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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01438
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/29/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01438
System ID: UF00028308:01438
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









WORLD SERIES da TIGERS TUMBLE


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Columbia falls to Ed White, 25- I .
SPORTS, I B


reporter


Friday, October 29, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 242 N 75 cents



CHS band in state semis

Tigers advance further well," Schulz said "But ing new for the Tigers..
we've done extremely well Last Saturday, they host-
than any marching s year. ed the Florida Band
anchThis is the first year Masters Association
band in school history w've qualified for state." District Marching Band
i ryColumbiadid it by plac- Performance Assessment,
ing fifth out of 17 in the which Schulz. described
By C.J. Risak least not at the state level. smaller bands division Oct. as the "FCAT of march-
crisak@lakecityreporter.com But the Tigers do have that 16 at the Ocala Marching ing bands. It's not a com-
distinction as far as school Festival. Out of the 27 petition, just judges (other
Best ever. history is concerned, bands competing overall, high school and college
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter Columbia High School's according to band director Columbia was ninth and directors) coming in and
Columbia High School marching band member Tyler Lents marching band hasn't Ryan Schulz. earned a superior rating.
(center) practices during a drill on Tuesday afternoon, reached that plateau yet, at "We've. always done That rating is noth- BAND continued on 3A


Woman in critical

condition after

motorcycle accident


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City woman was
critically injured Thursday
morning when she lost con-
trol of her motorcycle and
was thrown from the bike
after it ran through shrub-
bery near a local motel.
Anita Marie Sullivan, 35,
was taken to a Gainesville
hospital with injuries she
sustained in the wreck. She
was not wearing a helmet,
reports said.
The wreck occurred
around 10:30 a.m. Thursday
on U.S. Highway 90 just
east of SW Home Depot
Drive near the Piney Woods
Lodge.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Sullivan was traveling east-
bound on U.S. Highway
90 driving a 2002 Honda


motorcycle.
Witness accounts sa
Sullivan traveled throu
the intersection of Sta
Road 247 and then. -l
control of the bike. T
motorcycle traveled acro
the 'outside lane and o0
the sidewalk and continue
heading east on the gra
as it approached the prc
erty of the Piney Woo
Lodge, where it stru
some shrubbery, throwi
Sullivan from the bike.
The motorcycle cont
ued eastbound for a shc
distance before it struck
tree.
Sullivan was taken
Shands at the University
Florida where she remain
in critical condition.
Charges in connect
with the wreck are pendi
completion of a FHP inv
tigation, reports said.


Chamber bringing

in new business

exchange clubs


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County-
Lake City Chamber of
Commerce is forming a
new program to help busi-
nesses exchange leads and
referrals.
An information meeting
on Leads Clubs is 5:30-6:30
p.m. Nov. 4 at Holiday Inn
& Suites Lake City.
Leads Clubs are dynamic
groups of chamber mem-
bers who meet bi-monthly
to exchange business leads
and ideas with fellow busi-


ness professionals, sa
Rod Butler, organizer a
Holiday Inn Lake City ge
eral manager.
"I have participated
Leads Clubs in other m
kets where I have work<
and I know what a pow
ful resource they can
for growing a business,"
said.
The clubs give local bu
-ness owners and prof
sionals an opportunity
meet and share qualifi
business leads with th
CLUBS continued on


A


Crov

aid
gh By LEANNEI
ate Ityo@lakecityr
ost
hSS
aito
ed
ass the county
rds missed.
Ads
ck At least
ng cials and r
community
in- recognize
ort ment at a
a tion held
honor fo
to ment from
of County Bo
ins Commissic
Columbia
on Developme
ng the Comfor
es- City Thurs
Weaver
- -three ter
2's commi
3 years as
member. I
sitting on tI
is Nov. 4.
He said



aid
nd
en-
in
lar-
er-
be
he
si-
es-
to Local attorn
ed County Corn
eir thrown in his
are Lyla Fol
3A Weaver and


Fond Farewell


vd gathers to say goodbye to Dewey Weaver


TYO
reporter. corn


ommission-
er Dewey
Weaver's ser-
vice and com-
mitment to
will surely be


60 county offi-
members of the
y gathered to
that commit-
farewell recep-
in Weaver's
r his retire-
n the Columbia
)ard of County
>ners and the
County Tourist
ent Council at
rt Suites in Lake
day.
served 12 years
ms as District
ssioner and 10
a TDC board
His last meeting
he county board
he will miss the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Weaver comments on his relationship with local photographer John Moran after a framed and
autographed photograph of Ichetucknee Springs, which falls in his district, was presented to


people he had the chance to
serve and that he has been
richly blessed through his
work, friends and family.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ey Bill Haley congratulates retiring Columbia
nmissioner Dewey Weaver at a farewell reception
s honor Thursday at the Comfort Suites. Pictured
som (from left), 1, her grandmother Tina Roberts,
I Haley,


"I can't tell you how
God has blessed Dewey
Weaver," he said.
"I'd like to thank the
people in my district who
elected me and reelected
me," Weaver said at the
beginning of the reception.
"It's truly been an honor to
serve. There's few people
that get that opportunity
and I've been blessed."
The reception's organi-
zation was a collaborative
effort between the TDC,
the county, and Nick and
RJ, Patel, Comfort Suites
co-owners, who sponsored
the event.
Nick Patel, who sat with
Weaver on the TDC board,
said Weaver has accom-
plished much for the com-
munity and hotel industry.
"I just couldn't let him go
without a farewell party,"


he said.
"It comes out of our
hearts to do it," PJ. Patel
said.
Commissioners Jody
DuPree, Stephen Bailey,
Scarlet Frisina, and Ron
Williams, board chairman,
shared fond memories of
friendships formed with
Weaver and serving on the
board together.
Williams said the board
will miss Weaver's lead-
ership. When Weaver
made a decision, it was
for Columbia County as a
whole, not just District 2,
he said.
"He had Columbia
County at heart," Williams
said.
DuPree, Bailey and
Frisina wished Weaver well
DEWEY continued on 3A


Alligator Fest under way today am "1


From staff reports

Alligator Fest opens
today at its new location at
O'Leno State Park in south-
ern Columbia County. The
event runs from 9 a.m.-5
p.m. today and also will be
open to visitors during reg-
ular park hours on Saturday
and Sunday.
The event will offer a liv-
ing history demonstration
of both a Native American
gathering with dancers,


musicians, artisans, and
traders in a scene that
includes a re-enactment of
the Sept. 11, 1836, Seminole
War Battle of San Felasco
Hammock.
Event organizers said the
festival is designed for the
entire family to enjoy the
annual Alligator Festival
which celebrates the early
history of Columbia County,
before 1859, when Alligator
Town was renamed Lake
City.


The Alligator Fest for-
merly was held on the
banks of Lake DeSoto in
downtown Lake City and
in recent years had moved
to the campus of Florida
Gateway College. This
year, the event moves to
O'Leno State Park. The
Alligator Fest encampment
is offered free to the pub-
lic with a paid park admis-
sion.
O'Leno State Park is locat-
ed on U.S. 441, six miles


north of High Springs, but
is on the north bank of the
Santa Fe River in Columbia
County.
The Alligator Festival or
Alligator Warrior Festival, as
it is sometimes known, is
an annual non-profit event in
memory of the years leading
up to 1859 before Alligator
was renamed Lake City.
For more information on
the event, see the organiz-
ing group's Web site: www.
alligatorfest.org.


Alligator Fest offers all sorts of family fun and
experience, too.


FILE PHOTO
is a learning


I1 84264U0 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
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Voice: 75S-5445
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77
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


. -<,,_ Opinion .............
.._ _. People in the News....
Advice & Comics......
._ Puzzles...........
--, -I Around Florida.......


PEOPLE
' tl-i Bh .o ..:.


COMING
SATURDAY
It I ur-il. r, I Tre.-it
tillmlei


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


'ay,4)


C SH3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-8-4
Evening: 3-3-7


Thursday:
Afternoon: 1-6-0-2
Evening: 5-2-5-8


SU& Wednesday:
9-14-17-19-21


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Brooks to play benefit concert


NASHVILLE, Tenn.


C county music stars
Garth Brooks and
Trisha Yearwood said
Thursday they will play
a concert in December
to benefit flood relief in middle
Tennessee.
Brooks made the announcement
during a news conference Thursday
morning at the state capital that was
attended by Gov. Phil Bredesen,
Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and a
host of other politicians.
Brooks said making the decision
was easy: "I think we decided to do it,
the day we saw the flood."
He formally retired about a decade
ago to spend more time with his chil-
dren and Yearwood. But he began
performing at the Wynn Resort
in Las Vegas last December, and
expects to do 15 weeks of.shows
a year at least until his youngest
daughter graduates from high
school..
The benefit will be held Dec. 17 at
Bridgestone Arena and tickets will
go for $25. Information on how to
buy tickets will be released Nov. 3.
Brooks, said he likely will invite
other performers to participate and
left the door open for multiple per-
formances if there is demand.
There should plenty: He is the
best selling solo artist in U.S. history
with more than 128 million albums
sold.

Fergie named Billboard's
Woman of the Year
NEW YORK The Dutchess is
being crowned "Woman of the Year"
by Billboard magazine.
Fergie will be given the honor on
Dec. 2 at a ceremony in New York
City. The only female member of the
Black Eyed Peas says she's "hum-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Country Music stars Trisha Yearwood, right, and Garth Brooks, left, announce they
will hold a benefit concert in December 2010 for Nashville flood relief Thursday at
the old state capital in Nashville.


bled" to accept the award and called
it a "great career achievement."
The honor pays tribute to a trail-.
blazing female artist and her accom-
plishments. Though Fergie's only
solo album was 2006's mutli-platinum
"The Dutchess," she's continued to
sell out venues and score hits with
the Black Eyed Peas. They have a
new CD, "The Beginning," out Nov.
30.
Previous Billboard "Woman of the
Year" honorees were Beyonce, Ciara
and Reba McEntire.

'Sound of Music' cast
reunites on Oprah
CHICAGO It was the sound of
"The Sound of Music" cast on "The
Oprah Winfrey Show."
Winfrey says it's the first TV


appearance in 45 years of Julie
Andrews, Christopher Plummer and
the seven actors who played the
children.
In the interview that aired
Thursday, Andrews recalls the iconic
scene in which she sings about the
hills coming alive, saying the down-
draft from the helicopter filming
the scene kept knocking her to the
ground.
She also spoke of her surgery in
the 1990s that left her unable to sing,
saying she was in denial for a year,
thinking her voice would recover.
But she says it was that surgery that
led her to a new career as a writer.
Plummer joked about drinking
during the movie, and the now-
grown children told of growth spurts
and losing teeth during filming.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Curtis Lee is 69.
* Bluegrass singer-musi-
cian Sonny Osborne (The
Osborne Brothers) is 73.
* Country singer Lee Clayton
is 68.
* Rock musician Denny
Laine is 66.
* Singer Melba Moore is 65.
* Musician Peter Green is
64.

Daily Scripture


* Actor Richard Dreyfuss is
63.
* Actress Kate Jackson is
62.
* Comic strip artist Tom
Wilson ("Ziggy") is 53.
* Actress Finola Hughes is
51.
* Singer Randy Jackson is
49.
* Actress Joely Fisher is 43.


"For, 'All men are like grass,
and all their glory is like the
flowers of the field; the grass
withers and the flowers fall, but
the word of the Lord stands for-
ever.'And this is the word that
was preached to you."
I Peter 1:24-25


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number.............752-9400
circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, RFla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
' in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 31"-W880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10k0 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m:, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mall rates
2 Weeks............... . $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks ................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Poll: Crist trims
Rubio's lead

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Charlie Crist has cut into
Republican Marco Rubio's
once sizable lead in Florida's
three-way U.S. Senate con-
test as Democrats aban-
don the candidacy of their
party's nominee, a new poll
released Thursday shows.
Crist, however, still faces a
difficult task as Rubio retains
a seven-point lead going into
Tuesday's voting, accord-
ing to a Quinnipiac (Conn.)
University poll.
Meanwhile, Democrat
Alex Sink clings to a slight
advantage over Republican
Rick Scott in one of the nas-
tiest and most expensive
governor's races in Florida
history. Sink received 45
percent to Scott's 41 percent
with 11 percent undecided.
Nine percent say they might
change their minds.
"This race looks like it will
go to the finish line as a dead
heat," said Peter Brown,
assistant director of the poll.
"She has some .momentum,
but anything can happen in
the final days."
Quinnipiac questioned 784
likely voters by telephone
Oct 18 and. 24. The random
survey has a margin of error.
of 3.5 percentage points.
The poll had Rubio with
42 percent to Crist's 35
percent while Democrat
Kendrick Meek fell to 15
percent in the Senate race
where Crist is running as
an independent. Rubio,
who built his lead largely
on criticism of President
Barack Obama's policies,
led Crist by a 44 to 30 per-
cent margin two weeks ago
in a similar Quinnipiac poll
where Meek was favored
by 22 percent.
"Gov. Crist has pulled
within hailing distance,"
said Brown, who added
that the incumbent gov-
ernor will likely suffer on
Election Day without any
party machinery to assist a
get-out-the-vote effort.


