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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01434
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/24/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01434
System ID: UF00028308:01434
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Your Annual
Columbia County
Fair Magazine


aim


000016 120110 ****3-DIGI'
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


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www.lakecityreporter.com
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Best

in the West
Auburn upends LSU.
Sports, 3B




porter



Vol. 136, No. 238 E $1.00


NoHORSING AROUNDHERE


Partnerships


are beneficial


to industry


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn

Partnerships are
often the key
ingredients that
make business
relationships
successful.
The Certified
Horsemanship Association
and the American Farriers
Association have formed a
partnership which is prov-
ing to be mutually benefi-
cial to each entity.
Farriers provides service
for horse owners and takes
care of the horse's feet by
filing, trimming and balanc-
ing horse hooves or adding
horseshoes to horses.
As part of the CHA


International Convention, a
farrier demonstration was
given Saturday in which
Robbie Hunziker, a certi-
fied journeyman farrier of
Hurricane Forge, and Lyle
Jenkins, a certified jour-
neyman farrier and owner
of Jenkins Farrier Service,
showed what farriers do.
"We showed proper hoof
care for horses and the
types of different fungi that
attack the feet of horses
that trainers need to keep
on top of for their clients
and the people they're
training," Jenkins said.
"We also showed the differ-
ence between a properly-
trimmed foot on a horse
PARTNERS continued on 3A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Robbie Hunziker, a certified journeyman farrier of Hurricane
Forge, places a hot horse shoe on Aimee, as Colleen Davis
watches during a Saturday demonstration.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White resident Daniela Hofacker rides Tag while practicing her cantering technique.


Pressure

to win

can be

weighty

Psychologist
helps riders to
communicate.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Psychologyfor horses and
their riders may seem like a
strange brew, but at The
Certified Horsemanship
Association's (CHA)
International Convention,
its a topic with lots of inter-
est.'
Saturday afternoon
Daniel Stewart, who has a
sports science degree and
a minor in sports psychol-
ogy, served as an instructor
to give competitive riders
tips on how eliminate auxi-
ety for riders and horses in
competition.
"I've combined my edu-
cation in riding with my
education with the sciences
board, including sports psy-
chology, to help riders fig-
ure out how to stay focused,
avoid distraction, avoid
doubt and find confidence,"
he said.
Stewart, a Naples' resi-
dent, was an international
horse-riding competitor and
trainer for more than 20
years and coached riders
on U.S. teams to success at
STEWART continued on 3A


World's smartest horse

A second chance leads Lukas to claim the title.


By TONY BRITT -
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Many horse owners may
claim to have a smart horse.
For Karen Murdock, the
proof is in the pudding.
Murdock's horse, Lukas,
has been declared "the
world's smartest horse"
by the World Records
Academy.
However, it's only by


luck, perseverance and a
second chance that Lukas
is alive and able to show
the world how smart he is.
"He wasn't famous when
I got him, he was very trou-
bled," Murdock said. "He
came off the race track,
changed hands and ended
up neglected, then rescued
and I bought him from a
woman who rescued him
and was hoping to recondi-


tion him."
Murdock attended
this weekend's Certified
Horsemanship Ass6ciation
(CHA) International
Convention, where she was
a guest speaker. Lukas,
however, did not make the
trip and remained at home
in California.
Lukas has been fea-
tured on NBC, CBS, ABC,
CNN, HLN, Pet Talk radio,


Animal, Pet Place radio,
Animal Talk radio and
Inside Edition news broad-
casts, as well as featured in
on-line blogs, news letters,
forms and several other
media outlets.
Murdock said it was a
gradual process where she
learned how smart Lukas
was.

LUKAS continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
Lukas' ability in counting, among other things, got him the
title as the world's smartest horse, according to the Guinness
Book of World Records.


City: Halloween will be best on Saturday


County takes no
stand on what
day to celebrate.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The date for Halloween
on the calendar may say
Sunday, Oct. 31, but in
Lake City it's best celebrat-


1 842 64 l0021 8


ed on Saturday night. At
least that's the recommen-
dation.
The City Council is
encouraging the commu-
nity to celebrate Halloween
on Saturday this year.
"It has been custom-
ary in my experience that
when Halloween falls of
a Sunday, the city most
always celebrates the night
before to not conflict with


CALL US: 87
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO Partly Cloudy
THE REPORTER:y oudy
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 8A


church services," said City
Manager Wendell Johnson.
Numerous calls have
been coming in to the Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
about the date to observe
the holiday.
"I think because it falls on
a Sunday this year people
are curious as to what day
is the day to celebrate," said
Dennille Folsom, chamber


Opinion ......
Business ......
Advice ........
Puzzles . . . .
Life ...........


executive director.
Columbia County doesn't
set days for trick-or-treat-
ing, said County Manager
Dale Williams.
"We suggested a day
years ago when we had the
same problem, and all (peo-
ple) did was trick-or-treat
on both days,': he said.
The Board of
Commissioners did not
bring up Halloween at its


.......... 4A
.......... IC
.......... 3D
. . . . . 2B
... ....... I D


last meeting.
"So what I took from the
county is we didn't address
it," Williams said. "It's not
part of county government.
It's not something they felt
like they should be doing.
And so they're going to
trust that the public will
trick-or-treat on the night
that's most appropriate."
Halloween celebrations
will actually take place the


TODAY IN
WORLD
Leaked Iraq war files
portray weak nation.


entire weekend. Children
can wear costumes and get
candy at several free com-
munity events, including:
Finally Friday Trunk
or Treat begins at 6:30 p.m.
Friday at Olustee Park. A
costume contest is at 7:30
p.m. There will be candy
and a performance by the

HALLOWEEN continued on 3A


COMING
TUESDAY
Getting ready for
the County Fair


LL









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24,2010


,e AH3. P ayji iOT 8

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
1-14-25-30 12 8-9-22-28-36 Afternoon: 4-8-0 Afternoon: 7-9-9-9 1-4-6-37-38-51 7-17-20-39-59-17
Evening: 9-9-4 Evening: 6-9-4-2


AROUND FLORIDA


Sharks show their worth to ecology


DEL MILLIGAN
Associated Press

LAKELAND
When the
Deepwater
Horizon oil
rig disas-
ter spewed
nearly 5 million barrels of
oil into the Gulf of Mexico
during.the spring and sum-
mer, sharks were pushed
ever closer to shore.
"Some species were
almost being herded into
some beaches because oil
was coming in," said Dr.
Bob Hueter of Mote Marine
Laboratory in Sarasota.
The oil spill pushed
sharks toward the beaches
in the Panhandle and may
have caused an increase
in the number of sharks
off the Tampa Bay area
this summer, including a
rare appearance by mas-
sive whale sharks just 10
miles off Sarasota.
But scientists say not to
be fooled by the numbers:
Shark populations are on
the decline, and the great-
est threat has been over-
fishing.
Feared as man-eaters
but pursued by fisher-
men for the price of their
fins and meat, the thrill of
the catch and even world
records, sharks also are
vital to ocean ecology. As
the top predators in the
ocean, they impact every-
thing below them, not only
fish but coral reefs and sea
grasses.
Sharks are part of the
elasmobranchs fam-
ily along with sawfish, rays
and skates. With all carti-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill lines a small island in Barataria Bay near Port.
Sulphur, La. The oil spill has had its effect on sharks as well, driving them closer to shore,
with whale sharks spotted 10 miles from the Sarasota shoreline.


lage and no bones, they are
slow-growing animals with
long lifespans, a late age
of sexual maturity and lon-
ger gestation periods than
humans at 12-18 months.


They have adapted and
evolved over the past 400
million years, but heavy
fishing pressure in the last
two decades of the 20th
century heightened con-


cerns among scientists like
Hueter that the continuing
depletion of sharks would
disrupt the entire food
chain.
"Just like on land, when


you remove apex preda-
tors, the effect cascades
through the food web,
throwing everything out
of balance and leading to
changes," Hueter said. "It.
takes decades for them to
come back."
University of Florida
professor George Burgess
said populations of many
shark species are declining
in Florida and worldwide
because of several factors:
Their fins are highly cov-
eted in some parts of the
world, selling for more than
$12 per ounce in Hong
Kong.
They're snagged by
shrimp trawls, gill nets and
longlines, which are spread
along the sea floor with miles
of baited hooks intended for
species like grouper, tuna
and swordfish.
-They're losing habitat in
estuarine nursery grounds
where their pups are born.
"You can pick almost
any shark or ray in Florida
waters and make a case for
it being in trouble," said
Burgess, director of the
Florida Program for Shark
Research in Gainesville.
Quantifying exact shark
numbers is not possible.
But Hueter, director of the
Center for Shark Research
at Mote Marine, said shark
stocks around Florida have
dropped about 50 percent
since 1975 primarily because
of overfishing by commer-
cial boats, and to a lesser
degree recreational fisher-
men.
"It's like global climate
change. You've got to look
at the trends over time,"
Hueter said.


Alligator attacks,
kills family's dog

SARASOTA-ASarasota
County family is warning
its neighbors to be on alert
after an alligator pounced,
on their dog and dragged it
into a lake.
An alligator killed Darryl
Mizer's 50-pound kees-
hond Noah on Tuesday. A
trapper tried to locate and
catch the animal but has
not been able to find it.
Gary Morse, a spokes-
man for the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation,
says dogs resemble an alli-
gator's natural prey, and
that such attacks are not,
uncommon.

Records: Fraud
financed lifestyle

MIAMI Authorities-
say the .co-owners of a
Miami-based chain .of men-
tal health clinics accused of
bilking Medicare spent mil-
lions on luxury cars, travel
and private school tuition.
Lawrence Duran and
Marianella Valera and two
other executives from
American Therapeutic
Corp. were indicted
Thursday on charges of
conspiring to fleece $200
million from Medicare for
filing false mental health
service claims.
Court records indicate
the co-owners, who were
romantically involved, were
able to finance a lavish life-
style.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Plaque unveiled honoring Lennon


LONDON


Yoko Ono has unveiled a
commemorative plaque
on the London home
she shared with John
Lennon.
The blue English Heritage plaque
adorns a Georgian row house at 34
Montagu Square, where the couple
lived in 1968.
The ground floor and basement
apartment was home to several rock
-legends. ,peatles drummer Ringo
Starr bought the property in 1965,
and he sublet it to Paul McCartney
and later Jimi Hendrix before
Lennon and Ono moved in.
It was the setting for the nude
photo of the couple on the cover of
their 'Two Virgins" album.
Ono said Saturday she was hon-
ored by the decision to erect the
plaque, one of hundreds across
London marking the homes of prom-
inent figures.
Lennon would have turned 70 on
Oct. 9. He was shot dead in New
York in December 1980.

Brand, Perry wed in
traditional ceremony
RANTHAMBHORE NATIONAL
PARK, India British comedian
Russell Brand and American pop
singer Katy Perry were married
Saturday in a traditional Hindu wed-
ding ceremony at a luxury resort
in a tiger reserve in northwestern
India, an official said.
A Hindu priest conducted the cer-
emony, which was attended by fam-
ily and close friends of the couple,
a hotel official said on condition of,
anonymity as he was not authorized
to speak to the media.
Security has been stringent with
private security guards stationed at
the resort and other nearby hotels
where guests and the couple are
staying for the six-day wedding cel-
ebration.
Photographers and media report-
ers were not allowed into the Aman-
e-Khas wildlife retreat. The couple
have given the exclusive coverage


I' ASSOCIATED PRESS
Japanese artist and musician Yoko Ono (with hat) unveils a Blue Plaque honoring
British musician John Lennon during an unveiling ceremony at 34 Montagu Square
in London Saturday. John Lennon is commemorated with an English Heritage
blue plaque in celebration of his life and contribution to music at the flat where he
shared his first home with Yoko Ono and where the famous nude photograph of
John and Yoko was taken for the 'Two Virgins' album cover.


rights to a London magazine, and no
other photographers or journalists
will be allowed into the resort

Cajun singer Richard
recovering from stroke
LAFAYETTE, La. Cajun singer
and songwriter Zachary Richard
is recovering from a stroke but
may have to cancel or postpone a
Canadian tour scheduled to start
Oct. 29, a close friend said.
Richard, 60, is making a good
comeback from the stroke, which
affected one side of his body but
not his voice, Todd Mouton told
The Advertiser newspaper in
Lafayette, La.
'The whole thing was so scary,"
Mouton said. "But we're excited
with his progress. Doctors say he
should have about 100 percent
recovery."
The newspaper reported Friday
that Richard suffered the stroke late


Sunday, Oct. 17.
"By Monday afternoon, he was
already able to pick up his guitar and
put out a few licks," Mouton said.
He said Richard hopes to make
recording dates scheduled early in
December.
"Zach will be back," Mouton said.
"He's very confident about that and
what motivates him is his desire to do
more writing, recording, performing
and activism for the causes that he
loves."
Richard had to slow down on his
promotional work for "Le Grand
Gosier," a double-sided single and
video produced to help raise aware-
ness for the many issues facing the
people of the Louisiana Gulf Coast
Richard received his first record-
ing contract when he was 21 and has
released 20 albums since, recording in
both English and French.
He has also published three vol-
umes of poetry.

* Associated Press


* Football Hall-of-Famer Y.A.
Tittle is 84.
* Musician BillWyman is 74.
* Actor-producer David
Nelson is 74.
* Actor F. Murray Abraham
is 71.
* Actor Kevin Kline is 63.
* Former NAACP President
Kweisi Mfume is 62.


Daily Scripture


* Country musician Billy
Thomas (Terry McBride and
the Ride) is 57.
* Actor B.D. Wong is 50.
i Rock musician Ben Gillies
(Silverchair) is 31.
* Singer-actress Monica
Arnold is 30.
SActress Shenae Grimes is
21.


"Carry each other's burdens,
and in this way you will fulfill
the law of Christ."

Galatians 6:2


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duyal St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.,
In Columbia County, customers should
,call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(TuesdAy through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


STEWART: Psychology


Continued From Page IA

world championships and
the Olympics from 1999-
2007.
"It's easy to help eques-
trians figure out what they
need to help get beyond
their demons and whatever
is holding them back," he
said, explaining the topic of
his seminar.
As part of his seminar
Saturday, Stewart focused
on showing instructors and
riders there is a connection
between pressure and per-
formance.
"When pressure goes up,
performance tends to go
down," he said. "It's not just


in equestrian sports, but
all sports. As soon as we
lose focus, we lose poten-
tial. There is a real connec-
tion between pressure and
potential. This weekend I'm
helping riders get de-sensi-
tized to pressure.
"In sports psychology we
have a lot of great tools
to keep riders focused.
It's easy to send the tools
out there. I think what's
hard is to get riders to own
them, understand them and
work on them to overcome
things like show jitters, per-
formance anxiety, doubt,
distraction and stress."


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Daniel Stewart gives instructions to Beth Rehberg as part of a
Certified Horsemanship Association seminar Saturday.


Young Team CHA

member wants to

be an instructor


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
I n 2009 Jenny
Sdrenka served
1,419 volun-
teer hours for
The Certified
Horsemanship Association
and won the Team CHA
reward program.
Those volunteer hours
would equate to a great
amount of time for most
adults, but Jenny isn't an
adult.
At 11-years old, Jenny
is the youngest Certified
Horsemanship Association
member to attend this
year's CHA international
Convention at The Oaks.
"The convention is very
fun and has very interest-
ing classes," said Jenny,
who wants to be a riding
instructor or an equine
veterinarian when she gets
older.
Jenny and her mother,
Christina Sdrenka, who
are from Cape Coral, spent


Saturday taking part in
instructional exercises
during the event.
"The classes are won-
derful and the people that
came here are great,"
Christina Sdrenka said.
"We had the chance to
talk to and meet David
O'Connor and it was a
truly great night. There
are lots of really interest-
ing instructors and riders.
The convention was abso-
lqtely terrific."
Jenny has been riding
horses for several years
and rides English-style,
hunter, jumper and plea-
sure events. She also com-
petes in some horseback-
riding contests.
"I like competing
because it's just fun to see
how the others would ride
and see how we do. against
each other," she said.
Jenny, who plans to
get her Assistant Riding
Instructor certification as
soon as she turns 16-years
61d, also served as a rider
in a riding demonstra-


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Jenny Sdrenka (foreground) and her mother Christina
Sdrenka take a break after taking part in Certified
Horsemanship Association training activities.


tion and seminar early
Saturday.
"That was a lot of fun,
too," she said with a huge


smile. 'We were trying to
see how we could ease our
horse without pulling or
being mean to them."


Child injured waiting for bus


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

A 9-year-old Columbia
County student suffered
minor injuries when she
was struck by. a pickup
truck that collided with her
school 'bus Friday morn-
ing. The child was waiting
to board the bus when the
incident occurred, authori-
ties said.
The police report regard-
ing this accident wasn't


released until Friday eve-
ning, too late to make.
Saturday's edition.
Victoria Powell, 9, of
Lake City, was injured in
the incident, but reports
did not indicate whether
the child was taken to a
hospital.
The school bus was car-
rying 12 passengers at the
time of the wreck. None
of them has been listed as
being injured in the mis-
hap.


The wreck occurred at
6:56 a.m. on State Road
247, just north of County
Road 242.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
James Derringer, 44, of
O'Brien, was traveling
north on State Road 247
in a 1999 GMC pickup
truck following a Columbia
County school bus driven
by Mary G. Greene, 57, of
Lake City.
Greene stopped on


the roadway to let stu-
dents board the bus and
Derringer's vehicle struck
the back of the bus with its
left side.
As a result of the impact,
Derringer's vehicle spun
clockwise, onto the eastern
shoulder of the road and
struck Powell, who was
waiting to board the bus.
Derringer has been
charged with careless driv-
ing in connection with the
wreck, reports said.


"Everyday he seemed to
want to do more," she said.
Murdock said Lukas is
able to count and under-
stands the concepts of same-
different proportions, abs-
entness, object permanance
and spatial relationships.
"In addition, I've taught
him to identify shapes, let-
ters, numbers and how to
discriminate colors," she


said. "He's smarter than
some people."
Lukas is able to show how
smart of a horse he is by
identifying things by touch-
ing them with his nose.
, He has a desk with a
non-skid surface, where
he stands while Murdock
arranges the objects ran-
domly. As she calls out dif-
ferent things, Lukas touches


them with his nose.
Recently Lukas attempted
to stake his claim as the
world's smartest horse for
Guinness Book of World
Record officials.
"Guinness asked. us to
attempt a new record the
most numbers identified by
a horse in one minute," she
said. "Its a new category and
we really think it's wonder-


fuil Guinness is beginning
to acknowledge that animals
are smart and they deserve
humane treatment"
Murdock setup a benefit
non-profit organization to
raise money for the better
treatment of animals. She
and Lukas travel through-
out the country promoting
humane treatment for ani-
mals.


HALLOWEEN: Lots of thing planned for weekend


Continued From Page 1A

Justin Case band. The
movie Scooby Doo will be
shown at dark. The event is
hosted by the chamber and
sponsored by LifeSouth
Community Blood Center.
MOMS Club of Lake
City is sponsoring the 2nd
Annual Halloween Bash at
Lake City Mall from 3-6
p.m. Saturday. The event
immediately precedes the
traditional store trick-or-
treating. Families with chil-
dren of all ages are wel-
come to attend. A costume
contest is at 4 p.m.
Richardson Community
Center is having a Halloween
Carnival from 5-8 p.m.
Saturday. There will be
candy, food and informa-


tional booths. Children are
encouraged to wear cos-
tumes.
The Lake City Police
Department and Lake City
Fire Department are spon-
soring a Halloween event
from 6-9 p.m. Saturday in the
lot across from the Public
Safety Building. The event
will include bounce houses,
face painting and candy.
Trick-or-treating is
5-10 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Fair. A
pumpkin carving contest is
at 8 p.m. and there will also
be a costume contest.
The 7th Annual Family
Fall Festival is 6-9 p.m.
Sunday at Christ Central
Church. The theme for the


festival is western round-
up. There will be a bounce
house, candy, entertainment,
hay rides and an entertain-
ment contest
Setting most Halloween
events on Saturday gives the
community an idea of when
to expect trick-or-treaters,
said Capt John Blanchard,
LCPD public information
officer. Parents can also
know what day is best to
take their children.
The annual Florida-
Georgia. game is also
Saturday, which presents an
increased risk of people driv-


ing impaired following gath-
erings where people watch
the game on TV, he said.
Children should wear reflec-
tive bright colors, have an
adult or guardian with them
and be aware of drivers if
going door-to-door.
There may be a few
stragglers trick-or-treating
on Sunday, Johnson said.
"The key is getting the
word out to the public and
stressing the importance of
Saturday," he said.
Staff writer Leanne Tyo
contributed information for
this article.


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PARTNERS: Farriers
Continued From Page 1A


and how it affects the horse
as far as fatigue goes."
Hunziker, who has been
working as a farrier for 12
years, said he was attend-
ing the CHA International
Convention to show CHA
members the benefit of
using a certified journey-
man-farrier.
'We're taught anatomy
and do things with vet-
erinarians," he said. "It's
all about the horse's foot
is what we're doing. It's
important to have a part-
nership with CHA to show
its members what a proper
shoeing job is."
Christy .Landwehr, CHA
chief executive officer, said
both organizations are simi-


lar in their goals.
"They certify farriers
much like we certify riding
instructors," she said.
The two groups created
a process in which a person
can prove they are trained
and have the knowledge
to be a farrier or riding
instructor, even though
they aren't required by law
to have certification.
"We partnered with each
other so whenever we go
to a conference anywhere
in the country, we always
call the American Farrier
Association and only have.
certified farriers come and
do the demonstrations for
us."


,onor


II'


Our



Heroes!


The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


rq'








ry
OE




m"


~1


actual size



Address:
Town: State: Zip:
Daytime Phone:
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: Dates Served:
Bring dis in or iend to: Lake City Reporter. 18 I IhonlSt Lke 0y 1. 32055,W 55-5+~ 0rorm e inlo.
Submissions must he revived by 3:30 pm, Monda Nov 8 2010.All photos aill be retnmed by including SASE ith our entry.


LUKAS: World's smartest horse
Continued From Page 1A


FACTORY SALE!


THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
OPEN Toll Free 1-800-524-2875
611 N. Main St. M-F 9:30-5:30 F M t RB
Gainesville SAT. 9:30-4:00


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427














OPINION


Sunday, October 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
0


THEIR
INION


Crack

down

on 'Dirty

Dancing'

t may be natural for teens
to rebel, but it is the
responsibility of adults to
set clear limits.
From the 1920s
Flappers on to punk rockers
in the '80s, every generation
of American young people has
found a way of rebelling that
makes their parents uncomfort-
able. And from the comfortable
distance of past decades, some
of those parents look a little silly
for objecting to what now seem
like tame expressions of indepen-
dence.
But that doesn't mean those
parents were wrong. Part of
the adults' job is to educate and
instruct young people about the
social norms of society, as they
have been passed on. The idea
that some of them may someday
be old-fashioned is not a reason
to let the kids do whatever they
feel like doing.
This is the issue faced by
school administrators who are
running into a style of dancing
called grinding, in which the stu-
dents rub up against each other,
simulating sex.
A number of school districts
around the country have taken
action, informing students that
they would be kicked out of this
year's homecoming dance for
inappropriate dancing. An over-
reaction? Put yourself in the posi-
tion of the administrators: This
touching would be a criminal
act if it was not consensual, and
a chaperone at a dance is in no
position to know who has given
what consent to whom. How are
they expected to keep children,
and teenagers are children, safe
in such an environment?
Not all teenage rebellion is
later considered innocent Few
would argue that the prevalence
of drug use and underage sex in
the' 60sand 70s were harmless.
Adults can't predict the future;
they can only pass on the com-
munity's values as they currently
understand them. The kids don't
have to like it, but the adults in
their lives have a responsibility
to keep them safe, and school
officials are justified in taking a
strong stance against grinding.
* Portland Press Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --"Newspapers-
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


The 'no name' night of terror


On March 14 and
15, 1993, a vicious
cyclonic storm
known variously as
"The 1993 Super
Storm," '"The Great Blizzard
of 1993," "The Storm of the
Century," or "The No Name
Storm" came ashore near
Pensacola and streaked up the
east coast to Canada, causing
some $11 billion in damage and
killing 300 people. One source
called it the "largest one-piece
storm in recorded history."
The storm clobbered our
area violently one dark night,
and these random, skip-around
shorthand quotations taken
from local public safety scan-
ners give you a sense of the
countywide destruction and
danger inflicted on our county,
and also the heroism of our peo-
ple who braved that dark night
to help those in need.

Wires down
'With all these wires down,
it's a dark, dangerous world
out here. ... We got a bunch of
power lines down just south
of Herlong Road. You guys be
careful.... Uh oh, we got a tree
across a power line on top of
a hose. ... That's a situation
77, those are cable wires, not
power lines.-... Are those other
power lines dead or alive? Alive.
ALIVE.... Electric service broke
loose from the house. There's
live wires all over their front
yard. They got a yard full of
trouble.
'Two miles south on 47, trees
fell on power lines, big trouble.
.... 25 A, just west of Bell Road,
trees are on the power lines....
This is Lake City Fire Control,
priority, we got a dangerous
situation here with this trans-
former. Now hear this. That
transformer is singing and
about to fall. That'll be major
trouble .... North of Register


Morris Williams
Phone: (386) 755-8183
williams_h2@fimrn.edu
372 W Duval St
Lake City, FL 32055

Road and north of Deep Creek.
There's 10 sections of power
lines down.
"Station 47 in Lulu, power is
being restored. Watch 6ut for
live wires. ... That trees gonna
fall any minute right into a nest
of wires. We need a little good
news here, fellers. ... It's a blue
trailer with a wire down and a
tree on top of it. Here at 90 and
75 across from Murray Road,
power lines across a house.

Fuel shortage
"We need fuel BAD for these
generators. ... Find any gas sta-
tion that's open. Check S and S
number 28. Call G. W. Hunter at
the gas plant. S and S number
28 definitely has fuel right there
by the high school. Just pay for
it and get a ticket. You can get
fuel at the S and S at 252 and
41 south.... Correction, gaso-
line only, gas only. No diesel.
There's a little Exxon station
there in Jasper you can get gas
at. Conserve fuel any way pos-
sible.,

Encouragement
"Hang in there, lady, we're
gonna get you some help out
there.... 'Preciate it, 'preciate
it. ... You'll be OK, we're gonna
whip this thing.... Try not to
worry.... Can y'all send some-
body, anybody? These people
need help. ... Delta, delta ...


Two miles south on 47, trees
fell on power lines, big trouble.
... Have you been advised? Is
that family aware?... We got to
help'em. ... Got to ... All county
volunteers, report to'your sta-
tion. ... Get out there and help
people. ... I think we're about
half way to getting this thing
under control.... I see some
daylight! Daylight! Thank you,
Lord!

Random reports
"Advise rescue they're not
gonna be able to get through
there. We got a tree across the
road here. Send for Parnell's
Wrecker service. Call Abe's
Wrecker Service. No, I'll take
that one. You stay close to
town.... Put another wrecker in
rotation.... Five Points. Lavada
Avenue. That's L-a-v-a-d-a.
There's a tree across the road.
... Fuel is low, low, low. Get it
anywhere you can find it. Just
pay for it and get a ticket ....
Contact Southern Bell and have
them drag a wire ....
"The Suwannee Valley Zoo
reports some fences down.
Be careful. They got lions and
tigers and bears out there.
Call the Game Commission....
The Fort White gym is open
for those who need it. ... If the
wind takes that fire toward the
woods, we got a peck of trouble.
... You know that report about
all those trees blocking'the
road? A citizen came by with
a chain saw and cleared every
one of 'em. ... The citizens are
all working together.... They're
saving the night."
And that's a concise reminder
of the way it was here the ter-
rible night "the no-name storm"
hit us, and we all rose up
together and survived it.

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and longtime Columbia
County resident.


OTHER OPINION

Stock up now on bandages, aspirin


Sometime in the next
two months, the run
on Band Aids, ant-
acids, pain relievers
and humidifiers will
begin as millions of Americans
with tax-free flexible spend-
ing accounts for.health care
expenses try to spend what's
left in their accounts before they
forfeit the money. But thanks to
the health care reform act, this
is the last time account holders
will make an end-of-the year
rush for over-the-counter medi-
cal supplies.
Beginning January 1, such
purchases can't be made with
money from flexible spending
accounts money deducted by
employers free of both income
and payroll taxes unless they
were prescribed by a doctor.
That's an overdue and needed


change. The "use it or lose it
rule" forces people to stockpile
bandages for cuts they'll never
get, hoard medications that will
slowly lose their effectiveness
and otherwise spend needlessly
for health care.
Flexible spending accounts
have always provided the big-
gest tax break to the people who
need it the least: workers in the
highest tax bracket.
A worker in the 15 percent tax
bracket who puts aside $3,000
in an account, saves $450, but a
worker in the 35 percent brack-
et who does the same saves
$1,050. That's reason enough to
redesign the benefit.
Worse, low-income work-
ers actually lose money in the
long run: By diverting some
earnings to a flexible spend-
ing account they permanently


reduce their Social Security
benefits.
The new rules will, of
course, force consumers to be
savvier about how they use
their money or risk losing it.
Already, many workers forfeit
unspent money in their flexible
savings accounts.
The changes are estimated
to save the Treasury $13 bil-
lion over the next decade.
That's not a whopping sum,
but savings will also come
from not subsidizing unneces-
sary or ineffectual medical
care.
The new rules are a smarter
approach, but the changes
mean that account holders will
need to plan for future health
care expenses more carefully
or lose money.
* The Concord (Neb.) Monitor


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com


It's one


wacky


election


season

Hang in there, folks.
It's almost over.
One of our most.
zany, interesting,
frustrating, expen-
sive and unpredictable election
seasons ever is about to end.
Here's my take on some of
its perplexing, ridiculous and
astonishing highlights and
lowlights.
As the windup to the Big
Event begins, a group nam-
ing itself Latinos for Reform
is urging Nevadans NOT to
vote November 2. It argues
President Obama and
Democrats promised immi-
gration reform and failed to
deliver so Hispanics should
stay home.
It turns out the organizer
was once a paid employee of
the Republican Party; many
politicos suspect the just-stay-
home campaign was designed
to help Tea Partier Sharron
Angle, fighting for Harry
Reid's seat.
New York is having a race
for governor made.for the tab-
loids. GOP gubernatorial can-
didate Carl Paladino refuses to
talk about issues, fights with
reporters and seems obsessed
with speculating about whom
Democrat Andrew Cuomo
sleeps with. Oh yes, there's
also a candidate who says she
supplied prostitutes for former
governor Eliot Spitzer. New
Yorkers have a lot to ponder.
Kentuckians have their own
dilemma. Tea Partier Rand
Paul, tired of explaining why
he has trouble with civil rights
legislation and what he really
thought about organized reli-
gion decades ago, is defend-
ing himself from the strange
accusation that while in college
he and friends made a woman
kneel on a creek bank to wor-
ship "Aqua Buddha."
This is a tough year for
journalists. Alaskan Joe Miller,
Palin-endorsed for the Senate,
says he now refuses to answer
reporters' questions. His
guards handcuffed one pesky
journalist. Another Palin pro-
tege, Reid nemesis Sharron
Angle, dodges the media but
told Hispanic children that
some of them looked Asian
to her. In Arizona, GOP Gov.
Jan Brewer, mightily trying to
rid her state of undocumented
immigrants, says she sees no
need to answer more ques-
tions.
If this becomes a trend, we
will not have to work at ques-
tioning candidates at length
on issues, their promises or
conflicts in past and present
positions. We'll simply assess
them based on what we know
about their sexual habits, how
seriously they take their reli-
gion, if any, what their spouses
look like, etc.
The latest polls indicate
Democrats have a dramatic
"enthusiasm" gap about their
candidates compared with
Republicans, who appear far
more eager to vote. Somehow,
that's not surprising although
it's difficult not to worry
about people who can't wait
to put the likes of Christine
O'Donnell and Angle into posi-
tions of authority over the rest
of us.
Somehow, together, we'll get
through this.
Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Obama rejects


repeal of Wall


Street overhaul


By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
says consumers would lose
if Republicans regain power
in Congress and try to roll
back his hard-won Wall
Street overhaul.
He says the GOP's prom-
ised repeal of the law would
mean the return of a finan-
cial system whose near-col-
lapse led to the worst reces-
sion since the Depression.
"Without sound over-
sight and commonsense
protections for consumers,
the whole economy is put
in jeopardy," Obama said
Saturday in his weekly
radio and Internet address.
"That doesn't serve Main
Street. That doesn't serve
Wall Street. That doesn't
serve anyone."
The law passed despite
nearly unanimous
Republican opposition. It
sought to rein in a financial
system that had sped ahead
of outdated rules, allowing
banks, traders and others
to take increased risks.
Separate legislation tack-


led bank overdraft fees and
abuses such as retroactive
interest rate increases on
credit card balances.
The financial overhaul
law came in the wake of
a $700 billion bank rescue
passed in the final months
of George W. Bush's presi-
dency.
While the bailout is cred-
ited with providing stability,
it's deeply unpopular with
voters angry of taxpayer
money being used to help
prop up huge banks.
Obama promised that the
measure ensures that tax-
payers will "never again be
on the hook for a bailout."
Obama's address came
less than two weeks
before elections in which
Republicans have a good
chance of taking over the
House, if not the Senate.
The financial regulation
measure hasn't been a cen-
tral campaign issue.
House GOP leader John
Boehner of Ohio has called
for a repeal, as have top
Senate Republicans. But
Obama still would stand in
the way through his veto
power.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama speaks at a rally for Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev) at Orr Middle School in
Las Vegas, Friday.



Suicide attackers

assault UN office

in Afghanistan


By DEB RIECHMANN
Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
A suicide car bomber and
three armed militants wear-
ing explosives vests and
dressed as women attacked
a United Nations com-
pound Saturday in western
Afghanistan, but Afghan.
security forces killed the
attackers and no U.N.
employees were harmed,
officials said.
The brazen attack began
when four militants drove
up to the U.N. compound in
a car laden with explosives
and fired a rocket toward
the entrance, said Dilawar
Shah Dilawar, deputy police
chief of Herat province. .
The militants tried unsuc-
cessfully to blow up the
gate with the rocket so they
could drive the car inside the
compound, he said. When
that didn't work, three of
the militants got out of the
car and the fourth blew up
the vehicle, killing himself.
The explosion destroyed the
gate, allowing the three to
get inside.
"The three attackers were
wearing police uniforms cov-
ered with burqas," Dilawar
said, referring to the long,
flowing garment that many
Afghan women wear in pub-
lic. "All of them had suicide
vests and AK-47s."
Militants sometimes wear
burqas or police uniforms
as a disguise. The Interior
Ministry denied the attack-
ers were wearing police uni-
forms.
Guards at the U.N. com-
pound and Afghan police-
men who responded to the
site engaged in sporadic
gun fights with the three


attackers, who were killed
by Afghan security forces.
NATO forces also respond-
ed, a statement by the U.N.
said. Two Afghan guards
were wounded.
"The attack did not disrupt
the United Nations activi-
ties and no United Nations
personnel was injured," the
statement said. It said the
U.N. will continue its work
in Herat
U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon condemned
the assault, and said the
United Nations is conduct-
ing a full investigation, a
spokesperson for Ban said
in a separate statement
In October 2009, Taliban
militants attacked a guest-
house used by United
Nations workers in central
Kabul. Eight people were
killed, including five for-
eigners.


-il



ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 4, 2007, file photo, Abu Abdullah (right), a shop owner who lost two of his sons in a bomb explosion, cries
alongside a friend while standing in the debris of what used to be his shop in the obliterated Sadriyah outdoor market in a
predominantly Shiite area of Baghdad, Iraq. Military documents in the biggest leak of secret information in U.S. history sug-
gest that far more Iraqis died than previously acknowledged during the years of sectarian bloodletting and criminal violence
unleashed by the 2003 U.S.-led invasion.


Leaked Iraq war files portray


irresolute, divided America


By ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security Writer
WASHINGTON The
enormous cache of secret
war logs disclosed by
the WikiLeaks website
paints a picture of an Iraq
burdened by persistent
sectarian tension and
meddling neighbors, sug-
gesting that the country
could drift into chaos once
U.S. forces leave.
The reports, cover-
ing early 2004 to Jan. 1,
2010, help explain why
Iraq's struggle to create
a unified, independent
state continues, despite a
dramatic reduction in vio-
lence. They appear to sup-
port arguments by some
experts that the U.S.
should keep thousands of
troops there beyond their
scheduled departure in
2011, to buy more time for
Iraq to become stable.
The threats described
in the leaked documents
come from outside,
including next-door Iran,
as well as inside, in the
form of sectarian, political
and even family rivalries
that predate the 2003
American-led invasion and
endure today.
The reports demon-
strate the weakness of
Iraq's civic institutions,
cotirt system and military,
even before sectarian
violence exploded in 2006-
2007.
In the fall of 2005, the
U.S. military discovered
evidence of plots to assas-
sinate various officials,
including an Iraqi Army
colonel. In September,
one of the war logs said,
a group of judges was
abducted in Balad, beaten
and forced into the trunk
of a car.
Another example:
On June 6, 2006, U.S.
forces reported discov-
ering large amounts
of blood on the floor, a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 12, 2007 file. photo, Iraqis grieve amid the
rubble after a double car bomb attack in central Baghdad,
Iraq. Military documents in the biggest leak of secret infor-.
mation in U.S. history suggest that far more Iraqis died
than previously acknowledged and indicated that the coun-
try could drift into chaos once U.S. forces leave.


rubber hose and electric
wires rigged to a metal
door in a holding cell in
an Iraqi police station in
Husaybah, in western
Iraq.
The report called the
discoveries "evidence
of unchecked torture"
and "clear indications" of
human rights violations.
The U.S. report said
that for a time, U.S. mili-
tary advisers slept in the
police station to make
sure prisoners were not
abused, checked arrest
logs and counseled Iraqi
police, warning them
against these practices.
But even a program
of training and counsel-
ing didn't put an end to
the abuses. According
to a report dated Feb.
16, 2009, U.S. forces
reported the mistreat-
ment of 33 detainees
in custody at the same


police station.
The Associated Press
was given access to a
redacted WikiLeaks
database hours before its
general release Friday,
but was not provided the
raw data. The documents
appear to be authentic,
but their origin could not
be confirmed indepen-
dently.
The leaked war logs
reflect significant prog-
ress as well. There has


been a dramatic improve-
ment in security since the
height of the violence in
2006-07, due to a weak-
ened threat from al-Qaida
and an Iraqi population
weary of the sectarian-
bloodletting that once
threatened to plunge the
country into civil war.
Even so, some experts
question whether the
fledgling military and
police forces are capable
of defending Iraq after
Washington completes its
scheduled pullout Dec. 31,
2011.
Those who hold these
pessimistic views also
worry Iraq could repeat
its history of turning to
a military dictator in the
mold of Saddam Hussein.
Ryan Crocker, ambas-
sador to Iraq in 2007-08,
said Washington has
decided to turn the page
on Iraq but must not close
the book.
"We're still very much
at the beginning of this
story, or more to the
point, the Iraqis are at the
beginning of their new
narrative in their history,
and for all of the extraor-
dinary achievements that
we've seen, the list of
challenges is even great-
er," he said Friday.


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^AS3ENDENTA GROU


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


,**
>-.




k
i








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Corrimunity
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Blood donor tickets
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers is giving
away free movies tickets
to all blood donors 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. today. Donors
must donate at the donor
center located just south
of Bascom Norris Road on
State Road 47. Movie tick-
ets are while supplies last.
Donor must weigh at least
110 pounds and be a mini-
mum of 16-years-old (with
parent permission).

Local Authors Book Fair
A local authors book fair
is 2 to 4 p.m. today at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch. The
event is sponsored by the
Friends of the Library as
part of National Friends
of Libraries Week. The
fair will feature 13 local
authors each with a table
set up to sell their books.

Phenomenal women
program*
Gold Standard Chapter
No. 48 Order of the
Eastern Star is host-
ing the Phenomenal
Women's Program,
"Celebrating Trailblazers
and Trendsetters within
Our Community" at 4
p.m. today at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 505 NE MLK St.

L day
Yard Sale
The Shands Lakeshore
Regional Medical Center
Auxiliary, Inc. is holding
a yard sale at the hospital
on Monday. The proceeds
will be matched by the
Auxiliary and will go
toward scholarships for
the staff who wish to study
for advanced degrees.

Early voting
Early voting for the 2010
general election is 8:30 -
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-
Saturday through Oct.
30. Early voting locations
are at the Supervisor of
Elections Lake City office,
971 W. Duval St. and the
Fort White Community
Center, 17579 SW SR 47.
Voters need to bring a pic-
ture and signature I.D.


COURTESY PHOTO

Magnolia Fest rocks at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
More than 40,000 people attended the Magnolia Fest, a weekend music festival at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live
Oak. The festival concluded on Saturday night.


1469 for more information
about classes.

Bookfair and more
Family Reading Night
and Book Fair is 6 to 8
p.m. Tuesday at Covenant
Community School. The
theme is around the
world, and classrooms will
represent the different
continents. Characters will
be available for pictures.
Bring a book, take a book
or book exchange. Diop
off of old books is 6 to 7
p.m. Pick up of new books
'is 7 to 8 p.m. The school is
located at 2019 SW Main
Boulevard.

Wednesday


Flu vaccine and shots Habitat for Humanity


The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Photography workshop
A digital photography
workshop is 10 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 2 to 4:30
p.m. Monday and Nov. 1 at
Stephen Foster State Park.
These Monday workshops
teach participants how to
plan good photography,
create photographic com-
position, and the shooting
effects of both color and
black & white. Presented
by Don Williams, the
workshop fee is $25 and
includes park admission.
Call (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org. To learn more
about the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks. org/ste-
phenfoster

Tuesday
Square dance lessons
Square dancing is
fun and great exercise.
Classes start at 6:45 p.m.
Tuesday at Teen Town
on DeSota St. across
from Young Park. First
two classes are free. Call
Ouida Taylor at (386) 752-


needs help
Morning construction
volunteers are needed
from 8 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 971 NE Dyson
Terrace. E-mail terry@
hfhlakecity.org or call
Sheila at (386) 590-0766.
Regular meetings are 7
p.m. the first Tuesday of
each month at the Lake
City Medical Center.

Quilt guild meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold its
monthly meeting at 9:30
p.m. Wednesday at Teen
Town 533 NW Desoto
St. The program will fea-
ture the famous Chinese
Auction, where members
exchange a one-yard piece


of fabric, while playing a
game. Contact President
Ramona Dewees at (386)
496-3876.

Basic Scarf Knitting
Workshop
A basic scarf knitting
workshop is Wednesday
at the Stephen Foster
Folk Cultural Center State
Park. The cost is $15. It
will teach the basics of
knitting a simple scarf
using fun fur and worsted
yarn. Class is limited to six
people. Call (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.

Thursday
Fair contests
Entry deadlines for bak-
ing goods are 2 to 6 p.m.
Thursday for the 56th
Annual Columbia County
Fair Contests. For rules
visit www.columbiacounty-
fairorg. All highest placing
entries will receive mon-
etary awards and ribbons.
Call 752-8822.

9-12 Project meeting
The next 9-12 meeting is
at 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Taylor Building. Speakers
include: Terry Rauch
discussing amendments
on the Florida ballot; Rep.
Debbie Boyd, incumbent
candidate for District 11
State Representative seat;
and Marc Kazmierski and
Rusty DePratter, candi-
dates for the Columbia
County Commission


T." w



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District 2. Information
on the upcoming "Get
Out the Vote" Motorcade
Rally will also be available.
Call John, (386) 935-1705,
Sharon, (386) 935-0821 or
visit www.northcentralflori-
da912project. org.

Medicaid workshop
A workshop on
Medicaid planning, "Myths
and Opportunities," is
10 a.m. Thursday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The workshop is
presented by Teresa B.
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center. Call Cheryl at
(386) 755-1977.

Livestock
announcements
The mandatory End
Weigh-Ins for Steer,
Swine, Beef Heifer and
Meat Goat is 3 to 8 p.m.
Thursday and the Record
book deadline is one hour
following close of scales.

Friday
Halloween Dance
Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities Inc. is
having a Hallqween Dance
from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday.


Dance to music by Dean
Blackwell. Costumes are
optional. Tickets are $5. A
provider/guardian must
accompany an adult if.
assistance or supervision
is needed. There is no
charge for a provider/
guardian. Call 752-1880
ext. 103 or 104.

Petting Zoo
Skunkie Acres Inc.
petting zoo will be at
Rountree-Moore Toyota
and Scion Halloween
Festival 2 to 6 p.m. Friday.
See rescue animals at
the event, which will also
include food, pumpkin dec-
orating, balloons, prizes
and more.

Trunk or Treat
Finally Friday featuring


Trunk or Treat is at 6:30
p.m. in Olustee Park. It
will feature free candy, a
costume contest and more.
The movie is Scooby Doo.
The event is hosted by
the Lake City- Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce and sponsored
by LifeSouth Community
Blood Center.

