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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01439
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/30/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01439
System ID: UF00028308:01439
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







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Saturday, October 30, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 243 0 75 cents


TRUNK OR TREAT


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
One-year-old Melissa Selbe attempts to feed a robotic, skeletal dog Friday at the Trunk-or-Treat event, which took place at
Finally Friday at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City.


Families flock to park for Halloween festivity


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@rakecityreporter.com
C costumed chil-
dren had the
chance to trick-
or-treat out
of car trunks
which were decorated like.


Halloween scenes Friday.
At least 1,000 parents,
children and friends gath-
ered at Olustee Park to
celebrate Halloween with
the Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce's annual
Trunk-or-Treat, a Finally


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tony Harden, 1, chews on a princess wand belonging to his
sister Jade, 2, while waiting in line to receive candy.


Friday event.
Volunteers manning
almost 20 themed car
trunks passed out candy
and children could also
participate in a costume
contest. Prizes were given
to thechildren that took
first, second and third
place in the contest's two
age divisions.
The Justin Case Band,
a local group, performed
throughout the evening
and the movie "Scooby-
Doo" was shown for fami-
lies to enjoy.
Dennille Folsom, cham-
ber executive director, said
the free event was a safe
way for the community to
celebrate Halloween.
"And it's more than just
candy," she said. "It's a
movie. It's free and it's fun
and you kind of get a jump-
start on the Halloween
weekend."


"'There was a large turn-
out and tons of community
support," Folsom said. "All
the children are so excited
and it's fun to be able to
give back and help them
have a happy Halloween."
Charlotte Raulerson of
Lake City said her chil-
dren, Matthew, 11, and
Josie, 2, get excited about
the costume contest and
candy.
"It's just always been
really good and fun for the
kids," she said.
Skylar Parnell, 12, and
Kailey Durrance, 11, of
Lake City said they attend
every year.
"It's just like a tradi-
tion coming out here,"
Durrance said.
Stephanie Barker of
Lake City said she and
her daughter, Katie, 9, like
seeing how the different
TREAT continued on 3A


Fight at school leads to arrest


From staff reports
A Lake City woman was
arrested and faces multiple
charges for her alleged
involvement in an on-cam-
pus fight with a school prin-
cipal, police said.
Tyra Hays, 33, 141 SW
Rainmist Glen, has been
charged with battery of
a school official and dis-
rupting a school function


in connection with the
case. She was booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility on an
$11,000 bond.
Hays bonded out of jail
11:55 p.m. Thursday night,
according to sheriff's office
reports.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
on Oct. 20 LCPD officers


were dis-
patched to
Challenge
Learning
Center, 1301
NW Labonte
Terrace, in
Hays reference to
a fight.
Officers
spoke tpo the victim,
Deborah Hill, the school's


principal, who said Hays
came to the school to pick
up her child, who had
been suspended from the
school.
A verbal altercation
ensued between Hays and
Hill.
"Witnesses stated that
Hays walked out of the
SCHOOL continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Chi Meeker (left) and his wife Mary Kent, both of Folkston,
Ga., shows Taj Smith, 7, how to make a fire with flint and
steel. Chi Meeker said that the technique has been around
for thousands of years.


Alligator Fest


this weekend


at state park


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
O'Leno State Park will
come to life this afternoon
with sounds of gun fire
and war chants as part of
Alligator Fest 2010.
The sounds will accom-
pany the Second Annual
Seminole War Battle of San
Felasco Hammock re-enact-
ment that will take place
during the festival.
"We hold this event to
bring all of our people
together, both the American
Natives and the other popu-
lation, in realizing what
we've got to offer them as
far as our learning experi-


ence," said Vic Vasko, a
former Alligator Fest chief.
'This way it gives the gen-
eral population an idea of
what we were before the
Europeans came."
The battle re-enactment,
which is slated to begin at
2 p.m., will feature life in
the area circa 1836, when
soldiers residing in a near-
by fort were out gathering
corn when they encoun-
tered a group of Native
Americans, who attacked.
The re-enactment is
expected to last at least 30
minutes and will feature 24-
30 re-enactors. This week-

FEST continued on 3A


Ribbon-cutting

marks opening

of the County Fair


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
With a cut of the ribbon
by Nell Dukes, the 56th
Annual Columbia County
Fair opened to the commu-
nity Friday.
"Every year we have
someone this fair is dedi-
cated to," said Steve
Nelson, Columbia County
Resources president. "If
you ever had to go to the
office you'll end up running
into her."
Dukes and her husband
were the original founders
of the fair, he said. She will
be out volunteering with
the fair everyday.


"You name it, she does it
for us," Nelson said.
Columbia County native
James Montgomery spoke
about the fair's theme,
"Roots of America."
The roots of America can
be summed up in one word,
he said freedom.
"The first settlers came
for freedom," Montgomery
said. 'To this very day peo-
ple come to America for
freedom."
Caitlyn Frisina, 10, was
announced as the winner of
the youth T-shirt contest
design.
Shirts are designed by
FAIR continued on 3A


Custodian facing grand theft charges


From staff reports
FORT WHITE A Fort
White High School custodi-
an faces grand theft charg-
es after he was arrested
following a probe into more
than $1,500 worth of school
cash and property thefts,
local authorities said.
Lonnie Albert Hudson,
25, 117 Orchid Terrace, has
been charged with grand
theft in connection with

(386) 752-I
SUBSCRIB
THE REPO
Voice: 755-!
U 640 1 Fax: 7524


the case.
He was
arrested
with -
out inci-
dent and
booked
into the
Columbia


Hudson


County
Detention Facility on a
$5,000 bond.
Hudson was suspended


from his employment by the
Columbia County School
Board and his employment
status is pending the clo-
sure of the investigation.
Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer,
said Hudson was arrested
following an investigation
by CCSO school resource
deputies Sgt. Tim Ball and
David Milligan.


"It was determined that
Hudson had stolen two
laptop computers, a weld-
ing machine and various
amounts of cash from Fort
White High School," he
said in a prepared state-
ment. "The thefts have
occurred over an extended
period of time."
Hudson is also accused of
THEFT continued on 3A


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Opinion ...............
Faith .
r'" P Obituaries
Advice & Comics.
T ----- Puzzles


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Nell Dukes, center, cuts the ribbon for the official opening of
the 56th Annual Columbia County Fair Friday while Columbia
County Resources board members look on.
'A *lAW"Vtt4& U ^^t &A'S^,.t '', U tV i^


TODAY IN
FAITH
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COMING
SUNDAY
Going on board the
U.S.S. Enterprise.


Happy
Kirk'ma


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


fy4


(A$H3 Friday:
Afternoon: 2-7-0
Evening: 2-6-3


Friday:
Afternoon: 7-3-7-2
Evening: 3-2-0-2


t1 Thursday:
1-3-10-14-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Bieber video to debut at Series


NEW YORK

Game 3 of the World
Series will be tar-
geted to teenyboppers,
thanks to Justin Bieber.
Major League
Baseball says Bieber will debut the
music video for his song "Never Say
Never" on Saturday during Game 3's
pre-show on Fox.
The best-of-seven series is
between the Texas Rangers and the
San Francisco Giants. The Giants
won the first two games of the series
in San Francisco.
Game 3 will take place in
Arlington, Texas. Former "American
Idol" champion Kelly Clarkson will
sing the national anthem in her
home state.
The song is from the platinum-sell-
ing singing sensation's upcoming
acoustic CD, due out on Nov. 23.

NBA's Dwight Howard
tries to score with CD
NEW YORK Dwight Howard
may be the NBA's Superman, but
when it comes to making music, he'll
admit to having at least one flaw.
"I'm not good at rapping, I'll say
that," he says. "But singing, I can
hold a note. I'm pretty good. If I had
to sing in front of a big crowd, I don't
think I'd be that shy."
There's nothing timid about the
Orlando Magic star's musical CD
debut. This week, as the league
opened the NBA season, he released
"Shoot for the Stars," a CD for kids
that has the center singing songs by
Michael Jackson, Harry Belafonte
and the Black Eyed Peas and even
rapping MC Hammer's "U Can't
Touch This."
By releasing a CD, Howard fol-
lows in the footsteps of NBA stars
like Ron Artest and the league's
original Superman, Shaquille O'Neal,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 27 photo provided by Major League Baseball, teen singer Justin Bieber
is shown on the set of the music video for his song "Never Say Never," at Angels
Stadium, Anaheim, Calif., to debut during the pre-show of Game 3 of the World,
Series, which is between the San Francisco Giants and the Texas Rangers..


who has a platinum disc to go along
with his championship rings.

Conference marks
Chaplin anniversary
ZANESVILLE, Ohio Silent film
comedian Charlie Chaplin's first visit
to the U.S. 100 years ago is being
commemorated with an international
conference in Ohio.
Conference coordinator Lisa Stein'
at Ohio University's Zanesville cam-
pus in eastern Ohio says a Chaplin
look-alike contest and screenings of
rare films are part of the three-day
event that began Thursday. She tells
the Times Recorder newspaper that
people registered to attend from 11
countries, including France, Ireland
and Japan. Chaplin came to America
for the first time in 1910 as part of a
London comedy troupe.
Stein says organizers planned the


conference to introduce Chaplin to a
younger generation, so he won't be
forgotten.

Lynch plays favorite
films at AFl Fest
LOS ANGELES David Lynch
has segued from making movie's to
showing them.
As the first guest artistic director
of the AFI Fest, the "Blue Velvet"
director has programmed a mini
festival within the film festival, which
begins next week in Hollywood.
His selections: director Ingmar
Bergmah's "Hour of the Wolf'
(1968), Stanley Kubrick's "Lolita"
(1962). Jacques Tati's "Mon Oncle"
(1958), Alfred Hitchcock's "Rear
Window" (1954) and Billy Wilder's
"Sunset Blvd." (1950).

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Dick Gautier is 73.
* Movie director Claude
Lelouch is 73.
i Rock singer Grace Slick
is 71.
* Actor Ed Lauter is 70.
* Rhythm-and-blues
singer Otis Williams (The
Temptations) is 69.
* Actor Henry Winkler is 65.
* Country/rock musician


Timothy B. Schmit (The
Eagles) is 63.
Actor Harry Hamlin is 59.
Actor Charles Martin Smith
is 57.
Country singer T. Graham
Brown is 56.
Actor Kevin Pollak is 53.
Rock singer-musician
Gavin Rossdale (Bush) is 43.
' n Actor Jack Plotnick is 42.


Daily Scripture


"[Living Sacrifices] Therefore,
I urge you, brothers, in' view of
God's mercy, to offer your bod-
ies as living sacrifices, holy and
pleasing to God-this is your
spiritual act of worship."

-Romans 12:1


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-4
Circulation ..............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of CIRCULATION
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Rep
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6.30
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by
Periodical postage paid at Lake City Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and 3-- trp
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problerris with your delivery service
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City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers sl
in part is forbidden without the permnis- call before 10:30 a.m. to report
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service vice error for same day re-delivery.
No. 310-880. 10.30 a.m., next day re-delivery oi
POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home de
Lake City, Fla. 32056. is available; next day re-delivery oi
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ...............755-5
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If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
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To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks.................. $17


0419


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3.46

1.40
2.80
79.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Judge orders test
on cement in well

NEW ORLEANS A
federal judge is ordering
tests to be performed as
soon as possible on cement
Halliburton Co. used to
seal the BP well that blew
out catastrophically in the
Gulf of Mexico.
U.S. District Judge Carl
Barbier said some of the
components may be "dete-
riorating over time" and
that tests should be done
"as soon as reasonably
practicable."
Barbier is overseeing
lawsuits filed after the
BP-leased rig Deepwater
Horizon exploded April 20,
killing 11 workers and set-
ting off a massive oil spill.
Halliburton's cement-
ing work on the well has
jumped to the forefront
of investigations into the
explosion.
On Thursday, the pres-
ident's oil spill commis-
sion said tests performed
before the blowout should
have raised doubts about
the cement used to seal
the well.

4 sentenced for
gun smuggling

PANAMA CITY -
Three men from Mexico
and a Texas woman have
been sentenced in a Florida
drug and gun trafficking
conspiracy.
U.S. District Judge
Richard Smoak on
Wednesday sentenced
Martin Ramirez-Rodriguez
to nearly 48 years in prison
on charges that included
conspiring to smuggle up
to 800 fully automatic AK-47
assault rifles from Panama
City, Fla., to Mexico.
Santiago Valdez-Gomez
and Florencio Barrios-
Hernandez were sentenced
to nearly 16 years each on
charges that included pos-
session of firearms by an


SUNNY ., SUNNY MOSTLY -STORMS -STORMS
SUNNY


HI 78050 HI 81 LO HI83L056 180L56 1 77 LO 52
REIONLFRCS A oaudy sOctober 30_ 7,+L

Sauda, ,, h/atry+I ,0, lw


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 21 file aerial photo taken in the Gulf of Mexico
more than 50 miles southeast of Venice, La., the Deepwater
Horizon oil rig is seen burning. Tests performed before the
deadly blowout of BP's oil well in the Gulf of Mexico should
have raised doubts about the cement used to seal the well,
but the company and its cementing contractor used it anyway,
U.S. investigators with the president's oil spill commission
said Thursday.


illegal immigrant
Maria Cifuentes-
Espinoza was sentenced to
nearly four years for' con-
spiring to distribute cocaine
and methamphetamine.
The three men also were
convicted of that crime.

3 deputies, 2
others shot

PENSACOLA A
gunman barged into a,
home, shot and wounded
his former girlfriend and
then exchanged shots
with responding sheriff's
deputies, wounding three
of them before he was
shot and captured Friday,
authorities said.
Escambia County Sheriff
David Morgan said Deputy
Jeremy Cassidy was in sta-
ble condition at the Sacred
Heart Hospital. He said the
other two deputies, Sam
Parker and Chad Brown,
were being treated for less
serious injuries.
Morgan did not release
the names or conditions
of the suspect or his ex-
girlfriend, who were both
alive.
Morgan spoke to Gov.


Charlie Crist, who visited
the hospital after the shoot-
ing. Crist was in Pensacola
campaigning for the U.S.
Senate when he heard
about the shooting and
asked to be driven to the
hospital.
The Pensacola News
Journal reported that the
suspect threw the gun
into a toilet when officers
came into the residence.
A phone number listed
for the home was not in
service.
Customers at a near-
by grocery store, Apple
Market Grocery, told
The Associated Press that
police and the SWAT team
surrounded the area after
responding to a house
call.
"My tenant there is
a great tenant, she had
been renting the property
several years. I've had no
problem with that prop-
erty. It's a great communi-
ty," said Francisco Lenox,
who owns the home.
He would not give any
furtherinformationbecause
he was waiting to hear back
from the sheriff's office.

* Associated Press


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale


uainesville Dayon Bea Fort Myers
78/53 81W,57 Gainesville
79/54 alaJacksonville
\79/54 0
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
83/58 18/59 Lake City
Miami
Tampa: Naples
84/63 West Palm Beach Ocala
82/67 Orlando
FtL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 83/72 0 Pensacola
85/63 Naples Tallahassee
85/64 Miami Tampa
t 84/71 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
84/74


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset torn.