THE WEATHER


SUNNY



HI 77L046


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Supporters wave signs for Florida Democratic Senate candi-
date Kendrick Meek during a campaign rally Tuesday in St.
Petersburg. Recent polls show Meek in third place, with for-
mer Florida House speaker Republican Rep. Marco Rubio in
the lead and Independent Gov. Charlie Crist in second place.


Panhandle landfill 800 pounds of
still burning marijuana found


PANAMA CITY -
Florida Panhandle officials
have gone to court to close
a landfill that has been
burning for more than a
week.
Bay County officials
are monitoring the blaze
to make sure it does not
threaten nearby homes or
grow into a wildfire.
The county's chief of
emergency. services says
firefighters are reluctant to
dampen the fire with water
because the run-off would
pose an environmental haz-
ard.
The county says it
doesn't have the author-
ity to bury the landfill to
stamp out the flames. The
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
is supposed to be closing
the landfill and covering it
with dirt, but the owner's
death has complicated the
process.
DEP officials have filed
a motion in Panama City
court to gain access to the
landfill. A hearing date has
not been set.


MIAMI Four men face
federal drug smuggling
and drug conspiracy charg-
es after the Coast Guard
found about 800 pounds
of marijuana on a boat off
Miami.
According to the U.S.
Attorney's Office in Miami,
Customs and Border
Protection agents spotted a
suspicious vessel from the
air on Oct. 21.
The Coast Guard was
dispatched to the 45-foot
boat's location about 2
miles east of Miami. The
officers boarded the vessel
and found the drugs in the
forward cabin.
U.S. authorities then
arranged for a controlled
delivery of the drugs to
the boat captain's associ-
ates. The three men were
arrested when they arrived
to pick up the marijuana.
A judge Wednesday
ordered two of the men to
be detained pending trial.
The others face detention
hearings Friday.


72/49


) MOSTLY ^ > PARTLY CHANCE
SUNNY CLOUDY r -STORMS


HI 80L51 Hi84LO61 HI 79 LOI58


Tallahassee *
75/41 -

74/50


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


* osta
75/43
Lake City,


c


91
66
78
56
90 In 1911
34 in 2008

0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
2.29"
43.42"


7a 1p 7p la 6a
Friday Saturday







Formcasted teipmbn '"Fuhl bi' tqpin


Slaksonvie
74/48


City
Cape Canavera
Daytona Beach


1/0 \ Ft. Lauderdale
minesville Da yt 2Beach Fort Myers
8/48 762 Galnesvllle
Ocala Jacksonville
9/49 Key West
1 Orlando CapeCanaeral
83/62 80/69 Lake City
8 3/62Miami
STaa Naples
85/2 West Palm Beach Ocala
84/71 Orlando
S Ft Laudeiral Panama City
Ft. Myers. 85/75 0 Pensacola
87/64 Naples Tallahassee
'87/67 Miami Tampa
Ky West \ 8 /73 Valdosta
85/75* W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moondse today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:42 a.m.
6:46 p.m.
7:43 a.m.
6:45 p.m.


1:35 p.m.
12:32 a,m.
2:17 p.m.


Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov.
30 6 13 21
Last New First Full


' I KII


On this date in
1989, severe
thunderstorms in
Oklahoma and nc
central Texas prc
duced 2-inch dial
eter hail at Altus
Oklahoma. Large
hail damaged 60
to 80% of the co
ton crop in Tillma
County, Oklahom


6
MIX
3nfltile sb Ia
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
.. ,


Saturday
l 78. 63,
h 80/60/s
83/71/pc
85/62/pc
79/52/s
75/53/s
86/76/t
79/51/s
83/70/pc
85/64/pc
80/53/s
82/60/s
75/56/s
75/55/s
78/46/s
84/64/s
76/47/s
h 82/68/pc


Sunday
IS, 69 s
83/62/s
83/72/s
87/63/s
79/51/s
78/52/s
85/75/s
80/51/s
83/71/s
85/66/s
81/53/s
83/62/s
79/64/s
77/62/s
82/58/s
84/66/s
78/48/s
82/68/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


r Forecasts, data and graph-
.' l = Ics 2010 Weather Central
,'1L=- ULC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com





north


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* Associated Press


R O FORECAST. MAP f or i, OcIo '2


AROUND FLORIDA


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


Rules to follow


to make it a


safe Halloween


From staff reports

Halloween events can
be fun, but common sense
and adhering to good safety
advice can make the year's
largest candy-grab an eve-
ning to remember fondly.
Several agencies have
weighed in to make this
year's trick-or-treating
events fun for the entire
family.
Here are some of the
safety highlights from the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office:

* Plan costumes that
are bright and reflec-
tive. Make sure that
shoes fit well and that
costumes are short
enough to prevent
tripping, entangle-
ment or contact with
flame.
* Consider adding
reflective tape or
striping.to costumes
and trick-or-treat bags
for greater visibility.
* Because masks
can limit or block
eyesight, consider
non-toxic makeup
and decorative hats
as safer alternatives.
Hats should fit prop-
erly to prevent them
from sliding over
eyes.
* Wigs and acces-
sories should clearly
be labeled as flame
resistant.
* If.a sword, cane, or
stick is a part of your
child's costume, make
sure it is not sharp
or too long. A child
may be easily hurt by
these accessories if
he stumbles or trips.
* Obtain flashlights
with fresh batteries
for all children and
their escorts.
* Parents should
always accompany
their children on
trick-or-treating excur-
sions.
* Teach children
how to call 9-1-1 (or
their local emergency
number) if they have
an emergency or


become lost.
* Motorists should
expect and prepare
for children to be
everywhere.
If you're welcom-
ing little ghouls and
goblins to your home,
here are some addi-
tionals tips from law
enforcement.
m To keep homes
safe for visiting trick-
or-treaters, parents
should remove from
the porch and front
yard anything a child
could trip over such
as garden hoses, pot-
ted plants, toys, bikes
and lawn decorations.
* Parents should
check outdoor lights
and replace burned-
out bulbs.
* Wet leaves should
be swept from side-
walks and steps.
The Lake City
Humane Society adds
unique tips on how
to control your pets
during the uproar that
sometimes ensues
around Halloween.
* Keep your pet in a
separate room during
trick-or-treating hours
is best. At an open
door, dogs in particu-
lar, may feel the need
to protect their home.
Your pet also may
feel frightened and
dart through the open
door.
* Watch out for pets
around candles. Pets
are attracted to bright
lights in a darkened
room. Candles ,can
be easily knocked
over, spilling hot
wax everywhere and
potentially causing a
fire.
m Do not give your
pets candy. Chocolate
contains theobromine,
a substance that can
be poisonous to your
pet. It can be lethal to
pets. Candy wrappers
and sticks on caramel
apples can cause
choking and internal
organ damage.


Death toll rises in Indonesia


KRISTEN GELINEAU
Associated Press

MENTAWAI ISLANDS,
Indonesia The fisher-
man was jolted awake by
the powerful earthquake
and ran with his screaming
neighbors to high ground.
He said they watched as
the sea first receded and
then came roaring back
"like a big wall" that swept
away their entire village.
"Suddenly trees, houses
and all things in the village
were sucked into the sea
and nothing was left," Joni
Sageru recalled Thursday
in one of the first survi-
vor accounts of this week's
tsunami that slammed
into islands off western
Indonesia.
The death toll rose Friday
to 393 as officials found
more bodies, although hun-
dreds of people remained
missing. Harmensyah,
head of the West Sumatra
provincial disaster manage-
ment center, said rescue
teams "believe many, many
of the bodies were swept
to sea."
Along with the 33 people
killed by a volcano that
erupted Tuesday more than
800 miles (1,300 kilome-
ters) to the east in central
Java, the number of dead
from the twin disasters
has now reached 426.After
a lull that allowed mourn-.
ers to hold a mass .burial
for victims, Mount Merapi
started rumbling again
Thursday with three small
eruptions and another one
early Friday. There were
no reports of new injuries
or damage.
,The catastrophes struck
within 24 hours in differ-
ent parts of the seismically
active country, severely
testing Indonesia's emer-
gency response network.
Aid workers trickling
into the remote region
found giant chunks of coral


4 4


fe .te. Jf


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mount Merapi spews volcanic materials as seen from
Hargobinangun, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, early Friday.


and rocks in places where
homes once stood. Huge
swaths of land were sub-
merged. Swollen corpses
dotted roads and beaches.
In a rare bright spot,
an 18-month-old baby was
found alive Wednesday in
a clump of trees on Pagai
Selatan the same island
where the 30-year-old
Sageru lived. Relief coor-
dinator Harmensyah said
a 10-year-old boy found the
toddler whose parents are
both dead.
More than 100 survivors
crowded a makeshift medi-
cal center in the main town
of Sikakap on Pagai Utara
- one of the four main
islands in the Mentawai
chain located between
Sumatra and the Indian
Ocean.
Some still wept for lost
loved ones as they lay on
straw mats or sat on the
floor, waiting for medics to
treat injuries such as cuts
and broken limbs. Outside,
some rescuers wore face
masks as they wrapped
corpses* in black body
bags.
A young woman named
Adek sobbed uncontrolla-
bly as she tried to talk about
her year-old baby who was
washed away. "Oh, don't
ask me again," she said,
wiping her tears and turn-


ing away.
One of the hardest hit
areas with 65 dead was the
village of Pro Rogat, on
Pagai Seatandug island.
Villagers there huddled
under tarps in the rain and
told how many people who
had fled to the hills were
now too afraid to return
home.
Mud and palm fronds
covered the body of the
village's 60-year-old pastor,
Simorangkir. He lay on the
ground, partially zipped
into a body bag. Police and
relatives took turns push-
ing a shovel into the sod-
den dirt next to him for his
grave.
His 28-year-old grand-
son, Rio, traveled by boat
to Pro Rogat from his home
on a nearby island to check
on his relatives after the
quake and tsunami. He said
he was picking through the
wreckage when someone
cried out that he had found
a body.
Rio walked over and saw
the face of his dead grandfa-
ther, partially buried under
several toppled palm trees,
looking back at him.
"Everybody here is so
sad," Rio said, as relatives
prepared to lay his grandfa-
ther in the grave.
Officials say a multimil-
lion-dollar tsunami warning


system that uses buoys to
detect sudden changes in
water levels broke down a
month ago because it was
not being properly main-
tained. The system was
installed after a monster
2004 quake and tsunami
that killed 230,000 people
in a dozen countries.
A German official at
the project disputed there
was a breakdown, saying
Monday's 7.7-magnitude
quake's epicenter was
too close to the Mentawai
islands for residents to get
the warning before the kill-
er wave hit.
"The early warning sys-
tem worked very well it
can be verified," said Joern
Lauterjung, head of the
German-Indonesia Tsunami
Early Warning Project
for the Potsdam-based
GeoForschungs Zentrum.
He added that only one
sensor of 300 had not been
working and said that had
no effect on the system's
operation.
At the Mount Merapi
volcano, hot clouds of ash
spewed from the mountain
at 6:10 a.m. Friday, accord-
ing to the Indonesian volca-
nology agency Subandriyo.
It was unclear whether
the new activity was a sign
of another major blast to
come.
Residents from Kinahrejo,
Ngrangkah, and Kaliadem
- villages that were dev-
astated in Tuesday's blast
- crammed into refugee
camps. Officials brought
cows, buffalo and goats
down the mountain so that
villagers wouldn't try to go
home to check on their live-
stock.
Thousands attended a
mass burial for 26 of the
victims six miles (10 kilome-
ters) from the base of the
volcano. Family and friends
wept and hugged one anoth-
er as the bodies were low-
ered into the grave in rows.


BAND: Columbia HS going to state .

Continued From Page 1A


grading us."
Columbia was given a
superior mark for the
15th-consecutive year.
But qualifying for the
state semifinals was the
pinnacle for Columbia, at
least thus far. The Tigers
will be among 25 march-
ing bands competing in the
Class 3A division Nov. 20 at
Tampa Chamberlain High
School.
4


Should the Tigers fin-
ish among the top five,
they will qualify for the
state finals that night at
Tropicana Field.
"This is probably the
best band I've had," Schulz
said. He's been Columbia's
director for the last five
years and graduated from
Columbia in 1999. "Every
one (of mny bands) has
been good, but this group


has really stepped up to the of 15 bands, but as Schulz


plate.
"They've improved every
week. They've gone beyond
what I expected."
Indeed, Schulz would not
have anticipated this kind
of season when Columbia
turned in a relatively medi-
ocre performance in its
first competition Sept. 25 at
Leesburg High School. The
Tigers were seventh out


explained, "We'd only been
together about a month."
Nothing beyond perform-
ing at Tiger football games
remains for Columbia prior
to the state semifinals.
With the possibility of two
competitions, that final day
could be very busy not
that they'd mind.