Humane Asylum
The Lake City Humane
Society and Rountree-
Moore Auto Group pres-
ents the Humane Asylum
6 to 10 p.m. at the Lake
City Mall. The event is
every Friday and Saturday.
Tickets are $10 at the door
and $5 for veterans, active
duty military, law enforce-
ment and fire personnel
with ID. Children 13 and
younger must be accom-
panied by an adult. All
proceeds benefit homeless
animals.

Search for Blackbeard's
Ghost
A haunted trail thru
a woodland forest is 8
to 10:30 p.m. Friday to
Saturday. Admission is
. $2 and all proceeds go
to The Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation. Location is
1 mile south of the Fort
White light on State Rd 47.
Sodas, snacks and other
treasures will also be avail-
able.

Saturday
Planting and
Propagating Workshop
A planting a propagating
workshop is 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday at the Stephen
Foster Folk Cultural
Center State Park. The
cost is $25. Participants
will learn about sowing
seeds, transplanting bare
root plants, transplanting
plugs, working with cut-
tings, and see a demon-
stration of layering and
dividing plants. Call (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.

Halloween Bash
MOMS Club of Lake
City, Florida is sponsor-
ing the Second Annual
Halloween Bash from 3 to
6 p.m. Oct 30 at the Lake
City Mall. The event will
immediately precede the
traditional store trick-or-
treating event A costume
contest is at 4 p.m.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


-
f


le,
eliz.acth "Kathy"
Newman, ARNP









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE & NATION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Coast Guard checks on discolored water near La.


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS The
Coast Guard said Saturday
that an area of discolored
water near a Mississippi
River' pass south of New
Orleans appears to be an
algae bloom, but another
spot 10 miles away could
be oil.
Jeff Hall, spokesman for
the Unified Area Command,
said tests could determine
if the suspected oil is from
the BP spill.
The Coast Guard sent
two flights over the West
Bay area near Venice on
Saturday. Two boats also
went out to check the
waters.
Hall told The Associated
Press that tests will be done
Monday on water. sam-
ples from an area where
a marine investigator
believes there's an algae
bloom near Venice. The
area of discolored water
there was about 2.5 miles
long and 300 yards wide,
Hall said.
About 10 miles away,
Hall said .a crew spotted
what appears "some kind
of silvery, weathered oil."
The crew in that area didn't
have a sampling kit but


L t,,- ... . "


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Friday photo, boats (at top) travel through an area of brown or dark red water that was spotted in West Bay just west of
the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River near New Orleans, as Southwest Pass is seen at top left. Coast Guard crews are
checking the area to see whether it's oil or an algae bloom.


investigators could go back
out and take samples that
could be tested to deter-
mine whether it's oil from
the Deepwater Horizon
spill, he said.


Six months after the spill
started, the federal govern-
ment maintains much of
the oil is now gone from
the Gulf. But independent
researchers say they are


discovering significant
amounts, of crude below
the sea's surface, including
on the ocean floor. They
fear the oil that remains
could harm species lower


,down the food chain.
The Times-Picayune
reported in its Saturday
editions that fishermen
on Friday spotted what
appeared to be miles-long


strings of weathered oil,
and a photojournalist with
the newspaper captured
the images in a flight over
the water.
Hall said the material
discovered Saturday that
appears to be weathered oil
is "away from where those
photographs were taken."
The Deepwater Horizon
rig exploded April 20, kill-
ing 11 people.
About 172 million gal-
lons of oil spilled into the
Gulf before the well was
initially plugged July 15.
,It was permanently sealed
Sept. 19.
Robert Barham, sec-
retary of the Louisiana
Department of Wildlife and
Fisheries, told the Times-
Picayune that if oil is con-
firmed by his agency, the
area will be closed again to
fishing.
The Mississippi River
delta is a primary winter-
ing ground for hundreds
of thousands of ducks
and geese, some of which
already have begun arriv-
ing. The West Bay area
leads into several shallow-
er interior bays that attract
ducks, geese and myriad
species of shore and wad-
ing birds each winter..


Frustration with GOP leader despite expected gains


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele
speaks to supporters during a Republican National.
Committee rally in Orlando Saturday.









To?


By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON In the
mostfavorablepolitical envi-
ronment for Republicans in
decades, GOP chairman
Michael Steele ordinar-
ily might be lavished with
praise for leading his party
to the brink of a historic
triumph.
Instead, he heads an orga-
nizationthattrailsDemocrats
by $15 million in fundraising,
is in debt and largely has
been overshadowed by third-
party groups that, in a few
months, have raised almost
as much as Republican
National Committee has,
since January 2009.
Frustration with the
chairman is evident in some
states.
In Ohio, where the gov-
ernor's race is in doubt
and Republicans are chal-
lenging some Democratic
House members, party
chairman Kevin DeWine
recently wrote Steele that
the $566,900 the RNC had
transferred to date "simply
pales in comparison" with
2004, 2006 and 2008.
DeWine begged Steele on
Oct. 11 for the full amount


of $1 million-plus and then
another "emergency appeal"
of a million on top of that
The RNC this past week
sent $284,400 to Ohio as
part of a round of $2.8 mil-
lion to states.
Steele's gaffes and mis-
steps have clouded his
nearly two-year tenure. In
the past few weeks, he has
been content to steer clear
of the nation's capital, mak-
ing a 48-state tour to help
,GOP candidates. He was in
New Hampshire on Friday
and joined Sarah Palin at
a Florida rally Saturday,
where he praised tea party
supporters as a group that
"restored our faith in the
Constitution."
If Republicans make
major gains on Nov. 2, Steele


certainly would claim part
of the credit as he consid-
ers whether t6 seek another
term at chairman.
"Whether or not I run for
a second term has nothing
to do with winning on Nov.
2, it has absolutely nothing to
do with that," Steele told The
Associated Press in an inter-
view Friday in Concord, N.H.
The RNC has raised more
than $79 million this year
and has spent all of it and
then some. The RNC ended
September with about $3.4
million in cash on hand and
$4.6 million in debt The RNC
also took out a $2.5 million
loan in September.
Steele had started the job
with a $23 million surplus.
That money is long gone
Still, he may receive favor-


able reviews from the 168-
member central party, in
part because of his spend-
ing. Steele has doled out
cash to some state parties.
He's paid the salaries of
more than 350 operatives
beyond Washington. He's
sent money to places that
typically don't benefit from
the party's donors, such as
Democratic-leaning Illinois.
That has left Steele with
plenty of good will from state
leaders.
"It's days to the election.
Of course the vast inajority of
funds have been spehit," said
California Republican Party-
Chairman Ron Nehring,
who has 10 staffers on the
RNC's dime. "And I think
we're on the verge of a fan-
tastic national victory."


"Election 2010: America's Christian Heritage", Wednesday, October 27 6:15 p.m.

First United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City

Don't miss Dr. Tackett explaining America's only hope of survival. Fc *
_,_FAMILY


Ig$/ rThe-staff at the Lake City Reporter would like
to Salute the Strength and Courage of breast

r cancer survivors and to remember those whose
ber is Natinal Breast ane battle has ended.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.


Laura Hunter
Breast cancer survivor

You are

our hero!
We love you,
Barbara, Bonnie,
Cherl I and Jan


I


Essie P. Wilson
Breast cancer
survivor for 10 years!
To God be the Glory!
Love always,
Brenda & Brother & Sisters


In remembrance of
Paula Aymond.
We miss you very much.
Someday we shall
see you again in heaven.
Gone but not forgotten.
From your loving family
Ed, Cassandra, Joshua,
Samuel and Joseph Aymond


Leona Harden
Breast cancer
survivor
for 47 years!
The Greatest Mother,
Grandmother and Great
Grandmother
We all love you!
Your Family


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE & NATION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


THE WEATHER
,, ., t.. .


PARTLY i T-STORMS;:, ISOLATED 1 ISOLATED SHOWERS
CLOUDY ,T-STORMS 'T-STORMS



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NATIONAL FORECAST: Very windy conditions and rain will be likely across much of the Pacific
Northwest and Intermountain West today as a powerful upper-level disturbance moves inland.
Snow will also be likely at higher elevations with this system. Showers and thunderstorms
can also be expected from the Upper Midwest to the mid-Mississippi Valley and the Deep
South.


Valdosta
86. 62 Jacksonville
Tallahassee Lake CitMy, c'
-41 r,3 ,7 62
* Gainesville Daytona Beach
Panama Cith e


8/ 68O ucala
88/63


Tampa ,
88/68


*
FL Myer
88/70


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville


0 Jacksonville
4 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveralake City
88/66 84/72 MiLae City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
85/77 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
s 85/78 0 Pensacola
Napes Tallahassee
88/72 Miami Tampa


t 86/77 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
/.86/789


Monday Tuesday
13 : 2 p.: .5. 73 in
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$t. T6 I $6 ;7 [p,:
.S' 71 9 13 p.:
i~. .. I t., 73. p,
83/70/t 54 171 p.:
84/77/t -1 75 1
84/66/t ?7 66 p.: -
. 86/77/t ., p.:
90/73/t pic
87/67/t 8, ., p,:
89/70/t 88/72/sh
82/72/t 82/71/pc
82/72/t 82/73/pc
85/68/t 86/69/pc
88/70/t 89/72/pc0
85/65/t 88/67/t
84/78/t 84/78/pc
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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


High: 900, Mcallen, Texas Low: 220, Stanley, Idaho


Saturday Today


Saturday Today


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday 87
Low Saturday 50


Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday .
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


791
57
90 in 1927,
42 in 2006


0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.94"
43.07"


,i
SUN 7
Sunrise today 7:39 a.m. ".
Sunset today 6:50 p.m. '
Sunrise tom. 7:39 a.m. HIMt
Sunset tomrn. 6:49 p.m. 15imetestolbumn
| Today'S O
MOON ullra-olef
Moonrise today 7:45 p.m. radlidiion ris
Moonset today 9:07 a.m. f|r ir e area or, -
Moonrise tom. 8:33 p.m. fo 10a i Iri'
Moonset tom. 10:06 a.m. i .

S .,.. -


Nov. Nov. Nov.
6 13 21
New First Full


I
WE,


--._ Forecasts, da
S" Ics 2010 W
LLC, Madison,
S www.weatherp


CITY
Albany NY
S Albuquerque
Anchorage
~ Atlanta
,. Baltimore
Billings
* Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
ather.com Cleveland
Cilumbla SC
ta and graph- Dallas
Weather Central Daytona Beach
I,. WDenver


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publisher.com


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Saturday Saturdaaturday Today Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Acapulco 88/79/.02 87/78/pc La Paz 61/39/0 63/39/c Rio 81/70/0 79/70/sh
Amsterdam 50/41/.01 51/44/sh Uma 66/61/0 68/59/pc. Rome 68/46/0 69/55/sh
Athens 64/54/0 71/55/s London 54/48/.23 49/35/s St. Thomas VI 87/77/0 .'86/77/t
Auckland 63/50/0 67/55/c Madrid 68/45/0 68/40/s San Juan PR 87/78/.01 ,87/78/t
Beljing 61/55/.01 57/39/sh Mexico City 79/46/0 80/49/pc Santiago 70/50/0 74/46/s
Berlin 52/36/0 51/43/sh Montreal 46/30/0 41/36/sh Seoul 68/54/0 72/52/pc
Buenos Aires 68/39/0 72/49/s Moscow 43/36/.03 46/31/s Singapore 91/77/.74 90/80/t
Cairo 82/70/0 83/65/s Nairobi 79/45/0 79/61/t Sydney 86/57/0 64/58/r
Geneva 61/46/0 50/41/r Nassau 88/79/0 86/77/t Tel Aviv 82/72/0 83/68/s
Havana 88/72/0 87/70/t New Delhi 70/70/0 87/63/s Tokyo 68/57/0 68/62/c
Helsinki 45, 28 0 43/39/pc Oslo 32/19/0 40/33/c Toronto 57/45/0 64/57/sh
Hong-Kong, 2 1'2 75 i0 84/75/s Panam 84/75/.73 ,.\ 85/77/t Vienna 48/34/0 57/44/c
Kingston B. ;'. 10 85/77/t Paris 52/32/.02 52/39/pc Warsaw 55/37/0 57/38/pc
KEY TO CONDITONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f=-air, fg-fog, h-hazy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w-windy.


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83, 69


HI/Lo/W CITY


HI/Lo/Pcp.
55/38/0
61/44/0
38/29/0
78/49/0
69/35/0
61/45/0
83/53/0
53/35/0
56/49/0
58/40/0
60/44/0
76/46/0
78/35/0
73/36/0
53/43/.10
65/54/.08
78/38/0
63/49/0
77/38/0
75/61/.68
84/59/0
58/41/0


HI/Lo/W
59/46/sh
66/40/pc
41/35/pc
77/61/pc
73/57/pc
64/42/pc
83/67/pc
57/40/pc
54/38/r
60/52/c
67/59/pc
79/66/pc
79/58/pc
77/56/pc
58/44/pc
73/62/t
77/59/pc
72/59/c
81/61/pc
85/62/t
85/68/pc
69/43/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
72/60/.35
65/46/0
70/52/0
26/13/0
73/39/0
63/36/0
83/72/0
86/67/0
73/49/0'
85/51/0
82/52/0
76/61/.20
68/57/0
83/59/0
67/60/.01
81/64/0
85/78/0
65/52/0
.82/55/0
83/59/0
64/44/0
70/60/.04


66/52/t
69/57/c
76/48/s
24/7/pc
77/57/s
66/50/pc
86/72/pc
85/70/pc
73/60/6'
84/66/t
82/67/pc
73/54/c
74/61/pc
81/63/t
67/59/c
83/66/t
86/77/t
61/48/sh
83/68/t
84/70/t
71/55/pc
78/52/pc


Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
75/60/0
86/63/0
68/41/0
75/58/0
70/37/0 .
53/31/.01
57/52/.01
73/39/0
.52/46/.10
58/48/0
72/37/0
62/54/0
84/67/0
56/50/.12
83/66/.06
66/63/.01
68/57/.03
57/49/.06
47/42/.16
87/66/0
71/52/0
70/42/0


HI/Lo/W
69/49/c
88/66/pc
72/55/pc
82/61/pc
73/55/pc
51/44/c
57/51/r
77/58/s
63/44/pc
65/37/r
76/56/s
64/51/r
76/63/t
67/35/r
89/69/pc
68/62/pc
61/55/r
54/50/r
51/38/r
88/68/pc
79/57/pc
74/55/pc


$


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


.. ... ... .. .'

Oss
.?". . '. .. = ._,- ,


242









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Sunday, October 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Tournament


time


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High volleyball team members are (front row, from left) Ashleigh Bridges,
Jessie Bates, Anne Milton, Kelbie Ronsonet, Lauren Eaker and Hollianne Dohrn. Back row
(from left) are coach Rebecca Golden, Beth Williams, Taylor Owens, Simone Williamson,
Taylor Messer, Haley Dicks, Arden Sibbernsen and head coach Casie McCallister.

Lady Tigers face Middleburg


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It was a season filled with
highs and lows for the Lady
Tigers volleyball team, but


they hope to end it on a
high at the District 4-5A
tournament
Columbia High will open
the tournament against No.
4 seed Middleburg High at


5 p.m. Tuesday at Ridgeview
High in Orange Park. Ift's a
rematch from a three-set
loss to the Lady Broncos
CHS continued on 2B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2010 Columbia High girls golf team are*Ashley Mixon (from left), Brandy
Springer, Darian Ste-Marie, Shelby Camp, Brittany Boris and coach Candace Christie.

Golfers bound for region


CHS girls team,
Soucinek, Jones
tee it up Tuesday.
From staff reports

Columbia High's girls
golf team is returning
to region for the second
year in a row. The Region
1-2A meet begins at


8 a.m. Tuesday at the Golf
Club at Summerbrooke in
Tallahassbe.
The Lady Tigers quali-
fied with a second-place
finish at the district tour-
nament and must finish in
the top three to advance
to state. They were one
spot short in 2009 with the
same line-up.
Senior Brittany Boris


is captain and coming off
an 87 at district. She had
a season average of 42.5
and placed in the top 12 at
region last year.
Junior Darian Ste-Marie
led CHS with an season
average of 40, and also
placed in the top 12. Ste-
Marie qualified for region
GOLF continued on 2B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
The Lady Indians pose in the pink uniforms they wore for the 'Dig Pink' match Friday.

Fort White seeks return to state
By TIM KIRBY is back knocking on the Williston High in the
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com district door with a trip to opening round of the
the state playoffs waiting on District 2-2B tournament
FORT WHITE Fort the other side.
White High volleyball The Lady Indians play INDIANS continued on 2B


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup Series,
Turns Fast Relief 500, at Martinsville,Va.
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Castello
Masters, final round, at Castellon, Spain
Noon
TGC LPGA Malaysia, final round, at
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville
Open, final round, at PonteVedra Beach
5 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Shriners Hospitals
for Children Open, final round, at Las
Vegas
8:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Administaff
Small Business Classic, final round, at The
Woodlands,Texas (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game 7, San
Francisco at Philadelphia (if necessary)
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
'CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC Minnesota at Green Bay
RODEO
4 p.m.
NBC PBR,World Finals, final round,
at Las Vegas (same-day tape)

Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN N.Y. Giants at Dallas
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Los Angeles at Minnesota

BASEBALL

AL Championship Series

NewYork vs.Texas
NewYork 6,Texas 5
Texas 7, New York 2
Texas 8, New York 0
Texas 10, New York 3
NewYork 7.Texas 2
Texas 6, NewYork I ,Texas wins series,
4-2

NL Championship Series

San Francisco vs. Philadelphia
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3
Philadelphia 6, San Francisco I
San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 0
San Francisco 6, Philadelphia 5
Philadelphia 4, San Francisco 2
Saturday
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
Today
San Francisco (Cain 13-1 I) at
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-1 I), 7:57 p.m., if
necessary

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


N.Y
New
Miar
Buff


Hou
Indi:
Teni
Jack


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF I
Jets 5 I 0.833 159 I
w England 4 I 0.800154 I
mi 3 2 0.600 89 I
alo 0 5 0.000 87 1
South
W L TPct PF I
uston 4 2 0.667 153. 1
anapolis 4 2 0.667 163 1
nessee 4 2 0.667 162
sonville 3 3 0.500 110 i
North


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Kansas City
Oakland
Denver
San Diego


W L
4 I
4 2
2 3
I 5
West
W L
3 2
2 4
2 4
2 4


PA
01
16
12
61

PA
67
25
98
67


T Pct PF PA
0.800 114 60
0.667 112 95
0.400 100 102
0.167 88 125

T Pct PF PA
0.600108 92
0.333 120 151
0.333 124 140
0.333 157 126


GOLF

Continued From Page 1B

in the individual field as a
freshman.
SophomoreAshley Mixon
(season average 51.3)
and junior Shelby Camp
(average 54.5) round out
the CHS foursome. Junior
Brandy Springer also is on
the team.
Columbia shot 428 in
district at Panama Country
Club (Lynn Haven) and lost
to Chiles High (390). Leon
High also qualified from
District 2.
In District 3, Stanton
Prep (386), Fletcher (400)
and Mandarin (443) high
schools qualified.
In District 1, the quali-
fying high schools were
Niceville (330), Fort Walton
Beach (341) and Gulf
Breezes (346).
Columbia boys Dean
Soucinek and Nick Jones
qualified for region in
the individual field and will
play Tuesday at Panama
Country Club.


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas


Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Arizona
Seattle
St Louis
San Francisco


East
W L
4 2
4 2
3 3
1 4
South
W L
4 2
4 2
3 2
0 5
North
W L
4 2
3 3
2 3
I 5
West
W L
3 2
3 2
3 3
I 5


T.Pct PF PA
0.667 134 118
0.667 153 120
0.500 113 119
0.200 102 III

TPct PF PA
0.667 130 101
0.667 130 108
0.600 80 111
0.000 52 110

TPct PF PA
0.667112 97
0.500 139 112
0.400 87 88
0.167 146 140

TPct PF PA
0.600 88 138
0.600 98 97
0.500 103 113
0.167 93 139


Today's Games
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m.
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Tennessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:.15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit,
Houston
Sunday, Oct. 31
Denyer vs. San Francisco at London,
I p.m.
Washington at Detroit, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, I p.m.
Miami at Ccinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Dallas, I p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. I
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: N.Y. Giants, Philadelphia,
Chicago,Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland

College scores

Saturday
EAST
Maryland 24, Boston College 21
Navy 35, Notre Dame 17
Pittsburgh 41, Rutgers 21
SOUTH
Bethune-Cookman 23, N.C.
Central 10
Clemson 27, GeorgiaTech 13
East Carolina 37, Marshall 10
Florida A&M 17, Norfolk St. 13
Georgia Southern 20,The Citadel 0
Jacksonville 56, Marist 14
Louisville 26, Connecticut 0
UCF41,Rice 14
Virginia Tech 44, Duke 7
MIDWEST
Illinois 43, Indiana 13
Penn St. 33, Minnesota 21
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 37, Mississippi 24
Arkansas St. 37, Fla.Atlantic 16
Iowa St. 28,Texas 21
Nebraska 51, Oklahoma St. 41
FAR WEST
BYU 25,Wyoming 20
California 50,Arizona St. 17
Texas Tech 27, Colorado 24

Friday
South Florida 38, Cincinnati 30

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Tums Fast Relief 500
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (ESPN2,
noon-I p.m., ESPN, 1-5 p.m.)
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles).
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Korean Grand Prix
Site:Yeongam, South Korea.
Schedule: Today, race, 2 a.m. (Speed,
1:30-4 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Korean International Circuit


(road course, 3.493 miles).
Race distance: 192.1 miles, 55 laps.

GOLF

Golf week

NATIONWIDE TOUR
Jacksonville Open
Site: Ponte Vedra Beach
Schedule: Ends today.
Course: TPC Sawgrass, Dye's Valley
Course (6,864 yards, par 70).
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today
2-4:30 p.m.; Monday, 2-4 a.m.).