7:43 a.m.
6:45 p.m.
7:44 a.m.
6:44 p.m.

12:32 a.m.
2:17 p.m.
1:37 a.m.
2:55 p.m.


Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov.
30 6 13 21
Last New First Full


6

3 mi. estolb
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Sunday
80/69/s
82/60/s
84/73/s
86/65/s
81/55/s
79/56/s
86/76/s
81/54/s-
83/72/s
84/67/s
82/56/s
86/60/s
78/60/s
78/63/s
81/50/s
84/65/s
81/50/s
83/68/s


Monday
79/70/s
82/62/s
84/74/s
87/68/s
83/57/pc
80/59/pc
85/74/s
83/56/pc
85/73/s
86/68/s
84/58/pc
85/62/s
81/62/s
80/63/s
84/56/s
84/67/s
80/54/s
84/70/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


,- Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
.;- : t t LLC, Madison, Wis.
%\^|'h' www.weatherpubllsher.com





S Get Connected

n-


Pensacola
75/58


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


dosta
78/48 1 fsodnvi
Tallahassee Lake City* 74/54
78/41 78/50


Panama City
77/57


81
61
78
55
89 In 2009
32 in 2008

0.00"
trace
38.42"
2.36"
43.49"


- L ~


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


SATRIM


S l UN!


MlON!


kTESmF


[ LAKE CITY ALMANAC


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


Clinic slated to close


UF Department of

Community Health

clinic needs additional

funding to remain open


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

University of Florida
Department of Community
Health and Family
Medicine officials plan to
close one of the University
of Florida clinics that
started with funding from
the Shands Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board.
UF officials were seeking
additional funding from the
Hospital Authority Board.
Sherry Swilley, with
the UF Department of
Community Health and
Family Medicine Center,
Friday said officials intend
to close the UF Primary
Care Southwest office on


Dec. 3.
She said patients that are
being served by the facility
will receive letters notify-
ing them of the proposed
changes. The patients will
be welcomed to continue
their treatments at the UF
Primary Care West office.
. Last month Dr. R. Whit
Curry Jr., professor and
chairman of the University
of Florida Department of
Community Health and
FamilyMedicine, addressed
the Hospital Authority
Board and explained that
with the new partnership
between Shands and Health
Management Associates
(HMA), the hospital can
no longer offer the same


amount of support for the the HMA proposal before
clinics as in the past. signing off to fund both
Jack Berry, adminis- UF clinics.
trator of the Lake Shore The first UF Primary
Hospital Authority Board, Care Clinic opened in 2007.
said the decision is not Physicians at the two local
final and the topic is sched- clinics are UF faculty mem-
uled for discussion during bers provided a variety of ser-
the Hospital Authority's vices to local residents, includ-
November meeting. Curry ing preventive medicine and
is expected to address the education, immunizations,
Hospital Authority Board management of acute and
again during the meeting. chronic illnesses and minor
"Both clinics are funded surgical procedures.
through. June 2011," he According to Curry's
said. presentation to the Hospital
Berry said he was noti- Authority Board last month,
fied about the potential keeping the West clinic
closing of one of the clin- would cost an estimated
ics, but is uncertain when a $244,810 for the Hospital
final decision will be made Authority Board, while
on behalf of the Hospital having only the Southwest.
Authority Board. clinic would cost around
HMA has agreed to $234,000. To continue
operate two family prac- funding both clinics, the
tices in the same way Authority would have to
as the UF Primary Care invest almost $480,000. The
clinics. Several Hospital financial funding would
Authority Board members be on a recurring annual
appear to be interested in basis.


FEST: Alligator Fest to host re-enactment
Continued From Page 1A


end's Alligator Fest marks
the first time Alligator Fest
has been held at O'Leno
State Park, on U.S. Highway
441, six miles north of High
Springs.'
The festival, which. is
designed to educate people
about the life of the early set-
tiers and Creek, Seminole
and other Native American
tribes who populated the
area, was first held in Lake
City in 1995.
Admittance to Alligator
Fest is free, however, there
is a $5 entry fee for vehi-
cles carrying up to eight
people.
Vendors will be at the
event selling food, arts and
crafts and other merchan-
dise.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Johnny Gaston, the assistant pastor at the Broken Lance Native American Church, uses a
hide scraper to remove the fur from a deer skin at the Alligator Festival in O'Leno State Park


THEFT: Facing charges
Continued From Page 1A


using his Columbia County
School Board-issued fuel
card to put.gasoline in his
personal truck.
"Ball was able to recover
the computers and welder
from Hudson's home,"
Seifert said.
Seifert said school board
officials will be conducting
audits of the fuel receipts to
determine the amount of fuel


allegedly stolen by Hudson.
Hudson has been
employed as a school board
custodian for approximately
18 months.
Deputies estimate the
value of the recovered prop-
erty to be in excess of $1,500.
The amount of cash stolen
from classrooms has not yet
been finalized.


FAIR: Ribbon cutting

Continued From Page 1A


students to show their
creative side beyond rais-
ing livestock, said Wanda
Jones, CCR secretary/trea-
surer. The winning drawing
is published on a T-shirt.
More than 30 rides are
featured in the midway,
which include some attrac-
tions never before seen at
the fair, Nelson said.
Fair entertainment
includes Ron Diamond, a
hypnotist and magician, the
Kid's Pedal Tractor Pull,


the Pirates of the Sky fam-
ily thrill show and Bruce
Sarafian, world-record jug-
gler. Other local talent will
play all week long.
The fair runs through
Nov.. 6. Admission is $5.
Rides are not included in
the price of admission.
"We're here for the full
nine days, we have a barn
full of animals, a stage full
of entertainment and the
best-ever midway," Nelson
said.


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"Iqunt '-Nancy" or qan.


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as~ stad' sreea' re setl eor of aeds ia a
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SCHOOL: Fight

Continued From Page 1A


office, then approximately
10 minutes later, attempt-
ed to re-enter the office, at
which point Hill stopped
her at the door and asked
her to leave the school
grounds," said Steve Shaw,
LCPD officer and assistant
public information officer,
in a prepared statement.
"Hays then attempted to
push her way into the
school and struck Hill, at
which point Hill attempted
to defend herself and a
fight ensued."
Reports indicate other
school employees sepa-
rated the two women and.
called the, police.
Officers interviewed all


witnesses, the victim and
suspect, then contacted
the State Attorney's Office
and per their advice, affi-
davits, were completed
and submitted for their
review.
Thursday, LCPD investi-
gator Andy Miles obtained
a warrant for the arrest
of Hays in the case for
battery on a specified
official or employee and
disrupting a school func-
tion. Miles notified the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office and deputies went
to the Hays' residence
where she was arrested,
reports said.


Did You Hear About Peoples State Bank's
Thanksgiving Art Contest?


Peoples State Bank is hosting a Thanksgiving
themed art contest for children between the ages
of 6 and 11. Children can draw, paint or sketch
Thanksgiving themed artwork and have a chance to
win a $ 250, $ 100 or $ 50 US Savings Bond for
theirfuture. Visit one of Peoples'branches today
and pick up the official rules and submission form,
but you have to hurry all artwork submissions
are due by November 22, 2010. Peoples State
Bank. Now that's banking!
i -k


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES
STATE BANK


Gas leaks force

1-day delay for

Discovery's launch


MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL
- A pair of gas leaks has
delayed next week's launch
of space shuttle Discovery.
NASA ordered a mini-
mum one-day postpone-
ment on Friday after failing
to plug a small helium gas
leak aboard Discovery. A
nitrogen gas leak also was
detected. The problems
are unrelated to a fuel
leak that cropped up a few
weeks ago.
Discovery's launch to
the International Space
Station is now scheduled
for Tuesday afternoon
- Election Day.
NASA test director Jeff
Spaulding said if the latest
repairs go well, the agency
will press ahead with a
Tuesday launch, even
though it's Election Day.
Considerably more launch
spectators than usual are
anticipated, since this will
be Discovery's 39th and
final liftoff as the shuttle
program winds down.
Coupled with Election Day
traffic, the roads almost
certainly will be jammed.
For weeks, managers
have been encouraging
workers to vote early or
by absentee ballot, just in
case a launch attempt fell
on Tuesday. Florida, like


many other states, allows
voting before Election Day.
'"That was something
that we recognized a long
time ago, the possibility
for the dates to line up
could be a realistic event,"
Spaulding.told reporters.
"We want to make sure
everybody has the ability
to vote" without worrying
about getting to the pre-
cincts on Tuesday.
The Discovery's six
astronauts cast ballots
before leaving their
Houston homes. They
arrived at Kennedy Space
Center on Thursday.
Engineers have traced
the leaks to couplings, or
connection points, in the
helium and nitrogen lines
for the system used to
maneuver the shuttle in
orbit, back near the shuttle
tail.
Spaulding said he's con-
fident the faulty couplings
can be replaced in time for
NASA to begin the launch
countdown on Saturday. ,
These types of hookups
have a history of breaking
and leaking, and techni-
cians have replaced them
many times in years past at
the launch pad, he said.
Discovery is loaded with
a pressurized compart-
ment full of supplies and
even a robot for the space
station. The mission is
expected to last 11 days.


TREAT: Family fun time

Continued From Page 1A


vehicles are decorated.
Barker's friend, Amber
Feagle of Lake City, also
noted that the event is safe
for the children.
"It's a good, safe way to
celebrate," she said.,
Volunteers who deco-
rated their car trunks had
a good time, too.


11n l.

OHM1


"We just enjoy interact-
ing with the children,"
said Claudette Bertram of
Lake City, who has set up
a trunk with her husband,
Harry, for about 5 years.
"We just get a lot of plea-
sure and blessings out of
it. The children seem to
have a great time."


"101onor


Our


Heroes!


The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


r-.







rT'N


1 nanK you ror your
years of service.
We Salute You


Love, Eileen
actual size


Your Name:- -
Address:
Town: _Stole: .... Zip;
Daytime Phone:-_. ____- p --______,_b o
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: Doles Served:
Bring Illis in or Send to: Lake City Reporter, I)1 tE. l)Ml S. [i& ; l); 3205, O-S-7,441 for inoti ido,
Submissions oust be received by 3:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 8,2010. All.photlos ill be relumed by Includin S.SE Mtllh your Chtry.


i.-......


I


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


!Nrua


b-44


wk6 le, to Lf'
l .',,;j& ..(rx.&'-.,, 'j.'/ ..














OPINION


Saturday, October 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
0


THEIR
INION


Economy

still can't

shake

doldrums

T he last major eco-
S"nomic statistic
S before Tuesday's
elections did the
Democrats no favors.
When the analysts describe the
third quarter growth in GDP as
"weak," "anemic" and "stuck in
second gear" although one
giddy analyst described it as
"ordinary" that's not good.
The U.S. Commerce
Department announced that
from July to September the
economy grew 2 percent That's
hardly robust but it's still better
than the second quarter when
the economy grew at 1.7 per-
cent, a rate widely described as
"feeble."
For whatever consolation, that,
was the fifth consecutive quarter
of growth, but unfortunately not
strong enough to make a dent
in the politically sensitive job-
less rate, seemingly stuck at 9.6
percent
The average quarterly growth
in previous economic recover-
ies has been 3.6 percent What
the country really needs is a 5
percent growth rate but no one is
forecasting it
The third quarter growth was
largely due to business invest-
ment, federal spending and
consumer spending. Consumer
spending, on the threshold of the
critical holiday shopping season,
was up 2.6 percent, the largest
quarterly increase since the end
of 2006.
The less-than-overwhelming
numbers with no inflation in
sight means the Fed will keep
pumping money into the econo-
my. And in the current political
climate that's the last tool left to
the government
Extending the Bush tax cuts
would be basically sticking with
the status quo of the last 10
years. If the Republicans win
big, they are locked into hold-
ing down government spending,
which would rule out any kind of
stimulus.
The economy has not been
kind to the Democrats. But
with a projected fourth quarter
growth rate of 2.5 percent and at
2.8 percent for all of next year,
it's likely to be no kinder to the
Republicans.
! Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We. believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!".
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Voting fraud marring elections


Election Day is not
here yet, but poll-
ing problems have
already begun. From
possibly malfunc-
tioning ballot gear to potential
fraud, the 2010 mid-term vote
have been marred even before
the polls open Tuesday.
Like jurors who deliberate
before a trial concludes, some
Nevadans who have tried vot-
ing early for Republican Senate
nominee Sharron Angle instead
have seen Democrat Harry
Reid's name appear on their
electronic voting machines.
Some voters have complained
about this apparent glitch, but
how many others unwittingly
have miscast their ballots?
Intriguingly, these machines
are maintained in Las Vegas
by members of the Service
Employees International Union.
SEIU gave 95.3 percent of its
2008 campaign contributions
to Democrats. SEIU president
Andy Stern was last year's most
frequent visitor to the White
House.
Daytona Beach City
Commissioner Derrick Henry
and Genesis Robinson, his
campaign manager, face voter-
fraud charges. In an apparent
re-election tactic, they allegedly
completed 92 absentee-ballot
applications with the names of
Floridians who never requested
them or who had moved away.
The return address on 250
absentee-ballot applications in
Bridgeport, Connecticut is 1238
North Avenue a vacant lot.
Bucks County, Pennsylvania
officials are investigating 500
apparently fraudulent absentee-
ballot applications. Also, the
Pennsylvania Voter Assistance
Office sent citizens letters *
encouraging them to apply for
absentee ballots. No such office


LETTERS TO

Lake City practices
the Golden Rule
We would like to publicly
thnak the Good Samaritan who
found my husband's wallet
Monday morning in the Office
Max parking lot. It was turned
in and held for the police.
One of Lake City's finest
- officer Chris Hughes con-
tacted us. At the police sta-
tion, he politely and pleasantly
commiseratd with us during -
this "senior moment." We are
thrilled to (learn) our adopted
city practices the Golden Rule.
James and Greta Thiele
Lake City

Career politicians are
telling incredible lies
The 2010 election will come to
an end Tuesday, but the results
of this year's election will not
see an end. Good or bad, we and
our children and grandchildren
will be affected for a lifetime. I
have talked with a number of
individuals who say they are


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoailcom
exists. The letter says it was
financed by the Pennsylvania
Democratic Committee. The
committee sees "no evidence of
any irregularity or problem."
'"Would you like to vote a
straight Democratic Party tick-
et?," is something being uttered
all over Houston in early Texas
voting right now according to for-
mer Justice Department prosecu-
tor J. Christian Adams.
A federal appeals court in
Arizona rejected a state law
requiring voters to demonstrate
citizenship at the polls. Somehow,
it's too much to ask them to
prove who they are. Civil rights
advocates bellow that voter ID
somehow oppresses minorities,
especially blacks. If so, may black
voters drive to the polls without
licenses?
America's promiscuous use
of absentee ballots has become
problematic. These once were
reserved for people who were
traveling on Election Day, bedrid-
den, or otherwise unable to reach
the polls.
Just as grooming and grammar
slide toward the state of nature,
voting also has slouched from a
dignified civic activity into some-
thing else to do at home in sweat
pants, with all the solemnity of
microwaving popcorn.
As absentee ballots prolifer-
ate, so, too will opportunities for
repeat voting. Absentee ballots
make it easier for non-citizens,
non-residents, felons, and even


