 66 yards
after taking a pitch from
safety Tyler Sash, who had
picked off a pass.
Stanzi then found
Robinson for a 32-yard TD
pass, and Robinson's 2-yard
touchdown run put the
Hawkeyes ahead by 30 with
1:01 left in the first half.
Kirk Cousins threw
three interceptions for the
Spartans (8-1, 4-1).

No. 14 Nebraska 31,
No. 7 Missouri 17
LINCOLN, Neb. Roy
Helu Jr. rushed for a
school-record 307 yards, for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michigan State wide receiver Mark Dell (right) is upended
by Iowa cornerback Tyler Sash (left) and cornerback Brett
Greenwood (30) after making a reception during the game
Saturday in Iowa City, Iowa.


Nebraska.
The Cornhuskers (7-1,
3-1 Big 12) held off the
Tigers after building a
24-0 lead and moved into a
first-place tie with them in
the Big 12 North.
Missouri (7-1, 3-1) has
lost 17 straight road games
against Top 25 opponents
since 1997.
Helu ran for touchdowns
of 66, 73 and 53 yards. The
.Cornhuskers played with-
out quarterback Taylor
Martinez in the second
half. Zac Lee took over to
start the third quarter.
Nebraska put heavy pres-
sure on Blaine Gabbert and
held him to 18 of 42 pass-
ing for 199 yards. He was
sacked six times.

No. 15 Arizona 29,
UCLA 21
PASADENA, Calif. -
Backup Matt Scott passed
for a career-high, 319
yards, and Arizona held off
UCIA
Scott, playing for injured
starter Nick Foles (knee),
was 24 of 36 with one inter-


ception and one touchdown.
The junior also carried 12
times for 71 yards.
Keola Antolin rushed for
111 yards on 23 carries for
the Wildcats (7-1, 4-1 Pac-
10), off to their best start
since winning seven of their
first eight games en route
to a 12-1 finish in 1998.
Richard Brehaut passed
for a career-best 228 yards
and two touchdowns for the
Bruins (3-5, 1-4).

No. 17 South Carolina
38, Tennessee 24
COLUMBIA, S.C. -
Alshon Jeffery's 70-yard
touchdown catch broke a
fourth-quarter tie and kept
South Carolina in control of
the SEC East.
The Vols '(2-6, 0-5
Southeastern Conference)
had rallied back from a
14-point deficit on a pair
of touchdown passes from
backup quarterback Tyler
Bray to tie the game at 24.
That's when Stephen
Garcia found Jeffery in the
middle of the field and the
SEC's leading receiver out-


raced three defenders to
the end zone.
Garcia added two rush-
ing touchdowns, the second
from 1 yard out with 3:28
left that sealed the win for
South Carolina (6-2, 4-2).

No. 20 Oklahoma State
24, Kansas State 14
MANHATTAN, Kan.
- Brandon Weeden threw
two touchdown passes and
No. 20 Oklahoma State's
high-powered offense
overcame the absence of
star wide receiver Justin
Blackmon to beat Kansas
State.
Blackmon, suspended
for the game after being
arrested on a misdemean-
or DUI charge, left the
Cowboys (7-1 overall, 3-1
Big 12) without the nation's
leader in -receiving yards
per game, total receiving
yards, scoring and touch-
down catches.
Aided by Dan Bailey's
precise placement punting
and Johnny Thomas' touch-
down on an interception
return, the Cowboys scored
17 straight points in the
second half.

Virginia 24,
No. 22 Miami 19
CHARLOTTESVILLE,
Va. Virginia intercept-
ed Miami's backup quar-
terbacks four times after
Jacory Harris was hurt and
pulled off the upset. .
Virginia (4-4, 1-3 ACC),
which had lost nine straight
conference games, knocked
Harris from the game on
a huge hit by John-Kevin
Dolce in the second quarter
with the score still 0-0.
Keith Payne ran for two
touchdowns, and Marc
Verica added a touchdown
pass for Virginia.
The Hurricanes (5-3,
3-2), who seemed to hit
their stride in a victory
against North Carolina last
week, made it inside the
Virginia 20 just once in the
first three quarters.


Mixed 12 & Under I Mile Run
Name Age Team
5-6 Results Girls
I #25 Duarte, Natalia W6 Westside Elementary
2 #45 Henderson, Elaina W5 Eastside Elementary
3 #264 Huene,Joise W5 Queen of Pea
4 #263 Collins,Taylor W6 Pinemount Elemen
5 #90 Sherman, Kelsey W6 Lake City
6 #91 Sherman, Makenna W5 Columbia City El
7-8 Results Girls
I #23 Duarte, Eliana W8 Westside Elementary
2 #42 Henderson,Alivia W7 Lake City
3 #94 Smith-Stewart, Cour W7 Eastside Elementary
9- 10 Results Girls


1 #70 Morse, Bridget
2 #72 Morse,Jillian
3 #251 Gray,Tabitha
4 #34 Griffin, Sarah
5 #35 Griffin, Sydney
6 #249 Jolliffe, Marissa
4&
I #161 Griner,Wyatt.
2 #174 Wilson, Matthew
3 #162 Hales,Thomas
4 #164 Marroletti, Dalton
I #74 Pierce,Tanner
2 #18 Davis, Ethan
3 #250 Jolliffe, Colin
I #266 Ziegaus, Seth
2 #244 Tucker, Finn
3 #245 Tucker, Alexander
4 #3 Alexander, Luke
5 #10 Candler, Carson-
6 #252 Jolliffe,Aiden
7 #15 Collada, Matthew
8 #47 Higgs, Liam
9 #6 Asmus,Wesley
10 #267 Morse, Zach
II #265 Merritt, Jacob
12 #262 Collins, Colby
13 #268 Oliver,Ty
14 #269 Oliver, Cameron
I #75 PierceTyler
2 #242 Bridges,Jack
3 #239 Martin, Chase
4 #33 Griffin, Luke
*5 #31 Gravel,Jacob
6 #24 Duarte, Jack


Avg M
10:07.6
10:24.1
10:31.1
10:56.3
12:16.:
13:43.:
9:50.1
10:27.7
10:29.1


lil
6
8
8
3
3
7


W 10 Lake City 7:15.3
WIO 10 Eastside Elementary 7:15.3
W9 Summers Elementary 8:24.2
W9 Lake City 9:36.1
W9 Columbia City El 9:37.8
WI0 Summers Elementary 9:47.1
Under Results Boys
M Bradford Mid 7:26.1
M Bradford Mid 7:31.7
M Bradford Mid 8:13.7
M Bradford Mid 10:34.8
5-6 Results Boys
M6 Lake City 8:38.9
M6 Gainesville 9:41.5
M5 Summers Elementary 12:16.4
7-8 Results Boys
M8Westside Elementary 7:02.0
M8 Lake City 7:02.4
M8 Lake City 7:34.9
M7 Gainesville 7:38.4 '
M8 Summers Elementary 8:21.6 1
M7 Summers Elementary 8:31.3
M8 Queen of Pea 8:47.1
M7 Alachua 8:47.8
M7 Lake City 9:22.6
M8 Eastside Elementary 9:35.2
M8 Columbia City El 9:54.1
M8 Pinemount Elemen 9:57.4
M7 Gainesville 11:54.2
M7 Queen of Pea 13:13.6
9-10 Results Boys
M 10 Lake City 7:56.0
M9 Eastside Elementary 8:09.1
M9 Lake City 8:26.9
MI0 Columbia City El 10:13.4
M9 Columbia City El '10:18.3
M 10 Westside Elementary 11:36.0
1-12 Results Boys


I #46 Henderson, Micah MI I Lake City


e Finals
10:07.60
10:24.80
10:31.80
10:56.30
12:16.30
13:43.70
9:50.10
10:27.70
10:29.10
7:15.30
7:15.30
8:24.20
9:36.10
9:37.80
9:47.10
7:26.10
7:31.70
8:13.70
10:34.80
8:38.90
9:41.50
12:16.40
7:02.00
7:02.40
7:34.90 .
7:38.40.
8:21.60
8:31.30
8:47.10
8:47.80
9:22.60
9:35.20
9:54.10
9:57.40
11:54.20
13:13.60
7:56.00
8:09.10
8:26.90
10:13.40
10:18.30
11:36.00


8:45.0 8:45.00


KIRKMAN: All business
Continued From Page 1B


series. They were visiting
Michael in Oklahoma City
when he was called up to
the Rangers.
A starter during the
season, Michael had been
moved to the bullpen to
prepare him for the move
to the Major League club.
When he got the news, he
and Lorie boarded a plane
for Baltimore and Scott
and Lisa headed back to
Lake City.
Michael played in the
minors with several of
his Texas teammates at
Oklahoma City. He said
he spent three seasons
with Mitch Moreland.
Nolan Ryan threw out
the first pitch Saturday to
Ivan Rodriguez.
President George
W. Bush and President
George H.W. Bush will
join Ryan for first-pitch
ceremonies today. Lyle


Lovett will sing the
National Anthem.
San Francisco had its
own set of Hall-of-Famers
in the first-pitch ceremony
on Wednesday. Tony
Bennett sang his theme
song, "I Left My Heart in
San Francisco" and "God
Bless America."
"Ifs kind of cool when
you think about it,"
Kirkman said. "But, we
couldn't care less who's
.singing or dancing on
the field. That's not what
we're there for."

N Lake City native
Michael Kirkman is a 2005
graduate of Columbia High.
The left-hander was called
up by the Texas Rangers
in August and has pitched
in relief. He is sharing his
World Series experience
with readers of the
Lake City Reporter.


INDIANS: Bradford next
Continued From Page 1B


Bulldogs seven plays to
go 88 yards. Tony Jackson
started it with runs of 17
and 36 yards. William
Wentworth capped it with
throws of 19 and 22 yards
to James Strawter. The sec-
ond went for a touchdown
when Strawter juked three
defefiders on the way to
the end zone.
Now, it was Fort White's
turned to be pinned down,
at its 7. On second down,
Dixon broke over the left
side and raced 81 yards.
Baker scored on a bootleg
.keeper for a 24-21 score at
3:53 of the third quarter.
Taylor County moved
down the field again, but
Phillips halted the drive
when he broke through
to sack Grambling for a
10-yard loss. The Bulldogs
lined up for a 46-yard
field goal, and faked it.
Wentworth floated a pass
to the left side and it came
down in the hands of
Raydon Parker who made,
it to the end zone.
One second was left
in the third quarter and
the Indians ran only eight
plays in the final 12 min-
utes. Fort White forced
a fourth-and-5 on Taylor
County's last scoring drive,
but jumped offsides to sur-
render the first down.
A Fort White bright spot
was kickoff returns. Dixon
had returns of 51, 35 and
23 yards, while Tavaris
Williams had returns of 20
and 13 yard, and Legree
had a 21-yard return.
Fort White hosts


Bradford High on Friday
and the winner will be
district runner-up.
"Next week is for all the
marbles," Jackson said. "It
we don't win, it is basket-
ball time or some other
sport If we win it, we go to
the playoffs. It is still there
for us."

Taylor Co. 10 7 14 7 38
FortWhite 0 7 14 0 21
First Quarter
TC-Barfield 27 FG, 8:52
TC-Houston 22 pass from
Grambling (Barfield kick), 4:19
Second Quarter
FW-Dixon 4 run (Jones kick), :26
TC-Houston 64 pass from
Grambling (Barfield kick), :11
Third Quarter
FW-Saunders 53 pass from Baker
(Jones kick), 8:20
TC-Strawter 22 pass from
Wentworth (Barfield kick), 6:03
FW-Baker 6 run (Jones kick), 3:53
TC-Parker 29 pass fromWentworth
(Barfield kick), :01
Fourth Quarter
TC-T.Jackson 9 run (Barfield kick),
5:23
Taylor Co. FortWhite
First downs 14 8
Rushes-yards 36-198 35-142
Passing 211 110
Comp-Att-Int 8-16-0 7-12-0
Punts-Avg. 2-30.5 3-25
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 8-62 9-87
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Taylor CountyT.Jackson
16-177, Houston 3-11, Grambling 11-5,
Freeman 2-5, No. 32 1-5, No. 34 1-2,
No. 22 I-(-3), Ellis I-(-4). Fort White,
Dixon 26-152, Cormier I -(-I), S.Williams
I-(-4), Baker 7-(-5).
PASSING-Taylor County, Grambling
4-9-107-0, Wentworth 3-6-70-0,
T. Jackson 1-1-34-0. Fort White, Baker
7-12-110-0.
RECEIVING-Taylor County,
Strawter 3-56, Houston 2-86,
J. Jackson 1-34, Parker 1-29, T.
Jackson 1-6. Fort' White, Legree
3-36, Phillips 3-21, Sanders 1-53.


r "t


SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER








4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


Making This Right


Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


"Now Gulf seafood is coming back on the menu, so come on down,
we're open for business."
Bryan Zar
Co-owner, Restaurant des Families
Crown Point, LA


I grew up bussing tables at this restaurant. Last year, my wife,
Brooke, and I bought it. We were working hard to build a
business, then the spill hit. BP said they would try to make
things right. But how was an energy company going to help
our restaurant?

Keeping Businesses Open
We figured they would tell us to take a number and wait in line.
Instead, they asked us if we could serve food to the workers,
engineers, scientists, and local residents they had hired to
cleanup the spill. It kept us busy round the clock. And we
weren't the only ones. They hired a lot of.local businesses and
kept a lot of people working. They have kept businesses up and
down the Gulf open and it's still making a difference.

Open for Business
BP asked us to share our story with you to keep you informed.
Our restaurant's open six days a week. Customers are filling our
restaurant again and we think it's a good time to come down to
the Gulf Coast. And if we could make just one request, please
think of us When planning your next vacation. We're still here
and while it's been tough, we are still cooking. And we are just
one of the hundreds of great places ready to welcome you when
you come down. So don't wait. We're looking forward to
seeing you.


For information visit: bp.com For assistance, please call:
restorethegulf.gov To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
facebook.com/bpamerica To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
twitter.com/bp_america To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
youtube.com/bp floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP, E&P


bp












Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisok@akeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS


SundayOctober 3 1, 20 10


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Leadership Lake City ready for applicants


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
t wasn't until par-
ticipating in the 2006
Leadership Lake
City class that Janice
Dorminey, Lake City
Mall operations and mar-
keting manager, learned
just what she didn't know
about the community,
despite living here most of
her life.
"You just got to see so
much behind the scenes
- things for businesses
not in your trade," she
said.
The 2011 Leadership
Lake City program is now
accepting applications
for participants. The pro-
gram is through the Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
and begins in February.
The Leadership Lake
City aims to cultivate and
develop leaders for the
community, said Steve
Smith, program coordina-
tor and chamber business
enhancement chairman.
"The way we do that is
give them a very compre-
hensive look at the inner
workings of our communi-
ty," he said. "It's done over
a five- to six-month period.
Every couple of weeks we
get together and we tackle
a different aspect of the
community and it's cogs
and wheels."
One session might focus
on health care in the com-
munity, another on local
government, and there will
also be tours of different
industries in the area, he


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Dennille Folsom speaks with city manager Wendell
Johnson about attending Leadership Lake City classes. Johnson, who has previously attended and presented in leadership
events in other communities, is excited about this coming event. 'If you've never been to an event like this, you will find out
things you would never have otherwise known in the community,' Johnson said. 'You can grow from it.'


said.
Through a sponsorship
by John Kasak, Michele
Greene, City of Lake
City deputy city clerk,
participated in the 2006
Leadership Lake City
class.
"I thought it was an
excellent opportunity to
learn more about the dif-
ferent parts of enterprise
and government," she


said. "There were quite
a few different areas we
touched on at the time."
Greene said Leadership
Lake City was a great net-
working and eye-opening
experience.
"It definitely let me
know what resources were
available out there and
what organizations did,"
she said. "It was more than
just knowing a name. You


really go to understand
different industries and
how they benefit the com-
munity."
Most chambers through-
out the country offer a
leadership program, said
Dennille Folsom, chamber
executive director. She
will be participating in
Leadership Lake City this.
year.
"I'm looking forward to


being a part of the class
since I've never gone
through it and becoming
a more informed member
of the community with the
rest of my classmates,"
she said.
Program participants
develop a camaraderie
with each other.
"It's helped me form
new friendships and
business relationships


with people in the com-
munity I may never have
had a chance to meet,"
Dorminey said.
Putting on Leadership
Lake City is a big produc-
tion for the chamber,
Smith said. Anyone apply-
ing and accepted in the
program must be commit-
ted.
Students must attend
80 percent of the sessions
in addition to the kick-off,
SIMCOC, leadership train-
ing and graduation.
"We want to get people
that can do it and can com-
mit to the six-month pro-
gram," he said.
There has to be a buy-
in also from employers
because certain class dates
will require time off from
work, Smith said.
Other cities have wait-
ing lists for their leader-
ship programs and the
Chamber wants to move in
the same direction.
"We're looking for a
budding and growing pro-
gram this coming year,"
he said.
Applications for
Leadership Lake City are
available at the Chamber
office and due by Nov. 30.
The program is limited to
the first 30 qualified appli-
cants.
Tuition is $500, and
employer approval is recom-
mended. Call 386-752-3690.
"I would encourage
everyone to definitely sign
up," Greene said. "It was
just a great program, and
you definitely will learn
something you didn't know
before."


