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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01433
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/23/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01433
System ID: UF00028308:01433
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

























Death penalty sought in triple murder case


Suspects indicted
by Suwannee
grand jury.
By TONY BRITT
tbrit@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK Two
Suwannee County suspects
accused of taking part in


Jarvis


State Attorney
gets his way.


a triple
murder
may face
the "ulti-
mate pun-
ishment"
if Third
Judicial
Circuit
Skip Jarvis


Jarvis announced on
Friday that he would seek
the death penalty against
suspects James Lindsey
Howze, 38, and Lonnie
Robert Munn, 47.
Howze and Munn were
indicted earlier this sum-
mer by a Suwannee County
grand jury in the Aug. 25
deaths of Joseph Militello,


53, and his
68-year-old
wife, Nancy
Militello,
and their ri,
nephew,
Angelo ....
Rosales. Howze
Persons
accused of a crime by
indictment are presumed


Munn


death penalty
trial judge.


innocent
under the
law until it
is resolved
by trial or
plea. The
final deci-
sion to
impose the
is with the


Howze and Munn were
indicted by the Suwannee
County grand jury for the
crimes of conspiracy to
commit home invasion rob-
bery and first degree mur-
der, three counts of felony
murder in the first degree,
three counts of home
MURDER continued on 3A


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Brenda Hunter (right), Fort White Elementary Physical Education
teacher, leads Makai Gagliano (left), 10, a fourth-grade Westside
Elementary student, and Callahan Register, 9, a fourth-grade
Colurpbia City Elementary student with more than 50 district
elementary students in the third filming of Columbia County Funky
Fitness at Florida Gateway College Friday.


Local kids get

physically fit

through music


Students use
aerobics video as
PE supplement.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
District elementary stu-
dents got funky and fit on
film Friday.
More than 50 students
from the district's nine ele-
mentary schools gathered
at the Howard Conference
Center's gymnasium at
Florida Gateway College
to film Columbia County
Funky Fitness, an exercise
video that will be used in
all elementary classrooms
as a supplement to physical
education classes.
FGC's audio-visual


department performed 'the
filming for the first time,
but it was the video's third
production.
The video was first pro-
duced as Fort White Funky
Fitness and is the brain-
child of Brenda Hunter,
a Fort White Elementary
PE teacher and former
aerobics instructor. Hunter
formed the idea after the
state legislature implement-
ed a mandate in 2007 that
all elementary students
must have 150 minutes of
physical activity a week in
school to combat childhood
obesity.
"There's no. way anyone
can get 150 minutes of PE
in without making special
arrangements," Hunter
said.


Lady Tigers don

pink for cancer

awareness month


Volleyball teams
'DigPink'in
fundraising event

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Instead of its normal red
and black uniforms, Fort
White's volleyball team
Friday donned pink for
breast cancer awareness.
The team hosted its first
"Dig Pink" in-school game
against. ifhe Union County


Tigers. The game, which
also featured the Lady
Tigers in pink and was
played with a pink ball, was
a fundraising event.
"Dig Pink" is through the
Side-Out Foundation and is
part of raising awareness
and money for breast can-
cer, said Fort White coach
Doug Wohlstein. Volleyball
teams across the country
participate in "Dig Pink"
events.
The Lady Indians played
TIGERS continued on 3A*


BO 0UND TO RIDE


Horseback-riding instructors brush up

on their skills at Lake City convention


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Cheryl Gallegos pets Gracie, 11, a female thoroughbred, on Friday while attending the Certified Horsemanship Association
(CHA) International Convention at The Oaks. Gallegos, a resident of Fairbanks, Alaska, is a horseback-riding instructor at
camp Li-Wa at Living Water Ranch.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Horses and
horse-riding
instructors
pranced with
a purpose
through the covered arena,
a fenced outdoor riding
area and the barn at The
Oaks Equestrian Center
Friday.
The riders and their
four-legged partners were
taking part in a variety of
training and educational
exercises as part of The
Certified Horsemanship
Association (CHA)
International Convention.
The CHA international
convention, which is being
hosted for the first time in
Lake City, is held annually
at different locales around
the country. For the
remainder of the
RIDE continued on 3A


m Alaskan


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Samantha Keeran practices cantering on her horse Westie
during a lesson.


trainer

enjoys

climate

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
When you live in a place
where zero to 20 degrees
below zero is considered as
mild weather, chances are a
conference in the Sunshine
State is a welcome getaway.
The Certified
Horsemanship Association
(CHA) International
Convention is proving
to be a pretty neat, nice
and more importantly,

ALASKAN continued on 3A


1 11111111 I CAJl A
(386)752-1293 84
SUBSCRIBE TO Sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 8426 0000 Fax: 752-9400 WVVEATHER, 2A


---< Opinion ................ 4A
,' Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Faith &Values ............ 6A


TODAY IN
FAITH
Missionaries get
l^.. ow-tech training


COMING
SUNDAY
Secretariat's Fire was
sired by a champ.













LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010


H 31 Friday:
Afternoon: 2-2-4
Evening: 7-1-8


BIay34 Friday:
~ Afternoon: 1-6-5-6
Evening: 3-9-6-7


Thursday:
9-17-25-26-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




O.J. Simpson denied appeal


LAS VEGAS


The Nevada Supreme
Court refused Friday to
overturn O.J. Simpson's
armed robbery and
kidnapping convictions,
rejecting a claim that prospective
jurors were dismissed because they
were black.
Simpson attorney Yale Galanter
planned to take Simpson's appeal to
federal court after his 2008 convic-
tion in the gunpoint heist in a Las
Vegas hotel room was upheld.
"This is but the first step in a very
long line of appeals that Mr. Simpson
has before him," Galanter said.
Galanter was trying to reach
Simpson in prison but had not yet
spoken to the former NFL hall-of-
famer, actor and advertising pitch-
man.
"I'm extremely disappointed,"
added Malcolm LaVergne, another
Simpson lawyer. "I thought we had a
very strong appeal."
The court said all eight separate
issues raised in the appeal were
without merit.

Brand's guard, guest
beat photographers
RANTHAMBHORE NATIONAL
PARK, India Four news photog-
raphers Friday said that they were
punched by two men accompany-
ing British comedian Russell Brand
when they were taking pictures of
Brand at an Indian tiger reserve one
day before his scheduled wedding to
American pop singer Katy Perry.
According to Associated Press
photographer Mustaf Quraishi, who
was one of the four photographers
injured, Brand himself looked on
during the assault as the photogra-
phers tried to defend themselves
before being left stranded in the wild


This Dec. 5, 2008, file photo shows
O.J. Simpson in court during his sen-
tencing hearing at the Clark County
Regional Justice Center in Las Vegas.
The Nevada Supreme Court refused
Friday to overturn Simpson's armed
robbery and kidnapping convictions
stemming from a gunpoint Las Vegas
hotel room heist.

animal park.
The photographers said they had
been following about 330 feet (100
meters) behind two jeeps one car-
rying Brand, an unidentified woman,
a man and two children, and the
second carrying two men, one of


h-t.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Baseball HIll of Famer Sen.
Jim Bunning (R-Ky.) is 79.
* Movie director Philip
Kaufman is 74.
* Soccer great Pele (pay-lay)
is 70.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Barbara Ann Hawkins (The
Dixie Cups) is 67.
* Actor Michael Rupert is 59.
* Movie director Ang lee is

Daily Scripture


56.
* Jazz singer Dianne Reeves
is 54.
* Country singer Dwight
Yoakam is 54.
* Community activist Martin
Luther King III is 53.
U Movie director Sam Raimi
is 51.
* Parodist "Weird Al" Yankovic
is 51.


"A man finds joy in giving an
apt reply- and how good is a
timely word!"


-Proverbs 15:23


whom was later described by police
as Brand's friend and wedding guest
The other apparently was a body-
guard.
Brand and Perry are scheduled
to get married Saturday at a resort
near the reserve in the Indian state
of Rajasthan.
Private security has been stationed
at the hotels where guests and the
couple are staying for the six-day
wedding celebration.
The couple have given the exclu-
sive coverage rights to a London
magazine, and no other photogra-
phers or journalists will be allowed
into the resort.
The photographers filed a police
complaint and asked for a writ-
ten apology. Police summoned the
guard and the man for questioning,
Quraishi said.

Chris Rock to make his
Broadway debut
NEW YORK Comedian Chris
Rock will make his Broadway debut
in a new play about love and fidelity
with an X-rated title.
Rock will join Bobby Cannavale,
Elizabeth Rodriguez, Annabella
Sciorra and Yul Vazquez in a produc-
tion of Stephen Adly Guirgis' play
'The Mother ... With the Hat" (The
title includes an expletive.)
The 14-week engagement begins
previews on March 22 at the Gerald
Schoenfeld Theatre.
The play centers on Jackie
(Cannavale), a parolee who is newly
sober, and his girlfriend, who is not
Rock will play Jackie's sponsor.
Anna D. Shapiro, who won a
Tony for directing "August: Osage
County," will helm the project

N Associated Press


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
S(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks................ $48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lack of burning
gets pastor a car
SOUTH BRUNSWICK,
New Jersey A Florida
pastor who drew interna-
tional criticism by threat-
ening to burn a copy of the
Quran picked up a free car
on Friday, his reward from
a New Jersey car dealer
for calling it off.
Former New York
Giants tackle Brad Benson,
who is now New Jersey's
largest car dealer, offered
Florida pastor Terry Jones
a 2011 Hyundai Accent
worth $14,200 if he would
agree to never burn the
Muslim holy book. Jones
had threatened to do it
on the anniversary of
the Sept. 11, 2001, terror
attacks.
Jones never burned
the Quran. On Friday,
the Gainesville pastor
arrived at Brad Benson
Mitsubishi Hyundai in
South Brunswick to col-
lect a gray 2011 Hyundai
Accent, which he promptly
donated to a charity.
The pastor said the offer
Benson made in one of his
dealership's quirky radio
ads was not the reason
he decided to cancel the
Quran burning, and that
he only heard about it a
few weeks after Sept 11.
Jones donated the car
a Jersey City shelter that
helps abused women.

Feds: Request in
for drilling
WASHINGTON An
unspecified company has
filed the first request to
drill for oil and gas in the
deep water of the Gulf of
Mexico since exploration
there was temporarily
halted after the massive
BP oil spill.
The application,
announced Friday by the
Bureau of Ocean Energy
Management, was filed
Oct. 12, the day the gov-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former New York Giants tackle Brad Benson (left), who is
also New Jersey's largest car dealer, and Florida pastor Terry
Jones answer a question Friday in South Brunswick, N.J.,
Benson gave a 2011 Hyundai Accent to Jones for cancel-
ing plans to burn a Quran. Jones in turn, donated the car
to Women Rising, a Jersey City shelter that helps abused
women.


ernment lifted a morato-
rium on deepwater drilling
that was put in place after
an April 20 blowout caused
the largest offshore oil
spill in U.S. history.
Federal officials would
not name the company
that applied, saying it was
proprietary information.

NOAA opens more
waters to fishing
PENSACOLA
- Another area of the
Gulf of Mexico has been
reopened to commercial
and recreational fishing
after tests found seafood
in the area to have no oil
contamination to bar con-
sumption.
The 7,037-square-mile
area of Gulf waters that
was reopened is about 70
miles south of the Florida
panhandle, between the
Florida-Alabama state line
and Florida's Cape San
Blas. The closest point of
the area to the Deepwater
Horizon BP wellhead is
about 60 miles.
The National Oceanic


'and Atmospheric
Administration said no oil
or sheen has been docu-
mented in the area since
July 19.
The remaining closed
area is 9,444 square miles
of federal waters, about
four percent of federal
Gulf waters.
At the height of the
spill, about 37 percent of
federal waters in the Gulf
were closed.

Chicago developer
accused in hit
DENVER A 73-year-
old real estate developer
from Chicago is behind
bars in Colorado, accused
of hiring a hit man to kill a
business associate.
The U.S. Attorney's
office says Brooks Kellogg
paid $2,000 to an under-
cover agent he thought
was a hit man at Denver
International Airport on
Tuesday. Kellogg allegedly
asked him to kill Stephen
Bunyard of Destin, Fla.


THE WEATHER


SUNNY PARTLY 7 SCT. ISOLATED ISOLATED
CLOUDY -STORMS SHOWERS .SHOWERS


HI 84 L058 HI 86 LO 62 HI 85 L65 HI 86L0 64 HI 86 L0 63


81/64


Tallahassee *
84/58 .....-

82/63


SVadosta
83,/58
Lake City,
84/58
" Gainesville *
,84/59
O. cala
"ir /9 4


Tat
87/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


86
48
80
57
90 in 2006
38 in 1989

0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.87"
43.00"


Jacksonvile
,81/64


Daytona Beach
8369
\


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Sunday
82 71 pI:
85/70/pc
85/75/t
88/73/pc
86/63/pc
83/65/pc
84/73/t
86/62/pc
85/77/t
87/69/pc
86/64/pc
88/70/pc
83/69/pc
82/71/t
86/61/pc
87/70/pc
86/61/pc
84/76/pc


Monday
'3 -3 p,:
85/72/pc
85/77/s
89/72/pc
85/66/sh
83/67/sh
85/75/t
85/65/sh
85/77/sh
87/74/s
86/68/sh
87/72/pc
81/69/t
82/72/t
84/66/t
88/71/pc
85/65/t
84/77/sh


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrisetom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


0 U
Oct. Nov. Nov.
30 6 13
Last New First


* Associated Press


7:38 a.m.
6:51 p.m.
7:39 a.m.
6:50 p.m.