THE EDITOR
not going to vote because cor-
ruption is so widespread among
the candidates that they do not
know who to vote for. That is
not a rational reason not to vote.
If we don't vote, we in essense
are voting for the incumbents.
We have too many career politi-
cians who are only usink their
positions for their own financial
gain. This must stop.
Look at each candidate's vot-
ing record. How have they used
their position since the last time
they were elected? Do not listen
to what the candidates say they
will do if re-elected.
It is election time, lies flow
out of politicians' mouths like
honey out of a bee hive. We
have all talked about the fact
that many of the candidates
are not running on their vot-
ing records. That is because
they have continually voted in a
manner that is contrary to the
wishes of the people.
This year I am making my
voting choices on creating jobs,
and overhauling the health
care bill. It is obvious most
Americans do not realize the.


dead people to vote. Nursing
home staffers have voted absen-
tee "on behalf of' demented
elderly people who believe that
JFK occupies the White House.
Physically voting at the polls
is a vital exercise in self-govern-
ment It also gives election offi-
cials a chance to deter or catch
cheaters. Voting at home while
clad in a towel prevents such
scrutiny..
Sadly, America's increasingly
Third World voting system fits
this increasingly Third World
nation. The Land of the Free is
mired in the rubble of nearly a
decade of Washington-led social-
ism "compassionate" under
the free-spending, entitlement
launching (albeit tax-cutting)
Bush-Rove administration and
now aggressive under the freer-
spending, entitlement launching,
and tax-hiking Obama-Pelosi gov-
ernment The result? Economic
stagnation, mounting debt, a self-
sabotaged currency, class-warfare
rhetoric, and growing corruption.
The first step is for the
American people to march val-
iantly to the.polls Tuesday and
dislodge those who have brought
America to her knees.
Then, with a new Congress
rededicated to limited govern-
ment, public integrity, account-
ability, and the rule of law, the
American people should demand
photo ID at the polls, serious
jail time for vote fraudsters, a
rollback in absentee ballots and
early voting, and other steps to
establish voting norms worthy of
the Home of the Brave.
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


devastation Obama's health
care bill is going to do to this
country. Insurance premiums
are gong to increase, and health
services will greatly decrease.
We, by Obama's mandates,
will be forced to buy insurance
required by the government.
People who have been unable to
find work in several years will
be forced, by penalty of law, to
buy insurance when they strug-
gle to buy food.
Career politicians in Florida
are telling incredible lies about
their opponent because if they
ran on their voting record they
would surely lose. The liberals
want to control Tallahassee and
Washington, so they will be able
to continue to increase taxes
and force bad legislation on the
people.
If you care about Florida and
America, you must vote before
the end of the day Tuesday.
This may be our last chance to
keep our freedom and the right
to enjoy our lives as our forefa-
thers intended.
Edward Hunter
Lake City


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@noatonalpress.com


Ideal

candidate

remains

elusive

If we had the $4 billion
this election has cost, we
could each have a T-shirt
the Wednesday after Nov.
2 declaring: "I survived
the 2010 midterm elections, sort
of."
Aside from the record amount
of money spent on and by the
candidates, what has been sur-
prising about this election cycle
is the passion it has aroused.
Candidates travel with storm
troopers. A female protestor is
stomped. A Democrat tells the
president to take his endorse-
ment and shove it Family'
members shout at each other,
sparring over candidates they've
never personally met People
are told not to vote.
The other surprising aspect
is that with everyone agree-
ing that the bad economy is
paramount, few candidates have
expressed actual thoughts about
how to restore lost jobs. There
has been a lot of heat but very
little light.
So, who is the ideal candidate
this year? One who does not
tweet nonsensically every hour
on the hour. One who does not
air 24/7 ads calling his/her
opponent a deficit-expand-
ing, evil witch, a job-killing,
spendthrift devil or a satanic
Washington insider. One who
does not spew simplistic bro-
mides. Sadly, this is not a year
of ideal candidates.
When the new Congress con-
venes, most expect unparalleled
bickering and grandstanding,
legislative gridlock and non-stop
partisan attacks. That will make
us even angrier and more frus-
trated, disillusioned and fearful
about the future.
Here is what should happen:
Republicans and Democrats.
should agree to work together;
the 2012 presidential campaign
should not begin until 2012; law-
makers should commit them-
selves to being civil and well-
mannered and lead the country
away from personal nastiness.
And austerity must continue to
be the new watchword.
There have to be more tax
incentives for job creation and
unemployment compensation
must be expanded, with the
understanding that people don't
want handouts they want to
work. But there have to be trad-
eoffs, with higher retirement
ages and tax adjustments and
fewer subsidies.
Immigration reform
must be soberly and calmly
addressed (without fear mon-
gering). Infrastructure must
be improved, along with more
research and development
spending, countered with high-
er revenues.
The problem of underwa-
ter mortgages has to be fixed
almost one out of four hom-
eowners with a mortgage owes
more than the house is worth.
There have to be mortgage
modifications so homeown-
ers can make payments and
the wave of foreclosures ends.
Those who can't make pay-
ments will have to leave their
homes and rent.
A vote for the stimulus should
not be an issue in this election.
Without it, there would have
been a full-scale depression;
former President Bush and
President Obama are in full
agreement on that.

Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A












BRIEFS I \ .I


2 wildfires prompt evacuations
BOULDER, Colo. Two wildfires burning in
Colorado on Friday prompted the evacuations of the
homes of 1,700 people as well as more in neighboring
foothills where dozens of houses were burned in a blaze
last month.
Three subdivisiohs in the Boulder County foothills
were evacuated Friday morning shortly after the wild-
fires were first reported, and authorities issued emer-
gency phone calls to 181 numbers. Officials later
ordered evacuations for a portion of Boulder's west
side. Public buildings including a senior center, a court
house and two medical buildings were also evacuated.
Boulder County sheriff's Cmdr. Rick Brough said
about 100 firefighters and two air tankers were trying
to contain the blazes, which grew to about 134 acres by
Friday afternoon.

Teen testifies about abuse at trial

STOCKTON, Calif. A teenager has testified that a
California man charged with torture poured lighter fluid
on him and tried to set him on fire.
The alleged victim, Kyle Ramirez, testified Friday that
the incident happened in November 2008 while he was
being held in a central California home for more than
a year. ,
Defendant Anthony Waiters has pleaded not guilty
to aggravated mayhem, torture, kidnapping and false
imprisonment charges. Authorities said Ramirez was 16
when he was held at the home of Waiters' neighbors in
Tracy, Calif.

Hole found in plane from Miami

DALLAS A 1-foot-by-2-foot hole tore open in the
fuselage of a commercial airliner that suddenly lost
cabin pressure shortly after taking off from Miami,
authorities said. P
A man aboard American Airlines Flight 1640 said
passengers panicked when the Boston-bound flight lost
cabin pressure Tuesday night
"It was pretty chaotic and confusing. It just was kind
of surreal. We kind of looked at each other when the
masks came from the ceiling and thought this is it," said
Edward Croce, -34, of Braintree, Mass.
Croce tried to send a goodbye text message to his son
back home, but his hands were shaking uncontrollably.
The crew declared an emergency, and the pilot
returned the plane safely to Miami. The Boeing '757 car-
ried 154 passengers and six crew members.

Trick-or-treaters find suicide victim

LEWISBERRY, Pa. Children going door-toldoor to
trick or treat discovered a man who had shot himself to
death on his front stoop, police in central Pennsylvania
said.
The York Dispatch reported Friday that police were
called Thursday evening after children found the 68-
year-old man in the Conewago Valley Mobile Home
Park. Newberry Township Police tell the paper they
don't know exactly when the man shot himself in the
head, and that it's possible some people thought it was
a Halloween decoration.

Jurors weigh death sentence

PENSACOLA A karate instructor convicted of
leading a group of men dressed as ninjas who killed
a wealthy Florida couple reluctantly agreed to let his
family testify at a hearing on whether he should get the
death penalty.
Patrick Gonzalez Jr. originally didn't want his wife and
mother to testify at Friday's hearing but relented after a
brief meeting with his attorneys.
* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Norma Alvarado, stands at her doorway on Thursday in Chandler, Ariz. Alvarado, 47, who lives across the courtyard from the
apartment where Martin Alejandro Cota-Monroy's stabbed and beheaded body was found, is now thinking about moving her
and her three children out of the area.


Arizona beheading raises fears


of drug violence spilling over


By AMANDA LEE MYERS
Associated Press
CHANDLER,
Ariz. -The
gruesome
case of a
man who was
stabbed and beheaded
in a suburban Phoenix
apartment has police
investigating whether the
killing is potentially the
most extreme example
of Mexican drug cartel
violence spilling over the
border.
Martin Alejandro Cota-
Monroy's body was found
Oct. 10 in a Chandler
apartment his severed
head a couple feet away.
One man suspected in the
killing has been arrested,
and a manhunt is under
way for three others.
Detectives are focused
on whether the men
belong to a Mexican drug
cartel, and they suspect
that Cota-Monroy's kill-
ing was punishment for
stealing drugs. The brutal
nature,of the killing could
be designed to send a mes-
sage to others within the
cartel.
"If it does turn out to
be a drug cartel out of
Mexico, typically that's a
message being sent," said


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo combo shows, from left, Isai Aguilar Morales, 22,
Crisantos Moroyoqui, 36, and Jose David Castro Reyes, 25.
The three men are suspected in connection of the stabbing
and beheading of Martin Alejandro Cota-Monroy, 38 at a sub-


urban Phoenix apartment.

Chandler police Detective
David Ramer. "This person
was chosen to be execut-
ed. It sends a message to
other people: If you cross
us, this is what happens."
Decapitations are a reg-
ular part of the drug war
in Mexico as cartels fight
over territory. Headless
bodies have been hanged
from bridges by their feet,
severed heads have been
sent to victims' family
members and government
officials, and bags of up-
to 12 heads have been
dropped off in high-profile
locations.
More than 28,000 people
have been killed in Mexico
in drug-related violence


since December 2006,
when President Felipe
Calderon deployed sol-
diers to battle the cartels
in their strongholds.
If the suspects in the
Arizona case belong to a
cartel, the crime could be
the only known behead-
ing in the U.S. carried
out by a drug cartel, said
Tony Payan, a political
science professor at the
University of Texas at El
Paso who has done exten-
sive research about border
violence.
The killing could
also affect the immigra-
tion debate in Arizona.
Supporters of the state's
controversial immigra-


tion law frequently cite
this type of violence as
reason to crack down on
illegal immigrants. The
decapitation victim and the
suspects were all illegal
immigrants.
Republican Gov. Jan
Brewer drew criticism
this year for claiming that
headless bodies were
being found in the Arizona
desert as she sought to
bolster her argument for
immigration reform. She
later backtracked on those
claims, but said such vio-
lence in the broader bor-
der region is cause enough
for alarm.
The killing has
unnerved residents in the
neighborhood.
The tiny, run-down
complex sits along a side
street across from ram-
shackle trailer homes in a
neighborhood not far from
brand-new strip malls with
big-box stores in the sub-
urb of Chandler.
"I'm terrified," said
Norma Alvarado, a 47-year-
old housekeeper who lives
two doors down from the
apartment. "I've lived here
for 20 years and I've never
heard of that (decapita-
tion) happening.... Maybe
they're copying what's hap-
pening in Mexico."


Sheriff's Office schedules drug evidence disposal


From staff reports

Around 400 pounds of
drugs and drug parapher-
nalia will be destroyed
by the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office in the
near future, officials said.
As part of an annual
drug destruction pro-
gram, representatives
from the Columbia County


Sheriff's Office and the
Third Judicial Circuit State
Attorney's Office met
Friday to conduct a final
inventory of the items set
to be destroyed.
'The joint inventory
ensures that the appropri-
ate items are identified
for destruction," said Ed
. Seifert, Columbia County
Sheriff's Office public


information officer, in a
prepared statement.
Officials inventoried
1,331 individual pieces of
.evidence for destruction.
The items include
cocaine, marijuana, meth-
amphetamine and other
dangerous drugs, as well
as. drug paraphernalia
items, such as smoking
devices, Seifert said.


The 1,331 pieces of
evidence were collected
from 484 individual cases
that have been closed.
Representatives from
the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office are
expected to carry the
boxes of evidence to
an approved facility for
destruction within the
week.


Martha F. Spurling
Mrs. Martha F. Spurling, 86, of
Lake City, died Friday morning,
October 29, 2010 in the Haven
Hospice of the Suwannee Val-
ley. Funeral services for Mrs.
Spurling will be conducted at
Noon on Monday, November
1, 2010 in the Parkview Baptist
Church with Rev. Bill Wood of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
in the Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens. The family will receive
friends for two hours (10:00
until Noon) prior to the funeral


at Parkview Baptist Church.
A full obituary will appear in
Sunday's edition of the Lake
City Reporter. Arrangements are
under the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234. Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parrish familyfuineralhome.corn
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
mentat 752-1293.


1.vI5;t


Call today to place a surprise ad for your child,
grandchild, God child or anyone you think
deserves something extra on their special dayl


Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days
prior to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.

Call 755.5440 or 755.5441
between Sam & 4pm


Sat. Nov 6
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













FAITH


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS
*^ "


Angie Land
ongieland3@windstream.net


God will

claim

his lost

property

"So Ruth gleaned in the
field until evening. Then she
threshed the barley she had
gathered, and it amounted
to about an ephah. She car-
ried it back to town and
her mother-in-law saw how
much she had gathered.
Her mother-in-law asked
her, 'Where did you glean
today? Where did you work?
Blessed be the man who
took notice of you!' Then
Ruth told her mother-in-law
about the one at whose place
she had been working. The
name of the man I worked
with today is Boaz,' she said.
'The Lord bless him! That
man is our close relative;
he is one of our kinsman-
redeemers.'"
Ruth 2:17-20
God often uses
flesh and blood
examples in the
pages of scrip-
ture to model
important spiritual truths.
For example, in the life of.
David, we better understand
the authority and royalty of
God as our King. In Moses'
brother, Aaron, we get a
clearer picture of Jesus' role
as our High Priest Both are
imperfect representations, but
with enough likeness to the
real deal to give us the idea.
Buried deep in this second
chapter of Ruth we find the
point of this entire story,
the concept of the Kinsman-
Redeemer, played out in
Ruth's story by Boaz. The
importance of this role is
critical to Ruth and Naomi's
future, and ours.
Because this term is unfa-
miliar in our culture, let's
clarify what is meant by the
title of Kinsman-Redeemer.
A kinsman is a near relative,
such as a brother, uncle, even
a close cousin. The word
"redeem" means to buy back
or re-purchase. So by defini-
tion, a Kinsman-Redeemer is
a relative who is obligated to
buy back property that a fam-
ily member has lost through
debt or other means.
According to Leviticus
25:23, inherited property
could not be sold perma-
nently, because it belonged
to God. It could, however,
be sold, or leased for use
by another to raise crops
or herds, with the original
owner, or any of his near rela-
tives, having the permanent
option to repay the debt and
regain the property. This
obligation of the Kinsman-
Redeemer also extended to
the redemption of any family
member who fell on hard
times and was forced to sell
himself into slavery in order
to provide for his family or
repay a debt
So why do you and I need
a Kinsman-Redeemer? No
doubt we have all given up
hereditary property, spiritual
blessings that should have
been handed down from
one generation to the next,
but have been forfeited and
replaced with things such
as anger, pride and assorted
addictions. Wouldn't we all
like to have those blessings
redeemed and restored to our
family line?
* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association..