CLUBS: Chamber forming Clubs

Continued From Page 1A


fellow members, Butler
said. They are not social
clubs.
"If I go to a Leads meet-
ing, I might pass a prepared
written lead to another
member of people I know
that need their services,"
he said. "In turn they will
pass qualified leads to me
that need my services."
Every member has the
opportunity to stand up and
deliver a short explanation
of their product or service
at a meeting, Butler said.
It is common to form
Leads Clubs under a cham-


In Lox ing Menor
-/;//, F //*,,,,
lanuary I., \I2 -
()October 2I. 21W )
lhoie tie' lii'' ibi i
Ig'l tll l l ea( /'rd
It'iScar. i/earJrll

,aed. slllmwU '
WimiIen dear

l


ber.
"Leads Clubs play a vital
role in the success of many
chambers throughout the
country," he said. "As a
chamber board member, I
would like to see multiple
local groups form over the
next year."
. Multiples clubs can exist
within the program, but
only one representative
from each industry is in
each group, he said.
"Our goal is to have mul-
tiple local groups form over
the next year," Butler said.
The informational meet-


' To mi' b'est friend.
Siulnair ucaad lhnof ol r life
Russ t
i lH lpplv lHI", \
Anni re.;r} +.
I'm looking forward to what
the future holds for us.
I love you with all my heart.
ickie


ing will explain the benefits
of belonging to a Leads
Club and will include testi-
monials from people who
have previously participat-
ed in one, he said.
Once clubs are estab-
lished there will be an
annual fee not to exceed
$50, Butler said.
Applications are avail-
able at the chamber. Call
386-752-3690.
"There's no obligation
and cost to come out,"
Butler said.



THANK -
YOU!
To all our family and
many friends, I along with
my 4 sons, and special
grandson, would like to
thank you for the cards,
the visits, food sent, phone
calls and your prayers
for us during the loss of
Hosea.
May kindness be
returned to you in the
same beautiful way it was.
offered to us. Thank you
from the botom of our
hearts.


DEWEY: County official retires

Continued From Page 1A


and thanked him for his
mentorship, encourage-
ment, hard work and the
example he set.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said before being
a good politician, you must
first be a good person. ,
"And nobody epitomizes
that more than Dewey," he
said.
The county commission
presented Weaver with a
plaque and a ceremonial


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HALLELUJAH

FESTIVAL

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Olustee Park
Downtown Lake City
SlI.nsoraedl \h}
ir'ace lar,'r Ministries
G H M PRAISE BAND
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gavel in recognition for his
years of service.
Mike Collins, TDC board
vice chairman, said he will'
cherish the opportunity he
had to work with Weaver
and that he would be tough
to replace.
The TDC gifted Weaver
and his wife, Mary Jane,


with a print of "River of
Dreams: Fireflies on the
Ichetucknee," a photograph
taken by John Moran, for
his dedicated time spent
serving on the TDC board.
Weaver thanked those he
worked with and said his
future plans are to travel
with his wife.


NOTICE OF

FINAL

CERTIFICATION

OF TAX ROLL
Pursuant to Section 193.122, Florida Statutes,
J. Doyle Crews, Property Appraiser of
Columbia County, hereby gives notice that
the 2010 Tax Roll for Columbia County was
certified to the Tax Collector on the 26th day of
October for the collection of taxes.
J. DOYLE CREWS
PROPERTY APPRAISER


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, OCTOBER'29, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427














OPINION


Friday, October 29, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Trick or

treat on

Saturday

night


The City of Lake City
is recommending
that families trick-
or-treat on Saturday
evening and we
agree this makes the most
sense. Since Oct. 31 is actu-
ally on Sunday, it seems more
appropriate to go door-to-door
on Saturday evening rather
than to conflict with any church
services in the area.
Besides the recommenda-
tion, city officials urged local
residents to use good common
sense in their approach to the
awkward calendar situation.
This is sage advice. Have your
fun, but don't let your good
time infringe on others around
you or cause an inconvenience.
This is an easy compromise.
Take your kids out for candy on
Saturday night. Go to the mall
to the events there that begin in
the afternoon and stay through
mallwide trick-or-treating.
The Lake City Police
Department and Fire
Department will have their
annual candy event at the
downtown fire station Saturday
evening.
On Saturday night, have a
safe, fun, family-oriented good
time..

H I G H LIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Friday, Oct. 29, the
302nd day of 2010. There are
63 days left in the year.
On Oct. 29, 1929, Wall
Street crashed on "Black
Tuesday," heralding the
beginning of America's Great
Depression.
In 1618, Sir Walter
Raleigh, the English courtier,
military adventurer and poet,
was executed in London.
In 1901, President William
McKinley's assassin, Leon
Czolgosz was electrocuted.
In 1923, the Republic of
Turkey was proclaimed.
In 1940, Secretary of
War Henry L. Stimson drew
the first number 158 in
America's first peacetime mili-
tary draft

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
.work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should.be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Out of tragedy often
comes progress.
Such can be said,
for example, for the
Columbine massa-
cre and the awareness it raised
for the need of school-based bul-
lying prevention programs.
More than 11 years after the
murderous rampage at that
Colorado high school, carried
out by two teens who had been
teased and snubbed by school
mates, today's public school stu-
dent knows far more about bully-
ing, its long-term impact and what
to do to stop it than ever before.
But while awareness of the
problem, and the push to address
it, has come a long way, bullying
continues to be a vexing concern
in many school hallways.
And some recent tragedies,
namely the rash of recent suicides
linked to anti-gay harassment,
offer another opportunity for


www.lakecityreporter.com


The French fume; Americans are toast


France has lately been
convulsed by strikes
and protests over the
government's plan to
reform the country's
financially ailing pension sys-
tem. It includes the odious pro-
vision of raising the country's
minimum retirement age from
60 to 62.
Now there's a fork to deflate
a souffle. One can understand
why French workers are so
upset. How can the French
spend more time with mis-
tresses or lovers if they must
tediously earn a living for a
couple of years longer? Of
course, no French demonstra-
tion is complete without farm
tractors showing up on the
Champs-Elysee's and this
protest seems to have lacked
that, a sadness to traditionalists
everywhere.
Instead, garbage piled up in
Marseilles and gas stations ran
out of fuel in various parts of
the country, which is probably
why the protests failed to stop
government action. No style. No
elegance. No farm machinery.
And no real reason why France
should be shielded from eco-
nomic realities that afflict every-
body else.
Well, that's just great. There
goes my dream of sitting in a
boulevard cafe on the Left Bank,
smoking Gauloise cigarettes
made from genuine mattress
stuffings, sipping cafe au lait
and engaging in existential
discussions with fellow expatri-
ates on the ultimate meaning
of Steelers quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger.
Why bother with that now?
My fellow idlers in the middle
of the morning will all be old
people, not the frisky retirees
of a mere 60 years old. If the
French are going to go the way
of American retirement, which
was one of their fears, I might
as well just retire in America


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
when the time comes. At least I
won't need a beret to play golf.
Now, if that Barack Obama
were really a socialist, things
might be different. But in
America, the prospects for any-
one having a retirement at all in
the future of our children seems
increasingly unlikely.
Social Security will eventu-
ally run out of money and that
"eventually" is coming up on us
with the speed of a locomotive.
Any hope of reforming the
system looks hopeless, given
that the voters seem inclined to
stock Congress full of frothing
ideologues. Such moderates
that will remain after the Nov.
2 election will be afraid to com-
promise on anything. If they do,
they will be pilloried by secretly
funded TV ads suggesting that
they hate old people and are
mean to kittens and puppies.
Even now, as Social Security
dies of funding starvation, the
government-is-bad bunch are
straining at the bit to dust off
the idea that privatization is the
only hope, because it allows
people the freedom to take their
own money and have it disap-
pear when the stock market
crashes.
Meanwhile, somewhere back
atthe ranch, the Ex-President
Who Must Remain Nameless,
the one we supposedly cannot
blame.for anything, will be at
his ease rocking in an old chair,
knowing that his legacy will be
completed at last.
Once they come for Social
Security, it is logical that


Medicare will then be rooted
out, because it is a government
program, and hence socialism
in the current thinking. We can-
not allow our dear seniors to be
seduced by socialism. It is only
one remove from putting them
on a diet of heavy sauces.
In the transition period, some-
one will propose that the retire-
ment age be raised to oh I
don't know 70 perhaps, 75?
And with company retirement
benefits gone the way of the
dodo bird, seniors will have to
work until then. That's assum-
ing they have any jobs.
Yes, they certainly will have
jobs. They will just have to go
to China or India to get them.
For if the jobs have been out-
sourced, why can't seniors be
outsourced, too? The cost of
living over there is very cheap.
They could get a nice plate of
rice or legumes for next to noth-
ing.
Between the French welfare
state and American survival-of-
the-fittest ethic, a happy medi-
um has to exist. But at the rate
we are going, this country is
going to end up being medium
with little or no happiness.
At least the French, young
and old, take the future seri-
ously and make a show of their
fears. They may surrender but
we are the surrender monkeys.
In the last week of an important
election, has anyone insisted
on a serious discussion of jobs
for the young and secure retire-
ment for the old? We can't even
muster a decent convoy of
lawn tractor mowers to ride to
Washington in protest.
No, it is all Congressman
X is a serial bed-wetter and
Congressman Y supports Nancy
Pelosi (which apparently is
worse). The French are ridicu-
lous but we are not the ones to
talk. Tant pis! Quelle dommage!
* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


progress.
At least seven teenagers have
killed themselves since July
across the country after enduring
ridicule for their sexual orienta-
tion.
It is a heartbreaking occur-
rence that must be stopped, and
the fresh spate of suicides shows
this particular class of victim
remains a vulnerable target.
The question is what to do
about it, and the controversy
revolves around whether anti-
bullying efforts must, in order to
be effective, specifically address
harassment that targets gay
youth.
Of course they must. Ignoring
why some kids get bullied only
stigmatizes the reason, and com-
plicates the solution.
Unfortunately, some ideologues
are resisting anti-gay bullying
efforts, suggesting it is some
liberal tool to influence today's


youth on how homosexuality is to
be viewed. Religious beliefs and
opinions about sexual orientation
aside, anti-bullying efforts strive
to teach kids that no one deserves
to be harassed or tormented, no
matter the reason or the bully's
opinion of them.
But avoiding specific discussion
of the reasons people get bullied
- their weight, their religion,
their choice of dress, their sexual
orientation risks silently con-
doning their mistreatment in the
void.
It's not worth the risk.
Combating bullying requires
detailed instruction on what
behavior should not be tolerated.
And those who single out gay
youth for harassment must be
told in no uncertain terms that
what they are doing is wrong,
and unacceptable.
Sun-Sentinel


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


My 2

cents in

the candy

bucket

I've been asked to say
a few words about
Halloween. Nothing offi-
cial, mind you, but just
to address the topic and
possibly save our community
from certain bedlam this week-
end.
This is not about monsters,
broom riders or steaming
cauldrons of anything. This is
a column of much greater sub-
stance and overall world-spin-
ning importance.
We're talking trick-or-treat-
ing. Candy. And when?
This predicament burdens
America every time Halloween
lands on a Sunday. People fall
under a spell and can't decide
when to dress up the little
ones and parade them around
door-to-door to beg for candy.
There are many civic groups
and churches that are conduct-
ing their regular fall festivals
without any scheduling prob-
lems or concerns. Regular
trick-or-treating is complicated.
Ghouls and goblins don't com-
plement the Lord's day.
So in a fit of confusion,
people start randomly calling
around Labor Day: "When's
Halloween?" If we have had
the call at our office switch-
board once, the phone has
rung 8,462 times with the
question. Ditto at the Chamber
of Commerce and a few other
businesses, so I've been told.
Government was asked to
weigh in last week for wis-
dom: The city's police and fire
departments event for kids
downtown at the fire station is
set for Saturday night. So the
city is recommending that fam-,
ilies trick-or-treat on Saturday.
County government decided
against making any type of
official recommendation on the
subject.
The dilemma is not
unique to Columbia County.
Governments from the City of
Jacksonville to Baker County
wrestled with the "Saturday or
Sunday ruling" until midweek.
If you're confused, here are
some options:
Attend the Chamber of
Commerce's Trunk or Treat
event tonight in Olustee Park
and call it a weekend. It's free.
There will be trunk-loads of
.candy. You completely avoid
this ugly Saturday-Sunday con-
troversy.
If you're scared to roam
the streets, check out the
MOMS Club of Lake City
kids event inside Lake City
Mall. It's Saturday from 3-6
p.m. There will be face paint-
ing and a bounce house. It's
a great warfm-up before mall-
wide trick-or-treating or before
heading to the city's event at
the fire station downtown.
Be opportunistic. Keep an
eye on the foot traffic in your
neighborhood and go with
the flow. Troll for candy both
Saturday and Sunday. Never
miss the chance to pick up an
extra bite-sized Snickers.
Buy extra candy, since
there's a two-day Halloween
window, then turn off the
porch light, sit inside in the
dark and eat it yourself.
Or, skip trick-or-treating
altogether and head to the
Columbia County Fair. It opens
tonight and is the best fair in
the South.