Economy grows at slightly

faster pace in third quarter


By JEANNINE AVERSA
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
government's latest reading
on economic growth offers
little benefit to Democrats
who face deep losses in
Tuesday's elections.
The economy grew
slightly faster last summer
as Americans spent a little
more but far too little
to reduce the high unem-
ployment that is frustrating
voters.
The Commerce Depart-


ment said that the economy
expanded at a 2 percent annu-
al rate in the July-September
quarter. It marked an
improvement from the fee-
ble 1.7 percent growth in the
April-June quarter.
Consumers helped boost
last quarter's economic
growth with 2.6 percent
growth in spending, slightly
better than the 2.2 percent
rate in the second quarter.
Businesses also spent
more to replenish their
stockpiles. That trend has
provided a big lift to the


economy since the reces-
sion ended. But economists
note that businesses will no
longer need to rebuild their
stockpiles so much in com-
ing months. So the economy
won't benefit as much from
such spending in the year's
final three months. The
same goes for government
spending. Even though the
federal government contrib-
uted to growth in the July-
September quarter, stimulus
money is drying up at a time
when local governments
are cutting spending.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


Curb Those Trades
Q What are trading curbs? -
S.B., Fort Wayne, Ind.
A Trading curbs on program
trading were instituted by the
New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)
after the crash of 1987 to temporar-
ily restrict all or some trading dur-
ing periods of volatility.
Program trading was blamed, '
at least in part, for the crash of
1987. It features high-volume
trades typically made by institu-
tional investors using computers.
These may be programmed, for
example, to execute big trades if
certain securities rise or fall to
certain levels.
These curbs were discontinued
in 2007, as many deemed them
ineffective. But after this past May's
one-day "flash crash," curbs of vari-
ous kinds are being re-examined.
A powerful kind of curb still
around are "circuit breakers,"
which halt trading entirely for an
hour, two hours or the rest of the
day, whenever the Dow Jones
Industrial Average drops, respec-
tively, by 10 percent. 20 percent or
30 percent. A new rule will curb
trading temporarily for malor stocks'
that surge or plunge by 10 percent
or more in short order.

Q I saw a profit of$2.35 per
"dduted" share in an earn-
ings report. What's a diluted
share? K T. Las Cruces, N.M.
AA company's bottom-line
A profit. or "'net income," is
divided by its number of shares
to arrive at its earnings per share
(EPS This may be reported in
two ways, as "basic" and "diluted."
The basic number of shares are
those that currently exist,. while
the diluted share count is more
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shares that could exist due to
people exercising existing stock
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BRIEF


Toyota supplier
to fill 300 jobs
TUPELO, Miss. A
Toyota supplier in north
Mississippi is taking appli-
cations for about 300 jobs
at its Baldwyn facility.
The job listings for
Auto Parts Manufacturing
Mississippi were posted on
the Mississippi Department
of Employment Security
website Thursday. The
company is looking for
about 250 hourly workers
and 50 supervisors that will
work on salary.
Kiyoshi Tsuchiya, the
general manager of Auto
Parts Manufacturing
Mississippi, told The
Northeast Mississippi Daily
Journal that the company
wants to "build a strong
and diverse corporate fam-
ily."
The plant will supply
stamped body parts, plastic
bumpers and plastic instru-
ment panels for the Corolla
sedans to be built at Toyota
Motor Manufacturing
Mississippi in Blue Springs,
starting in fall 2011.
The company will begin
hiring production workers
in November, with the first,
start dates at the end of
.November. Hiring will con-
tinue through February.
To apply for an hourly
job, applicants have to go
to a WIN Job Center loca-
tion in Mississippi.
Pay will start at $12.50
with increases as employ-
ees learn their jobs,
Tsuchiya said. Pay will
increase to $13 after three
months, $13.50 after six
months and $0.50 each
six months after that for a
top rate of $15.80 after 36
months. The Toyota plant
in northeast Mississippi,
has also been accepting
applications for hourly pro-
duction and skilled mainte-
nance jobs.
M Associated Press


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Employment costs show modest rise


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Employ-
ment costs posted another mod-
est gain in the July-to-September
quarter with compensation for
state and local government
employees turning in the weak-
est performance in nearly three
decades.
Employment costs for civilian
workers rose 0.4 percent in the
third quarter and are up just
1.9 percent for the 12 months
ending in September, the Labor
Department reported. High


unemployment following a deep
recession continues to depress
workers' bargaining power.
State and local government
workers, who have been bat-
.tered by shrinking budgets,
fared even worse than employ-
ees of private industry.
Their compensation was flat
in the third quarter and up
only 1.7 percent in the past 12
months.
Both were the weakest
showings on records that go
back 28 years.
The 1.9 percent 12-month
rise in compensation for all


civilian workers was little
changed from a 1.8 percent
increase for the 12 months
ending in June.
Those gains are significantly
below the 3.3 percent increase
for the 12 months ending in
December 2007, the month
the recession began.
With more than 8 million
jobs lost from December 2007
to December of last year,
employees have not had the
bargaining power to demand
higher wages.
For the third quarter, wage's
and salaries for civilian work-


ers rose 0.4 percent, matching
the second quarter increase,'
while benefits were up 0.5
percent, also the same as the
April-to-June quarter.
Wages and salaries make
up 70 percent of employee
compensation while benefits,
which include health insur-
ance and pensions, make up
the other 30 percent.
For state and local workers,
the flat reading on total com-
pensation in the third quarter
reflected a 0.3 percent drop in
wages and salaries and a 0.7
percent rise in benefits.


Mortgage rates rise to near record low


* By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON Rates
on 30-year fixed mortgages
rose slightly this week to
an average of 4.23 percent,
just above the lowest level
in decades.
The average rate for
30-year fixed loans inched
up from 4.21 percent the
previous week, mortgage
buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday. Earlier in the


month, rates fell to 4.19
percent, the lowest aver-
age on records dating
back to 1971.
The average rate on 15-
year fixed loans rose to
3.66 percent. That was up
from 3.64 percent a week
earlier.
Rates have been falling
since April.
They have remained
low this month because
investors have been buy-
ing up Treasury bonds in


anticipation of the Federal
Reserve's likely move to
buy Treasurys to stimu-
late the economy. That
demand lowers Treasury
yields, which mortgage
rates tend to track.
Low rates haven't
helped the struggling
housing market, which
recorded its worst sum-
mer in more than a
decade. But they have'led
to a modest surge in refi-
nancing.


To calculate average
mortgage rates, Freddie
Mac collects rates from
lenders around the coun-
try on Monday through
Wednesday of each week.
Rates often fluctuate sig-
nificantly, even within a
given day.
Rates on five-year
adjustable-rate mortgages
averaged 3.41 percent, up
from 3.45 percent a week
earlier. Rates on one-year
adjustable-rate mortgages


remained at an average of
3.3 percent.
The rates do not include
add-on fees known as
points. One point is equal
to 1 percent of the total
loan amount.
The nationwide fee for
loans in Freddie Mac's
survey averaged 0.8 a
point for 30-year loans. It
averaged 0.7 of a point for
15-year and 1-year mort-
gages and 0.6 of a point
for 5-year mortgages.


Caterpillar plans locomotive factory in Indiana


Associated Press

MUNCIE, Ind. -
Caterpillar Inc. announced
plans Friday to start build-
ing diesel-electric locomo-
tives in a vacant former
transformer factory in
eastern Indiana, potential-
ly hiring 650 workers in
the next two years.
Company executives
said the Muncie factory
would allow Caterpillar


subsidiary Progress Rail
Services to seek business
related to transit rail proj-
ects.
The Peoria, Ill.-based
company plans to spend
$50 million to reopen the
740,000 square-foot plant
on Muncie's south side
that ABB Power T&D Co.
closed in 1998. Caterpillar
also plans to build a loco-
motive test track on the
facility's 75-acre campus.


Billy Ainsworth, the
president and chief exec-
utive officer of Progress
Rail, told the crowd during
an announcement event at
the factory that production
is expected to start dur-
ing the second half of next
year and increase during
2012.
"If the economy picks
up and demand picks up,
we'll go to full production,"
Ainsworth told WTHR-TV


of Indianapolis.
The company expects
to announce within a few
weeks plans for hiring
employees ranging from
engineers to production
workers, Ainsworth said.
The Star Press reports
Progress Rail will be taking
over a massive building that
features a central structure
with a 99-foot-high ceiling
and a manufacturing floor
with built-in railroad tracks.


It has mostly been used for
storage in recent years.
I The Indiana Economic
Development Corp. said it
offered Progress Rail up to
$3.5 million in performance-
based tax credits and up to
$1 million in training grants,
along with up to $1 million
to the city for infrastructure
improvements.
State and local officials
welcomed the announce-
ment in a county that had a


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Casinos and
Online Gaming
Casino companies are finally start-
ing to see online gaming as a possible
growth engine for the industry and
are talking with members of Con-
gress about four different bills float-
ing through the House and Senate.
The November elections may result in
a more conservative Congress, less
friendly to legalizing online gam-
bling, so now is the time for action.
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levels, online gaming is an espe-
cially appealing opportunity, with
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. high growth potential. It's every-
thing a company dreams of.
The real winners could be opera-
tors with lots of variety. Harrah's and
MGM Resorts.have more than a
dozen properties scattered through-
out the country. A range of rewards,
which is a major differentiator in
online gaming, could be offered,
bringing gamblers into both the
online and brick-and-mortar casinos.
Smaller operators may also bene-
fit. Some online players have no
interest in Las Vegas-located perks,
and Boyd Gaming and Ameristar
Casinos both have casinos through-
out the country. Local perks that Las
Vegas Sands or Wynn Resorts can't
offer in Las Vegas could attract
online players in these other markets.
Keep an eye on the progress of
online gaming bills in Congress.This
could be a big win for the casino
industry if it gets the legislation right.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


v










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


W(O





tarti


ver


How to take

charge of your

financial future

FAMILY FEATURES

higher incomes and have a more
powerful role in the workplace
than women of previous genera-
tions. But in spite of this progress,
90 percent of women say they feel financially
insecure, according to the 2007 Allianz Women,
Money and Power Study. The vast majority of
women will need to take financial responsibility
at some point in their lives, so it is vital that they
have the knowledge and confidence to take charge
of their financial future.
Women at Risk
A 2009 report by The Women's Institute for a
Secure Retirement (WISER) says that women are
particularly vulnerable going into retirement. The
findings in "How Can Women's Income Last as
Long as They Do?" show that:
Women at age 65 are expected to live, on
average, another 20 years four years
longer than men. That means they will need
to save more for retirement.
Less than one third of retired women today
receive pension income. And less than half
of today's working women have access to a
pension or retirement savings plan through
their jobs.
For more than 40 percent of older women
living alone, Social Security is virtually
all that they have. This group is four to
five times more likely to be poor than
married couples.
"Each stage of life holds events that can
shape your financial needs and impact your ability
to achieve long-term goals," says Katie Libbe,
vice president of Marketing Solutions for Allianz
Life. "Divorce and widowhood are two stages that
have significant financial impact for women, so
they need to learn how to take control of their
financial futures."


'I)


I . *' --


-.
.4. I-;
-"^ 1. 11 _


Tips for Starting Over
Losing one's spouse through divorce or death
means a change in financial needs and responsi-
bilities. Here are some tips to help begin the
process of starting over.
Find Your Starting Place.
Before you begin any new journey, you need to
know where your starting place is. Gather all the
information you need to evaluate your current
financial situation. These include:
Checking and savings account statements
Credit card information
Tax returns
Social Security records
Investment information stocks and bonds
certificates, mutual fund statements .Illustraion cou
Insurance policies homeowner's, life, auto,
health, long-term care
Retirement assets 401(k), pension, IRA,
ROTH IRA, annuity statements
Deeds
Wills and powers of attorney
Know Your Benefits.
As a divorced spouse, you may still be eligible for certain benefits
from your partner's retirement plan and Social Security payments.
You may be able to obtain rights to a portion of your spouse's
retirement benefits. In most plans, this is done using a
Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO). Find out from
the plan's administrator what requirements must be met.
If you are divorced after at least 10 years of marriage, you
can collect retirement benefits on your former spouse's
Social Security record if you are at least age 62 and if your
former spouse is entitled to or is receiving benefits.
If you have filed joint tax returns, you may be able to apply
for Innocent Spouse Relief, which frees you from the res-
ponsibility of paying taxes attributable to your former spouse.
As a widow, you can explore the following options:
You are allowed to rollover an IRA you may have inherited
from your husband into your own IRA.
Be sure to contact the Social Security Administration to
apply for the $250 death benefit under your spouse's Social
Security benefits and to determine your new benefit amount.
Typically you will receive the greater of his or your benefits,
but not both.
It's important to file estate taxes within nine months of your
husband's death to avoid any interest penalties.
Develop a New Budget.
Evaluate how much money you will need for the next six to 12
months and keep that money in an easily accessible account in
your own name.
Pay Your Bills. Failure to pay your bills can result in bigger
problems due to late payment fees, interest charges, and
damage to your credit history. /


rtesy of Getty Images


Take it Slow. Don't make any
major purchases or changes
right away. Give yourself time
to heal emotionally before
rushing into major decisions.
Don't Go It Alone.
If you don't already have a finan-
cial advisor, it may be.advisable to
get one. "A professional financial
planner can help you improve your
current financial management and
help you through these challenging
changes," says Libbe. "Their exper-
tise and objective perspective can
save you time, and help you invest
for your future."
To find a qualified financial
advisor, you can ask trusted friends
or professionals, sudh as lawyers
and accountants, for references.
You can also get references from
professional associations such as
the Financial Planning Association, the Nation
tion of Personal Financial Advisors, or the Am
Institute of Certified Public Accountants.
Make sure that you have a support network r
of trusted family, friends and professionals who
you feedback, go with you to meetings and he
follow up on the;ictions you need to take.
Starting a new phase of life can be challenge:
there are a lot of uncertainties. But by taking a
you can take control of your finances and give
a more secure future.
For more information on finding a financial a
to download free financial checklists for the wi
divorced, visit www.allianzlife.com/womenmo
consumerinformation.aspx.


