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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01435
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/26/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01435
System ID: UF00028308:01435
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






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Reporter


Tuesday, October 26, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 239 0 75 cents



Crash fatal to 2 Lake City residents


From staff reports

WAKULLA Two Lake
City residents were killed
in a two-vehicle accident
after attending a wedding
near the Wakulla Shrine
Club, according to Wakulla
County Sheriff David
Harvey. Three others were
injured, including one criti-
cally.
Tracy Williams, 40,
and her daughter, Ashley


Shallar, 17, died in the acci-
dent that occurred at 10
p.m. Saturday.
Helen Edenfield, 37,
Brittany Edenfield, 18, and
Michael Edenfield, 9, were
also hurt in the accident
and hospitalized. Brittany
Edenfield was airlifted to
Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital and remains in
the hospital in critical con-
dition. Helen Edenfield
has been released. The


Edenfields are also resi-
dents of Lake City.
The five people were
in a single vehicle attend-
ing a wedding at 4141
Crawfordville Highway in
Crawfordville, according to
the police report. Williams
was driving a Honda Civic
following other relatives
who were leaving the
Shrine Club.
She pulled out in front of
a Ford Super Duty Truck


that was driven northbound
by Kenyard Coleman, 17,
of Crawfordville. Chelsea
Scalingi, 17, was a passen-
ger in Coleman's vehicle.
Both suffered minor inju-
ries and were treated at the
scene.
The Ford truck struck
the Honda in a "T-bone"
fashion and nearly broke
the Civic in half, according
to. the police report. Shallar
was in the seat behind


Williams.
The Civic was dragged
approximately 75 feet and
ended up in the middle of
the highway. The truck
flipped onto its side.
Both vehicles were
destroyed in the accident.
Shallar was a senior at
Columbia High School and
dual-enrolled in classes at
Florida Gateway College,
said Donnie Harrison,
assistant principal.


LEARNING AND GIVING


LEANNE TYO L .:i, )LI |::.I,
Local Rotarians and Columbia High School Logistics Academy students work together at the school district warehouse Monday to re-pack about 900 Rotary-
stickered dictionaries bought and donated annually by the Rotary Club of Lake City that will be distributed to all third-grade students in the district.
Pictured are Chadd Abbott (from left), 16, a 10th-grader; Rebecca Golden, CHS global logistics teacher; Steven Houston, 16, a ninth-grader; Carlton Jones,
Rotary president; Tyson Johnson, Rotary vocational director; and Henry Gonzalez, 15, a 10th-grader.


CHS students

help distribute

dictionaries to

third-graders


By LEANNE TYO
ItyoTlakecityreporter.com

C olumbia High
School stu-
dents pitched
in to help
with a special
Rotary Club service proj-
ect by putting classroom
skills to work at the dis-
trict's warehouse Monday.
About 20 CHS Logistics
Academy students helped
to prepare approximately
900 dictionaries for distri-
bution to all third-grade
students in the district.The
dictionaries were bought
O and donated by the Rotary
Club of Lake City.
For the past five years,
the Rotary Club has been


budgeting for, purchasing
and donating the dictionar-
ies which include other
educational resources such
as the U.S. Constitution
and the Periodic Table of
the Elements to district
third-graders to support
literacy in the county.
"It's something they can
carry with them through-
out their years in school,"
said Carlton Jones, Rotary
president.
With the implementa-
tion of the new Logistics
Academy a program
with a logistics and dis-
tribution curriculum
and applicable projects
- at CHS, the Rotary Club
sought to get the Logistics'
students involved in the


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Chad Abbott flips through one of the Rotary-donated dictionaries which include educational
resources such as the U.S. Constitution and the Periodic Table of the Elements in front of
.the re-packed boxes that hold about 900 of the books. The dictionaries will be distributed to
district third-graders by the Logistics Academy.


project.
"They're going to be
taught the working pro-
cess of redistribution and
the shipping process from
beginning to end," Jones
said. "We felt it was a win-


win situation for the club
and the students. It helps
us where we don't have to
do it all ourselves and it
can be hands-on for them."
Students spent time
applying Rotary "Four-Way


Test" stickers four ques-
tions of integrity Rotarians
use to test how they think
and act to each dic-
tionary and re-packing
DISTRIBUTE continued on 3A


"She was a good student
and worked at the county
office as well," he said.
"She did well."
Counselors were on
standby for students if
needed, Harrison said.
U.S. Highway 319 was
closed down for approxi-
-mately three hours while
the Traffic Unit investigat-
ed the crash. The investiga-
tion continues.


Fair


game


time

56th Annual
County
Fair opens
Friday

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
It's that time of the year
again for fair food, rides,
games and, most important
of all, fun.
The ribbon-cutting cer-
emony and official opening
of the 56th Annual Columbia
County Fair is at 4 p.m.
Friday at the fairgrounds.
The fair runs through Nov.
6.
The guest speaker at
the, ceremony is Columbia
County native James
Montgomery.
"We're very excited about
this year's fair," said Wanda
Jones, the Columbia County
Resources secretary/trea-
surer. 'We've got a good
line up of entertainment for
the community."
The theme for this year's
fair is "Roots of America."
"We're going back to
the root of what brought
America where it is today,"
she said."
The fair will feature 38 to
40 rides including the tradi-
tional ones as well as some
new attractions never seen
at a Columbia County Fair,
said Steve Briscoe, CCR
director. All rides will be
inspected for safety.
Returning to the fair
is crowd-favorite Ron
Diamond, a hypnotist and
magician.
"Ron draws such a tremen-
dous crowd with his show,"
Briscoe said. "As I've said
in the past, you can't have a
Columbia County Fair with-
out Ron Diamond."
The Kid's Pedal Tractor
Pull is also part of the enter-
tainment lineup.
"It was a tremendous suc-
cess," he said. "We had so
much of a positive response
that we had to bring it
back."
New additions to the
fair's entertainment include
the Pirates of the Sky fam-
ily thrill show and Bruce
Sarafian, world-record jug-
gler.
FAIR continued on 3A


I "- 1- 1 ,


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T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Schools................. 7A
Puzzles ................. 2B
Advice & Comics ......... 4B


TODAY IN
NATION
tr n I I r
sIi i i,-r :


COMING
WEDNESDAY
.'. I .l .. ii:, ,:l. -
:., , ,-:fHi ,.r I I a,


. '.. t-OHA'tey"iGlOS'V.I~WfT'inB










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


- $H Monday:
Afternoon: 5-9-9
Evening: 5-5-9


Monday:
Afternoon: 0-2-0-1
Evening: 3-1-8-7


* ezwrnfCh.
; s.. Sunday:
1-4-6-7-27


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Sugarland: Full steam ahead


NASHVILLE, Tenn.

where you'll find country
duo Sugarland.
They are continuing
to stretch genre bound-
aries on their fourth album, "The
Incredible Machine," and consider it
a "thank you note" to fans for allow-
ing theip to grow as artists over the
years.
"I don't think we're at the fringe
of country music, I think we are the
fringe," said lead singer Jennifer
Nettles, 36, in a recent interview.
Sugarland's other half, guitar-
ist Kristian Bush, 40, said fans not
only have encouraged the duo but
rewarded them for taking risks, like
with their 2008 hit, "Stay." The near-
ly five-minute acoustic song went to
No. 2 on the country charts and won
them a Grammy.
They're doing it again with "The.
Incredible Machine's" leadoff single,
"Stuck Like Glue." It's a top five hit
on Billboard's country music chart,
despite getting initial push back
from some country radio program-
mers who took issue with the song's
reggae-infused section.
"Art in general is provocative,"
said Nettles, brushing off any criti-
cism. "It is meant to provoke. If it
provokes conversation, if it provokes
complete and total outrage or if it
provokes euphoria, whatever that
may be, and I think we've gotten a
little provocative on this record."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kristian Bush, left, and Jennifer Nettles of Sugarland perform in Central Park in
New York.


Angeles before the Dec. 5, sale,
administered by Julien's Auctions.
A portion of the proceeds will
benefit MusiCares, the Recording
Academy's charity for musicians in
need.


Johnny Cash costumes, H dlin f Willias'
guitars, lyrics for sale andring gets apologyams
.firing gets apology


LOS ANGELES The man
in black will be bringing in some
green when Johnny Cash's guitars,
costumes, handwritten lyrics and
personal belongings go on the auc-
tion block.
The items will be on view in Los


NEW YORK NPR's chief
executive says she's sorry for how
analyst Juan Williams' dismissal was
handled but she's not sorry for
firing him.
Vivian Schiller sent an apology to


NPR staff members Sunday night
She says Williams deserved a face-
to-face meeting to hear that his
contract as an analyst was being
terminated over remarks he made
on Fox News Channel. Williams
was fired for saying he gets nervous
when he's on a plane and sees peo-
ple in clothing that identifies them
as Muslim. Washington-based NPR's
management, which had long been
troubled by Williams' dual role as an
analyst on Fox, said the remarks vio-
lated its standards of not giving his
opinion on the air.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Musician Bill Wyman is 74.
* Former Sen. Edward
Brooke III is 91.
* Actress Shelley Morrison
is 74.
* Actor Bob Hoskins is 68.
* Author Pat Conroy is 65.
* Actress Jaclyn Smith is 65.
* TV host Pat Sajak is 64.
* U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton is 63.


* Singer Maggie Roche (The
Roches) is 59.
* Musician Bootsy Collins
is 59.
* Actor James Pickens Jr.
("Grey's Anatomy") is 58.
* Rock musician Keith
Strickland (The B-52's) is 57.
* Actor Dylan McDermott is
49.
* Actor Cary Elwes is 48.


Daily Scripture


"Speak to one another with
psalms, hymns and spiritual
songs. Sing and make music in
your heart to the Lord, always
giving thanks to God the Father
for everything, in the name of
our Lord Jesus Christ."
Ephesians 5:19-20


Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


'Hiccup girl' gets
murder charge

ST. PETERSBURG A
teenage girl who became
famous'after hiccuping
uncontrollably for weeks
has been charged with
luring a man to a house
where he was robbed and
fatally shot
Jennifer Mee, 19, of
St. Petersburg and two
others are charged with
first-degree murder in the
death of Shannon Griffin,
22, on Saturday.
Mee's unusual condi-
tion landed her on NBC's
'Today Show" in 2007 and
got her a hug from coun-
try star Keith Urban.
But her life fell into
disarray when the hiccups
finally stopped five weeks
after they started. She ran
away from home twice
and her family has sued a
hiccup cure company for
allegedly using her image
for profit without permis-
sion.
"I've said for a while
now, her case of the, hic-
cups wasn't a case of the
hiccups, it was a curse
of the hiccups," Mee's
mother, Rachel Robidoux,
told the 93.3 WFLZ "MJ
Morning Show" in Tampa
on Monday. She said she
did not know exactly what
happened, but described
the situation as a night-
mare and said her daugh-
ter had not lived with her
in a year.
Sgt. T.A. Skinner of
the St. Petersburg Police
Department said in a news
release that Mee lured
Griffin to a home where
the others robbed him at
gunpoint. Griffin struggled
with the suspects and was
shot several times, police
said.
Skinner said Mee and
the others admitted their
involvement.
She was being held
without bond early
Monday. Pinellas County


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 1, 2007 file photo, Jennifer Mee, 15, right, and
her mother, Rachel Robidoux, stand in a hallway at Clear
Channel Radio in Tampa. Mee, 19, of St. Petersburg, whose
uncontrollable hiccups brought her worldwide attention, is
charged in the killing of a 22-year-old man during a robbery.
Mee and two others are charged with first-degree murder in
the death of Shannon Griffin on Saturday.


jail records did not show
whether she had an attor-
ney. She is scheduled
for a court appearance
Monday afternoon at the
Pinellas County Court in
Clearwater.


been leaking. NASA says
the repairs seem to have
solved the problem.
Discovery will
deliver equipment to
the International Space
Station.