Sometimes corn dogs are
better than candy.
N Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


OTHER OPINION

Anti-bullying efforts must be expanded












FACES & PLACES
Scenes from Commissioner Dewey Weaver's farewell reception Thursday at Comfort Suites in Lake City.
Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Emory Bailey and Stephen Bailey Pupesh Patel and Pravin Mehta


Gail Matthews, Mike Millikin and Patty Melgaard


Harvey Campbell, Gloria Ortiz
and Brian Bickel Linda Howard and Brenda Clemente


Paulette Lord and Theresa Lastihger


PJ Patel and Jayeeni Patel -


Alison Gravely, Klaudia Lapham and Amy Skowron


Linda Crews and Marsha Morrell James Montgomery and Jody DuPree


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


TODAY
Fair opening
The ribbon-cutting cer-
emony and official open-
ing of the 56th Annual
Columbia County Fair
is at 4 p.m. today at the
fairgrounds. The fair runs
through Nov. 6. The guest,
speaker at the ceremony
is Columbia County native
James Montgomery.
Regular fair admission
is $5 and free from 4-6
p.m. Friday. Rides are not
included in the price of
admission.

Halloween Dance
Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities Inc. is
having a Halloween Dance
from 7 to 9 p.m. today.
Dance to music by Dean
Blackwell. Costumes are
optional. Tickets are $5. A
provider/guardian must.
accompany an adult if
assistance or supervision
is needed. There is no
charge for a provider/
guardian. Call 752-1880
ext. 103 or 104;

Petting Zoo
Skunkie Acres Inc.
Petting Zoo will be at
Rountree-Moore Toyota
and Scion Halloween
Festival 2 to 6 p.m. today.
See rescue animals at
the event. There will be
food, pumpkin 'decorating,
balloons, prizes and more.

Trunk or Treat
Finally Friday featur-
ing Trunk or Treat is at
6:30 p.m. today in Olustee
Park. It will feature free
candies, a costume contest
and more. The movie is
"Scooby Doo." The event
is hosted by the Lake
City- Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
and is sponsored by


to wear costumes.

Halloween Safety Bash
sSafet


lt


Jo Lytte applauds after listening to a speech made by U.S.


City on Thursday.

LifeSouth Community
Blood Center.

Humane Asylum
The Lake City Humane
Society and Rountree-
Moore Auto Group pres-
ents the Humane Asylum
6 to 10 p.m. today and
Saturday at the Lake City
Mall. Tickets are $10 at
the door and $5 for veter-
ans, active duty military,
law enforcement and
fire personnel with ID.
Children 13 and younger
must be accompanied by
an adult. All proceeds ben-
efit homeless animals.

Blackbeard's Ghost
A haunted trail through
a woodland forest is 8
to 10:30 p.m. today and
Saturday. Admission is
$2 and all proceeds go


to The Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation. Location is
.one mile south of the Fort
White light on State Road
47. Sodas and snacks will
also be available.

Early voting
Early voting for the 2010
general election is 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. today
until Saturday. Early vot-
ing locations are at the
Supervisor of Elections
Lake City office, 971 W.
Duval St. and the Fort
White Community Center,
17579 SW SR 47. Voters
need to bring a picture and
signature I.D.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Senate candidate Marco Rubio at Olustee Park in downtown Lake


appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Saturday
Fair festivities
The 56th Annual
Columbia County Fair
runs through Nov. 6.
Regular fair admission is
$5. Rides are not included
in the price of admission.

Neighborhood haunts
"A Haunting On
Hernando" is dusk until
midnight Saturday at
the CMS Professional
Staffing Building, 181


SE Hernando Ave., and
the Lake City-Columbia'
County Historical
Museum, 157 SE
Hernando Ave. A live
band, Southern Justice, is
scheduled to perform from
7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. The
LifeSouth Bloodmobile will
be on site for blood dona-
tions. Tickets are $10 for
adult and $5 for children
and the proceeds will go to
Haven Hospice. The action
is PG-13. Parents are
advised that the event is
not for younger children.

Halloween Carnival
Richardson Community
Center is having a
Halloween Carnival from
5-8 p.m. Saturday. There
will be candy, food and
informational booths.
Children are encouraged


The Lake City Police
Department and Lake City
Fire Department are spon-
soring a Halloween event
from 6-9 p.m. Saturday
in the lot across from the
Public Safety Building.
The event will include
bounce houses, face paint-
ing and candy.

Halloween celebration
Trick-or-treating is 5-
10 p.m. Saturday at the
Coluiibia County Fair. A
pumpkin carving contest
is at 8 p.m. and there will
also be a costume contest

Trick-or-treat at the mall
Trick-or-treating for
children younger than 12
years old is 6-7 p.m. at the
Lake City Mall stores.

Halloween Bash
MOMS Club of Lake
City, Florida is sponsor-
ing the Second Annual
Halloween Bash from 3
to 6 p.m. Saturday at the
. Lake City Mall. A costume
contest is at 4 p.m. The
event will immediately pre-
cede the traditionalstore
trick-or-treating event

Planting workshop
A planting and propa-
gating workshop is 9
a.m. to noon Saturday at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State
Park. The cost is $25.
Participants will learn
about sowing seeds, trans-
planting bare root plants,
transplanting plugs, work-
ing with cuttings, and see
a demonstration of layer-
ing and dividing plants.
Call (386) 397-1920 or visit"
www.stephenfosterCSO.org.


Tests warned of troubles before BP blowout


By DINA CAPPIELLO
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Tests
performed before the dead-
ly blowout of BP's oil well in
the Gulf of Mexico should
have raised doubts about
the cement used to seal
the well, but the company
and its cementing contrac-
tor used it anyway, investi-
gators with the president's
oil spill commission said
Thursday.
It's the first finding from
the commission looking


into the causes of the April
20 explosion that killed 11
workers and led to the larg-
est offshore oil spill in U.S.
history. And it appears to
conflict with statements
made by Halliburton Co.,
which has said its tests
showed the cement mix
was stable.
The company instead has
said BP's well design and
operations were responsi-
ble for the disaster.
The cement mix's failure
to prevent oil and gas from
entering the well has been


identified by BP and others
as one of the causes of the
accident
BP and Halliburton
decided to use a foam
slurry created by injecting
nitrogen into cement to
secure the bottom of the
well, a decision outside
experts have criticized.
The panel said that of
four tests done in February
and April by Halliburton,
only one the last -
showed the mix would
hold. But the results of
that single successful test


were not shared with BP,
and may not have reached
Halliburton, before the
cement .was pumped,
according to a letter
sent to commissioners
Thursday by chief inves-
tigative counsel Fred H.
Bartlit Jr.
BP had in hand at the
time of the blowout the
results of only one of
the tests a February
analysis sent to BP by
Halliburton in a March 8
e-mail that indicated the
cement could fail.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people-are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.

Wednesday, Oct. 27
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jasmine Shakiyla
Johnson, 20, 603 NE
Aberdeen Ave., warrant:
Aggravated assault with
intent to commit felony.
Mark Levon Arnette,
no age given, 5309 S. U.S.
Highway 441, dealing in
stolen property and grand
theft.
Gary Lee Craigo, 36,
5120 S. U.S. Highway 441,
warrant: Sell or delivery
of a controlled substance
(two counts).
Joshua Ewen, 22,
11141 Coimbra Lane,
Bonita Springs, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of pos-
* session of more than 20
grams of marijuana.
Marquis DeQuain
McKinnie, 23, 7933 Rex
Hill Trail, Orlando, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of car-


trying a concealed weapon,
possession of a firearpn by
a felon.
Edward Mitchell
Ottinger, no age given,
7181 S. U.S. Highway 441,
possession of a firearm by
a convicted felon.
Robert B. Sparrow,
29, 2747 SE County Road
252, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of burglary of a
structure (conveyance)
(two counts) and third-
degree grand theft (two
counts).
Tony Carl Steel,
8595 FM Street,
Henderson, Texas,
warrant; Violation of
probation on original
charge of possession of
a controlled substance
(cocaine) and felony


?Hang- n
a minute ,

O ur customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
r when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning
While Sup lies Last


petit theft.

Lake City
Police Department
Rocky Allen Moody,


no age given, 493 SW
Alamo Drive, accessory
after the fact (robbery).

* From staff reports


p wnonor




SHeroes!


The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.



















Thank you for your
years of service.
We Salute You |
Love, Eileen
actual size


Your Name:' . ... .
Address: .. ... .. ... .. ...
Town:- -..- ... .. ---- State: Zip:- -
Daytime Phone: .. .
Servicmemmber's Nome:
Branch of Service: Dates Served:
tring ihis in or Send to: Lake City Reporter. 180 ). IBnmd R. lAke vt: R.H 320i, 755. 5 fo for morc into.
Submissions musth be nteivt3l h :y 3:30pilm | ,oni 2o01 S. 20) Mll phoos ill be returned by including SASE th your eatry.
N. -;-a'.
Lov ,Ele


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29., 2010

WE'RE MOVING YOU SAVE!
.. ..E ._TOCK REDUCED T.- s.S F DOLLARS!
S|New double wides from the low 40s and one remaining triple wide in the 90s!l
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HOME C -- Y HURRY BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE!!!

ENDAYS 752-7751 PRESTIGE 3973 HWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY
HOME CENTERS 386-752-7751 r ~ -800-355-9385


indian.

p of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Colton Jones (17) attempts a field goal during the game against
East Gadsden High on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the junior varsity cheerleading team deliver a performance during the Indian
Uprising homecoming celebration on Thursday.

Fort White begins final surge


Fort White High
has narrowed
its football
district to two
opponents, but
the Indians likely will have
to beat both.
Showdown No. 1 is
Friday when the Indians
travel to Perry to take on
Taylor County High. Both
teams are 3-0 in District
2-2B, and the Bulldogs are


undefeated overall at 7-0.
Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
The Indians and
Bulldogs are 3-0 against
common opponents East
Gadsden, Union County
and Suwannee high'
schools.
Taylor County was
district runner-up last
year, knocking out Fort
White with a 16-6 win.
The Bulldogs had to go to


Pensacola Catholic High in
the first round of the
playoffs and lost, 41-35.
This is the eighth
straight year the two teams
will meet, with Taylor
County holding a 4-3 edge.
Fort White is 2-1 against
the Bulldogs under head
coach Demetric Jackson.
The Indians have a pair
of district wins around an
open date on Oct. 15.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members'of the 2010 Fort White High homecoming court pose for a photograph
during halftime of Frday's game. Pictured are Rebecca Staehnke (from left),
Chantal Soria, homecoming king Justin Kortessis, homecoming queen
Catherine Triscli Katelyn Albright and Da'Leecia Armstrong.

2010 Indians Football Schedule


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0
Fort White 14, Newberry 13
Fort White 52, Suwannee 22
Fort White 31 Union County 12
N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28
Fort White 30, Florida High 27
Fort White 28, East Gadsden 14
Wk 8 Taylor County A 7:30 p.m.


Wk 9 Bradford H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


Get Connected




S I *


50SWLjkimntd Pe i3 7 .LakeG0ty FL
Phone (386) 752-0580
4PR'28*8ii- Z o


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LIM









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday. October 29. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


LADIES OUTLOOK






Antonia Robinson
SF -..:.,,: 754-0425
orobinson@aokecqtyreportercom


Cardio

boxing,

kicking

Laila Ali better
watch out.
Coming soon
to a boxing
ring near her
might be me.
I recently floated like
a butterfly and stuhg like
a bee during a Kardio
Kickboxing/ Boxing
class at Southside
Recreation Center.
Actually, I just shuffled
like a penguin and
sweated like a pig, but I
did get the workout of a
year.
The certified
instructor, Michele
Halladay, made sure we
felt the burn that night,
all while having fun. That
Boston creme pie from
-lunch became a distant
memory by the time
class ended.
Kardio Kickboxing
provides a full-body
workout of all the muscle
groups, she said. Boxing
includes weight training
and going one-on-one
with punching bags.
I wanted to be the
Pink Power Ranger as
a child because of her
cool kickboxing moves.
That dream faded once I
reached adulthood.
At least I could learn
to mimic some of those
same moves in the class.
Normally, both
sessions are offered
separately boxing is
6:30 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday and Kardio
Kickboxing is 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday
but I tried a special
combined class.
I warned Halladay I
might pass out, but she
stressed that everything
can be done at a person's
own level. I didn't have
to kill myself while
following her example.
The workout music
went on and the fun
began with a warm-up.
Soon Halladay was
calling out instructions
for repetitive punches to
one side and hand strikes
to another, all mixed in
with some kicks.
It seemed to take
forever for the last
. eight-count of every
repetition, but I made it
through and we moved
on to weights.
I didn't want to seem
like a wimp, so I grabbed
the five-pound weights.
Halladay still put me to
shame using the
10-pound weights as we
did different exercises.
Next up were the five
boxing stations. I've
boxed on the Wii Fit
S several times. It couldn't
be that hard to hit a real
bag, right?
But my arms were
putty from the earlier
cardio session. Somehow
I made it through
without falling over.
Class ended with a
cool down of ab
exercises on a mat. The
urge to just lay still and
not move was quite


CARDIO continued on 2B


Kirkman sees action in opening game


Series appearance
a dream come
true for local man.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
It's just one game, but
it is one Michael Kirkman
and his family and friends
will never forget.
Kirkman got the call from
the Texas Rangers bull-
pen in the opening game
of the World Series on
Wednesday.
San Francisco won the
unexpected slugfest, 11-7,
and Kirkman was called on
to get the' final out in the
bottom of the eighth inning.
He gave up an RBI-single
to Nate Schierholtz, with
KIRKMAN continued on 2B


I DiamondDia



World Series notes from

SMichael Kirkman





/ ^


Giants win, 9-0,
to take two-game
lead in Series.
From staff reports

San Francisco blew open
a 2-0 game with seven runs
in the eighth inning to beat
Texas, 9-0.
Michael Kirkman was*
one of four relievers victim-
ized in the inning, as the
Giants used four walks and
four hits to score all the
runs with two outs.
Kirkman gave up a two-
run triple to pinch-hitter
Aaron Rowand and a run-
scoring double to Andres
Torres before striking out
Freddy Sanchez.
The World Series moves
to Arlington, Texas, with
Game 3 on Saturday.