What's Your Financial Personality?
Knowing your particular financial personality type will help you and a financial
professional create a personal approach to planning your financial future.
Financial Dreamer: Intimidated by money and investing, you feel helpless and
hope that someone else will help you take care of your financial problems.
Financial Avoider: You feel overwhelmed by all the financial choices.available to
you. A lack of financial knowledge keeps you from taking the necessary steps
to resolve your financial problems.
Financial Initiator: You're self-assured, empowered and optimistic. You're quite
clear about your financial goals, and typically know how to achieve them.
Financial Collaborator: When in a relationship, you're healthy, happy and
cooperative. You provide family financial comfort and-stability. You and your
partner share equally in financial decisions and actions.
Financial Analyzer: You have a good understanding of household finances, and
take initiative in thoroughly researching investment opportunities and tracking
financial results. You're a comparison shopper, an avid saver and rarely purchase
something you can't afford.
Find out which type you are by filling out the Financial Personality Worksheet at
www.allianzlife.com.



al Associa- Learn More
erican
It's never too late or too early-- to start learning about financial matters.
made up Here are some online resources to get you started.
o can give w 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy -
lp you www.360financialliteracy.org
ing, and a The Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement -
action now, www.WiserWomen.org
yourself The Women's Institute for Financial Education -
www.Wife.org
advisor and U.S. Financial Literacy and Education Commission -
dowed or www.MyMoney.gov
neypower/ m Free brochure, "Suddenly Single," from the National Endowment for
Financial Education www.nefe.org


Every story,

Every photo,

Every page of the paper,



I I' i


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STATE BANK


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

3 NYSE A Amex Nasdaq
7,513.35 -9.56 2,083.89 +20.73 5 2,507.41 +28.02


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Reddy Ice 3.49 +1.31 +60.1 Wtber 9.26 +3.24 +53.8 TOR Minrs 10.34 +4.16 +67.3
FslMercFn 16.30 +5.23 +47.2 GenMoly 5.22 +1.13 +27.6 RITTech 7.30 +2.70 +58.7
Compellent 25.27 +6.99 +38.2 Kerne 3.74 +.76 +25.5 Thomas rs 2.40 +.85 +54.8
ComScop 31.66 +8.54 +36.9 Gainsoo 11.60 +2.35 +25.4 CleanDslrs 16.85 +5.70 +51.1
iStar 4.57 +1.15 +33.6 MastechH 3.68 +.63 +20.7 MERTIrsh 2.58 +.84 +48.3
Syniverse 30.49 +6.87 +29.1 EslUCap 4.58 +.78 +20.5 Vertrors 4.19 +1.25 +42.5
iStarplF 14.91 +3.29 +28.3 HMG 5.00 +.80 +19.0 MIPSTech 14.70 +4.30 +41.3
Mons*tWw 18.06 +3.93 +27.8 NovaGldg 11.22 +1.65 +17.2 Pansoft 5.08 +1.48 +41.1
iStarplE 14.90 +3.16 +26.9 Uranerz 2.24 +.32 +16.7 BSDMed 4.75 +1.37 +40.5
iStarpfG 14.62 +3.02 +26.0 SearchMed 2.58 +.34 +15.3 InfoSvcsun 2.30 +.65 +39.4


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NewpkRes 5.88 -2.41 -29.1
NavigCons 9.15 -3.11 -25.4
Unisys 23.05 -7.73 -25.1
JonesGrp 14.46 -4.66 -24.4
PMI Grp 3.34 -1.03 -23.5
Dex One n 7.01 -2.03 -22.5
Revlon 11.42 -3.08 -21.2
Lexmark 38.03 -8.89 -18.9
WilmTr 7.11 -1.65 -18.8
Tsakos 10.34 -2.37 -18.6

Most Active (s$1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 18206770 4.17 +.06
BkofAm 11277337 11.45 +.01
S&P500ETF7376061118.49 +.14
FordM 4470804 14.13 +.18
SprintNex 3962336 4.13 -.73
SPDR Fncl2441275 14.56 -.04
iShEMkts 2371274 46.12 +.09
GenE!ec 2340321 16.02 -.04
Pfizer 2218383 17.42 -.09
iShR2K 2025820 70.30 -.02

Diary
Advanced 1,564
Declined 1,556
New Highs 489
New Lows 35
Total issues- 3,184
Unchanged 64
Volume 20,950,757,0991


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaShen 2.25 -.95 -29.7
LGLGrp 26.37 -6.62 -20.1
Hyperdyn 2.46 -.48 -16.3
BioTimewt 3.74 -.51 -12.0
OrionEngy 3.35 -.41 -10.9
UnivPwr 3.25 -.39 -10.7
Argan 8.47 -.89 -9.5
DellaApd 12.92 -1.36 -9.5
SinoHub 2.25 -.23 -9.3
CAMACn 2.64 -.26 -9.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
RareBe g 429586 11.36 +1.25
NovaGlIdg 220965 11.22+1.65
PhrmAlh 191475 3.51 -.34
KodiakOg 184050 4.13 -.13
GoldStrg 154933 5.22 +.36
ChinaShen 149805 2.25 -.95
Taseko 123825 6.31 +.07
NIhgtMg 106037 2.81 +.01
NwGoldg 102053 7.40 +.82
GrtBasGg 92343 2.81 +.27

Diary
Advanced 287
Declined 238
New Highs 32
New Lows 7
Total issues 557
Unchanged 32
Volume 533,327,051


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Odclaro rs 8.41 -6.32 -42.9
SavientPh 12.43 -9.27 -42.7
NuVasive 26.17-10.31 -28.3
DJSPun 2.00 -.75 -27.3-
SunBcpNJ 3.95 -1.34 -25.3
CarverBcp 2.30 -.69 -23.1
Sourcefire 23.59 -6.51 -21.6
UveDealrs 7.79 -2.10 -21.2
AMAG Ph 15.91 -4.03 -20.2
SuperMda n 6.58 -1.67 -20.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Microsoft 3689932 26.67 +1.29
Intel 2760852 20.05 +.22
SiriusXM 2715280 1.5) +.19
PwShs QQQ268801952.18 +.54
Comcast 1664935 20.63+1.17
Cisco 1619597 22.86 -.62
Oracle 1616110 29.38 +.39
MicronT 1569060 8.26 +.57
RschMoln 1322821 56.92+7.89
SeagateT 1260295 14.71 -.47


Their in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


WIdy Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.68 28.52 +.23 +0.8 +1.7
AMD NY ... 7.34 +.45 +6.5 -24.2
AutoZone NY ... 237.63 +2.91 + 1.2 +50.3
BkofAm NY .04 11.45 +.01 +0.1 -24.0
BarVixShTNY ... 13.10 +.27 +2.1 -61.5
BobEvans Nasd .80 28.70 -.34 -1.2 -.9
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.89 +.12 +0.9 -13.1
CSX NY 1.04 61.45 +.27 +0.4 +26.7
Chevron NY 2.88 82.60 -1.95 -2.3 +7.3
Cisco Nasd ... 22.86 -.62 -2.6 -4.5
Citigrp NY ... 4.17 +.06 +1.5 +26.0
CocaCI NY 1.76 61.32 -.29 -0.5 +7.6
Comcast Nasd .38 20.63 +1.17- +6.0 +23.1
ComScop NY ... 31.66 +.54 +36.9 +19.3
Delhaize NY 2.02 70.46 +1.84 +2.7 -8.2
DirFnBear NY ... 12.59 +.19 +1.5 -35.2
DrxFBulls NY ... 22.18 -.38 -1.7 -10.2
FamilyDIr NY .62 46.17 +.75 +1.7 +65.9
FordM NY 14.13 +.18 +1.3 +41.3
GenElec NY .48 16.02 -.04 -0.2 +5.9
Hallibrtn NY' .36 31.86 -2.32 -6.8 +5.9
HomeDp NY .95 30.90 -.58 -1.8 +6.8
iShEMkts NY .59 46.12 +.09 +0.2 +11.1
iShR2K NY .79 70.30 -.02 ... +12.6
Intel Nasd .63 20.05 +.22 +1.1 -1.7
JPMorgChNY .20 37.63 -.07 -0.2 -9.6
LVSands NY ... 45.88 +7.10 +18.3+207.1
Lowes NY .44 21.34 -.66 -3.0 -8.8


Money Rates
Last PvsWeek


Prime Rate


3.25 3.25


i Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-.25
Advanced 1,446 Treasuries
Defined 1,363 3-m6nth 0.12 0.13
New Highs 345
ew Lows 89 6-month 0.17' 0.17
Total issues 2,880 5-year 1.17 1.14
Unchanged 71 10-year 2.61 2.56
Volume 9,714,829,621 30-year 4.00 3.94


Wkly Wily YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
NoldkiaCp NY .56
OcdcPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShsQ0ONasd .33
ProLogis NY .45
RegionsFnNY .04
RschMotn Nasd
Ryder NY 1.08
S&WP50ETFNY 2.31
SearsHldgsNasd
SidusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDRFndcNY .16
TimeWarn NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20


-.78 -1.0 +24.6
+.57 +7.3 -21.8
+1.29 +5.1 -12.5
+.33 +4.2 +5.2
-.01 -0.1 -37.9
-.41 -0.7 +4.2
-.96 -10.7 -23.4
-.36 -3.3 -16.7
-.95 -1.2 -3.3
+.39 +1.3 +19.8
-1.37 -4.? +17.2
+.29 +0.4 +7.4
-.09 -0.5 -4.3
+3.30" +2.3 +33.7
+.54 +1.0 +14.1
+1.03 +8.2 -.4
-.84 -11.8 +19.1
+7.89 +16.1 -15.7
-1.12 -25 +6.3
+.14 A.1 4.
-4.34 ; -1W,
+.19 4145.1WO
+.01 ... +13.7
-.73-14.9 +12.7
-.04 -0.3 +1.1
+.99 +3.1 +11.6
+.11 +0.2 +1.3
-.05 -0.2 -3.4


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0209 1.0222
Britain 1.6021 1.5931
Canada 1.0203 1.0212
Euro .7196 .7181
Japan 80.49 81.07
Mexico 12.3430 12.4026
Switzerlnd .9855 .9832
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


IlI


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials 31.49 5.41 -43.18 -12.33 4.54
Close: 11,118.49 *1 '. 0 ..
1-week change: -14.07 (-0.1%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
11,500 ................ ......... .... ................




10,50 0.". ..... .........



0 ,50 00 .... M ... ........ -. ... ... ..... ............. ..................... .... .............
9,500 M J J A S 0


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Mm Inn
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 144,752 11.69 +1.0 +11.4/B +8.8/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStldx LB 67,000 29.53 +3.9 +18.4/A +2.3/B NL .3,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 62,279 29.00 +4.2 +15.0/D +2.7/B 5.75 250
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 57,298 50.05 +2.4 +12.1/D +4.8/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 55,855 64.74 +4.2 +20.9/B +5.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 53,561 .35.33 +3.4 +12.4/D +5.9/A 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 50,016 16.45 +2.7 +15.9/A +4.5/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB 48,658 108.34 +3.8 +16.5/B +1.8/C NL 5,000,000
Vanguard 500Inv LB 47,989 109.04 +3.8 +16.4/B +1.7/C NL 3,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 46,302 27.02 +3.7 +14.0/D +2.3/B 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 40,048 101.27 +4.2 +14.5/B -0.3/D NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntiStk FV 39,751 35.08 +4.6 +16.2/A +5.9/A NL 2,500
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 38,548 40.97 +3.2 +12.8/C +7.2/A 5.75 250
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 36,847 26.05 +3.1 +16.3/A +1.7/B 5.75 250
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl 35,095 11.69 +1.0 +11.1/B +8.5/A NL 1,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 32,274 2.14 +2.0 +16.0/A +5.5/A 4.25 1,000
ATr.,rar, Fundi, NlrFPerspA m WS 31,425 27.69 +4.3 +16.2/C +6.5/A 5.75 250
Vanguard TOlillAdimn LB 31,061 29.54 +3.9 +18.6/A +2.4/B NL 10,000
Amrnnar, Fun.l,; FninvA m LB 30,461 34.74 +3.7 +16.5/B +4.4/A 5.75 250
Arenc:jn Fun.r. BalA m MA 30,004 17.40 +2.9 +14.9/B +3.7/C 5.75 250
vjriuar.1,00Admr.i LB 29,323 109.06 +3.8 +16.5/B +1.7/C NL 10,000
Vanguard Welln MA 29,123 30.25 +2.1 +12.4/D +5.5/A NL 10,000
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 28,457 11.69 +1.0 +10.9/B +8.3/A 3.75 1,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 27,872 12.49 +0.5 +9.6/C +4.1/E 3.75 250
Vanguard Totlntl d FB 27,753 15.48 +3.5 +13.3/B +5.3/B NL 3,000
Vanguard InstPlus LB 27,516 108.35 +3.8 +16.6/B +1.8/C NL 200,000,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 26,604 77.41 +3.9 +25.6/A +5.7/A NL 2,500


CA-ConservativeAllocaton, Cl -Inieedante-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foeign Large Blend, FG -Forein Lagerowth, FV-Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Aloeaeon, LB-Laroe Blend, LG -Lage Groith, LV -ae Value, MA -Moderate Allocaion, MB -Mid-CapBleid, MV-
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Spdty-heath, WS -World Stock Tol Return: Chng in NAV wiv dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund peromed vs.
others with same oijec e: A s in lop 20%, E in bottom 20%. Mn MInvt Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: MomiDstar.


Wkly YTD Wly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR ...
AT&T Inc 1.68
AbtLab 1.76
AberFitc .70
Accenture .90
AMD
Aetna .04
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
Alria 1.52
AmbacFh ...
AMovilL 1.31
AmAxle
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmeriBrgn .32
Anadarko ..36
AnalogDev .88
Annaly 2.60
Aon Corp .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.34
Avon .88
BB&TCp .60
BHP BillU 1.74
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .51
BcoSantand .80
BcoSBrasil .33
BkofAm .04
BkNYMel .36
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.16
BerkHBs ...
BestBuy .60
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ..
Brinker .56
BrMySq 1.28
CB REllis ..
CBSB .20
CIGNA' .04
CMS Eng .84
CSX 1.04
CVS Care .35
Cameron
CapOne .20
CardnIHIth .78
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78
CntryUnk 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp ...
CliffsNRs .56
Coach .60
CocaCE '.48
CocaCI 1.76
ColgPal 2.12
Comerica .20
ComScop ...
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.20


12 '-.37 -10.3
12 +.43 +20.8
35 -.76 -41.0
... +.47 +2.1
8 +.23 +1.7
13 -1.24 -4.9
32 +.46 +23.0
17 -.93 +7.7
4 +.45 -24.2
8 -1.34 -5.8
22 -.09 +41.8
... -.16 +4.8
-... +.42 -18.5
... -.11 -70.9
14 -2.30 +1.5
14 +.50 +29.5
1 -.19 -.4
... -.30 +21.9'
9 +.01 +15.0
20 -.57 -5.7"
14 +.74 +7.6
14 +2.43 +2.3
15 +.77 +25.9
57 -.94 -1,4
17 +1.66 +6.6
13 --.51 +1.9'
16 -.12 +A7.
25 -2.16 -29.2
43 -.22 +10.5
11 -.22 +6.4
4 -2.23 -12.5
14 +.34 +.2
20 -3.98 -3.3
21 +.79 -7.7
... +1.67 +7.8
43 ... +14.7
... -.50 +15.1
... -.57 -22,1
... +.02 +3.2
17 +.01 -24.0
13 -.12 -10.4
... +.27 -61.5
17 +2.12 +22.1
13 -.19 -13.2
16 -3.78 +21.1
13 +.24 +8.9
8 +1.00 -47.9
15 -.62 +30.5
... +.09 -29.0
13 -1.65 +24.3
14 -.06 +6.5
29 -.53 +35.2
30 -.25 +20.5
8 -1.01 -.3
15 -.31 +17.4
17" +.27 +26.7
12 -1.23 -6.5
22 +.83 +4.7
7 -1.85 -2.8
13 +2.70 +7.6
18 +3.03 +36.2
26 +.27 +37.9
... +.58 -22.8
15 +.14 '+14.1
11 +.79 +14.3
15 +.48 -16.2
10 -1.95 +7.3
16 -.17 -30.8
6 -.11 +5.7
... +.06 +26.0
16 +.60 +41.5
20 +5.45 +36.9
14 -.62 +65.2
19; -.29 +7.6
16 +.28 -6.1
... -.48 +21.0
99 +8.54 +19.3
14 -.23 -2.4
9 -1.73 +16.3