Shuttle good for Selection starts
Monday launch for Leyritz's trial


CAPE CANAVERAL
- Space shuttle Discovery
has new seals and is no
longer leaking.
NASA says now that
the repairs are completed,
everything is looking good
for liftoff next Monday.
Senior managers are meet-
ing at Florida's spaceport
to set the launch date.
This will be Discovery's
final flight. NASA is retir-
ing its shuttles next year.
The White House wants
the space agency to focus
on developing spaceships
that can take astronauts
out of orbit and into deep
space.
Over the weekend,
technicians replaced a
pair of seals in a fuel line
aboard,Discovery that had


FORT LAUDERDALE
- The DUI manslaugh-
ter trial of former major
league baseball player Jim
Leyritz is starting with
jury selection.
A six-person jury will be
chosen from a pool of 75
people brought to court
Monday. Jury selection is
expected to take several
days and the trial three to
four weeks.
Leyritz is accused
of driving drunk in
December 2007, running a
red light and crashing into
a vehicle driven by 30-year-
old Fredia Ann Veitch.
If convicted, Leyritz
faces a faces a maximum
15-year prison sentence.


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SValdosta
88/66
allahassee 87/ke65City,
87/68 .. 87/65
8 ",, Gainesville
-Panama City ,88/65
85/72 Ocala
'89/67


Tampa 0
89/73,


Ft Mye
90/72


MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY


HI 79 LO 49 HI 79 L054


Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Keyke Wesit
90/70 86/72 iLake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
87/77 Orlando
FtL Lauderdale Panama City
rs 87/79 Pensacola
0 Naples Tallahassee
90/74 Miami Tampa


On this date in
1983, unseason-
ably warm weathi
stretched from th
West Coast to the
northern Rockies
Record high tem-
peratures include
96 degrees at Sa
Maria, Calif., and
degrees at Billing
Wyo.


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


ISOLATEDD ISOLATED
T-STORMS T-STORMS


HI87 LO ,5 HI 90 LO 65

i,


Tb


Pensacola
83/72


*l


lacksonville
,,88/68


Daytona Beach
88J71


City Wednesday
Cape Canaveral 85/71/pc
Daytona Beach 87/69/pc


Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


87/77/pc
91/71/pc
90/66/pc
89/67/pc
86/76/t
90/65/pc
87/76/pc
90/72/pc
90/66/pc
90/68/pc
85/71/pc
84/71/pc
86/67/pc
90/71/pc
88/67/pc


S .., at. 87/78 Valdosta


n 86/7
86/77-


W. Palm Beach 87/74/pc


Thursday
84/68/pc
87/67/pc
85/75/pc
90/69/pc
88/58/pc
87/60/pc
84/75/s
88/56/pc
86/74/pc
88/71/pc
88/59/pc
89/69/pc
85/56/pc
81/53/pc
87/56/pc
89/71/pc
87/53/pc
86/72/pc


An exclusive
service
i.;Ptgy~d to
our readers
by
'* e '' ":
Channel.



weather.com


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.,
Moonset tom.


88
69
79
56
91 in 1911
33 in 1917


0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
2.08"
43.21"


7:40 a.m.
6:48 p.m.
7:41 a.m.
6:48 p.m.


9:26 p.m.
11:04 a.m.
10:25 p.m.
11:58 a.m.


15 mhbesto bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Oct. Nov. Nov.
30 6 13
Last New First


0
Nov.
21
Full


7a 1d p 7p la 6a
Tuesday Wednesday







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Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


Biden, Napolitano push to


local help to end terrorism


Murder trial of

karate instructor

is ready to start


ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press
ORLANDO Vice
President Joe Biden urged
law enforcement officers
Monday to strengthen com-
munication, share informa-
tion and always be on alert
because "it's the local cop
who's going to discover
the terrorist" and not some
"special forces guy."
Speaking to the
International Association
of Chiefs of Police, Biden
said law enforcement has
changed dramatically and
that federal agencies also
need assistance from the
local level to prevent ter-
ronsm.
'"This is not your father's
world anymore. This is not
1950 policing," Biden said.
'Today it's the local cop
who's going to discover the
terrorist who's working out
of a vacant home. You're
the guy." Biden said. "It'fs
not going to be some brave
special forces guy wearing
fatigues and night vision
goggles."
Those sentiments were
echoed by another key fig-
ure in the Obama adminis-
tration.
Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano
said the department and
the FBI are "operating
under the premise that
the individuals prepared to
carry out terrorist acts are
already in the country and
may carry out these acts
of violence with little or no
warning."
She cited the arrests
of a Pakistani immigrant


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vice President Joe Biden, right, greets Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano before
speaking at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Conference in Orlando
Monday.


who tried to detonate a car
bomb in Times Square,
a Jordanian man caught
attempting to blow .up a
Dallas skyscraper and
American-born terrorists
who have received train-
ing as examples of the new
threatgfaced on home soil.
"More and more we are
seeing an increased role
in Westerners, including
U.S. citizens, engaged in
terrorist training in plan-
ning attempted attacks,"
Napolitano said. "And many
of these individuals are
unknown to the intelligence
community and unknown
to federal authorities. And


that means that traditional
intelligence community
efforts and travel analysis
may not in and of itself be
enough to identify domes-
tically inspired terrorists
planning attacks."
The goal of the annual
conference is to bring law
enforcement communities
together to combat violence
and prevent terrorism.
The visits by Biden and
Napolitano. came a little
more than a week before
the midterm elections.
Florida is again a major
swing state this election
with vacancies for U.S.
Senate and nearly every


major statewide office.
Bidendidn'tmissachance
to. briefly veer off topic and
criticize Republicans in
a key area of Florida. He
said Republicans would cut
funding for law enforce-
ment and now isn't the
time to steer away from
Democrats.
Biden was scheduled
to attend a reception later
Monday for U.S. Rep. Alan
Grayson, D-Florida. The
vice president was then
traveling to Nashua, N.H.,
for a campaign event for
Democratic Congressional
candidate Ann McLane
Kuster.


MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press Writer

PENSACOLA, Jury
selection began Monday in
the trial of a karate instruc-
tor charged with leading
a group of armed men
dressed as ninjas in rob-
bing the home of a wealthy
couple and killing the pair
as their nine special-needs
children cowered or slept
nearby.
Leonard Patrick Gonzalez
Jr., 36, could get the death
penalty if convicted of
organizing the break-in at
Byrd and Melanie Billings'
home in a rural area near
Pensacola on the night of


July 9, 2009.
Gonzalez wore arm
and leg chains as he was
brought into the court
Monday morning. His
defense attorneys asked
that their desks be moved
so that the roughly 200
potential jurors would not
see the chains. Sheriff's
deputies later removed the
his wrist chains. Gonzalez
has also been charged with
attacking another inmate in
jail with a pencil.
Prosecutor Bill Eddins
said he expects jury selec-
tion to take about two days.
Two of Gonzalez's co-
defendants are scheduled
to testify against him;
Eddins said.


Mystery surrounds

woman found

floating in river


From staff reports

A Fort White woman
found injured and floating
in the Suwannee River last
week has revealed very lit-
tle about the incident to law
enforcement officials.
The woman, age
unknown, was found float-
ing in the river in Lafayette
County on Oct. 20, accord-
ing to law enforcement
accounts. The details of
her injuries have not been
released.
Sheriff's office depu-
ties from Suwannee and
Lafayette counties contin-


ued to work the case on
Monday and confirmed the
woman was pulled from the
river.
No further details, includ-
ing the woman's name, were
released, as the incident
continues to be studied by
officials. Further details as
to whetherthe incident was
an accident or foul play was
involved were not shared
by law enforcement officers
assigned to the case.
The Lafayette County
Sheriff's Office is serving
as lead investigator in the
case, officials said.


DISTRIBUTE: CHS students learn while helping
Continued From Page 1A


them for distribution.
Rebecca Golden, CHS
global logistics teacher,
said the Rotary project is
the first applicable project
the students have worked
on so far in the program
and coincides with their
curriculum.


It will teach students the
entire shipping, distribu-
tion and delivery process,
she said.
"They see the whole
process of it coming on a
palette to in the children's
hands," Golden said.
Brijesh Patel, 16, an 11th


grade Logistics student,
said participating in both
the Academy class and the
Rotary project is an invest-
ment in the community
and a future vocation.
"This class is a vocation-
al program and helps you
build on your future," he


.VPK Pi-ovie4r'

ACCEPTING
, .... ,,,-' t. 17 ,-' "- ",-, ;' ]e


said. "And I love anything
that has to do with helping
children out. I just love
doing it. It's a good experi-
ence for me because these
books are actually going to
be useful for the kids."


FAIR: Columbia County Fair to open Friday


Continued From Page 1A

Pirates of the Sky is an
aerial acrobatics show,
Briscoe said. Performers
will entertain on the high
wire and more.
Sarafian will entertain by
juggling while on a uni-
cycle throughout the fair-
grounds..
There is also a good line-
up of stage shows, includ-
ing: Elvis, 8:30 p.m. Friday;
the Mercy Mountain
Boys, 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Saturday; and the Legends
Show, which will feature
eight different country
music impersonators, 2
p.m. Sunday.
"Ift's the county fair," he
said. "You can't go through
the year without attending
at least one day." .
Regular fair admission
is $5 and free from 4-6
p.m. Friday. Rides are not
included in the price of
admission.
Midwayspecialsthrough-
, out the week include: Fair
Opening Day/ Midnight
Madness Friday, Matinee
Discount and Senior Day
Saturday, Family Day
Sunday, Hardees Night
Nov. 2, School Day Nov.
3, S&S Food Stores Nov.
4, Midnight Madness Nov.
5 and Matinee Discount/
Military Day/ Senior Day


Nov. 6.
"Where else can you go
for $5 and literally spend an
entire day outside," Briscoe
said. "Entertainment is free
with gate purchase."


The fair is always a safe
environment for the entire
family,. Jones said. The
entire community is invited
to come spend time at the


"You can talk to people
you haven't seen since the
last fair," she said. "It's a
huge family reunion with
rides, entertainment and a
lot of good food."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


r


V













OPINION


Tuesday, October 26, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


A common

base of

knowledge

on religion


across the country
have to be shaking
their heads about this
one. A survey con-
ducted by the Pew Forum on
Religion and Public Life found
that although 86 percent of
Americans say they believe in
God or a higher power, many
can't answer basic questions
about their own faith or that of
others.
In fact, the average American
correctly answered only half of
the questions they were asked
about topics such as the name
of the holy book of Islam, the
religion of the Dalai Lama and
the significance of the bread
and wine Catholics use for
Communion.
Ironically, atheists and agnos-
tics were the most knowledge-
able about religion, an outcome
that likely reflects the careful
consideration and study they
- undertake before deciding to
become nonbelievers. Jews
and Mormons came in second
and third place, respectively,
while Protestants and Catholics
scored the lowest overall.
The survey seems to make a
compelling argument for more
high schools to offer com-
parative religion courses as an
elective, something that, con-
trary to what many Americans
think, wouldn't violate the First
'Amendment.
Such courses would give
students a common base of
knowledge with which to com-
bat misinformation and to make
sense of what's happening in
the world.
Given the enormous impact
religion has had and contin-
ues to have on the history
and culture of this country, it's a
shame we know so little about it

: Chicago Sun-Times

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
On Oct. 26, 1881, the
"Gunfight at the O.K Corral"
took place in Tombstone, Ariz.,
as Wyatt Earp, his two broth-
ers and "Doc': Holliday con-
fronted Ike Clanton's gang.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard.
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


TGEl c cr pd A-RyXsubs



Electric car powered by subsidies


When the auto
was first invent-
ed, electric and
gas-powered
cars were about
equally viable, but while the
internal combustion engine
evolved in efficiency and power
the battery did not and the elec-
tric car never caught on.
Now the Obama administra-
tion and the automakers have
discovered the secret to making
the electric car go money.
The administration plans a $5
billion program of tax credits
to buyers and grants and subsi-
dized loans to automakers to get
the-electric car rolling.
.There is a $250 million pub-
lic-private partnership called
the EV Project to spread the
gospel of charging stations and
popularize electric cars. A West
Coast company has a $115 mil-
lion contract to set up and subsi-
dize 15,000 charging stations in
16 cities. Another company has
a $15 million contract to install
2,600 public chargers and anoth-
er 2,000 in private homes.
The New York Times talked
to a Nashville lawyer who put
down a $99 deposit on an all-
electric Nissan Leaf and is get-
ting a $7,500 federal tax credit,
a $2,500 cash rebate from the
state and, for participating in a
study, a $3,000 home charging
unit paid for by the Department
of Energy. Even if you missed
the free charger offer, you can
still take a $2,000 tax credit for
buying one.
And there are other bennies.
California will give you a-$5,000
tax credit. In Washington, elec-