7:04 p.m.
8:09 a.m.
7:45 p.m.
9:07 a.m.


0
Nov.
21
Full


On this date in
1988, an upper-
level ridge of higi
pressure brought
record heat from
the southern Plai
to the West Coas
Austin and San
Antonio, Texas, b
set records with
an afternoon high
of 93.


7


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Forecasts, data and graph-
r Ics 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllisher.com


|E i as


h iitrlpti


ns
;t.
oth
h


~.u wvihuiwwiwu


AROUND FLORIDA


,o/Oi U KeyWest
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key Wst
/ 87/66 82/72 Lake City
S Miami
nIa, Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
83/78 Orlando
"* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 85/78 Pensacola
88/68 Naples Tallahassee
89/72 Miami Tampa
t 84/79 Valdosta
84/74Key West W. Palm Beach
84/74


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, RFla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilton..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)


~---- -cl-- - c -----L--- -- - --~


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


SATUbLIAN


[24 SUN


25 MONDrY


mmr


LAEIY LAA


W ,M Y-1HU













Trainer spends weeks on the road


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Julie Goodnight rides Chic as she teaches a lesson in advanced maneuvers at the canter and
lope on Friday. 'The rider is always the biggest obstacle to canteririg,' Goodnight said.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. comr
Julie Goodnight has
been around the country
as a horseback riding
instructor.
This week she's
spending time in Lake
City at The Certified
Horsemanship
Association's (CHA)
International Convention,
where she's teaching
instructors how to fine-
tune their horseback-rid-
ing skills.
Goodnight, of Salida,
Colo., is the spokesperson
for CHA and during this
year's convention she's got
several tasks ahead of her.
"I'm doing some presen-
tations. I have a keynote
speech on Saturday night
for our annual awards ban-
quet and I'm doing some


teaching sessions out here
at The Oaks," she said.
As a CHA member,
Goodnight is a horse
trainer and clinician who
travels about 40 weeks
each year taking part in
training seminars, confer-
ences, trade shows and
horse expos.
"I'm classified as a natu-
ral horsemanship trainer,.
which means I know and
understand the horse's
natural behavior, ,and I use
that in a way to commu-
nicate with them in a way
that's understandable," she
said. "I do a lot of working
with problem horses, and
helping horses and riders
achieve their goals."
Unlike some other
trainers, Goodnight is not
breed or discipline specific
when working horses. She
focuses on the commonal-


ity between all the differ-
ent types of riding.
Goodnight said the
international convention
is a unique conference
because it allows people
to ride horses in demon-
strations and take part in
hands-on lessons.
She said it's also unique
because its a conference
where instructors get
instructions on how to
become better instructors.
"This is a unique
conference because it's
targeted toward riding
instructors," Goodnight
said. "There's a lot of
inside information,
whether it be on market-
ing your program better
or how to deal with dif-
ficult parents it's really
targeted to the riding
instructor. We welcome
anyone and everyone."


ALASKAN: Unique challenges face horseback-riding trainers in cold weather

Continued From Page 1A


warm, getaway for Cheryl
Gallegos.
Gallegos is one of many
visiting horseback riding
instructors and horse enthu-
siasts who have flocked to
the area to take part in the
event However, Gallegos
probably journeyed further
than most of the others.
Gallegos traveled from
Fairbanks, Alaska, to take
part in the international
convention.
In Fairbanks, Gallegos
works at camp Li-Wa at
Living Water Ranch.
'We have about 22 horses
there and.during the sum-
mer months we run eight
weeks of ranch camps and
other camps for kids in the
area," she said. "During the
winter we give horse-riding


lessons, we work with rid-
ers with disabilities, work
with equine therapy pro-
grams and also run some
weekend retreats."
The horses at the camp
stay outside all winter.
"Even though the tem-
perature gets 40 or 50
degrees below zero, they
can still handle the tempera-
tures because they grow
a really thick coat of hair,"
Gallegos said. "So when it's
very cold, 30 or 40 below
zero, we don't bring them
into the barn because it's
too much of a temperature
change. When the tempera-
tures are a little bit more
mild, between 0-20 degrees
below zero, they can handle
the change and we bring
them into the barn for how-


ever long the lesson is and
-then we let them go back
outside as long as they are
not sweated up too much.
They survive just fine and
don't seem to mind the
cold."
As a horseback riding
instructor living in Alaska,
Gallegos said she experi-
ences a lot of unique chal-
lenges that many other
instructors don't have to
face.
"One of the biggest chal-
lenges is the feed," she said.
"It's pretty difficult to get
hay and it's very expensive.
A major part of our budget
is the hay."
Living Water Ranch has
an indoor-covered arena
which is heated with used
oil.


"The problem is with
the extreme difference in
temperature from inside to
outside, it creates a lot of
moisture on the walls and
the doors," Gallegos said.
"We have lot of icing prob-
lems on the doors and mold
problems that we're always
dealing with on the walls.
Those are probably two of
the major drawbacks of hav-
ing horses in Alaska."
Gallegos was quick to
point out that there aren't
many large horse programs
in Alaska and they are con-
stantly busy.
"There's a lot of people.
that want to make use of
the facilities or take lessons
and we have a waiting list
for most of our programs,"
she said.


The Living Water Ranch
mostly utilizes quarter
horses, which Gallegos said
make a good schooling and
training horse for begin-
ner students. The quarter
horses can also be trained
to do most of the difficult
levels of riding.
"We do Western- and
English-style riding," she
said, noting CHA has four
levels of riding. "For the
upper level riders, the more
advanced riders, there's
some jumping."
Gallegos, who has been
a CHA member for eight
years, said she was enjoying
her trip to Florida as part of
the CHA convention.
"I'm learning a lot," she
said. "'There's a lot of great
people that you can learn


from, exchange ideas with
and ifs a great experience
- being in Florida is won-
derful, too.
"By attending this year's
international convention,
I was hoping to get more
training in what I do and
that's working with begin-
ners," she continued. "It'fs
a challenge working with
beginners because some-
times they don't have a lot
of control of the horse or of
themselves, so they need
to learn how to ride in a
balanced way and also to
be able to concentrate on
the horse and themselves
at the same time. I'm
always open to learn more
to make the class more
enjoyable so the kid can
be more successful."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

And the Homecoming Queen is ...
The reigning 2009 Fort White High School Homecoming Queen Ashley Harrell (left), 18, hugs
Catherine Trisch, 18, as she iscrowned the 2010 Homecoming Queen. 'I'm so excited and
cold. I can't stop shaking,' Trisch said.


TIGERS: Digging Pink for awareness

Continued From Page 1A


in a "Dig Pink" event host-
ed by the Lady Tigers earli-
er this season, he said. The
team wanted to also host
their own game.
"That the kids wanted to


do (Dig Pink) was even bet-
ter," Wohlstein said. "They
came to us and asked to
do it."
. Fort White High and
Middle School students


were able to purchase tick-
ets for the game.
A portion of gate sales
from the game will go
toward breast cancer
research.


|RIDE: CHA certifies riding instructors


Continued From Page 1A
weekend, convention
attendees will go to semi-
nars, a silent auction and
other events designed'
to improve their profi-
ciency as horseback-riding
instructors and trainers.
The CHA certifies
horseback riding instruc-
tors throughout the coun-
try and Canada.
"We train the trainer
who teaches people how
to ride," said'Christy
Landwehr, CHA chief
executive officer.
Landwehr said the orga-
nization is operated on a
$500,000 budget.
'We have 3,500 mem-
bers that we have to sup-
port on a $500,000 budget
in command expenses,"
.she said. 'We're a 501C-3,
not-for-profit organization,
so at the end of the year
we have zero dollars. We
don't have to pay any tax
and we're an educational
organization in order to
make that happen."
For the annual inter-
national convention, the


MURDER: Suspects were arrested in Minnesota

Continued From Page 1A


invasion robbery and first
degree murder and three
counts of kidnapping.
"I have carefully weighed
the facts of this case and
have waited to have an
opportunity to personally
speak to the members of
the family. After doing so
I am convinced that the
death penalty is warrant-
ed in this case," Jarvis
said in a prepared state-
ment. "Florida Stature
755.082 provides for the
death penalty under these
circumstances.
"I do not take the impo-
sition of the death penalty
lightly," Jarvis continued.
"'To ask that the state be
authorized to take a defen-
dant's life is the ultimate
punishment that can be
imposed. I firmly believe
it the appropriate decision
in this case."


On Aug. 26, Suwannee
County authorities were
called to a McAlpin farm
where three adults were
found shot to death, exe-
cution-style in the head,
according to SCSO. They
were eventually identified
as the Militellos and their
nephew, Rosales.
The bodies were found
in the morning by an
employee who worked


at the farm. Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
officials say they received
a call around 7:36 a.m.
notifying them about the
bodies.
Authorities believe
robbery was the primary
motive behind the deadly
shootings.
Munn and Howze were
arrested in Minnesota
less than a week after


the murders.
A third suspect in
the case, Keith Allen
Hughes, was taken into
custody for his alleged
involvement in the case.
However, authori-
ties say he subsequent-
ly committed suicide
while incarcerated in
the Suwannee County
Jail and has not been
charged.


"Election 2010: America's Christian Heritage", Wednesday, October

First United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City

Don't miss Dr. Tackett explaining America's only hope of survival.


!7 6:15 p.m.




FOCUS"
FAMILY


organization normally bud-
gets $20,000 for expenses
- based on the amount of
registrations.
Landwehr said atten-
dance for this year's con-
vention is average and she
estimated 80 members are
attending.
"Attendance is a little
bit smaller than we had
anticipated, just because
we thought The Oaks
would be such a draw,"
she said.
She said she believes
attendance is below
the anticipated amount
because of the slow econ-
omy and because many of
the organization's mem-
bers attended the World
Equestrian Games, which
took place in Lexington,
Ky., earlier this year.
"It's the first time the
World Equestrian Games


have ever been in the
United States and we saw
quite a few of our mem-
bers there," Landwehr
said. "They said they
couldn't choose both
events and they had to
pick one, and they chose
the World Equestrian
Games."
In the United States, a
person can declare him-
self or herself a horse-
back riding instructor
without a license, unlike
Europe, Germany, Great
Britain and France, where
the law requires horse-
back riding instructors be
certified.
"People voluntarily
choose to be certified
through us, so we can give
them discounts on insur-
ance and we provide them
with marketing opportuni-
ties," Landwehr said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Saturday, October 23, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER
OPINION


Challenging

horrors of

ObamaCare

Americans, it turns
out, might yet be
spared from the hor-
rors of ObamaCare.
Not only are many
Republican candidates running
on vows to repeal the odious
"reform," but a federal judge in
Florida last week ruled that a
major lawsuit challenging the
health-care law can proceed.
Judge Roger Vinson's action
is only preliminary: In refusing
the Obama administration's'
request to dismiss the suit,
Vinson said the plaintiffs
- attorneys general from 20
states had raised enough
legitimate issues to continue
the process.
Yet Vinson's 65-page ruling
sounded sympathetic to the
plaintiffs' arguments.
That's especially true with
regard to ObamaCare's individ-
ual mandate the requirement
that everyone must buy health
insurance or pay a fine.
* First, Vinson dismissed Team
Obama's claim that the man-
date is constitutional because
it's a "tax."
He said the administra-
tion was taking "an 'Alice in
Wonderland' tack" and try-
ing to argue in court that
"Congress really meant some-
thing else entirely" during the
ObamaCare debate when it
explicitly denied the mandate
was a tax.
If it had done that, he said, it
would have been "circumvent-
ing the safeguard that exists
to keep their broad power in
check."
Buying a car is an activ-
ity an individual chooses to
undertake. The impact of that
purchase has ripple effects far
and wide thus giving govern-
ment the power to mandate
coverage.
With ObamaCare, however,
folks would be penalized for
not buying a specific product.
That's very different
This case is only at the begin-
ning stages. Undoubtedly, it
will end up before the Supreme
Court. But the challenge to
ObamaCare has passed a signif-
icant hurdle. Opponents should
be encouraged that at least one
federal judge is concerned over
the significant constitutional
issues it raises.

* New York Post

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


CURRENTLY,
TERE ARE NO BUt
'SHOVEL-RA" EXPECT 1M ATTO
JOBS CHANGE COME
NOVEMBER.