Name Div
ConsolEngy.40
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Cummins 1.05
DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.20
DeftaAir
.DevelDiv .08
DrxEMBII s5.68
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBull s ...
DirxSCBull 4.77
DirxLCBear...
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
DukeRlty .68
Dynegy rs ...
EMCCp ...
EIPasoCp .04
Ean
EldorGId g .05
EmersonEl 1.34
EnCana gs .80
Exelon 2:10
ExxonMbl 1.76
RdlNFin .72
FidNatlnfo .20
FstHorizon .72
FirstEngy 2.20
RagstB rs ...
FordM
FMCG 2.00
FrontierCm .75
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenDynaml.68
vjGnGrthP ..
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21
GoldRPd .16
Goldcrp g .36
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear .
GrtAftPac
HCP Inc 1.86
Hallibrn .36
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt .
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
Honwlllnt 1.21
HostHotls .04
Huntsmn .40
ING
iShGolds .
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn .16
iShSing .38
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20 T 3.82
iS Eafe 1.38
iShR2K .79
iShREst 1.88


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.1 18 -2.27 -26.2 36.76
4.8 15 +.60 +9.4 49.72
3.2 1 -1.14 -14.0 30.24
1.1 9 -.32 -5.3 18.28
1.2 18 -5.53 +92.1 88.10
5.6 ... -.04 -.2 .5.01
1.4 ... -.18 -4.0 10.43
4.8 14 -.17 +7.3 46.76
.2 18 +.18 +15.3 43.36
9 +.43 -42.4 10.40
1.6 20 -.45 +42.0 76.80
... 29 +.71 +22.0 13.89
.6 ... -.32 +39.5 12.92
.5 ... +.21 +11.3 37.40
... -.04 -54.1 &2.61
...... +.19 -35.2 12.59
,.. ... -.38 -10.2 22.18
.2 ... -.11 +23.1 52.63
...... -.09 -35.9 10.96
.5 15 +.24 +20.0 17.65
1.0 18 +1.16 +12.0 36.13
4.2 15 -1.05 +11.7 43.46
1.9 21 +.64 +11.6 30.84
5.4 12 +.43 +5.8 18.21
5.5 ... +.07 +2.3 12.45
..... -.12 -48.7 4.64
... 27 -.42 .+20.3 21.02
.3 11 +.08 +34.9 13.26
S... .-,24 -16.4 5.45
... 46 +.15 +19.5 16.93
2.4 22 +.39 +28.9 54.90
2.8 15 4.67 -12.9 28.22
5.1 11 -1.18 -16.5 40.82
2.6 12 +.15 -2.5 66.49
5.4 10 +.61 -.5 13.39
.7 19 -1.50 +15.6 27.10
...... +.16 -22.5 10.09
6.1 14 -1.20 -21.8 36.32
... ... -1.18 -78.8 1.27
... 7 +.18 +41.3 14.13
2.1 12 +.75 +18.1 94.80
8.5 13 -.01 +12.4 8.78
1.4 5 -.33 -20.2 11.85
.2.1 11 -.14 -8.9 19.01
2.5 11 +3.62 -.1 68.12
...... -.19 +45.3 16.80
... 22 -2.05 -.2 11.33
1.6 ... +.68 -23.0 13.04
1.0 3 +.44 +20.3 15.77
.8 ... +2.55 +13.3 44.59
.9 9 +3.37 -4.6 161.13
... 37 -1.52 -27.5 10.22
...... +.09 -70.8 3.44
5.2 86 -.36 +17.9 36.01
1.1 20 -2.32 +5.9 31.86
.8 8 ... +3.0 23.95
... 13 +.58 +10.2 8.01
.. 69 +.19 +11.5 6.89
... 45 +.66 -5.0 11.32
.6 8 -.22 +4.2 63.03
.8 11 -.83 -18.4 42.04
3.1- 18 -.58 +6.8 30.90
2.6 18 -.15 +20.2 47.11
.3 ... -.32 +36.2 15.89
2.9 ... +.38 +22.7 13.85
-.37 +9.9 10.78
+.30 +23.7 13.28
3.3 ... +.94 +3.3 77.04
2.6 ... -.25 +19.6 18.73
1.6 ... -.13 +2.9 10.02
2.8 ... -.12 +18.7 13.64
... ... +.44 +7.2 13.90
... ... +1.41 +46.1 24.17
1.5 ... -.70 +6.4 44.97
1.3 ... +.09 +11.1 46.12
3.8 ... -.96 +11.7 100.42
2.4 ... -.28 +3.1 57.01
1.1 ... -.02 +12.6 70.30
3.4 ... -1.08 +19.7 54.96


New York Stock Exchange
























FAn ITa












Emeditilfff




lakeityrportr^co


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iStar
.w 1
IBM
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Invqsco
IronMtn
ItauUnibH
JCrew
JPMorgCh
Jabil
JanusCap
JohnJn 2
JohnsnCtl
JonesGrp
JnprNtwk
Kellogg
Keycorp
KimbClk ;
Kimco
KingPhrm
Kinross g
Kohls
Kraft
LDK Solar
LSI Corp
LVSands
LennarA
Lexmark
UllyEli
UncNat


+1.15 +78.5
-1.01 -4.8
+3.93 +9.7
+.78 -16.9
+1.60 -5.6
-.08 +40.2
+.68 -2.1
-.82 -4.3
-.59 +7.6
+.31 -28.5
-.07 -9.6
+1.16 -11.7
-.17 -21.5
-.07 -1.0
+.94 +28.9
-4.66 -10.0
+.45 +21.4
+.71 -5.5
-.10 +47.7
-3.22 -.6
-.12 +27.2
-.02 +15.2
+.35 -2.4
-1.67 -5.0
+.37 +18.7
+.63 +62.2
+.55 -12.8
+7.10 +207.1
-.31 +13.6
-8.89 +46.4
-.20 -1.4
-1.53 -1.6


Name Div
LyonBasA .
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl .90
MGIC
MGMRsts ...
Macys .20
Manpwl .74
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .11
MarlntA .16
Marshals .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McKesson .72
MedcoHIth ..
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ...
Moodys .42
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
NV Energy .44
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.17


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
-.69 +22.1 26.86
... ... -1.17+181.7 11.21
... ... +.26 -5.9 12.82
11.4 8 ... +7.6 7.91
... ... -1.05 +52.6 8.82
-.31 +19.8 10.93
.8 17 +1.49 +41.2 23.67
1.4 36 -1.25 +.3 54.73
2.8 14 -.04 +13.9 35.57
...... +2.41 +24.0 57.30
.4 36 -.24 +36.0 37.05
.7 ... -.23 +9.1 5.95
2.8 ... -.29 -22.8 10.66
.6 ... +2.24 +.1 42.07
1.1 14 +4.90 +5.6 65.98
... 18 +1.19 -17.8 52.53
2.6 11 -.52 -19.9 35.23
4.2 13 -.79 -.6 36.31
1.8 12 -.01 +14.1 40.33
... 18 -.21 +36.3 10.40
... +3.71 +175.5 35.40
1.9 27 +2.27 -27.3 59.42
... ... +3.93 +3.8 18.06
1.6 14 +.22 +1.0 27.06
.8 10 +.40 -16.0 24.87
.3 32 +7.20 +22.5 73.16
... 39 +.33 +5.2 8.16
... 10 -.03 +23.3 13.72
3.2 15 +.59 +10.4 13.67
... 91 +1.55 -4.5 20.90
... ... -.09 -51.1 2.26
6.1 ... +1.13 -2.8 47.48


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NOilVarco .40 .7 14 +5.17 +21.9 53.76
NatSemi .40 2.9 12 +.53 -10.8 13.70
NewellRub .20 1.1 15 -.42 +17.6 17.65
NewmtM .60 1.0 16 +1.49 +28.6 60.86
NewpkRes ... ... 23 -2.41 +39.0 5.88
NextEraEn 2.00 3.6 14 -.41 +4.2 55.04
NiSource .92 5.3 16 -.17 +12.5 17.31
NokiaCp .56 5.2 ... -.36 -16.7 10.70
Nordstrm .80 2.1 17 +1.62 +2.5 38.51
NorflkSo 1.44 2.3 16 -.61 +17.3 61.49
Novartis 1.99 3.4 14 -.17 +6.5 57.95
Nucor 1.44 3.8 60 +.34 -18.1 38.22
OcciPet 1.52 1.9 15 -.95 -3.3 78.63
OfficeDpt ... ... ... -.14 -30.4 4.49
OfficeMax ... ... 24 +2.55 +39.5 17.70
OilSvHT 2.66 1.7 ... +.36 +.3 119.20
Omnicom .80 1.8 17 +.73 +12.3 43.96
Owensll ... ... 9 -.93 -14.7 28.03
PG&E Cp 1.82 3.8 14 +.16 +7.1 47.82
PMI Grp ... ...... -1.03 +32.7 3.34
PNC .40 .7 8 -.82 +2.1 53.90
PPLCorp 1.40 5.2 15 -.05 -16.9 26.86
PalriotCoal .. ...... +.68 -12.7 13.49
PeabdyE, .34 .6 22 +1.86 +17.0 52.90
Penney .80 2.6 25 -1'.37 +17.2 31.18
'PepsiCo 1.92 2.9 16 +.29 +7.4 65.30
,Petrohawk ... .. 22 -.31 -29.2 16.99
PetrbrsA 1.12 3.6 '... +2.27 -26.4 31.19
Petrobras 1.12 3.3 .. +2.22 -28.4 34.12
Pfizer. "'72"4. 9' -.0~' -4.3 17.42
PhilipMor 2.56 4.4 15 +.38 +21.4 58.51
Potash .40 .3 28 +3.30 +33.7 145.09
PS USDBull... ... ... -.10 -3.1 22.37
PrUShS&P ... ...... -.05 -22.0 27.33
ProUltQQQ... ... ...+1.61 +25.9 74.87
PrUShQQQ... ......-.28 -32.4 12.88
ProUltSP .43 1.0 +.07 +10.8 42.35
ProUShL20 ... ... +.57 -31.9 33.99
ProUSjhtFn ... ... ... +18 -21.4 19.05
ProUFin rs .09 ... -.61 -.2 56.19
ProUSR2K ... ... ... -36.4 16.03
ProUSSP500... ......-.09 -33.8 24.01
ProgsvCp 1.16 .8 13 +.19 +17.6 21.16
ProLogis .45 3.3 ... +1.03 -.4 13.63
Prudentl .70 1.3 8 -.13 +5.7 52.58
PSEG 1.37 4.2 10 -.91 -2.7 32.34
PulteGrp ...... -.39 -21.5 7.85
QntmDSS ... ... ...+.48 +15.4 3.38
QksilvRes ... ... 36 -.23 -.3 14.97
OwestCm .32 4.8 24 +.15 +57.0 6.61
RAIT RFin ... ... 3 -.21 +28.2 1.68
RRI Engy ... ... ... +.24 -34.3 3.76
RadianGrp .01 .1 ..-1.35 +3.8 7.59'
RadioShk .25 1.2 11 -2.68 +3.2 20.12
RangeRs .16 .4 +.64 -25.0 37.39
RaserTh .......... -.05 -84.8 .19
Raytheon 1.50 3.3 8 -1.52 -10.6 46.08
RegionsFn .04 .6 ... -.84 +19.1 6.30
RepubSvc .80 2.7 24 -.90 +5.3 29.81
RylCarb ... ... 22 +4.67 +56.4 39.54
SLMCp .... ... 7 +.36 +5.6 11.90
SpdrDJIA 2.55 2.3 ... -.05 +7.0 111.31
SpdrGold ... ...... +2.89 +23.6 132.62
SP Mid 1.54 1.0 ... +.80 +14.3 150.53
S&P500ETF2.31 1.9 .. +.14 +6.3 118.49
SpdrHome .12 .8 ... -.16 +2.6 15.50
SpdrKbwBk .11 .5 ... -.22 +6.7 22.59
SpdrRetl .57 1.3 ... +.27 +22.5 '43.61
SpdrOGEx .20 .5 ... +.04 +6.4 43.85
SpdrMetM .35 .6 ... +1.37 +8.5 55.99
Safeway .48 2.1 ... +.61 +7.6 22.90
Saks ... ... ... +.41 +69.8 11.14
SandRdge ... ...... -.06 -42.0 5.47
SaraLee .46 3.2 16 -.17 +17.7 14.33
Schlmbrg .84 1.2 28 +2.12 +7.4 69.89
Schwab .24 1.6 31 +.43 -18.1 15.41
SemiHTr .60 2.0 ...+1.04 +5.7 29.51
SiderNac s .58 3.4 ... -.02 +5.7 16.88
SilvWhtng ... ... 52 +2.53 +91.4 28.75


Name


4
Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Che Last


Skechers ...
SouthnCo 1.82 4.8
SwstAiri .02 .1
SwstnEngy ...
SprintNex ...
SP Malls 1.05 3.0
SPHIthC .58 1.9
SP CnSt .77 2.7
SP Consum .43 1.2
SPEngy 1.00 1.7
SPDRFndc .16 1.1
SP Inds .60 1.9
SPTech .31 1.3
SP Util 1.27 4.0
StarwdHtl .20 .4
StateStr .04 .1
Suncorgs .40 ...
SunTrst .04 .2
Supvalu .35 3.2
Syniverse ...
Synovus .04 1.9
TCF Fncl .20 1.5
TJX .60 1.3
TaiwSemi .47 4.3
Target 1.00 1.9
TeckRes g .40' ...
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
TexInst .52 1.8
Textron .08 .4
ThermoRs ...
ThomCrkg ...
3MCo 2.10 2.5
TimeWam .85. 2.6
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44 2.6
TrinaSol s ... ...
Tycolntl .85 2.2
Tyson .16 1.0
UBS AG ... ...
USAirwy ...
UnionPac 1.32 1.5
UtdContl ...
UPS B 1.88 2.8
US Bancrp .20 .8
US NGsFd ... ...
US OilFd ... ...
USSteel .20 .5
UtdhlthGp .50 1.4
Vale SA .76 2.4
Vale SApf .76 2.6
ValeroE .20 1.1
VangEmg .55 1.2
VerizonCm 1.95 6.0
Visa .60 .8
Vishayint ...
Walgm .70 2.1
WsteMInc 1.26 3.5
Weathfintl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20 .8
WDigital ... ...
WstnUnion .24 1.4
Weyerh .20 1.2
WmsCos .50 2.3
WilmTr .04 .6
Wyndham .48 1.7
XLGrp .40 1.9
XcelEngy 1.01 4.2
Xerox .17 1.5
Yamanag .08 .7
YingliGm ...
Zimmer