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
tric cars are exempt from the
state sales tax. And in six states
you have unfettered access to
the HOV lanes.
In eastern and central
Tennessee, electric cars can
recharge for free at charging
stations on the major highways.
It so happens that Nissan is
building an electric car plant
there, so maybe the idea is to
have you well out of sight of the
plant if the juice runs out.
The Nissan Leaf arrives in
selected showrooms next month
and the Chevy Volt, an electric
car with a small backup gas
engine, in December. They are
the vanguard of about 20 mod-
els to come from Ford, Toyota,
Honda and. BMW.
Prospective buyers of electric
- cars give the automakers access
to what is described as "highly
desirable demographic," afflu-
ent, college-educated, mid-40s,
environmentally conscious,
willing to take a chance on new
technology. In other words, if
you're willing to buy an elec-
tric car, there's a good chance
you're willing to buy a whole lot
of other stuff.
But there are na'ysayers.
According to the killjoys at The
Wall Street Journal, "Electric


cars are too expensive, take
too long to recharge and don't
provide enough driving range
before they run'out of juice to
be practical ..."
The Leaf is $33,000 and
the Volt, $41,000 when well-
equipped cars of similar size go
for half that. The Leaf's range
is 100 miles less if you use
the heater or air conditioner
- which in some parts of the
country, particularly out West,
is a trip to the corner store. In
the East, it's the equivalent of a
normal backup on 1-95.
The Leaf takes eight hours,
basically overnight, to charge
on a 240-volt home charger, but
even the high-powered char-
gers like those being installed
at selected BP stations take 26
minutes.
That's a long time to kill in
the convenience store inspect-
ing the displays of window
washer fluid and chewing
tobacco.
And one consultant quoted
by the Journal thinks gas would
have to hit $8 or $9 a gallon for
electric cars to be cost effective.
The Obama administration
plans to have 1 million electric
cars on the roads by 2015.
That's a lot of bribes excuse
us. incentives to would-be
buyers. Between the Cash for
Clunkers and the electric car
subsidies and its ownership of
two carmakers, the motto of the
Obama administration may soon
be: No Car Buyer Left Behind.
* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


FOR ALL CAMPAIGN FUNDINGtl^^


OTHER OPINION

Next Congress should rein in spending


The Republican lead-
ers who pulled on
khaki pants and
stood in a lumber
yard recently would
have you believe they are all
ready to get to work on the fed-
eral deficit.
But don't be fooled by the
work pants, the stacks of lum-
ber and all the huffing about
cutting some things, some-
where, sometime.
The "Pledge for America"
isn't heavy lifting; it's another
unbearably light promise to
reduce the deficit even while
tacking on tax cuts and pre-
tending that it's not necessary
to rein in entitlement spend-
ing.
Of course, it doesn't add up.


The Republicans pledged to
extend all the expiring Bush
tax cuts and heap on new ones,
including yet another deduc-
tion for small businesses.
The combined tax cuts
would add as much as $4
trillion to the deficit unless
Congress managed to make
massive spending reductions.
The Republicans promised
to make the necessary cuts,
but offered no serious plan to
actually carry them out.
Yes, the pledge vows to roll
back non-security discretion-
ary spending to 2008 levels
and cap future growth.
The House Republican
leader, John Boehner, said the
reductions would save $100 bil-
lion the first year alone. What


would they cut? The only pos-
sible savings the Republicans
identified is small beer "cut-
ting Congress' budget" and
"imposing a net hiring freeze
on non-security employees."
You see $100 billion there,
let alone a couple of trillion
dollars? Neither do we.
Of course, Democrats in
Congress already have proven
that they are not prepared to
contain entitlement spending
or corral the federal deficit.
This country needs a cred-
ible opposition.party prepared
to make those hard deci-
sions. It's critical that the next
Congress rein in spending and
reduce the deficit.
* The Oregonian


4A


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


Democrats

can only

blame

themselves

If Democrats are dis-
traught over the effect
President Barack Obama
is having on this year's
congressional elections,
they have no one to blame but
the person in the mirror.
As we get closer to Election
Day, there has been a spate of
stories about how the president
is failing to connect with white
working-class voters.
Duh! Many of these same
white working-class voters, and
white women voters (another
group the Democratic Party is
failing to reach out to or gain
support from this election cycle)
were among the 18 million
who voted, for then-Sen. Hillary
Clinton.
Its not just that Obama came
seemingly out of nowhere to
topple the heir apparent to the
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion.
It's also that party leaders
proceeded to try to push her out
of the race (think Vermont Sen.
Patrick Leahy) before the prima-
ry process was over and before
she was ready to give up.
Lefs not forget that Hillary
Clinton won primaries in many
major, working-class, blue col-
lar states such as Pennsylvania,
Indiana and Ohio, precisely
where Democrats are now in
big trouble: "They are the vot-
ers who have pulled away most
sharply (from the Democrats),"
says Democracy Corps pollster
Stanley Greenberg, who has
long written about blue-collar
voters. "The president looks
inattentive to them, and his
approval is lowest with white
working-class voters, who are
seriously alienated from the
elites.
"But they are open to populist
arguments about what's happen-
ing, even though they are criti-
cal of Democrats as too aligned
with Wall Street, not Main
Street The Democrats have not
convinced white working-class
voters that they are with them in
this crisis."
In West Virginia, Gov. Joe
Manchin is paying dearly for
his support for the president
because it is a state where blue-
collar workers reign supreme.
Politico reports that Manchin's
advice to the president is: "Go
to where they live and work.
Listen. And don't talk down to
them."
Is Obama capable of not
talking down? It's a serious
question, especially in tough
economic times. Obama is who
he is. This is one Ivy Leaguer
who sees Obama as being as
Ivy League as Ralph Lauren's
designer line.
He furthers arguments that
he foments class divisions by
supporting a continuation of the
Bush tax cuts for some econom-
ic groups but not for others.
Ifs a little too late for that The
influence of the Tea Party dur-
ing this election cycle is scary,
because some of its candidates
seem truly extreme. But by jump-
ing on Obama's campaign wagon
so early in 2008, Democrats set
themselves up for the problems
they are experiencing now.
Add to that the president's
economic stimulus bill did little
to help blue-collar workers find
Work, and his image as being big
on talk and less committed to
political principle is exacerbated.
As one friend said, the Clintons
must be laughing up their sleeves.
But many voters don't find this
situation very funny.

Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Fun dance lessons
Square dancing is fun
and great exercise. Classes
start at 6:45 p.m. today at
Teen Town on DeSoto St.
across from Young Park.
First two classes are free.
Call Ouida Taylor at 386-
752-1469 for more informa-
tion about classes.

Bookfair and more
Family Reading Night
and Book Fair is 6-8
p.m. today at Covenant
Community School. The
theme is around the world,
and classrooms will rep-
resent the different conti-
nents. Characters will be
available for pictures. Bring
a book, take a book or book
exchange. Drop off of old
books is 6-7 p.m. Pick up of
new books is 7-8 p.m. The
school is located at 2019 SW
Main Boulevard.

Early voting
Early voting for the 2010


general election is 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-
Saturday through Oct
30. Early voting locations
are at the Supervisor of
Elections Lake City office,
971 W. Duval St and the
Fort White Community
Center, 17579 SW SR 47.
Voters need to bring a pic-
ture and signature I.D.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Wednesday
Habitat for Humanity
needs help
Morning construction
volunteers are needed


COURTESY PHOTO

100 years to remember
Lake City resident Julia Land enjoyed celebrating her
birthday with friends and family. She turned 100 on Oct. 18.
She said it was wonderful having her grandchildren and great
grandchildren who came from Greenville, S.C., and Knoxville,
Tenn., to join her during the festive occasion.


from 8 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, Thursday
and Saturday at 971 NE
Dyson Terrace. E-mail
iterry@hfhlakecity.org or
call Sheila at 386-590-0766.
Regular meetings are 7


p.m. the first Tuesday of
each month at the Lake
City Medical Center.

Quilt guild meeting
The Lady of the Lake


Quilting Guild will hold
its monthly meeting at
9:30 p.m. Wednesday
at Teen Town, 533 NW
Desoto St. Theprogram
will feature the famous
Chinese Auction, where
members exchange a
one-yard piece of fabric
while playing a game.
Contact President
Ramona Dewees at 386-
496-3876.

Basic scarf knitting
A basic scarf knitting
workshop is Wednesday
at the Stephen Foster
Folk Cultural Center State
Park. The cost is $15. It
will teach the basics of
knitting a simple scarf
using fun fur and worsted
yarn. Class is limited to six
people. Call 386-397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.

Thursday
Fair contests
Entry deadlines for bak-


ing goods are 2 p.m. to 6
p.m. Thursday for the 56th
Annual Columbia County
Fair Contests. For rules
visit www.columbiacounty-
fair.org. All highest placing
entries will receive mon-
etary awards and ribbons.
Call 752-8822.

Medicaid workshop
A workshop on
-Medicaid planning, "Myths
and Opportunities," is
10 a.m. Thursday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The workshop is
presented by Teresa B.
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center. Call Cheryl at 386-
755-1977

Livestock
announcements
The mandatory End
Weigh-Ins for Steer, Swine,
Beef Heifer and Meat
Goat is 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Thursday and the Record
book deadline is one hour
following close of scales.


OBITUARIES


Everett Gene Creel
Mr. Everett Gene Creel, 88, of
Lake City died Saturday, Oc-
tober 23, 2010 at his residence
following an extended illness.
He was the son of the late
James Everett and Maude Idella
Dildy Creel. He was a member
of Epiphany Catholic Church,
Knights of Columbus, was an
avid gardener who enjoyed
growing tomato plants. He is
preceded in death by his wife of
fifty-three years Helen M. Creel,
and one grandson Ronald Miller.
He is survived by three daugh-
ters Barbara Creel, Newark, OH;
Nancy Vanscoder (Lonnie), Ce-
cil, OH; Teresa Dekle, (Terry),
Lake City, FL.; four grandchil-
dren Dean Miller, Newark, OH;
Brenda Miller, Ft. Worth, TX;
David Fine, Toledo, OH; Wil-
liam Blake Dekle, Lake City,
FL; seven great-grandchildren
also survive, and a special friend
and caregiver Mary Hockett.
Funeral Mass will be conducted
at 11:30 A.M. Wednesday, Octo-
ber 27, 2010 at Epiphany Catho-
lic Church with Father Mike Pen-
dergraft Officiating, assisted by
Father Mike Williams. Visitation
with the family will be one hour
. prior to service time at Gateway-
Forest Lawn Funeral Home. In
lieu of flowers the family ask
donations be made to Epiphany
Catholic School at 1937 SW
Epiphany Ct. Lake City, FL.
32025; Haven Hospice 6037
US Hwy 90 West Lake City, FL.
32055 or Lake City Animal Shel-
* ter 1392 NW Shelter GLN. Lake
City, FL. 32055. GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. US Hwy 441,
Lake City, FL (386-752-1954)
is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.