Playoff




potential


Indians, Bulldogs
have district score
to settle tonight.
By TIM KIRBY
,.-. i m < ..,rep..an.or(.coni .
FORT WHITE Ihweek
four of District 2-2B games,
the big battle will take place
in Perry.
Fort White High (5-2,
3-0) travels to Taylor County
High (7-0, 3-0) today in a
matchup of the top two
teams in the district.
Taylor County would be
district champions with a


win, but Fort White does
not have the same luxury.
The Indians still have
Bradford High (6-2, 2-1)
to play on Nov. 5 and the
Tornadoes can keep district
hopes alive with a road win
today at East Gadsden High
(4-4, 1-2).
Defending district cham-
pion Florida High (2-5, 0-3)
hosts Union County High
(4-3, 0-3) with both playing
for pride.
The playoff scenarios:
R Fort White beats Taylor
County and Bradford beats
INDIANS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon (11) runs away from the East Gadsden High defense on Oct. 22.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columrbia High's Timmy Jernigan (8) wraps. up a Ridgeview High runner, as Devante Bell (23)
closes in to help, during a game on Oct. 8.


More of the same


CHS loses to Ed
White for fourth
consecutive loss.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
JACKSONVILLE As
the old saying goes, to be
the champ you have to beat
the champ.
That's exactly what Ed
White High did in its 25-11
home win against Columbia
High to win the District
4-4A championship on
Thursday.
The Tigers needed a win
to stay alive in the cham-
pionship race, but weren't


able to overcome turnovers
in the end.
The first mistake came
early as Columbia's spe-
cial teams failed to cover
Cornelius Williams after a
punt on its first possession.
A bad snap led to a shanked
punt by Hayden Lunde and
the Tigers' special teams
failed to cover Williams
after he picked it up and ran
35 yards for the touchdown.
Columbia blocked the extra
point to trail 6-0.
Columbia's offense went
three-and-out on its next two
possessions and Ed White
took over at its own 26 with
3:47 remaining in the first
quarter. Lereginald Veals


broke a 28-yard run and
quarterback Kyle Seigler
followed it up with a pass to
Veals for 20 yards to move
into Tiger territory. Six
plays later, Devonte Mable
rushed in for a two-yard
touchdown and a 12-0 lead
after a failed extra point.
The Tigers went three-
and-out on their follow-
ing three possessions, but
were able to get a 43-yard
field goal from Lunde, due
to Cameron Wimberly's
fumble recovery at the
Commanders' 18-yard line.
Going into the half, the
Tigers trailed 12-3.
CHS continued on 3B


Fort White JV

comes up short


Indians fall, to
Santa Fe, 22-20,
in final game.
From staff reports

Fort White High's
junior varsity football has
struggled all season with a
small squad.
The Indians (0-6) made
a push for their first win,
against visiting Santa Fe


High on Thursday, but
came up short, 22-20.
The Raiders ran the
opening kickoff back for
a touchdown and soon
pushed their lead to 14-0.
Fort White answered
with a touchdown by
Melton Sanders, but Santa
Fe scored again.
Robert Bias and Edward
Garrison scored touch-
down for the Indians down
the stretch.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Downed at district
Fort White High lost to host Santa Fe High in the final of
the District 5-3A volleyball tournament on Thursday. Fort
White returns to the state playoffs as district runner-up.
Above, Fort White senior Holly Polhill (32) slams a kill in a
match against Columbia High on Sept. 29.


I~











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
final practice for Mountain Dew 250, at
Talladega,Ala.
2 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Amp Energy 500, at Talladega,
Ala.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series." final practice for
Amp Energy 500, at Talladega, Ala.
4:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
pole qualifying for Mountain Dew 250, at
Talladega, Ala.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 West Virginia at
Connecticut
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATourAndalucia
Masters, second round, at Sotogrande,
Spain
Noon
TGC LPGA, Hana Bank
Championship, first round, at Incheon,
South Korea (same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour
Championship, second round, at
Charleston, S.C.
4:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, AT&T
Championship, first round, at San Antonio
7:30 p.m.
TGC Asia Pacific Classic Malaysia,
second round, at Selangor, Malaysia (same-
day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Orlando at Miami
10:30 p.m.
ESPN LA. Lakers at Phoenix

BASEBALL

World Series

San Francisco II .Texas 7
Thursday
San Francisco 9,Texas 0, San Francisco
leads series 2-0
Saturday
San Francisco (Sanchez. 13-9) at Texas
(Lewis 12-13), 6:57 p.m.
Sunday
San Francisco (Bumgarner 7-6) at
Texas (Hunter 13-4), 8:20 p.m.
Monday
San Francisco at Texas, if necessary,
7:57 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 3
Texas at San Francisco, if necessary,
7:57 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 4
Texas at San Francisco, if necessary,
7:57 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


N.Y.Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo

Tennessee
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland

Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


East
'W L T Pct PF PA
5 I 0.833 159 101
5 I 0.833 177 136
3 3 0.500 I11 135
0 6 0.000 121 198
South
W L TPct PF PA
5 2 0.714199 117
4 2 0.667 153 167
4 2 0.667 163 125
3 4 0.429 130 209
North
W L TPct PF PA
5 I 0.833 137 82
5 2 0.714 149 129
2 4 0.333 132 141
2 5 0.286 118 142
West
W L TPct PF PA
4 2 0.667 150 112
3 4 0.429179 165
2 5 0.286 177 149
2 5 0.286 138 199


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 5 2 0.714175 153
Washington 4 3 0.571 130 133
Philaddlphia 4 3 0.571'172 157
Dallas I 5 0.167 137 152
South
W L TPct PF PA
Atlanta 5 2 0.714 169 133
Tampa Bay 4 2 0.667 98 128
New Orleans 4 3 0.571 147 138
Carolina I 5 0.167 75 130
North
W L TPct PF PA
Chicago 4 3 0.571 126 114
Green Bay .4 3 0.571 167 136


CARDIO


Continued From Page 1B
strong, but I resisted.
I was drenched in sweat,
sore and out of water, but I
felt alive.
Halladay said she mixes
up the exercises so the
body doesn't get used to
one thing.
Both classes are open to
all fitness levels at a cost
of $5 per class or $30 a
month, and the first one is
free. Call (386) 697-3299.
Iplan on trying both
classes again in the future
for another intense
workout. And next time my
putty arms will be ready for
those punching bags.

* Antonia Robinson is a
reporter for the Lake City
Reporter.


Minnesota 2 4 0.333 III 116
Detroit I 5 0.167 146 140
West
W L TPct PF PA
Seattle 4 2 0.667 120 107
Arizona 3 3 0.500 98 160
St. Louis 3 4 0.429 120 131
San Francisco I 6 0.143 113 162
Sunday's Games
Denver vs. San Francisco at London,
I p.m.
Washington at Detroit, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, I p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Dallas, I p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: N.Y. Giants, Philadelphia,
Chicago, Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland
Sunday, Nov. 7
Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Detroit, I p.m.
Miami at Baltimore, I p.m.
San Diego at Houston, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
New England at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 8
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis,
Jacksonville, San Francisco,Tennessee

College games

Today
West Virginia (5-2) at Connecticut
(3-4), 8 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Saturday's Games
No. I Oregon at No. 24 Southern
Cal, 8 p.m.
No. 3 Auburn at Mississippi, 6 p.m.
No. 4TCU at UNLV, 11 p.m.
No. 5 Michigan State at No. 18 Iowa,
3:30 p.m.
No 7. Missouri at No. 14 Nebraska,
3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Utah at Air Force, 7:30 p.m.
No. 10 Ohio State at Minnesota,
8 p.m.
No. II Oklahoma vs. Colorado,
9:15 p.m.
No. 13 Stanford at Washington, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Arizona at UCLA, 3:30 p.m.
No. 17 South Carolina vs. Tennessee,
12:21 p.m.
No. 19 Arkansas vs.Vanderbilt, 7 p.m.
No. 20 Oklahoma State at Kansas
State, Noon
No. 22 Miami at Virginia, Noon
No. 23 Mississippi State vs. Kentucky,
7 p.m.
No. 25 Baylor atTexas, 7 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Amp Energy juice 500
Site:Talladega,Ala.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
2-4:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Speed,
noon-3 p.m.); Sunday, race, I p.m. (ESPN2,
noon-I p.m.,,ESPN, I-5 p.m.).
Track- Talladega Superspeedway (oval,
2.66 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 188 laps:
CAMPINGWORLD TRUCKS
Mountain Dew 250
Site:TalladegaAla.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
10 a.m.-noon), qualifying (Speed, 4:30-
6 p.m.); Saturday, race, 4 p.m. (Speed,
3-6:30 p.m.).
Track:Talladega Superspeedway.
Race distance: 250.04 miles, 94 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA LasVegas Nationals
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday, 1-2:30 a.m.);
Sunday, final eliminations (ESPN, 9-11:30
p.m.).
Track: The Strip at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Cleveland 95, Boston 87
New Jersey 101, Detroit 98
Miami 97, Philadelphia 87
New York 98,Toronto 93
Atlanta I119, Memphis 104
Sacramento 117, Minnesota 116


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one'letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I KAFLE I


New Orleans 95, Milwaukee 91
Oklahoma City 106, Chicago 95
Dallas 101, Charlotte 86
San Antonio 122, Indiana 109
Denver I 10, Utah 88
Golden State 132, Houston 128
Portland 98, L.A. Clippers 88
Thursday's Games
Orlando I12,Washington 83
Phoenix at Utah (n)
Today's Games
Indiana at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State,
10.30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio,
8:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 preseason

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' preseason 2010-11 college basket-
ball poll, with first-place votes in paren-
theses, final 2009-10 record, total points
based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote
and 2009-10 final ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Duke (55) 35-5 1,613 3
2. Michigan St. (8) 28-9 1,558 13
3. Kansas St. (2) 29-8 1,414 7
4. Ohio St. 29-8 1,368 5
5. Pittsburgh 25-9 1,310 18
6.Villanova 25-8 1,198 9
7. Kansas 33-3 1,172 I
8. North Carolina 20-17 1,034 -


9. Florida
10. Syracuse
11. Kentucky
12. Gonzaga
13. Illinois
14.Purdue
15. Missouri
16. Baylor
17. Butler
18.Washington
19. Memphis
20. Georgetown
21.Virginia Tech
22.Temple
23.Tennessee
24. BYU
25. San Diego St.


21-13
30-5
35-3
27-7
21-15
29-6
23-1 1
28.8
33-5
26-10
24-10
23-11I
25-9
29-6
28-9
30-6
25-9


Others receiving votes: Wisconsin
126, Texas 107, Georgia 67, West Virginia
65, Minnesota 55, Florida St. 28,Wichita
St. 28, UNLV 21, Richmond 17, Murray St.
15,Vanderbilt 14, N.C. State 10.Arizona
8, Connecticut 8, Colorado 7, Mississippi
St. 7, UCLA 5, Miami 4, Ohio 4, Utah St.
4, Xavier 4, Dayton 3, Old Dominion 2,
Georgia Tech I, New Mexico IWofford
1.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Rangers 4
Washington 3, Carolina 0
Montreal 5, N.Y. Islanders 3
Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 3
Chicago 3, Los Angeles I
San Jose 5, New Jersey 2
Thursday's Games
,Columbus 3, Edmonton 2,SO
Boston 2,Toronto 0
Ottawa 5, Florida 3
Phoenix 4, Detroit 2
St. Louis 3, Nashville 0
Minnesota 2,Washington I
Los Angeles 5, Dallas 2
Colorado at Calgary (n)
Today's Games
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Washington at Calgary, 10 p.m.
New Jersey at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


DRIVE LL1STENEr PIoIP --j
, I -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: L i
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PIETY CUBIC SYMBOL GOATEE
I Answer: What the couple got when they weren't
compatible COMBATIBLE


Season ends for CHS teams


From staff reports

Columbia High was
eliminated from playoff
contention with a loss
to Middleburg High on
Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers went
down in three-straight sets
13-25, 13-25, 14-25.
"Physically we were atthe
tournament, but mentally,
we were somewhere else,"
coach Casie McCallister
said. "I thought Haley Dicks
and Kelbie Ronsonet played
hard. Simone Williamson
and Jessie Bates also did a
good job for us. It was a dis-
appointing way to end the
season. Everyone loses,
except the state champi-
ons, so losing is part of
playing the game."
Ronsonet led in service
points with four in the
match. She added an ace,
two kills and three blocks.
Haley Dicks led in digs
and kills with four in each
category.