6 -4.35 -33.9
15 +.01 +13.7
25 +.29 +20.4
19 -.07 -29.8
... -.73 +12.7
... +.51 +5.5
-.06 +.3
-.04 +8.7
... +.30 +18.4
... -.06 +3.9
... -.04 +1.1
... -.30 +15.8
... +.24 +6.2
... -.15 +2.3
55 -2.82 +48.0
... +1.36 -4.1
76 -.61 -9.3
...-1.19 +23.3
... -.01 -15.1
27 +6.87 +74.4
... .24 +5.4
13 -.83 -3.4
14 +1.03 +25.6
... +.31 -4.6
14 -1.93 +7.4
.... +.44 +27.9
16 +.03 -19.1
7 -.21 +4.8
25 -.24 -4.4
12 +1.04 +13.5
... -.13 +10.7
21 +1.76 +7.8
33 +1.48 +2.6
15 -6.22 +1.9
15 +.99 +11.6
7 -1.88 -23.5
8 +.10 +10.7
11 +.52 -.8
17 -.05 +7.3
58 -.08 +26.7
... -.91 +9.7
7 +.98+143.6
17 +1.37 +37.2
... +1.33 +124.9
21 -2.49 +17.4
16 +.61 +7.5
... +.49 -42.2
... -.32 -10.5
... +.44 -22.5
9 -1.21 +18.3
.. +.07 +10.7
... +.04 +15.8
... +.30 +7.2
... +.09 +14.3
... +.39 +4.9
20 -1.13 -10.6
14 +.75 +50.6
16 -.19 -7.7
18 -1.07 +5.6
76 -.47 -6.1
5 -3.20 -6.8
10 -.05 -3.4
6 +1.58 -27.5
13 -.31 -6.7
... +.50 +2.4
30 +.52 +2.0
... -1.65 -42.4
17 .-.74 +42.5
27 -.83 +15.4
14 -.03 +12.4
16 +.28 +38.3
32 +.28 -3.4
25 +.01 -26.2
13 -3.85 -19.7


16 +.27 +3.2 11.46
31 -.06 -23.5 28.15
62 +4.068+103.9 51.67
15 +1.78 +38.0 31.24
67 -3.90 +22.8 165.23
6 +.52+186.1 6.98
12 -.36 +1;1 57.19
... +1.73 -8.2 13.03
10 +1.48 -38.1 37.48
20 -6.49 +42.8 300.98
26 +.23 -11.4 12.35
... +.02 -53.5 1.65
5 -.26 +61.4 3.68
... -.74+106.5 17.68
24 +2.67 -9.3 31.04
... +.71 +92.2 8.86
19 +.69" +3.9 44.49
... -.46 +27.4 2.42
18 +1.24 +13.4 45.46
98 +2.03 +72.9 9.84
95 +2.73 +167.5 110.01
16 +3.96 +17.2 62.71
25 +3.28 +29.7 40.83
21 +.46 -16.8 6.35
16 +.331 +3.3 23.20
15 +.50 +41.4 8.47
31 +3.29 +11.4 62.03
... -.03 -67.0 .38
... +.01 +27.4 13.81
11 -.36 +88.6 12.86
17 -.62 -4.5 22.86
... -.20 -1.4 .68
45 +3.33 +54.1 64.13
... -.01 +87.5 4.97
33 -2.77 +43.8 65.19
41 +10.08 +107.3 57.58
16 +1.17 +23.1 20.63
15 +1.11 +21.7 19.36


Name Div Y
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
CypSemi
Dell Inc ...
DirecTV A ..
DishNelwk 2.00
DryShips ...
eBay ... .
ElectArts ...
EgyXXIrs ...
Entegris
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
ExactScih ...
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
F5 Netwks ...
FdithThird .04
Finisar
Rextlm
FosterWhl ...
FresKabi rt ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
GreenMtC s...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .60 5
IntgDv
Intel .63
Intersil .48
Intuit
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ..
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
LamResrch...


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 22 +.09 +38.5 10.01
... 3 +.46 -62.0 5.23
1.3 21 -1.05 +6.1 62.77
'... 29 +1.09 -9.0 51.29
.. 29 +.76 +33.5 14.10
... 17 -.19 +.2 14.40
.. 28 +.73 +30.3 43.45.
... 12 +.46 -4.3 19.87
... 16 -.13 -29.3 4.11
.. 15 +1.79 +26.9 29.86
... ... +.22 -10.8 15.83
... 39 -1.40 +88.1 21.72
.. 12 +.94 +13.4 5.99
... 38 +.13+172.6 8.37
2.6 ... -.50 +19.5 10.98
... ... -.97+102.4 6.86
1.0 18 +.67 +12.5 28.95
... 25 -.48 +12.3. 48.52
... 63+19.25 +122.2 117.70
.3 .. -.30 +28.8 12.56
... ... -2.09 +90.9 17.03
21 +.94 -1.9 7.17
... 10 -.59 -20.4 23.44
... ... +.02 -84.3 .05
... ... -.20 +47.4 72.25
... 12 +.56 -8.3 39.67
... 65 +1.70 +21.5 32.99
... ... +.09 -50.6 2.36
5.2 10 +.11 -15.2 11.64
... 37 -.09 -8.8 5.90
3.1 11 +.22 -1.7 20.05
3.7 ... +.56 -14.7 13.09
... 27 +.77 +56.1 47.98
... 18 -.15 +46.1 8.33
S-1.08 +27.3 10.50
... 23 +.14 +28.1 6.98
2.8 26 -.27 -1.2 35.72
... 11 +1.91 +16.8 45.79


Name DIv
LeGaga n ..
Level3
UbGlobA ...
UfeTech ...
UnearTch .92
MIPS Tech ...
MarvellT
Mattel .75
Maximintg .84
MecoxLn ...
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT ...
Microsoft .64
Microtune ..
Molex .70
NIl HIdg ...
NasdOMX ...
NetLogics ...
NetApp
Netflix ...
NGenBiof h ...
NewsCpA .15
NorTrst 1.12
Novell
Novlus
NuVasive
Nvidia
Oclarn rs ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QOQ.33


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yid PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... ... ... 11.26
...... +.06 -36.7 .97
...... +2.97 +72.5 37.77
... 18 +3.03 -3.9 50.18
2.9 17 +1.34 +5.5 32.25
... 34 +4.30+236.4 14.70
23 +1.58 -7.1 19.28
3.2 13 +.08 +16.8 23.33
3.9 33 +2.30 +6.6 21.66
... ... ... -5.4 16.33
...... +.37 +86.6 6.27
... 4 +.57 -21.8 8.26
2.4 7 +1.29 -12.5 26.67
-.01 +27.9 2.89
3.4 22 -1.54 -5.8 20.30
... 22 +3.37 +24.5 41.81
... 15 +.45 +6.5 21.11
...... +3.41 +30.0 30.06
... 39 +1.28 +55.0 53.25
... 65 +5.47+215.1 173.57
+.03 -86.1 .11
1.0 15 +.08 +5.8 14.48
2.3 17 +1.82 -5.3 49.63
-.14 +42.9 5.93
13 +1.62 +25.2 29.22
..-10.31 -18.2 26.17
... 30 +.22 -35.6 12.02
... 32 -6.32 +14.4 8.41
... 14 +.38 -13.0 7.67
.7 23 +.39 +19.8 29.38
... 21 +.22 -11.2 7.69
.9 56 +.49 +41.3 51.26
1.0 ... -.32 +26.4 19.41
4.5 21 +.05 -9.5 27.74
5.0 41 -.15 -26.4 12.30
... ... -.12 +20.8 2.73
-.31 +139.5 10.42
.6 ... +.54 +14.1 52.18


Powrwav
Qualcom
RF MicD
RschMotn
Riverbed
STEC
SanDisk
Salcon h
SavientPh
SeagateT
Silicnlmg
SiriusXM
SkywksSol
Sohu.cm
Solarfun
Staples
Starbucks
StIDynam
Symantec
TD Ameritr
Tellabs
TevaPhrm
TibcoSft
TiVo Inc
TriQuint
UranmRs
UrbanOut
Veecolnst
Verisign
VirgnMda h
Vivus
Vodafone
Windstrm1
Xilinx
Yahoo
Zoran


Wkly YTD
Div Yid PE Chg %Chg
+.29 +72.6
.76 1.7 22 +.98 -2.4
.17 +.73 +52.8
... 11 +7.89 -15.7
.. ... +3.32+150.7
17 +.96 -4.5
8 +.64 +29.8
... -.30 +42.9
-9.27 -8.7
... 5 -.47 -19.1
... ... +1.53+138.4
... +.19 +150.0
... 28 +1.44 +61.5
... 24 +8.74 +30.1
... 19 -.07 +33.8
.36 1.8 18 -.08 -16.6
.52 1.8 27 +.07 +23.9
.30 2.1 20 +.22 -17.9
... 17 +.49 -9.5
.20 1.2 17 +.41 -11,8
.08 1.2 12 -1.02 +20.1
.72 1.4 19 -.56 -7.7
.41 +.48 +99.6
... ... +.82 +9.5
10 +.87 +71.8
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... 20 +.51 -12.0
... 10 +2.42 +25.6
... 6 +1.89 +43.4
.16 .6 ... +1.14 +51.1
... ... ... +1.67 -15.8
1.32 4.8 ... +1.09 +19.1
1.00 7.9 19 +.21 +15.2
.64 2.4 12 +1.60 +6.9
... 21 +.19 -1.7
... ... -.63 -35.9


AMEX Most Active


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chq %Cho Last


AbdAsPac .42
AIIdNevG ...
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ..
AmO&G ...
Anooraq g ...
AntaresP ...
Aurizon g ...
BMB Munai ...
BrclndiaTR ...
(iAMACn ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
'CFCdag .01
CheniereEn ..
ChiGengM ...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen ...
CrSuiHiY .32
Crystallx g ...
DenisnMg ...
Endvrlnt ...
EndvSilv g ...
EntGaming ...
ExeterR gs ...
Fronteerg ..
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy...
GenMoly
GoldSlrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
Hyperdyn
Kemetl
KodiakOg ...
UbertyAcq ...
UbAcq wt ...
MaqHRes ...


+.01 +11.0
+1.53 +63.4
+.31 +174.3
-.20 -68.7
-.03+105.0
+.07 +47.1
+.04 +28.1
+.51 +48.4
+.21 -30.7
-2.74 +20.0
-.26 -43.5
-.02 -32.2
... -23.7
+.69 +28.4
+.33 +35.5
+.05 -14.7
-.55 -27.4
-.95+216.9
-.04 -.3
+.03 -7.9
-.07 +65.4
+.09 +27.8
+.39 +34.3
+.01 +64.4
+.07 +8.1
+.64 +102.0
+.11 +7.8
-.01 -35.8
+1.13 +151.0
+.36 +67.3
+.06 +30.2
+.27 +64.3
-.48 +182.8
+.76 +214.3
-.13 +86.0
-.11 +8.6
-.06 +137.7
+.24 +208.4


Name Div
Metalico ...
MetrolHIlth
Minefndg ...
NIVS IntT ...
Nevsun g ...
NDragon
NwGold g
NA Pallg ...
NthnO&G
NIhgtM g
NovaGId g
Oilsandsg
OrienPapn
ParaG&S .
PhrmAth
PionDrill
PolyMet g ...
ProceraNt ...
RadientPh ...
RaeSyst
RareEleg ...
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ...
Senesco
SulphCo ..
TanzRy g ...
Taseko
TmsatlPtn ...
US Gold ..
Uluru
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX .50
VislaGold ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 27 -.39 -11.8 4.34
... 9 +.25 +113.1 4.24
... ... ... -14.5 8.81
... ... +.13 +10.5 2.85
... ... +.61 +135.0 5.71
... ... -.00 -70.0 .04
... ... +.82 +103.3 7.40
... ... +.23 +32.9 4.65
... +.79 +66.2 19.68
20 +.01 -8.8 2.81
... +1.65 +83.0 11.22
-.03 -62.2 .44
3 +.61 -48.0 5.45
... ... +.08 +16.6 1.69
... ... -.34 +79.1 3.51
... ... -.12 -22,P 6.16
... ... +.34 -39.5 1.85
... ... +.08 +34.1 .59
... ... -.07+113.8 .51
... 53 +.01 +44.5 1.59
... ... +1.25 +192.8 11.36
... ... +.03 -3.3 1.19
... ... +.18 -21.9 3.68
... ... -.02+395.8 1.19
... ... ... -28.8 .24
... ... -.46 -62.7 .25
... ... +.06+100.0 6.98
... ... +.07 +49.5 6.31
... ... -.05 -10.8 3.05
... ... +.30 +110.9 5.23
... ... ... -55.5 .10
... ... +.02 +76.0 1.35
... .. +.32 +72.3 2.24
... ... +.27 +2.4 3.87
... 57 +.06 +6.8 1.72
... 14 +.94 +531.0 18.55
... ... +.10 +12.2 2.75


Stock Footnotes. g Dividends and 'amings in Canadian dollrI h= Does roal maee corn.',iua.in3.-'.. slar.aoids
I = Lelle iling wain SEC n = New in pas 52 weeks pi = Preferrtned rs SCK na undergo e a reverse lah PSilil
,t at least 50 percent *itn Ine past year ir= r l W to buy sermty at a apecified prue s = Stoc nas spill by InI
leasi 20 percent tAlnln the last year un Unt vi a In Ibanlrfuplcy or recoverni p d = Wren distnbuted ,. =
When issued wI = Warrants
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from lund aul a = De6fend sale rmerge ur
redmptnlon Iee:f Irontlioad l(aeScnargesl mrn Mulupla fee, ereciarged NA = no.l alteiaI p=pieo-:u d Oi
net assel value as fund splt n6r, amluring 11 wee = lnr pau a ildstna uoin ijunrn l", nee* k Ganers and
Losers muEi De wvwth at leads S2 to bte a14fd ir, talae at laf Most Actil mu-i De Mr, at6 basi 1 I Volue Tir,
huroreds 01 diarert Source: The Asociated Press. Seale pguree are unaofrdal


Wldy YD WPy
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg last


ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Amylin
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc
ApldMatl .28
ArenaPhm ...
AdadP
ArmHId .12
Atheros
Atmel
AutoData 1.36
AvanirPhm ...
BMC Sft ...
BMP Sunst ...
Baidu s
Biogenldc ...
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm
CA Inc .16
Cadence ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...
CitrixSys ...
Clarienth ...
CognizTech...
Coinstar
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38


'


,,t












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


4Ilines.*6 days add"tiona |
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each t Include a price
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One item per ad l ditional
4 lines 6 daysline 1.10
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person merchandise i 0or less.
Each Item must de a price.
psamThis I sa n-eundable a e.




One Item per ad 16 |
4 lines 6 days Each additional
hne $1.15
p Rate applies to p te Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.






4 lines 6 daysEachadditional
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persona merchandise totalling 2,500 orless.
Each Item must Include a price
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S One Item per ad
4 lines days line$1.5ina
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personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less
Each item must Include a price.
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IOne tem per ad 2 additi
4 lines 6 days a tona
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personal merchandise totally $4,000 or les
SEach item must include a prie.
This ia a -refundable rate.







SI5:00 1 50
mdese 2 iSlB 6as d hi s E int 165



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.


Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad foreach Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to placetheir
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East DuVal Street.
You can also fax or mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Emaillby:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a m l. .Mon.,9:00am.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 am. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Tlhus., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice




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on the first day of publication.
- We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for*prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Ndrmal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject, '
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lilkeCityr)porter.C0om


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000109CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE
FOR AMERICAN HOME MORT-
GAGE ASSETS TRUST 2007-3
MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL LIENEMANN A/K/A
MIKE LIENEMANN et. al.
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated October 25, 2010, and en-
tered in Case No. 10000109CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein DEUT-
SCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2007-3 MORT-
GAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-3, is a Plaintiff and MI-
CHAEL LIENEMANN A/K/A
MIKE LIENEMANN; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MICHAEL LIENE-
MANN A/K/A MIKE LIENE-
MANN;. WESTFIELD INVEST-
MENT GROUP, LLP; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 are the Defendants. P.
DeWITT CASON as The 'Clerk of
-the Circuit Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for- cash at
173 NE HERNANDO AVENUE,
COURT ROOM 1, LAKE CITY, FL
32055, at 11:00 a.m on December
8th, 2010, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
ALL OF BLOCK 97, ACCORDING
TO E.L. SNOWDEN'S SURVEY
OF THE TOWN OF COLUMBIA
CITY, FLORIDA AND BEING SIT-
UATED IN SECTION 10, TOWN-
SHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
LESS AND EXCEPT THE NORTH
8.52 FEET FOR RIGHT OF WAY
FOR STATE ROAD NO. S-240,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner.as of,the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 26th day of October,
2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 26th day of October,
2010.
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of.the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL,
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329.