Campaign against political ads


Since the U.S. Supreme
Court in the infamous
Citizens United case
changed the campaign
finance rules to treat
corporations more like people
- and how considerate of the
justices! money has rained
down upon our, democracy in
great and unrelenting torrents.
There's an old saying that
the rain falls on the rich and
poor alike but, of course, it's
always the poor-who end up
being soaked because the rich
have better umbrellas.
Now the rich control the
political weather itself. Things
have reached such a sorry state
that the weather forecasters will
soon say: "It will be clear this
morning with clouds of corpo-
rate funding moving in later to
rain down deceptive ads during
prime time."
In theory, unions as well as
corporations benefit from the
Citizens United decision, but
union strength has faded, so
the targets of the current crop
of ads are disproportionately
Democrats. This is fine if you
don't like Democrats ,- and
there's a lot of that going
around.
But because some of these
nimbus clouds of funding are of
uncertain origin, it isn't fine for
the future of the republic. After
Citizens United, these funding
clouds with their political thun-
derbolts are clouds of secrecy.
The White House recently
got into an unseemly argu-
ment with the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce, a prominent
rainmaker indeed, a veri-
table monsoon machine in the
midterm elections. In a weekly
radio address last month,
President Barack Obama raised
the specter of possible illegal
foreign influence on our elec-
tions because, "We don't know
who's behind these ads or who's
paying for them."
Defenders of the ads were
quick to point out that no proof
existed for such a charge.


Right you are. Indeed, we
have to believe the Chamber
of Commerce in this instance,
because if you can't trust a
Chamber of Commerce, who
can you trust these days?
Besides, we all know that noth-
ing nefarious ever goes on in
the world of politics, especially
when money is involved.
Still, I have to think that this
shyness among those who
secretly fund ads will inevitably
lead to abuse of the privilege
handed down on a silver platter
by the Supreme Court
Unless bears promise not to
seek honey, and raccoons swear
off garbage, and indeed all the
laws of nature are repealed,
some political operative is
bound to smell the money and
not care that the scent is waft-
ing on trade winds from over-
seas.
Perhaps Osama bin Laden
and the boys are even now
forming a nonprofit politi-
cal advertising outfit called
Jihadists United to exercise the
loophole so recklessly provided
by the American infidels.
They would need a respect-
able front, of course; otherwise
the first line of defense in
America's democracy (blog-
gers in pajamas) would leap
into action, either defending .
or attacking this development,
depending on their level of
craziness. But if the jihadists
have good cover and why
not, when they won't have to
disclose their identity? most
of us won't know what's going
on until a camel is shown on TV
nuzzling a favored candidate.
Of course, I exaggerate I
was just trying to get your atten-


tion, which you have to agree
worked out well. It probably
won't come to mad Muslims try-
ing to influence our elections.
It will be insufferable French
people supporting the most
ridiculous candidate and this
year there's no shortage so
that they can laugh at us and
make gesticulations and nasal
snorting noises when they are
Selected.
Maybe it wouldn't be so bad if
. any of the flood of ads currently
on TV could drop one sparkling
hailstone of reason or wit or
even a fairly rendered fact
But every ad, no matter what
party is the beneficiary, appears
intended for the consumption
and confusion of morons.
The political wizards obvi-
ously believe that insulting our
intelligence with lies, lies and
innuendo is the best way to
elect candidates.
Why are political ads so
dopey? Apparently the best
brains in this country are mak-
ing beer ads, with cute flatulent
animals, or car insurance ads,
with little green lizards, and
nobody is left with a sense of
humor to make a decent, cre-
ative political ad.
This is another reason to
support remedying the Citizens
United case all the money
that secrecy can buy, and
nobody can, produce an honest
political ad to make us think or
laugh.
Unfortunately, the
Republicans have blocked leg-
islation to undo the Supreme
Court's handiwork. Sadly, it
appears that the party of Lincoln
is now the party of the corpora-
tions, by the corporations and
for the corporations.
And where are those roused
populists, the tea partiers, who
are pledged to remake the con-
servative party? Like taxi cabs,
they are never around when it's
raining.
Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


Drug courts and the
supervised drug
treatment they offer
help addicts turn
their lives around.
Success is not guaranteed, but it
occurs with enough regularity that
these programs are better than
locking addicts up. That should
have been the guiding philosophy
behind an extended drug court
pilot program launched this year.
But because the Legislature
attached too many strings, the
program is far short of its goals.
Judges need more discretion an
easy fix that can be accomplished
when lawmakers meet next
A $19 million federal grant
allowed the Legislature to establish
new, extended drug courts in eight
Florida counties. The hope was that
4,000 offenders would be diverted


from prison and into treatment
programs over two years, saving
the state $95 million in corrections
costs. But according to a new
report by the Office of Program
Policy Analysis and Government
Accountability, the program won't
come close to that savings. After six
months there was only a total of 324
admissions.
The problem is that the
Legislature tightly restricted who
could qualify for the offer of 12 to'
18 months of drug treatment as
an alternative to state prison. For
example, only those probation viola-
tors who have failed a drug test can
be placed in treatment If they have
any other violations they are barred
from participating. In the real
world, this restriction is unwork-
able. Statewide, 74 percent of all
offenders who violate probation


by failing a drug test have another
technical violation. Often these are
also indicators of a relapse in drug
use, such as failing to pay court-
ordered fees or failing to report to a
probation office..
Florida has to use this fed-
eral grant by next October or
the money will be forfeited. At
this pace, exhausting the grant
money is not going to happen,
and neither will the anticipated
cost savings to the prison system.
At its earliest opportunity, the
Legislature needs to loosen the
restrictions on participation. Trial
judges, not legislators, meet the
offender and hear recommenda-
tions by prosecutors and others
on an appropriate sentence. They
are in the best position to make the
call between treatment or prison.
* St. Petersburg Times


Martin Schram
martin.schram@gmai.com


Obama's

accurate

mid-term

critic

If you are a journalist
covering sports or poli-
tics, you are probably
smart enough to know
that wandering right in
the middle of the homestretch,
just as the racers are sprinting
for the finish line, is probably
not your best time or place to
get a thoughtful analysis of just
how and why the race was lost.
Yet that's just what The New
York Times' Peter Baker tried
to do last month. And he came
up with one individual's spot-
on analysis that explained why
so many politically indepen-
dent Americans who had voted
for Candidate Barack Obama
for president in 2008 seem to
have become so disenchanted,
disillusioned, disappointed
and mainly, so damn mad at
President Obama in 2010.
No anti-Obama critic from
the Tea Party could have
improved upon what one
analyst told Baker for last
Sunday's New York Times
Magazine article. The cri-
tique began by noting that
Americans saw the bailouts
of the auto bunglers from
General Motors and the bank-
ers on Wall Street (plus, of
course, the costly healthcare
reform):
"That accumulation of num-
bers on the TV screen night
in and night out in those first
six months, I think deeply and
legitimately troubled people.
They started feeling like,
'Gosh, here we are tighten-
ing our belts, we're cutting
out restaurants, we're cutting
out our gym membership, in
some cases we're not buying
new clothes for the kids. And
here we've got these folks in
Washington who just seem to
be printing money and spend-
ing it like nobody's business.'
And it reinforced the narrative
that the Republicans wanted
to promote anyway, which
was Obama is not a different
kind of Democrat he's the
same old tax-and-spend liberal
Democrat"
Exactly. What made that
analysis most interesting
was that the speaker wasn't
a Tea Party activist or Grand
Old Party strategist it was
Obama himself. On Sept 27,
more than a month before the
voters will render their judg-
ment in the 2010 mid-term
elections, Obama agreed to
pause and reflect for The New
York Times on just what had
gone wrong.
Obama and his inner circle
came close to getting it right
as far as what has turned off so
many Americans who once had
high hopes for Team Obama.
What they didn't get right
was what they could have
and should have said to show
voters they were working for
the middle class voters whose
. lives have been shaken and
often shattered by the near
Depression and jobless recov-
ery.
What Obama needs most
of all is to re-ignite his inner
populism.
A good way to start is to
think of himself as return-
ing to his political organizer
roots and work the precinct
within the black iron fence that
surrounds 1600 Pennsylvania
Avenue.

Martin Schram writes


political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A


OTHER OPINION

State drug treatments offer better option









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


I-To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today


take out. Call 755-1770.


Writing Workshop with Pumpkin Fest
a...L-.J_ P 1--L--


auoye uauthen
This workshop at 2 p.m.
Saturday at the Columbia
County Main Library is
about incorporating writ-
ing into our busy lives:
how to keep the words
coming, whether poetry,
fiction, or nonfiction;
exercises to sharpen skills
of observation; openings
and closings. We will
come away excited about
language. This workshop
requires pre-registration.
To register, please call
Katrina Evans at 758-1018.

Children's yard sale
A children's yard sale
is at 8 a.m. Saturday at
Happy House, 544 NW
Lake Jeffery Road. It will
have children's clothing,
toys, books and more.
Proceeds will help fund
the scholarship program.
Call 752-4736.

Pulled pork dinners
The Christian Service
Center is having a pulled
pork dinner from 12 to 3
p.m. Oct 23. Meals are $6
and include pulled pork,
baked beans, cole slaw
and a soft drink. Dine in or


The Second Annual
Pumpkin Fest is 3 to
6:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at Big
Shoals State Park in White
Springs. There is a chil-
dren's pumpkin decorating
contest and costume con-
test. Admission is $2 per
person or $4 per carload
and includes entry into
all contests, drinks and
snacks, live music, twilight
camp fire with marshmal-
lows roasting and a park
ranger lead hike with
hundreds of Mexican
free-tailed bats. Call (386)
867-1639.

Lake City Veterans
Benefit Car Show
There will be a car show
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 23
at the Fair Ground. The
event will include goody
bags, door prizes, contests
and a DJ. Registration is
$20. Call (386) 365-8839 or
(386) 365-3101.

Sunday
Early voting
Early voting for the 2010
general election is 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-
Saturday through Oct.
30. Early voting locations


are at the Supervisor of
Elections Lake City office,
971 W. Duval St. and the
Fort White Community
Center, 17579 SW SR 47.
Voters need to bring a pic-
ture and signature I.D.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Local Authors Book Fair
A local authors book fair
is 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch. The
event is sponsored by the
Friends of the Library as
part of National Friends
of Libraries Week. The
fair will feature 13 local
authors each with a table
set up to sell their books.

Phenomenal women
program
Gold Standard Chapter
No. 48 Order of the
Eastern Star is host-
ing the Phenomenal


Women's Program...
"Celebrating Trailblazers
and Trendsetters within
Our Community" at 4
p.m. Oct 24 at New
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 505 NE MLK
Street.

Habitat for Humanity
needs help
Morning construction
volunteers are needed
from 8 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 971 NE Dyson
Terrace. E-mail terry@
hfhlakecity.org or call
Sheila at (386) 590-0766.
Regular meetings are 7
p.m. the first Tuesday of
each month at the Lake
City Medical Center.

Monday
Photography workshop
A digital photography
workshop is 10 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 2 to 4:30
p.m. Sept 20, Oct 25
and Nov. 1 at Stephen
Foster State Park. These
Monday workshops teach
participants how to plan
good photography, create
photographic composi-
tion, and the shooting
effects of both color and
black & white. Presented
by Don Williams, the


workshop fee is $25 and
includes park admission.
Call (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org. To learn more
about the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
phenfoster

Garage sale
The Shands Lakeshore
Regional Medical Center
Auxiliary, Inc. is having a
garage sale in the hospital
on Monday. The proceeds
will be matched by the
Auxiliary and will be used
to provide scholarships to
the staff wishing to study
advanced degrees. It is
open to the public.

Yard Sale
The Shands Lakeshore
Regional Medical Center
Auxiliary, Inc. is holding
a yard sale at the hospital
on Monday. The pro-
ceeds will be matched by
the Auxiliary and will go
towards scholarships for
the staff who wish to study
for advanced degrees.

Tuesday
Square dance lessons
Square dancing is
fun and great exercise.
Classes start at 6:45 p.m.


Oct. 26 at Teen Town on
DeSota St. across from
Young Park. First two
classes are free. Call
Ouida Taylor at 386-752-
1469 for more information
about classes.

Wednesday
Quilting meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold
it's monthly meeting on
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m.
at the Teen Town 533
NW Desoto St, Lake City,
Florida. (two blocks north
of Duval (US 90) on Lake
Jeffery Rd. The program
will feature the famous
Chinese Auction, where
members exchange a one-
yard piece of fabric, while
playing a game. For more
details: Contact President
Ramona Dewees, 386-496-
3876.

Knitting, workshop
A basic scarf knitting
workshop is Wednesday at
the Stepehen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State Park.
The cost is $15. It will teach
the basics of knitting a
simple scarf using fun. fur
and worsted yarn. Class is
limited to six people. Call
(386) 397-1920 or visit www.
stephenfosterCSO. org.