For the season, Taylor
Messer led in service
points and aces with 218
and 74, respectively. Beth
Williams led the team with
303 assists. Messer led in
kills for a middle hitter with
140 and Arden Sibbernsen
led in kills for an outside
hitter with 94.

Columbia golf

Columbia High's Dean
Soucinek and Nick Jones
were part of a Region 1 field
that was put through the
ringer at Panama Country
Club in Lynn Haven on
Tuesday.
Both qualified as individ-
uals from district tourna-
ment; Soucinek shot 82 at
region and Jones shot 90.
"It was tough scoring
conditions," coach Steve
Smithy said. "There was a
25-30 mph wind blowing all
day. The best high school
golfers from Jacksonville to
Pensacola were there and


none of them broke par."
Smithy said it was an
excellent experience for
sophomore Soucinek and
freshman Jones, who are
both first-year players for
the Tigers.
Brandon James of
Choctawhatchee High was
medalist with a 73. Milton
High won the tournament
and Mosley High placed
second.

Lady Tigers golf

The Lady Tigers golf
team made their second
straight region field.
Senior captain Brittany
Boris shot 88, as did
junior Darian Ste-Marie.
Sophomores Ashley Mixon
and Shelby Camp shot 113
and 125, respectively.
Niceville High won the
tournament at The Golf
Club at Summerbrooke.
Chiles High placed second,
led by medalist Carlton
Kuhlo with a 74.


KIRKMAN: Gets call in eighth inning


Continued From Page 11

the run charged to' Mark
Lowe, and got Cody Ross
on a pop-up.
"It was exciting, some-
thing I have always dreamed
of," Kirkman said Thursday
morning. "It would have
been better if we were in
a better position. I would'
rather it be like that than a,
2-1 ball game and you give
up a hit."
Kirkman got a strike on
Schierholtz, who entered
as a defensive replacement
in. the seventh inning.
"I knew he had a hole up
and in," Kirkman said. "I
got it up as far as I wanted
it to be, but he got the label
of the bat on the ball and hit
it up the middle."
The base hit looked like
a flare but Kirkman said, "It
counts just like a laser."
As for Ross, "I got him
on a fast ball away. He's
looking to pull the ball."
The ,Rangers had
Kirkman warm up early in
the game when starter Cliff
Lee was struggling.
"I warmed up a few
times, then sat back down,"
Kirkman said. "Justbecause


ACROSS 38
39
1 Imagine
6 Bodies of 40
water
11 Goodbyes 41
13 Hormel rival 42
14 Mien
15 Slight injury 44
(hyph.)
16 Kind of jump 47
17 MD 51
employer
18 Half-star movie 52
21 Ice structure
23 Stockholm car- 53
rier 54
26 NASA counter-
part
27 Kuwaiti leader
28 Baby soother 1
29 Flowering trees
31 Heroic quality 2
32 Moon track 3
33 Roman-legion 4
officer
35 Plow 5
36 Cruel
37 Mao -tung 6


you are oose doesn't neces-
sarily mean you will get in.
It depends on matchups."
When manager Ron
Washington made the move
to Kirkland, what did he tell
the rookie?
"He gives you some
encouragement, some-
thing to make you relax,"
Kirkman said. "He gives
you the ball and says go
get 'em."
Kirkman said the 16 hits
and 11 runs given up by
Cy Young winning starters
Cliff Lee and Tim Lincecum
was just baseball.
"You can't control every-
thing," Kirkman said. "Cliff
is not a machine and that
stuff happens. His ball was
up and over the plate a
little bit. It could have been
a lot worse on Lincecum.
If that. ball (bases-loaded.
shot in the first inning that
third-baseman Juan Uribe
turned into a double play)
scoots by, it is a whole dif-
ferent ball game."
Washington summed up
the loss.
"His exact words -
we'll get them tomorrow,"


WNW opposite
Ring-shaped
cake
Untold
centuries
- Alamos
"Mona Lisa"
crooner
Druid or
shaman
"I" trouble?
Fragrant
shrubs
Shark
hitchhiker
Egg parts
Taste or smell

DOWN

LAX
overseer
Billboards
Touch of frost
Average
grades
Most disgust-
ing
TV teaser


Kirkman said. "We haven't
had our (butts) kicked like
that in a long time. Let's not
do it again."
The Rangers used four
pitchers from the bullpen,
but Kirkman said he and
the others would be ready.
"(Alexi) Ogando (pitched
two innings) may be the
only person not hot tonight,
but he probably will be,"
Kirkman said.
Kirkman had to wait until
the morning of game one
before finding out if he was
on the roster for the World
Series. '
"I was changing and
our pitching coach (Mike
Maddux) walked by and
said, 'Hi, Michael... you are
on the roster by the way.'"

Lake City native
Michael Kirkman is
a 2005 graduate of
Columbia High. The
left-hander was called up
by the Texas Rangers in
August and has pitched
in relief. He is sharing his
World Series experience
with readers of the Lake
City Reporter.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LAP AN KA WARP
AWL NOON ALEC
TRU EGRIT LINT
SYSTEM I RKED
ALAS O W NS
M LLI ASEA






UM P DRE A
AMEN SWAN KIER
LENS PERT SRA
BODE SSTS SOSY


7 Melville novel
8 Cribbage card
9 Twosome
10 Old sellout
notice
12 Pistil top


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-29


13 More than dis-
like
18 Reduce in
rank
19 Egyptian god
20 Play the slots
22 Eavesdrop
23 Greet the gen-
eral
24 Maria
Conchita -
25 Wire mesh
28 Typewriter key
30 Lubricate
31 Fine wines
34 Gilda of
"SNL"
36 Requirements
39 Juicy pears
41 Faucet prob-
lem
43 Heavy volume
44 Wield
45 "Road movie"
locale
46 Down with a
cold .
48 Charged parti-
cle
49 Almost-grads
50 Ginnie or
Fannie


@2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421












Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


'Noles lose control of division


By AARON BEARD
Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. Russell Wilson
threw a fourth-down touchdown
pass to George Bryan with 2:40 left
to help North Carolina State rally.
from a big halftime deficit and beat
No. 16 Florida State 28-24 on Thursday
night
Wilson also ran'for three scores for
the Wolfpack (6-2, 3-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference), who trailed 21-7 at the
break before ending a three-game los-
ing streak to the Seminoles (6-2, 4-1).
With the win, N.C. State surpassed


its victory total for last season while
earning a key victory in a matchup of
Atlantic Division contenders.
Trailing 24-21, the Wolfpack drove
to the FSU 1-yard line and appeared
to have a winning score within easy
reach. But the Seminoles stopped
Wilson on a pair of sneaks, then
stuffed James Washington's leap over
the line on third down.
The Wolfpack appeared ready to
kick a field goal, but called timeout
and sent the offense back out ori the
field.
This time, Wilson rolled to his
right on a play-action fake, then found


Bryan alone near the back of the end
zone for the 28-24 lead.
Still, Christian Ponder who ran
for a pair of scores and threw for
one nearly rallied the Seminoles,
driving Florida State all the way to
the N.C. State 4 in the final minute.
But on what looked like a play-action
fake, Ponder fumbled when tailback
Ty Jones appeared to bump him as
he ran by.
N.C. State linebacker Nate Irving
pounced on the loose ball at the 9 with
48 seconds left, sealing a dramatic
victory in a game that was statistically
even much of the night.


Ducks look to end USC domination


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

The transition of power
in the Pac-10 from Southern
California to Oregon start-
ed in 2007, reached a major
milestone last year and
could be complete by the
end this season.
The next step for the
top-ranked Ducks comes
Saturday, when they try to
win on USC's turf for the
first time since 2000. That
was before Pete Carroll led
the Trojans on the most
dominant run in the history
of Pac-10 football.
USC won seven straight
conference titles from
2002-2008. The Ducks did
manage to beat the Trojans
in '07 and appeared poised
to win the conference, but
an injury to Dennis Dixon
thwarted those chances
and USC again went to the
Rose Bowl.
In 2008, the Trojans
pounded Oregon 44-10 in
Los Angeles and it seemed
as if USC might just rule
the Pac-10 forever.
That was before USC
went to Eugene last year
and coach Chip Kelly's
Ducks handed the Trojans
what at that point was the
worst beating of the Carroll
era.
Oregon zipped past
USC for 613 yards, 319 on
the. ground, and beat the
Trojans 47-20.
From there, the Ducks
soared to the Rose Bowl.
The Trojans tumbled to an
8-4 season and Carroll left
when it was done.
Oregon continues to
climb. Two weeks ago, the
Ducks rose to No. 1 in the
AP poll for the first time.
They are also second in the
BCS standings. Keep win-
ning and Oregon will likely
play in the BCS national
championship game.
Under coach Lane Kiffin,
USC (5-2) is no longer a
national title threat. The
Trojans have lost twice on
last-second field goals and,
while their offense is still
explosive, USC's defense
ranks 87th in the nation.
How much has the hier-
archy of the Pac-10 changed
in the last year? Oregon is a
touchdown favorite in the
Los Angeles Coliseum. USC
hasn't been an underdog
at home since 2001 against
UCLA, according to odds-
maker RJ Bell of Pregame.
com.
The Trojans can't go to a
bowl this season as they dig
out from NCAA sanctions,
so this is their Rose Bowl.
For the Ducks, this might


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Kentucky quarterback Mike Hartline (5) scans the field for an open receiver in a
game against University of Florida at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on Sept. 25. The
Wildcats will be looking to knock of No. 23 Mississippi State on Saturday.


be the toughest hurdle
standing between them and
a trip to Glendale, Ariz., for
the Jan. 10 title game.
USC's Matt Barkley is
the highest-rated passer
in the Pac-10, the Trojans
are averaging more than
200 yards on the ground
and their offense just might
be able to keep up with
Heisman trophy contender
LaMichael James and the
high-speed Ducks.
Conference road games
have undone Alabama,
Ohio State and Oklahoma
the last three weeks.
Or Oregon could squash
USC again, showing the
Trojan dynasty is truly
dead.
The picks:
No. 1 Oregon (minus
7) at No. 24 Southern
California
Trojans last stand ... USC
48-42.
No. 3 Auburn (minus
7) at Mississippi
Nine straight years,
Tigers have won game
that follows LSU game ...
AUBURN 35-30.
No. 4 TCU (minus 35)
at UNLV
Horned Frogs have
allowed 10 points in last


four games ... TCU 48-6.
No. 5 Michigan State
(plus 6%2) at No. 18
Iowa
The Big Ten race gets
muddled if Hawkeyes win
...IOWA 28-24.
No. 7 Missouri (plus
7%) at No. 14 Nebraska
It's early, but this game
should decide Big' 12 North
winner ... NEBRASKA
28-17.
No. 8 Utah (minus 7)
at Air Force
Utes have won three of
four vs. Falcons, games
are usually close ... UTAH
27-21.
No. 10 Ohio State
(minus 25/2) at
Minnesota
This season can't end
fast enough for Gophers ...
OHIO STATE 45-13.
Colorado (plus 23) at
No. 11 Oklahoma
Sooners have been out-
scored 67-30 in fourth quar-
ter ... OKLAHOMA 48-14.
* No. 13 Stanford (minus
7/2) at Washington
Cardinal will pound
Huskies' weak run defense
... STANFORD 37-24.
No. 15 Arizona (minus
8'/2) at UCLA
Suspensions and injuries


are cutting Bruins to shreds
... ARIZONA 28-17.
Tennessee (off) at No.
17 South Carolina
This rivalry, is no fun
when Steve. Spurrier isn't
teasing the Vols coach ...
SOUTH CAROLINA 38-14.
Vanderbilt (plus 20) at
No. 19 Arkansas
Vandy won last trip to
Fayetteville in 2005 ...
ARKANSAS 45-13.
No. 20 Oklahoma State
(minus 5/2) at Kansas
State
Cowboys WR Justin
Blackmon's status uncer-
tain after arrest ... KANSAS
STATE 40-35.
No. 22 Miami (minus
14'2) at Virginia
Damien Berry has four
straight 100-yard rushing
games for Hurricanes ...
MIAMI 34-14.
Kentucky (plus 61/2) at
No. 23 Mississippi State
Road team has won four
straight meetings between
Wildcats and Bulldogs ...
MISSISSIPPI ST 28-20.
No. 25 Baylor (plus 7)
at Texas
First-place Bears against
struggling Longhorns in
bizzaro Big 12 matchup ...
TEXAS 38-28.