04542120
October 31, 2010
November 7, 2010
PUBLIC NOTICE
ON INVITATION TO BID
ITB-002-2011
Sealed bid's will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until November 17, 2010 at
11:00 A.M. at which time all bids
will be opened and read aloud in the
City Council Chambers located on
the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
DIRECTIONAL DRILL
Bid specifications may be viewed on
the City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or (386) 719-5816.

04542147
October 31, 2010


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440









Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School Board of Columbia
County, Florida announces that the
School Board will hold a public
meeting, to which all persons are in-
vited to attend, as follows:
DATE: Tuesday, November 16,
2010
TIME: 4:00 P.M.
PLACE: School Board Administra-
tive Complex Auditorium
372 W. Duval Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
PURPOSE: Re-Organization of the
School Board and other pending
items
A copy of the agenda may be ob-
tained no earlier than 7 days prior to
the meeting by writing to the Super-
intendent of Schools at 372 W. Duv-
al Street, Lake City, Florida 32055 or
by calling Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386)
755-8003. A complete agenda will
be available on the School District's
website at: www.columbia.kl2.fl.us
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in this meeting
is asked to advise the School Board
at least 48 hours before the meeting
by contacting Mrs. Lynda Croft at
(386) 755-8003.
If a person decides to appeal any de-
cision made by the School Board
with respect to any matter considered
at such meeting he or she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools

04542105
October 21, 2010 .
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-497-CA
DEAS BULLARD PROPERTIES
a Florida general partnership
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHEN SCOTT SOMERS and
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 3, Cedar Hills, a subdivision as
recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 134,
.public records of COLUMBIA
County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled'.
action dated October 27, 2010, at the
Columbia County, Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
December 1, 2010, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in ahy surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal in
the State and.County aforesaid this
27th day of October, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04542119
October 31, 2010
November 7, 2010 .
PUBLIC NOTICE
ON INVITATION TO BID
ITB-001-2011
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake. City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until November 17, 2010 at
11:00 A.M. at which time all bids
will be opened and read aloud in the
City Council Chambers located on
the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205' N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
AUTOMATED WEATHER OB-
SERVATION SYSTEM (AWOS III
PT)
MANDATORY PRE-BID CON-
FERENCE WILL BE HELD ON
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3,
2010 AT 10:00 A.M. AT THE
LAKE CITY MUNICIPAL AIR-
PORT LOCATED AT 3524 EAST
U.S. HWY 90, LAKE CITY, FLOR-
IDA
Bid specifications may be viewed on
the City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or (386) 719-5816.

04542148
October 31, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: FORT
WHITE AUTOMOTIVE gives No-
tice of Foreclosure of Lien and- .intent
to sell these vehicles on 11/10/2010,
08:00 am at 8493 SW US Hwy 27
Forth White, FL 32038, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. FORT WHITE AUTOMO-
TIVE reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.

1G1FP21S9KL177223
1989 Chevrolet

04542136
October 31, 2010
NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY TO ADOPT RULE
AND SET PUBLIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, December 14, 2010, at
7:00 p.m., at the School Board Ad-
ministrative Complex, 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida, on
proposed amendments to rules, regu-
lations and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Columbia County School
System. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public


hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
ed.


Legal

TITLE: Policy 3.16 Charter
Schools
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To clari-
fy parent ballot process
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.02; 1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43;
1002.33(2);
1002.345; 1013.62, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.10 Zero
Toler-
ance for School Related Crimes
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Revision
regarding notification requirements
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43;
120.57(1); 775.08; 784.081;
985.04;1001.54; 1003.31; 1006.07;
1006.08; 1006.09; 1006.13;
1006.135; 1006.14; 1012.28;
790.162; 790.163, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.102 Dating Vio-
lence and Abuse NEW
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To align
policies with new State Statute re-
quirements
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1000.21;
1003.42; 1006.07; 1006.148, Florida
Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.11 Student Ill-*
ness
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Revi-
sions regarding prescription medica-
tion
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1000.21;
1002.20; 1002.22; 1006.062;
1011.62, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.15 Student Re-
cords
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Release
of information to partners in an inter-
agency agreement
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43;
119.07(1); 119.071; 1001.52;
1002.22; 1002.221; 1002.72;
1003.25; 1008.386, Florida Statutes
P.L. 103-382 (34 CFR PT.99) P.L.
104-191
TITLE: Policy 5.16 Student Ac-
tivities
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To add
Academic Scholarship Signing Day
SPF I1CF L TEpGAl AUTHORITY:


1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1002.41;
1006.07; 1006.15; 1006.16; 1006.20
(2); 1012.22; 768.135, Florida Stat-
utes
TITLE: Policy 5.21 Use of Time-
Out, Seclusion and Physical Re-
straint for Students with Disabilities
- NEW
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To align
policies with new State Statute re-
quirements
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001:42; 1001.43; 1003.32;
1003.573; 1006.07; 1006.11;
1012.75, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 6.211 Approval of
Leaves
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To clari-
fy wo'rding i.!i t og to i.Vlj4,tar .'..,
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
.QlQ1,41JQQ1.42;, 10,1.43,1,12.22;
1012.23; 1012.66, Florida Statutes
THE FAMILY, AND MEDICAL
LEAVE ACT OF 1993; PART 825
OF THE CODE OF FEDERAL
REGULATIONS, TITLE 29, U.S.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, EM-
PLOYMENT STANDARDS AD-
MINISTRATION, WAGE AND
HOUR DIVISION
TITLE: Policy 6.242 Family and
Medical Leave
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To clari-
fy wording relating to military
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001,43; 1012.22;
1012.23; 1012.66, Florida Statutes
THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL
LEAVE ACT OF 1993; PART 825
OF THE CODE OF FEDERAL
REGULATIONS, TITLE 29, U.S.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, EM-
PLOYMENT STANDARDS AD-
MINISTRATION, WAGE AND
HOUR DIVISION
TITLE: Policy 6.25 Military-
Leave
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To clari-
fy wording relating to compensation
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.43; 1012.22; 1012.23;
1012.66; 230.22(2); 230.23(17);
115.07; 115.09; 115.14; 121.111;
230.23005(11); 231.39; 250.341,
Florida Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of. Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday Friday. Eco-
nomic impact statements, where ap-
plicable, aue on file in the Office of
Superintendent at the above
listed address.
DATED THIS 26TH DAY OF OC-
TOBER, 2010.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY-
BY: /s/ Keith Hudson, Chairman

ATTEST:/s/ Michael F. Millikin, Su-
perintendent

04542127
October 31, 2010


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197

100 Job
Opportunities

(0541830
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
No CDL, No Problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236


100 Job
0 Opportunities

04542009
BAKER TRANSPORT needs
owner operators with wedge
trailers to deliver cargo trailers
across Southeast. Must have
CDL-A and a one ton
truck or larger.
Call 1-866-764-1601
for pay rates and more info.

04542061
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Post Closing File Coordinator.
This position provides
administrative assistance to loan
officers and loan department
staff. Previous office environ-
ment experience required.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City FL 32056 or
email Turbeville.J(@ffsb.com..
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542062
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Commercial Loan Processor in
Lake City. This position is
responsible for documentation
and transaction management,
coordinates loan closings and
other duties as assigned.
Previous loan processing
experience is preferred.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City FL 32056 or
email resume to
Turbeville.J(ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.


04542090




Managers and Assistant
Managers
Join a fast growing team of
managers in the Convenience
store business. Now accepting
applications for qualified
people for a new store in
Lake City, Florida.
We offer a competitive salary,
weekly pay, bonus, incentives,
paid holidays, and vacation.
Must have retail experience
and willing to work a
flexible schedule.
Apply at the Lake City
Fast Track Location on
Highway 90'
or
Call: 866-539-7685 Ext 24
Fax Resume to: 352-333-1161
Email:
dtumeri@fasttrackstores.com


Accepting applications.for
Housekeeping/Weekend Breakfast
attendant.. Apply in person at
Cabot Lodge 3525 US
Hwy 90W. No phone calls.







SANT LEO
UNIVERSITY
What you need for where you're going
Founded 1889
Saint Leo University, Florida's oldest
Catholic education Institution in the
Benedictine tradition, currently enrolls
more than 15,000 students in 17
regional centers throughout Florida,
the Southeastern United States
and through our Center for Online
Leaning. University Campus is located
approximately 20 miles north of Tampa,
Florida.
We are currently seeking qualified
applicants for a Staff Assistant for
Lake City Center location in Lake City,
Florida. The Staff Assistant would
provide administrative support In
application, maintenance and process
of student, faculty and/or staff policies
and procedures.
The minimum requirement is a high
school diploma and two (2) years
administrative experience.
For additional information and appli-
cation instructions, please visit: www.
saintleo.edu/jobs or for a direct link to
the position: http://www.saintleo.jobs/
postings/6605

Saint Leo University is an equal opportunity
employer. Catholics, women and minorities
are encouraged to apply.


100 Job
S Opportunities

04542126




FAMILY CASE MANAGER
Masters Degree in Social Work
or related Human Services field
required. Two years experience
preferred. Serve youth and
families in nine northern Florida
counties. Office will be located
at the Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch campus in Live Oak.
Travel to the Boys Ranch will
be on a bi-weekly basis.
Agency vehicle provided for
business usage. Contact Linda
Mather at 386/842-5555
(fax resume 386/842-1029)
EOE/DFWP

04542128
.The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
positions available:
(2) Digital Court Reporters,
Lake City
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org

04542141
NOW HIRING! THR &

company with hundreds of well
paying jobs. All positions offer

positions offer attractive
bonuses. Local and national
positions available. We are
looking for professional,
friendly, self motivated indvidu-
als, who are customer service
oriented and have sales
experience. Many salaries
starting at $45,000 and up.
To learn more about positions
available and to apply, visit us at
www.thrassociates.com

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.

Lily Pad is Hiring!
Looking for Outgoing Sales
Associates for Seasonal Positions! i
Bring in Resume Today!

FLORIDA

F, y Lrke Ci Coapmu.y Colh
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2011
-College Level Mathematics
Online and/or evening classes. Masters
degree in mathematics or a Masters degree
with 18 graduate semester hours in
mathematics. Contact Paula Cifuentes at
oula cifuentestfac.edu .
*Chemistry
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree in chemistry or a Master's plus 18
graduate hours in chemistry. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at paula.cifuentestMfac.edu
*Statistics
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree in statistics or a Masters plus 18
graduate hours in statistics Contact Paula
Cifuentes at paula.cifuentes@fc.edu
*Programmable Logic Control (PLC)
At least five years of full-time, In-field work
experience and expertise in the installation,
maintenance, operation and troubleshooting
of current technology automated process
controls and associated systems Including
PLC's, variable frequency drives,
instrumentation and process control
systems, hydraulic and pneumatic systems.
Experience in training both factory
technicians and operations personnel. For
additional Information contact Bob Deckon at
-Lean Six Sigma
Must have Six Sigma Black Belt with multiple
projects. Must have Master's degree in
engineering, management or quality, or
Masters degree with 18 graduate hours in
some combination of the above fields.o
Bachelor's degree with PE certification or
five years experience as a practitioner, wlI
be considered. Teaching experience and/or
curriculum development preferred. For more
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-754-
4442 or rober.deckon(afqgc.edu
*Developmental Mathematics
Gilchrist Center. Minimum requirement is a
Bachelors degree in mathematics or a
mathematics-related field. Contact Carrie
Rodesier at carrie rodesilerfrqc.edu
*Medical BIIIng and Insurance
Classes meet on Monday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement Is at least two
years of experience In Medical Insurance/
Billing with a certificate in this or related
area. AA or AS degree and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to tracy.hickilan@facedu
*Basic Medical Coding
Classes meet on Wednesday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is certified
medical coder with at least two years of
experience in Medical Coding. AA or AS
degree with certification and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to tracy.hickman@fqc.edu '
*Nursing Clinical
BSN Required. Master's degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent
clinical experience required. Contact Matlfe
Jones at 386-754-4368 or
mattie.iones()tfac.edu.
College application and copies of transcripts
required. All foreign tranrripts miet he
sulmitiited with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at wwe .rc.l
roFtC ,. dil,,id by 6. siyahcrn ,,, ,ul af(iillt'yes =nd S> hi'i
hP.A DACIiA'F.O Cdilcse ,, i'dmiuuu& i.miLo> ute


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?
















Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
www386.754.8562
SETEL www.sitel.com EQE


I


I-


BUY IT


SELL IT


LaL ITT










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
pm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
sents seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
one of these positions to qualify
for the job. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all
managers before they are hired.

Mechanic Needed
Heavy truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the
right person, Southern Specialized
Truck & Trailer, US 41 N
386-752-9754
Operations/MGR Position
Exceptional people skills,
Proficient with Quickbooks req,
Marketing exp req, M-F, some
travel, job demanding but reward-
ing, fast paced medical industry,
fax resumes to 386-758-9047
04542145
DENTAL
ASSISTANTS
I Lake City
$500 Sign-On Bonus!

Technology advanced practices,
lucrative compensation package,
medical, life & disability
insurance, paid time off, 401(k)
and much more!
Come and join our team!
Apply at CoastDental.com
Call (877) COAST-17 ext. 220
Fax (813) 289-4500


Coast
EOE/M/F/D/V.
Drug-free workplace


120 Medical
10 Employment

04542125
Assistant Office Manager
Must have Medical Billing
experience including
Medicare and Medicaid.
Please apply in person to
Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave,
Lake City, Fl or
fax resume to 386-752-7337.
EOE/DFWP
iI


04542183
Director of Human Resources
Small Critical Access Hospital
seeks experienced Human
Resources Director to lead HR
functions. Responsible for all
HR functions including
recruitment, retention,
regulatory compliance, benefits,
organizational development,
employee relations, and
State/Federal Survey
preparedness. Comprehensive
benefit package, salary
commensurate with
experience. Bachelor's degree;
PHR or SPHR preferred.
Hospital/Healthcare
experience preferred.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace

05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp.l all Cindi: (850)253-1906

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of CNA/MA/LPN
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494


Mon.-Fri.: 8a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!



180 EU t DuvaIlS
Lake City, loriodda 32055


12 'j Medical
.120 Employment

05524356



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's & LPN's
P/T & PRN 1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN
Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center
Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke
Case Manager
Child/Adult
G'Ville/Trenton
Live Oak/Starke/LakeCity
Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City
Therapist
LCSW/LMHC/Preferred
Masters/CAP Required
Discharge
Planner/Addictions
Emergency
Screener/Outpatient
Therapeutic Foster
Care/Residential
Day Treatment
$35-$57 K
G'Ville/Lake City
Bronson/Trenton/Starke
Counselor
(Bachelors in Human Srvcs)
F/T & PRN
Residential /Rehab/Outpatient
G'Ville & Lake City
Custodial
Lake City
Cook
PRN & P/T
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP


408 Furniture
Floor Lamp, 65" high.
Brass finish base,
$20
386-758-9205
FOR SALE
Queen Bed.
$80.
386-758-3574
FUTON BED
Queen Size
Wood Frame $75.00
386758-3574
MUST SEE!! Sofa & Loveseat.
Navy Blue & Black. Plush &
comfortable. Immaculate condi-
tion $200 Call 386-935-0654

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman Rider
42" cut, good condition,
$385
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295
Nice Craftsman Push Mower,
6.5 HP, runs good,
$85 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

412 Medical
412 Supplies
Medical potty Chair.
Brand new $50.
386-752-3720


416 Sporting Goods
Inversion Table,
had to move,
only a few months old $75
386-719-8886
Sportcraft TX, 4.9 Treadmill,
almost new
$100
386-758-9205

420 Wanted to Buy
SK&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


190 Mortgage Money I W IRIA IL liUQ


FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools&
240 Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/08/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


ntact us 360Feed Seed
Onn I JDU -& Plants
Con c us Perrenial Peanut
at t wholesale prices direct
T The paer. farm $38$9 per -
at the pap U l Madison 850-464


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


Hay,
t from the
Male,
-3947


401 Antiques
Antique Table,
Ten sided, 30" high and wide
$50
S386-758-9205

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Slide in 30" Electric Range
$100
386-292-3927 or
386-754-9295


K QUEEN
condition,


must sell $450 OBO.
Call 386-752-5345 after 3:00 p.m.