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason final


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Boston 7 I .875
Toronto 4 4 .500
New Jersey 2 5 .286
New York 2 5 .286
Philadelphia 2 5 .286
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Orlando 7 '0 .1.000
Charlotte 4 4 .500
Washington 3 4 .429
Miami 2 4 .333
Atlanta 2 5 .286


Cleveland
Chicago
Indiana
Detroit
Milwaukee


Central Division
W L
6 I
4 4.
3 4'
3 5
3 5


WESTERN. CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 7 0 1.000 -
Dallas 4 4 .500 3'A
Houston 4 4 .500 3'/
San Antonio 3 3 .500 3'A
New Orleans I 7 .125 6'A
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Utah 8 0 1.000 -
Minnesota 6 2 .750 2
Denver 5 3 .625 3
Oklahoma City 3 3 .500 4
Portland 3 4 .429 4'A
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 4 3 .571 -
Sacramento 3 4 .429 I
Golden State 3 5 .375 I 'A
Phoenix 2 6 .250 2h'
L.A. Clippers I 7 .125 3'A
Friday's Games
Charlotte 99,Atlanta 66
Toronto 108, NewYork 103
Memphis 106, Detroit 103
Orlando vs. Miami at Tampa, unsafe
floor conditions
Chicago 102, Indiana 74
Dallas 97, Houston 96
Minnesota 119, Milwaukee 118, OT
Utah 82, Sacramento 71
Denver 144, Phoenix 106
LA. Lakers 105, Golden State 102, OT
End preseason

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
Calgary 6, Columbus 2
Ottawa 4, Buffalo 2
Tampa Bay 5,Atlanta 2
St. Louis 4, Chicago 2
Vancouver 5, Minnesota I
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Bostopj (n)
Montreal at Ottawa (n)
Buffalo at New Jersey (n)
Toronto at Philadelphia (n)
Atlanta atWashington (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Florida (n)
Anaheim at Detroit (n)
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (n)
Nashville at Dallas (n)
Columbus at Chicago (n)
Los Angeles at Colorado (n)
Carolina at Phoenix (n)
San Jose at Edmonton (n)
Today's Games
Nashville at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8 p.m.


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


Carriage LS
36' 3 slide fifth wheel. y & Online
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only. O ne Low
$26,000 OBO L
Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with $t
low miles. $47,000 Price!
Call
386-755-0653


INDIANS: District final on Thursday


Continued From Page 11

at 5 p.m. Tuesday. Santa
Fe High is the tournament
host and top seed.
No. 2 seed Fort White
is 6-2 in district play,
falling only to the Raiders.
Williston is the No. 3 seed.
Seeds 4 and 5, Suwannee
High and Newberry High,
play at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday
for the opportunity to meet
Santa Fe at 6:30 p.m. in the
other semifinal.
The championship match
is 7 p.m. Thursday.
Fort White has made the
state field as runner-up the
past two seasons and a win
over Williston will match
the three-year playoff run
of the school in 2000-02.
Doug Wohlstein has
coached the Lady Indians
during the current streak.


Fort White swept Williston
during the season, winning
25-11, 25-21, 25-14 at home
on Sept. 29.
A district championship
is the ultimate goal, but
Wohlstein is not looking
ahead.
"At our Monday practice
will be strictly setting up to
beat Williston," Wohlstein
said. '"That is ourfocus right
now. They probably won't
switch anything and we
won't change anything."
Fort White and Santa Fe
met in the championship'
final last year.
"I would love to host (a
playoff game), but we have
got to go into Santa Fe and
beat them. I believe it can
be done, but we have got to
be clicking.


"We have got the talent
and team to do it, but you
have got to do it. First and
foremost we have got to
beat Williston."
Fort White won two of
three matches last week,
with wins on Senior Night
.(Hamilton County High)
and in a student-body game
(Union County High). The
loss was to a strong Oak
Hall .School team.
Seniors Brett Sealey,
Brigitte LaPuma, Kaycee
Baker and Holly Polhill
have experience from
the 2009 playoff run, as
does sophomore Sarah
Stringfellow.
Rounding out the roster
are Lync6 Stalnaker, Angel
Dowda, Alison Wrench and
Ashley Beckman.


CHS: Buchholz next on the card


Continued From Page 1B

earlier this season. as four. si
"'We just weren't there years of
mentally or physically," district to
Columbia coach Casie "Beth
McCallister said. "It wasn't Dicks, A
a true indicator of what and Tayl
we can be. They've always all played
been a good program, but sophomot
there's no doubt in my said. "If ti
mind we can win." that exp(
A win would likely pit the trol, it co\
Lady Tigers against top- very wel
seeded Buchholz High in
the second round, but what
will it take to get there?
"It's going to take a ready Unscramble
head and heart from the one letter to
opening whistle to the end to form four
of the match," McCallister YON
said. "We have to start
strong and not let up. If the
senior leadership is very @2010 T
good, we have a chance. All Rig,
We have to take that focus, BEL
want to win and keep the '
focus on the match."
McCallister feels the
Lady Tigers are better TSA1
prepared for this matchup
against Middleburg.
"It hurt that we didn't
have any depth," she said. I
"They were subbing in AGG
and out the whole night
We just couldn't catch a
break. We've added depth
by bringing up Hollianne Answer:
Dohrn and Lauren Eaker
from the junior varsity." Saturday's
Experience should be on
the side of the Lady Tigers,

ACROSS 38 Pedeptals
39 Gladiator's
1 Mammoth hello
4 Primitive 40 Virus
weapon infection
8 alai 41 Large blossom
11 El Dorado loot 44 Safe topic
12 Baby grand 48 "Bali -"
13 Sudbury's 49 Glaciers
prov. (2 wds.)
14 Paunch, slangi- 51 Coffee brewer
ly (2 wds.) 52 Itemized
16 Had a snack accounts
17 Tangled 53 Off-road
18 Recluse vehicle
20 Capp and 54 Student stat
Jolson 55. Rides
21 Once called a bench
22 Harbors 56 Skip stones


25 Jolting
29 Calcutta nanny
30 Weep
31 Pooh's pal
32 Aloha token
33 Positive
response
34 Take cover
35 Gandhi and
Nehru


DOWN

1 Fishing floats
2 Shah's king-
dom
3 "Naked Maja"
artist
4 Movie theaters
5 "Shane" star


eniors have three
experience in the
urnament.
Williams, Haley
rden Sibbernsen
or Messer have
d since they were
res," McCallister
hey come out with
erience and con-
uld keep us doing
1. Taylor Owens




these four Jumbles,
each square,
ordinary words.

IOL I


has also came on strong
in the middle. She's a big
hitter and has made a big
impact. She's very domi-
nant"
In the end, McCallister
is leaving it in the hands of
her team.
"It comes down to how
we play," she said. "At the
end, we want to be in the
championship."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike 'Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


THE
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: GAMUT PATIO GASKET MARTYR
Answer: What the warden gave the repeat offender -
A TIME "OUT"



Answer to Previous Puzzle


P E S O GR IND
ELLE MOVIE
ESIR E OCTANE
SPA N WI G NOD-
GoSSED
,MAOoAR OINK

N SCREAM
CO STS METIINIG
ERLE IJAIN LEIT


S RA A H OIBE Y
WETT.ER EQ UI E
INTEND SUNLI
MIE NDS AGED r


6 Famous
numero
7 Alley
competitor
8 Baez or Rivers
9 Penny-


10 Livy's route
12 Tablets -
15 Fierce anger
19 Above,
to a bard
21 Catches
a crook
22 Sanskrit
dialect


23 Bad or good
sign
24 Surprise
attack
25 Pesci and
DiMaggio
26 Eye part
27 Leaf
juncture
28 Pushes off
30 New Year's
Eve word
34 cuisine
36 Fleming of 007
novels
37 Is of benefit
38 Mild case of
the blues
40 Celebrations
41 Puff along
42 Seniors' org.
43 Ms. Foch
44 Frontier, once
45 Cabbage unit
46 Jazzy James
47 Party-throw-
er's plea
50 LI doubled


@ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


10-25


SCOREBOARD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

| 12 13 4 15 j6 |7 0 8 l9 10 7


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I


IZZ/
^ ^









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Best in the West


Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. Cam Newton ran for
217 yards and Onterio McCalebb sprinted
70 yards for the go-ahead score with 5:05
left to lift No. 5 Auburn to a victory over
No. 6 LSU on Saturday.
The host Tigers (8-0, 5-0 Southeastern
Conference) moved on as the powerful
league's last unbeaten team. LSU (7-1, 4-1)
finally had a Les Miles gamble backfire in
an adventurous season.
Newton ran for two touchdowns and
broke the league's single-season rushing
mark for a quarterback of 1,006 yards
by Auburn's Jimmy Sidle in 1963. He
also topped Heisman winner Pat Sullivan's
40-year-old school mark of 26 TDs rushing
and passing in a season.
Miles opted to go for it on fourth-and-6
from LSU's 30 with 3:27 left. Jarrett Lee
tried to scramble for it but was stopped
well short by Neiko Thorpe.

No. 8 Michigan State 35,
Northwestern 27
EVANSTON, Ill. Kirk Cousins threw
for 331 yards and three touchdowns,
and No. 8 Michigan State rallied to beat
Northwestern and remain unbeaten.
B.J. Cunningham made an acrobatic
grab for the go-ahead touchdown with two
minutes left. Edwin Baker added a 25-yard
scoring run and Eric Gordon intercepted
Dan Persa to seal a wild win.
The Spartans scored 28 points in the
second half.

No. 10 Wisconsin 31,
No. 13 Iowa 30
IOWA (ITY, Iowa Montee Ball ran
8 yards for a touchdown with 1:06 left and
Wisconsin rallied to beat Iowa.
Scott Tolzien threw for 205 yards and
a touchdown, John Clay added a pair of
touchdowns for the Badgers, who kept
their final drive alive by converting a fake
punt deep in their own territory.
Punter Brad Nortman ran 17 yards
on fourth down from his own 26 with
Wisconsin trailing 30-24. The Badgers con-
verted another fourth down with 3:23 left
and Ball capped an 80-yard drive with the
game-winning score.

No. 11 Ohio State 49, Purdue 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio Terrelle Pryor
threw for three scores, Dan Herron ran for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn's Nick Fairley (90) sacks LSU
quarterback Jordan Jefferson (9) in the
game at Jordan-Hare Stadium in Auburn,
Ala., on Saturday.

two and No. 11 Ohio State showed it was
over its Wisconsin hangover with a victory
over Purdue.
The beat-up Buckeyes (7-1, 3-1 Big Ten)
also got redemption for a stunning 26-18
upset a year ago at Purdue, along with
last week's 31-18 defeat in Madison that
toppled them from No. 1.

No. 14 Nebraska 51,
No. 17 Oklahoma State 41
STILLWATER, Okla. Taylor Martinez
set a Nebraska freshman record with 323
yards passing and threw a career-high five
touchdown passes and the Cornhuskers
knocked Oklahoma State from the ranks
of the unbeaten.

Syracuse 19, No. 20 W. Virginia 14
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Ryan Nassib
threw a touchdown pass, Ross Krautman
kicked four field goals and Syracuse scored
nine points off turnovers in shocking West
Virginia.

No. 21 Arkansas 38, Mississippi 24
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Knile Davis
ran for 176 yards and three touchdowns,
and No. 21 Arkansas beat former coach
Houston Nutt and Mississippi.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to.the Reporter
Members of the 2010 Columbia High swim team are (front row, from left) seniors
Jordyn Smith, Alan Henry, Cyntaria Anderson, Jonathan Smith and Katherine Mathis.
Second row (from left) are coach Sabrina Sibbernsen, juniors Justin Tompkins,
Meghan Collins, Heather Burns, Lauren Lee, David Morse, Kaicie Chasteen,
Alexis Angstadt, Marion Polintan and coach Mary Kay Mathis. Third row (from left) are
sophmores Tammy Roberts, Joana Mata, Vicki Duncan, Levi Harkey, Jacob Finley,
Joseph Piccioni, Michaela Polhamus, Kayla Williams and Sara Woodfield. Back row
(from left) are sophomore Cheyenne Brown, freshmen Cody Smith, Cale Shaw, Lindsay Lee,
Sydney Morse, Carlos Diaz and Jackson Nettles, and sophomore Aleena Fields.


Pool of talent for CHS


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia High
swim teams will participate
in the 10-team District 2-2A
on Monday at Cecil Field
in Jacksonville.
"I'm hoping that many
of the returnee swimmers
will be making a trip to
regions in two weeks,"
coach Mary Kay Mathis
said. "The team is led by
senior captains Alan Henry
and Katherine Mathis."
There will be more than
30 CHS swimmers compet-
ing at district, including 16
returning from last season.
The team is led by five
seniors, but there's youth
- as well with 12 sophomores
and five freshman.
Both teams come in with
identical 8-2 records.
"It has been a very
rewarding year," Mathis
said. "We have had three
school records broken.
Heather Burns broke the
500 Freestyle, Lindsay Lee


broke the 100 Backstroke
and the girls 400 Freestyle
Relay which had Burns,
Lyndsay Lee, Lauren Lee
and Mathis."
Only the top eight com-
petitors will advance to
the region tournament,
and Mathis is hoping that
includes a lot of Tigers.
"We have a large girls
team and I hope to see
most of them swim their
event twice, which is pre-
lims and finals," she said.
"I want to see the girls
score many points for CHS
and place high in the dis-
trict as well."
Among two of the other
favorites in the tourna-
ment will be Lincoln High
and Chiles High from
Tallahassee, but. Mathis
feels Columbia has th6
team to compete.
"They have really good
competitors," she said.
"The girls that have a
good chance to return to
regions are Heather Burns
(200 free, 500 free), Lauren


Lee (500 free, 100 breast),
Lindsay Lee (50 free, 100
back), Katherine Mathis
(100 fly, 200 IM), Syndey
Morse (100 breast),
Michaela Polhamus (500
free, 100 fly), Jordyn Smith
(100 back), and hopefully a
few surprises from Kaicie
Chasteen, Aleena Fields
and Sara Woodfield."
SThe oys team is a much
smaller group, but Mathis
expects them to be com-
petitive as well.
"They are led by seniors
Alan Henry and Jonathan
Smith," she said. 'We are
hoping to have boys relay
go to regions. Junior Dave
Morse should go in the 100
Breaststroke. Alan hopes
to repeat in his events
(200 free and 500 free).
Jonathan will swim the 100
fly and 200 IM."
Among the others that
Mathis feels could make
it to the regional tourna-
ment are Levi Harkey,
Jacob Finley and Justin
Tompkins.


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1 _


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


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I ,


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010












Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS


Sunday, October 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Horsemanship convention spurs LC economy

By TONY BRIT r .c. .... .
tbr.tt@.akecityreporter. corn .,. m


Horsemanship
Association's
International
Convention
pumped an estimated
$100,000 into the local
economy as a result of
its five-day convention in
Lake City.
Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council
director, said most conven-
tions that are held in Lake
City tend to equate to $100
per day spent, per visitor.
However, with the
Certified Horsemanship
Association International
Convention attendees are
spending an estimated
$250 per day, per visitor.
The Certified
Horsemanship Association
is composed of horse-
riding instructors who
are holding their conven-
tion events at The Oaks.
The Oaks is an O'Connor
Signature Facility.
Equestrian Olympians
Karen and David O'Connor
are the names behind the
brand.
Campbell said much of
the financial transaction
with convention attendees
included visits at local res-
taurants, retail shopping
venues and the Holiday
Inn and Suites.
"They're impacting
restaurants and retail
establishments," Campbell
said. "I've heard nothing
but people bragging about
having been to Smitty's
Western Store and having


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Robert Fuller (right) and Bob George, both of Tarpon Springs, take a look at Smitty's selection of saddles. 'This has a really nice saddle detail work to it,'
Fuller said. 'This is my first time here, but I like it so far.'


spent substantial dollars."
Bob Smith, owner of
Smitty's Western Store,
said some of visitors have
purchased equipment
for English riding and
Western riding as part of
their visit to the area.
"There's an influx of


people and trainers from
all over the United States
in town and some of them
have been in town for
three or four days and
this is a great opportunity
that they bring us," he
said. "These people from
all over the country have


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come to Lake City for sem-
inars, knowledge, training
and clinics. It's a wonderful
situation."
Campbell also noted that


several local restaurants
have catered luncheons at
The Oaks as part of the con-
vention.
"We hope the residual is


"U.,












I,

It


twofold. Some of them may
decide to move here and
live in some proximity to

ECONOMY continued on 2C


..4










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I








LAKE CITY REPORTER


Overnight Moves
Q How can a stock's price
change a lot overnight, when
the market is closed? N.G.,
Abilene, Texas
AIt's not the trading that makes
a stock price rise or fall; it's
the perceived value of the com-
pany. Imagine that shares of Farm
Dogs Inc. (ticker: BINGO) are at
$25 when the market closes one
day. That evening, the company
reports surprisingly steep growth
in sales and earnings.
When trading resumes the
next morning, the stock price isn't
likely to open at $25 and then creep
up slowly. Instead, it will just begin
trading at a significantly higher
level. That's because many investors
are now assigning a higher value to
the company, and the limited exist-
ing shares have risen in value to
meet the higher demand.
Buyers are simply willing to pay
more. The opposite happens when
a stock is viewed less favorably.,

Q When a company buys
another, does the acquired
company's stock price go up or
down? H.B., Bloomington, Ind.
A It depends on the deal and the
purchase price. If the
acquire's current market value is
around $1 billion, and it's bought
for $1.5 billion, you can expect 4
the stock price to jump on the
news When a company is very
desirable, perhaps due to its growth
prospects, a buyer may have to out-
bid other interested companies. But
if a firm is struggling, it might get
scooped up for a song.
Meanwhile, if investors
think that the acquiring company
has struck a good deal, its own
price might also nse. But if the)
think that the company overpaid
or won't see a good return on its
investment, the price can fall.. It all
depends on investor reactions to
the deal, and their expectations.
Some acquisitions turn out to be'
smart moves, while others end up
being regretted.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


The Motley Fool'

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Don't Try to Time
the Market
The stock market crashed in
2008, only to start coming back
strongly in 2009. If you managed
to sell at the top and buy in at the
bottom, you did well. Odds are,
though, that you panicked and sold
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until the recovery was under way.
Sure, some prognosticators
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A Walgreen Surprise
Talk about your pleasant sur-
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During the recent economic down-
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well. While Walgreen's pharmacy
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generic prescriptions.
Walgreen is also profitingfrom
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2010 Tiii MOTEY FOoiiliST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (OR RELEASE 10/21/2010)


ECONOMY
From Page 1C
The Oaks and that's a long-
standing asset to our area,"
he said. "Our secondary
motive is to get into a rota-
tion so that every third
year this event is hosted in
Lake City."
Campbell said he and his
staff have heard compli-
ments from visitors about
The Oaks.
"Without fail, people
coming back from The
Oaks came back and said
to people who had not
been yet 'You have got
to go; You're going to be
wowed'."
Campbell said he hopes
hosting The Certified
Horsemanship Association
International Convention
will spark other conven-
tions for this area.
"I just think this is a
door-opener," Campbell
said. "Our hope is that all
of these people go back
home and become ambas-
sadors for The Oaks and
Lake City."


'. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Ashley Baker (right), 19, a Smitty's Western Store sales associate, assists, longtime cus-
tomer Rianna Eliott pick out a Brighton necklace. 'They have excellent selection, and a
friendly atmosphere,' Elliott said. 'If they don't have it, they can get it for you the next day.'


More working families getting food aid


By MARK NIESSE
Associated Press

HONOLULU Lillie
Gonzales does whatever it
takes to provide for three
ravenous sons who live
under her roof. She grows
her own vegetables at
home on Kauai, runs her
own small business and like
a record 42 million other
Americans, she relies on
food stamps.
Gonzales and her hus-
band consistently qualify
for food stamps now that
Hawaii and other states are
quietly expanding eligibil-
ity and offering the benefit
to more working, moderate
income families.


Data from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture
reviewed by The Associated
Press shows that 32 states
have adopted rules making
it easier to qualify for food
stamps since 2007. In all, 38
states have loosened eligi-
bility standards.
Hawaii has gone farther
than most, allowing a fam-
ily like Gonzales' to earn up
to $59,328 and still get food
stamps.
Priorto an Oct. increase,
the income eligibility limit
for a Hawaii family of five
was $38,568 a year.
"If I didn't have food
stamps, I would be buying
white rice and Spam every
day," said Gonzales, whose


Island Angels business
makes Hawaiian-style fab-
ric angel ornaments, quilts,
aprons and purses.
Eligibility for food stamps
varies from state to state,
with the 11 most generous
states allowing families to
apply if their gross income
is less than double the fed-
eral poverty line of $22,050
for a. family of four on the
U.S. mainland. The thresh-
old is higher in Alaska and
Hawaii.
With more than 1 in 8
Americans now on food
stamps, participation in
the program has jumped
about 70 percent from 26
million in May 2007, while
the nation's unemployment


rate rose from 4.3 percent
to 9.2 percent through
September of this year.
' "We've seen a huge
increase in participation
due to the economic down-
turn," said Jean Daniel,
a spokeswoman for the
USDA's Food and Nutrition
Service. '"That's the way this
program was designed."
In addition to helping alle-
viate economic pressures,
many states embrace the
popularity of food stamps
because their cost $50
billion last year is paid
entirely by the federal gov-
ernment. States are only
responsible for paying half
of their programs' admin-
istrative costs.


County Farm Bureau

receives recognition

during annual meet


From staff reports

The Columbia County
Farm Bureau was recog-
nized for its outstanding
programs by the Florida
Farm Bureau Federation
at the Federation's annu-
al meeting Oct. 13-15 in
Daytona Beach.
The Columbia County
Bureau was honored in five
categories: legislative/pol-
icy implementation, public
relations/information, orga-
nization and management,
education and promotion,
and leadership develop-
ment.
Charlie Crawford, presi-


dent of the Columbia County
Farm Bureau, accepted the
award from Florida Farm
Bureau President John L.
Hoblick.
The Columbia County
Farm Bureau is headquar-
tered in Lake City, serving
more than 2,800 member
families. It is affiliated with
the Florida Farm Bureau
Federation, headquartered
in Gainesville and serv-
ing approximately 140,000
member families.
Farm Bureau is a non-
profit trade organization
that advocates for agricul-
ture and agricultural pro-
ducers.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia County Farm Bureau President Charlie Crawford
receives plaque recognizing achievements during 2010 from
Florida Farm Bureau President John L. Hoblick at the State
Annual Meeting on Oct. 14 at the Hilton in Daytona Beach.