Florida investigating 5 colleges


BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-Florida
is investigating five private,
for-profit colleges to deter-
mine if they've engaged in
unfair or deceptive practices
in recruitment and other
areas, the state attorney
general's office said Friday.
The office is also looking
into whether the colleges
misled students about finan-
cial aid.
Ryan Wiggins, a spokes-
woman for Attorney General
Bill McCollum, confirmed
Friday his office was con-
ducting a civil investigation.
Wiggins said the investi-
gation began in response to
consumer complaints and a
federal report that accused
some for-profit schools
of encouraging fraud and
engaging in deceptive mar-
keting practices.
"Ifs all in its infancy right
now," Wiggins said. She said
officials are unsure how


long the civil investigation
will take.
According to McCollum's
office, the colleges being
examined are Kaplan Inc. of
. Alpharetta, Ga.; University
of Phoenix Inc. of Arizona;
Argosy University of Florida
Inc.; Everest College, a
subsidiary of Corinthian
Colleges Inc. of Santa
Ana, Calif., and Medvance
Institute'Inc., of Miami.
Most of the schools, which
all have branches in Florida,
say they plan to cooperate.
Jacquely P Muller, spokes-
woman for Pittsburgh,
Pa.-based Education
ManagementCorp.,Argosy's
parent, said the company
has not been formally noti-
fied of the investigation but
is prepared to provide any
information required.
'The EDMC Code of
Business Ethics and Conduct
makes it clear to all employ-
ees that failure to comply
with all federal and state
regulations is not tolerated,"


she said in a statement
The Government
Accountability Office, an
arm of Congress, reported
in August that its investiga-
tion of 15 schools nationwide
found four colleges encour-
aged fraudulent practices
and that all made deceptive
or otherwise questionable
statements to undercover
applicants about such mat-
ters as costs and graduation
rates.
The report doesn't iden-
tify the colleges visited but
says two were in Florida.
At a privately owned two-
year Florida school offering
a radiologic therapy degree,
the report said, a financial
aid representative suggest-
ed the undercover applicant
should fraudulently remove
$250,000 from a savings
account because having that
much money on hand would
have prevented the applicant
from qualifying for a govern-
ment-subsidized loan.
An admissions represen-


tative at the same school
refused to tell the applicant
what its graduation rate was
except to say "very high,"
according to the report
The other Florida school
is described as a two-year
college owned by a publicly
traded company. The report
said an admissions repre-
sentative falsely claimed the
school was accredited by the
same agency that accredits
Harvard University and the
University of Florida.
The report said the under-
cover applicant, who was
interested in a criminal jus-
tice degree, was not allowed
to speak to a financial aid
official before enrolling and
had to sign an agreement
saying she would pay $50 a
month while enrolled. The
report said representatives
used hard-sell marketing
techniques and scolded the
applicant for not wanting to
take out loans.


OBITUARIES


W. H. Higginbotham
W. H. Higginbotham, 73, passed
away October 21, 2010 of an ex-
tended illness. He was a lifelong
resident ofLake City. Survived by
wife Gloria, son "late" Clint, two
daughters, Glenda Marra (Mi-
chael), and Gail Griffis, grand-
son "late" Brandon, four grand-
children, Ashley, Ricky, Andrew
and Taylor and two great grand
children, Hayden and Emily.
Mr. Higginbotham attended Pine
Grove Baptist Church, enjoyed
fishing, hunting and working
outside as an everyday hobby.
There will be a Remembrance
Memorial Service at Pine
Grove Baptist Church 1989
N US Hwy 441, Sunday, Oc-
tober 24, 2010 at 2:00 PM.

Frank Howard Mathews
Mr. Frank Howard Mathews,
83, of Lake City passed away
Wednesday, October 20, 2010.
Mr. Mathews was born in Lex-
ington, Georgia, but had lived
in the Lake City area since 1968
after moving here from Warner


Robins, Georgia. Mr. Mathews
was a veteran having served
in the United States Army. Mr.
worked for .
many years at -
DCASPRO
as a govern-
mental aircraft
inspector on
C-130, then at
AERO (TIM-
CO) until retir-
ing in 1985. Mr.
Mathews was
an avid stock
car racing fan and had worked
for many years at the Lake
City & North Florida (Colum-
.bia) Speedways. Mr. Mathews
was a former Governor of the
Moose Lodge in Warner Rob-
ins, Georgia and in his spare
time he enjoyed fishing and
gardening. Mr. Mathews was
preceded in death by his wife
of 57 years Frances Mathews,
his bothers George, R.B., Rob-
ert, Ralph, Clyde, Myrtes, and
Jerry, and a sister Aline Todd.
Mr. Mathews is survived by his
son Scott Mathews (Tracy) of
Lake City, a sister Ruby Andrews


Reverse Mortgage

^ INCOME FOR LIFE



McELHANEY'SERVCES
Frank McElhaney, GMA MORTGAGE SERVICES
Principal Broker Your Local Mortgage Connection
291 SW Sisters Welcome Rd. MNAB


of Lexington, Georgia, and two
grand children Amy and Mandy
Mathews both of Lake City.
The family will receive friends
at the funeral home from 5:00
- 7:00 P.M. on Monday, Oc-
tober 25, 2010. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERALHOME, 458 S.Mar-


ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234. Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Don't MRs

The Deadline!


Call
Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!

755-5440 or

755-5441
Between 8am & 5pm


T,~


Audit faults schools

for '05 storm claims


FORT LAUDERDALE
- Auditors 'say Broward
County school officials
can't prove they properly
spent $15 million in federal
disaster aid for 2005 hur-
ricane cleanup.
According to the audit
by the Department of


Homeland Security, the
school district's expens-
es for repairs related to
Hurricanes Katrina and
Wilma were excessive or
could not be verified.
The audit recommends
that the school board repay
the money.


Honor



Our



Heroes!


- ill 'i
ll n,


T he men and women of our military have always been
there to answer tlie call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


F !


r-w."l




PMH
.1





rN-1


Love. Eileen
actual size


Your Name:
Address:n*
Town;: --.State: Zip:._
Daytime Phone: ...... ....
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service: Dates Served:
Bring this in orSend to: Lake City Reporter, 1I0 E. Ild S lAct Ukt t 1 3tii n 1 7 i ) for monr ilo.
Submissions must be rTceied by 3'30 p.m, MondhyN. ov 8, 2010. All photo ill be rriturned b including SMSE ith )our cnn.
.5:M


I nank you ror your
years of service.
We Salute You


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












FAITH


Saturday, October 23, 2010 v


&


VALUES


ww.lakecityreporter.com


Third World missionaries get low-tech training


By JAY REEVES
Associated Press

In a rural
nook of east
Alabama where
there aren't
enough bright lights to
blot out the stars at night,
missionaries and commu-
nity leaders from foreign
lands are learning to save
lives in the Third World
not just with Bibles, but
with mud, sand and leaves.
Located off a winding
highway, an organiza-
tion called Servants in
Faith and Technology has
offered training for three
decades on how to use
common items to improve
and extend lives in under-
developed nations.
On a recent day in
October, 19 trainees from
10 countries learned how
to make efficient, clean-
burning cook stoves from
mud bricks. The small,
boxy structures replace
open fires that the World
Health Organization
blames for 1.6 million
deaths annually in the
world's poorest countries.
On other days they'll
learn how used tires can
become the foundation
for gardening systems
that use only a little water.
They'll find out how sand
can be used as a filter to
rid drinking water of dan-
gerous parasites. They'll
see how the ground-up
leaves of some tropical
plants contain enough
nutrients to save the life of
a malnourished child.
Raphael Ogbole, 42,
says low-tech solutions
like the mud-brick stoves,
which cut back noxious
smoke, can have an enor-
mous impact in his native
Nigeria, where he works
as a Christian missionary
on the Mambilla Plateau
in the northeastern part tif
the country.
"My mother cooked on
a three-stone stove and
every time she came out,
of the kitchen she had
tears in her eyes" from the
smoke, said Ogbole.
Jean-Eles Denis said
simple water purification
systems can save lives
back home in Haiti, where
some 250,000 people


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ifeanyi Nwanaforo (center) of Nigeria, reacts along with the Rev. Grace Akunor (right) of Ghana, and Sylvie Kamuna (second
from left) of the Democratic Republic of Congo, after successfully starting a fire in their homemade brick oven during training
in Lineville, Ala., on Oct. 5. Trainees from several countries are learning how to make an-efficient, clean-burning stove from
mud bricks. The Servants in Faith and Technology group provides the training in rural Alabama.


died in an earthquake in
January and more than 1
million still live in tents or
other temporary shelters.
Millions lack access to
clean water, particularly
outside the capital of Port-
au-Prince.
"People who live in the
city can go buy water, but
people who live in the
country don't have the
ability to do that," he said.
Hundreds of people
from about 85 coun-
tries have come to rural
Alabama for training in the
31 years since the open-
ing of Servants of Faith
and Technology, or SIFAT
(which is pronounced SEE
fat).
It was founded by Ken
and Sarah Corson, a mis-
sionary couple who moved
to Bolivia in 1976 and were
inspired to come up with a
way to improve life for res-
idents of the world's poor-
est areas. They returned to
America three years later
and founded SIFAT in east
Alabama near Lineville for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rev. Appolonia Okwu of Nigeria works to build a fire in
her hand-built mud and straw brick oven in Lineville, Ala.,
Tuesday. Okwu is one of 19 trainees from 10 countries who
are learning how to make the efficient, clean-burning cook


stoves from mud bricks.,

a simple reason: Sarah was
from nearby Wedowee,
and they got a good deal
on the land.
Today, SIFAT operates
on a 186-acre campus
that includes classrooms,
gardens for research


and demonstration, out-
door training labs and a
"global village" area where
American visitors can visit
and stay in mud huts and
open-air houses like those
that are common in much
of the world.


SIFAT is Christian, but
anyone is welcome and
people of other faiths have
been trained. While it's not,
part of a denomination, the
organization has ties to the
United Methodist Church.
Many U.S. denomina-
tions and schools have
training programs for
missionaries that com-'
monly teach Americans to
go overseas and perform
tasks like starting church-
es. SIFATs training pro-
gram is different because
it brings international
missionaries to America
and provides them skills'
for serving in their own
countries.
At SIFAT, the focus is
more practical than evan-
gelical.
A vital part of the opera-
tion is the 10-week training
sessions, where people
come to America to learn
how to use appropriate
technologies to improve
living conditions. Back
home, they can spread the
knowledge as teachers


or even help set up small
businesses to provide both
jobs and needed items,
like stoves.
The program primarily
trains missionaries, but
graduates include govern-
ment officials, teachers,
doctors, business people
and agricultural experts
like Denis, an agronomist
in Haiti.
"These people are learn-
ing basic ways where they
can have a good quality of
life even though they don't
have the resources we
have," Sarah Corson said.
Training for one person
is $3,750, and scholar-
ships and fundraising typi-
cally help cover the cost
Participants also must pay
for their transportation
to and from the United
States; similar training is
provided at satellite loca-
tions in Africa, Asia and
South America.
The cost is worth it
for many. One of the stu-
dents in Alabama this fall,
Cynthia Navarro, said
something as simple as
a stove made out of mud
bricks can save lives in
the Philippines, where she
works as a missionary.
The stoves use as much
as 75 percent less wood
than an open fire, and the
design reduces noxious
smoke emissions drasti-
cally.
"The smoke from fires
is a huge problem where
I work," Navarro said. "It
kills people."
The training has another
effect, too: It helps some
participants rethink their
* entire purpose as mission-
aries.
Before he met a
SIFAT graduate in 2007
in Cameroon, Ogbole
thought of himself almost
exclusively as a preacher.
He came to Alabama for
the first time in 2008, has
since returned twice for
additional courses, and
now sees himself in a
more holistic role.
"It was kind of an
eye opener to me about
Christian. ministry," he
said. "It gave me a balance.
We don't just need to mea-
sure ourselves in preach-
ing and proclamation, we
need to meet physical
needs, as well."


CHURCH NOTES


Today
An evening of basking
in his presence
A ladies night out of
fellowship and fun from
4 p.m. to 7 p.m. today at
On Eagles.Wings, 185
SE Baya Drive. Door
prizes will be given out
and refreshments will be
services. Contact Linda
Brown at (386) 961-8371.
The event is sponsored
by on Eagle's Wings
Mentorship Program
and Life in the Inside
Ministries.

Sunday
Homecoming service
Calvary Baptist Church
is having homecoming at
10:30 a.m. Sunday with
a concert by Lindsey
Mimbs. The Rev. Brian
Mimbs, pastor of Chapel
Hill Baptist Church in
Tallahassee, is the speak-
er. Calvary Baptist Church
is located at 776 County
Road 25A Rev. Ivan
Clements is the pastor.

Church anniversary
celebration
The 147th church anni-
versary celebration at
Trinity United Methodist
Church is 3 p.m. Sunday.


The keynote speaker
is Pauleltte Monroe of
Daytona Beach. She is
a former first lady of
Trinity and has served as
president of the Florida
Conference of United
Methodist Women and
Liaison to the South
Atlantic Regional School
of Christian Mission. The
church is located at 238
SE Martin Luther King
St.

Monday
Lake City Aglow
Lighthouse is host-
ing its monthly meeting
at 7 p.m. Monday at the
Christian Service Center.
Shirley McManus, CSC
executive director, is the
speaker. She will provide ,
an overview of the CSC's
programs and a tour of the
facility. Bring donations
of PB&J, macaroni and
cheese and any canned
goods. The center is locat-
ed at 441 NW Washington
St. Call 935-4018, 752-1971
or 249-4380.

Wednesday
Focus on the Family
series
"Election 2010:
America's Christian


Heritage" is at 6:15 p.m.
Wednesday at First United
Methodist Church. The
church is located at 973 S.
Marion Ave.