Latter-day Saints dedicate



Meetinghouse in Lake City


Staff report


T he new
Meetinghouse
of The Church
of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day
Saints was dedicated Oct
17. The church is located at
Sisters Welcome Road and
Bascom Norris Drive.
Elder John Anderson,
an area Seventy with the
Church, gave the dedica-
tion prayer.
Two congregations, the
Cannon Creek Ward and the
Young Single Adult Branch,
meet in the building.
'The purpose of this
new building is to provide
a place to teach the gospel
of Jesus Christ and declare
to all that He is our Savior,"
said the Rev. Charles
Gagliano, bishop of the
Cannon Creek Ward,
The facility was con-
structed in response to
the growth of the church
in Columbia County. Prior
to the completion of the
new building four congre-
gations met in the church
building located on Old
Country Club Road.
The Columbia County
congregations are among
nine North Florida congre-
gations that constitute the
Church's Lake City stake.


COURTESY PHOTO
Members attended the dedication of the new Meetinghouse of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Oct. 17.


The Meetinghouse will
see varied uses from the
members of the two con-
gregations.
A sanctuary is adjoined
by a multi-purpose,hall that
is used for cultural and ath-
letic activities and provides
overflow seating for church


services. Classrooms and
administrative offices sur-
round the sanctuary and
multi-purpose hall.
Like other Latter-day
Saints houses of wor-
ship, the building will
have almost daily use to
accommodate the frequent


Espiscopal parish to join Catholics


BALTIMORE A
Baltimore parish has
decided to leave The
Episcopal Church and
join the Roman Catholic
Church, citing differ-
ences with The Episcopal
Church over the ordina-
tion of women and gays,
among other divisions


about 'what Christians
should believe.
Parishioners at the small
Mount Calvary Episcopal
Church voted Sunday to
join the Catholic church as
an Anglo-Catholic parish,
which allows them to retain
aspects of their Anglican
liturgy and identity.


"It is the'hope of the
clergy, vestry, and people
of Mount Calvary that this
transition can be accom-
plished with
efficiency and with
all due sensitivity to all
involved," said the Rev.
Jason Catania, rector of
Mount Calvary Church.


religious, service, social,
sports and scouting activi-
ties conducted by the two
congregations and their
women's, youth and chil-
dren's organizations.
The Cannon Creek Ward
meets on Sundays at 9 a.m.
The Young Single Adult


Evangelist Danny
Johnston is speaking at
10:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sunday at Live Oak Church
of God.
His message will reflect a
grasp on the relevant issues
today.
Johnston recognizes the


Branch meets at 1 p.m. and
is comprised primarily of
single adults ages 19 to 29.
The public is welcome
at the meetings of the
church.
More information about
meetings is available at
www.lds.org.


needs of this generation
and proclaims the answers
to their problems is Jesus
Christ.
He has a thorough
knowledge of the Bible and
God-give extemporaneous
speaking ability.


CHURCH NOTES


Sunday
Live Oak service
Evangelist Danny
Johnston is speaking
at 10:45 a.m. and 6:30
p.m. Sunday at Live Oak
Church of God.

Family and Friends Day
Bethesda Outreach
Ministries of Alachua
is having its 1st Family
and Friends Day Oct. 31.
The 11 a.m. speaker is
Elder Robert Jammer.
The 4 p.m. speaker is
Pastor Steve Miller. The
church is located at 13205
N.W. 157th Ave. Contact
(352)339-4466

Homecoming
celebration
Bethlehem Baptist
Church Homecoming is
10:30 a.m. Oct. 31. Pastor
Lowell O'Steen will be
leading this trip down
memory lane. There will
be a covered dish dinner
following the service. Call
(386) 752-5156 for more
information. The church
is located SR 100 east just
past Homes of Merit.

Youth service
The first youth-directed
service is 1 p.m. Oct.
31 at Iglesia Evangelica
Aposento Alto. Call the
Rev. Arturo Suarez for
more information at 754-
1836.

7th Family Fall Festival
Christ Central is having
a fall festival as an alterna-
tive to ttick or treating
for children at 6 p.m. to 9


p.m. Oct 31. The theme
for the festival is western
roundup. Businesses -are
welcome, and the church
only requests that bags of
candy are brought. There
will be a bounce house,
candy, entertainment, hay
rides and an entertainment
contest. Call Leilani at 755-
2525.

Fifth Sunday service
Union AME WMS is
hosting it's Fifth Sunday
worship service at 11 a.m.
Oct. 31. The guest speaker
is Cynthia Robinson of
New Mount Pisgah AME
Church. The church is
located at 357 NW Queen
Road. Call Romania
Newman at 752-3295 or
Angee Ford at 755-6314.

Saturday, Nov. 6
Fall festival and yard
sale
An inaugural fall festi-
val and yard sale is Nov.
6 at Cornerstone Baptist
Church. The yard sale is
at 8 a.m. and the festival
begins at 10 a.m. Festival
events include sack races,
face painting, horse riding
and more. Food will be
available.

Yard sale
An indoor yard sale is
at 8 a.m. Nov. 6 at Our
Redeemer Lutheran
Church. The church is
located on State Road 47,
one mile past 1-75.

Old Timey Day
The 17th Annual Old
Timey Day starts 8 a.m.


Nov. 6 at Shady Grove
Baptist Church in Live
Oak. There will be sample
food cooked on a wood-
burning stove from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Other activities
include antiqtie cars and
tractors, cane grinding,
wood splitting and more.
The event is free.

UCF choir performance
The University of
Central Florida Gospel
and Cultural Choir is
performing 6 p.m. Nov.
6 at Union AME Church.
Choir president, Jamaul
Thomas, is from Lake City,
and is the past musician
and choir director at Union
AME. Call Terri Thomas,
386-344-3212 or Patricia
Carter, 386-303-1507. The
church is located at 357
NW Queen Road.

Sunday, Nov. 7
Philippi Baptist
Homecoming
The 133rd Homecoming
celebration is 10:30 a.m.
Nov. 7 at Philippi Baptist
Church. Special music is
by Stephen Jones. The
guest speaker is the Rev.
Dan Williams. A covered
dish lunch and fellowship
is after the worship ser-
vice. Call Ralph Graham
386-752-5101.

Mt. Pleasant
Homecoming
The annual homecom-
ing celebration is Nov. 7
at Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church in Wellborn.
Special music is by the
Believers from Adel, Ga.
Call 386-438-9848.


Pastor Appreciation Day
An appreciation celebra-
tion for Rev. Ulis Taylor is
Nov. 7 at New Beginning
Church. A covered dish
luncheon is in the fellow-
ship hall after the morning
worship service. Bring a
covered dish. Call 386-935-
6553.

Wellborn Homecoming
An annual homecoming
celebration is 10:30 a.m.
Nov. 7 at Wellborn Church
of God. James Scott is the
special speaker. Bring a
covered dish lunch. The
church is located at 3330
US Hwy. 90.

Tuesday, Nov. 9
The fall meeting with
Elder Ronald Lawrence
of Nashville, Tenn. is 6:30
p.m. Nov. 9- Nov. 11 at
Salem Primitive Baptist
Church. The church is
located 9 miles NW of
Lake City Jeffrey Road.
Call Pastor Herman Griffin
at 752-4198.

Abortion regret support
group
Crossroads Pregnancy
Center is starting a sup-
port group for people with
abortion regrets. The
group is free and confiden-
tial. Call Catherine at (386)
497-4978.

Every Tuesday
Greater Visions hosts
addiction support group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based


addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
in the fellowship hall of
Christ Central Ministries,
217 SW Duval Ave. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 755-2525.

Free Biblical counseling
is available
Free Biblical counsel-
ing is available at Hopeful
Baptist Church. Many are
struggling with problems
including marital, financial,.
communication, emotional,
spiritual and addiction. To
make an appointment, call
(386) 752-4135 between
8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Every Thursday
English and literacy
classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes pro-
vided by Columbia County
School District's Career
and Adult Education
Program is from 5:30 to
8 p.m. every Thursday at
Unity of God Ministries,
Inc. in Wellborn. Activities
for children will be pro-
vided. Call (386) 755-8190.
The church is located at
12270 County Road 137.

Submit Church Notes
items in writing no later
than 5 p.m. Monday the
week prior to an event by e-
mail to arobinson@lakecity-
reporter com, fax to (386)
752-9400 or drop-off at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City.
Call (386) 754-0425 with
questions. Church Notes
run as space is available
each Saturday.


Saturday, October 30, 2010


Evangelist to speak at
Live Oak Church of God


I _









LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


A 7hen "thank you" is said it is encouraging,

/ whether it's for a small, routine matter or

a large undertaking. A personal thank you also

reminds us that a thank you to God is in order.

As we pray each day and weekly at our house of

worship, we can thank Him for everything, big and

small. With each thank you we can acknowledge

God's love for us and our love for Him!


I-


sow.'.'


SO*.r S
.5
V.
'so."


*0 .
t
C ',. .


Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US90WEST I47

GWHunter, Inc.
chevron Chevron Oil
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Holly/ectInc, Ic.
"Quality AIork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944j


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do dl things through Christ which srecngtheneth me"
PhilippiasM :13

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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in '
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Call Mary
755-5440


RICK'S (RANE SERVE







this Directory
Located at 25A
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in,
this Directory

755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881SWMcFarlaneAve.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
SundayService: l.00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GIAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NWLake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: LarryE. Sweat

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196SE James Ave.* 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM& 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
SundayWorship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor

OLIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E.Davis Street
(386)752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. *752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.dom
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
Sunday Wor-hip 13 4 & I AM & 6PM
AWANA 5:30 PM
Evening Woiship 6:00 PM
Wed. Eve Schedule
Family Supper IReservaoni 5PM
Children's Miritnr' .6PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer MNleering 6 00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule Si. 8121 08
Pailview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor Michael A ltem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCHII
Iq1i N US Hwy 4 I
3Afi-7i2-'664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Wornhip I1 lA & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM,
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive *755-5553

Bible Study 9:15AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Worship .6:15PM
Wednesday
AWANA 5:45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 6:15 PM

TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274
Sunday School 10AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

THEVINEYARD
A Southern Baptist Church
2091 SW Main Blvd. *623-0026
SundayWorship 10:00AM
Where Jesus is Preached
and jeans are appropriate.
Pastor, Bo Hammock

EPIPHANYCATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SWEpiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass -5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.*
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S., 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Morn, Worship 10:30AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7PM

NEWHORIZON
ihuich of Chriit
Diretins & fime's 55-1320
lack EkJuilr.. Minsier

LAKE CIn' CHURCH OF GOD
16' Ermine S 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun, Worship. 10.3AM & 6:00)PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGELCHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen, 755-1939
Sunday School 9.45 AM
Sunday Worship :0.50 & 6 30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment '7PM '
"Shock Youth Church"'
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218,
Email: a pL330@hellsouthnet

Sun, 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev, MichaelArmstrong
Deacon: The Rev.immieHunsiner
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


_ _


CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
SundayMorning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns'
'"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones' 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road ,755-0580 .
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIAEVANGELICA
APOSENTO ALTO
17077,25th Rd L/C FL 32055
Service Fri: 7:00PM, Sun: :00PM
'Arturo Suarez 1386-754-1836
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 F of Branford Highwa.y
Sunday School It, ,itAM
Momruig Worship II U1i,'Nl
Sunday Everung 6 00PM
Wednesday 7 UuPM
A Fu GospelChurch Everyuri WtI uin
S.* (3lif6 755.5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy47,to Culumila Ciiy.
one nile East on CR JOU
Sunday IIAM and 7P'M
Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


Toavrie inths Curh iretoy a ll55-44


CIay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. BruceAlkire

SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hw3 W. 1., mile Wdest of I '75 752-3807
Sundj) Worship 10:00AM
Nuirery Avdil.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar Ilhn D.i-d Brnam


BEHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
16 US 441 Iouyi
Suildai Worship Semceni,
Indinonal Services 8 30 & II -00MI
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com

First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave,.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:15A1
Sunday Monming Worhilp
l.unemporary Service h:30A1
Tiadirionral Service II IOuAM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages
For d complete schedule
contact church office at
752.-4188

WESLE MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:08AM
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Nursery provided -
Praise & Worship 6 00PM
AWANA starts /15 Wed. 5.00PM
Pasior The Rev I Louie Mabre)
Ww.esleygiem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun.Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum


AKE CITYCHURCHOFTHENAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship 1045AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Craig Henderson
Nursery.Provided.
SW SR47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive* 752-0670
Sunday Contemporary 9:00AM
Sunday School : 10:00AM
- 'Taditional Service 11:00 AM

Pastor Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRSTFUILL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NEWashington St.
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7-00 PM
For info call 755-3408* Everyone Welcome
Pastor Rev. Stan Ellis
OEM=lIi~lllHiM


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
s: 755-7050


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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

BAYWAYiuiiori.dS .nces
FIRE & Water Retorauon
Flour & C.qrp'l (Care
I I--6L l, tIa h
755-6142


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


1


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morreil's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register p
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St. MDn.-Fr. 9:00 a.n. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIALL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
.ac Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


P m 752-2308 -1

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


BRIEFS


Mob turncoat
is sentenced

NEW YORK Mobster
Salvatore Vitale had a
hand in at least 11 mur-
ders, including that of a fel-
low gangster in the fallout
from the infamous Donnie
Brasco case.
But he was spared a life
term Friday, sentenced
instead to time served after
federal prosecutors said the
admitted killer deserved a
break for delivering a crip-
pling blow to his brethren.
The evidence against the
Bonanno organized crime
family provided by the 63-
year-old turncoat since his
arrest in 2003 "has been
devastating to the very
Mafia to
which he
once swore
allegiance,
and particu-
larly to the
Bonanno
family y,"
Vitale prosecu-
tors wrote in court papers.
Vitale admitted to 11
killings between 1976 and
1999. He pleaded guilty in
April 2003 to racketeering
conspiracy and murder-in-
aid of racketeering, and has
served nearly eight years
behind bars.
At his sentencing, Vitale
apologized to the families of
his victims.
"I committed some really
horrible crimes tI1 always
be ashamed of, and I pray
for forgiveness," he said.
According to the gov-
ernment memo, Vitale has
identified more than 500
mobsters and their asso-
ciates across the United
States and elsewhere.
His cooperation, includ-
ing testimony at six trials,
has led to convictions of
four Bonanno bosses one
a close friend and broth-
er-in-law and dozens of
lower-ranking family mem-
bers. .