^.I AkthFol I













Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW oTHE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW



The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

NYSE 3 Amex A Nasdaq
7,522.91 +2.31 2,063.16 -37.46 2,479.39 +10.62


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
FstPfd pfA 10.63 +2.88 +37.2 ChinaShen 3.20 +1.80 +128.6 RIT Tech 4.60 +3.25 +240.7
Compx 12.00 +2.33 +24.1 HMG 4.20 +1.19 +39,5 CleanDsIrs 11.15 +6.25 +127.7
QksilvRes 15.20 +2.59 +20.5 RareEleg 10.11 +2.46 +32.2 LiveDealrs 9.89 +5.39 +119.8
Brookdale 19.77 +3.10 +18.6 GoldenMin 25.45 +4.40 +20.9 eOnComm 2.60 +1,16 +80.8
AMR 7.42 +1.16 +18.5 PhrmAth 3.85 +.66 +20.7 WSI Inds 7.10 +2,80 +65.1
HangrOrth 19.48 +3.04 +18.5 SinoHub 2.48 +.33 +15.3 AGAMed 20.99 +6.28 +42.7
DeltaAir 13.18 +1.80 +15.8 BioTimewt 4.25 +.55 +14.9 Clarienth 4.98 +1.39 +38.6
GIbShipLs 3.69 +.49 +15.3 Versar 3.21 +.40 +14.1 AlancoTrs 2.09 +.52 +33.3
iStarpfl 11.65 +1.54 +15.2 WhiteRiv 19.00 +2.00 +11.8 Towerstm 2.80 +.67 +31.5
Raythnwt 10.50 +1.37 +15.0 BioTimen 6.36 +.66 +11.6 GenFin 2.12 +.47 +28.5


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BlueUnx 3.02 -.97 -24.3
MediaGen 6.70 -2.05 -23.4
Goldcpwt 3.83 -1.14 -22.9
DexOnen 9.04 -1.89 -17.3
LaBmch 3.30 -.67 -16.9
Valhi 20.04 -4.12 -16.5
ChNBorun n15.62 -2.93 -15.8
EthanAl 15.48 -2.88 -15.7
McMo pfM 107.00-18.69 -14.9
McMoRn 15.72 -2.72 -14.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 27620797 4.11 +.16
BkofAm 20692799 11.44 -.54
S&P500ETF8581893118.35 +.65
SPDR Fncl4186616 14.60 +.26
WellsFargo3148029 26.11 +2.53
iShEMkts 3011552 46.03 -.69
FordM 2990682 13.95 +.15
GenElec 2985387 16,06 -.25
Pfizer 2312890 17.50 -.25
JPMorgCh2296763 37.70 +.55

Diary
Advanced 1,658
Declined 1,453
New Highs 439
New Lows 22
Fetal issues 3,188
Jnchanged 77
Volume 22,853,741,743


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Vdngo n 2.11 -.73 -25.7
NewConcEn 3.30 -.90 -21.4
Hyperdyn 2.94 -.49 -14.3
Neuralstem 2.29 -.35 -13.3
Aurizong 6.17 -.88 -12.5
CCAInds 4.64 -.62 -11.8
iGoldResrc 20.20 -2.50 -11.0
CAMACn 2.90 -.35 -10.8
ChiArmM 4.08 -.49 -10.8
SeabGld g 26.60 -3.20 -10.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PhrmAth 765400 3.85 +.66
RareEleg 504030 10.11 +2.46
NthgtMg 189277 2.80 -.10
GoldStrg 181505 4.86 -.39
ChinaShen 181070 3.20+1.80
Taseko 177827 6.24 -.52
KodiakOg 166181 4.26 +.21
NovaGldg 142886 9.57 +.10
NwGold g 132004 6.58 -.46
DenisnMg 123657 2.17 +.17

Diary
Advanced 211
Declined 314
New Highs 43
New Lows 12
Total issues 560
Unchanged 35
Volume 642,900,245


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GreenBcsh 3.72-3.27 -46.8
Amylin 11.30 -9.74 46.3
ColdwtrCrk 3.48 -1.98 -36.3
Infinera 8.14 -4.31 -34.6
MetaFind 14.15 -4.80 -25.3
Alkerm 11.07 -3.73 -25.2
Conns 3.79 -1.24 -24.7
FstFnB wt 6.77 -2.18 -24.4
BrdwyFn 2.75 -.68 -19.8
FstBcMiss 8.04 -1.85 -18.7

Most Active (S1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQ0379385551.64 +.15
Intel 3396795 19.83 +.52
SiriusXM 2891607 1.31 -.07
Microsoft 2438026 25.38 -.16
Comcast 1737316 19.46 +.52
Oracle 1658906 28.99 +.09
Cisco 1647096 23.48 +.12
Yahoo 1554143 16.31 +.06
Apple Inc 1367899307.47 -7.27
SeagateT 1224453 15.18 -.33

Diary
Advanced 1,413
Declined 1,406
New Highs 286
New Lows 82
Total issues 2,878
Unchanged 59
Volume 9,777,848,409


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.68 28.29 -.04
AMD NY ... 6.89 -.23
AmbacFh NY .. 102 -.03
AutoZone NY ... 234.72 +1.76
BkofAm NY .04 11.44 -.54
BarVixShTNY .12.83 -1.59
BobEvans Nasd .80 29.04 -.16
BostonSci NY ... 6.30 +.15
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.77 +.06
CSX NY 1.04 61.18 +1.64
Chevron NY 2.88 84.55 +.94
Cisco Nasd ... 23.48 +.12
Citigrp NY 4.11 +.16
CocaCI NY 1.76 61.61 +1.67
Comcast Nasd .38 19.46 +.52
Delhaize NY 2.02 68.62 -.56
DirFnBear NY ... 12.40 -.71
DrxFBull s NY ... 22.56 +1.05
EMCCp NY .. 21.44 +.35
FamilyDIr NY .62 45.42 -.15
FordM NY 13.95 +.15
GenElec NY .48 16,06 -.25
HomeDp NY .95 31.48 +.78
iShEMkts NY .59 46.03 -.69
iShR2K NY .79 70.32 +.03
Intel Nasd .63 19.83 4.52
JPMorgCh NY .20 37.70 +.55
LVSands NY ... 38.78 +.11


-0.1 +.9
-3.2 -28.8
-2.9 +22.9
+0.8 +48.5
-4.5 -24.0
-11.0 -62.3
-0.5 +.3
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+1.1 +9.8
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+2.7 +16.1
-0.8 -10.6
-5.4 -36.2
+4.9 -8.7
+1.7 +22.7
-0.3 +63.2
+1.1 +39.5
-1.5 +6.1
+2.5 +8.8
-1,5 +10.9
... +12.6
+2.7 -2.8
+1.5 -9.4
+0.3+159.6


Name Ex Div Last


Lowes NY .44
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
Microsoft Nasd .64
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
NokiaCp NY .56
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .33
PrUShS&PNY
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.31
SearsHidgsNasd
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .16
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
Yahoo Nasd


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg


+.55 +2.6 -5.9
+.18 +1.6 +23.2
+1.07 +1.4 +25.8
-.16 -0.6 -16.7
-.12 -1.5 +.9
-.60 -7.2 -37.9
+.13 +0.2 +5.0
-.54 -5.7 -14.2
+.18 +1.7 -13.9
-5.36 -6.3 -2.2
+.09 +0.3 +18.2
-1.32 -3.9 +22.3
-1.67 -2.5 +6.9
-.25 -1.4 -3.8
-3.12 -2.2 +30.7
+.15 +0.,3 +12.9
-.36 -1.3 -21.9
-.51 -1.1 +9.0
+,65 +0.5 +6.2
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-.07 -5.1+118.3
+.64 +1.7 +15.0
+.26 +5.7 +32.5
+.26 +1.8 +1.4
-.27 -0.8 +8.2
+.71 +1.3 +1.1
+2.53 +10.7 -3.3
+.06 +0.3 -2.8


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred, rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets, d =Deferred sales charge, or
redemption lee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during theweek. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.13 0.14
6-month 0.17 0.17
5-year 1.14 1.18
10-year 2.56 2.57
30-year 3.94 4.00


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0203 1.0231
Britain 1.5669 1.5713
Canada 1.0273 1.0271
Euro .7178 .7177
Japan 81.36 81.27
Mexico 12.4040 12.3880
Switzerlnd .9783 .9665
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 11,132.56
1 -week change: 69.78 (0.6%)
11,500 ,


9,500 -4-.


80.91 -165.07 129.35 38.60 -14.01


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


'M'"""'" '"j """'" **-yj A s


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min nit
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 144,752 11.68 +1.3 +11.6/13 +8.6/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStldx LB 67,000 29.48 +4.8 +11.6/A +2.7/B NL 3,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 62,279 28.89 +4.8 +8.3/D +3.1/B 5.75 250
American Funds CapincBuA m IH 57,298 49.96 +2.9 +8.5/C +5.1/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 55,855 64.36 +4.8 +14.4/A +5.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 53,561 35.39 +4.7 +6.5/D +6.4/A 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 50,016 16.41 +3.3 +12.5/A +4.8/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB -48,658 108.30 +4.4 +10.4/B +2.2/C NL 5,000,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 47,989 109.00 +4.4 +10.3/B +2.1/C NL 3,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 46,302 26.98 +4.8 +9.1/C +2.8/B 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 40,048 100.88 +5.4 +7.7/C +0.1/D NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox lnflStk FV 39,751 35.21 +6.5 +8.1/A +6.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds EurPacGrA .m FB 38,548 41.19 +5.5 +6.6/B +7.8/A 5.75 250
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 36,847 26.03 +3.6 +11.3/A +2.1/B 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 35,095 -11.68 +1.3 +11.3/B +8.3/A NL 1,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 32,274 2.14 +2.5 +13.7/A +5.6/A 4.25 1,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 31,425 27.64 +5.5 +9.7/C +7.0/A 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 31,061 29.49 +4.9 +11.7/A +2.8/B NL 10,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 30,461 34.70 +4.5 +9.3/C +4.9/A 5.75 250
American Funds BalA m MA 30,004 17.35 +3.0 +11.0/A +3.9/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 29,323 109.02 +4.4 +10.5/B +2.2/C NL 10,000
Vanguard Welltn MA 29,123 30.28 +2.6 +9.0/C +5.8/A NL 10,000
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 28,457 11.68 +1.3 +11.1/B +8.1/A 3.75 1,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 27,872 12.50 +0.8 +10.0/C +3.9/E 3.75 250
Vanguard Totlntl d FB 27,753 15.53 +5.4 +6.6/B +5.9/B NL 3,000
Vanguard InstPlus LB 27,516 108.31 +4.4 +10.5/B +2.3/C NL 200,000,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 26,604 76.41 +4.4 +15.9/A +6.0/A NL 2,500
CA -ConservativeAlcaton, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Alocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Lage Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Alioraon, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV -
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Spedally-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dMdends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Indt nvt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68
AU Optron ...
AbtLab 1.76
AberFitc .70
Accenture .90
AMD
Aeropostls ...
Aetna .04
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Allergan .20
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
Altria 1.52
AmbacF h ...
AMovilL 1.31
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.68
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp ...
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .88
Annaly 2.60
Apache .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
ATMOS 1.34
Avon .88
BB&TCp .60
BHP BillLt 1.74
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .51
BcoSantand .80
BcoSBrasil .33
BkofAm .04
BkNYMel .36
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.16
BerkH Bs ..
BestBuy .60
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.28
CB REllis
CBS B .20
CMS Eng .84
CSX f.04
CVS Care .35
Cameron
CapOne .20
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78
CntryLink 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56
CocaCE
CocaCI 1.76
Comerica .20
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.20
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
DR Horton .15


13
2.2 14
1.5 14

5.9 8

3.3 13
1.7 32
2.0 19
... 4
... 10
.1 9
.. 23

.9 ...
.3 27

2.4 18
6.1 13
... 1
2.3 ...
2.7 20
4.6 14
1.8 13

.6 58
2.7 16
14.3 10
.6 13
2.2 26
1.6 44
1.8 11
4.6 14
2.6 23
2.7 20
2.2 ...
1.3 43
2.4 ...
6.0 ...
2.3 ..
.3 17
1.4 13

1.0 ...
2.3 13
... 17
1.4 13
5.6 8
2.4 15

4.7 14
39
1.2 30
4.5 19
1.7 17
1.1 12
21
.5 7
1.0 17
2.2 26

4.8 15
7.1 11
1.4 15
3.4 10
1.6 16
16.4 7

.9 16
15
2.9 19
.6 ...
4.0 15
3.6 12
4.8 14
3.1 1
1.1 9
2.0 26
1.4 ...


-.01 -7.5
+.94 +19.9
-.65 -37.5
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. -.54 -1.6
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-1.58 -52.3
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-.24 +6.8
-.07 +39.1
-.36 +22.3
-'12 +19.3
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-.17 +2.7
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+.81 +26.7
-.98 +37.4
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-1.79 -18.1
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-.82 -29.6
+.06 +8.5
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-2.94 +40.2
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+.53 -.4
+.89 +20.8
+.52 +8.1
-1.36 -10.8
-.18 -3.7
-1.23 -17.5
+.12 -2.4


Wkly YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg


AGA Med ...
ASML HId .27
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlignTech ...
Alkerm
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Amylin
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApIdMatl .28
ArenaPhm...
ArmHId .12
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36
AvanirPhm ...
BMC Sft ...
Baidu s
BrigExp
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
Bucyrus .10
CA Inc .16
Cadence
Celgene
CellTher rsh..
ChkPoint ..
ChinaDir
CienaCorp ..
Cirrus
Cisco
CitrixSys .,
Clarient h


+6.28 +42.1
-,45 -5,1
-.18 +.7
+.13 -23.3
+.52 +87.9
-2.33 +1.9
-3.73 +17.6
-.36 +30.2
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+.84 +1.7
-9.74 -20.4
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-7.27 +45.9
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-.07 -54.1
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-.24 +76.8
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+.86 +2.3
-.35 +51.6
-.46 +10.3
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+.54 +54.5
-.18 +19.3
-.07 -22.7
-5.85 +21.4
+.70 +1.8
... +33.1
+.53 +5.5
-.02 -64.0
+2.36 +22.9
+.03 +26.3
-.70 +27.3
-2.87 +93.8
+.12 -1.9
+1.61 +46.1
+1.39 +87.7


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


DTE 2.24
Danahers .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.20
DelMnte .36
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevonE .64
DrxEMBII s 5.68
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBull s
DirxSCBull 4.77
DirxLCBear ...
DirxEnBull 5.06
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
DukeRIty .68
Dynegy rs ...
EMC Cp ...
EIPasoCp .04
EldorGId g .05
EmersonEl 1.34
EnCana g s .80
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FidlNFin .72
FstHorizon .72
FirstEngy 2.20
Ruor .50
FootLockr .60
FordM
ForestLab ...
FMCG 2.00
FrontierCm .75
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenMills s 1.1.2
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .18
GoldmanS 1.40
GrtAtlPac ...
HCP Iric 1.86
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .40
HartfdFn .20
HeclaM
Hersha .20
Hertz
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwlllntI 1.21
HostHotis .04
Huntsmn .40
IAMGId g .06
iShGolds ...
iSAstla .81
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn .16
iSh Kor .39
iSMalas .25
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver
iShChina25 .68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20 T 3.82
iS Eafe 1.38
iShR2K -.79
iShREst 1.88
ITW 1.36
IngerRd .28
IBM 2.60





Name Div
ColdwtrCrk ...
Comcast .38
Come spcl .38
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
CubistPh ...
CypSemi
Dell Inc
Ondreon
DirecTVA ...
DiscvLab h ..
DryShips
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
EvrgrSlrh ..
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
F5 Netwks ...
FLIR Sys ..
FifthThird .04
Finisar
FstNiagara .60
Flextrn
FresKabi rt ..
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC s...
Gymbree
HudsCity .60
HumGen
Infinera
Intel .63


14 -.18
18 +1.26
9 -.40
20 +1.09
13 -.07
27 +1,80
22 -1.00
10 -2.43
... -2.02
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-.71
...+1.05
-.23
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11 -.37
16 +.02
26 +.26
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87 +.08
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... -.40
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-.53
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... +1.11
-.24
... +.03
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14 -2.27
24 +.61
13 -1.39


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Name Div
IntPap .50
Interpublic ..
fnvesco .44
ItauUnibH .59
JCrew
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JanusCap .04
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk
Kellogg 1.62
Keycorp .04
Kimco .64
KingPhrm ...
Kinross g .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
LillyEli .1.96
Limited .60
LincNat .04
LyonBasA ...
MBIA
MEMC
MFA FncI .90
MGIC
MGM Rsts ..
Macys .20


WKly YT1 WKly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.1 51 +.15 -11.6 23.68
39 -.38 +41.3 10.43
2.0 28 -.54 -5.0 22.32
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43 ... +19.8 31.94
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... 83 ... +15.4 14.16
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Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg


Wkly
Last Name


... -1.98 -22.0 3.48
15 +.52 +16.1 19.46
14 +.38 +14.7 18.25
22 +.96 +37.2 9.92
3 +.04 -65.4 4.77
22 +.33 +8.2 64.03
29 -6.36 -10.9 50.20
14 -2.08 +22.0 23.15
28 +.23 +26.3 13.34
17 +.10 +1.6 14.59
... -.94 +40.4 36.89
28 +.07 +28.1 42.72
... -.01 -63.8 .23
16 -.36 -27.1 4.24
... -.63 -20.2 14.04
14 +2.39 +19.3 28.07
... -.35 -12.1 15.61
92 -.27 +168.4 8.24
... +.63 +24.9 11.48
.. +.04 -35.7 .97
21 +.46 +9.9 28.28
28. +.63 +13.4 49.00
56 +1.25 +85.9 98.45
18 +.62 -19.3 26.41
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-2.02+114.3 19.12
18 +.56 -12.9 12.11
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-.00 -90.0 .03
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61 +1.30 +15.2 31.29
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11 +.52 -2.8 19.83


Wkly YTD
Div YId PE Cha %Chg


Intersil .48
Intuit
IsilonSys ..,
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
LamResrch ...
Lattice
Level3
LibGlobA ...
LiblyMIntA ...
LifeTech ...
LinearTch .92
MannKd
MarvellT ...
Maftel .75
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
Nil Hldg
NetApp
Nettlix .
NetSpend n ...
NewsCpA .15
NorTrst 1.12
Novell
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20
PMC Sra
Paccar .48
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Polvcom


... +.71 -18.3
27 +.58 +53.6
... +1.53 +326.4
18 -.63 +48.8
... -.67 +40.4
22 +.25 +25.5
62 +.32 -.5
11 +2.52 +11.9
11 -.34 +68.5
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... +1.32 +59.0
16 +.13 +35.0
16 +.05 -9.7
16 +.17 +1.1
... -.20 -25.8
21 +.60 -14.7
13 +.80 +16.4
48 +.32 -4.7
... +.33 +75.6
4 +.08 -27.2
7 -.16 -16.7
22 +.41 +14.5
38 +1.64 +51.3
63+12.38 +205.1
... +3.8
15 +.22 +5.2
16 -.93 -8.8
... -.01 +46.1
13 +.28 +1.2
30 +.51 -36.8
14 4,08 -17.3
23 +.09 +18.2
20 +.26 -13.7
81 +.30 +40.0
... +.19 +28.5
21 +.39 -8.6
42 -.54 -24.5
59 +4.11 +30.3


Name Div
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ .33
QiaoXing
Qlogic
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ..
RschMotn ...
Riverbed
SanDisk
Salconh ...
SeagateT ..
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Solarfun
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SunesisPh ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr ..
Tellabs .08
TerreStar ...
TevaPhrm .72
TibcoSft
TriQuint
UrbanOut
Vivus ..
Vodafone 1.32
WholeFd
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1.00
Xilinx .64
YRC Ww rs ..
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg
... ... +.01 +26.1
... ... +.41 +146.7
.6 ... +.15 +12.9
... ... +.17 -21.9
24 -.51 -11.3
1.7 22 -.61 -4.5
... 19 -.02 +37.5
... 9 +.34 -27.4
... ... +7.24 +136.3
... 8 -2.22 +27.6
... ... +.17 +53.5
... 5 -.33 -16.5
... ... -.07+118.3
... 26 -.34 +51.4
... 19 -.79 +34.7
1.7 18 -.21 -16.2
1.8 27 +.95 +23.5
2.1 20 -.03 -19.2
... ... +.04 -67.6
.. 16 -.03 -12.2
... 16 +.24 -13.9
1.0 15 +.28 +38.0
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40 +.46 +94.6
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2.5 12 -1.28 +.6
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Wkly
Last Name


Name


WKly YIU
Div YId PE Cha %Cha


Manpwl .74
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .11
MarlntA .16
MarshM .84
Marshals .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McMoRn
Mechel
MedcoHlth ...
Medtrnic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Molycorp n ..
Monsanto 1.12
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.17
NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .40
Netezza
NY CmtyB 1'00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .60 ,
NextEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92


36 +1.32 +2.6
14 -.14 +14.1
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36 +1.69 +36.8
19 +1.27 +14.1
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13 -2.99 +18.8
18 -1.99 -19.7
11 +2.46 -18.7
14 +.15 +1.5
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18 -.04 +39.1
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26 +.37 -30.1
10 -.50 -17.2
29 -2.43 +10.4
46 -.12 +.9
10 -.52 +23.5
84 -.20 -11.6
... +.02 -49.1
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13 -.01 +10.2
12 +.13 -14.3
... +.08 +178.4
13 +.33 +16.1
15 -.04 +20.4
16 -2.51 +25.5
14 +.13 +5.0
16 -.07 +15.1


Name Div Yld PE


NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .56
Nordstrm .80
NorflkSo 1.44
Novartis 1.99
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 2.66
Omnicom .80
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMIGrp ...
PNC .40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.18
Petrobras 1.18
Pfizer .72
PhillpMor 2.56
PlainsEx
*Potash .40
PS USDBull...
Pridelntl
PrinFncl .50
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ..
PrUShQQQ...
froUltSP .43
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSRErs...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUFin rs .09
ProUSR2K ...
ProUltR2K .01
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp 1.16
ProLogis .60
Prudentl .70
PulteGrp ..
QntmDSS ...
QstDiag .40
QksilvRes ...
QwestCm .32
RAIT Fin ...
RRI Engy ..
RadianGrp .01
RadioShk .25
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola ...
RepubSvc .80
RiteAid
SLM Cp ...
SpdrDJIA 2.55
SpdrGold ...
SP Mid 1.54
S&P500ETF2.31
SpdrHome .12
SpdrKbwBk .11
SpdrRetl .57
SpdrOGEx .20
SpdrMetM .35
Safeway .48
StJude
Saks
SandRdge ..
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .60
SiderNac s .58
SilvWhtng ...
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAirl .02