Oct. 31
Family and Friends Day
Bethesda Outreach
Ministries of Alachua
is having its 1st Family
and Friends Day Oct.31.
The 11 a.m. speaker is
Elder Robert Jammer. )
The 4 p.m. speaker is
Pastor Steve Miller. The
church is located at 13205
N.W. 157th Ave. Contact
(352)339-4466

Homecoming
celebration
Bethlehem Baptist
Church Homecoming is
10:30 a.m. Oct. 31. Pastor
Lowell O'Steen will be
leading this trip down
memory lane. There will
be a covered dish dinner
following the service. Call
(386) 752-5156 for inore
information. The church
is located SR 100 east just
past Homes of Merit.

Youth service
The first youth-directed
service is 1 p.m. Oct.
31 at Iglesia Evangelica
Aposento Alto. Call the


Rev. Arturo Suarez for
more information at 754-
1836.

7th Family Fall Festival
Christ Central is having
a fall festival as an alterna-
tive to trick or treating
for children at 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. Oct. 31. The theme
for the festival is western
roundup. Businesses are
welcome, and the church
only requests that bags of
candy are brought. There
will be a bounce house,
candy, entertainment, hay
rides and an entertainment
contest Call Leilani at 755-
2525.

Fifth Sunday service
Union AME WMS is
hosting its Fifth Sunday
Worship Service at 11 a.m.
Oct. 31. The guest speaker
is Cynthia Robinson of
New Mount Pisgah AME
Church. The church is
located at 357 NW Queen
Road. Call Romania
Newman at 752-3295 or
Angee Ford at 755-6314.

Nov. 6
Old Timey Day
The 17th Annual Old
Timey Day starts at 8 p.m.
Nov. 6 at Shady Grove
Baptist Church in Live


Oak. There will be sample
food cooked on a wood-
burning stove from 10 a.m.
to 1.p.m. Other activities
include antique cars and.
tractors, cane grinding,
wood splitting and more.
The event is free.

Abortion regret
support group
Crossroads Pregnancy
Center is starting a sup-
port group for people with
abortion regrets. The
group is free and confiden-
tial. Call Catherine at (386)
497-4978.

Every Tuesday
Greater Visions hosts
addiction support group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
in the fellowship hall of
Christ Central Ministries,
217 SW Duval Ave. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 755-2525.

Free Biblical counseling
is available
Free Biblical counsel-
ing is available at Hopeful
Baptist Church. Many


are struggling with prob-
lems including marital,
financial, communication,
emotional, spiritual and
addiction. To make an
appointment, call (386)
752-4135 between 8:30
a.m. and 4 p.m.

Every Thursday
English and literacy
classes
Free English speak-
ing and literacy classes
provided by Columbia
County School District's
Career and Adult
Education Program is
from 5:30 to 8 p.m: every
Thursday at Unity of
God Ministries, Inc. in
Wellborn. Activities for
children will beprovided.
Call (386) 755-8190. The
church is located at 12270
County Road 137.

Submit Church Notes
items in writing no later
than 5 p.m. Monday the
week prior to an event
by e-mail to arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com,
fax to (386) 752-9400 or
drop-off at 180 E. Duval
St., Lake City. Call (386)
754-0425 with questions.
Church Notes run as
space is available each
Saturday.










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


As winter approaches and the evenings grow

longer, we may feel drawn to the "old times"

when families settled in early for the night, gathering

for a meal and a fireside chat. These are busier times,

with all our activities we may not have time for the

togetherness we long for. Bring your family together

at your house of worship this __


Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society .
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve lou
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


wv. r-oi b; c f^^a Iy and JnT^.J^Tilj-
6-7t5 An4.--i55

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter,
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90QWEST 755-2427


GW


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
Jobber-


Inc.
"Quality ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944_


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake Cit) FL.
S(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all hmq, th ough Chris ,,, ich tricnlgthnlh me"
'Phihppmns n 13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440.


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A ..
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881SW McFarlane Ave
j*6-,'5?-3900I
Sunday School: 9-45AMN
Sunday Service 1.00iAM
Wednesday Servire. 7.00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW L le Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship I10 30A & 6PM
Wed. Fan. Bible Study - I 7'OOPM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR41 S, 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10-145AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pasior Larr E swear
LFTSIDE BAPTIST CHiJRCH
196 SE James Ave.* 386-752-2860
Sun Bible Srud\ 9 4SA1
Sun Wrship I [kM & 6PM
Wed Prayer MligBible Srud 6PM
Rev. Brandon i Win

FIRST BAPTISTr CHURCH
Sard iv Bible Studyv .'9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10 3i1AM & 6 00PM
Wed 6-LlIPM Pdyer Service,.
Chfldrerts Minitrv 6:15PM
Dorwinrcow Lake City 52-5-122
Re% Siephen Ahrens. Pasint
OULIVET MISSION BAPTISTl CHURCH
541N E DavisSneet
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Murning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God'sWord, Will & Way".

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
.68 N' Lake lelfer) 8id 752-0681
Lake -ltry. Honda 32055
Swww phcl crrum
Sunday School 8 ill, 145 & I IAI
SundayWorship 9 .45 & 1,AM & 6 M
AWANA 5:30PM
Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule.
Family Supper (Reservation) 5PM
Children's Ministry 6PM
YouthWorship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule St 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664 -
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
SundayWorship IHAM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITFT BAPTIST
Sunday Sermves Ill urt AM
Pasicr Fldet Hetman Gitfin
752.4198
SOUIHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388S E Ba a [inre* 755-5553
Sunday


Bible Studv
Morning Wutshtp
Evening Woiship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Praver & Bible Study


9:15 AM
10: AM
6:5PM
5'45PM
h !5 PMl


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baprisil
144 SE M tnu.se Ave '752-42.74
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun Mom Worship II AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. PtMyer Meeung 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman
THEVINEYARD
.\ Southern Bpiipo, -t.hua:h
2091 SW Main Blvd. *623-0026
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Where lesui is hePiraltd
aind jeans are apprtopiiat'.
PastJr. Pt HaTrrim, k

EPIPHANi CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphpvar, ioun -752-4470
Sdaliday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Ma s 8.15 AM. i n AM
,, iJU iM Sparnish En gi. hi
SundaVy SdChl Relihous Ediau:In
9 0 0AM l. 1015..-\

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service .7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. *755-9436


Sunday School
Sun, Mom, Worship
Wed. Prayer Meeting


9:30 AM
10:30 AM
7 PM


NEWHORIZON
church of Christ
Directions &Times-755-1320
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine s 79.25965h
Sunday School 45 ,1\
Sun Worshp 10:30AM&6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30.
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs -
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music. Dr. Alfonso Levy


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 12 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire

SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave,
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9".1AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8 1tO14M
Traditional Service l! utAM
Program opportunities available ri aill
areas for all ages.
For a complete schedul-
contact church office a"
752-4488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNIT ED
12.2 S1 Mlailarine*752-1351
IAdjaw:ent Tl Stmnie!t Shiho'll
SundaV Sclhu.Il 4.1)10A
Worthip A.1'1& 1IJ:001AM
jurnery provided
Prai:,e & Wurship 6.0Ll1PM
AWAIA starts 9115 Wed. '5 IOPM
Pav'tr The Re I Louie Mabrey
www hler)inem cumi

WATERrOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 91J 1 rurn -,rn Cu)[i inOi it to Quality
Ind.ing hion Olanjaia.
Sunday School 9 45 AM
Sun Wourhip 11AM .'s PM
Wed Night SerVxie 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


. LAKE C CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9 4'5AM
Sundd Woarhip 10:45AM 6 3;PM
Wednesday 6 30PM
Adult,Youth Ministry, Children' M Ninisrry
Pastor: Craig Henderson

SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday Cornrempoiir 9.00AM
Sunday Schtol 10:00AM
Tradin,:n.d Servie II tlJ0 AM
NRSERYPROVIDED
Pa iir. Dr. Roy A Mamn
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NEWashington St.
SundaySchool Ili 1 .I1AM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6 lit PM
Youth Services -Wednesdav 7O00PM
Mid.ive6. Sertc e Wedrie.sda.t (.'i PM
Fi rw lh ,:.1l7''.. 3 ll Eiir,,ine Wel'y: rit
P'.:ir f e,' Sitn Li h.

CHRifT CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9 111,A\M
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wedrneday SerVme 7 ,UOPM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy90 take
istliers lWelorit Rid. gj 'i mnilt, south,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
CornerSR. 47.& Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and ThirdSundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIA EVANGELICAL
APOSENTOALTO
17077 .-'i rRd L.'C L 321155
Service Fri: 7:00PM, Sun: 1:00PM
\rmir:l Sul.iar,* @ .6754-1836
NEWBEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A'Ful Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Call





752-1293!


To dvrtie- n tisChuchPi etryCal,75-'44'


fi'lay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete-decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon..Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St. Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

=1 HARRY'S
&t '."s Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

P n. 752-2308 h

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
170 s 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercild
755-6142


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


r-


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010









IMATIMM 0 AItDI I ........


8A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



Cholera outbreak hits rural Haiti; 142 dead


By JACOB KUSHNER
Associated Press

ST. MARC, Haiti At
least 142 people have died
in a cholera outbreak,
and aid groups are rush-
ing in medicine and other
supplies Friday to combat
Haiti's deadliest health
problem since its devastat-
ing earthquake.
The outbreak in the rural
Artibonite region, which
hosts thousands of quake
refugees, raised fears of
an epidemic spreading to
squalid tarp cities, where
homeless quake survivors
are vulnerable to disease
because of poor sanitation.
"We have been afraid of
this since the earthquake,"
said Robin Mahfood, presi-
dent of Food for the Poor,
which was preparing to fly
in donations of antibiotics,
dehydration salts and other
supplies.
Many of the sick have
converged on St. Nicholas


hospital in the seaside
city of St. Marc, where
hundreds of dehydrated
patients lay on blankets in
a parking lot with IVs in
their arms as they waited
for treatment.
Health Ministry direc-
tor Gabriel Thimothe said
laboratory tests confirmed
that the illness is cholera.
He said Friday that 142
people have died and more
than 1,000 infected people
were hospitalized.
The president of
the Haitian Medical
Association, Claude
Surena, said people must
be vigilant about hygiene
and wash their hands fre-
quently to slow the spread
of the disease.
"The concern is that it
could go from one place to
another place, and it could
affect more people or move
from one region to another
one," he said.
Cholera is a waterborne
bacterial infection spread


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Patients suffering from diarrhea and other cholera symptoms
are helped by other residents as they wait for treatment at
the St. Nicholas hospital in Saint Marc, Haiti on Friday. An
outbreak of cholera in rural central Haiti has killed at least 142
people and sickened hundreds more.


through contaminated
water. It causes severe
diarrhea and vomiting that
can lead to dehydration and
death within hours.
Health Minister Alex
Larsen urged anyone suf-


fering diarrhea to make
their own rehydration
serum out of salt, sugar
and water to drink on the
way to a hospital.
Michel Thieren, a
program officer for the


Pan-American Health
Organization, said hos-
pitals in the region have
enough IV treatments for
now but stocks will need to
be replenished.
"Most of the cases can be
done with oral treatment,
but here we have a signifi-
cant number that require
IV treatment," he said.
No cholera outbreaks
had been reported in
Haiti for decades before
the earthquake, accord-
ing to the U.S. Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention. Haitian offi-
cials, including President
Rene Preval, have been
pointing to the lack of
severe disease outbreaks
as a success of the quake
response.
With more than a mil-
lion people left homeless
by the disaster, however,
experts have warned
that conditions are ripe
for disease to strike in
areas with limited access


to clean water.
At the hospital, some
patients including 70-
year-old Belismene Jean
Baptiste said they got sick
after drinking water from
a public canal.
"I ran to the bathroom
four times last night vom-
iting," Jean Baptiste said.
The sick come from
across the Artibonite
Valley, a starkly desolate
region of- rice fields and
deforested mountains.
The area did not expe-
rience significant damage
in the Jan. 12 quake but
has received thousands
of refugees from the dev-
astated capital 45 miles
south of St. Marc.
Most of the refugees in
the area were absorbed
into communities, in con-
trast with the hundreds of
thousands living in squal-
id tarp cities in Port-au-
Prince, according to U.N.
humanitarian spokeswom-
an Imogen Wall.


Political

neophyte

clashes

with Boyd


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
funeral director may finally
succeed in laying to rest
Rep. Allen Boyd's political
career, something several
Republicans have never
come close to accomplish-
ing against the conservative
"BMue Dog" Democrat.
Political newcomer Steve
Southerland is benefiting
from nationwide tea party
enthusiasm for the GOP,
an influx of negative adver-
tising against Boyd by out-
side groups and discontent
within the conservative
2nd Congressional District
over the incumbent's sup-
port of President Barack
Obama's economic stimu-
lus plan and health care
overhaul.
The GOP has made
Boyd a top target in the
party's drive to win control
of the U.S. House.
In what may be an omen
of the Nov. 2 outcome,
Boyd barely survived a pri-
mary challenge from state
Senate Democratic Leader Al
Lawson and the Tallahassee
lawmaker has refused to
endorse him. Southerland,
meanwhile, easily won a five-
way Republican primary.
"I think that did serve
notice to Congressman
Boyd that there is unrest,
great unrest," Southerland
said. "People are aggra-
vated the economy is not
moving in the direction that
it should be moving."
Southerland is on leave
from his family's Panama
City funeral home business
that his grandfather started'
in 1955. His family also is
involved in the timber indus-
try and traces its presence
in the Florida Panhandle to
colonial times.
Boyd, a Monticello farm-
er and Vietnam veteran,
remains confident he'll win
an eighth term.
He's been buoyed by
endorsements from the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce and
National Rifle Association,
a rarity for a Democrat in
both cases. Boyd also has
been aggressive in attack-
ing Southerland for being
late in paying property taxes
and making statements,
such as favoring repeal of
directly electing U.S. sena-
tors and calling Medicare
a "train wreck," that he's
since backed off on.
The 2nd District is
Florida's largest, sprawl-
ing across all or parts of
16 mostly rural counties.
Southerland, like many
Republicans this year,
and the groups opposing
Boyd are trying to nation-
alize the election while the
incumbent has stressed
local issues.