CHS: Wolfson, Suwannee remain on schedule
Continued From Page 1B


Columbia's special teams'
woes continued in the sec-
ond half as another low
snap led to Lunde being
tackled at the 22-yard line.
Three plays later, Seigler
would keep on an option
and give the Commanders
an 18-3 lead.
The Tiger offense final-
ly responded, as Nigel
Atkinson led the Tigers on
a four-play drive covering
53 yards. Atkinson hit Shaq
Johnson for 20 yards on the
first play and followed it up
with a completion to Alex
Sromalski for 11 yards.
Atkinson's third comple-
tion would give the Tigers'
a touchdown on a 16-yard
reception from Rakeem


Battle. Another pass gave
the Tigers a two-point con-
version as Atkinson found
Nate Ayers in the corner of
the end zone to cut the lead
to 18-11, but that's as close
as Columbia would get.
The Tigers' defense held
Ed White to a three-and-
out, but Atkinson fumbled
on Columbia's first play of
the next possession to give
the Commanders the ball
at the 46-yard line. Seigler
found Javon Curry for 33
yards and two plays later he
capped off the touchdown
drive with a seven-yard pass
to Curry with 8:38 left.
Ed White went with a bit
of trickery on the follow-
ing kickoff and recovered


an onside kick that seemed
to bounce off one of their
defenders before traveling
10 yards. It was ruled a
recovery on the field, and
the Commanders were able
to work on the clock.
When Columbia took
back over on its next pos-
session, the Tigers were
cut short on their first three
plays setting up a fake-punt
attempt, but Jayce Barber
was hit in the backfield
turning the ball back over
to Ed White.
Again, the Columbia
defense held Ed White
on four downs, giving the
Tigers a final shot at a
comeback. Atkinson was
forced into another fumble


after Jamar Gilyard hit him
behind the line and Chris
Jamison recovered to seal
the deal.
"It was a hard night and
a tough feeling for the
seniors," Columbia coach
Craig Howard told the team
following the game. "We're
not playing for next season.
We want to finish this sea-
son right. We'll fight back
against Wolfson and then
we'll fight back against Live
Oak Suwannee."
Columbia hasn't been
mathematically eliminat-
ed from the playoffs as
Ridgeview must still win
another district game to
officially claim the runner-
up position.


EYE OF THE TIGER 3K


COURTESY PHOTO
Winner Shawn Ziegaus (left) leads Timothy Pierce at the
Eye of the Tiger Invitational at Alligator Park on Saturday.
Ziegaus won with a personal best time of 11:16, followed by
Pierce in 11:26. Both times were below the middle school
state qualifying time of 12:30 for the 3K distance.


Mixed 3K Run CC MS


Name
I #178 Tucker., Emma
2 #179 Ziegaus, Samantha
3 #176 Morse, Nicole
4 #136 Faltemier, Emily
5 #150 Rodgers,Autumn
6 #153 Waters, Priscilla
7 #148 Ricker, Rachel
8 #139 Chitty, Kaylen
9 #147 Rehberg,Taylor
10 #186 Steed, Shianne
II #149 Ricker,Tessa
12 #191 Laywell, Natalie
13 #188 Belo,Anna
14 #141 Fares, Rima
15 #193 Moreschi, Olivia
16 #177 Seay,Taylor
17 #187Varner, Mia
18 #189 Harwick, Megan
19 #190 Lawson, Emma
20 #196Viviano, Sophia
21 #192 Laywell, Savannah
22 #181 Evans, Shannon
23 #195 Toomey, Gabrielle
24 #144 McCarty, Melani
25 #185 Rivera, Leandra
I #175 Ziegaus, Shawn
2 #183 Pierce,Timothy
3 #161 GrinerWyatt
4 #162 Hales,Thomas
5 #170 Stanze,Teddy
6 #165 Martin, Brandyn
7 #180 Barwick,Austin
8 #270 Sawyer.William
9 #173 Tyre,Tristen
10 #164 Marroletti, Dalton
II #199 Collada, Nicolas
12 #166 Nguyen, Jordan
13 #174 Wilson, Matthew
14 #157 Crum,Juwan
15 #184 Tucker, Jerome
16 #169 Simpson, Brandon
17 #67 Moreschi, Michael
18 #202 Laywell, Matthias
19 #200 200, Matthew
20 #208 Thornton, Nathan
21 #207 Thornton,Adam
22 #201 Huber,Seth


Women
Team
W Eye of the T
W Eye of the T
W Eye of the T
W Unattached
W Bradford Mid
W Bradford Mid
W Bradford Mid
W Bradford Mid
W Bradford Mid
W Eye of the T
W Bradford Mid
W Queen of Pea
W Queen of Pea
W Bradford Mid
W Queen of Pea
W Eye of the T
W Queen of Pea
W Queen of Pea
W Queen of Pea
W Queen of Pea
W Queen of Pea
W Eye of the T
W Queen of Pea
W Bradford Mid
W Eye of the T
Men
M Eye of the T
M Eye of the T
M Bradford Mid
M Bradford Mid
M Bradford Mid
M Bradford Mid
M Eye of the T
M9 Queen of Pea
M Bradford Mid
M Bradford Mid
M Queen of Pea
M Bradford Mid.,
M Bradford Mid
M Bradford Mid
M Eye of the T
M Bradford Mid
M6 Newberry
M Queen of Pea
M Queen of Pea
M Queen of Pea
M Queen of Pea
M Queen of Pea


Avg Mile Finals Points
6:20.3 11:48.80 I
6:33.0 12:12.50 2
6:40.4 12:26.40 3
7:01.8 13:06.20
7:09.8 13:21.10 4
7:24.1 13:47.80 5
7:27.1 13:53.30 6
7:41.5 14:20.30 7
7:43.3 14:23.50 8
7:57.6 14:50.30 9
8:12.5 15:18.00 10
8:22.2 15:36.00 II
8:41.7 16:12.50 12
8:50.7 16:29.30 13
8:51.6 16:30.80 14
8:58.5 16:43.70 15
8:59.8 16:46.20 16
9:03.0 16:52.20 17
9:03.3 16:52.70 18
9:05.9 16:57.60 19
9:06.1 16:57.90
9:09.6 17:04.40 20
9:14.8 17:14.10
9:20.0 17:23.90
14:14.6 26:33.00 21


6:03.2 11:16.90
6:07.8 11:25.50
6:09.7 11:29.00
6:37.3 12:20.50
6:50.1 12:44.40
7:13.4 13:27.90
7:23.1 13:46.00
7:24.0 13:47.60
7:26.5 13:52.30
7:39.7 14:16.90
7:54.5 14:44.40
7:57.3. ,14:49.600
7:58.5 14:51.90
8:06.6 15:07.00
8:07.6 15:08.80
8:21.6 15:35.00
8:29.6 15:49.80
8:36.5 16:02.80
9:42.9 18:06.60
1 1:05.8 20:41.00
13:08.6 24:30.00
13:11.5 24:35.40


BRIEFS


YOUTH SOCCER
Winter league
registration set
Columbia Youth Soccer
Association's winter
recreational league final
registration for ages
3-16 is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday at the CYSA
clubhouse. Fee of $65
includes uniform.
For details, call Scott or
Melody Everett at
288-2504 or 2884481.

CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
set for Monday
Columbia High's soccer
teams have a Moe's Night
fundraiser planned from


5-8 p.m. Monday at Moe's
Southwest Grill on U.S.
Highway 90 in Lake City.
For details, call
(386) 365-1877,

TIGERS SOCCER
Breakfast at
Kazbor's Grille
Columbia High's
boys soccer team has a
breakfast fundraiser from
7:30-10:30 a.m. Ndov. 6 at
Kazbor's Grille in Lake
City Commons. Tickets
are $6 at the door and
may be purchased in
advance from team
members.
For details, call
(386) 365-1877.

N From staff reports


INDIANS: Common foes
Continued From Page 1B


East Gadsden Fort
White would need to
beat Bradford to prevent
a three-way tie should
Taylor County beat Florida
High;
Fort White beats
Taylor County and
Bradford loses to East
Gadsden Fort White
clinches district title and
Taylor County would be
runner-up with a win over
Florida High;
Taylor County beats
Fort White and Bradford
beats East Gadsden -
Fort White/Bradford win-
ner would be runner-up;
Taylor County beats
Fort White and Bradford
loses to East Gadsden -
Fort White/Bradford win-
ner would be runner-up.
The district champion
and runner-up advance


to the state playoffs. The
champion gets to host at
least the first-round game
and that would be a first
for Fort White.
Fort White and Taylor
County have played three
common opponents. The
Indians beat Suwannee
High (52-22), East Gadsden
(28-14) and Union County
(31-12).
Taylor County's winning
scores were Suwannee,
30-20, East Gadsden, 57-17,
and Union County, 20-10.
Directions: Take U.S.
Highway 27 west to Perry;
turn right at first red light
(Center Street); drive
through two red lights
and take the first 'paved
road to the right; there is a
cemetery and baseball
field on the way to the
football stadium.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010 4B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS






WOULpMAKI
COOL 4


GARFIELD

I ReNTEP A SCAR



0o


Y OU KNOW, I CAN SEEIT JLST
FINE FROM HERE HOW ABOUT YOU?
ABSOLUTELY

0
0


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Journal of son's life is gift

worthy of special occasion


DEAR ABBY: I have
been keeping a journal for
my son since he was born
22 years ago. I have never
missed a single day. I write
About him regardless of
whether I see him or not.
Sometimes I'll jot down
a verse I remembered,
or something happening
in his world or an item of
newsworthy information.
I have also written my
thoughts about his life and
decisions.
46 My dilemma is when I
should give these writings
to him. I don't want to keep
them indefinitely because
they are meant for him. He
is married and has a son on
the way. My inclination is to
' give him the writings of his
T life on the occasion of his
son's birth. He has no idea
I've been doing this, so it
will be a complete surprise.
I'd appreciate your input
BLOCKED WRITER
IN OKLAHOMA
DEAR BLOCKED
WRITER: What an amaz-
ing gift those journals will
be. However, allow me to
caution you against giving
them to your son when his
child is born. There will be
I a lot going on at that time,
and you do not want to dis-
tract from that momentous


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
occasion. My advice is to
wait until his next milestone
birthday and present them
to him when he's 25. And
because you enjoy journal-
ing, consider starting one
about your own life then.
DEAR ABBY: I have
always enjoyed Halloween.
I like seeing the children
in their costumes and, for
most of the little ones, it is a
fun and magical time.
In our neighborhood, a
group of 15 to 20 parents
escort their trick-or-treat-
ing children from door to
door. Sometimes there are
25 to 30 kids. When they
approach a house for their
treats, the parents remain
on the sidewalk, apparently
oblivious to what's going on
when the door opens.
We have a small front
porch that rises about 8
inches above the sidewalk.
The kids push and shove,
jockeying for position to
get their "loot" Last year, a
5-year-old fell off our porch.


.Fortunately, she was not
hurt. The parents did not
issue any directions to their
children to take turns ac-
cepting 6ur candy because
they were too busy chatting
among themselves.
Because of the inherent
danger to unsupervised
children (and the possibility
of a lawsuit if there should
be an accident), I will not
be turning on my porch
light this year the signal
in our area that alerts kids
that the home is participat-
ing in trick-or-treat
I hope my letter will re-
mind parents to practice
mindfulness and make this
Sunday a Happy Hallow-
een! LIGHTS OUT IN
HARRISBURG
DEAR LIGHTS OUT:
So do I, and that's why I'm
printing your letter, which
arrived just in time for me
to include it in today's col-
umn. Last year your neigh-
bors were lucky the child
who fell didn't break a
wrist or an ankle. Parents,
when escorting your little
ghosts, goblins and vam-
pires, please remain vigi-
lant. Common sense must
prevail.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't take
what others say to heart.
Constructive criticism may
not be easy to swallow
but it will help you make
improvements. Don't let
someone put unreasonable
demands on you. You have
more to offer than you re-
alize. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): A family affair
will help you make a deci-
sion regarding where you
live and the lifestyle you've
been accustomed to. A
change will help you man-
age your money better.
Love and romance should
be the focus of your day.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): There is work
to do and the person who
does the best job with the
least amount of fuss will
get the big prize. Be spe-
cific as well as creative and
you will get the deal you've
been hoping for. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22):'Take the plunge
and follow your dreams,
hopes and wishes. If you
push your ideas and pres-
ent what you have to offer
with a little flair, you will
attract the kind of atten-
tion required to reach your
goals. Love is in the stars.
*****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last*

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't give in to emo-
tional blackmail. If some-
one you love or to whom
you are close tries to get
something from you for
nothing,. put a stop to it.
Take any opportunity to
travel or socialize. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Listen and
observe. Preparation will
be the prerequisite to win-
ning. A change in the way
you do things will surprise
others and give you the.
edge. Love is in your cor-
ner. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Concentrate on work
and getting ahead, not on
your personal life or prob-
lems you face at home.
Securing your position will
help you feel more at ease
about the developments
you are facing in your per-
sonal life. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take a trip or
plan something special
that entails love and ro-
mance. You can take up
a new hobby or practice
a craft you enjoy. Now is
the time for pleasure and
enjoyment so get out with
friends, your lover or new


people. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The future
may be dependent on how
others perceive you and
what you do. Give your all
and don'tbe afraid to ask
for advice along the way.
Your desire to please may
even counteract some, of
the negativity going on in
your life. -AA
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't stop
believing in yourself and
what you can do. Ask the
one you love or the peo-
ple with whom you spend
most of your time to help
you complete a project you
are excited about The con-
tributions will lead to your
success. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Not everything
you are told will be factual.
Get a second opinion from
someone with experience.
You can learn personally
and professionally from *
your past. Don't make the
same mistake twice: **,*
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Relax and
enjoy the things you like
to do most. People, places
and pastimes will all come
into play. An agreement or
settlement can be resolved,
enabling you to make deci-
sions regarding your fu-
ture. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: F equals D
"JKTG HXNT WGBSWZ VBP YB VBPL
W G T TZ, M G F XY J X H H . XZG 'Y
YKMY YKT ATZY RBZXYXBG NLBU
J KXS K Y B R LMV?" T.Y KTH
A ML LV U B LT
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "When you have been given something in a moment
of grace, it is sacrilegious to be greedy." Marian Anderson


(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc.