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Chg Last


8 -1.73 -16.0 34.17
... +.18 -13.9 11.06
16 -1.91 -1.8 36.89
18 +.59 +18.5 62.10
14 -.90 +6.8 58.12
59 -1.37 -18.8 37.88
15 -5.36 -2.2 79.58
... -.23 -28.2 4.63
...-1.15 +.1 118.94
17 +1.47 +10.4 43.23
14 +.76 +6.7 47.66
... -.16 +73.4 4.37
9 +3.40 +3.7 54.72
20 -.62 -16.7 26.91
... -.45 -17.1 12.81
21 -.74 +12.9 51.04
26 -1.32 +22.3 32.55
16 -1.67 +6.9 65.01
22 -.23 -27.9 17.30
...-2.94 -31.8 28.92
... -2.39 -33.1 31.90
9 -.25 -3.8 17.50
15 -.41 +20.6 58.13
20 -1.21 -2.5 26.97
31 -3.12 +30.7 141,79
... +.13 -2.6 22.47
41 -.88 -2.6 31.07
12 +.59 +12.6 27.07
.. -.36 -21.9 27.38
... +.39 +23.2 73.26
.. -.09 -30.9 13.16
... +.45 +10.6 42.28
-.75 -33.0 33.42
... -.77 -49.4 18.96
... -.74 -22.1 18.87
.. +1.93 +.9 56.80
... -.04 -36.4 16.03
... -.03 +21.4 34.41
-.47 -33.6 24.10
.. -.06 -18.0 10.40
13 +.26 +16.6 20.97
... -.06 -8.0 12.60
8 -1.11 +5.9 52.71
... +.27 -17.6 8.24
97 +.14 -1.0 2.90
12 -1.31 -18.8 49.03
36 +2.59 +1.3 15.20
24 +.12 +53.4 6.46
4 -.15 +44.3 1.89
... -.12 -38.5 3.52
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13 +.94 +16.9 22.80
9 +1.89 -7.6 47.60
... +.08 +35.0 .7.14
... -1.15+149.6 11.88
25 -.03 +8.5 30.71
.. +.07 -36.6 .96
7 +.32 +2.4 11.54
... +.68 +7.0 111.36
... -3.95 +20.9 129.73
... +.84 +13.7 149.73
... +.65 +6.2 118.35
.. +.05 +3.6 15.66
... +.35 +7.7 22.81
... -.69 +21.7 43.34
.,. -.90 +6.3 43.81
...-1.61 +5.8 54.62
+.53 +4.7 22.29
14 -1.07 +5.6 38.83
+.89 +63.6 10.73
+.16 -41.4 5.53
16 -.37 +19.0 14.50
27 +3.27 +4.1 67.77
31 +.47 -20.4 14.98
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-.69 +5.9 16.90
48 -1.48 +74.6 26.22
15 +.64 +15.0 38.32
24 +.52 +17.8 13.47


Name Div
SwstnEngy ..
SpectraEn 1.00
SprintNex ...
SP Matls 1.05
SP HIthC .58
SP CnSt' .77
SP Consum .43
SPEngy 1.00
SPDRFncl .16
SP Inds .60
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
Stryker .60
Suncorgs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
TCF Fncl .20
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .40
TenetHIth
Teradyn
Terex
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
ThermoFis ...
3MCo 2.10
TimeWam .85
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSol s ...
Tycolntl .85
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Airwy
UnionPac 1.32
UtdContl
UPSB 1.88
UtdRentals ..
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
US OilFd
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
UnumGrp .37
Vale SA .76
Vale SA pf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
VimpelC n ...
Visa .60
VMware
Walgrn .70
Weathfintl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20
WmsCos .50
WilmTr .04
XLGrp .40
Xerox .17
Yamana g .08
YingliGrn
YumBmds 1.00


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD
Div YId PE Chg %Chg


AbdAsPac .42 6.1
AlexcoR g ...
AldNevG ... ...
AmO&G ...
Anooraqg ...
Augusta g ...
Aurizon g ...
CAMAC n ...
CanoPet ...
CardiumTh.
CelSci
CFCdag .01 .1
CheniereEn ...
ChiGengM...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen...
CrSuiHiY .32 10.7
Crossh glf ...
Crystallxg ...
DenisnM g ...
Endvrlnt
EndvSilvg ...
EntGaming ...
Express-1 ...
Fronteer g ...
GabGldNR 1.68 9.6
GascoEngy...
GenMoly ...
GoldResrc .09 ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
Hyperdyn ...
KodiakOg ...
UbertyAcq ...
MagHRes ...
Metalico ... ...
Minefnd q ... ...


-.15 +11.5
-.59 +44.9
-2.41 +53.2
-.07 +105.7
-.22 +39.1
-.18 +61.6
-.88 +37.1
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-.03 -29.4
-.01 -23.7
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Wkly
Last Name
6.93 NIVS IntT
5.45 Nevsun g
23.11 NDragon
8.64 NwGold g
1.21 NAPallg
3.91 NthnO&G
6.17 NthgtM g
2.90 NovaGId g
.41 Oilsands g
.48 OpkoHIth
.69 ParaG&S
17.01 PhrmAth
2.95 PionDrill
1.87 PolyMet g
7.27 Protalix
3.20 RadientPh
2.96 RareEle g
*22 Rentech
3217 Rubicon g
2.17 SamsO&G
1.29
41.5 Senesco
40 SulphCo
2.47 TanzRy g
7.30 Taseko
17.50 TimberlnR
.35 TmsatlPt n
4.09 TwoHrb wt
20.20 US Gold
4.86 Uluru
7.40 Ur-Energy
2.54 Uranerz
2,94 UraniumEn
4.26 VantageDrl
10.61 VimetX
4.54 VistaGold
4.73 WT Drf Bz
8.81 YM Bio q


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId. PE Chg %Chg Last
... 21 -.71 -29.6 33.91
4.2 17 +.18 +15.9 23.78
. .. ... +.26 +32.5 4.85
3.1 ... -.30 +3.9 34.29
1.9 ... +.08 +.5 31.23
2.7 ... +.20 +8.8 28.81
1.2 ... +.25 '+17.4 34.96
1.7 ... +.09 +4,0 59.30
1.1 ... +.26 +1.4 14.60
1.8 ... +.25 +16.9 32.48
1.3 ... +.02 +5.1 24.11
4.0 ... -.03 +2.7 31.87
.1 ... +.35 -7.2 40.40
1.2 16 +1.55 +A 50.59
... 78 -1.70 -7.6 32.62
... ... -.72 -47.7 8.70
.2 ... +1.82 +29.1 26.20
3.2 ... -1.41 -15.0 10.80
1.7 ... -.20 +17.1 2.40
1.4 14 -1.14 +3.1 14.04
4.4 ... +.26 -7.3 10.60
... 26 -1.24 +7.1 9.54
1.9 15 -.46 +11.4 53.87
... ... -1.13 +26.7 44.30'
... 16 -.09 -19.7 4.33
12 +.05 +6.7 11.45
... 12 -.97 +15.9 22.96
25 -.90 -2.6 13.20
1.8 14 -.06 +10.0 28.66
.4 ... -.56 +11.4 20.95
... 21 +.87 +4.1 49.66
2.3 17 +1.30 +9.4 90.44
2.7 14 -.27 +8.2 31.52
... 7 -1.84 -21.2 65.24
2.6 8 +1.47 +10.5 55.10
10 -1.63 -2.8 26.24
2.2 17 +.56 .+8.0 38.54
1.0 58 +.27 +27.4 15.63
+.14 +15.6 17.93
... 7 +1.11 +123.3 10.81
1.5 17 +1.10 +35.1 86.31
... +1.56+114.6 27.71,
2.7 22" +.52 +217 69.83
.. +2.19 +88.3 18.47
.8 15 +1.05 +4.8 23.59
... -.35 -47.1 5.33
.. +.02 -9.6 35.49
.5 ... -1.40 -23.3 42.28
1.3 9 +1.28 +22.2 37.26
1.7 9 ... +14.9 22.42
2.4 ... -.27 +10.5 32.07
2.6 ... -.21 +15.6 28.69
1.1 ... -.45 +5.4 17.65
1.2 ... -.64 +14.1 46.78
6.1 ... -.34 +3.7 32.09
1.6 13 -.69 +25.1 37.18
-.22 -20.5 14.69
.8 21 +1.69 -9.3 79.29
90 -1.73 +79.1 75.90
2.1 16 -.51 -7.2 34.07
... 79 -1.32 -3,5 17.28
... 5 -.24 -1.3 57.54
.8 10 +2.53 -3.3 26.11
1.2 29 -.01 +4.3 4.89
... 6 -1.46 -31.1 30.43
1.3 15 +.01 -5.0 17.90
1.3 ... +.20 -.8 15.72
2.4 28 -.25 -.4 20.99
.5 ... +.97 -29.0 8.76
1.8 28 -.06 +19.9 21.98
1.5 16 +.36 +35.0 11.42
.7 '32 -.56 -5.9 10.71
... 25 -1.47 -26.3 11.65
2.0 21 +.72 +41.8 49.57


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... +.07 +5.4 2.72
... ... -.53 +109.9 5,10
... ... ... ... -69.2 .04
... -.46 +80.8 6.58
... ... -.15 +26.3 4.42
... 99 +.47 +59.5 18.89
... 20 -.10 -9.1 2.80
... ... +.10 +56.1 9.57
... ... -.01 -60.0 .46
... ... +.22 +49.7 2.74
... ... -.13 +11.0 1.61
... ... +.66 +96.4 3.85
... ... ... -.36 -20.5 6.28
... -.20 -50.7 1.51
... ... +.21 +45.0 9.60
... ... -.08+141.7 .58
... ... +2.46 +160.6 10.11
... ... -.05 -5.7 1.16
... -.26 -25.7 3.50
-.01 +404.2 1.21
-.04 -28.8 .24
+:... .. +25 +6.0 .71
.. ... -.35 +98.3 6.92
... ... ... -52 +47.9 6.24
-.22 +5.6 1.14
... -.02 -9.4 3.10
... -.02 -69.8 .13
... -.52 +98.8 4.93
-.00 -55.5 .10
... ... +.08 +73.4 1.33
+.16 +47.7 1.92
... ... -,38 -4.8 3.60
... 55 +.03 +3.1 1.66
.50 ... 13 +.41 +499.0 17.61
... -.14 +8.2 2.65
.29 1.0 ... -.73 +8.3 28.72
... ... -.01 +48.9 2.01


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


11,000


10,500


10,000









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Women are important part our business
community. Nation-wide women comprise of
46% of the total United States workforce.
Columbia County is fortunate to have a diverse,
professional group of women managing,
running and leading our businesses. They work
in the financial, beauty, business, real estate,
publishing and the medical industry.





WOme *v & "4vz4


Linnie F. Jordan
The Blake School of Lake City
The Blake School Foundation
(Ft. Lauderdale)

Position
Founder/Director/Faculty Member
How long Established or in Career
43 Years 1967 FLL 1992 Lake City
Awards & Achievements
Assoc. of Independent Schools of FL Outstanding Service 1983
Assoc. of Independent of FL Director of Emerita 1987
Assoc. of Independent Schools of FL Distinguished Educator of the
Year 2008
Public Service Involvements
1972 Present AISF Accreditation of Florida Private Schools
National Council for Private School Accreditation (NCPSA) 1985-Present
NCPSA Commissioner for National Early Childhood Standards
NCPSA Commissioner for Accreditation Standards and Review
NCPSA Executive Board Secretary
NCPSA Executive Board Member
US Dept. of Education Delegate to Beijing, China Beijing University
Conference for Accreditation of Chinese Schools
Served as Accreditor of three Shenzhen, China District Colleges for CITA
Council for International and Tran Regional Accreditation


)bIe tlaite brcool


7443 US Hwy 90 West
Lake City, Florida
(386) 752-8874


Laurel A.
I" Warwicke, M.D.
[I Community Cancer Center
., of North Florida


How long Established or in Career
9 years

Awards & Achievements
2000 Roentgen Resident/Fellow Research Award; Published
in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology 'Biology'
Physics; American Brachytherapy Society Best Poster Award

Public Service Involvements
Board Member of the American Cancer Society


COMMUNITY
C). v CANCER CENTER
OF NORTH FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE.- LAKE CITY


(386) 755-0601
cccnf.com


Gloria Markham
First Federal Bank of Florida




Position
Manager of Main Blvd. Branch

How long Established or in Career
S19 years in Banking

Awards & Achievements
Started with First Federal as a loan processor, stepped up
to consumer loan officer, managed our call center for 3
years, now the financial center manager/financial
specialists since 2001

Public Service Involvements
Involved with Women in Business for approximately 9 years


707 US SW Main Blvd
markhamg@ffsb.com
386.755.0600 ext. 3601


II~d V C IIIV IIV


Nicole Storer


Nicole Storer
First Federal Bank of Florida



Position
Joined First Federal Bank as pa Financial Specialist
in June, 2010 at the full service Financial Center on US
90 West at Turner Rd.

How long Established or in Career
5 years in banking and finance
Awards & Achievements
Award of Excellence and Top Sales Producer, 2005 -
2010 for Bank of America Public Service Involvement:
Lake City Chamber of Commerce Member, United Way,
Habitat for Humanity, Another Way. Nicole has been
extensively involved with youth advocacy programs,
education and scholarship funding.

[I r4705 US Hwy 90 West,
I "' ',/" storern@ffsb.com
K I I (386) 755-0600 ext. 3909


Crista Thomas
First Federal Bank of Florida



Position
Financial Manager Mall Office Branch

How long Established or in Career
11 years in banking & finance over 32 years with First
Federal

Awards & Achievements
Leadership Lake City 2008, received 'Certificate of
Appreciation'from First Federal Bank for 'Outstanding
Performance & lasting contribution 2008-2009'

Public Service Involvements
Lake City Chamber of Commerce member
and active in several charities. "


I kf^

2571 US Hwy 90 West
thomasc@ffsb.com
386.755.0600 ext. 3954


Helen Tarr
Aspen Dental Group, P.A.




Position
Administrator
How long Established or in Career
Over 30 years in Healthcare -
13 years with Aspen Dental Group
Awards & Achievements
National Trap Shooting Team 2 years
Certified Sporting Clays Instructor

Public Service Involvements
Active in American Brittany Rescue and Boykin Spaniel Rescue


1788 SW Barnett Way
Lake City, FL
386.752.2336


Diana Parker
CAMPUS USA Credit Union


Position
Service Center Manager
How Long Established or in Career
28 years
Awards and Special Achievements
University of Lending, Management Essentials of
Supervision School, Certified Financial Professional
CUNA Branch Management Institute. Husband
-Jimmy, Daughter-Jenifer (Jeff), Granddaughters-
Hilary, Alison & Emma

Public Service Involvements
Christian Heritage Church, United Way

CAMPUS 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
SUSA Lake City, FL
.... ,386-754-2215


QGwynn Cochran
Virostek
First Federal Bank of Florida

Position
Senior Vice President & Director of Retail Banking
How long Established or in Career
Over 25 years
Awards & Achievements
Extensive background in banking, sales, financial administration
and community outreach programs. Owner/President Westside
Consulting Group; Senior VP and Southeast Division Executive
of Washington Mutual Bank, FA./J.P. Morgan Chase 1997-2009;
First VP & South Florida Territory Sales Manager for Great
Western Bank (acquired by Washington Mutual) 1990-1997.
Public Service Involvements
Served as Florida Bankers Association Chairman of the Board of
Directors; Current Chairman of Board of Florida's Foundation,
formerly the Governors Volunteer Florida Foundation; Governor's
Fellows Program; Points of Light; Current Vice Chair Volunteer USA
Foundation, an organization to promote education and literacy nation-
wide; also held executive member positions with Council for Education
Change; American Bankers Association Government Relations Council;
Florida Tax Watch; United Way.
4705 US Hwy 90 West
/ virostekg@ffsb.com
386.755.0600 ext. 3251


Dr. Celia Martin
Martin Orthodontist


Position
Doctor (Orthodontist)

How long Established or in Career
22 years

Awards & Achievements
National Advisory Committee for 3-M Unitek,
Academy of Women Dentist and Operative Dentistry Award,
Past FacuLty of the University of Florida Dental School,
Member of Great Aspirations 1999 an 11-person team that
trekked to the North Pole, Climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro 1999 &
went to Antarctica with National Geographic 2007

Public Service Involvements
Altrusa Member, Supporter of Youth Activities and Sports.

701 SW State Road 47
Lake City, FL
Mar tin 386-755-1001


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010 5C


Heather Gray
Mercantile Bank



Position
Senior Vice President, Retail Banking

How long Established or in Career
14 Years

Awards & Achievements
Leadership Lake City Class of 2000,
Past Ambassador for Chamber of Commerce.

Public Service Involvements
Altrusa International, Inc., Chamber of Commerce


Lynn Causey
Mercantile Bank


Position
Vice President, Retail Banking

How long Established or in Career
27 years banking / 6 years with Mercantile

Awards & Achievements
Husband and 2 grown children;
Past Ambassador Chamber of Commerce
Past Treasurer of Altrusa International

Public Service Involvements
Altrusa International Board Member
Catholic Charities, Haven Hospice and United Way of
Suwannee Valley Volunteer
187 SW Baya Drive
MERCANTILE BANK Lake City, FL
386-752-5021


2844 US Highway 90
Lake City, FL 32055
386-754-9080


Kathleen Marshall
North Florida Pharmacy
of Ft. White





Position
Ft. White Pharmacy Manager/Co-Owner

How long Established or in Career
8 years

Awards & Achievements
Doctor of Pharmacy degree from University of Florida




Ej NORTH FLORIDA 7729 SW US Hwy 27
PHARMACY Ft. White
(386) 497-2580


rSharon Pace
. North Florida Pharmacy




Position
Pharmacist

How long Established or in Career
Pharmacist for 26 years

Awards & Achievements
Married to Steven Pace, 3 wonderful daughters


NORTH FLORIDA
PHARMACY


347 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL
386.758.6770


Christie L. Petro
North Florida Pharmacy


Position Pharmacist

How long Established or in Career
33 Years

Awards & Achievements
Audrey C. McGann Award for Pharmacy Practice
from the University of Florida Pharmacy Fraternity
(1998), Smith Kline & French Award for Clinical
Pharmacy (1978), Husband Gary

Public Service Involvements
To give the best possible service
& information to my patients.


M NORTH FLORIDA
IXPHARMACY


-'B Dr. Terry Andrews
Oak Hill Dental Group



Position
Dentist

How long Established or in Career
19 years (18 years with Dr. Wheeler)

Awards & Achievements
Past president ofAltrusa of Lake City, married to
Michael for 25 years. Mom to Matt for 17 years.

Public Service Involvements
Many years as school volunteer, volunteer dentist
for Mobile Dental Unit, Creating smiles and helping
my community with their dental needs.


"1 a'0, J


272 SW Bentley Place
Lake City, Florida
(386) 752-3043


Suzy Burch, SLP
Omni Home Care
Ii 4


Position
Community Liaison
How long Established or in Career
22 years experience in the areas of speech, language, hearing and swal-
lowing disorders. Suzy graduated with a Bachelors degree in Speech and
Hearing Science from the University of South Alabama and a Masters
degree in Speech Language Pathology from Valdosta State University.
Awards & Achievements
Speech Teacher of the Year and Rehab Director of the Year. Suzy was
raised in Live Oak and has worked in both Suwannee and Columbia
Counties for 18 years. She lives in Live Oak with her husband David
and two daughters, Blakely and Baylor. She has always found it
important to positively serve in her community.
Public Service Involvements
Altrusa and The Woman's Club of Live Oak, member First United
Methodist Church serving as Acolyte Coordinator and assist with
youth. Board member of Susanna Wesley Women's Circle in Live Oak
in charge of devotions, speaker in the area of education of children/
families dealing with severe food allergies.
OMNI .,, 1037 US HWY90 W. ste 140
Lake City, Florida
(386) 754-6671


Cessie Lizotte
Cothran
I Peoples State Bank

Position
Chief Financial Officer, Vice President
How long Established or in Career
7 years with Peoples State Bank
Awards & Achievements
MBA University of North Florida
Florida School of Banking
Married to Charlie Cothran with one son, Little Charlie

Public Service Involvements
Member ofAltrusa International
Treasurer and Board Member for the
United Way of Suwannee Valley
Member of Epiphany Catholic Church


PEOPLES
STATE BANK


350 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL
386-754-0002


Im LonnieT.
Haltiwanger
Peoples State Bank

Position
Vice President .
How long Established or in Career
35 years in financial services
Awards & Achievements
Married to Joseph Haltiwanger,; two daughters,
Jodi Kelley, and Julie Haltiwanger,
one Granddaughter Jillian Haltiwanger

Public Service Involvements
Member of Mount Carmel Baptist Church,
Altrusa International of Lake City, Columbia County Builders
Association, and Treasurer of Mt Carmel Cemetery


PEOPLES
STATE BANK


MERCANTILE BANK


Sharon Rosenfeld
North Florida Pharmacy





Position
Pharmacist

How long Established or in Career
32 Years

Awards & Achievements
Married to Joel Rosenfeld, 3 great
children and 2 great sons-in-law



E NORTH FLORIDA 347 SW Main Blvd.
IXPHARMACY Lake City, FL
(386) 758-6770


3718 US 90 West
Lake City, FL
(386) 755-9300


U .Emily Wilson
North Florida Pharmacy




Position
Pharmacist

Howlong Established or in Career
7 years

Awards & Achievements
Doctor of Pharmacy from University of Florida





NORTH FLORIDA 347 SW Main Blvd.
PHARMACY Lake City, FL
(386)758-6770


H Dr. Lorrie Wheeler
Oak Hill Dental Group



Position
Dentist

How long Established or in Career
18 years (18 years with Dr. Andrews)

Awards & Achievements
Volunteer of the Year,- Summer's Elementary

Public Service Involvements
Summers, LCMC & CHS volunteer, Masterpiece
Performing Arts, First United Methodist Church, board
member and past president of Happy House. Volunteer
dentist for Mobile Dental Unit

'i / L ,U 272 SW Bentley Place
-' n t' Lake City, Florida
,'.0. :6.," -(386) 752-3043


350 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL
386-754-0002


ollmmm-1


i - -


I








6C LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Jaclyn Peterson
Sunbelt Honda



Position
Sales Consultant
How long Established or in Career
7 months
Awards & Achievements
Honda Certified Sales Consultant
Public Service Involvements
In much appreciation of my family, friends and
especially my new family at Sunbelt Honda.
They have helped me set and achieve many goals.
Thank you!


SLHONDA

HONDA


2018 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 755-6500


~'

.4K '~

'4.


Danielle Rodgers
Sunbelt Honda


Position
Internet Manager
How long Established or in Career
8 years
Awards & Achievements
Council of Sales Leadership 2005 Gold Level
2006 and 2007 Silver Level and 2008 Bronze Levelfor exem-
plary customer satisfaction, outstanding sales performance and
exceptional knowledge'of Honda products.
Internet Sales and Sales Consultant.
Public Service Involvements
In great appreciation to God, my customers, family and friends
who helped me obtain these goals. (Thank You.)