Ceramic Table Lamp,
Maroon, 28" high,
$20
386-758-9205
Dual reclining
Love seat.
$100.
86-752-3720


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

650 Mobile Home
o650& Land
D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
SCall today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825
FSBO 5 acres in Ellisville area
w/3br DWMH ready to move in.
Plus 20X24 workshop. $2000.
down $675 per mo. 386-752-4597

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials! ,
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryei hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Large '& clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"'
Apartinents, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813


SReduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $600 plus dep & bckgmd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652


Sat & Sun, 8am ?, Something for
everyone!119 SE Travis Glen,
(252 by High School
to Forest & comer of Travis)

440 Miscellaneous
10' X 3' Inflatable Pool,
pump and all still in box
$60
386-292-3927or 386-154-9295
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231
Rug Doctor
w/Attachments
$400 firm
386-719-8886
White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $60
386-935-0654

Good Things
450 to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent.
1 bd/l bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
386-7524941 or 386-965-0932
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to I-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2br/2ba MH on 2.5 ac located 10
min from Lake City, quite area.
Washer/Dryer, all appliances incl.
$550/mo. Amanda 386-365-6493.
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo Ist and last.
386-365-7402
DWMH, $850 mo Spacious 4/2,
on 5 acres, just south of Lake City,
clean, quiet, great location, storage
shed. November FREE. Last
month & $300 security, 386-462-
1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location. -
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2I^ For Rent
1 bedroom upstairs apartment,
utilities & cable included,
$150 a week, $300 deposit,
386-758-2080 or 755-1670
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73O Unfurnished
730v Home For Rent

04542071
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2 br/lba House w/yard,
near airport, $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
2bedroom/lbath in city
$550. mo. plus deposit
No Pets! Call Buckey
386-758-0057
3 possible 4 br 1 ba home
located in Lake City (90west)
$800.00 first & last required
386-623-9686 or 386-288-0120
3/2 big, in town, small indoor pet
ok, W/D hook-up, hard wood
floors, $650 mo, plus $200 sec,
386-397-3568


7 0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Completely remodeled 4/2 plus
study wit h carport in quiet area.
$1100 mo plus last and security.
386-867-2283
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
u Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695.'sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N441 & 1-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale

5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
04542115
3/2 on 4 acres, "Like New"
Brick home w/18'X20'
concrete block
workshop. $139,900.
Call Susan Eagle/
Daniel Crapps Agency,
Realtor 386-623-6612


82O Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.'
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks






ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includesva 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.





Carriage LS i P r i .-p
36' 3 slide fifth wheel. & Online
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only. One Low
$26,000 OBO
Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with P e
low miles. $47,000 P c
Call
386-755-0653


iSat., Nov. 6
~ I A* A P









9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Park Here

FREE to .............
Nassau Street

Participate Uan C

While chalk supplies last.
DWS ll Sheet Uh 90

180 E.SDuval Street. Lake Cit y FL


408 Furniture
ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
adsakecityreporteco 7 PIECE SOLID OA
adsrlakecityreporter.com Bedroom Set, good







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


$25 Prize Weekly Winner

Contest rules and official entry blank in Tuesday's paper.


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Classified Department: 755-5440


- I


Willi


DRESS







8C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


10 ANNIVERSARY




'14.4 1 51SWVD
LAhIKr CA- .F.v


HRotate &
Balance
Parts C Service Tires
430 W US wy 9 Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
(386) 755-0631 Not valid with any other offer
Monday Friday p expires 11/30/10


Most cors & trucks
expires 11/30/10
ex V


I WITNESS
DRCENTER


1 MONTH MEMBERSHIP
Now $30Reg.
Only s50


Or as low as S20 a month for longer term.
* No Key Deposit No Enrollment Fee
Other restrlcilors may apply
Westfielstd ae


NOVEMBER TH, & NOVEMBER 5T


Whole Semi Boneless Nettles Pork Chop Box Nettles Smoked or New Crop
Ribeye 6 LBS $12.00 Each Fresh Link Sausage w t Potrt1
$4.39 LB 10 LB Box $22.00 ea Co
Whole Semi Boneless Nettles Sugar Cured Realtree Quail No 1 Grade
Kansas City Strips Smoked Picnics 12 Count Box 40 LB Box $20.00
$3.99 LB $1.49 LB $15.49 Each Fresh Frozen Vegetables
Whole Boneless Nettles Smoked Turkeys Seabest IQF 4 for $10.00
New York Strips $24.99 Each Tilapia Fillets .
$4.39 LB$ L5 LB Bag $04.99 aby Lima Beans, California
Whole Boneless Nettles Sugar Cured Bar S Corn Dogs Mix, Corn on the Cob, Cut
Top Sirloins Smoked Hams 3 LB Box 2 for $8.00 kra, Cut Squash, Field Peas,
$2.69 LB Whole Only $1.69 LB .-talian Green Beans, Mixed
80/20 Ground Chuck Whole Boneless Nettles Country
10 LB Tubes $1.79 LB Pork Loins Ham Slices vegetables, Speckled Beans,
$2.19 LB 5 LB Pack $10.00 Stew Mix, Stir Fry Veggies,
Clifty Farms Boston Butt Cooked Crawfish W] ite Acre Peas and Vegetable
Real Pulled Pork Barbeque Pork Roast 5 LB Bag $10.50 Gumbo
18oz. Tub $1.49 LB
2 for $10.00 Clifty Farms
Fryer LAg Quarters Fresh Pork Boneless Skinless Country Ham
10 LB Bag $4.99 Spare Ribs Fryer Breast 1/6 Ham 2 LB Pack
40 LB Box $19.99 2 pack $1.89 LB 10 LB Bag $15.99 $6.99 Each
40 LB Box $63.50 $6.99 Each


0 ** 3 **


iLA


To dertse YR

huies n.fisn,. e
.............. ....












Story ideas?


Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@laokecityreportercom


Sunday, October 31, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Ferns are

abundant

in Florida

ferns and fern-
Slike plants are
certainly an
interesting and
diverse group of
plants, especially in Florida.
According to fossil records,
ferns are among the
world's oldest living plants.
Florida's climate'and
abundant moisture create
growing conditions that
are favorable -for ferns.
Tropical storms have
deposited foreign spores
to create a rich diversity
of fern species. Hawaii is
the only state to exceed
Florida in the number
fern species.
We have an estimated
123 native fern and fern-
like species. Agricultural
and urban land uses have
expanded, and now 43 of
these species are endan-
gered.
Ferns have become
very popular in the home
landscape. Their abil-
ity to grow in areas of
dense shade, under trees,
and along north sides of
buildings has made them
very useful to gardeners.
Their graceful appearance
has made them a desir-
able addition to the land-
scape, as well.
In general, most ferns
require an acidic soil.
The soil moisture should
be constant, except for a
few ferns that will tolerate
moderate drought. Ferns
do not tolerate high fer-
tilization and will suffer
leaf scorch if fertilized too
much. Fortunately, they
are relatively pest free
plants, because they are
easily injured by insec-
ticides and fungicides
applications.
The Autumn fern is
a lovely addition to the
landscape. The name
actually refers to the
'autumn-like' colors of the
fresh, unfolding foliage.
This slow growing fern
will reach a height of 2-3
feet and will remain semi-
evergreen. Trim back the
brown fronds in late win-
ter to make way for the
copper and orange spring
growth.
A fern with unique
foliage resembling a pea
plant is the Royal fern,
Osmunda regalis. The
delicate bright green
fronds are often topped
with golden colored pin-
nae that resemble dried
flower stalks. This fern
can grow to 5 feet and
looks right at home
around a pond or water
feature. It needs acidic
soil with constant mois-
ture.
The Resurrection fern is
a very interesting air plant
living in tree branches.
This drought tolerant
native fern will brown and
curl when dry, but will
open new fronds as soon
as it receives moisture. To
learn more about plants,
visit the Columbia County
Master Gardeners at the
.- fair or call 752-5384.
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension


of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Darien Stephens, 16, throws salt over his left shoulder after spilling some on the dinner table based on a superstitious belief that it would help keep the
devil at bay. 'I believe in luck,' he said. 'I have lucky charms. I even wear this shirt to every Gator game.'





SUPERSTITIONS


Often silly, superstitious beliefs have affected daily life


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Keidy Lee, 18, attempts to get the attention of puppies at the Puppies & ,
More pet store. A more commonly known superstition is to avoid opening an
umbrella indoors if one does not want to invite bad luck.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Whistling has
never been a skill
Bettye Lane of
Lake City fos-
tered because of
'her mother's favorite superstition:
"A whistling girl and a crowing
hen always come to some bad
end."
The superstition has even
passed down to her great-grand-
children.
"None of us whistle," she said.
'They just know we just don't
whistle."
Superstitions "None o
are beliefs or
practices passed They jus
down from gen- just don
eration to gen-
eration. Beti
"It's a lot of Lake C
folklore," said
Pat McAlhany,
Lake City-
Columbia County
Historical Museum treasurer.
'"We call it superstition, but back
then it was folklore."
Superstitions are usually not
based on fact, but people know
them from childhood, Lane said.
"Growing up nobody had a
rationale for following supersti-
tions," she said. "They were just
going to do it. We lived by them."
Lane is not superstitious but
does adhere to throwing salt over


the shoulder.
"If I spill some salt I take a bit
and throw it over the left shoul-
der," she said. "I do it to this day,
and if you ask why I couldn't tell
you."
The elders in her community
used to tell pregnant women not
to let their feet hang while sitting
in the back door because it would
cause excruciating labor pains,
Lane said. Once a person killed
a softshell turtle, it could only be
cooked after sundown because
that's when the heart stops beat-
ing.
"Some of these things I don't
know where
f us whistle. these folks
came up with,"
st know we she said.
't whistle." 'There are
some strange
tye Lane things I heard
City resident growing up."
Mark Kirby
of Lake City
also isn't
superstitious,
and he never really knew any-
one else -who was, he said. But
a friend's aunt did have one par-
ticular belief.
"Every Christmas Eve she
thought it was bad luck if the cat
meowed," Kirby said. "She made
sure that cat had a lot of food and
milk and was comfortable."
He heard several superstitions
from his grandmother such as
hold your breath when you go by


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Brett Houston, 18, picks up a silverware after dropping them in his kitchen.
According to a certain superstition, if a person drops a knife, fork or spoon,
that person will be visited by a man, woman or a child, respectively. '1 think
superstitions are just what they are superstitions,' Houston said. 'They
hold as much power as what you give them.'


a graveyard because it's impolite
to breathe when other people
can't or don't let a cat In the room
with a baby because it will suck
the child's breath out.
One superstition is even
thought to determine visitors.
"If you drop a knife a man is
coming to visit you," Kirby said.
"If you drop a fork it's a woman
or a spoon it's a child."
.Most people are not supersti-


tious but out of habit might still
follow some beliefs, such as eat-
ing collard greens, black-eyed
peas and hog jowls on New Year's
Day for prosperity and good
luck, he said. People won't open
umbrellas inside or place hats on
the bed.
'The modern mind tells us
(superstitions) are ridiculous,
but a lot of us do them any way,"
Kirby said.


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


I -_ I I - I - -


|
.q
I
1









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


How do you know what career is right for you?


H ave you ever
thought about
your career
path and won-
dered if it's
the right one for'you?
Not everyone knows
exactly what they want
to be when they grow
up. Sometimes we are all
grown up and still aren't
sure what we want to do.
Then there are those who
are currently working in
a field that doesn't really
interest them or doesn't
suit their lifestyle and
they want a change of
career.
Does this sound like
you? How do you know
what career is right for
you? Florida Gateway
College Career Services
Center is here to assist
in exploring career pos-
sibilities that will aid in
making a career decision
or changing your cur-
rent career. Whether you
are still.in high school
and undecided, in col-
lege and undecided, or
currently working and
just want a change, the
Career Services Center at
Florida Gateway is here


to help.
Our mission in the
career center is to pro-
vide comprehensive
resources and services
for students to assist
in meeting their career
development.
We provide the fol-
lowing services: Career
advising, a career center
library,, an employment
website, internship
opportunities, and career
fairs.
In addition, we are
here to assist students
with r6sum6 writing, and
interviewing skills.
You can explore
career possibilities with
the advisor by talking
about your interests,
hobbies, and skills, you
can then take a comput-
erized interest assess-
ment called "CHOICES"
to determine the career
cluster that best fits
your interests, and
finally you can dis-
cuss the results of that
assessment with your
career advisor and begin
to think about career
choices that are right for
you.


Dr.Toni Briley
toni.briley@fgc.edu
The career center
provides advising by
appointment for students
and other persons con-
cerned about making a
career decision, choos-'
ing a major, exploring
occupations or changing
careers.
Career planning is an
essential part of each
student's academic and
skills training program.
Exploring interests,
skills, values and lifestyle
preferences are part of
the decision making pro-
cess.
One of the first things
that should be done when
you are considering your
career choice or chang-
ing your career is self-
assessment or "Looking
at Yourself."
Answer these:


What kind of activities
am I interested in? What
sort of values do I have
that might be an impor-
tant part of exploring pos-
sible occupations, fields
of study, or jobs? What
kinds of skills and abili-
ties do I possess or need
to develop?
Once you answer those
questions, you can begin
to look at careers that
match those activities,
values, skills and abilities.
If you are still unsure
about what you want to
do, you should do an
interest inventory using
an internet program
called "CHOICES."
This computerized
assessment is based
on your preferences
for interests, physical
demands, educational
level, salary, aptitude,
future outlook, working
hours and working envi-
ronment. Plan to spend
about 2 hours with the
advisor when you do the
"CHOICES" program.
In addition to career
advising, the career
center provides an exten-
sive career library that


includes printed publica-
tions, books, videotapes,
CDs and handouts provid-
ing information on choos-
ing a major, planning or
changing careers, effec-
tive job search strategies,
and much more.
There are many books
including four-year and
graduate school catalogs
and videos as well as CDs
on some schools, gov-
ernment agency career
information books, and
the current Occupational
Outlook Handbook.
Students can read and
view the materials while
at the career center or
can check those materials
out to view at home.
The career center also
provides an employment
website to assist students
and others in finding suit-
able employment in and
around the area, as well
as find job opportunities
throughout the state of
Florida. You can log onto
the employment website
at www.fgc.edu. Once
on the homepage, click
on "employment," then
"Student Employment
Positions;" locate "Job


Listings" on the left side
of page, click and browse
through the current job
openings.
Employers can call
(386) 754-4334 or e-mail
toni.briley@fgc.edu to
have job opportunities
posted on the website.
Once you find a job you
are interested in, you can
apply based on the infor-
mation provided by the
employer.
Don't let choosing a
career become an uphill
climb. Take the neces-
sary steps to get to the
top.
Seek out profession-
als in the field of career
advising; we are here to
help. Call (386) 754-4222
to make an appointment
with a career advisor. The
Career Center is dedicat-
ed to ensuring that you
receive the best possible
service through expert
advising, caring and con-
cern for your success at
Florida Gateway College.