Josie A. Kimbril
Mrs. Josie A. Kimbril, 71, of
Lake City, passed away Monday,
October 25, 2010 in the Lake
City Medical Center following
an illness of several months. A
native of Miami, Florida, Mrs.
Kimbril had been a resident of
Lake City since March of 2004
having moved here from Ocala.
Mrs. Kimbril was the daughter of
the late Barney and Elease Addi-
son Andrews. She had a college
education but chose instead to be
a homemaker and offer love and
support to her husband who is a
minister. Mrs. Kimbril was also
an accomplished author having
published several short stories
and numerous poems. She very
much enjoyed being a mother,
grandmother and all aspects of
being a homemaker. Mrs. Kim-
bril was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Lake City.
Mrs. Kimbril is survived by
her husband of forty-seven
years, Rev. Travis R. Kimbril;
a son, Edward Kimbril of Bran-
ford, Florida and a daughter,
Karen Kimbril of Lake City.
Three grandchildren, Kristen
Thompson, Gabriel Vunk and
Amber Kimbril also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Kimbril
will be conducted at 1:00 P.M.,
Thursday, October 28, 2010 in
the First Baptist Church with Pas-
tor Stephen Ahrens, Rev. Lewis
Gooch and Rev. Glen Lawhon
officiaiting. Interment will fol-
low in the Mt. Zion-Swift Creek
Cemetery in Union County. The
family will receive friends at
the funeral home Wednesday
evening from 5:00-8:00 P.M..
In lieu of flowers the family re-
quests that memorial donations
be made to The Gideons Inter-
national, P.O. Box 1805, Lake
City, FL 32056 or the Haven


Hospice of the Suwannee Val-
ley, 6037 US Highway 90 West,
Lake City, FL 32055. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234. Please sign
the on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

John Willie Martin
Mr. John Willie Martin, 83 of
Fort White passed away on Sat-
urday, October 23, 2010 at the
Lake City Medical Center. Mr.
Martin was a native and lifelong
resident of Fort White and Co-
lumbia County and was a son to
the late John William and Mary
Elizabeth Hudson Martin. He
was a lifelong farmer, served
on the Columbia County School
Board from 1972-1976 and was
an active Constable of District
6 taking over for his father and
serving until the position was
phased out. Mr. Martin was a
member of Elim Baptist Church
where he had served as Deacon
and also a member of the Cherry
Hill Masonic Lodge #12 in Fort
White; When able he enjoyed
fishing on the river, farming his
land and helping people in need.
Mr. Martin was preceded in
death by one brother, Riley Mar-
tin and one sister, Lottie Dicks.
Mr. Martin is survived by his
wife of 62 years, .Mrs. Lena M.
Martin, Fort White, three sons,


Johnnie Martin (Salley), Trenton,
Richard Martin and Rex Martin
both of Fort White, one daugh-
ter, Dorothy Finley, Fort White,
three brothers, Robert Martin
(Shirley), Lake City, Thurman
Martin (Doris) and Earl Martin
(Mattie) all of Fort White and
three sisters, Mary Felton (Jer-
ry), Marie Fountain (Fritz) and
Dottie Shaw (Ray) all of Lake
City. One sister-in-law, Hazel
Martin, Alabama, one brother-
in-law, J.L. Dicks, Lake City,
numerous nieces, nephews, nine
grandchildren and three great-
grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Mar-
tin were conducted on Monday,
October 25, 2010 at 11:00 AM
at Elim Baptist Church with
Rev. Charles Knight and Rev.
Andrew Thomas, pastor of
Elim Baptist Church officiat-
ing. Interment followed at Fort
White Cemetery in Fort White.
Visitation with the family was
from 4-6:00 PM Sunday after-
noon at the funeral home. In
lieu of flowers donations may
be made to Elim Baptist Church
Building Fund at P.O. Box 448,
Ft. White, Fl 32038 or to the
Gideon's International at P.O.
Box 1805, Lake City, FI 32056
in memory of Mr. Martin. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME, 2659 SW Main Blvd.,
Lake City. 386-752-2414


Call today to place a surprise ad for your child,
grandchild, God child or anyone you think
deserves something extra on their special day!


S Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days
prior to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.

Call 755.5440 or 755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


Beatrice Williams O'Steen
Mrs. Beatrice Williams O'Steen,
98, of Lake City, died Mon-
day, October 25, 2010 at her
daughter's residence following
an extended illness. Funeral ar-
rangements are incomplete at
this time but will be available
after Noon today by calling
752-1234. A full obituary will
be published Wednesday. Ar-


rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386)752-1234.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Florida Home Auctions Nov 1st 20th
Nominal Opening Bids
from $1,000
For details, see
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- ll Heroes!

The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


m1


Thank you for your
years of service.
We Salute You
Love, Eileen
actual size


Your Name:
Address:
Town: _____State: Zip:
Daytime Phone:
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: _Dales Served:
S ring his in orSend b : Lkme City Reporter, 180 F. l ial s will e ret d by 32055, Ic755 g Sf h your e ntry.
Submissions must be received by 3:30 p.m., Mon y, Sov. 8, 2010. Ml photos will be returned by Including SASE with our entry.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


BRIEFS


WikiLeaks docs raise policy questions


Case raises energy
drink concerns

ELLENSBURG, Wash.
- Sugary, high-alcohol
energy drinks that are pop-
ular with college students
who want to get drunk
quickly and cheaply came
under renewed scrutiny
Monday as investigators
announced that nine fresh-
men had been hospitalized
after drinking them at an
off-campus party.
Several states are consid-
ering outlawing the drinks
and at least two universi-
ties have banned them from
campus while the Food
and Drug Administration
reviews their safety.
The issue received new
attention after the Oct.
8 party in Roslyn, a pic-
turesque mountain town
known as the place where
the 1990s television series
"Northern Exposure" was
filmed.
Police first responded to
a report of an unconscious
female in a grocery store
parking lot and learned
about the party from her
friends. At the home, offi-
cers found a chaotic scene,
with students from near-
by Central Washington
University passed out and
so intoxicated that inves-
tigators thought they had
overdosed on drugs.

1 dead as school
bus overturns
LOS ANGELES -
Authorities said one person
has died and dozens are
injured in a crash involving
a schoolbus and two other
vehicles east of downtown
Los Angeles.
Fire spokesman Brian
Humphrey said the bus
flipped on its side after the
collision shortly after 3
p.m. Monday in the Boyle
Heights area.

Regulators probe
foreclosure mess
WASHINGTON -
Federal banking regula-
tors are examining whether
mortgage companies cut
corners on their own proce-
dures when they moved to
foreclose on people's homes,
Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke said Monday.
Preliminary results of the
in-depth review into the prac-
tices of the nation's largest
mortgage companies are
expected to be released next
month, Bernanke said in
remarks to a housing-finance
conference in Arlington, Va.


By RAPHAEL G. SATTER
and PAISLEY DODDS
Associated Press
LONDON President
Barack Obama stepped
into the White House
pledging to end George W.
Bush's gloves-off approach
to interrogations and
detention but a flood
of leaked documents sug-
gests that some old habits
were hard to break.
Field reports from the
Iraq war published by
WikiLeaks show that,
despite Obama's public
commitment to eschew.
torture, U.S. forces turned
detainees over to Iraqi
forces even after signs of
abuse.
Documents also show
that U.S. interrogators
continued to question
Iraqi detainees, some of
whom were still recover-
ing from injuries or whose
wounds were still visible
after being held by Iraqi
security forces.
"We have not turned
a blind- eye," U.S. State
Department spokesman
P.J. Crowley said Monday,
noting that one of the rea-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama steps down from his helicopter to board Air Force One at
Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Monday. One week before the crucial midterm elections,
Obama is traveling to Rhode Island for Democratic Party events in Providence and a
speech in Woonsocket, where he will tour the facilities of American Cord & Webbing.


sons why U.S. troops were
still in Iraq was to carry
out human rights training
with Iraqi security forces.
"Our troops were obli-
gated to report abuses to
appropriate authorities and
to follow up, and they did
so in Iraq."


Crowley added, "If
there needs to be an
accounting, first and fore-
most there needs to be an
accounting by the Iraqi
government itself, and
how it has treated its own
citizens."
Obama signed three


executive orders shortly
after taking office, vowing
to return America to the
"moral high ground" in
the war on terrorism.
The implication was that
the United States would do
more to make sure terror
suspects weren't tortured


or abused either at the
hands of U.S. forces or by
governing' authorities to
whom the detainees were
handed over for detention
or interrogation.
WikiLeaks recently
published almost 400,000
U.S. military logs, mainly
written by soldiers on the
ground, detailing daily
carnage in Iraq since the
2003 U.S.-led invasion:
detainees abused by Iraqi
forces, insurgent bomb-
ings, sectarian execu-
tions and civilians shot
at checkpoints by U.S.
troops.
In one leaked document
from a U.S. military intel-
ligence report filed Feb.
9, 2009 just weeks after
Obama ordered U.S. per-
sonnel to comply with the
Geneva Conventions an
Iraqi says he was detained
by coalition forces at his
Baghdad .home and told
he would be sent to the
Iraqi army if he didn't
cooperate. According to
the document, the detain-
ee was then handed over
to Iraqis where he said
he was beaten and given
electric shocks.


Cuba makes self-employment rules official


By PAUL HAVEN
Associate Press

HAVANA Potential
entrepreneurs lined up
outside government offic-
es around the capital on
Monday after Cuba made
official the grand econom-
ic. changes it announced
last month, raising hopes
that eagerly anticipated
licenses for the newly self-
employed could be issued
soon.
The economic overhaul
- the most significant
undertaken in communist
Cuba since the early 1990s
- was outlined in nearly
100 pages of rules and
regulations for small busi-
nesses published in the
government Gazette.
"I hope this license will
bring me a better future,"
said Lazaro Ramos, who
was one of about 20 people
waiting outside a govern-
ment office in Havana's 10
de Octubre neighborhood.
Ramos, 34, said he was
unemployed but was hop-
ing to get permission to
make pinatas for children's
parties. "The economy is
not good. But with this, I
will be able to make ends
meet."
Officials took down


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"Che" Guevara, past vintage cars in Havana, Cuba, Monday. Cuba has made official the
economic changes it announced last month, publishing nearly 100 pages of rules and regu-
lations for small businesses in the government Gazette.


personal details and told
applicants to come back
in a couple of weeks for
more information. It was
not clear how long it would
take to process the licens-
es.
Cuba announced on
Sept. 13 that it would lay
off half a million workers
and push many of them
into the private sector. It
later detailed some 178 pri-
vate jobs that will be allow-
able. But the rules did not
become law until they were


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The rules published
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Communist Party news-
paper Granma last week,


but the newspaper account
lacked crucial details and
contained several contra-
dictions.
The lengthy rules laid
out in the government
Gazette clear up most of
the uncertainty.
The law establishes 178
private activities for which
licenses can be granted
- everything from restau-
rateur to taxi driver, from
button maker to party
planner. The majority of
those businesses will be
eligible for a simplified tax
system that establishes a
monthly quota regardless
of revenue.
For instance, parking
attendants would pay 80
pesos ($4) a month, while
typing instructors would
have to fork over 100 pesos
($5) monthly.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


BulletinBoard

NE SABOU OR CHOL


COURTESY PHOTO

Young Writers of the Month receive achievement certificates

Westside Elementary School's Young Writers of the Month for October are Callie Williams (front from left), Carly Brocchi,
Parker Blankenship, Conner Kazmierski and Jacob Whitchard pictured with Jack Wiley (back), Mix 94.3 morning host. The
Young Writers of the Month program is a business partnership activity between the Columbia County School District, Sunstate
Federal Credit Union, Mix 94.3 and Burger King of Lake City.


CAMPUS NEWS


Homecoming Week
Richardson Wolves
homecoming week started
with dress from the 1960s,
'70s and '80s and ended
with everyone dressed
in orange and green.
Homecoming court was
King Kahlil Caldwell and
Queen Nayla Williams,
eighth grade; seventh-
grade representatives were
Cha'matria Coker and
Dre'mond Higgins; and
sixth-grade representatives.
were Damien Williams and
Jasmine Parker.

Classic novel explored
Mr. Cole's sixth-grade
language arts class
explored Gary Paulsen's
classic novel, "Hatchet",
by using all five senses to
explore the theme.
They built dioramas of
Brian's campsite by going
on an excursion of the
Richardson Middle School
campus.
The students learned
important survival skills,,
life lessons and had great
fun.

Sonny's Kids get treats
Sonny's Kids with
Character for October
were treated to lunch at
Sonny's restaurant with
Susan Summers, assistant
principal; Cindy Clark,
CRT; Karla Rodriguez,
guidance counselor; and.
Pastor Mike Tatem of
Parkview Baptist Church,
who chauffeured the
group in the church


bus. The honorees for
October were Timera Pate,
Zachary Clark, Kenyonna
Carter, Akiria Richburgh,
Cameron Ball, Kristal
Smith, Kenny Paul and
Jason Bass.