Police: Gunman
surrenders

RENO, Nev. -A gunman
who police said was about
to be fired surrendered to
police Friday after three
employees were wounded
in a possible retaliation
attack in the Walmart store
where the suspect worked,
police said.
The move came after
police negotiators spoke
for two hours by telephone
with the man identified as
45-year-old John Dennis
Gillane.
Reno police Lt.
Mohammad Rafqat said
Gillane was taken into custo-
dy and will be charged with
three counts of attempted
murder.
No shots were fired after
the three victims were
wounded shortly after 8:30
a.m., Rafqat said.

Storms crippling
tsunami aid

MENTAWAI ISLANDS,.
Indonesia A group of
private aid workers battled
fierce swells and driving
rain that kept most craft
on shore Friday, managing
to deliver food and other
supplies to desperate survi-
vors on the islands hardest
hit by a tsunami that killed
more than 400 people.
Government agencies
pulled back boats and heli-
copters that had been ferry-
ing aid to the most distant
corners of the Mentawai
islands and instead resort-
ed to air-dropping boxes of
aid from planes.
On a borrowed 75-foot
cruiser, aid workers faced
rough seas and sheets of
rain plus miserable sea-


sickness to bring noo-
dles, sardines and sleeping
mats to villages that have
not received any help since
Monday's earthquake.
In one village, most peo-
ple were still huddling in
a church in the hills, too
afraid to come down even to
get the aid.

* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama makes a statement to reporters about the suspicious packages found on U.S. bound planes on Friday in the James Brady Press
Briefing Room of the White House.


US-bound explosive packages



show expanding Yemen threat


By LOUTA C. BALDOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
discovery of two explo-
sive-laden packages from
Yemen bound for U.S. des-
tinations appears to rep-
resent a new twist in the
terror threat emanating
from the violence-wracked
Mideast country.
If the explosive devices
shipped in cargo planes
from Yemen are conclu-
. sively linked by investiga-
tors to- the al-Qaida fac-
tion :in Yemen, it could
represent a new tactic
by Al-Qaida in the Arab
Peninsula. The group has
previously spawned plots
against commercial U.S-
bound flights and had a
role in mass shootings in
several American cities.
In the past 18 months,
the al-Qaida offshoot in
Yemen has grown stronger,
and its members have been
implicated in several plots
against U.S. targets, includ-
ing the Christmas Day air-
Sliner attack in Detroit.
Next to Osama bin
Laden and his al-Qaida lead-
ers in Pakistan, al-Qaida in
the Arabian Peninsula is
considered the most active
al-Qaida threat to the U.S.
and its Western allies,
according to the Obama
administration.
The U.S. has beefed up
its military and intelligence
assistance to Yemen, includ-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this frame grab from WNYW FOX 5, a United Parcel Service plane sits isolated at
Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. on Friday. Law enforcement officials are
investigating reports of suspicious packages on cargo planes in Philadelphia and Newark.


ing the potential addition
of armed Predator drones
operated by the CIA. The
Pentagon is sending more
than $150 million in military
aid, including helicopters,
planes and other equip-
ment
There have been a
number of airstrikes into
Yemen that have taken
out insurgent leaders, with
either coordination from
the U.S. or direct involve-
ment, but officials decline to


talk about them.
I AQAP includes as many
as 300 members operating
out of Yemen. A key lead-
er is Anwar al-Awlaki, the
American-born radical cler-
ic who is believed to have
helped plan the Christmas
Day attack and inspired other
attacks, including the shoot-
ing massacre at Fort Hood,
Texas, last year. He is on a
U.S. government secret list
of targets to be captured or
killed.


Over the past year, the
number of elite U.S. train-
ers moving in and out of
Yemen has doubled, from
25 to about 50 now. And
the U.S.. forces are provid-
ing more complex instruc-
tion that combines tactical
ground and air operations.
Yemen is the poorest
country in the Arab world,
with 45.2 percent living
below the poverty line,
according to the CIA fact-
book.


President
Obama's
statement
Last night and earlier
today, our intelligence and
law enforcement profes-
sionals, working with our
friends and allies, identi-
fied two suspicious pack-
ages bound for the United
States specifically, two
places of Jewish worship in
Chicago. Those packages
had been located in Dubai
and East Midlands Airport
in the United Kingdom. An
initial examination of those
packages has determined
that they do apparently
contain explosive material.
The events of the past
24 hours underscores the
necessity of remaining vigi-
lant against terrorism. As
usual, our intelligence, law
enforcement and Homeland
Security professionals have
served with extraordinary
skill and resolve. ... As we
obtain more information
we will keep the public
fully informed. But at this
stage, the American people
should know that the coun-
terterrorism professionals
are taking this threat very
seriously and are taking
all necessary and prudent
steps to ensure our secu-
rity. And the American
people should be confident
that we will not waver in our
resolve to defeat al-Qaida
and its affiliates and to root
out violent extremism in all
its forms.


FBI asks how subway defendant was radicalized


By MATT APUZZO
and ADAM GOLDMAN
Associated Press

.WASHINGTON FBI agents
who ensnared a suburban father
in a terrorism sting involving a
fictional subway bomb plot have
turned their attention to figur-
ing out what may have made the
Pakistani-born U.S. citizen turn
against his adopted country.
Law enforcement officials said
they believe Farooque Ahmed was
radicalized in the United States,
becoming the latest in a string
of U.S. citizens radicalized here,
and charged with plotting terrorist
attacks.
FBI agents were tipped off to
Ahmed in January, when a source
inside the Muslim community said
the 34-year-old telecommunica-
tions worker was asking around,
trying to.join a terrorist group and
kill Americans overseas, the offi-
cials said. The officials spoke on
condition of anonymity because
the investigation continues.
Since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror-
ist attacks, the FBI has tried hard
to build relationships inside the
Muslim community. The White
House has made combating home-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
FBI and law-enforcement investigators leave the home of Farooque Ahmed
in Ashburn, Va., Wednesday. Ahmed was arrested and charged with trying
to help people he believed were al-Qaida operatives planning to bomb sub-
way stations around the nation's capital, the FBI said.


grown terrorism part of its nation-
al security strategy.
"We need to build this trust
factor within the community," act-
ing FBI Assistant Director John
Perren said Friday. ,'The fight
against terrorism is a multi-dimen-
sional approach and we want to
have the community help -us."


Born in Lahore, Pakistan,
Ahmed arrived in the U.S. in 1993
and became a citizen in 2002, offi-
cials said. He worshipped at the
All Dulles Area Muslim Society,
which is known for its mainstream
Islamic congi L'.Itti,'I Ahmed has
not been back to Pakistan since
2005 and has no ties to terrorist


groups there, officials said.
Perren said Ahmed is part
of a growing trend of would-be
terrorists who don't receive for-
mal training abroad and operate
without direction from al-Qaida
leaders overseas. On Thursday,
the FBI and Homeland Security
Department issued a law enforce-
ment bulletin saying they remained
concerned about homegrown ter-
rorists.
"They know the geography.
They're astute to Western cul-
ture," Perren said.
Like many would-be terrorists
and sympathizers, Ahmed was
potentially influenced by Anwar
al-Awlaki, the radical Muslim
cleric who preached in northern
Virginia until 2002 and now lives
in hiding in Yemen, officials said.
But while Ahmed listened to al-
Awlaki's Internet sermons, offi-
cials said the two were not in
contact and they're not sure how
influential those sermons were.
In April, Ahmed thought he had
found what he wanted: a pair of al-
Qaida operatives who would help
him carry out a bomb attack on
the nation's second-busiest sub-
way system, according to court
documents unsealed Thursday.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirbyt@akectyreporter'com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, October 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE






Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

Game

still

matters

year, but it's
still the Florida-
Georgia game.
When the
Gators and Bulldogs
kick off today, it may
not involve national-title
implications, but the bad
blood will be enough
to fuel this long-lasting
college football rivalry.
Sure, the given name
is no longer allowed to
be uttered outside of
local cocktail parties,
but we all know that
Jacksonville will be
kicking today. After all,
the city didn't decide to
make their stadium 83
thousand plus for that so-
called NFL franchise.
The real reason this
stadium packs in so
many is for the masses
of orange, blue, red and
black fans that flock into
the city for more than
a week in preparation
of the one game that
records don't matter.
Old-time Gator fans
have one goal for their
beloved team each
season and that's to beat
Georgia. The old-school
Bulldogs just try to
remember what its like.
While Florida has
owned the series since
Steve Spurrier began his
tenure in Gainesville, it
may seem like Georgia
has the edge heading
into this game. After
the Bulldogs got off to
a snail-like start to the
2010 season, Georgia has
rebounded with three-
consecutive wins.
It feels like the
Bulldogs are starting
to peak after scoring
40-plus points over that
stretch, while the Gators
seem to have taken
after one of Tom Petty's
famous lyrics and are
'free falling.'
Losers of three
straight, Florida fans
may have been thinking
of another Petty song.
'Don't do me like that'
comes to mind.
Today, The Waiting' is
over and the border war
begins.
Florida's theme for
today's game should
incorporate another
Petty song, as the Gators
'Won't Back Down' from
the Bulldogs. This team
shouldn't resemble what
. we've seen over the past
month for two very good
reasons (Jeff Demps and
Chris Rainey).
Missing playing time
for two very different
reasons, the two players
have been the missing
pieces to the Gators'
puzzle. Without the
speedsters, Florida's
offense has flopped.
With a win today, the
Gators stay alive in the
SEC East race and can
continue 'Running Down
a Dream.'

Florida 27,
Georgia 24

Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


Kirkman, Rangers happy to be home


Bullpen needs
short memory
after meltdown.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Michael
Kirkman
slept in
Friday after
what had
to be a restless red-eye
flight from San Francisco
following game two of the
World Series.
The Giants blew open a
2-0 game with seven runs
in the eighth inning and
put it out of reach, 9-0. San
Francisco leads the series
2-0, with game three today
in Arlington, Texas.

KIRKMAN continued on 3B


Bulldogs bite


Fort White falls
on road to Taylor
County, 38-21.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
PERRY Fort White
High fell behind 10 points
and Taylor County High
never let them catch up.
The result was a 38-21
homecoming triumph for
the Bulldogs, and also
sowed up the District
2-2B championship. Fort
White (5-3, 3-1 district) host
Bradford High next week
for the district runner-up
spot and a playoff birth that
goes with it. Taylor County
remained undefeated at 8-0
and 4-0 in district play.
'"We couldn't slow them
down enough," coach
Demetric Jackson said. "We
played a good team and
they made a few more plays
than we did. We couldn't
get the breaks. Sometimes
that's the way it is and to
that extent, we didn't win."
The Bulldogs scored
on their first two drives
-- a 27-yard field goal
by Hunter Barfield and a
22-yard touchdown pass
from Eli Grambling to
James Houston.
Fort White took control
in the second quarter and
pulled within three points
when JR Dixon scored on
a four-yard run with 36
seconds left. Colton Jones


Texas hopes to
crash Giants'
World Series party.
By BEN WALKER
Associated Press
ARLINGTON;? Texas
- A half-hor'r after Jeff
Francoeur hit an easy fly
ball for the final out, a most,
curious sight began to
unfold in front of the San
Francisco dugout.
General manager. Brian
Sabean and maybe 100
members of the Giants staff
gahered on the grass after
Game 2 Thursday night,
posing for a group picture
around a huge trophy.
Moments later, the
party picked up. Family
SERIES continued on 3B


Indians


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High quarterback Andrew Baker (12) searches for an open receiver against East Gadsden High Oct. 22.


kicked the first of three
extra points.
A defensive lapse wast-
ed all the hard work.
Grambling hit Houston on a
slant and he outran the field
for a 64-yard scoring play.
The lead was back to 10.
Fort White struck quickly


in the third quarter. Andrew
Baker hit Donnell Sanders
from the tight end spot and
he rambled 53 yards for a
touchdown, off a block by.
Trey Phillips.
Taylor County answered
with an 88-yard scoring
drive. William Wentworth


hit James Strawter for 22
yards and a touchdown.
Sparked by an 81-yard
run by Dixon, Fort White
struck again. Baker scored
from six yards out on a
bootleg.
Fort White's defense held
this time, but the Bulldogs


pulled a fake field goal and
Raydon Parker hauled 29-
yard touchdown pass from
Wentworth.
Tony Jackson added a
nine-yard touchdown run in
the fourth quarter to make
the margin look worse than
it was.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lady Tigers soccer
The Columbia High School girls soccer team pose for a photograph at the CYSA Soccer Fields. Pictured are Keeley Murray (front row, from left),
Britni Machleit, Christy Everett, Amber Simms, Holly Boris. Alyssa Spahalski, Megan Collins, Ruth Ruiz, Brittany Bethea (back row, from left), Joanne Ortiz,
captain Leslie Wood, Trisha Ruthorford, Lucie Fqris, captains Brittany Strickland and Haley Dicks, Heather Rountree, Michaela Burton, Kaitlyn Daniel and
head coach Ashley Brown. Story on Page 3B.


~











LAKE CITY REPqFITER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
pole qualifying for Amp Energy 500, at
Talladega,Ala.
4 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Mountain Dew 250,atTalladega,Ala.
I a.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Las
Vegas Nationals (delayed tape)
BOXING
II p.m.
FSN Raul Garcia (28-1-1) vs. Luis
de la Rosa (14-0-1), for interim WBO
minimum flyweight title, at Cartagena,
Colombia (same-day tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Miami at Virginia
ESPN2 Purdue at Illinois
FSN OklahomaSt. at Kansas St.
2:30 p.m.
NBC -Tulsa at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m.
ABC Split national coverage,
Michigan St., at Iowa or Missouri at
Nebraska
CBS Georgia vs. Florida, at
Jacksonville
ESPN Regional coverage, Missouri
at Nebraska or Michigan St. at Iowa
FSN -Arizona at UCLA
6 p.m.
ESPN2 -Auburn at Mississippi
7 p.m.
FSN Baylor at Texas
VERSUS Stanford at Washington
8 p.m.
ESPN Michigan at Penn St.
8:07 p.m.
ABC Split national coverage,
Oregon at Southern Cal or Ohio St. at
Minnesota
9:15 p.m.
ESPN2 Colorado at Oklahoma
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC- European PGATour,Andalucia
Masters, third round, at -Sotogrande,
Spain
Noon
TGC LPGA, Hana Bank
Championship, second round, at Incheon,
South Korea (same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour
Championship, third round, at Charleston,
S.C.
4:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, AT&T
Championship, second round, at San
Antonio
7:30 p.m.
TGC Asia Pacific Classic Malaysia,
third round, at Selangor, Malaysia (same-
day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
6:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 3, San
Francisco at Texas
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Chelsea
at Blackburn
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
II p.m.
VERSUS Hartford at Sacramento

BASEBALL

World Series

San Francisco I l,Texas 7
San Francisco 9,Texas 0, San Francisco
leads series 2-0
Today
San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Texas
(Lewis 12-13), 6:57 p.m.
Sunday
San Francisco (Bumgarner 7-6) at
Texas (Hunter 13-4), 8:20 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
N.Y.Jets 5 I 0.833 159 101
New England 5 I 0.833 177 136
Miami 3 3 0.500111 135