* Dr. Toni Briley is academic/
career adviser at the Florida
Gateway College. She can be
reached at 386-754-4334.


ENGAGEMENTS


Caldwell-Combs
Juanita and Leslie
Weston and Bobby-L.
Caldwell of Lake City and
Ft. Lauderdale announce
the engagement and
approaching marriage of
their daughter, Ischarna
Yvette Caldwell of Lake
City, to.Donal Adrian
Combs of Lake City. He
is the son of Donnie and
Quinitta Combs of Lake
City.
The bride-elect is a 1987
Columbia High School
graduate, active member
of New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church and self-
employed at New Attitude
Beauty Salon.
The future groom-is


McCullough-Royal
Teresa McCullough and
Dwayne McCullough of
Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their
daughter, Matey Elizabeth
McCullough of Lake City,
to Timothy Scott Royal of
Lake City. He is the son of
Albert and Twanda Royal
of White Springs.
The bride-elect is a 2008
Columbia High School
graduate. She is currently
employed with the Little
Red School House and will
receive her AA in January
2011 from Santa Fe
College. She plans on con-


COURTESY PHOTO
Ischarna Yvette Caldwell and Donal Adrian Combs


a 1991 Columbia High
School graduate, active
member of New Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church
and self-employed at New
Attitude Beauty Salon.
The wedding is planned
for 5 p.m. Nov. 20 at New

tinuing her education in
the medical field through
Santa Fe College an their
various competitive medi-
cal programs.
The future groom is
a 1998 Columbia High
School graduate. He is
*currently employed with
Hibbett Sports in the Lake
City Mall while continuing
his education in the com-
puter science and technol-
ogy field.
The wedding is planned
for 12 p.m. Nov. 26 at the
Stephen Foster State
Park in White Springs. A
reception will follow at the
Stephen Foster State Park
Auditorium.


Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church, 550 NE Martin
Luther King St A recep-
tion will follow at Winfield
Reception Center, 1324
NW Winfield Street :
All friends and family
are invited.


COURTESY PHOTO
Macey Elizabeth McCullough
and Timothy Scott Royal


SSat., Nov. 6
FREEwwwIecityreporter.co





&fll &f M-
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Participate


k llt lh:ick -Lip pIr.. I.,.r.


Lake Ci.t
Off*i ce- I


Duval Street US 90
180 E. Duval Street Lake City FL
Yo upl TeImgnain!1v.ae IY eore


COURTESY PHOTO
Kathryn Michelle Lane and Joseph T. Schneberger


Lane-Schneberger
Mr. and Mrs. George
H. Hudson are happy to
announce the engagement
of their granddaughter, ,
Kathryn Michelle Lane
formerly of Lake City, to
Joseph T. Schneberger.


Hedges-Franks
Angela Phillip Douglas
of Lake City announces
the engagement and
approaching marriage of
her daughter, Heather
Denise Hedges of Lake


The bride-elect is the
daughter of the late Janis
Hudson Lane and Richard
C. Lane. The future groom
is the son of Barbara
King and Joseph R.
Schneberger. The wedding
is planned for Nov. 20 in
Ponte Vedra Beach.

City, to David Franks of
Lake City.
He is the son of David
and the late Janet Franks
of Hamilton Ala.
The wedding is planed
for 1 p.m. Nov. 4 at the
Christian Service Center.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Randi Lightbody
Eric Preston
October 23, 2010

Rebecca Busby
Robert Murray
October 23, 2010

Sarah Ratliff
Justin Moses
December 11, 2010
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap,
" WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS /

156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City j
752-5470


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


c-~


8-










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Differences create tension


as sisters have grown apart


DEAR ABBY: My sister
"Penny" and I live in dif-
ferent states and lead com-
pletely different lives.
We have grown distant
over the years my choice
really.
Penny isn't a bad person.
She just doesn't "get" my
lifestyle. I have decided to
remain unmarried and child-
less. A husband and family
are all Penny ever wanted,
and she considers it an in-
sult that I don't want the life
she always dreamed about
for herself.
I would like to spend time
with my sister occasional-
ly but she has a different
personality, no close friends
and feels we MUST have a
close relationship because
we're sisters. Abby, I don't
want to be her replacement
for the friends she is unable
to make.
Penny complains that I
never visit. But when I do,
we're both miserable, tend
to provoke each other and
get under each other's skin.
- I love her, but it isn't pro-
ductive for us to spend a lot
of time together.
I would like to have a less
stressful relationship with
her and my new nephew.
What can I do to make this
happen? HORSE OF A
DIFFERENT COLOR IN
WYOMING


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com

DEAR HORSE OF A
DIFFERENT COLOR: By
being frank with your sister
and telling her exactly what
you have told me. You CAN
have a less stressful rela-
tionship with her, but it will
require some compromise
on the part of each of you.
Explain to her that you do
not have it in you to provide
the closeness she appears so
desperate for and perhaps
she will finally accept what
you are willing and able to
give her. It may lessen the
tension between you.
DEAR ABBY: We're
planning a 50th wedding an-
niversary celebration for my
parents. My son "Mark" and
his girlfriend, "Cindy," have
been a couple for six years
and have a 3-year-old son.
They live in another town
and plan to be married after
Mark gets his degree.
Abby, my father was never
told about the birth of Mark
and Cindy's child, per strict
orders from my mother.
Because Dad adheres to


the values and morals he
learned as a young man in
the 1950s, Mom is afraid he
would "have a stroke" if he
knew.
Mom refuses to allow
Mark and Cindy to bring
their son to the party be-
cause Dad still doesn't
know. All of the other great-
grandchildren will be there
and included in the pho-
tos. This seems unfair and
heartless. What can I do?
ANONYMOUS IN THE
MIDWEST
DEAR ANONYMOUS:
Depriving your father of
knowledge that he has a
great-grandchild has not
only been unfair to the
child, but also unfair to
your father. The news will
NOT "kill" him. He made it
through the 1960s, '70s and
'80s, didn't he? At this point,
he may be surprised, but by
now NOTHING will shock
.him. What may disturb him
is learning that this was kept
from him for so long.
You should insist that he
be told. Your grandson is not
a guilty secret. He deserves
to know his great-grandfa-
ther while there is still time.
And if your mother won't tell
your father, then you should
do it before the party.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Look and you shall find a
way to improve your financial
situation. Whether it is some-
thing you can offer as a home-
based business or an invest-
ment or settlement, you should
be able to ease your stress and
make ends meet. Don't let
someone cause you to make a
poor choice. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll be drawn to some-
one who has lots to offer and
an interest in you personally
and professionally. Don't let
compliments go to your head.
Make sure you don't give up
too much because you are flat-
tered. 2 **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't take anyone or any-
thing for granted. The more
precise you are, the furtheryou
will get. Interacting with peers
will be challenging but fruitful.
You will secure your place in a
function or event if you don't
let your emotions cause you to
make a fuss. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Develop your ideas and
put a creative spin on some-
thing you enjoy doing. Social-
izing will lift your spirits and
help you answer some of the


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
questions you've been asking
yourself. Love is in the stars.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't make trouble at home or
you will get more than you bar-
gained for. It's best to remain
quiet and busy yourself with
things that improve your emo-.
tional well-being. Consider
shopping or getting into a self-
improvement regime. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You can make interest-
ing changes at home but do
the work yourself. Taking part
in a neighborhood or com-
munity event will lead to love,
romance and new friendships.
What you offer will be appreci-
ated and considered a service
worth paying for. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Revisit some of the places
you used to frequent. Look up
old friends and share memo-
ries. The changes you make in
the future will be influenced by
the discussions you have now.
There is much to gain from lis-
tening. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptograms are ated from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals Y
"XAT S D R XTRX KDM SBJ D
W B Z H X HU HDL X B VTUB FT DL T Z GT J.
RXDXTRFDL HR X B Z BRT DL
TZTUX HBL." TDJZ KHZ R BL
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There are'nights when the wolves are silent and only
the moon howls." George Carlin
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-1


21): Your emotions will get
the better of you. You need
to overcome any obstacles
that stand in your way. Look
realistically at what you need
to accomplish. Nothing is im-
possible if you remain calm
and you pull in the help you
require. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Don't get angry,
get busy. The more you can
accomplish, the less others
will be able to complain. Keep
your expenses to a minimum
but don't accept any handouts
or you 'will be expected to re-
ciprocate. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Prepare for the up-
coming week and you will feel
good about your prospects. A
proposal you've been working
on will take on a new angle.
Don't exclude or ignore your
family or lover or you will be in
a vulnerable position that will
cost you emotionally, mentally
or financially. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 1,8): Self-deception is
the enemy. Take a closer look
at your situation and the people
you are associating with. Don't
let anyone'take advantage of
you financially or emotionally.
A minor change will make a
big difference. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A positive outlook will
draw individuals who can
make whatever you are doing
better. Join forces with some-
one you admire for his or her
expertise. Together you can
come up with a plan that will
be prosperous for everyone
involved. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


RISKY BUSINESS By Brendan Emmett Quigley / Edited by Will Shortz 1- 2 3- 4 5,6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 15 16 17


Across
1 Charitable
; contributions
5 Bungalow roof
11 Part of an ice
skater's shoe
18 One of the Three
B's ,
19 Friend of Hamlet
21 Film festival
name since 1990
22 London-based
place to play the
ponies?
24 Firm part
25 Street bordering
New York's
Stuyvesant Town
26 ._ Athlete
Dying Young"
(A. E. Housman
poem)
28 8-point X, e.g.
29 Laughing
30 J. D. Salinger
character's
favorite game?
37 Golfer John
38 Doughnut shape
39 Asian royalty
40 Letters on an
Olympics jersey
42 Busy
44 Like Nasser's
movement
48 Game played
with dice set on
fire?
52 "Mad Men" actor
Hamm
53 "99 Luftballons"
hit-maker of
1984
54 Spoilage

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


55 Short and
detached, in
mus.
56 Diva Renata
59 One-third of a
game win
60 "I'm ___ you!"
62 Libido
64 One-armed
bandits?
66 Arabian
Peninsula native
68 Sideways on a
ship
70 Participants in an
annual run
71 Relative of a
bingo caller?
75 Insurer's offering
79 Author
McCaffrey
80 Antiquity,
quaintly
81 Mitch Albom
title person
82 Losing tribe in
the Beaver Wars
84 Psychologist
LeShan
85 Crumhorn, e.g.
87 Dearie
88 Card game
played
Reynolds's way?
93 Leaves high and
dry
95 Poe's "rare and
radiant maiden"
96 On a roll
97 "I'm not the only
one?"
99 Actress Langdon
101 ___ ghanouj
105 "Please
consider playing
the wheel
again"?
109 "Life of Brian"
outfits


110 Stereotypical
lab assistant's
name
111 Alphabetically
first inductee in
the Rock and
Roll Hall. of
Fame
112 Arriviste
114 Split
personality?
118 Pot with a pile
of chips?
122 Offered in
payment
123 Vine-covered
colonnade
124 Emphatically
125 Nods
126 Radio _
127 Gym gear

Down
1 "All __!"
2 8-Down's home
3 TV character with
dancing baby
hallucinations
4 Climb, as a rope
5 What you used to
be?
6 Big gun
7 The Iguazu Riv.
forms part of its
border
8 1960s chess
champion
Mikhail
9 L overseer
10 Alluded to
11 When repeated,
an admonishment
12 Mich. neighbor
13 Capital ufitil
1868
14 Like politics, by
nature
15 Hole just above a
belt
16 Flashlight
battery


17 Worked (up)
20 N.B.A. star
nicknamed the
Candy Man
21 World capital
almost 11/2
miles above sea
level
23 Bit in trail mix
27 Part of a plot
31 "The Epic of
American
Civilization"
muralist
32 Stuff of legends
33 Effort
34 Begins to
,transplant
35 "Lost" shelter
36 Squishy place
38 Art collector's
asset
41 Snake's warning
43 Rock band with
an inventor's
name
45 Football special
teams player
46 Tropical menace
47 Roadster's lack
48 Frogs
49 Seven-line poem
50 One who's all
there?
51 Bygone
geographical
inits.
52 Scribble
57 Give for free
58 Frequently, in
brief
61 Well-known
Tokyo-born
singer
63 "The Open
Window" story
writer
64 Talk to the flock:
Abbr.


65 Mau
(forever, in
Hawaii)
67 School: Suffix
69 Former Buffalo
Bills great Don
72 Hall & Oates,
e.g.
73 1974 top 10 hit
whose title
means "You Are"
74 Canvases, say
76 Coach Dick in
the N.F.L. Hall
of Fame


77 The Altar
78 Recess
83 Prefix with
warrior
86 Do some quick
market work
89 Tacit
90 Smooth operator
91 Early smartphone
92 Basically
94 Neighbor of Swe.
95 Trial of the
Century
defendant


98 "Shanghai
Express" actor
100 Mathematical
sequence of
unknown length
102 Annual award
for mystery
Writers
103 Most meager
104 Texas nine
105 Mahdates
106 Meanies
1Q7 Common times
for duels


108 0.5 fl. oz.
109 "Your safety is
our priority"
org.
113 Bit of theatrics
115 "Taps" hour
116 N.Y.C. subway
line
117 1950s political
inits.
119 Actress Graynor
120 Metric weights:
Abbr.
121 Big stretch?


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
LISA A STIN PERMA CHEF
AGUA THANE ACERB AUTO
WNB A I S N W I T T Y
NOW O D L ES ANTI INSET
CR AL8O'G EZ INE
H AwRKI| A R K D
HARKS W8UNT I LDARK FDA
ANAN AS SHOT RAED AWN


ICIE P ST ATTEND DEDUCED





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2 -_ 4


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5 9


9 1


6 3 2


9 7 3


3 4 5 9


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L 9 L 8 8 9 69


919 Lz L 6 1 8 17


8 6 C 9 19 L LZ


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Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


Debbie Boyd is defending our way of life. She shares our
values of faith, family, hard work, and doing what's right.
Debbie stands up to Tallahassee insiders and their special
interests-because she answers to us.

OPPOSING TAX HIKES AND BIGGER GOVERNMENT
Debbie co-sponsored a bill to repeal millions of dollars in motor vehicle tax hikes. She fought to
protect North Floridians from a big government mandated septic tank inspection program that our
citizens cannot afford. We don't need bigger government invading our lives and businesses.
[HB 99, 2010; SB 550, 2010]

SAFEGUARDING OUR WATER AND SPRINGS
Debbie knows that the rivers and springs here in North Central Florida are essential to our way of
life. Debbie sponsored a bill every year for springs protection, and is leading the fight to keep our
water here where it belongs. [HB 299, 2007; HB 31, 2008; HB593, 2009; HB 307, 2010]

STANDING STRONG FOR OUR VALUES & SECOND AMENDMENT RIGHTS
Debbie is one of us, and she's proud to be our voice in Tallahassee. She is a strong supporter of
our second amendment rights, which is why she is endorsed by the National Rifle Association.
Debbie is a common-sense leader who understands and lives by the values of faith, family, and
hard work.

CREATING JOBS AND FIGHTING FOR FAMILY FARMERS
Debbie's top priority is to put our citizens back to work and help stimulate the economy. She won
access to tax incentives to help North Central Florida grow good jobs and she led the bipartisan
charge to strengthen the Greenbelt Law for family farmers.
[HB 843, 2010; HB 981, 2010]



www.ElectDebbieBoyd.com DEBBIE


n www.facebook.com/ElectDebbieBoyd


DISTRICT 11


4D


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2010


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