Westside Young Artists
Westside Young Artists
of Columbia County for
the month of October
are Mandy Anderson,
Joseph Buchanan, Jordan
Teran, Carly Brocchi,
Yisel Caballero and
Rhett Feagle. Westside
Elementary received sup-
port of its Westside night
at Moe's and raised $725
for technology.

$750 grant received
. Melrose Park
Elementary School has
received a $750 grant
from the Exxon/Mobil
Educational Alliance
program to support the
school's math and sci-
ence programs. Stephanie
Hinton with Jim Hinton Oil
Company and Exxon No.
6 at 13769 S U.S. Highway
441 worked with school
officials to secure the
grant.

Learning about season
Kindergarten just fin-
ished science units on
balls, ramps and the five
senses. Students are now
eagerly learning about
the fall season in prepara-
tion for October activi-
ties. Students and teach-
ers went on a walking


field trip to the pumpkin
patch at the First United
Methodist Church Oct. 25
and will be having the Fall
Festival Oct. 29.

Assortment of things
First-grade students
have an assortment of
interesting things going on
this month. They had their
first field trip on Nov. 4,
and will be learning about
a program called "From
the Farm to the Table."
Students will see live
animals at the fairgrounds
and learn about different
foods and items we get
from animals. They will
also learn about plants and
how to grow them.
In science, students will
also be learning about live
animals. They will expe-
rience and learn about
goldfish, worms, snails, pill
bugs and sow bugs.
It's fun to dig for worms.
Students like to watch the
goldfish swim and learn
about their behavior.
First-grade students will
perform a Thanksgiving
program for the November
PTO meeting.


Growing pumpkins
Second-grade students
are heading into autumn in
full fall colors.
In science, students are
growing pumpkins and
observing how plants grow
and change.
In math, students are
learning addition and
subtraction. Also, Science
Fair projects are due next
month.

Summers after school
Summers Elementary
After School program for
third-, fourth- and fifth-
grade students began Oct.
25.
This 21st-Century
Community Learning
Center grant program
focused on reading, math,
science, technology, char-
acter-building, healthy
living, archery, music
and the arts. This year's
enrichment theme will
take students and teach-
ers around the world as
they experience far-flung
cultures via invited guests
from other lands, field
trips and student-planned
culture showcases.


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Kamaya
Bennett
Age: 11
Parents: Patty and
Tony Bennett
School and grade:
Summers Elementary,
fifth grade
Clubs or organiza-
tions: Safety Patrol, piano
lessons, Angel Praise
and Choir at Union AME
Church and tennis les-
sons
What would you like
to do when you complete
your education? Play ten-
nis or piano professionally.
Achievements: Honor
roll, Cool Cub Tiger
Mascot, Science Fair win-
ner, first place oratorical
winner at church.
What do you like best
about school? Math, sci-
ence and reading.
Teacher's comments:
Kamaya is a top-notch stu-
dent who gives 110 per-
cent in the classroom.
She strives to do her best
and help her peers in the
process. She actively par-
ticipates in PTO events.
Most recently, she suited
up in our school mascot
costume to help recog-
nize awesome lunch room


B.__-_.-
COURTESY PHOTO
Kamaya Bennett

behavior.
Principal's com-
ments: Kamaya is an
excellent role model for
students and faculty. She
always has a beautiful
smile and kind disposition.
She has wonderful values
of honesty, determination
and empathy for others.
She is truly a beautiful
person inside and out. It
is an honor to have her to
set a daily example for all
students.
Student's comments
about honor: I am
extremely excited and
happy to have received
this honor.


Westside Elementary

celebrates A' school

rating for 2009-2010


Westside Elementary
School students enjoyed
"A" Day to celebrate for
being designated an "A"
school for the 2009 to 2010
school year. Westside
Elementary has achieved
an "A" school rating four
years in a row.
Students began their
day with "A" balloons and
banners greeting them in
the car rider area.
A special edition of
the morning news show,
"Wake-up Wildcats," was
broadcast.
Mrs. Hill, Westside


Elementary principal, read
a proclamation declaring
September 24 as "A" Day.
Faculty and staff were
entered into drawings
for free meals donated
by McAlister's Deli and
Wildcat Cards.
Students also had a spe-
cial visit from Miss Viola,
our vocabulary expert
Each student was given a
pencil and Smarties candy
by the principal.
Many students, faculty
and staff showed their
school spirit by wearing
their school colors.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


5 years after indictments, DeLay's trial begins


By JUAN A. LOZANO
Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas -
Former House Majority
Leader Tom DeLay, one of
the most polarizing politi-
cians of the Bush years, is
finally getting his day in
court, five years after being
charged with illegally fun-
neling corporate money to
help elect Republicans to
the Texas Legislature.
Jury selection begins
Tuesday, but it's at nei-
ther the time nor the place
that DeLay sought. The
trial will be in Austin, the
most Democratic city in
one of the nation's most
Republican states, and tes-
timony is set to start on the
eve of Election Day.
DeLay was once one
of the most powerful
Republicans in Congress.
As the No. 2 leader in the
House, he earned the nick-
name "the Hammer" for
his heavy-handed style in
bringing recalcitrant mem-
bers of the GOP into line
for votes.
But the criminal charges
in Texas, as well as a sepa-
rate federal investigation of
his ties to disgraced former
lobbyist Jack Abramoff,
forced DeLay to step down
as majority leader and even-
tually to resign after repre-
senting suburban Houston
for 22 years.


DeLay has been press-
ing for a trial for years, but
appeals of pretrial rulings
have repeatedly slowed
down the case.
Lead defense attorney
Dick DeGuerin said the
"harshly drawn lines in pol-
itics today" could hamper
the efforts to try DeLay,
who was a lightning rod for
liberal critics.
"This is a highly charged
political case, and my con-
cern is Tom DeLay will be
on trial for his politics and
not whether he committed
a crime," DeGuerin said.
The 63-year-old DeLay is
charged with two crimes:
money laundering and con-
spiracy to commit money
laundering. If convicted
of money laundering, he
faces from five years to life
in prison. The conspiracy
charge carries a prison
term of two to 20 years.
DeLay had wanted
his trial moved from
Democratic Travis County
to his conservative home
county of Fort Bend. But
Senior Judge Pat Priest,
who is handling the case,
has ruled DeLay can get a
fair trial in Austin.
DeGuerin and DeLay
have said the charges
were the result of a politi-
cal witch hunt by Ronnie
Earle, the Democratic for-
mer Travis County district
attorney who originally


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 7, 2006, file photo, Rep. Tom DeLay speaks during a news conference in Sugar
Land, Texas after announcing his decision to abandon his bid to remain as House majority
leader. DeLay is finally getting his day in court, five years after being charged with illegally
funneling corporate money to help elect Republicans to the Texas Legislature.


brought the chse. Travis
County generally handles
cases involving officials at
the state Capitol.
Prosecutors declined to
comment before the start
of the trial. But they have
said in the past that Earle,
who retired in 2008, did not
seek the indictment based
on politics. They have
pointed out that, through-
out a career spanning more
than 30 years, Earle pros-
ecuted Democrats as well


as Republicans.
The witnesses who have
been subpoenaed will prob-
ably only heighten the trial's
political overtones. On the
list are current and former
state lawmakers, includ-
ing former Texas House
Speaker Tom Craddick, as
well as lobbyists and politi-
cal fundraisers. The list
also includes former asso-
ciates of DeLay with ties
to Abramoff, who went to
prison as part of a corrup-


tion probe that ensnared
some members of George
W. Bush's administration.
The Justice Department
ended its federal investiga-
tion into DeLay's ties to
Abramoff without filing any
charges against DeLay.
Michael Diaz, a defense
attorney and former feder-
al prosecutor from Miami
who has followed the
DeLay case, said divorcing
politics from the trial will
be impossible.


"The very nature of the
charges implicate how poli-
tics in this country works,"
he said.
DeLay and two associ-
ates Jim Ellis and John
Colyandro are accused
by prosecutors of tak-
ing $190,000 in corporate
money collected by a state
political action committee
DeLay started and ille-
gally funneling it through
the Republican National
,Committee in Washington
to help elect GOP state
legislative candidates in
2002. Under Texas law,
corporate money cannot be
directly used for political
campaigns.
In 2002, Texas
Republicans won a major-
ity in the Texas House of
Representatives for the
first time since the Civil
War era.
Once the GOP leadership
was in place, Republicans
pushed through a con-
gressional redistricting
plan engineered by DeLay
that sent more Texas
Republicans to Congress in
2004.
Ellis and Colyandro,
whose charges are less
serious than DeLay's, will
be tried later. A previous
charge alleging that the
three men had engaged
in a conspiracy to violate
campaign finance laws was
dismissed.


Conservative groups, gay marriage


foes back push to oust Iowa justices


By MIKE GLOVER
Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa -
Stung by a state Supreme
Court ruling legalizing gay
marriage in Iowa last year,
out-of-state conservative
groups have been pouring
time and money into an
effort to unseat three of the
court's seven justices.
At a Statehouse rally
Monday to kick off a bus
tour, gay marriage oppo-
nents pleaded their case for
why voters on Nov. 2 should
opt not to retain Chief
Justice Marsha Ternus, and
justices David Baker and
Michael Streit. Iowa voters
have never ousted a state
Supreme Court justice.
"I can't overstate the sig-



Home

sales up

in Sept.,

but...


By ALAN ZIBEL and
JEANNINE AVERSA
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sales
of previously occupied homes
rose last month after the worst
summer for the housing mar-
ket in more than, a decade.
And fears over flawed foreclo-
sure documents could keep
buyers on the sidelines in the
final months of the year.
Sales grew 10 percent
in September to a season-
ally adjusted annual rate of
4.53 million, the National
Association of Realtors said
Monday. Home sales have
declined 37.5 percent from
their peak annual rate of 7.25
million in September 2005.
They have risen from July's
rate of 3.84 million, which
was the lowest in 15 years.
Most experts expect
roughly 5 million homes to
be sold through the entire
year. That would be in line
with last year's totals and
just above sales for 2008, the
worst since 1997. Still, sales
could fall further if potential
lawsuits from former hom-
eowners claiming that banks
made errors when seizing
their homes make consum-
ers fearful of buying fore-
closed properties.


nificance of what is about
to happen in Iowa," said
Brian Brown, executive
director of the Washington,
D.C.-based National
Organization for Marriage.
'The whole country is look-
ing at you. This cannot be
overstated."
At a counter rally about
100 yards away, organiz-
ers argued that anti-gay
rights groups that have
spent more than $600,000
to oust the justices are only
focused on the one issue
and don't care about the
damage they'll do to the
state's judicial appointment
process.
"In January, when the
consequences of this effort
come to fruition, the special
interest advocates will be


gone back to Mississippi,
Pennsylvania, New Jersey
and Alabama," said former
Attorney General Bonnie
Campbell. "They won't be
here after Nov. 3, but the
rest of us will be."
The court joined in a 7-0
ruling last year upholding a
lower court's decision that
found that a state law limit-
ing marriage to between a
man and a woman violated
the constitutional rights of
equal protection.
Those who want to oust
the three justices argue
that by striking down ,a
law banning gay mar-
riage, the high court, in
effect, amended the state
constitution, which can
only be done through a
referendum. They say


the justices were legis-
lating from the bench,
and should therefore be
removed.
Des Moines resident
Art Arrett, who attended
the rally, said legislating
should be left to legisla-
tors, not judges.
"It's not their job to
make laws," Arrett said.


FlRNITLTURE SHOWPL ACE
A \ l "ic e t ) nhdrs


-, k 0 1 E IS1 ..* 1


John Burns III
234 SW Main Boulevard
32D5G
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john burns cnji@statefarm corn

Tennessee at South Carolina


John A Kasak
904 SW SH 247 Branfo d Hlwy
, 9 32025
i 9 -/b21
j|lli kasak 1949(@slaalcai[ corn


[, Bank
statefarm.com'


Arizona at UCLA



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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0429


Foig r








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Tuesday, October 26, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


SEMINOLES
Game watching
. party Thursday
The Lake City
Seminole Club and
Audlowaves are
sponsoring a game
watching party Thursday
outside of Kazbor's
Grille. The Florida State/
N.C. State game will be
on the big screen. All
fans are invited.
For details, call Norbie
Ronsonet at 752-2180.

CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
fundraiser set
Columbia High's
soccer teams have a
Moe's Night
fundraiser planned from
5-8 p.m. Monday at
Moe's Southwest Grill
on U.S. Highway 90 west
in Lake City. The soccer
program will receive a
percentage of the sales.
For details, call
(386) 365-1877.

GATORS
Grill Gamecocks
on Nov. 11
The North .Florida
Gator Club is sponsoring
a "Grill the Gamecocks".
social at 6 p.m. Nov. 11
at the home of Mike and
Terri Millikin on State
Road 47. Steve Russell
of WRUF radio is gueat
speaker and the club will
provide dinner. Bring a
lawn chair. All Gator fans
are invited.
For details, call Ian at
(352) 316-4305, Bob at
752-3333, Ron at (386)
397-3378 or Angela at
758-8801.

Packages for
football games
"Journey to the
Swamp" is a Columbia
County Tourist
Development Council
initiative with Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites
and Fabulous Coach
Lines to provide
transportation from
Lake City to the Florida
game against South
Carolina on Nov. 13.
Holiday Inn is offering a'
two-night package, and
Fabulous Coach Lines
will provide motor coach
transportation.
Local fans can take
advantage of the
transportation.
For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or call
the Holiday Inn at
754-1411.

From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
girls golf in Region 1-2A
tournament at The Golf
Club at Summerbrooke,
8 a.m.
SColumbiaHigh's Dean
Soucinek and Nick Jones
in Region 1-2A boys golf
tournament at Panama
SCountry Club, 9 a.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Santa Fe
High, 5 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Middleburg
High in District 4-5A
tournament at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m..'
Wednesday
Columbia High,
Fort White High
bowling vs. Suwannee
High at Thunder Lanes in
Live Oak, 4 p.m.


Kirkman ready for media day


Rangers arrive in
San Francisco for
Series opener.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

The Texas Rangers' first
trip to the World Series will
include a favorite son from
Lake City.
Texas and San Francisco
play at 7:57 p.m. Wednesday
in the opening of the best-
of-seven series.
Michael Kirkman was
reached by phone Monday
afternoon, one hour away
from boarding the plane
with his Texas teammates.
"We have to be at the
park at 11 a.m. Tuesday for
media day and then we will
work out," Kirkman said.
"Everybody will be there;


STEPHEN DUNN/Dallas Moming News
Lake City's Michael Kirkman (62) joins in the Texas Rangers' celebration after defeating the
New York Yankees in the American League Championship Series on Wednesday.


they are taking 30-some- in August. He traveled with
thing players." the team to Tampa for the
Kirkman was called up American League Divisional
to the Major League club Series, but was not on the


playing roster.
He was added to the ros-
ter for the American League
Championship Series and


saw action in New York.
He pitched two scoreless
innings while facing eight
Yankees.
The Rangers have to
make another roster deci-
sion for the World Series.
'We won't find out any-
thing about the roster
until Wednesday morn-
ing," Kirkman said. "There
are reports the team
might drop one of the left-
handers and add a right-
hander. The game depends
on the starters, but it is all
about the matchups with
the bullpens."
Lefty Kirkman hopes his
1.65 ERA during the season
will get his No. 62 called.
"I am pretty confident
I will be on (the roster),"
Kirkman said. "I have done
what I can to show them
what I've got"


Ground





attack


Fort White rolling
up yards running
the football.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High football is
rushing toward a district
championship shot in more
ways than one.
The Indians improved to
3-0 in District 2-2B with a
28-14 win over East Gadsden
High on Friday.
Fort White is making its
living running the ball.
JR Dixon rushed for 211
yards against East Gadsden,
his second 200-plus game
in a row after 201 yards at
Florida High. Dixon also
ran for 144 yards against
North Florida Christian
School. He has nine rush-
ing touchdowns.
Before suffering an
-injury, Alexis Blake had
a 234-yard game against
Suwannee High and 122
yards at Newberry High.
He has 10 rushing TDs.
The Indians are averag-
ing 212 yards per game on


East Gadsden 0 0 0 14 14
FortWhite 7 7 7 7 28
First Quarter
FWV-Dixon II run (Jones kick), 6:55
Second Quarter
FW-Saunders 26 fumble return
Cones kick), 9:09
Third Quarter
FW-Dixon I run (Jones kick), 5:05
Fourth Quarter
EG-O.J. Johnson 3 pass from Parker
(kick failed), 7:13
FW-Dixon 65 run (Jones kick), 1:07
EG-D. Johnson 85 kickoff return (O.J.
Johnson pass from Parker), :53
East Gadsden Fort White
First downs 9 12
Rushes-yards 21-24 46-271
Passing 75 38
Comp-Att-Int 9-26-1 4-10-1
Punts-Avg. 7-31 2-42
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 15-86 10-85
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-East Gadsden, Jarrell
Reynolds 4-29, D. Johnson 3-8, Parker 2-7,
Smith 4-2, Robinson 4-(-I), O.J. Johnson
4-(-2). FortWhite,Dixon 31-211, Cormier
9-23,T.Williams 1-13, Faulkner I- II, Baker
2-6, S.Williams 1-4, Bryant 1-3.
PASSING-East Gadsden, Parker
7-20-58-0, Robinson 2-6-17-I. Fort White,
Baker 4-9-38-I, Dixon 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING-East Gadsden, Daniels
3-37, D. Johnson 2-11, Jaron ,Reynolds
1-16, Jaleell Reynolds 1-13, O.J. Johnson
1-3, Smith I -(-5). Fort White, Legree 2-18,
Phillips 1-10, Faulkner 1-10.

the ground. In contrast,
Fort White's backs had one
100-yard game in 2009.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon (11) runs but of a tackle during the homecoming win against


East Gadsden High on Friday.

"It is a good experience,"
Dixon said, after 31 carries
in the East Gadsden game.
"I take a lot of pounding,
but it is something I am
prepared for and I have to
thank the coaches for that."


Dixon ran 42 times in
the double-overtime win at
Florida High. As for the
success in the two games,
Dixon said, 'The offensive
line has got a lot to do with
it. They say, 'All right, we


are going to block for you',
and I say, 'If you do I'll run
right behind you.'"
Dixon had big plays last
week running to the right
INDIANS continued on 2B


Veterans honored

with Cup preview


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Announcing the 2010 Commander's Bowl are (kneeling, from left) Lake City Middle School
captains Lucas Bradley, Ben Kuykendall, Jake Thomas and Wayne Broom, and Richardson
Middle School captains Dustin James, Deion-Tay Jones, Ethan Bailey and Terrivio Williams.
Standing (from left) are Falcons coach Billy Jennings, DAV Chapter 20 Vice-Commander
Carl Rentz, Commander John Mann, VA Medical Center Acting Associate Director Maureen
Wilkes, DAV Area 1 committee member Willie Merrell and Wolves coach Al Nelson.


Falcons, Wolves
play annual game
at 7 p.m. today.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn

Players from Lake City
and Richardson middle
schools gathered at the VA
Medical Center on Monday
to honor veterans and
announce a football game.
The 11th Commander's
Bowl is 7 p.m. today at
Columbia High Stadium.
The annual game is


sponsored by the Disabled
American Veterans Chapter
20, which hosts the teams
at the VA each season.
The players visit veterans
as part of the event.
"It allows them to see that
freedom isn't free," DAV
Chapter 20 Commander
John Mann said.
"They need to understand
why we have the freedoms
we do," Falcons coach Billy
Jennings said.
"It is an opportunity to
honor veterans for what
they have done," Wolves
coach Al Nelson said.


- -












2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Louisiana Tech at Boise St.
NBA BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
TNT Miami at Boston
10:30 p.m.
TNT Houston at LA. Lakers
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Buffalo at Philadelphia

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday's Games
Baltimore 37, Buffalo 34, OT
Washington 17, Chicago 14
Atlanta 39, Cincinnati 32
Tennessee 37, Philadelphia 19
Pittsburgh 23, Miami 22
Tampa Bay 18,St. Louis 17
Cleveland 30, New Orleans 17
Kansas City 42, Jacksonville 20
Carolina 23, San Francisco 20
Seattle 22,Arizona 10
Oakland 59, Denver 14
New England 23, San Diego 20
Green Bay 28, Minnesota 24
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at Dallas (n)

College games

I Today
Louisiana Tech (3-4) at Boise St.
(6-0), 8 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Turns Fast Relief 500

At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway,Va.
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 500 laps,
122.7 rating, 190 points, $177,375.
2. (21) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 500,
95.5, 170, $125,825.
3. (36) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 500,
119.7, 170,$147.951.
4. (26) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 500, 103.6,
160, $140,531.
5. (19) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 500,
108.9, 155, $135,303.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Toyota, 500, 96.3,
150, $118,490.
7. (28) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
500, 104.8, 151, $93,475.
8. (7) Carl Edwards, Ford, 500, 92.7,
142, $1 17,773.
9. (18) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 500,
126.2, 148, $126,040.
10. (25) Bhad Keselowski, Dodge, 500,
74.3, 134, $110,710.
11II. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
500, 80.2, 130, $112,479.
12. (15) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 500,
80.4, 127, $113,676.
13. (12) Paul Menard, Ford, 500, 79.4,
124, $84,975.
14. (33) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 500,
67.6, 121,$113,248.
15. (32) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 500, 74.5,
118,$120,951.
16. (29) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 499, 68.5,


I 15,$117,523.
17. (10) David Ragan. Ford, 499, 68.6,
1I 12, $83,350.
18. (38) Ken Schrader, Ford, 499, 53.5,
114, $82,725.
19. (5) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
499,77.8, 106, $109,356.
20. (I I) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 498,
92.8, 108, $118,251.
21. (35) Aric Almirola, Ford, 498, 66.6,
100.$112,690.
22. (41) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 498,
48.7, 102, $91,448.
23. (14) Scott Speed, Toyota, 498, 54,
94, $89,198.
24. (6) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 498,
88.3,96, $109,948.
25. (24) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 496,
52.1, 88, $80,200.
26. (42) Hermie Sadler, Chevrolet, 496,
38.3,85, $72,425.
27. (8) David Reutimann, Toyota, 494,
98, 87, $103,056.
28. (31 ) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 474, 39.7,
79, $79,400.
29. (16) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 473,
53.2, 76, $71,275.
30. (4) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 455,
99.6.78, $107,829.
31. (13) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 442,
45.3, 70, $78,575.
32. (40) Tony Raines, Ford, rear gear,
437,41.9, 67, $67,975.
33. (3) Greg Biffle, Ford, 432, 67.1, 64,
$77,800.
34. (2) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 428,
69.4, 66, $92,373.
35. (27) Travis Kvapil, Ford, rear gear,
423,36.4.58, $86,510.
36.(34) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, brakes,
418,40.5,55, $67,700.
37. (39) David Gilliland, Ford, 382,28.6,
52, $79,723.
38. (17) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, rear
gear, 359, 71.2,49, $75,600.
39. (43) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, brakes, 282,
27.5, 46, $67,550.
40. (20) Casey Mears, Toyota,
electrical, 271,42.8,48, $67,500.
41. (37) Joe Nemechek,Toyota, brakes,
264, 32.2,40, $67,450.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


42. (30) Landon Cassill,Toyota, brakes.
200, 26.9, 37, $67,395.
43. (23) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
overheating, 197, 41.2, 34, $66,971.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
71.619,mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 40 minutes,
20 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.318 seconds.
Caution Flags: 15 for 90 laps.
Lead Changes: 24 among 12 drivers.
Top 12 in Points: I. J.Johnson, 5,998;
2. D.Hamlin, 5,992; 3. K.Harvick, 5,936;
4. KyBusch, 5,826; 5. J.Gordon, 5,795;
6. C.Edwards, 5,785; 7. T.Stewart, 5,762;
8. J.Burton, 5,752; 9. Ku.Busch, 5,721;
10. M.Kenseth, 5,705; I I. G.Biffle, 5,682;
12. C.Bowyer, 5,592.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today
Miami at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 10 p.m.
Houston at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Sunday's Games
Nashville 4,Tampa Bay 3
N.Y. Rangers 3, New Jersey I
Calgary 4, San Jose 0
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Columbus (n)
Phoenix at Montreal (n)
Los Angeles at Minnesota (n)
Today's Games
Florida at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Anaheim at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Colorado atVancouver, 10 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Answer here: A L I
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: UNCLE TEPID GYPSUM RUBBER
Answer: Another name for a great magician -
A SUPER DUPERR"