Buffalo


Tennessee
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


0 6 0.000121 198
South
W L TPct PF PA
5 2 0.714 199 117
4 2 0.667 153 167
4 2 0.667 163 125
3 4 0.429 130 209
North
W L TPct PF PA
5 I 0.833 137 82
5 2 0.714 149 129
2 4 0.333 132 141
2 5 0.286 118 142
, West
W L TPct PF PA
4 2 0.667 150 112
3 4 0.429 179 165
2 5 0.286 177 149
2 5 0.286 138 199


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Washington
Philadelphia
Dallas


Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis
San Francisco


East
W L
5 2
4 3
4 3
1 5
South
W L
5 2,
4 2
4 3
I 5
North
W L
4 3
4 3
2 4
I 5
West
W L
4 2
3 3
3 4
1 6


T Pct PF PA
0.714 175 153
0.571 130 133
0.571 172 157
0.167 137 152

T Pct PF PA
0.714 169 133
0.667 98 128
0.571 147 138
0.167 75 130

T Pct PF PA
0.571 126 114
0.571 167 136
0.333 III 116
0.167 146 140

TPct PF PA
0.667 120 107
0.500 98 160
0.429 120 131
0.143 113 162


.Sunday's Games
Denver vs. San Francisco at London,
I p.m.
Washington at Detroit, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, I p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Dallas, I p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: N.Y. Giants, Philadelphia,
Chicago.Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland

Sunday, Nov. 7
Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Detroit, I p.m.
Miami at Baltimore, I p.m.
San Diego at Houston, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta. I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
New England at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota. I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 8
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis.
Jacksonville, San Francisco, Tennessee

College scores

Thursday
Bethune-Cookman 67, N.
Carolina A&T 17
N.C. State 28, Florida St. 24

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Oregon at No. 24 Southern
Cal,8 p.m.
No. 3 Auburn at Mississippi, 6 p.m.
No.4TCU atUNLV, II p.m.
No. 5 Michigan State at No. 18 Iowa,
3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Missouri at No. 14 Nebraska,
3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Utah at Air Force, 7:30 p.m.
No. 10 Ohio State at Minnesota,
8 p.m.
No. II Oklahoma vs. Colorado,
9:15 p.m.
No. 13 Stanford atWashington, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Arizona at UCLA, 3:30 p.m.
No. 17 South Carolina vs. Tennessee,
12:21 p.m.
No. 19 Arkansas vs.Vanderbilt, 7 p.m.
No. 20 Oklahoma State at Kansas
State, Noon /


No. 22 Miami atVirginia, Noon
No. 23 Mississippi State vs. Kentucky,
7 p.m.
No. 25 Baylor at Texas, 7 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Amp Energy juice 500
Site:Talladega,Ala.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed,
noon-3 p.m.); Sunday, race, I p.m. (ESPN2,
noon-I p.m., ESPN, I-5 p.m.).
Track: Tailadega Superspeedway (oval,
2.66 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 188 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Mountain Dew 250
Site:Talladega, Ala.
Schedule: Today, race, 4 p.m. (Speed,
3-6:30 p.m.).
Track:Talladega Superspeedway.
Race distance: 250.04 miles, 94 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA LasVegas Nationals
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
Sunday, 1-2:30 a.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN, 9-11:30 p.m.).
Track: The Strip at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Orlando I 2,Washington 83
Phoenix I 10, Utah 94
Friday's Games
Indiana at Charlotte (n)
Sacramento at New Jersey (n)
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
Cleveland at Toronto (n)
New York at Boston (n)
Milwaukee at Minnesota (n)
Denver at New Orleans (n)
Oklahoma City at Detroit (n)
Orlando at Miami (n)
Memphis at Dallas (n)
L.A. Clippers at Golden State (n)
LA. Lakers at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
.Sacramento at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio.
8:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Miami at New Jersey, I p.m.
Dallas at LA. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Utah at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Golden State at LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Columbus 3, Edmonton 2 SO
Boston 2,Toronto 0
Ottawa 5, Florida 3
Phoenix 4, Detroit 2
St. Louis 3, Nashville 0
Minnesota 2,Washington I
Los Angeles 5, Dallas 2
Colorado 6, Calgary 5
Friday's Games
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (n)
Buffalo at Atlanta (n)
Edmonton at Chicago (n)
New Jersey at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers atToronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Washington at Calgary, 10 p.m.
New Jersey at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No games scheduled


BRIEFS


YOUTH SOCCER

Winter league

registration today

Columbia Youth Soccer
Association's winter
recreational league final
registration for ages 3-16
is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today
at the CYSA clubhouse.
Registration fee is $65.
For details, call Scott or
Melody Everett at 288-2504
or 288-4481.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Travel team tryout

now on Nov. 13

An open tryout for a
9-under travel baseball
team players is 10 a.m.
Npv. 13 at the Southside
Recreation Complex
practice fields.
For details, call Todd
Gustavson at 365-2133.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL

Practice under

way for Falcons

The Lake City Falcons '


semi-pro football team is
seeking players, qualified
coaches and sponsors.
Conditioning and practice
is under way at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and
Saturday at Richardson



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I RODLE I


Community Center gym
and field. *
For details, call Elaine
Ortiz Harden at 292-3039
or (386) 438-5728.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHAT THE
CHAIN GANG
GOT WHEN THEY
WORKED.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: L "
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FLAKE WALTZ GIGOLO FERVID
I Answer: The politician claimed to stand for it, but the
listener didn't FALL FOR IT


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Susie
Flick 183; 2. Lori Davis 178; 3. Mary
Lobaugh 177. 1. George Walters 244;
2. Bill Dolly 223; 3. Mark Koppa 214.
High scratch series: 1. Lori Davis
522; 2. (tie) Susie Flick, Mary Lobaugh
509; 4. Linda Andrews 477. 1. Bill
Dolly 640; 2. George Walters 600;
3. Mark Koppa 584.
High handicap game: 1. Pat
Frazier 225; 2. Jen Tripp 219; 3. (the)
Karen Moody, Danni Fair 216. 1. Scott
Thompson 244; 2. Mark Koppa 239;
3. Nick Niquette 233.
High handicap series: 1. (tie) Lori
Davis, Beth Koppa 639; 3. Susie Flick
629; 4. Linda Andrews 606. 1. George
Walters 708; 2. Bill Dolly 688; 3. Bill
Price 656.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
179. 1. Tom Sewejkls 201.
(results from Oct. 19)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Legal Ladies
(27-13); 2. Lucky Strikers (26-14);
3. Spare Us (21-19).
High handicap game: 1. Angie
Meek 268; 2. Sandra Peterson 245;
3. Linda Adams 238.
. High handicap series: 1. Angie
Meek 647; 2. Linda Adams 635;
3. Cythe Shiver 633.
(results from Oct. 26) .
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(30-10); 2. Pink Panthers (23-17);
3. Golden Oldies (22-18).


10-30


BOWLING

High scratch game: 1. Roberta
Giordano 182; 2. Bea Purdy 170;
3. Roberta Giordano 164. 1. Rick
Yates 197; 2. Art Joubert 189; 3. John
Quinn 188.
High scratch series: 1. Roberta
Giordano 508; 2. Bea Purdy 444;
3. Louise Atwood 443. 1. Art Joubert
540; 2. Earl Hayward 529; 3. Keith
Herbster 501.
(results from Oct. 26)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Shiners (24-12,
21,419 pins); 2. Wild Things (24-12,
21,308 pins); 3. Quirky Quad (20-
18).
High scratch game: 1. Elaine
Nemeth 177; 2. Betty Carmichael
174; 3. Vy Ritter 164. 1. Lee McKinney
233; 2. Dan Ritter 211; 3. Thomas
Young 193.
High scratch series: 1. Bea Purdy
531; 2. Dee Dee Young 484; 3. Jane
Sommerfeld 462. 1. David Duncan
638; 2. George Mulligan 620; 3. Lee
Evert 533.
High handicap game: 1. Bertha
Black 230; 2. Janie Posey 226;
3. Joan Carman 215. 1. Thom Evert
253; 2. (tie) Sal Annello, Earl Hayward
228.
High handicap series: 1. Louise
Atwood 651; 2. Pat Hale 629;
3. Sandra Johns 598. 1. Winton
Brewer 688; 2. Chuck Pressler 663;
3. James Burnett 648.
High average: 1. Bea Purdy 151.15;
2. (tie) Shirley Highsmith,/ Elaine
Nemeth 149.04. 1. David Duncan'
191.19; 2. Bill Dolly 184.19; 3. George
Mulligan 181.41.
(results from Oct. 21)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS


Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(31-9); 2. Average Joe's. (26.5-13.5);
3. Team 1 (24-16).
High scratch game: 1. Kim
Schneiders 201; 2. Donna Duncan
185; 3. Norma Yeingst 181. 1. Leonard
Randall 235; 2. Mark Moore 226;
3. Marshall Campbell 215.
High scratch series: 1.. Kim
Schneiders 508; 2. Norma Yeingst
483; 3. Donna Duncan 480.
1. Leonard Randall 620; 2. Mark
Moore 593; 3. Matt Stephan 578.
(results from Oct. 24)

Youth leagues

MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Chicken
Alfredol (83-45); 2. Bobby's Angels
(71-57); 3. Scrumdiddlyumptious
(63.5-64.5).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 246; 2. Christine Peters 198;
3. Sara Sykes 197. 1. Garrett Shay
239; 2. Cody Howard 221; 3. Danny
King 213.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 585; 2. Sara Sykes 515;
3. Christine Peters 505. 1. Garrett
Shay 593; 2. Bobby Hosier 574;
3. Danny King 554.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Kaylee
Blackstock 163; 2. Emily Wells 159.
1. Eric Anderson 169; 2. Josh Kasper
167; 3. Christian LeRoux 164.
High handicap series: 1. Emily
Wells 453; 2. Kaylee Blackstock 428.
1. Tylor Dudley 458; 2. Eric Anderson
454; 3. Christian LeRoux 448.
(results from Oct. 16)


LAKE CITY POP WARNER


COURTESY PHOTO

Peewee Tigers

Team members are (front row, from left) Ethan Goodrich, Teon Dollard, Derek Simpson,
Tyius Duffy, Aaron Barber and Logan Lowery. Second row (from left) are Davin Schuck,
Jake Stephens, Kenny Steele, Josh Manning, Jaquez Dunmore, Jordan Culp and
Kaleb Thomas. Third row (from left) are Mike Williams, Ronnie Collins Jr., AJ James, Marcel
Edmond, Reggie Sharpe, Marcel Bell and Ryan Raymer. Back row cQaches (from left) are
Sherod Keen, Larry Keen, Trent Walker, Russell Thomas and head coach Richard Keen.


ACROSS

1 Uses a straw
5 Swab brand
(hyph.)
10 Was selected
12 Granola cousin
13 Rice alternative
14 Merchant
15 Not imaginary
16 Cousins of
"unm"
18 McMahon and
Sullivan
19 Hammy actors
23 Nasty!
26 Picture border
27 Othello's foe
30 Not late
32 Buzzes off
34 Town opposite
Dover
35 Mountain
ranges
36 Supernova
37 "Ulalume" poet
38 Sardines hold-
er
39 Gauge


42 Visitor from
Melmac
45 Orchestra's
place
46 Unappetizing
fare
50 Steers
53 California
shout,
once
55 Cousin of
Vogue
56 Gloomy
57 Ballroom num-
ber
58 Vulcan's forge

DOWN

1 Pump or loafer.
2 Kappa preceder
3 Church reading
4 Establish
5 Vt. neighbor
6 Londoner's
brew
7 Atlas dot
8 Responded in
court


Answer to Previous Puzzle



ADIEUS A RMO U R
AS P E-C T B OO B OO
L AS R MO


D O0S GLOSENS


OR TRIBUNE
T I L MEAN TSE
ESE BUND T EON
LOS NAT
EREST EG01ISM
L I LACS R EMO R A
Y KSIENS


9 Gentlemen
10 EMT technique
11 Nutty confec-
tions
12 Dept. store
inventory


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Elev.
20 Referee
21 More fertile
22 Paretsky or
Teasdale
23 Checkout ID
24 Mardi -
25 Oater actor
Tim -
28 Horse's stride
29 All, in combos
31 Polite address
32 Reconnoitered
33 Tax-form ID
37 Air-pump
meas.
40 Nave neigh-
bor
41 Heron
42, Seaweed
extract
43 Dilly
44 Thin coating
47 Without fat
48 Gumbo veggie
49 Fork out
51 Make a knight
52 NOW cause
54 "Where Eagles
Dare" actress


2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


HARTOX




ALFACI

L -11















Rainey, King expected to


return after suspensions


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Florida's Chris Rainey and
Georgia's Caleb King made
headlines for all the wrong
reasons earlier this season.
Arrested, then suspended.
They will be back in the
spotlight Saturday, this
time probably playing star-
ing roles for the Gators
and Bulldogs in what
essentially will be an
elimination game in the
Southeastern Conference's
Eastern Division.
Rainey, suspended the
last five games after he was
arrested for allegedly send-
ing a threatening text mes-
sage to a former girlfriend,
was fully reinstated fol-
.lowing practice Thursday.
Coach Urban Meyer said
Rainey "had a good week,"
doing everything asked of
him "and beyond."
King is coming off a two-
game suspension for failing
to take care of a speeding
ticket
Their returns come at
a much-needed time for
Florida (4-3, 2-3 SEC) and
Georgia (4-4, 3-3).
The Gators have been
lethargic on offense the last
three weeks, struggling to
run, committing turnovers
and failing to score in the
red zone. Coach Urban
Meyer points to injuries
as the main culprit, 'with
running backs Jeff Demps,
Emmanuel Moody and
Mike Gillislee banged up.
Rainey will get snaps in
the backfield and at receiver.
"He's one of those guys
that can take it to the house
on. any play," center Mike
Pouncey said. "Like I've
been saying the whole year,
he's our best player."
Although Rainey did lit-
tle in his two games this
season he has six recep-
tions and a touchdown he
was a significant contribu-
tor the last two seasons.
He ran for 1,227 yards and
nine touchdowns the last
two years and caught 13
passes for 198 yards and
a score.
"He's a special guy," tight
end Trey Burton said. "The
things he can do makes the
defense's head spin."
King has been special
at times for Georgia, too.
He ran for 594 yards and
seven touchdowns last sea-
son, providing the offense
a 1-2 punch with Washaun
Ealey.
King has 228 yards rush-
ing and a touchdown this
season. He led the team


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida's Justin Trattou (94), Will Hill (10) and Janoris Jenkins (1) converge to
tackle Mississippi State running back Vick Ballard (28) on Oct. 16.


in rushing in consecutive
games before his suspen-
sion.
The Bulldogs did. just
fine without him, though.
Ealey ran for 123 yards
and a touchdown against
Vanderbilt, then added 157
yards and a school-record
five touchdowns on the
ground last week against
Kentucky.
But Ealey sprained a lig-
ament in his right knee late
in the game, opening the
door for King to get extra
work against the Gators.
"I don't even know who's
going to start right now,"
coach Mark Richt said. "If
Washaun was healthy the
entire week, he might have
got the nod."
Richt was confident
Ealey's injury would by
better by Saturday.
"!t's not necessarily any-
thing structurally wrong,"
Richt said. "But it's bother-
ing him right now. In a few
days that will subside, then
you add a little adrenaline
to it and hell be fine."
Although Rainey and
King will be back in the
mix, both drew negative


attention to their programs
during the season.
King was Georgia's 11th
player arrested this year.
Receiver Tavarres King
and safety Alec Ogletree
were suspended a game
following arrests.
Richt dismissed quarter-
back Zach Mettenberger,
linebacker Montez
Robinson and punter
Trent Dittmer before the
season, the booted line-
backer Demetre Baker in
September.
"Even those men that
have left our program, I
still think they all deserve
another opportunity to fin-
ish their college career and
pursue anything they want
to pursue," Richt said. "I
believe we're educators of
young men and there's a
lot of things we have to
educate them oi, and when
they go astray, we need to
straighten it out.
"Hopefully they'll learn
from it and become a bet-
ter man from it"
Meyer has similar expec-
tations for Rainey, a junior
who was charged with
aggravated stalking charge


after he allegedly sent
a text that read, in part,
'Time to die ..."
Meyer dismissed him
from the team the next
day, saying Rainey violated
the program's core value
regarding violence against
women.
Rainey agreed to a plea
deal last month on a mis-
demeanor charge. If he
stays out of trouble for six
months, the charge will be
dismissed.
Still, his arrest was the
30th in Meyer's six seasons
at Florida.
"Obviously, the initial
sting is a lot of negativity
brought on the program
and the, disappointment,"
Meyer said. "Then it's an
opportunity for a young
man to clear his name and
get himself right and get
him going like we have a
.bunch of guys around here
and a bunch of guys all
over the place.
"I just want to keep a
tight rein on Chris Rainey.
These things have never
been an issue before and
certainly never will be
again."