10-29


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


I T'HOU-DN'T HAv WORgN MY ZOM'IP
/ -\ c ( COSTUMt AND
A___DFOgRA
To 5,41, I. DON'T

r QUALIFY FO0 A
COST-OF-/IVING
41^ INC gEA .


LffM mwVql 19


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Clarinet I, LLC of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1037
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 5S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 03751-217
LOT 17 SOUTH WIND S/D. ORB
932-2424
Name in which assessed: DAVID P
HALL III
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 22nd day.
of November, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04542020
October 29, 2010
November 3, 10, 17, 2010

NOTICE OF ACTION
*.BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license to practice nurs-
ing of
Aranda E. Williams, C.N.A.
1166 S.E. St. Johns Street Lot #2
Lake City, Florida 32025
CASE NO.: CNA 136466
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (850)245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by November
24, 2010, the matter of the Adminis-
trative Complaint will be presented
at an ensuing meeting of the Board
6f Nursing in formal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-
.en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850)245-4640, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (v),
via Florida Relay Service.
04541997
October 22, 29, 2010


S010 Announcements

* f i V fl& A l'W Wum


020 Lost & Found

STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197

100 Job
Opportunities
Lily Pad is Hiring!
Looking for Outgoing Sales
Associates for Seasonal Positions!
Bring in Resume Today!

Operations/MGR Position
Exceptional people skills,
Proficient with Quickbooks req,
Marketing exp req, M-F, some
travel, job demanding but reward-
ing, fast paced medical industry,
fax resumes to 386-758-9047


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins' FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
****************************


Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04542061
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Post Closing File Coordinator.
This position provides
administrative assistance to loan
officers and loan department
staff. Previous office environ-
ment experience required.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lhke City FL 32056 or
email Turbeville.J()ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542062
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Commercial Loan Processor in
Lake City. This position is
responsible for documentation
andtransaction management,
coordinates loan closings and
other duties as assigned.
Previous loan processing
experience is preferred.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City FL 32056 or
email resume to
Turbeville.J(a ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04542090




Managers and Assistant
Managers
Join a fast growing team of
managers in the Convenience
store business. Now accepting
applications for qualified
people for a new store in
Lake City, Florida.
We offer a competitive salary,
weekly pay, bonus, incentives,
paid holidays, and vacation.
Must have retail experience
and willing to work a
flexible schedule.
Apply at the Lake City
Fast Track Location on
Highway 90
or
Call: 866-539-7685 Ext 24
Fax Resume to: 352-333-1161
Email:
dtumrnerafasttrackstores.com


05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
pm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
sents seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
pne of these positions to qualify
for the job. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all
managers before they are hired.

05524306
Human Resource/Fiscal Clerk
Min 2 yrs computer experience
intermediate/advanced skill in
Word, Excel, Publisher, &
PowerPoint. Prefer 1 yr
accounts payable/payroll/
human resource experience.
HS Dip/GED. To apply:
Submit cover letter and resume
to: SV4Cs PO Box 2637, Lake
City, 32056; In person:
236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake
City 32025; By email:
arobinson(asv4cs.org
Closes 11/5/2010 EOE

Accepting applications for
Housekeeping/Weekend Breakfast
attendant.. Apply in person at
Cabot Lodge 3525 US
Hwy 90W. No phone calls.

Mechanic Needed
Heavy truck mechanic, must have
own tools, great position for the
right person, Southern Specialized
Truck & Trailer, US 41 N
386-752-9754

i so Medical
120 Employment

04542125
Assistant Office Manager
Must have Medical Billing
experience including
Medicare and Medicaid.
Please apply in person to
Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave,
Lake City, Fl or
fax resume to 386-752-7337.
EOE/DFWP


05524303
CHIEF NURSING OFFICER
for Madison County Hospital
Min. 2 yr. degree, BS preferred.
Min 5 yrs nursing exp. with at
least 1 yr mgmnt or supervisory
exp. Call Cindi: (850)253-1906

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of CNA/MA/LPN
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494


190 Mortgage Money 420 Wanted to Buy


FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
Education
04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/08/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. -Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife- If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


0 Livestock &
3 Supplies
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

360 Feed, Seed
3 0 & Plants
Perrenial Peanut Hay,
wholesale prices direct from the
farm. $3-$9 per bale,
Madison 850-464-3947


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fumrn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Slide in 30" Electric Range
$100
386-292-3927 or
386-754-9295


403 Auctions

04542087
Public Auction
Sat. Oct. 30, 2010 @ 10:30 A.M.
Location: 8486 N. US. Hwy 441
Lake City, FL
3/2 Mobile Home on
3.66 AC of Land
For More Info Call: John Hill
386-362-3300 Lic.Re.Bkr.


407 Computers
IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

Panasonic Tough Book Laptop
metal casing, touch screen, recent
diag, works great, upgraded mem-
ory/anti-virus $150 386-623-2443
Panasonic Tough Book Laptop,
runs Windows XP, works great,
recent diagnostic $100
386-623-2443


408 Furniture
7 PIECE SOLID OAK QUEEN
Bedroom Set, good condition,
must sell $450 OBO.
Call 386-752-5345 after 3:00 p.m.

Dual reclining
Love seat.
$100.
86-752-3720
FOR SALE
Queen Bed.
$80.
386-758-3574
FUTON BED
Queen Size
Wood Frame $75.00
386758-3574
OUST SEE!! Sofa & Loveseat.
Navy Blue & Black. Plush &
comfortable. Immaculate condi-
tion $200 Call 386-935-0654

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman Rider
42" cut, good condition,
$385
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

Nice Craftsman Push Mower,
6.5 HP, runs good,
$85 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

412 Medical
12h Supplies
Medical potty Chair.
Brand new $50.
386-752-3720


K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large otrsmall tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE Sat Oct 30. 9-?
206 SW Greenbrier in
Timberlane off Troy Rd.
386-365-4950
Friday & Saturday 8am
Collectables, Antiques,
(2 blks N of VA)
433 S. Marion Ave
MULTI FAMILY Sale. Sat. 8-?
Hwy 47 to 242 to Wise Estates.
353 SW Wise Dr. Too much to list
From clothes to furniture. (Signs)





PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun, 8am ?, Something for
everyone! 119 SE Travis Glen,
(252 by High School
to Forest & comer of Travis)
SAT. 7:30-? Hwy 441S across
from North Florida Eyecare, right
on Alamo Dr. Look for signs. Pots
& pans, clothes, fum., much more.


440 Miscellaneous
10' X 3' Inflatable Pool,
pump and all still in box
$60
386-292-3927or 386-154-9295
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231
White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $60
386-935-0654

450 Good Things
450 to Eat ___
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
I bd/l bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Tumer Rd
386-752-1941 or 386-965-0932
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3/2 S/W MH, 1 acre fenced lot,
close to town, near new Elem
school, $700 mon, 1st & last
at move-in 352-281-0549
'3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
DWMH, $850 mo Spacious 4/2,
on 5 acres, just south of Lake City,
clean, quiet, great location, storage
shed. November FREE. Last
month & $300 security, 386-462-
1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Newly Remodeled
2/1 S/W, front kitchen, CH/A
$375. mo. plus $200. dep
386-752-2254
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
* Q IItt fit JiIuau


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevallcyproperties.com


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 lays. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.






Carriage LS Online
36' 3 slide fifth wheel. Onl e
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only. One Low
$26,000 OBO O w
Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with 0 1
low miles. $47,000 1C
Call
386-755-0653


Classified Department: 755-5440


SITTi
SELI


FID i


Mobile Home
650 & Land
D/W Homes of Merit, almost 1/2
acre, on Branford Hwy, Applian-
ces included, Asking $55,000,
Call today-386-208-0665 or
386-466-2825

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
(15523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA with carport, screen
porch, Privacy Garden.
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
A'Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook-up,
CH/A, $600 plus dep & bckgmd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 352-377-7652
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
IV2 bFor Rent
1 bedroom upstairs apartment,
utilities & cable included,
$150 a week, $300 deposit,
386-758-2080 or 755-1670
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands;
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04542071
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced back yard
$1,200 mo. For more
information call 386-752-4864.

2 br/lba House w/yard,
near airport, $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
2bedroom/lbath in city
$550. mo. plus deposit
No Pets! Call Buckey
386-758-0057
3 possible 4 br 1 ba home
located in Lake City <90west)
$800.00 first & last required
386-623-9686 or 386-288-0120
3/2 big, in town, small indoor pet
ok, W/D hook-up, hard wood
floors, $650 mo, plus $200 sec,
386-397-3568
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543


730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
I+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

7 0 Furnished
4Iv Homes for Rent
Completely Renovated furnished
1 bdrm house on private property.
Water included. No pets, $400. mo
plus $50. Deposit 386-752-8755

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft *
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N441 & -10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
ldo down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnantfwomen and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275. --

810 Home for Sale

FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Vake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
04542115
3/2 on 4 acres, "Like New"
Brick home w/18'X20'
concrete block
workshop. $139,900.
Call Susan Eagle/
Daniel Crapps Agency,
Realtor 386-623-6612


82O Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010


.... A tOwner


& STRI P

PAFMANEI


E S


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Nigel Atkinson (12) runs through an open hole on a quarterback keeper.

CHS can still win district title


Despite three
consecutive
losses, the
Columbia
High Tigers
can move one step closer
to the District 4-4A
championship with a win


against Ed White High
(5-2, 3-0) in a special
Thursday showdown.
Last year, CHS rallied
from 25 points down at
home to win 36-32.
This year, the
Tigers must travel to


Jacksonville to take
on the Commanders,
who currently hold the
district lead. A win for
the Tigers would shake
up the district and the
championship would go
through Columbia.


tig


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Wide receiver Adrian Hill (1) loses his footing while trying to shake two Ridgeview High
defenders.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High football players take a knee as an injured player is escorted off the field in a
game against Ridgeview High on Oct. 8.


2010 Tiger Football Schedule


Wk 9 Wolfson H 7:30 p.m.

Wk 10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.


*': Ooodwmrnch "
Ronsonet Buick GMC Service Features:
* Factory Trained and
ASE Certified Technicians e
* Early MorninglLate Night Drop Off ERpICE
* We Use Genuine GM Parts
* Full Service Tire and Battery Center
* On Site Wash, Wax & Detail Service

Ov 50 ~tw s .of SAisfI -


The Predator

*48,900
4BR/2BA, 1800sqft
(386) 754-8844


QBel H 1
)DU5
w P A K I c L
G H J 0 A M L G C G
C N A F U C E E M A
Q H I I X B E F F^ w
U E A T U D Y F S H
B B C S I U VB A Q
E R E Q D C NI Y H
U A P K G U EX L Y S
V F 0 H F M 0 El G L S


B I G V N
Lake City
Reporter' s
popular weekly
word search is
a great way to
get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
Leek at a price
any business
can afford.


Deal e I Wdned- a- 4A


C HS STAR


CHS 38, Brooks County 13

CHS 30, South Lafourche 19

CHS 22, Buchholz 14

CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20

Madison 19, CHS 0

Ridgeview 16, CHS 9

Godby 35, CHS 14

Wk 8 Ed White A 7 p.m.


A+ EyeCare
Sa I l
,I 1 In1 \gm*



555-5555


....."Power~ar97

.... ^ALL TYPES


Cxi YT'C GE


FOOD ST


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