EL 7"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Pentagon in Washington is seen in this aerial view in this 2008 file photo. The WikiLeaks website appears close to
releasing what the Pentagon fears is the largest cache of secret U.S. documents in history hundreds of thousands of
intelligence reports compiled after the 2003 invasion of Iraq.- In a message posted to its Twitter page on Thursday, the
organization said there was a 'major WikiLeaks press conference in Europe coming up.'








iAJOR EAK



WikiLeaks prepares to release


cache of US war documents


By RAPHAEL G. SATTER
and PAULINE JELINEK
Associated Press

LONDON -
The WikiLeaks
website is
poised to
release what
the Pentagon fears is
the largest cache of
secret U.S. documents
in history hundreds
of thousands of intelli-
gence reports that could
amount to a classified
history of the war in Iraq.
U.S. officials con-
demned the move and
said Friday they were
racing to contain the
damage from the immi-
nent release, while
NATO's top official told
reporters he feared that
lives could be put at risk
by the mammoth disclo-
sure.
NATO chief Anders
Fogh Rasmussen said
any release would create
"a very unfortunate situ-
ation."
"I can't comment on


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Afghan children look at a U.S. military vehicle in Kandahar
City, Afghanistan Friday. The Pentagon fears that the docu-
ments to be released by WikiLeaks could put at risk the
lives of American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.


the details of the exact
impact on security, but in
general I can tell you that
such leaks ... may have
a very negative secu-
rity impact for people
involved," he told report-
ers Friday in Berlin fol-
lowing a meeting with
German Chancellor
Angela Merkel.
In a posting to Twitter,


the secret-spilling web-
site said there would
be a "major WikiLeaks
announcement in
Europe" at 5 a.m. EDT
Saturday. The group has
revealed almost nothing
publicly about the nature
of the announcement.
A U.S. Defense
Department spokes-
man, Marine Corps Col.


Dave Lapan, echoed
Rasmussen's stance,
urging WikiLeaks to
return the stolen mate-
rial some 400,000
secret files on Iraq that
Pentagon officials believe
someone slipped to the
organization.
"We deplore
WikiLeaks for inducing
individuals to break the
law, leak classified docu-
ments and then cavalierly
share that secret infor-
mation with the world,
including our enemies,"
Lapan said. "By disclos-
ing such sensitive infor-
mation, WikiLeaks con-
tinues to put at risk the
lives of our troops, their
coalition partners and
those Iraqis and Afghans
working with us."
Meanwhile, a team
of more than a hundred
analysts from across the
U.S. military, led by the
Defense Intelligence
Agency, has been comb-
ing through the Iraq doc-
uments they think will be
released in anticipation of
the leak.


Poll: US

split on

health

repeal


By RICARDO ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON First
it was President Barack
Obama's health care over-
haul that divided the nation.
Now it's the Republican cry
for repeal.
An Associated Press-GfK
poll found likely voters
evenly split on whether
the law should be scrapped
or retooled to make even
bigger changes in the way
Americans get their health
care.
Tea party enthusiasm for
repeal has failed to catch
on with other groups, the
poll found, which may be
a problem for Republicans
vowing to strike down
Obama's signature accom-
plishment if they gain con-
trol of Congress in the Nov.
2 elections.
Among likely voters, 36
percent said they want to
revise the law so it does more
to change the health care sys-
tem. A nearly identical share
- 37 percent said they
want to repeal it completely.
'We just can't ignore the
health of people in our coun-
try.... It would be an even big-
ger drain on the economy,"
said Linda Montgomery, 63,
a retired software engineer
from Pass Christian, Miss.
"I wouldn't oppose having
the law changed I would
like to see it expanded even
more."
But Joe Renier, an infor-
mation technology manager,
said he finds that view "actu-
ally quite scary."
"They want more power
for the government," said
Renier, 54, of Tucson, Ariz.
"I don't believe the govern-
ment has a right to tell us
to buy health insurance," he
said, adding that the law does
nothing to address unsustain-
able health care costs.
In the poll, only 15 percent
said they would leave the
overhaul as it is. And 10 per-
cent wanted modifications to
narrow its scope.
The health care law will
eventually extend cover-
age to more than 30 mil-
lion uninsured by signing
up low-income adults for
Medicaid and providing
middle-class households
with tax credits for pri-
vate insurance. Starting in
2014, most Americans will
be required to carry cover-
age, and insurers no longer
will be allowed to turn away
people in poor health.
Overall, Americans remain
divided about the changes.
Among likely voters, 52 per-
cent oppose the legislation,
compared with 41 percent
who said they support it.
Strong opponents outnumber
strong supporters by 2-to-1.


M M -;7C n ')








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Saturday, October


23, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

Battle

for SEC

West
It may be a slow
week for the teams
that are generally
adored around this
area, but there's
still plenty of fun in this
college football weekend.
This is one of
those weekends as an
enthusiast that you
like to kick back in the
recliner and have the
remote on standby,
because there are pivotal
matchups throughout the
nation that could shake
up the college football
landscape.
No game is bigger
than the one played on
the plains of Alabama
where the sixth-ranked
LSU Tigers will try to
knock off the undefeated
and fifth-ranked Auburn
Tigers at Jordan-Hare
Stadium.
The two teams present
contrasting styles of
football and its going to
be a matter of which one
conforms to the others'
playing style.
Auburn comes in with
an up-tempo styled attack
and the Tigers want to
score points ... fast. Led
by Heisman Trophy
flavor of the week, Cam
Newton, the Auburn
offense has been nearly
unstoppable this season.
Last week, the Tigers
racked up 65 points
against a formidable
Arkansas team that
gave Alabama a run for
its money. This season,
'Auburn has averaged 40
points a contest
LSU is the yang to
Auburn's ying. While
the Tigers are capable of
putting up points, it's not
at the break-neck pace
that Auburn sets. LSU
uses a dual-quarterback
system behind Jordan
Jefferson and Jarrett Lee.
The two are also polar
opposites.
When Lee is in.the
game, the Tigers are
more prone to the
passing game, while
Jefferson has some of the
same skill set that makes
Newton so indispensable
for Auburn.
If this game were to
be played 10 times on
a neutral site, I'd be
inclined to say that LSU
would win the majority of
the battles. This game is
at Auburn, however, and
that gives the Auburn
version of the Tigers a
slight edge.
In the end, its hard
to believe that LSU will
be able to keep up with
Auburn's attack for four
quarters, and there's a
good possibility, if its
close, that Les Miles'
clock-management skills
will come into play. In
either scenario, it's not
looking good for LSU's
chances at remaining
undefeated.

Auburn 44, LSU 28
In other games ...
Landry Jones leads the
undefeated Oklahoma
PICKS continued on 2B


Godby clamps


down on Tigers

Columbia High the offense responded, the
thrashed by Cougars had already put it
out of reach.
Cougars, 35-14. Godby scored the only
three points of the first
By BRANDON FINLEY quarter as Billy Mueller
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com connected on a 34-yard
field goal with 44 seconds
TALLAHASSEE remaining in the opening
- Sometimes records quarter to put the Cougars
aren't the best indicator on the board.
of a team's overall ability. Godby would add seven
Columbia High learned that more points in the second
first hand as the Tigers fell, quarter with a five play,
35-14, against Godby High 64-yard drive led by quar-
in Tallahassee. terback Dennis Andrews.
Godby built a 16-0 half- Andrews hit Bakari Harris
time lead while the Tiger on consecutive passes total-
offense finally got going in ing 32 yards before hitting
the third quarter to make a
game out of it By the time CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High running back Rakeem Battle (3) is wrapped up by a Ridgeview High defender
in the home game on Oct. 8.


Jacking up Jaguars


JASON MATTHEW WALkER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Josh Faulkner (36) carries the ball on a reverse during the homecoming game against East Gadsden High on Friday.


Fort White High
doubles us East
Gadsden, 28-14.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE
- Fort White High
dispatched another District
2-2B team.
The Indians beat East
Gadsden High, 28-14, and
capped off their homecom-
ing celebration in style.


JR Dixon cracked the 200-
yard rushing barrier for the
second straight game and
had three touchdowns. He
scored on runs of 11, one
and 65 yards.
Donnell Saunders
snatched up a bad snap on
a punt and went 26 yards
for a touchdown.
"We got on our guys
about doing their part (for
homecoming)," Fort White
head coach Demetric
Jackson said. "We prepared
them well, but if you don't


execute you make bad .deci-
sions. The guys played real
physical football. "
Fort White jumped on
the Jaguars quickly. East
Gadsden received and the
first series ended with a
punt on fourth-and-23.
The Indians took over at
the Jaguars' 35 and Dixon
put it in the end zone six
plays later. Colton Jones
kicked the first of his four
extra points at 6:55 of the
first quarter.
After another quick out


for East Gadsden, Fort
White started at its 15 and
turned the field around by
driving to the Jaguars' 24.
'One first down after tak-
ing over, the Jaguars set up
to punt and the snap was
on the ground. A defend-
er knocked it loose from
the punter and Saunders
was there to pick it up and
score. It was his second
touchdown on a fumble
recovery this season.
Fort White had a touch-
down called back on a pen-


alty late in the second quar-
ter and missed a long field
goal at the horn to take a
14-0 lead into intermission.
After an. exchange of
punts to open the third
quarter, the Indians drove
63 yards in eight plays for
Dixon's second touchdown.
Trailing 21-0 with 5:05
left in the third quarter,
East Gadsden went to the
super spread with disas-
trous results. In five plays,
DISTRICT continued on 3B


Among friends


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High volleyball coach Doug Wohlstein talks strategy during the match against
Union County High on Friday. The Lady Indians won in four sets.


Lady Indians win
student-body
volleyball match.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High volleyball
hosted Union County High
in a "Dig Pink" match
Friday in support of the
fight against breast cancer.
It also was a match
played in early afternoon in
front of a large group of stu-
dents, and the Lady Indians
stumbled at the start. Fort
White rallied to win the match
18-25, 25-19, 25-9, 25-17.
'They did the same thing
to us over there, winning
the first game," Fort White
head coach Doug Wohlstein


said. '"We started off a little
slow. Some of the girls had
not played a student-body
game and there was the
pressure of playing in front
of a lot of their friends. They
were trying too hard."
Alison Wrench provided
a preview of what was to
come with three service
points late in the first set.
Sarah Stringfellow got the
Lady Indians off to a strong
start in the second set with
four service points. She
added three more points
later, including an ace.
Wrench had four late
points with one ace.
Kaycee Baker had four
kills in the game. Holly
Polhill, Brigitte LaPuma
and Brett Sealey also had
INDIANS continued on 3B


:"map.' -- -- .....











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Turns Fast Relief 500, at
Martinsville,Va.
10:30 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Gateway 250,
at Madison, III.
I p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Kroger 200, at Martinsville,Va.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Gateway 250, at Madison, III.
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Turns Fast Relief 500, at Martinsville, Va.
(same-day tape)
1:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Korean
Grand Prix, atYeongam, South Korea
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
CBS National coverage, Notre
Dame vs. Navy, at East Rutherford, N.J.
ESPN Michigan St. at
Northwestern
ESPN2 Syracuse at West Virginia
FSN Iowa St. at Texas
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Georgia
Tech at Clemson, Wisconsin at Iowa or
Nebraska at Oklahoma St.
CBS LSU at Auburn
ESPN Georgia Tech at Clemson or
Wisconsin at Iowa
FSN -Arizona St. at California
7 p.m.
ESPN -Alabama at Tennessee
FSN -Texas A&M at Kansas
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 North Carolina at Miami
8 p.m.
ABC Oklahoma at Missouri
10:15 p.m.
ESPN -Washington at Arizona
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Castello
Masters, third round, at Castellon, Spain
Noon
TGC LPGA Malaysia, second
round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-,
day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville
Open, third round, at PonteVedra Beach
5 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Shriners Hospitals
for Children Open, third round, at Las
Vegas
8:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Administaff
Small Business Classic, second round, at
The Woodlands,Texas (same-day tape),
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game 6, San
Francisco at Philadelphia
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, World Finals, fourth
round, at Las Vegas
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Everton
at Tottenham
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
3:30 p.m.
VERSUS Hartford at LasVegas


BASEBALL

AL Championship Series

New York vs.Texas
NewYork 6,Texas 5
Texas 7, New York 2
Texas 8, NewYork 0
Texas 10, New York 3
NewYork 7,Texas 2
Friday
Texas 6, NewYork I,Texas wins series
4-2

NL Championship Series

San Francisco vs. Philadelphia
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3
Philadelphia 6, San Francisco I
San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 0
San Francisco 6, Philadelphia 5
Thursday
Philadelphia 4, San Francisco 2, San
Francisco leads series 3-2
Today
San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 7:57 p.m.
Sunday
San Francisco (Cain 13-11) at
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-1 I), 7:57 p.m., if
necessary


FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m. "
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia atTennessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit,
Houston


Sunday, Oct. 31 I
Denver vs. San Francisco at London,
I p.m.
Washington at Detroit. I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, I p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Dallas, I p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.