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City native Michael Kirkman holds the American League
Championship Series Trophy along with wife Laurie after the
Rangers beat the New York Yankees to advance to the World
Series.

KIRKMAN: Pitches again


Continued From Page 1B
Kirkman was the last of
four relievers that gave up
the runs, all coming with
two outs, on four hits and
four walks.
"Once they get that
momentum, it is tough
to stop," Kirkman said.
"That is why those 2-3
run innings can turn into
a 7-run inning like that.
It is not fun to watch and
not fun to be a part of. It
seems like everything goes
wrong."
Derek Holland was on
everybody's criticism hit .
list, as he could not find
the plate after coming in
for Darren O'Day.
Holland threw 11 straight
balls and walked three
batters.
"I have never seen him
do anything close to that,"
Kirkman said. "He works
hard on his mechanics and
has been great all year. It
just happens. He mtght
go out the next time and
strike out the side."
Mark Lowe did not
get an out and Kirkman
came in with runners at
the corners. He gave up a
triple and a double before
getting the last out on a
strikeout.
"They pinch-hit (Aaron)
Rowand and in a hitter's
count I left a pitch up and
he hit it in that big gap
out there," Kirkman said.
"I had a pitcher's count
on the next guy (Andres
Torres), but hung a slider.
It was at the bottom of
the zone, but not where it
needed to be."
Kirkman then sat down
Freddy Sanchez.
"I had faced him
a couple of times at


Oklahoma City when he
was rehabbing," Kirkman
said. "It was the first time I
had seen the other two and
that makes it a little tough.
I guess that's why you
need some time up here,
so you can see everybody."
In the big picture, San
Francisco has only held
serve at home and the
Rangers are returning to
familiar territory. Friday's
workout was scheduled for
4-6 p.m.
"We have played really
good at home, especially
when I was here," Kirkman
said. "Hopefully it will be
a turning point for us. We
have got to get big hits in
big situations, and we as a
bullpen have got to step up
when we get a chance."
In baseball, where the
really good teams still
lose 60 games in a season,
Kirkman said the idea is to
keep an even keel.
"It is a game of failure,"
Kirkman said. "Hitters fail
70 percent of the time and-
get into the hall of fame.
You have got to accept
that and overcome it when
you're not playing at your
best.
"It is rough, but
everybody tries to forget ,
about it once they leave the
ballpark. You can worry
about it after the season."

Lake City native
Michael Kirkman is a 2005
graduate of Columbia
High. The left-hander was
called up by the Texas
Rangers in August and
has pitched in relief. He is
sharing his World Series
experience with readers of
the Lake City Reporter.


SERIES: Giants in control
Continued From Page 1B


members joined. in. Adults
ran. the bases, a toddler
made a headfirst dive toward
home plate. Hugs and high-
fives for all., Hundreds of
fans cheered from the box
seats, horns honked out-
side AT&T Park.
Sure looked like the
Giants had just won the
World Series.
They will, too, unless the
Texas Rangers can reverse
their fortunes at home.
Down 2-0, the hitters are
slumping, the bullpen is a
wreck and the manager is
being criticized. A team that
did so well in the AL play-
offs got battered 11-7 in the
opener, then embarrassed
9-0.
"We're not playing the
same. I don't know what it
is," Texas slugger Nelson
Cruz said. "I wish I could
tell you. The way we're
playing, it's different. It's
not us."
Neither is San Francisco,
apparently. The week began
with many fans wondering
whether the Giants could
hit enough to win so far,
they've become the first NL
team to score at least nine
runs in back-to-back World
Series games.
"Well, it's nice to do it


a little bit easier. As you
know, we don't do things
easy," manager Bruce
Bochy said.
Bochy and the Giants
were inside the clubhouse
while the postgame festivi-
ties took place on the field,
so nobody could accuse
them of celebrating too
early.
Outside, members of
the Giants organization
whooped it up. They stood
around the NL champion-
ship trophy the official
picture might've been a mat-
ter of logistics since there's
no guarantee the Series will
return to San Francisco.
"See you next year,"
some giddy fans told ush-
ers on their way out of the
stadium. Others chanted
"Sweep! Sweep!"
"We have a lot of baseball
left, but if anything to see
how these fans have come
out and brought the enthu-
siasm, energy, it's been a
lot of fun here playing down
the stretch," Bochy said.
After Friday's break,
Colby Lewis is set to
start Game 3 Saturday
night against Giants lefty
Jonathan Sanchez. It will be
the first Series game in the
Dallas-Fort Worth area.


Defense expected to lead CHS


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreflorter.com

Columbia High coach
Ashley Brown begins her
first full season as coach
of the Lady Tigers' soccer
team this week, and Brown
expects good things from a
senior-heavy class.
Brown and the Lady
Tigers will travel to
Hamilton County High
at 7 p.m. Tuesday for the
beginning of the regu-
lar season after playing
exhibition matches
against P.K. Yonge and
Gainesville high schools on
Thursday.
The Lady Tigers fell
to P.K Ypnge 1-0 in the
first game before tying
Gainesville 1-1 in their sec-
ond contest. Haley Dicks
scored Columbia's only
goal with five minutes
remaining against the Lady
Hurricanes.
"I think we came out with
intensity, but we need to
clean up our play," Brown


said. 'We have to get bet-
ter first touches and com-
munication. We did lose
Brittany Strickland with a
knee injury and Holly Boris
had to be taken to the ER
after taking an elbow to the
face."
Strickland will go in for
an MRI to update her status
this week. She was one of
three captains selected by
the team for the upcoming
season along with Dicks
and Leslie Wood.
"She's always positive
and will stay after practice
to help others improve,"
Brown said.
All of the captains have
individual strengths,
according to the coach.
"Leslie is a consistent
player," Brown said. "She's
never up and down. She's
shy and quiet, but aggres-
sive. Haley is just very pos-
itive in general and always
works hard. She's got great
size and speed, and can be
more aggressive control-
ling the midfield."


, c. S earhable Cassid
r A led AdS O


Keeley Murray will take
over in the goal for the
Lady Tigers and will anchor
what Brown expects to
be a solid defense for
Columbia.
"Our strength is our
defense," she said. "We're
really strong and have a
strong keeper in Murray.
We're looking for the girls
to step up in the middle
and on the outside. Losing
ShelbyWidergren will hurt,
but we've got Haley and
Brittany to command the
middle of the field. Overall,
the program is strong with
a lot of seniors coming back
and some sophomores that
have improved over the
summer.
I think they've put in a
lot of hard work. They have
the work ethic and inten-
sity. They have a belief in
each other. They trust their
teammates and there's
great senior leadership."
Of course, the district
will have some of the top
contenders from around


the state. The Lady Tigers
will contend with the likes
of Gainesville, Fleming
Island, Robert E Lee,
.Ridgeview, Buchholz, Ed
White, Middleburg and
Santa Fe.
Brown believes that the
Lady Tigers can be in the
top tier of those programs.
"I think the district is
always strong starting with
Buchholz and Fleming
Island," she said. "I think
a lot of the talent is fairly
young. Depending on if we
can step ,up and make an
impact, I think we can fall
right in toward the top."
Scott Busby will step in
as an assistant coach for
the Lady Tigers.
"He played at CHS and
he's a tremendous help,"
Brown said. "He's got a
great energy and you can
tell he enjoys it. Erika
Hall is also volunteering
her time and helping the
program."
The soccer season will
run through January.


'" Connected ..
S. Cnu www.lakecltyreporter.com
L ae Lke ('it
1|1 ,, Reporter


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


\ II NO SIR, PARSON,
WE WOULDN'T I
SAVf7 I BE GOSSIPIN' !! j


ZITS






WOULPMA
BCENYS
PARGM6


IF WE KNOWED
YOU WUZ
COMIN' !!


GARFIELD


B.C.

OR-E DLiS To TOSU W50 NEV-MAr- o We'IL HAvE soTa-THIMN
aNLuME-Rs TO ol drj's. NUMEPs,COcH,/ To -TIE IF YoU
W ..H Now VE CATCA A ALL


DEAR ABBY


Tween takes stock of life

and wants to make changes


DEAR ABBY: I am a 12-
year-old girl who is not hap-
py with who I am. When I
was younger I always imag-
ined what I'd be like when I
was older and this is not
who I want to be.
I am the girl everyone
wants to date. I have lost
people close to me lately
and made mistakes I wish I
could take back. I love God
and the fact that He gave me
life, but I don't like myself.
People treat me like I have
no feelings sometimes, and
I'm tired of drama that isn't
worth my time. I want to
change who I am to who I
really want to be.
Do you have any tips on
how to make myself the
person I want to be, and not
the person everyone else
wants? WHO AM I?
VALRICO, FIA.
DEAR WHO AM I?:
You are an intelligent young
lady who has recognized
that she must make chang-
es if she wants to achieve
her goals. Good for you.
At 12, you're not fro-
zen into any role. There is
time to change your image.
While it may be flattering
to be someone "everyone
wants to date," you are not
obligated to date anyone.
Concentrate on improving
your grades, becoming ac-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
tive in sports, developing
your interests and a stron-
ger relationship with your
church. If you do, you will
form different kinds of re-
lationships that will enable
you to become the person
you want to be. I have no
doubt that you'll accom-
plish whatever you set your
mind to because you have
already started.
DEAR ABBY: I am a
friendly, 23-year-old wom-
an who likes to make new
friends all the time. Recent-
ly, though, I have had a few
"bumps" and I'm not sure if
I may be doing something
wrong.
I tried to befriend one
girl who was an acquain-
tance from high school. I
found her on Facebook and
sent her a message. She re-.
plied that she was glad for
the surprise e-mail. I sent
her a reply, but she never
returned one.-I also tried to
add her as a friend,'but she
declined.
Then there's the girl who


is the sister of one of my
male friends. I found her on
Facebook, too, and sent her
an e-mail. It was the same
story. I got a friendly reply
- then nothing.
I met the third girl online
at a different friend-type
site. She said she was "so
glad I messaged her" and
the same scenario repeated.
I'm confused. Am I making
some mistake or just pick-
ing the wrong people to be-
friend? EVERYONE'S
PAL, EUGENE, ORE.
DEAR PAJL: What mat-
ters in life isn't the number
of friends one has, but the
quality of the friendship.
Friendship does not usu-
ally happen spontaneously,
it takes time and common
interests among acquain-
tances to build.
Instead of trying to make
friends all the time, concen-
trate on trying to nurture
relationships more slowly
on common interest sites.
The approach you have
chosen may strike others
as a little too aggressive.
Also, stop depending on on-
line sites and venture into
the real world, too.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't look for
trouble or you will surely
find it. It's best to engage
in some down time with
people you enjoy and trust.
A partnership is likely to
develop with someone
who shares your interests.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Go where the ac-
tion is and experience new
people and places. You can
learn from the activities you
take part in and the people
with whom you talk. Love
is on the rise and, single
or not, you will encounter
some people who interest
you. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Focusing on
what you can do at home
to make things better will
bring far greater returns in
the end. Stick up for those
close to you and protect the
ones you love from being
misled by someone selling
the impossible. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Make your rove,
do your own thing but most
of all don't procrastinate.
Relationships will take on
a new flavor if you spice
things up or find fun ways
to spend time together.
Children will highlight your
life. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Give more, take less
but protect what's yours
already. Nothing is perfect
but it is attainable if you
are fair and share. Once
you have made your deci-
sion and followed through,
it will be time to enjoy the
exciting of new beginnings.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Getting angry will be
your demise. Think before
you react. You will get fur-
ther ahead if you are diplo-
matic and willing to c9m-
promise to make things
work for everyone involved.
Don't let anyone take ad-
vantage of you. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): If you are willing to ac-
cept what's happening, you
will stand a much better
chance of making the right
personal choices. You have
to give the impression you
are on top of the world. Ev-
eryone wants. to associate
with someone who is posi-
tive and confident. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't let emo-
tions dictate what happens.
Love is in the picture but, if
you allow jealousy or pos-
sessiveness to creep in, you
will ruin a good time. An


idea you have can change
the way you do things. **
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Put your
energy, hope and trust in
what you do best. An in-
vestment will pay off if you
stick to your budget and
make your move when an
opportunity presents itself.
Helping someone out will
'lead to valuable informa-
tion. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Let your in-
stincts lead the way. Take
note of what everyone
around you is doing. Know-
ing who can offer what will
be strategic in days to come.
Don't let an emotional mat-
ter get out of hand. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can't win
if you try to reason with
someone who isn't being
receptive. Back away and
reassess your situation. It
may be better to cut your
losses and move on. Focus
on what you can do to im-
prove your lifestyle. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't stop if
you think you can accom-
plish your goals. It may be
the weekend but let your
entrepreneurial spirit take
over and lead you in a direc-
tion that looks personally
and professionally promis-
ing. ***


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals V
"YWHOH XOH FJTWYN UWHF YWH

UBSKHN XOH NJSHFY XFZ BFSA YWH


RBBF WBUSN."


THBOTH IXOSJF


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "When life knocks you to your knees, and it will ..
isn't that the best position from which to pray?" Ethel Barrymore
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-30


CLASSIC PEANUTS

yUt mHlH,,ER1 I
LSt1AlTIN A H qOVBEENi "
|FITHRA T OL T i
APUMW 10 TRA$ RE 6


Page Editor: Emogene Graham,











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010


IWU3I


SELLg


F~IND I


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


4 lies days anal
personal merchandise totaling $100 or less
Each item must include a price
This is a non-refundable rate




4 lines 6 days additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personalmerchendisetotalling $500orless.
Each Item must Include price.
This Is a no-rundabl. s .o




One em per ad |
4 lines 6 days ach d4onal
Rate applies o private individuals sling
persona merchandise totalling $1,00 or less.