HONDA


2018 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 755-6500


Mary Sineath
'-. .. l Sunbelt Honda



Position
Office Manager

How long Established or in Career
4 years









2018 SW Main Blvd.
HONDA Lake City, FL 32025
HU (386) 755-6500


Dinia L. (Wezzie)
Huelskamp
"Ms. Wezzie's Haircuts

Position
Owner/Operator
How long Established or in Career
Master Cosmetologist & Barber/ Stylist for 37 years
Awards & Achievements
Certified by: Clairol, Sasoon, Zoto, De-Lo-Rossi, Pivot Point,
International, & Mr. Peter Hantz. Married to husband, Michael &
3 children; Billy Jack, Michael and Bonnie. Baptized in 1983 and
trying to live a Christian life.
Public Service Involvements
Member of Elks Lodge #893, Lifetime Member of NRA and
Blue-Grey Army and'FFA Alumni. Volunteer at Haven Hospice,
VA Hospital, VFW, FFA, 4H and numerous other organizations.


Ms. f 1
Wezz e's
Haircuts


84 SW Dominos Way, ste 101
Lake City, FL
W-386.758.7700
C-386-365-7117


Antonia Jeanelle
Robinson
Lake City Reporter
Position
Staff Writer
How long Established or in Career
4 years
Awards & Achievements
Nominee for Georgia School Board Association Beacon Award
for Media Coverage of Hart County School System 2008 & 2009
Third Place Best Feature Story for
CNI Better Newspacper Awards 2010
Helped earn Media Promotion of the Year
in 2010 from ACE of Florida
Public Service Involvements
Greater Shiloh MBC in Palatka, ACR Hunnies,
Society of Professional Journalists and all around
Lake City Reporter Representative.


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS mtgazi-e


180 East Duval St.
Lake C ty, FL
386-752-1293


Lake City Reporter
", ,:" Misty Tomlinson



Position
Account Executive
How long Established or in Career
I have just recently taken an executive sales
position with the Lake City Reporter, but
I was in the financial industry prior.
Awards & Achievements
My greatest achievement in my life would be my family.
My 7-year-old son, Gage and Justin. "I love you both"

Public Service Involvements
CCBA, Lake City Pop Warner football "Scholastic Administrator"
with sponsorship by the Richardson Community Center/ Annie
Mattox Park North Advisory Council (RCC/AMN),
Member of the Chamber of Commerce


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS niagazinc


180 East Duval St.
Lake City, FL
386-752-1293


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS migazine


Heather Turbeville
Peoples State Bank



Position
Vice President, Business Development Officer
How long Established or in Career
3 years with Peoples State Bank
and 21 years in financial services
Awards & Achievements
Married to Robert Turbeville and have
4 sons Walker Johnson, Wyatt, Bryson
and Dylan Turbeville.

Public Service Involvements
Chamber Ambassador.
Served on the Planning and Zoning Board for the county,
the American Diabetes Board and the Crime Stoppers Board.
P PEOPLES 350 SW Main Blvd.
P -A Lake City, FL
STATE BANK 386-754-0002


^ WH. Cynthia Mantini
Print-O-Matic, LLC



How long Established or in Career
Printing and publishing since 1979, moved to Lake City
and purchased Print-O-Matic in 2001

Awards & Achievements
Nominated Entrepreneur of the Year in Gainesville, Florida,
Won prestigious State Wide Self-Advertising award
from Printing Industries of Florida, Entrepreneur in
the Printing Business since 1979 various other
entrepreneurial achievements
Public Service Involvements
Support various Civic Activities


273 NW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 755-4545


ASTOUnDIN FEATS I IN n & COPY SINCE 1979


Angie DePratter
Sunbelt Honda



Position
Finance Manager
How long Established or in Career
24 years
Awards & Achievements
American Financial & Automobile Service,
Automotive Training Academy.







2018 SW Main Blvd.
SHON DA Lake City, FL 32025
DI 1(386) 755-6500


Missy Zecher
RE/MAX Professionals Inc.





How long Established or in Career
16 years experience in the housing industry, 4 years as a
licensed realtor

Awards & Achievements
RE/MAX Professionals Rookie of the Year 2008,
RE/MAX Executive Club 2009, RE/MAX 100% Club 2010,
CDPE Certified Distressed Property Expert,
CSP Certified Short Sale Professional

Public Service Involvement
MLS Board of Directors, Senior Services Board of
Directors, CHS Football corporate sponsor; contribute
and supporter of local schools, sports organizations and
charitable organizations.


www.missyzecher.com
(386)623-0237


Eileen Bennet


I ^Eileen Bennett
Lake City Reporter


Position
Account Executive

How long Established or in Career
25 years

Awards & Achievements
2 beautiful sons (Scott & Andy),
2 great daughter-in-laws (Veronica & Heather),
and 3 terrific grandchildren
(Drew, Case, Nina & Ella (Not born yet))
Meeting my high school sweetheart and
being together after 40 years



Lake City Reporter 180 East Duval St.
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine Lake City, FL
386-752-1293


1 LeanneTyo
Lake City Reporter



Position
Staff Writer

How Long Established or in Career
2 years

Awards & Achievements
Helped to earn Media Promotion of the Year in 2010
from Adult and Community Educators of Florida

Public Service Involvements
Church on the Way, Skater of the Month for
ACR Hunnies roller derby team


180 East Duval St.
Lake City, FL
386-752-1293


I











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER24, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


020 Lost & Found
STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197
100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

04541830
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
No CDL, No Problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1.-866-457-6236

04542009
BAKER TRANSPORT needs
owner operators with wedge
trailers to deliver cargo trailers
across Southeast. Must have
CDL-A and a one ton
truck or larger.
Call 1-866-764-1601
for pay rates and more info.

05524275
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
For Our NEW Store on
Pinemount & Birley Rd
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees .
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
pm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
sents seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
one of these positions to qualify
for the jab. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all
managers before they are hired.

05524295
Need experienced
-CNC Machine Programmer
and Operator.
Must have some Supervisory
Experience, Send Resume to
Grizzly Mfg. Attn: Guy
174 NE Cortez Terrace
Lake City FL, 32055
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Exec.Dir.- nonprofit working with
people with disabilities. Manages
agency with $2M bgt./120 empl.
Reports to 14 mbr.board. 3 yrs.
admin. exp incl. budgeting,.
community relations, fundraising,
implementing policies/programs
required. BA degree preferred.
Email resume
prenew(@lakecity-carc.com:
Industrial Sewing Machine
Operator, wages based on ability,
Call Hafner's
386-755-6481
Operations/MGR Position
Exceptional people skills,
Proficient with Quickbooks req,
Marketing exp req, M-F, some
travel, job demanding but reward-
ing, fast paced medical industry,
fax resumes to 386-758-9047
Secretary Needed FT for a busy
Doctor's office. Excellent skills in
MS Word (speed 60wpm or
above), & MS Excel.
Fax Resume to 386-758-5987

-i




Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
.Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn chre, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
****************************


100 Job
100 Opportunities
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity to
earn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
email to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information
Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to
northfloridajobs( gmail.com
Special invitation
to those 18+ Get paid for your
personality. No experience
necessary All expenses paid.

Tow Truck Operator. Bryant's
Towing is now hiring Drivers!
Must have a clean MVR never
been charged with or convicted of
a felony. 6 day work week, night
& weekend hours required. Salary
386-752-7799

o Sales
Employment

05524246
Outside Sales Experience? You
have the sales skills, maybe just
the wrong product? Would you
like to make $1000 $1500 a
week? If you are a people
person, we need to talk
904-472-3626

05524247
Promotions Rep
$500 is a bad day for our reps.
Are you an outgoing people
person? Would you like to
make $1000 a week?
Call 904-472-3626


12 a a Medical
120 Employment

05524296



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
PRN RN and LPN
F/T & PRN C.N.A.
t.
Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center
Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke
Case Manager
SChild/Adult
G'Ville/Trenton
Live Oak/Starke/LakeCity
Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City
Therapist
LCSW/LMHC/Preferred
Masters/CAP Required
Discharge
Planner/Addictions
Emergency
Screener/Outpatient
Therapeutic Foster
Care/Residential
Day Treatment
$35-$57 K
G'Ville/Lake City
Bronson/Trenton/Starke
Counselor
(Bachelors in Human Srvcs)
F/T & PRN
Residential /Rehab/Outpatient
G'Ville & Lake City
Cook
PRN & P/T
Custodial worker
8-4:30 M-F
Meridian" is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494


190 Mortgage Money
FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
Continuing education ,
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or,
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
0v Supplies
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
GE Refrigerator,
front milk door,
36x311/2, height 681/2,
6 yrsold $450 386-752-1811

407 Computers
IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
Panasonic Tough Book Laptop
metal casing, touch screen, recent
diag, works great, upgraded mem-
ory/anti-virus $150 386-623-2443
Panasonic Tough Book Laptop,
runs Windows XP, works great,
recent diagnostic $100
386-6232443

420 Wanted to Buy
I BUY USED APPLIANCES.
Working or not.
Don't scrap that machine.
Call 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
FIRM QUEEN Mattress, still in
plastic. Never been used!
$150
Call 386-288-8833
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


rYour skills
,and. ,
positive attitude.
i' ..)


Apply Online or In Person!


S iEL


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake .City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


450 Good Things
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3/2 S/W MH, 1 acre fenced lot,
close to town, near new Elem
school, $700 mon, 1st & last
at move-in 352-281-0549
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $550
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
DWMH, Spacious 4/2, on 5
acresjust south of Lake City,clean,
quiet, great location, storage shed,
$850 mo, 1st, last & $300 sec,
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-86-7-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
2.5 acres in Olustee, close to
Ocean Popd,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
5523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA with carport, screen
porch, Privacy Garden.
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
.386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex,
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $625 plus dep & bckgrnmd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 386-397-2108
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


72 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73O Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2br plus bonus room. w/h5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Furnished Farm House. 3/2,re-
modeled, wrap around porch, hors-
es welcome, on 160 ac, 5 miles to
1-75, 2 miles to I-10, $1200 month
386-362-8708 or 386-3624114
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45, 4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
Irg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft, Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626). 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

75C Business &
59U Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recent area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695: sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & I-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2000 obo
386-965-2215
1994 FORD Ranger.
$1,500 obo
386-397-4912


940 Trucks






951 Recreational
SVehicles
Carriage LS 36 ft, fifth wheel,
$26K obo, can see by, appt. only
(will sell w/F350 package)
serious offers only 386-755-0653


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445




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Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


jBUYBr


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8C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


SIsu, and' 1ck Tannimnsto a-07


Please join us to celebrate this SPECIAL DAY! Great Savings on Tanning and Lotions!
Register for Drawings to win Tanning and Lotion Free! All Day! One Day Only!
CAKE MUSIC ROUZEN DRINKS GIVE-A-WAYS!


4w Nettles Sausage, Inc. Store Hours:
S90 sW CR 240 Monday Saturday:
S>'" 8 am 6 Spm
. 386-752-2510


Fresh
Ground Chuck
Family Pack
s2.39 Ib.


Fresh Fryer
Leg Quarters
10 lb. Bag
$5.99


Semi-Boneless
Ribeyes
Whole or Half
$5.99 ib.


Beef Tenderloin
Fillets

$8.991b.


Everyone who
comes in gets a
Free Packet of
Lotion!
Stock up on
Tanning and
Products at Great
Discounts!


;'~~i2U~. -
.t *4 -, -t


10TH ANNIVERSARY

vi L


o1 445 SW WAI e9LVU
754-5200


i MONTH MEMBERSHIP
I J ^f Only 50

Or as low as 20 a month for longer term.
No K.ay De-posit -', 1-n Enirn,,iW at Fee,
*c--"'.^. '^m i^BB^^n r O iricr.c riionCin md jCppl,


Westfield Square LAKE T.
386-752-0749
"Lake City's Best Since 1986"


Rountree
1( TOYOTA

IWUSn:90g


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 10/31/10


*fI'l LmfI1I~iI' i ;I1k~Ii' miii I '~a


COME ENJOY LIFE IN THE FAST LANE

AT THE

WlHITE SPRINGS RIVER RALLY AND FESTIVAL

OCTOBER 30TH, 2010


9 AIM. TO 6 P.M.
Take 1-75 to Exit 439 (Highway 136), go East toward White Springs past the river and bear left to the blinking light at US41.


C~)A


5TTE4 IhoW


Arts & Crafts, Great Food,Karaoke and Live Entertainment


Vehicle Registration


by The Willow Creek Band.
only $10 from 8 A.M.-11:30 A.M. and Best of the Best t


o be awarded by our judges.


11F. .
. : 'A


Arts & Crafts Spaces Available
Contact Wendell Snowden 386-963-1157
Sponsored by Town of White Springs, First Federal Bank, American Pawn Brokers, The Jasper News, Kilgore's Repair Shop, and Interstate Recycling


FITNESS
CENTER


expires 10/31/10


STATIO


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- .. I.-I o Im o


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2P019


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MotomylFwo











Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@cakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, October 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

'Leaves

of three,

let it be'

We have so
many beau-
tiful parks
and natu-
ral areas
where we can enjoy recre-
ational activities in North
Florida.
With the arrival of cooler
temperatures, many of us
are back to walking, hik-
ing, and exploring what's
around the next bend of
the trail. Beware that your
close encounters along the
way do not include poison
ivy.
At least 75 percent of
the population will experi-
ence an allergic reaction
if exposed to the sap of
the poison ivy plant, Rhus
radicans. Many people who
believe they are immune
may become sensitive to
the toxin after repeated
exposures.
Burning poison ivy can
even release the toxin into
the air to be carried by
smoke particles.
All parts of poison ivy,
including the roots, are
poisonous any time of
the year. After coming in
contact with the plant, the
symptoms may appear
within a few hours or days.
Itching and burning is fol-
lowed by a red rash and
blistering.
Learning how to recog-
nize poison ivy will save
you a great deal of discom-
fort. These woody vines
are covered with 'hairy'
looking roots that will grow
up trees and fences, or
creep along the ground.
Leaf forms may vary, but
the leaves consist of three
leaflets.
Remember the saying,
"Leaves of three, let it be!"
The fruit of the poison ivy
is a waxy white berry.
Poison oak, or Rhus toxi-
codendron, is another com-
mon plant in North Florida
that can cause similar reac-
tions. It is often called oak-
leaf ivy because of the dis-
tinctive shape of the leaves.
The leaflets also occur in
threes, but they are lobed
and resemble oak leaves.
Poison oak grows as a low
shrubby plant, however,
unlike the vining growth of
poison ivy.
The chemical in the sap
of these plants that causes
irritation is called urushiol
(pronounced oo-roo-shee-
ohl).
The first line of defense
is to immediately flush the
contacted skin with cold
water.
Hot water may hasten
the spread of the oil.
Cleanse the skin with
detergent and water as
soon as possible to remove
the urushiol oil. Remove
and launder clothing that
came in contact with the
sap.
For more information
on poisonous plants, go
to http://edis. ifas. ufl. edu/
ep220 or call the Master
Gardeners at 753-5384.
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bennett pets Sophia, a white speckled mare, and Rocky, a chestnut gelding, while visiting a pasture on her 30-acre property where she will temporarily
house Secretariat's Fire until a permanent stable is constructed. Bennett will bring Secretariat's Fire, 22, the pregnant mare sired by Secretariat, down from
Lexington, Ky. Secretariat's Fire was bred to Eclipse Champion and three-time Grade 1 winner Midnight Lute.






SIRED BY A CHAMP



Secretariat's Fire sparks excitement


among local fans of thoroughbreds


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Growing up in
New York,
Shirley
Bennett would
walk more
than a mile to see a horse
in a pasture, hoping it
would come to a fence so
she could pet it.
Now Bennett, a Fort
White resident, is making
preparations to bring her
racing horse to Florida.
"As a little girl I loved
horses," she said. "It's
come full circle."
Bennett is owner of
Secretariat's Fire, a mare
sired by Secretariat. It is
expected to give birth in
the spring of 2011.
Secretariat was an
American thoroughbred
racehorse that in 1973
became the first U.S.
Triple Crown champion in
25 years. The foal is sired
by Midnight Lute, the only
horse to win the Breeder's
Cup Sprint two consecu-
tive years. It won the 2008


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White resident and horse enthusiast Shirley Bennett, 62, poses with a painting of the
thoroughbred racehorse Secretariat in her home.


Breeder's Cup Spring in
1:07, the fastest time in
the race's 25-year history.
Bennett is a partner at
Signature Thoroughbreds,
which has a seven mares
expecting and three


ready to train. Several
of the mares come from
Secretariat.
Her racing partner,
Roger Braugh, bred his
mare, Crimson Saint, with
Secretariat, which pro-


duced Reportage. Crimson
Saint also gave birth to a
filly named Terlingua.
Bennett has only been
involved in the horse rac-
ing industry for two years.
"I'm new to the world


of racing," she said. "It's
a big learning curve. It's
very exciting, and I'm like
a sponge taking it all in."
She came to Fort White
to get away from the big
city and work on a book,
she said. Initially, she
owned three quarter hors-
es but later sold them.
It was during a conven-
tion in Lexington, Ky.
when she met Braugh and
a partnership was formed.
Secretariat's Fire is in
Lexington, Ky., now but
Bennett plans to bring her
to Columbia County for
the winter, along with two
other expecting mares.
Bennett said she was
already excited about
the upcoming foal's
birth before the movie,
"Secretariat," came out
this year.
"I saw the movie and
got more excited," she
said.
The movie shows the
exciting world of horse
racing as well as its ups
and downs, Bennett said.
Secretariat and his owner,


White House fall harvest turns up turnips


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Michelle Obama munched
a baby turnip, dug up giant
sweet potatoes and snipped
pumpkins off the vine as she
teamed up with local school-
children and world-class
chefs for a fall harvest day
in the White House garden.


One hulking sweet potato
weighed in at 4 pounds on
its own, drawing an admir-
ing stare from the first lady.
"You guys have witnessed
the first White House pump-
kins," she told the children
as they loaded up wheelbar-
rows and weighed in their
haul.
Mrs. Obama later posed


for a group photo with the
harvest team, and at first
prompted the children to
smile and say "cheese." But
then she had a better idea,
declaring, "Let's say 'veg-
gies!'"
After the kids finished
their harvesting, they were
put to work once again,
washing the produce and


then slicing and dicing veg-
etables for a fresh garden
salad made just for them.
The White House kitchen
team got some help from
world-renowned chefs
Daniel Boulud and James
Kent, representing the
United States in the 2011
Bocuse d'Or cooking com-
petition, known informally


as the Olympics of cooking.
Boulud quizzed the
schoolkids on what to do
with turnips and then told
them, "We can make a good
soup with that"
The garden has produced
1,600 pounds of food this
year, used to feed the first
family and White House
guests and for donations.


_ _ I I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Plum Creek Foundation supports sustainable project


On Sept: 8, the
Plum Creek
Foundation
awarded
Florida
Gateway College $30,000,
payable at $10,000 per year
for three years, to create
and maintain a Sustainable
Florida Gateway web por-
tal.
This new web portal (to
be unveiled in January of
2011) will feature descrip-
tions of environmental and
conservation programs -
and activities that are avail-
able throughout North
Central Florida, increasing
access to useful informa-
tion about conservation
and sustainability issues.
This Sustainable Florida
Gateway will provide
links to related websites
and provide a regional
calendar of environmental
education and awareness
activities.
The website will include
targeted discussion forums
and blog opportunities,
providing a way for people
to ask questions and share
important information.
The web portal will
also be used to share
Sustainable Florida initia-
tive progress with plan-
ning partners and other
interested people through-


out the state.
Plum Creek Timber
Company has been a
strong workforce and
educational program devel-
opment partner for many
years at Florida Gateway
College.
Greg Driskell, Plum
Creek's harvesting man-
ager for the Lake Butler
District of Florida, served
on the college's forestry
industry Advisory Council
and now is a key member
of the college's Sustainable
Florida advisory committee.
That project will be
located on approximately
1,000 acres of land
adjacent to the Florida
Gateway College campus,
owned by the Suwannee
River Water Management
District.
Plum Creek owns the
trees on that property
(until time for harvest)
and is actively working
with Florida Gateway
College and the Suwannee
River Water Management
District to design and '
develop a Sustainable
Florida Demonstration site
for residents of north cen-
tral Florida.
The Sustainable Florida
project is still in an early
development phase, but
plans include a wide vari-


Laurel Semmes
laurel.semmes@fgc.edu
ety of sustainability and
"green technology" educa-
tion resources, including:
A custom, "net zero
energy" modular home
pilot project that demon-
strates green technologies
for residential structures,
including use of passive
solar techniques, geother-
mal heating and cooling,
solar photovoltaic energy
production, and other
Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design
(LEED) principles and
building standards;
A Living Machine
that will process approxi-
mately 3,000 gallons of
wastewater a day;
Sustainable horticul-
ture, agriculture, forestry,
and landscape exhibits;
A "green" golf course
demonstration of low-
water/low-pesticide-use
landscape plants and main-
tenance practices;
Interpretive trails


through various ecosys-
tems that can be used for
learning, entertainment, or
wellness activities.
Sustainable Florida plan-
ners have seen significant
progress toward meeting
these goals.
Last January, a diverse
group of Sustainable
Florida stakeholders
(including private indus-
try, UF extension, envi-
ronmental conservation
non-profits, educators, and
state and federal legisla-
tors) recommended an
initial focus on issues of
water quantity and quality
in Florida.
Following that guid-
ance, Florida Gateway
College sought and was
competitively awarded
distinction as Florida's
statewide Banner Center
for Water Resources.
Formal announcement of
that award took place in
Orlando on Oct. 19 at the
Florida Earth Foundation
sponsored Water Choices
Forum www.FloridaEarth.
org).
Florida Gateway
College has also received
funding from golf and
landscape industries for
the Sustainable Florida
master,planning process
and encouragement from


the National Science
Foundation to apply for
broader demonstration site
construction funds.
Plum Creek owns
590,000 acres in 22 of
Florida's counties with
a significant amount
of land in and around
Columbia County. It is the
largest private landowner
in the United States,
Like other residents
of North Central Florida,
Plum Creek values the
quality of life we gain from
living among Florida's
largest concentration of
magnitude-one springs and
some of its most pristine
remaining ecosystems.
Plum Creek is the larg-
est private owner of con-
servation lands in Florida,
with more than 90,000
acres under permanent
conservation easements.
Two principles guide
Plum Creek operation:
responsible stewardship
of their property holdings
and continual improve-
ment of the quality of life
in,the communities they
call home,
Nationally, Plum Creek
manages approximately
7 million acres of timber-
land.
In 1999, they were the
first timber company in


the nation to have all
operations certified to
Sustainable Forestry
Initiative (SFI) standards
- requiring replant-
ing for natural forest
regeneration, use of Best
Management Practices
for protection of water
resources, and manage-
ment of wildlife habitat by
preserving ecosystems
that support threatened
and endangered species.
Plum Creek continues
to seek opportunities
to "protect land that
has visual, historic, rec-
reation, forestry, wild-
life habitat, and other
significant attributes"
through-the way they
purchase, use, and man-
age our valuable natural
resources (see Plum
Creek website at www.
Plum Creek.com for more
information, including
a case study describing
their economic develop-
ment partnership with '
Columbia County).
We are thankful for
,having neighbors like
Plum Creek Timber
Company.