Rk
I.Auburn 3
2. Oregon I
3. Boise St. 2
4.TCU 4
5. Mich. St. 5
6. Missouri 8
7.Alabama 6
8. Utah 7
9. Okla. I I
10.Wisc. 9
I. Ohio St. 10
12. LSU 12
13. Stanford 13
14. Nebr. 14
15.Arizona 15
16. FSU .16
17. Okla. St. 20
18. Iowa 17
19.Arkansas 18
20. S.Car. 19
21.Miss.St. 23
22. Miami 22
23.Va.Tech 21
24. Nevada 24
25. Baylor 25


Harris
Pts
2611
2818
2668
2545
2250
2061
2220
2095
1701
1897
1858
1574
1562
1448
1202
1189
755
907
828
790
392
466
556
162
124


USA Today
Pts Pct
1350 .9153
1463 .9919
1383 .9376
1308 .8868
1175 .7966
1060 .7186
1152 .7810
1091 .7397
871 .5905
973 .6597
966 .6549
787 .5336
763 .5173
802 .5437
628 .4258
651 .4414
385 .2610
401 .2719
404 .2739
431 .2922
251 .1702
260 .1763
317 .2149
48 .0325
70 .0475


Computer
Rk
I
8
6
4
3
2
12
10
5
9
I I
6
14
15
13
16
17
19
21
23
18
20
28
22
25


Avg
.9371
.9069
.8846
.8833
.8387
.8006
.7100
.7049
.6691
.6584
.6356
.6219
.5185
.5073
.4492
.4395
.3053
.2834
.2481
.2431
.1959
.1799
.1367
.0865
.0403


INDIANS: Rushing challenge met


Continued From Page 1B

side, including his 65-yard
and 11-yard touchdown
runs. Guard Zack Bentley
and tackle Dylan Newman
pave the way on that side.
"If we keep blocking for
him, he can score on every
drive and we plan on doing
that," Bentley' said. "We
have worked together for
two years and are really jell-
ing. We are in synch and it
really helps with (starting
center Jonathan Dupree) in


there with us."
Newman and Bentley are
seniors, as are fellow offen-
sive linemen starting left
guard Kyle Leland, Anthony
Pearce and tight end
Donnell Sanders. Starting
left tackle Dylan Graham,
Dalton O'Dell, Raul Colon
and Dupree are juniors.
"We worked really hard
in the summer and put it
all together," Newman said.
"We kept getting stronger


At left is the a
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
Correct to form four ordinary words.
NOAGY

Jumble &
2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

Crossword


for


Saturday.


YAIMDS

October 23. [W I I


We apologize



for the error.


Answer here: A


DARAPE
]- ( --I

^_^_^_
wU


and stronger and it paid
off. I love it when he calls
runs to the right side. I
want to put the team on my
shoulders and do anything
it takes for a victory."
'We know they are going
to put 8-9 in the box," line
coach Chad Bonds said.
"Since Lett (Blake) went
down, it put all the pressure
on JR and the line. I've chal-
lenged them each week to
get JR at least 100 yards."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHAT HE RAN INTO
AT THE WATER

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


LIII' \ ~\7~ ~\


(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: LOONY BLAZE LATEST ZIGZAG
Answer: The driver won the road race because he.
knew ALL THE ANGLES


ACROSS

1 100 centavos
5 Daily routine
10 Check casher
.12 Low-budget
film (hyph.)
13 Long for
14 Fuel rating
15 Bridge
section
16 Store-bought
hair
18 Give silent
assent
19 Made before
taxes
23 1960s
Chairman
26 Fortify
27 Moo companion
30 Candy-bar nut
32 Summon help
34 Glides
35 Rationing out
36 Gardner of
mystery
37 Oddjob's
creator


38 Permit
39 Homer epic
42 Madrid Mrs.
45 Hearth residue
46 Comply with
the wishes of
50 More laden
with moisture
53 Horse
or zebra
55 Plan
56 Naturally bright
57 Patches up
58 Mellowed

DOWN

1 Quick look
2 Lohengrin's
bride
3 Open-back
shoe
4 Not neathh
5 Truck mfr.
6 Spoil
7 One-of the
Karamazovs
8 El (ocean
current)


Answer to Previous Puzzle

W HI ARF BO G U S
I M P AL MO S T
N O R ONV Y


DOS BO RST ADI D


mUS RA TmT


LAA ER RSMEER
ERE IVI AS RD S
A MIS D TE C T S


C A E DE RAI L
TY ROIL DOPE Y


9 Legal
document
10 Gridiron stats
11 Puts
differently
12 Marshes


17 Suffix for hero
20 Carried on
21 Time of the
mammals
22 Gossip
23 Slicker
24 Burn soother
25 FitzGerald's
poet
28 Sedaka or
Simon
29 Batman
creator
31 Fjord
port
32 Drops a glass
33 Co. honchos
37 Shuttle
destination
40 Unit of length
41 Not very old
42 Use the pool
43 Lacoste
of .tennis
44 Envelope
abbr.
47 Liver output
48 Camelot lady
49 So far
51 Actor Danson
52 USN rank
54 Sine non


11
,4

8(
12F
13
14
15
17
18
19
20

22

23 (
26 R
C


ACROSS 37 Alkali
38 Await action
tch 39 Draws on
"Hud" Oscar- 40 Autumn
winner color
Grizzly, e.g. 41 Baba
'oint 43 Opposite
Earthenware jar of credit
Cancel 46 Inner self
Vied for a pin 50 Subj. of
No-hitter king rollovers
Luxury car 51 Long trains
Approves 54 Sotto -
Summer 55 Tea-leaves
Games org. reader
Cry of discov- 56 Add- (extras)
ery 57 Invites
Grid kick 58 Strange sight-
Mia of soc- ings
cer 59 LA hrs.


28 Decay
31 Huron neighbor
32 Police-blotter
info
33 Type of poem
34 Response to a
rodent
35 Shark warning
36 Box-score stats


DOWN


Sailing vessel
Blarney Stone
locale
Taos loc.
- fast!
House wing


Answer to Previous Puzzle




ORO PIANO ONT





GA iWtD DAE
AM AH SO-B R



A VE FL





GPA SITS DAP


Pub pint
Schoolboy
Muslim garment
Gaelic pop star
Call it -
Howard and Reagan


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


16 Apartment
19 Unit of resis-
tance
21 Abraded
22 Ms. Blake
23 Orange skin
24 Heavy hydro-
gen discover-
er
25 Running shoe
name
27 Similar
28 Steals from
29 "Garfield" dog
30 Dick Tracy's
wife
36 Wishing
undone
38 Cat or canary
40 Gets up
42 Refuges
43 Vocalist
44 Romantic
deity
45 Go in reverse
47 Hotcakes
acronym
48 Rockies,
briefly
49 Off. helper
51 Seminoles'
sch.
52 NBA official
53 Want-ad let-
ters


@ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES


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Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


* 2B


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


10-26


10-23


@ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


L







LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


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DEADLINE
very Thursday, 5:00 pm
ie Breaker: CHS -vs- Ed White


NAME
CONTEST RULES ADDRESS
On Tuesday selected games will be sponsored in each of the ads of the participating
merchants. Indicate which team you think will win by writing the team name beside the
sponsoring merchant's name in the entry blank. Entries may be mailed or dropped off at PHONE
the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055 or fax to 386-752-9400.
Entries must be received by 5:00pm on Thursday following the contest. Prize will be
awarded weekly on the basis of most games selected correctly. In case of a tie, the AGE
winner will be determined by the most accurate guess on the Tie-Breaker (score
required). You must be 18 years- of age to enter; one entry per person. Participating
sponsors and their families, employees of the Lake City Reporter and their families are T!
not eligible to enter


Phish Heads

Octi Dry

Baker's Communication


Mikell's


State Farm Insurance

Drawdy Insurance

Florida Gateway College


CMS Pro Staffing

Rightway Auto


Mangrum Plumbing

People's State Bank
Wilson's Outfitters

Furniture Showplace

First Federal Bank


his week's winner: Doug Johns


T


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


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F: 41









4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BLONDIE
HEY, OA6, W WE OVERSEE
" TELL ME THE WRITING OF
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pit,


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Cancer survivors take man

to task for his implant bias


DEAR ABBY: I had to
laugh when I read the letter
from "Needs a Real Woman
in Florida" (Sept. 8), writ-
ten by a man complaining
about dating women with
breast implants. I am a
breast cancer survivor and
I have implants. I was with
a man for nearly two years
who knew I'd had one of
them done because the
scarring was obvious. One
night when we were talk-
ing, I mentioned that the
other one was also false and
he didn't believe me. He
couldn't tell the difference.
Years ago, I dated a
man who told me before
we became intimate that
he didn't know if he could
"handle" being with some-
one with implants. I should
have dumped him then, but
I didn't. But the real kicker?
We were in the middle of an
amorous embrace when
his toupee fell off. I started
laughing, and that was the
end of the relationship.'
What a hypocrite putting
down someone else when
he had a rug!
I wonder what "Needs"
would do if he met a wom-
an post-mastectomy before
she had reconstructive
surgery? GRATEFUL
SURVIVOR IN ARIZO-
NA
DEAR GRATEFUL:
You are one of many sur-
vivors who shared their


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
reason for breast surgery,
many.of whom pointed out
that the biggest "boob" of
all was the writer of that let-
ter. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: Women
with breast implants ARE
real wbmen. I know because
I'm one of them. Perhaps
before "Needs" passes judg-
ment on their intelligence,
and prior to becoming inti-
mate with them, he should
get to know them better. If
they trust him, they will tell
him the truth.
Some of us have had the
surgery because of dramat-
ic weight loss or medical
conditions that contributed
to the loss of fullness in that
area. And some of us did it
because we were tired of
wearing padded bras only
to have our little secret
come to light at an inconve-
nient moment.
I hope "Needs'" bias
comes back to haunt him
when Viagra no longer
works and HE needs an
implant. PERKY AND
PROUD OF IT
DEAR ABBY: I have


been seriously contem-
plating breast enhance-
ment surgery. I'm 35 and,
although mine are ample,
they don't "stand at atten--
tion" the way they used to.
I'm intelligent and easygo-
ing, but men don't seem to'
notice us "natural" women.
After reading "Needs'"
letter, I have decided
against the surgery. Maybe
there's some nice guy out
there after all who will love
me the way I am and I won't
have to alter myself to get
his attention. NEEDS
A NICE GUY IN GEOR-
GIA
DEAR ABBY: I can't be-
lieve how narrow-minded
"Needs" is. Hasn't that man
thought about the women
who have no choice but
fake breasts because of can-
cer? Would he turn a wom-
an away who went through
all the hurt, pain and loss -
just to survive and ended
up with implants? If he's so
shallow, he doesn't deserve
a decent woman because
she will never measure up
to his "high" standards. I
know I am a beautiful, in-
telligent woman and my
fake breasts are just like
my real ones were. AN
ORDAINED MINISTER
OUT WEST
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Work on per-
sonal and professional rela-
tionships. It's time to make
some changes in your life,
with regard to the people
you deal. Slowly but surely
begin spending, more:!tiqie,
with the people who can of-
fer as much as you give in
return. ****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Put your own
personal touch on whatever
you do. Take ideas from
your past and update them
for your current situation.
A strong position must be
taken when dealing with
what you will and won't do.
Work on your own. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Keep a close
watch on what everyone
around you is doing. Imple-
ment a creative touch to
your work that is sure to
grab the attention of some-
one in charge. Don't get
angry if someone tries to
copy you; take it as a com-
pliment. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): The more time
spent with friends, family
and peers, the better you
will feel about yourself and
your future. There are op-
portunities that must be put
into motion now. Romance
is heightened, so spread a
little love around. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Speak from the heart.
Problems with loved ones,
children and your resi-
dece ,ari be expected if
,you aren't on top of what
needs to be said and done.
Taking chances or being
evasive will lead to misun-
derstandings. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): The knowledge you
acquire by using your ex-
perience to help others will
lead to a better lifestyle and
higher returns. Travel for
pleasure and love will be
highlighted. A change will
ignite new ideas that will
transform your future. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Look at what you
have learned and apply that
knowledge to something
professional. Strive to reach
,goals thatwill put you ahead
of any competition. Don't
let what others do be how
you measure your own ac-
complishments. ******
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take pleasure
in making your home and
family more comfortable.
Invest in something that
can be used as a safety net.
Use wisely and fully the
skills you were born with
and the ethics you were
raised with and you will