SEach item must include a pdice

One item per ad $2370
14 lines 6 days alng |$ o 4
S Rate applies to private ndividualsselling
personal merchandise totalling $2,50 or less
Each Item must Include a price.
This isa non-refundableorate.








4 lines *l f ai s Each addi tional
lines ays $.55
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
person merchandise titao ing $4000 or less.
Each itimo n e
Includs Ean i t Include a price. r
This is a nonrefundable rate.




|One Item per ad Ea1 addit
a lines 6 days
Rate applies to private Individuals ling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or lass
S Each tem must include a price.
This Is a non- refundable rate.













You can cals fat a e
3days 1750
"lalsidu"S""2s Eac aWdtltmia][lbs '1.65



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
















FlaX: 386-752-9400 Please
You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
EMAIL: classified person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon,,11:00am. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon.,S9:0a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed., 9I0 am.
Friday Thrs., 10:00 am. Tlhurs.,9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fr., 9:00 am.
These deadlines are subject to change withoAt notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
BIIIIng Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
Swill be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lalikccityrcportcr.com


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-1108-SC
CURTIS PARKER OR PATSY
SCOTT
6349 SW SR 47
LAKE CITY, FL 32024
Plaintiff
VS
OPAL DAVIS KING
16601 JEWETT STAPT. 105
WHITE SPRINGS, FL 32096
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1991 SUZI
with serial # 2S2AC35S2M6601940
located in Lake' City, Columbia
County, Florida.
The following persons) may claim
some right, title or interest therein:
CURTIS PARK OR PATSY
SCOTT
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written answer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within 10 days.
CLERK OF COURTS
BY: /s/ D. Watkins
Deputy Clerk
04542184
October 30, 2010
November 6, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-34-CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
v.
JASON JENKINS and JACKIE
JENKINS; any and all unknown par-
ties claiming by, through, under, or
against the herein named through,
under, or against the herein named
individual Defendant(s) who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties may claim an
interest as spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees or other claimants; John
Doe and Jane Doe as unknown ten-
ants in possession,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given the P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County Flor-
ida, will on the 17th day of Novem-
ber, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Co-
lumbia County courthouse in the
City of Lake City, Florida, offer for
sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the
following described property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:
Lot 32 of Country Creek, according
to the plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 4, at Page 81, of the public re-
cords of Columbia County, FL
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 10-34-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court, this 13 day of October,
2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04541999
October 23, 30, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000503
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LISA M. MARTIN, pt al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: LISA M. MARTIN
Last Known Address: 437 NW Ash
Dr. Lake City, FL 32055-5142
Current Address: Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services


Legal

to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST: COM-
MENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4
AND RUN THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SEC-
ONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
33.68 FEET TO THE NORTH
TIGHT-OF-WAY OF ASH ROAD;
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
385.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE NORTH 89 DEGREES 17 MI-
NUTES 42 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-
WAY OF ASH ROAD A DIS-
TANCE OF 133.26 FEET; THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MI-
NUTES 40 SECONDS 0 WEST A
DISTANCE OF 225.26 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 14 SEC-
ONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
133.24 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 21 MINUTES 40 SEC-
ONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
227.20 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF ASH
ROAD AND THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. IN COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. THE FOREGOING
DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS ALSO
KNOWN AS LOT NO. 28 OF
SEALEY SOUTH, AN UNRE-
CORDED SUBDIVISION.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND
APPURTENANCE THERETO DE-
SCRIBED AS 2006 FLEETWOOD
BEARING VIN NUMBERS
GAFL53SA90708BH21 AND
GAFL53SB90708BH21
A/K/A 437 NW ASH DR., LAKE
CITY, FL 32055-5142
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after
the first publication, if any, n Alber-
telli Law, plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa,
FL 33623, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court wither before
service on Plaintiff's attorney, or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once a
week for two consecutive in The
Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS mu hand and the seal of
this court on this 15th day of Octo-
ber, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Please send invoice and copy to:
Albertelli Law
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
10-41787
**See the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should call Jacquetta
Bradley, ADA Coordinator, Third
Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-
7428 within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing impaired call (800) 955-
8771; if your voice impaired, call
(800) 955-8770. To file response
please contact Columbia County
Clerk of Court, 173 NE. Hernando
Ave., Lake City, FL 32056-2069;
Fax: (386) 758-1337.
04541998
October 23, 30, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION NO.
PLANTATION AT DEEP
CREEK, LLC, a Florida limited
liability company,
16525 Temple Boulevard
Loxahatchee, FL 33470
Plaintiff,
vs.
ADVERSE POSSESSION,
QUIET TITLE
P.G. BROWN, LULA HARDEE
BROWN,
E.V. BROWN, W.S. BROWN, JAN-
IE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B.
SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN, JR.,
E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH B.
HEATH,
addresses unknown, and their un-
known spouses and children, their
.heirs, devisees, and personal repre-
sentatives and their or any of their
heirs, devisees, executors, adminis-
trators, grantees, trustees, assigns, or
successors in right, title, or interest to
the hereinafter described property
and any and all persons claiming by
or through them or any of them; and
all claimants, persons or parties, nat-
ural or corporate, or whose exact le-
gal status is unknown, claiming un-
der any of the above named or de-
scribed defendants, claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in and to
the lands hereinafter described, the
addressed of whom are unknown;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: P.G. BROWN, LULA
HARDEE BROWN, E.V. BROWN,
W.S. BROWN, JANIE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B. SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN,
JR., E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH
B. HEATH, addresses unknown, and
their unknown spouses and children,
their heirs, devisees, and personal
representatives and their or any of
their heirs, devisees, executors, ad-
ministrators, grantees, trustees, as-
signs, or successors in right, title, or
interest to the hereinafter described


property and any and all persons
claiming by or through them or any
of them; and all claimants, persons
or parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants,


Legal

claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in and to the lands herein-
after described, the addresses of
whom are unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action seeking an order of ad-
verse possession for and to quiet the
title of the following property in Co-
lumbia County, Florida:
A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF
(W 1/2) OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE
17 EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING THOSE LANDS
DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1007,
PAGE 2420 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF'
SAID SECTION 31; THENCE
NORTH 00905'09" WEST ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF SAID NE 1/4
A DISTANCE OF 825.05 FEET TO
THE INTERSECTION OF SAID
WEST LINE WITH THE NORTH-
ERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF NORTHWEST
CANSA ROAD AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL;
THENCE CONTINUE NORTH
00905'09" WEST ALONG SAID
WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF
566.67 FEET TO THE SOUTH
LINE OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1021,
PAGE 826 OF THE AFORESAID
RECORDS; THENCE SOUTH
61907'42" EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE A DISTANCE OF
353.29 FEET TO A REBAR ON
THE AFORESAID NORTHERLY
MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE; THENCE SOUTH 37'55'01"
WEST ALONG SAID NORTHER-
LY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF
502.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
CONTAINING 2.01 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
SAID' LANDS SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Clay
A. Schnitker, Davis, Schnitker,
Reeves & Browning, P.A., Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Drawer 652, Madison, Florida
32341, on or before November 24,
2010, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
Dated October 21, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Court
By:B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04542045
October 23, 30, 2010
November 6, 13, 2010


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197

1 00 Job
100 Opportunities

04542061
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Post Closing File Coordinator.
This position provides
administrative assistance to loan
officers and loan department
staff. Previous office environ-
ment experience required.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City FL 32056 or
email Turbeville.J(ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542062
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Commercial Loan Processor in
Lake City. This position is
responsible for documentation
and transaction management,
coordinates loan closings and
other duties as assigned.
Previous loan processing
experience is preferred.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
Sand submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City FL 32056 or
email resume to
Turbeville.J@(ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

055243106
Human Resource/Fiscal Clerk
Min 2 yrs computer experience
intermediate/advanced skill in
Word, Excel, Publisher, &
PowerPoint. Preler 1 yr
accounts payable/payroll/
human resource experience.
HS Dip/GED. To apply:
Submit cover letter and resume
to: SV4Cs PO Box 2637, Lake


100 Job
o100 Opportunities

04542090




Managers and Assistant
Managers
Join a fast growing team of
managers in the Convenience
store business. Now accepting
applications for qualified
people for a new store in
Lake City, Florida.
We offer a competitive salary,
weekly pay, bonus, incentives,
paid holidays, and vacation.
Must have retail experience
and willing to work a
flexible schedule.
Apply at the Lake City
Fast Track Location on
Highway 90
or
Call: 866-539-7685 Ext 24
Fax Resume to: 352-333-1161
Email:
dturner fasttrackstores.com


04542126




FAMILY CASE MANAGER
Masters Degree in Social Work
or related Human Services field
required. Two years experience
preferred. Serve youth and
families in nine northern Florida
counties. Office will be located
at the Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch campus in Live Oak.
Travel to the Boys Ranch will
be on a bi-weekly basis.
Agency vehicle provided for
business usage. Contact Linda
Mather at 386/842-5555
(fax resume 386/842-1029)
EOE/DFWP

05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
p'm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
sents seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
one of these positions to qualify
for the job. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all'
managers before they are hired.

Accepting applications for
Housekeeping/Weekend Breakfast
attendant.. Apply in person at
Cabot Lodge 3525 US
Hwy 90W. No phone calls.
Lily Pad is Hiring!
Looking for Outgoing Sales
Associates for Seasonal Positions!
Bring in Resume Today!
Mechanic Needed
Heavy truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the
right person, Southern Specialized
Truck & Trailer, US 41 N
386-752-9754
Operations/MGR Position
Exceptional people skills,
Proficient with Quickbooks req,
Marketing exp req, M-F, some
travel, job demanding but reward-
ing, fast paced medical industry,
fax resumes to 386-758-9047

120 Medical
120 Employment

04542125
Assistant Office Manager
Must have Medical Billing
experience including
Medicare and Medicaid.
Please apply in person to
Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave,
Lake City, Fl or
fax resume to 386-752-7337.
EOE/DFWP

05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp. Call Cindi: (850)253-1906

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of CNA/MA/LPN
for full-time position
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494


190 Mortgage Money

FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com


240 Schools &
Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/08/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they.
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. .Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida

unsure, contact the local
office for information.

30n Livestock &
3J 0 Supplies
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

360 Feed, Seed
3 & Plants

Perrenial Peanut Hay,
Wholesale prices direct from the
farm. $3-$9 per bale,
Madison 850-464-3947


401 Antiques

Antique Table,
Ten sided, 30" high and wide
$50
386-758-9205
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fur., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Slide in 30" Electric Rahge
$100
386-292-3927 or
386-754-9295


403 Auctions

04542087
Public Auction
Sat. Oct. 30, 2010 @10:30 A.M.
Location: 8486 N. US. Hwy 441

3/2 Mobile Home on
3.66 AC of Land
For More Info Call: John Hill
386-362-3300 Lic.Re.Bkr.



408 Furniture

7 PIECE SOLID OAK QUEEN
Bedroom Set, good condition,
must sell $450 OBO.
Call 386-752-5345 after 3:00 p.m.
Ceramic Table Lamp,
Maroon, 28" high,
$20
386-758-9205
Dual reclining
Love seat.
$100.
86-752-3720
Floor Lamp, 65" high,
Brass finish base,
$20
386-758-9205
FOR SALE
Queen Bed.
$80.
386-758-3574
FUTON BED
Queen Size
Wood Frame $75.00
386758-3574
MUST SEE!! Sofa & Loveseat.
Navy Blue & Black. Plush &
comfortable. Immaculate condi-
tion $200 Call 386-935-0654

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman Rider
42" cut, good condition,
$385
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295
Nice Craftsman Push Mower,
6.5 HP, runs good,
$85 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

412 Medical
412 Supplies

Medical potty Chair.
Brand new $50.
386-752-3720


416 Sporting Goods

Inversion Table,
had to move,
only a few months old $75
386-719-8886
Sportcraft TX, 4.9 Treadmill,
almost new
$100
386-758-9205


Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


City, 32056; In person:
236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake
City 32025; By email:
arobinson@sv4cs.org
Closes 11/5/2010 EOE


I


Classified Department: 755-5440










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010.


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE Sat Oct 30. 9-?
206 SW Greenbrier in
Timberlane off Troy Rd.
386-365-4950
Friday & Saturday 8am
Collectables, Antiques,
(2 blks N of VA)
433 S. Marion Ave
MULTI FAMILY Sale. Sat. 8-?
Hwy 47 to 242 to Wise Estates.
353 SW Wise Dr. Too much to list
From clothes to furniture. (Signs)


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat & Sun, 8am ?, Something for
everyone! 119 SE Travis Glen,
(252 by High School
to Forest & comer of Travis)
SAT. 7:30-? Hwy 441S across
from North Florida Eyecare, right
on Alamo Dr. Look for signs. Pots
& pans, clothes, furn., much more.

440 Miscellaneous
10' X 3' Inflatable Pool,
pump and all still in box
$60
386-292-3927or 386-154-9295
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231
Rug Doctor
w/Attachments
$400 firm
386-719-8886
White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $60
386-935-0654

450 Good Things
S to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
1 bd/1 bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
386-752-1941 or 386-965-0932
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
Squth of town,NO Pets.
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2br/2ba MH on 2.5 ac located 10
min from Lake City, quite area.
Washer/Dryer, all appliances incl.
$550/mo. Amanda 386-365-6493.
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
DWMH, $850 mo Spacious 4/2,
6n 5 acres, just south of Lake City,
clean, quiet, great location, storage
shed. November FREE. Last
month & $300 security, 386-462-
1138, No Cats/Pitbulls


6 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/I BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825
FSBO 5 acres in Ellisville area
w/3br DWMH ready to move in.
Plus 20X24 workshop. $2000.
down $675 per mo. 386-752-4597

71 Unfurnished Apt.
71v0 For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $600 plus dep & bckgmd
chk. 352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
1 bedroom upstairs apartment,
utilities & cable included,
$150 a week, $300 deposit,
386-758-2080 or 755-1670
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

(1454207
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2 br/lba House w/yard,
near airport, $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.




am In Print,
Carriage LS
36' 3 slide fifth wheel Online
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only. n ow
$26,000 OBO VneLow
Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with P e
low miles. $47,000 Prce
Call
386-755-0653

Fo Mr Dtal Cl


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2bedroom/lbath in city
$550. mo. plus deposit
No Pets! Call Buckey
386-758-0057
3 possible 4 br 1 ba home
located in Lake City (90west)
$800.00 first & last required
386-623-9686 or 386-288-0120
3/2 big, in town, small indoor pet
ok, W/D hook-up, hard wood
floors, $650 mo, plus $200 sec,
386-397-3568
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.cgm
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A'
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NWof Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

'750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Gommercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A.Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N441 & 1-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wV $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
04542115
3/2 on 4 acres, "Like New"
Brick home w/18'X20'
concrete block
workshop. $139,900.
Call Susan Eagle/
Daniel Crapps Agency,
Realtor 386-623-6612

801' Farms &
8A2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFiniancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks


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