* Laurel Semmes is director
of grants and grant manage-
ment at the Florida Gateway
College.


Polyantha is a rose that keeps on giving


By LEE REICH
Associated Press
T here's a rose
that week after
week, since
spring, has
been decked
out in pretty pink blos-
soms. Even going into fall,
the plant is covered with
hopeful flower buds, many
of which are prodded open
on balmy days.
Polyantha is obviously
not your average rose.
The usual ills, such as
blackspot or Japanese
beetles, do little damage
to Polyantha. Her leaves
remain almost as perky
green in fall as they were
in early summer. And no
need to coddle this plant
through winter in a styro-
foam hut or with mulch
heaped around its base.
Polyantha's ancestor
originated in France in
1860 as a seedling of the
often scorned multiflora
rose. You know this shrub,
popping up everywhere,
threatening to engulf fields
and even some backyards
with its giant, thorny canes
and small white blossoms.
(Okay, the flowers are
pretty.)
M. Guillot, a rose breed-
er, had planted seeds of a
climbing multiflora rose,
and found in the offspring
plants bearing double
pink flowers. All the plants
produced sterile blooms,
except one. When this one
plant's seeds were planted,
its offspring, Polyanthas,
were short, compact plants
that bloomed the whole
season.
Yes, Polyantha blossoms
are small, less than an
inch across, but they make


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo shows a Polyantha rose in New Paltz, N.Y. The usual ills, such as
blackspot or Japanese beetles, do little damage to Polyantha. The leaves of this rose remain
almost as perky green in fall as they were in early summer.


up for their size with their
abundance. The flowers
are borne in large sprays
that decorate the plant in
pink through much of the
summer. Not the traffic-
stopping pink of Hybrid
Tea roses, but a soft, pas-
tel pink.that calls to mind,
along with Polyantha's
blowsy form, old-fashioned
roses of cottage gardens.
The petals are white at
their bases, and pollen-
laden stamens paint a dab
of yellow at the center of
each" blossom. The blos-
soms fade almost white
with age, so the different
aged flowers create waves
of color over the plant.
And can you detect a slight


fragrance from the blos-
som? Yes!
There's no science or
art to pruning Polyanthas.
Take your choice. Lop the
whole plant to within a few
inches of the ground and
sacrifice the very earliest
blossoms but keep the
plant smaller. Or don't
prune at all; the plant still
never grows more than
about 3 feet high.
Although generally
overlooked by gardeners,
Polyanthas have not been
overlooked by rpse breed-
ers. In 1930, a Polyantha
was crossed with a
Hybrid Tea rose, and thus
originated what are today
known as Floribunda


roses. Floribundas get
their blossom shape from
the Hybrid Tea but their


hardiness, floral abun-
dance, compactness and
disease resistance from
the Polyantha.
Although Polyanthas
have mostly been used to
breed other roses, there
are a few Polyantha variet-
ies. The best known is The
Fairy, followed closely by
China Doll. Marie Pavie
is another variety, notable
for being thornless, with
creamy white blossoms.
Zenaitta's blossoms are
deep red, and the rose
pink ones of Mignonette
cluster in sprays of 50 or
more.
Besides buying a plant,
another way to get started
with Polyantha is to just
plant seeds, which sprout
quite readily. Ideally, plant
the seed or seeds, just
for insurance in a small
flowerpot of potting soil.
Water and keep the pot in
a cool place for a couple of
months. The seeds might
sprout by then, surely
soon after you move the
plant to a warmer location.
Give the seedling plenty
of bright light outdoors
when weather is mild or


in a sunny window if the
weather is cold as long
as it has leaves.
Once you have one
plant, it can become many
new plants from cuttings.
With care, you can get
almost 100 percent of
Polyantha cuttings to take
root, especially if the cut-
tings are taken just before
growth begins. Just stick
4- to 6-inch pieces of stem
into pots of moist soil and
keep in a partially shaded
location. Once rooted, pot
up each plant and move it
into the sun. As a plants
grows, plant it out to the
garden or move it into a
larger pot.
A particularly cheery
association for Polyantha
is growing shoulder to
shoulder with a large-blos-
somed, sparse-flowering,
cottage-y rose such as
Bibi Maizoon. Polyantha's
ongoing show of small,
pink flowers provides
delightful background
"music" for Bibi Maizoon's
corpulent, pink and heav-
ily fragrant blossoms,
which are too few and far
between.


Model your makeup after the '70s


By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
AP Fashion Writer

NEW YORK-- Think big
(hair). Think bold (eye shad-
ow). Think bright (lips).
You're going to need the
hair, makeup and nails to
Really capture the '70s girl
dominating spring trends,
but you don't have to wear
them all at once.
Beauty insiders who
turned runway models into
Bianca Jaggers during the
season's previews say the
disco-infused look has ele-
ments of mass appeal but
moderation will keep it from
becoming a costume.
Move just enough outside
your comfort zone to update
your look, they say. Some


tips:
Redken's creative consul-
tant Guido saw a pervasive
theme of "decadent glam-
our," noting inspirations
from the '70s as well as the
'20s, as he moved from New
York to London, to Milan,
Italy, to Paris for runway
shows this cycle.
"There was glamour, shine
and gloss. The '20s and '70s
were both strong decades.
Women were very forceful
and that happened with the
direction of fashion," Guido
says. "For a long time, it
was about bed-head, beachy
matte hair, but this season
was definitely not about
that" (Guido's full name is
Guido Palau, although he is
known by his first name.)


No one is expected to fully
recreate the runway, which
is a platform for the fashion
world to send women in a
particular direction, if not a
specific place, he says. "You
can do it in small bits. The
shows are there to indicate
what designers and stylists
are thinking."
He suggests teasing the
hair a bit at the crown, add-
ing spray shine or an exag-
gerated side part. A side
ponytail or a wave of hair
over one eye also capture
the mood, he says.
"I follow the fashion
trends and then I try to
adapt them for women
today," says Frederic
Fekkai celebrity stylist
Renato Campora.


Sto b te ake it Rpote

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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Churchgoer wishes fellow


congregants would kiss off


DEAR ABBY: I have a
problem with people in our
church congregation who
want to greet me with a kiss.
Please advise me on how to
handle this delicate situation.
I don't want to hurt any
feelings; these, are nice
people. However, lips carry
germs, and I have a weak im-
mune system. I have tried ex-
tending my hand in greeting,
but one man smooched me
anyway, saying, "I don't shake
hands with girls!" Abby, I'm
70 and hardly a "girl," and I
didn't appreciate his rejection
of my handshake.
Do you think it will work
if I tell him and others that
I have a contagious disease
that causes men's lips to dry
up and fall off? DEANNA
IN FLORIDA
DEAR DEANNA: No. It
would be more to the point to
tell your fellow church mem-
bers that you have a fragile im-
mune system and are suscep-
tible to viruses which is why
you prefer to shake hands.
It's the truth. And if the man
who smooched you continues
to be a problem, talk to your
clergyperson about it.
DEAR ABBY: I hive met
my soul mate. She has the
same name as my ex-wife.
How do we remedy this? It is
driving me nuts! SCOTT
IN WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR SCOTT: Remem-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

ber when you were in school
and there were several stu-
dents in a class who shared
the same name? Some of them
would adopt a nickname. If it's
OK with your soul mate, she
can certainly do the same.
But consider the upside for
you. The fact that your new
lady's and ex-wife's names
match guarantees you won't
ever slip and call her by the
wrong one.
DEAR ABBY: I am hop-
ing you might have a sugges-
tin on how to handle ciga-
rette smokers who ignore my
requests to not smoke in my
direction. I have severe aller-
gies, and I also suffer from
dry eye syndrome. Even after
I have told smokers that their
addiction worsens my condi-
tion they continue, assuming
that by cracking a window the
room is ventilated. FRUS-
TRATED IN TURLOCK,
CALIF.
DEAR FRUSTRATED:
I do have a suggestion, one
that is time-honored and ef-
fective. Safeguard your health


by avoiding anyone who con-.
tinues to smoke after having
been told that it negatively af-
fects you.
DEAR ABBY: A year ago,
I married an old and dear
friend. We have both been
through marriage, divorce
and difficult relationships. At
last, I finally found the person
I was meant to be with.,
My husband's parents
have been gone for several
years, but I was fortunate
enough to know them before
they died. We went to visit
their graves the day after our
wedding, and I placed two
pennies I had been saving on
their headstone one dated
1968 for me and one dated
1963 for him.
Last week I received sev-
eral pennies in change and
dropped them into my wallet.
When I fished them out later,
I was delighted to see that one
was frbm 1968 and the other
was from 1963! I believe in my
heart it's his parents' way of
telling us that they are happy
we are together. LUCKY
BRIDE IN MAINE
DEAR LUCKY BRIDE:
And I can't think of a more
meaningful wedding gift you
could have received from your
late in-laws. May you and your
soul mate enjoy many happy,
healthy years together.
S Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't look back or have
regrets about what might have
been. Forward motion will
bring you back to being your
best. A contract with unusual
rewards is apparent A new
partnership will inspire you.
***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Take advantage of an op-
portunity to do business, form
a partnership or take part in
something that can further
your interests. Relationships
will be emotional but stellar,
so express your feelings and
intentions. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't be fooled by how
others portray who they are or
what they do or have accom-
plished. You are every bit as
resourceful and successful, so
don't lose faith or allow anyone
to belittle you. Connect with
someone from your past who
owes you a favor. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Take on a challenge and
you will surpass your expecta-
tions. You can enhance your
reputation and impress people
willing to help you advance.
Children and older relatives
will give you great insight


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You can expect to face opposi-
tion at home and with regard
to personal matters or settle-
ments. Focus on your work
and how you can get ahead.
Greater insight into different
lifestyles will help you make
any necessary adjustments.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): It's your turn to choose
with whom you want to spend
your time. Don't be shy take
the plunge and be a participant
Love is in the stars and social-
izing with friends, neighbors
or someone you are already
attached to will help you dis-
cover a new interest. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Don't give in to pressure
or guilt that someone tries to
push your way. Rely on what
you have learned through past
experience. Focus on what you
have to offer and how you can
utilize your skills to advance.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Put aside your differ-


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals B
"JWTK F XTT XCLTOWF KV RKNRXO,
WUBT OC F K OTMBTK T FO X WUMA
DCM LT OC J UO Y W O WT RKAT M,A C V
XRDDTM." SMFXOTK ITH H
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Whatever it is that will bring me the reward of
paradise, I'll do the best I can." Anne Bancroft
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-25


ences and plan to have some
fun. Taking an entertaining
approach to the way you deal
with the people you are with
today will plant the seed for
future opportunities. Creative
projects can get a boost and a
partnership looks promising.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Getting involved in
a cause you believe in or work-
ing alongside someone you
respect or want to get to know
better will lead to greater op-
portunities. Don't let unsettled
business 'at home cause you
to miss out on something you
want to do. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Return to doing
the things you enjoy most and
spending time with people you
relate to better. Improve both
your personal and professional
direction and purpose. Offer-
ing help to someone from your
past will open up a door that
has been shut for some time.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Keep things low
key and observe before mak-
ing a move. Problems can be
expected to surface if you trav-
el or communicate with people
with a different opinion or at-
titude. Go over your personal
and financial papers. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Take pride in what you
do. You'll be the one who can
persuade others to join your
crusade or to get involved in a
creative project you are work-
ing toward. Money and inter-
esting proposals are heading
your way. ****


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


FIGURE OF SPEECH By Patrick Blindauer / Edited by Will Shortz 1- 2 3[140 5161 7 9 1O 11 113 114 5 16 1 7 18


Across
1 Alaska senator
Murkowski
5 Sean who played
the title role in
"Rudy," 1993
10 Start to frost?
15 Pan handler
19 El oc6ano, por
ejemplo
20 Shakespeare's
Lennox, Angus
or Ross
21 Bitter
22 Aries or Taurus
23 Hoop grp.
24 They may be
.split
25 Singer with the
#1 country hit
"Hello Darlin'"
27 When repeated, a
calming phrase
28 A whole lot
29 Debate side
30 Cartographic
extra
31 Egg protector
32 Easy as falling
off
33 Salon, for
example
35 Listens, old-
style
37 Suspenseful 1966
Broadway hit
43 Grp. that
conducts many
tests
46 Biblical liar
48 See 39-Down

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


49 Actress
Chong
51 Least welcoming
52 Wait upon
53 Gathered
54 ___ Coty, French
president before
de Gaulle
55 Stick in the mud
57 Subtracting
59 Cassandra, for
one
60 Repeatedly
raised the bar?
63 Long piece of
glassware
67 N.F.C. South
player
70 Noggin
71 Still product:
Abbr.
72 On the safe side
73 Wave function
symbol in
quantum
mechanics
74 Items of short-
lived use
76 Racy best-selling
novel of 1956
79 Take ___ (rest)
80 Hindu titles
82 Speed-skating
champ Johann
___ Koss
83 Out of
87. Like an
egocentric's
attitude
91 Flammable fuel
93 Part of a postal
address for
Gannon
University
95 Carry out
96 Moon of Saturn
97 Barbecue cook


98 Football linemen:
Abbr.
99 Fast-talking
salesman's tactic
102 Itsy-bitsy
103 Explorer ___ da
Gama
104 Shout from one
who's on a roll?
106 ___ loss
107 One to a
customer, e.g.
110 Prime
113 Camping treats
115 B.M.O.C.'s,
often
116 X Games
competitor
118 Rikki- ___-tavi
119 Tanned
120 Zoom
121 Florida univ.
affiliated with
the Cathol.ic
Church
122 ___the hole
123 and it
again!"
124 "Twilight," e.g.
125 __ manual
126 Gull relatives
127 Spat

Down
1 Common patio
sight
2 Bliss, it is said
3 1, 2, 3,4,5,6 or
7, in New York
City
4 Prominent tower,
for short
5 Massachusetts
industrial city on
the Millers River
,6 Trails


7 Follow too closely
8 Dictator's phrase
9 Dread loch?
10 Spotted cavy
11 H.S. class
12 Didn't buy,
perhaps
13 Don Herbert's
moniker on
1950s-'60s TV
14 Lessen
15 "Educating Rita"
star
16 Sheds
17 Novel
conclusion?
18 Track star A. J.
26 Gave a sly signal
28 Good spot for a
date?
34 "Dies "
(hymn) *
36 Prepare for a
dubbing
38 Yucatan "you"
39 With 48-Across,
mediocre
40 Insomniac's TV
viewing
41 "The Chairs"
playwright
42 Former Fords
43 Showing, as a
deck member
44 Square sorts
45 Peace Nobelist
Sakharov
47 Cost for getting
money, maybe
50 Common settler
52 Bowls
56 ___-Tass news
agency
58 Bread, milk or
eggs
61 Tech stock
62 Elk


64 Folk singer
Jenkins
65 Miracle Mets
pitcher, 1969
66 Shamus
67 Person who's
visibly happy
68 On deck
69 Rubs
75 Sweeping story
77 Schubert's "Eine
kleine
Trauermusik,"
e.g.


78. Use TurboTax,
say
81 Comedian Foxx
84 Movie producer's
time of stress
85 Tariffs hinder it
86 Oscar-winning
actress for "The
Great Lie," 1941
88 With freedom of
tempo
89 Conditions
90 Some service
stations


92 Black bird
94 Devotional
ceremonies
97 Pickle type
100 Noggin
101 Ring around the
collar
103 Lead-in to harp
or phone
105 Dancer's
controls?
107 W.W. II craft
108 Furniture giant


109 Largest
employer in
Newton, Iowa,
until 2006
111 Nbt e'en once
112 Winged Greek
god
113 Ballpark figure
114 Cheese lovers
117 The Sun Devils
of the N.C.A.A.
119 Magnanimous


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
P S H AIWNIPIAIPIEIR I M MIAID D101S
AL 0 NE AI 0 AII SCARE AK C
PORKBARRELPROJECT YEA
SHAPE KAPOW FOSTER
ACE PREP A RIE T OBECUTOFF
P RP 0 u P P S I R 0 N|EHD S H R IN E S
ALLS I NCA STEI ER
0 AIS TITI|HI R 0 U G H E ED S IE L S
E R YS YE S M A A M T 0 E
FO R ADRAG|EZ| N E
MA RHA A R~S EA 0 T NIN

R N A0 S TC ND T H A G
RE A TNP I S I G N
LOISE TARAsY IA ER A
BASE T W 0 PH HUMA N S
LEAV E F Y S U0SE A P 4 T H
I NREM T ILT SASSAD
G E T K IE I T U NDERE G H TY
H A RI I S T E RW I N E A D
TSET N TSY RA NY Y E|A|R|N S


7 4 3


1 6 7


5 9


8 2


6 4 1


56 8 3


6 _8


9 1 2 5


5 4 7


L L 8.9 6. 1 V 9


919 1 L L L 8 61



71691 LL8 896




8Z L 817 .9 EL 6


9 9 L 6 Z L 17 8


689L LL L 7v


L S 9 9 8 Z 6 8 L


L 8 Z I 617V 9 8 L


I f I


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415













LAKE CITY REPORTER


LIFE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


an ou hearmeNO





Hearing loss in

teens and tweens
I ,\%III y I [A I IRIh

I you're the parent of a teen or tween,
chances are you've wondered, half-
jokingly, if your child hears anything you -
say The reality is that there are over 6.5
million American children ages 12 to 19
living with some form of hearing loss and
much of it is preventable. : .


Noise induced hearing loss :
Every day, we experience
sound in our environment
-from television and radio, Soundwaves
to household appliances and travel through
dreaded rush-hour traffic. the ear canal t.
Normally, we hear these sounds the inner ear,
at safe levels that do not affect where tiny hair
our hearing. However, when cells convert
we are exposed to harmful the sound into
noise, sounds that are too loud nerve impulses
or loud sounds that last a long that travel to
time, sensitive structures in hearing centers
our inner ear can be damaged, in the brain.
resulting in noise induced Excessive noise
hearing loss (NIHL). can damage
Noise induced hearing those cells and
loss can be'caused by a one-time cause permanent
exposure to an intense "impulse" hearing loss.
sound, such as an explosion, or
by continuous exposure to loud
sounds over an extended period
of time, such as a too-loud MP3 player. Accord-
ing to the National Institute of Health (NIH),
long-term exposure to 80 to 85 decibels, or any
more than 15 minutes exposure to 100 decibels,
can lead to hearing loss. Music players like iPods
can top 100 decibels when turned all the way up.
In fact, according to a survey conducted by
Hear the World, a global initiative by leading
hearing system manufacturer Phonak, exposure
to high noise levels was found to not only result
in gradual hearing loss, but also stress, aggression
or insomnia in 73 percent of those surveyed.

MP3 players and your teen
A study released in the Journal of the American
Medical Association found that 1 in 5 U.S. teens
suffer from some form of hearing loss. Among
other culprits named, from nutrition to environ-
mental toxins, the use of the "earbud" style of
headphones while listening to high decibel music
was found to be one reason for the increase.
"It is no surprise that teens and young adults
today are listening to music longer and poten-
tially louder than years past," said Dr. Craig
Kasper, ChiefAudiology Officer of Audio Help .
Hearing Centers and Hear the World spokes-
person. "Ongoing exposure to loud sounds daily,
through earphones for example, can have a direct
impact on your hearing early in life and not just
as you age."
How loud is too loud? If an earbud headphone
sounds loud to people nearby, it's too loud.
If you suspect your child might have hearing
loss, contact your local audiologist for a complete
hearing screening. For more information on hear-
ing loss and how loud is too loud, as well as an
online hearing test, visit www.hear-the-world.com.

Reducing the risk
The good news is that noise induced hearing loss
is 100 percent preventable.
"The impact of noise on hearing is often under-
estimated because the damage may take place
gradually. As a result, many
people do little to prevent the
process of hearing .loss that
takes place -hroiughui ihcir Top five misconceptions
lives due to the noise pollution
around them," said Dr. Kasper. about hearing loss
To protect hearing, Dr. 1. Hearing loss nlnhi lor iihe eldcrl\
Kasper recommends these Only 35 percent uf people 's iih
tips for teens and tweens: hearing loss are older than age t4
1. Be mindful of your There are oetr 5 nimillin Xmeriuan
hearing. Think about children ages 12 ic, lhin mi itih
the level of noise you're some form o1 hearing loss.
exposed to as well as the 2. If my child or I had hearing loss,
duration of time you're in my family doctor would have told
that noise. me: Only 14 percent of physicians
2. When attending concerts routinely screen for hearing loss
or loud events, wear during a physical.
hearing protection. Most 3. Your hearing loss cannot be helped:
of us would never think With modem advances in technology,
to sunbathe without some nearly 95 percent of people with a
form of SPF protection, sensorineural hearing loss a type of
Using either over-the- hearing loss in which the root cause
counter earplugs or lies in the inner ear can be helped
custom-molded hearing with hearing aids.
protection is like SPF for 4. Hearing aids are large, clunky and
your ears. obvious: Many modem hearing aids
3. When listening to your are nearly invisible to the naked eye
iPod or other MP3 player, and smaller than a quarter.
invest in a sound-isolating 5. Hearing loss isn't serious enough
earphone, such as the to treat: Hearing loss can create
Audio PFE by Phonak social and emotional barriers for
(see sidebar): This will the individuals living with it, or the
reduce the amount of families of those it affects. Research
environmental sounds shows that when left untreated,
and allow you to turn hearing loss can lead to reduced
the volume down. earning power, disruptions in family
life and can cause a wide range of
other psychological problems.


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


Signs of hearing loss
in your teen
* Loss of hearing sensitivity, first
to high-pitched (high-frequency)
sounds, then eventually to lower
pitches.
a Difficulty hearing conversations,
especially in a group setting or in
a noisy environment.
* Temporary or permanent ringing,
buzzing or fluttering in one or both
ears.
s Often asks people to repeat
themselves.
v Needs to set the TV or radio
volume louder than other people.
* A sense of fullness in the ears.
n Voices and other noises sound
muffled and/or distorted.


Audeo PFE
Perfect Bass
The Aud6o PFE (Perfect Fit
Earphones) Perfect Bass are
a set of high-end, sound-
isolating earphones by
leading hearing systems
manufacturer Phonak.
The Aud6o PFE provides
exceptional fit with different,
replaceable ear tips, great
sound (even at low volume
levels) without sacrificing
the health of your ears,
and starts below $100.
The Audeo PFE Perfect Bass
can be purchased online at
www.audeoworld.com.


Photo courtesy of Phonak




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