reach your goals. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The past will
come back to haunt you
if you did something un-
derhanded in order to get
ahead. Someone you are
close to will not have your
best interests at heart. A se-
rious partnership will influ-
ence your status. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Give and
take will help you relate to
the people you are work-
ing with and for. Once you
establish your position, you
can do the best job possible
in order to advance. A trip
or attending a conference
will enhance your knowl-
edge. ***
AQUAfIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Be ready and
proceed steadily along if
you want to avoid setbacks.,
The more prepared you are
to deal with people who op-
pose you, the easier it will
be to bypass any obstacles.
Do your research and speak
from the heart. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): If you be-
lieve in something, follow
through. A serious partner-
ship will be the basis for
what you build in the future.
Make' amends with anyone
you need in your life in or-
der to turn-your plan into a
success. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Z equals V
"A I R U H . G N SL EWO GWJ S W
UDDA VWO, W FWIV, TROOL,
CDZMOU TWVMCL VWO, WOA GRIO
NMV MOGD W CDHSI WOA FDIHS."
VMENWSC 'PSIUMO
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "When I see something unjust, I have to intervene -
.it's hard for me to watch the underdog s.uffer." Kristen Bell
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-26


CLASSIC PEANUTS











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SELLg


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-207-CP
PROBATE DIVISION:
IN RE: The Estate of:
JAMES E. MORTON,
Deceased
/
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The ancillary administration of the
estate of JAMES E. MORTON,
whose date of death was November
22, 2009; is pending in the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, Florida,
Probate Division;- File Number 10-
207-CP; the address of which is The
Honorable P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk
of Court, Columbia County Court-
house, 173 NE Hemando Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055. The names
and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this court
ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF
THE DATE THAT IS THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS:
October 19,, 2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive: /s/ John E. Norris
Florida Bar No. 058998
Norris & Norris, P.A.
253 NW'Main Blvd.
Post Office Drawer 2349
Lake City, Florida 32056-2349
Telephone: (386) 752-7240
Personal Representative: /s/ James
M. Morton
James M. Morton
3530 Blue Ridge Road
Raleigh, North Carolina 27612
05524215
October 19, 26, 2010
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned, being the sole owner
and president of Warden and Associ-
ates Corp.,will apply for registration
of Warden and Associates Corp. to
do business under the ficticious
name of "Glass Slipper Bridal", with
the Florida Department of State.
Warden and Associates Corp.
By: /s/ Jeffrey L. Warden
JEFFREY L. WARDEN
President
05524294
October 23, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000178
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LINFORD D. QUINN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORE CLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated October 6,
.2010 and entered in Case NO. 12-
2010-CA-000178 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein WELLS FARGO
Bank, NA, is the Plaintiff and LIN-
FORD D. QUINN; BRENDA S.
QUINN; are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 10th
day of November, 2010, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
THE EAST 204.48 FEET OF LOTS
2, 2A AND 3 OF COUNTRY
HILLS, A SUBDIVISION OF A
PART O,F THE NORTHWEST 1/4
OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF
SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 58 OF THE PUB-


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
*****************************

Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


Legal

LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 288
PERSIMMON PLACE SW, LAKE
CITY, FL 32024.
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake'
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) day after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on October 8, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, PL.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F10007034-NMNC-FHA
04541975
October 19, 26, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000390
DIVISION:
GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC,
Plaintiff
vs.
DONALD R. JERNIGAN, et al,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DONALD R. JERNIGAN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 261 SE
MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
CURRENT ADDRESS: 261 SE
MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DONALD R. JERNIGAN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS : 261
SE MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
CURRENT ADDRESS: 261 SE
MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
TENANT #1
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS :
261 SE MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
CURRENT ADDRESS: 261 SE
MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
TENANT #2
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 261 SE
MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
CURRENT ADDRESS: 261 SW
MULBERRY PLACE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
LOT 7 IN BLOCK 1 OF ELM
ACRES, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 84 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after
the first publication, if any, on Flori-
da Default Law Group, PL., Plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is 9119
Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the
original with this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter, otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for two consecutive
weeks in the Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on this 14 day of October,
2010.
P. D Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
GMAC-SPECFNMA--F 10035578
** See Americans with Disabilities
Act
05524261
October 26, 2010
November 2, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 10-217-CP
Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOYLE CARLTON MARKHAM,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DOYLE CARLTON MARKHAM,
deceased whose date of death was
SEPTEMBER 17, 2010. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 N.E.
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-


er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice has been served,
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-


Legal

TER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is October 19, 2010
/s/Lauren C. Markham
Lauren C, Markham
Personal Representative
/s/Robert F Jordan
Robert F. Jordan
Jordan Law Firm, PLLC
934 N.E. Lake DeSoto Circle
Lake City, Florida 32055
Tele: (386) 755-3456: Fax (386)
758-2021
Attorney for Personal Representative
05524205
October 19,26, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 10-231-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EVA M. GRIFFITTS
a/k/a EVA MOBLEY GRIFFITTS,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
EVA M. GRIFFITTS, deceased,
whose date of death was August 6,
2010; File Number 10-231-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court foT Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: October 27, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Benjamin K. Mobley
BENJAMIN K. MOBLEY
1239 Briarcliff Drive
Asheboro, North Carolina 27205
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Marlin M. Feagle
Marlin M. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0173248
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
04542056
October 26, 2010
November 2, 2010


010 Announcements







* 9 WVA r 'i iWur


M a IurM fa' kAM I iuU


020 Lost & Found

STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197

100 Job
Opportunities

05524275
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
For Our NEW Store on
Pinemount & Birley Rd
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and on line


1to Job
100 OOpportunities

05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
pm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
sents seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
one of these positions to qualify
for the job. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all
managers before they are hired.

05524295
Need experienced
CNC Machine Programmer
and Operator.
Must have some Supervisory
Experience, Send Resume to
Grizzly Mfg. Attn: Guy
174 NE Cortez Terrace
Lake City FL, 32055
Exec.Dir.- nonprofit working with
people with disabilities. Manages
agency with $2M bgt./120 empl.
Reports to 14 mbr.board. 3 yrs.
admin. exp incl. budgeting,
community relations, fundraising,
implementing policies/programs
required. BA degree preferred.
Email resume
prenew(@lakecity-carc.com.
Industrial Sewing Machine
Operator, wages based on ability,
Call Hafner's
386-755-6481
Open position for Laborer
at Grizzly Mfg. Apply in person
at 174 NE Cortez Terr.
Lake City
/ Operations/MGR Position
Exceptional people skills,
Proficient with Quickbooks req,
Marketing exp req, M-F, some
travel, job demanding but reward-
ing, fast paced medical industry,
fax resumes to 386-758-9047
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity to
learn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
email to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information
Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to
northfloridajobs@(gmail.com
Special invitation
to those 18+ Get paid for your
personality. No experience
necessary All-expenses paid.
Call Heather 866-438-6571

1 Medical
120 Employment

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494

190 Mortgage Money


FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com
24 Schools &
2 Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/08/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

* Continuing education
Fees ncl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


0 Livestock &
330 Supplies
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
Panasonic Tough Book Laptop
metal casing, touch screen, recent
diag, works great, upgraded mem-
ory/anti-virus $150 386-623-2443
Panasonic Tough Book Laptop,
runs Windows XP, works great,
recent diagnostic $100
386-6232443


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY USED APPLIANCES
Working or not.
Don't scrap that machine.
Call 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231

450 Good-Things- '
to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 & 2/2 Large MH's, small park,
near LCCC, Small pets ok, $500
dep $575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 S/W MH, 1 acre fenced lot,
close to town, near new Elem
school, $700 mon, 1st & last
at move-in 352-281-0549
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
3867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
2.5 acres in Olustee, close to
Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

710 Unfurnished Apt.
71 For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972


2BR/1BA with carport, screen
porch, Privacy Garden.
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A lg walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $625 plus dep & bckgrnd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 386-397-2108
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Until. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
73O Unfurnished
SHome For Rent
2 br/lba House w/yard,
near airport, $450 mo,
1st, last & $225 see.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $738 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Furnished Farm House. 3/2,re-
modeled, wrap around porch, hors-
es welcome, on 160 ac, 5 miles to
1-75, 2 miles to 1-10, $1200 month
386-362-8708 or 386-3624114
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and'
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45,4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
lrg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
- 1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture.
available, (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & I-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and i
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $825 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&
82 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2000 obo
386-965-2215
1994 FORD Ranger.
$1,500 obo
386-397-4912








iL -,. \ f -. .,


Lake City Reporter


CONN


Contact us

at the paper.





CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440

SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445

ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
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Mowr,-F~: 8 am- 5:00p.ni.
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Contest rules and official entry blank in Tuesday's paper.


* NEWS


* WEATHER



* OPINION



* SPORTS



*ARCHIVES


I


* CLASSIFIED



* COMMUNITY


* ENTERTAINMENT


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


Carriage LS
36'3 slide fifthwheel.
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only.
$26,000 OBO
Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with
low miles. $47,000
Call
386-755-0653


In Print,

& Online
One Low
Price!


Fo More Detail Call iir~ ~


Lake City Reporter


Adotion


Are you pregnant? A successful, financially
secure, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be
full-time mom & devoted dad. Expenses paid.
Call Mindy & Rich. (ask for michelle/adam).
(800)790-5260. FL Bar# 0150789

Announcements

Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout
Florida. Advertising Networks of Florida, Put
us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.flori-
da-classifieds.com.

Equipment For Sale

NEW Norwood SAWMILLS-LumberMate-
Pro handles logs 34" diameter, mills boards 28"
wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases
efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.
com/300N (800)661-7746 Ext 300N

Financial

CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured
settlement or annuity payments. High payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Busi-
ness Bureau.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted

Colonial Life seeks entrepreneurial profes-
sional with sales experience to become a Dis-
trict Manager. Life/Health license is required.
Substantial earnings potential. Please contact
meredith.brewer@coloniallife.com or call
(904)424-5697

ASAP! New Pay Increase! 37-43 cpm Excel-
lent Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR.
(877)258-8782 www.imeltontruck.com

Trailer Truckin' As It Should Be! Star Trans-
portation. Home most Weekends. Class A CDL
Company Drivers. Excellent Pay, Rider Program,
Medical, 401k, Paid Holidays & Vacation. Owner
Operators. Check out the best pkg. In the Industry


(800)416-5912 www.startransportation.com

Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEED-
ED OTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/
Tanker REQ'D. Outstanding pay & Benefits!
Call a recruiter TODAY! (877)484-3042 www.
oakleytransport.com

Drivers-CDL/A $2,000 SIGN-ON BONUS!
Start up to .42 CPM. Good Home Time and
Benefits. OTR Experience Required. No Felo-
nies. Lease Purchase Available. (800)441-4271
xFL-100

INSURANCE REPRESENTATIVE NEED-
ED. Most earn $50K-$100K or more. Call our
branch office at (866)896-1555. Ask for Dennis
Mayfield or email dmayfield@insphereis.com.
Visit www.insphereis-pensacola.com.


Miscellaneous


AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA ap-
proved program. Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)3'14-3769. ,


Out of Area Real Estate


Crawford Co., GA 85 AC $1,125/AC Where
will you hunt this season? Other tracts avail-
able, stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis
Paper Co.

VIRGINA MOUNTAINS GALAX AREA
6 acres on .river, great fishing, private, reduced!
$59,900. Call owner now! (866)275-0442


Schools & Education


Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-9904





ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA
.*.k i fI .I.er, 5, iiy



( Week of October 25, 2010 )


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