Monday, Nov. I
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: N.Y. Giants, Philadelphia,
Chicago,Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland

College scores

Thursday
Ark.-Pine Bluff 39,Alcorn St. 35
Carson-Newman 34, Mars Hill 27
Tenn.-Martin 52, Lambuth 21
Oregon 60, UCLA 13

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 3 Oklahoma at No. 18 Missouri,
8 p.m.
No.4TCU vs.Air Force, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Auburn vs. No. 6 LSU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Alabama at Tennessee, 7 p.m.
No. 8 Michigan State at Northwestern,
Noon.
No. 9 Utah vs. Colorado State, 6 p.m.
No. 10 Wisconsin at No. 13 Iowa,
3:30 p.m.
No. 11 Ohio State vs. Purdue, Noon.
No. 12 Stanford vs.Washington State,
5 p.m.
No. 14 Nebraska at No. 17 Oklahoma
State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 15 Arizona vs. Washington,
10:15 p.m.
No. 19 South Carolina at Vanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 20 West Virginia vs. Syracuse,
Noon.
No. 21 Arkansas vs. Mississippi,
12:21 p.m.
No. 22 Texas vs. Iowa State, Noon.
No. 23 Virginia Tech vs. Duke, Noon.
No. 24 Mississippi State vs. UAB,
7 p.m.
No. 25 Miami vs. North Carolina,
7:30 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Turns Fast Relief 500
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
10-I I a.m., ESPN2,6:30-7:30 p.m.); Sunday,
race, I p.m. (ESPN2, noon-I p.m., ESPN,
1-5 p.m.)
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles).
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
NATIONWIDE
5-Hour Energy 250
Site: Madison, III.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
10:30 a.m.-noon), race, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
3-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Gateway International Raceway
(oval, 1.25 miles).
Race distance: 250 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Kroger 200
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (Speed,
12:30-3:30 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway.
Race distance: 105.2 miles, 200 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Korean Grand Prix
Site:Yeongam, South Korea.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 1-2:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 2 a.m.
(Speed, 1:30-4 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Korean International Circuit
(road course, 3.493 miles).
Race distance: 192.1 miles, 55 laps.


20. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 96.342.
21. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
96.244.
22. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 96.229.
23. (09) Bobby Labonte. Chevrolet.
96.19.
24. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
96.166.
25. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
96.136.
26. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota,96.132.
27. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 96.107.
28. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
96.024.
29. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 95.888.
30. (64) Landon Cassill, Toyota,
95.888.
31. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 95.859.
32. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 95.767.
33. (83) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 95.685.
34. (U36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
95.675.
35. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 95.641.
36. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
95.521.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
95.208.
38. (26) Ken Schrader, Ford, 95.098.
39. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 94.78.
40. (34) Tony Raines, Ford, Owner
Points.
41. (7) Kevin Conway, Toyota, Owner
Points.
42. (71) Hermie Sadler, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
43. (81) J.J.Yeley, Dodge, 94.855.
Failed to Qualify
44. (46) Michael McDowell, Dodge,
94.472.
45. (07) Robby Gordon,Toyota, 94.34.
46. (55) Terry Cook, Toyota, 94.125.
47. (66) Johnny Sauter,Toyota.


GOLF

Golf week

NATIONWIDE TOUR
Jacksonville Open
Site: PonteVedra Beach
Schedule: Through Sunday.
Course: TPC Sawgrass, Dye's Valley
Course (6,864 yards, par 70).
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Sunday, 2-4 a.m., 2-4:30 p.m.; Monday,
2-4 a.m.).


BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Thursday's Games
Cleveland 83, Milwaukee 77
Oklahoma City 101, New Orleans 86
Atlanta 98, Miami 89
San Antonio IIl, Houston 103
Portland 90, Denver 83
LA. Lakers 120, Golden State 99
Friday's Games
Atlanta at Charlotte (n)
NewYork vs.Toronto (n)
Orlando vs. Miami at Tampa (n)
Memphis at Detroit (n)
Indiana at Chicago (n)
Houston at Dallas (n)
Minnesota at Milwaukee (n)
Sacramento at Utah (n)
Denver at Phoenix (n)
Golden State vs. LA. Lakers (n)
End preseason


HOCKEY


Tums Fast Relief lineup NHL schedule


At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway,Va.
Friday qualifying; race Sunday
(Car number in parentheses)
1.(I I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota,97.018.
2. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
97.003.
3. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 96.988.
4. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
96.973.
5. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
96.959.
6. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
96.889.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 96.835.
8. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
96.825.
9. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
96.696.
10. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 96.686.
11. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
96.666.
12. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 96.657.
13. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
96.622.
14. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 96.607.
15. (43) A J Allmendinger,. Ford,
96.583.
16. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
96.479.
17. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
96.46.
18. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
96.366.
19. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
96.352.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

YONOL /


2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

BELZA ;




TSATLE !E


Thursday's Games
Boston 4,Washington I
N.Y. Rangers 2,Toronto I
Anaheim 3, Philadelphia 2
Detroit 4, Calgary 2
New Jersey 3, Montreal 0
N.Y. Islanders 3,Tampa Bay 2, OT
Dallas 4, Florida I
Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 3, OT
San Jose 4, Colorado 2
Minnesota 4, Edmonton 2
Phoenix 4, Los Angeles 2
Friday's Games
Calgary at Columbus (n)
Ottawa at Buffalo (n)
Tampa Bay at Atlanta (n)
Chicago at St. Louis (n)
Minnesota atVancouver (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Florida, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Carolina at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Edmonton, 10.p.m.
Sunday's Games
Nashville at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Calgary, 8 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


I rM THE RIVER WON
L L A THE ROAP RACE
z | EiECAUSE
AGGIZZ HE KNEW ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: THE LII I 1
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: GAMUT PATIO GASKET MARTYR
Answer: What the warden gave the repeat offender -
A TIME "OUT"


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 213; 2. Linda Andrews 191;
3. Lori Davis 188. 1. Dess Fennell
227; 2. Tom Sewejkis 226; 3. Luke
Milton 214.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 568; 2. Susie Flick 510;
3. Lori Davis 479. 1. (tie) Tom Sewejkis,
Dess Fennell 643; 3. Mark Davis 622.
High handicap game: 1. Dianne
Petit 252; 2. Linda Andrews 235;
3. Joyce Hooper 228. 1. Mark Koppa
243; 2. (tie) Luke Milton, Michael
Mclnally 242; 4. Raleigh Lilley 238.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 640; 2. Susie Flick 636;
3. Linda Oliver 609. 1. Dess Fennell
712; 2. Mark Davis 664; .3. George
Mulligan 642.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
180. 1. Tom Sewejkis 203.
(results from Oct. 12)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Lucky Strikers
(25-11); 2. Legal Ladies (24-12);
3. Spare Us (21-15).
High handicap game: 1. Sandra
Peterson 242; 2. Angie Meek 231;
3. Jackie Alford 230.
High handicap series: 1. Ruth
Heims 628; 2. Joan Carman 606;
3. Angle Meek 598.
(results from Oct. 19)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(26-10); 2. Farmers (21-15); 3. Golden
Oldies (20-16).
High scratch game: 1. Shirl Reeve
198; 2. Betty Brown 186; 3. Louise
Atwood 185. 1. Thom Evert 211;
2. Dan Ritter 196; 3. Earl Hayward
189.
High scratch series: 1. Betty
Brown 487; 2. Louise Atwood 469;
3. Bea Purdy 464. 1. Rick Yates 512;
2. Thom Evert 510; 3. Dan Ritter 508.
(results from Oct. 19)
'MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Lake City Bowl
(139.5-70.5); 2. Neil Hoffman's Auto
Transport (136.5-73.5) 3. Team 12
(133-77).
High scratch game: 1. Daniel Adel
278; 2. Ted Wooley 270; 3. Wally
Howard 268.
High scratch series: 1. Wally


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

Howard 761; 2. Daniel Adel 759;
3. J.J. Hilbert 673.
High handicap game: 1. Daniel
Adel 291; 2. John McFeely IIIl 290;
3. (tie) Wally Howard, Ted Wooley
-276.
High handicap series: 1. Daniel
Adel 798; 2. Wally Howard 785;
3. John McFeely III 721.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
233.33; 2. Mike Koon 217.5; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 214.61.
(results from Oct. 11)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Wild Things
(22-10); 2. Shiners (21-11); 3. Golden
Niners (20-12).
High scratch game: 1. Louise
Atwood 200; 2. Shirley Highsmith
176; 3. Yvonne Osborn 164. 1. Lee
McKinney 219; 2. Bill Price 189;
3. George Mulligan 186.
High scratch series: 1. Elaine
Nemeth 514; 2. Jane Sommerfeld
479; 3. Bea Purdy 444. 1. David
Duncan 656; 2. Bill Dolly 600; 3. Art
Joubert 494.
High handicap game: 1. Dee
Dee Young 240; 2. Janie Posey 235;
3. Aggie Mumbauer 228.- 1. Chuck
Pressler 239; 2. Winton Brewer 230;
3. Thomas Young 210.
High handicap series: 1. Pat Hale
661; 2. Joyce Hooper 615; 3. Vy Ritter
607. 1. Sandy Sanders 677; 2. James
Burnett 614; 3. Jerry Ellis 577. 1
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
149.76; 2. Betty Carmichael 148.54;
3. Elaine Nemeth 148.5. 1. David
Duncan 188.5; 2. Bill Dolly 186.54;
3. George Mulligan 178.25.
(results from Oct. 14)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Oui Suk (23-
9); 2. Waterbury Builders (22-10);
3. Couple of Pair's (21-11).
High scratch game: 1. Shannon
Brown 235; 2. Candace Christie 213;
3. Shannon Howard 209. 1. Wally
Howard 268; 2. Roger Snipes 255;
3. Zech Strohl 237.
High- scratch series: 1. Shannon
Brown 681; 2. Candace Christie
555; 3. Karen Coleman 533. 1. Wally
Howard 694; 2. Roger Snipes 675;
3. Zech Strohl 662.
High handicap game: 1. Bonnie
Hood 254; 2. Shannon Brown 249;
3. Shannon Howard 247. 1. Roger
Snipes 282; 2. Wally Howard 277;
3. George Rye Jr. 251.
High handicap series: 1. Shannon


PICKS: Solid week of college football


Continued From Page 1B

Sooners into Missouri to
take on Lake City Reporter
publisher Todd Wilson's
alma mater. Though I'm
sure Wilson will be
pulling for the Tigers to
come away with the
upset, it's just not feasible
against the best team
in the country. Expect
Jones to shine and put
his name in the Heisman
conversation after a solid
showing on Saturday
with a Sooners' win ...
Nebraska was exposed
*


ACROSS

1 Mammoth
4 Primitive
weapon
8 alai
11 El Dorado loot
12 Baby grand
13 Sudbury's
prov.
14 Paunch, slangi-
ly (2 wds.)
16 Had a snack
17 Tangled
18 Recluse
20 Capp and
Jolson
21 Once called
22 Harbors
25 Jolting
29 Calcutta nanny
30 Weep
31 Pooh's pal
32 Aloha token
33 Positive
response
34 Take cover
35 Gandhi and
Nehru


by a reeling Texas
Longhorns' team that
was coming off a bye last
week. This week, the
Huskers get a chance at
redemption against an
undefeated Oklahoma
State Cowboys program.
Expect Roy Helu and
company to bounce back
on the road and give the
Cowboys their first loss of
the season ... Wisconsin
made a statement by
running through then
top-ranked Ohio State last


38 Pedestals
39 Gladiator's
hello
40 Virus
infection
41 Large blossom
44 Safe topic
48 "Bali -"
49 Glaciers
(2 wds.)
51 Coffee brewer
52 Itemized
accounts
53 Off-road
vehicle
54 Student stat
55 Rides
a bench
56 Skip stones

DOWN

1 Fishing floats
2 Shah's king-
dom
3 "Naked Maja"
artist
4. Movie theaters
5 "Shane" star


weekend behind the legs
of John Clay, but there's
a trap waiting for them in
.the Iowa Hawkeyes. Other
than a cross-country loss
to Arizona early in the
season, the Hawkeyes
have looked solid. Expect
a hard-hitting victory for
Iowa as the wild
college football season
continues.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PIEISOGRII NID
TELL BBM|O I V E
I IRI
|DES |RE E OC TAN E
ONWND
rstp R 0 Ell~i~ D

MAO| AR RlO I|N Kp
ALMOND SCREAM
OAST ETIN
ERLE AN LET
OD Y SE Y
SRA ASH OBE Y
WETTER EQ UINE
INTEND SUNLIT
M E N DSG E D


Famous
numero
Alley
competitor
Baez or Rivers
Penny -


10 Livy's route
12 Tablets
15 Fierce anger
19 Above,
to a bard
21 Catches
a crook
22 Sanskrit
dialect
23 Bad or good
sign
24 Surprise
attack
25 Pesci and
DiMaggio
26 Eye part
27 Leaf
juncture
28 Pushes off
30 New Year's
Eve word
34 cuisine
36 Fleming of 007
novels
37 Is of benefit
38 Mild case of
the blues
40 Celebrations
41 Puff along
42 Seniors' org.
43 Ms. Foch
44 Frontier, once
45 Cabbage unit
46 Jazzy James
47 Party-throw-
er's plea
50 LI doubled


6

7

8
9


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-25 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Brown 723; 2. Bonnie Hood 672; 3.
Kenya Gutzmer 651. 1. Roger Snipes
756; 2. Wally Howard 721; 3. George
Rye Jr. 694.
(results from Oct. 8)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(28-8); 2. Average Joe's (23.5-12.5);
3. Team 1 (23-13).
High scratch game: 1. Donna
Duncan 205; 2. Angela Pond 192;
3. Norma Yeingst 189. 1. Terry Shay
278; 2. Bill Duncan 258; 3. Terry
Shay 224.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yeingst 535; 2. Cheryl Jacks 517;
3. Donna Duncan 512. 1. Terry Shay
706; 2. Bill Duncan 647; 3. Joe Cohrs
623.
(results from Oct. 17)

Youth leagues

MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Chicken
Alfredo! (72-40); 2. Bobby's Angels
(61-51); 3. Team 2 (57.5-54.5).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 180; 2. Courtney Schmitt
167; 3. Christine Peters 166.
1. Daltori Coar231; 2. Cody Stuart 223;
3. Danny King 215.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 497; 2. Christine Peters 482;
3. Shayna Catlett 472. 1. Danny
King 616; 2. Madison Stephens 614;
3. Dalton Coar 604.
JUNIORS
Team Standings: 1. Spineless
Pins (18.5-9:5); 2. Wolverines (18-10);
3. Pin Killers (17-11).
High handicap game: 1. Victoria
Mayer 234; 2. Amanda Schmitt 198;
3. Bryannah Billingsley 197. 1. Dalton
LeRoux 218; 2. Blake Lyons 214;
3. Avery Atkinson 209.
High handicap series: 1. Victoria
Mayer 623; 2. Bryannah Billingsley
558; 3. Amanda Dillon 546. 1. Avery
Atkinson 568; 2. Blake Lyons 564;
3. Dalton LeRoux 557.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Biancah
Billiigsley 168; 2. Emily Wells 153.
1. Mason Cooper 182; 2. Eric
Anderson 159; 3. John Wells 157.
High handicap series: 1. Biancah
Billingsley 491; 2. Emily Wells 448.
1. Mason Cooper 532; 2. Eric
Anderson 446; 3. John Wells 437.
(results from Oct. 9)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010


Rangers headed to World Series


COURTESY PHOTO
In this Oct. 16, 2010, file photo, Oklahoma quarterback Landry Jones (right) throws a pass
as Iowa State Patrick Neal (left) looks on during the first quarter of an NCAA college
football game in Norman, Okla. ,

Oklahoma, Auburn, LSU face

big challenges to stay unbeaten


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press


Picks for Saturday's AP
Top 25 games:
No. 3 Oklahoma
(minus 3) at No. 18
Missouri
Show-me game
for upstart" Tigers ...
OKLAHOMA 31-21.
Air. Force (plus 18'/2)
at No. 4 TCU
Horned Frogs have
given up three points total
in the last three games ...
TCU 35-14.
No. 6 LSU (plus 5) at
No. 5 Auburn
Cam Newton's sec-
ond straight week in
Heisman spotlight ...
AUBURN 27-23.
No. 7 Alabama (plus
16'/2) at Tennessee
Vols have only sur-
passed 17 points vs. UAB
and Tennessee-Martin ...
ALABAMA 28-10.
No. 8 Michigan
State (minus 5) at
Northwestern
Can Spartans han-
dle prosperity? ...
NORTHWESTERN 24-20.
Colorado State (plus
30) at No. 9 Utah
Utes have won four
straight against Rams,


averaging 34 points ...
UTAH 45-10.
No. 10 Wisconsin
(plus 5) at No. 13 Iowa
Badgers won't be doing
the Bucky at Kinnick
Stadium ... IOWA 27-20.
Purdue (plus 24) at
No. 11 Ohio State
Buckeyes lost to
Boilermakers last season
... OHIO STATE 38-17.
Washington State
(plus 34'/2) at No. 12
Stanford
Cardinal have won last
two meetings by combined
97-13 ... 50-21.
No. 14 Nebraska
(minus 51/2) at No. 17
Oklahoma State
So how good are these
Cornhuskers? And these
Cowboys? ... NEBRASKA
34-21.L
Washington (plus 61h)
at No. 15 Arizona
With QB Nick Foles out,
Wildcats need big effort
from defense ... ARIZONA
21-17.
No. 19 South
Carolina (minus 121) at
Vanderbilt
Vandy makes every-
thing better for the
opposition ... SOUTH
CAROLINA 42-17.
Syracuse (plus 14) at


No. 20 West Virginia
Mountaineers have won
eight straight meetings ...
WEST VIRGINIA 31-13.
Mississippi (off) at
No. 21 Arkansas
Ryan Mallett says. he's
ready to go after concussion
last week ... ARKANSAS
47-24.
Iowa State (plus 20'1)
at No. 22 Texas
Cyclones heading for
third straight serious beat-
ing ... TEXAS 42-10.
Duke (plus 261/2) at
No. 23 Virginia Tech
Hokies back in Top 25,
probably for rest of the
season ... VIRGINIA TECH
45-17.
UAB (plus 19'/) at No.
24 Mississippi State
Bulldogs' Dan Mullen,
coach of the year?
MISSISSIPPI STATE 31-7.
North Carolina (plus
61/2) at No. 25 Miami
The Oh, What Could
Have Been? Bowl... MIAMI
27-24.


Lastweek: 12-9 (straight);
9-11 (vs. points).
Season: 108-28 (straight);
64-58-3 (vs. points).
Best bets: 2-1. Upset
specials: 2-1.


Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas
- Their Texas-sized wait
is over. The Rangers are
going to the World Series.
Vladimir Guerrero drove


in three ruds before Nelson
Cruz hit a towering, two-run
homer and the Rangers beat
New York 6-1 Friday night
in Game 6 of the American
League Championship
Series, the biggest vic-


tory in the franchise's 50
seasons.
Colby Lewis dominated
over eight innings for his
second win of the series
and Josh Hamilton earned
the ALCo ivIVP award.


Soron Williams had two
sacks and Trey Phillips
added another.
"They are not going to
stay in five-wide with us,"
Jackson said. "We have guys
with speed and we went at


them and dominated."
East Gadsden put togeth-
er an 80-yard scoring drive
to open the fourth quarter.
Austin Parker hit O.J. Brian
Johnson for three yards and
the score.


After Dixon broke a
65-yard touchdown run,
Darious-Johnson ran the
kickoff back 85 yards for
a touchdown. -arker hit
Johnson for the two-point
conversion and final score.


CHS: Barber leads two TD drives
Continued From Page 1B


Markis Davis down to the
Columbia 19-yard line. To
cap off the drive Andrews
went back to his favorite
target and hit Harris for the
score with 5:30 remaining
in the second quarter.
Godby added another
field goal from Mueller to
lead 13-0 with- 1:05 remain-
ing. This time he connected
from 33 yards.
Nigel Atkinson's second
interception of the half by
Cougars' linebacker Poncho
Thomas set up Godby for a
final score before the break.
The Cougars drove it down
to the one-yard line, but
settled for an 18-yard field
goal from Mueller.
Mueller connected on his
fourth field goal to open
then second half.
Columbia finally found its


way onto the scoreboard in
a drive led by Jayce Barber
and capped off by Atkinson.
Following a seven-yard run
from Barnabus Madision,
Barber followed up with
20 yards to kick-start the
offense. Five plays later,
Barber found Shaq Johnson
for 17 yards-and Columbia
was in the red zone.
After a 13-yard run from
Rakeem Battle, Columbia
had eight yards remaining
to pay dirt. Atkinson would
do the rest on runs of three
and five yards to cut the lead
to 19-7 with 2:27 remaining
in the third quarter.
TimmyJernigan provided
a spark for the Tigers' late
in the third quarter with an
interception, but the Tigers'
offense failed to convert on
fourth down.


With 8:03 remain-
ing in the fourth quarter
Columbia received the bc"
at their own 24, but the ball
went to the ground and the
Tigers were backed to their
own 3. On the following
play Atkinson fumbled and
the ball went through .the
end zone for a safety to give
the Cougars a 21-7 lead and
the ball.
Godby took advantage
with Andrews hitting Markis
Davis for eight yards to cap
a five-play drive and build a
28-7 lead.
With 2:52 remaining,
Barber led the offense on
their most productive drive
with a 22-yard run and
20-yard pass that went
to Battle for a touch-
down and the final
35-14 margin.


INDIANS: District tournament next
Continued From Page 1B


kills.
Baker took control in the
third set. Following a kill
by her, she reeled off nine
service points with two
aces.
Polhill had a killduring
the run and later added a
couple of service points.


Ashley Beckman ran off
five service points to give
Fort White a large lead.
Angel Dowda had a pair of
kills and LaPuma had a kill.
Lync6 Stalnaker had
eight kills in the match.
Wrench had 25 assists and
Stringfellow had. 13 digs.


Baker had three blocks to
go with her lead in kills, and
Dowda had two blocks.
Next up for Fort
White is the District 5-3A
tournament, which begins
Tuesday at Santa Fe High.
The Lady Indians play
Williston High at 5 p.m.


COURTESY PHOTO

'Elvis' in the air
The Crash-A-Rama series is playing at Columbia Motorsports Park today. In one of the
featured acts, 'Elvis' will perform a car jump involving flaming vehicles. The jet-powered
Green Mamba will also be a part of the Night of Fire theme. Tickets for the 7:30 p.m.
performance are available at S&S Food Stores. Columbia Motorsports Park is 14 miles south
of Lake City on Howell Street off U.S. Highway 41-441. For details, call the track at 752-8811.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Seniors shrined at Columbia's final game of season
Columbia High seniors (from left) Arden Sibbernsen, Taylor Messer, Haley Dicks, Taylor Owens, Beth Williams, Simone Williamson and coach Casie McCallister show off the awards gathered
by the Lady Tigers' on Senior Night Thursday in Lake City.


DISTRICT: 2 touchdowns for Dixon
Continued From Page 1B


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER


DILBERT


BLONDE
> THIS NEW '*ATVISION' qOOO-HD
MOVIE CAMERA CAN MAKE A PITCH-
1LACK CAVE LOOK LIKE
A SUNNY
'" V^. E- TROPICAL
/"^ ~~~~ '^3 EC.


-] ... ^


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Single mom wonders when

u to introduce son to suitors


IS THAT THE !NSIO O OUR
|'! : ',,, RE PR ATOR? '[i ,



ii,


S ,..i,


DEAR ABBY: I'm a sin-
gle mom to my 10-year-old
son. I have dated on and off
for six years. My question
is, how soon is too soon to
introduce male friends who
may become boyfriends?
I don't want to scare a
guy away, and I also don't
want to risk having my son
become attached to some-
one who may not be in the
picture long. YOUNG
IDAHO MOM
DEAR YOUNG MOM:
Does your son know you're
dating? Do the men you're
seeing know you have a
child? Any man who would
be scared off after learning
you have a son isn't for you
anyway.
Ten-year-olds today are
not as sheltered as they
once were. If you are see-
ing someone regularly, your
boy may be curious to meet
him. Some women wait until
a man is ready to commit be-
fore making an introduction.
Others wait six months to a
year. There are no hard and
fast rules. Play it by ear.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a
. sophomore in hikh school,
and I really like this girl, but
there's a problem. I never
know what to say to her -
or any girl, for that matter.
The right words never come
to mind. All my guy friends
are what I guess you would


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
call "ladies' men," and I'm
tired of everyone else mak-
ing fun of me.
I have liked this girl for a
long time but she's how
do you say it "out of my
league." I have seen her,
turn down guys just like me.
What should I do? SHY
GUY IN PENNSYLVA-
NIA
DEAR SHY: Start talk-
ing to girls in general. Ask
questions about school,
athletic events, movies or
television shows they may
have seen. The more you
do it, the more comfortable
you will become. You don't
need to put yourself on the
line by immediately asking
anyone out. Just try to get
to know them and their in-
terests and let them get
to know you. If you do, your
chances of a girl saying yes
when you ask one out will
be better.,
DEAR, ABBY: I have
been having an affair for
several years. I deeply love
this man. I love my husband,
too, but in a different way. I


~;`ii~


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't stop be-
lieving in yourself. Disci-
pline and hard work will get
whatever chore you face
done and out of the way.
Don't be afraid to show your
serious side and to bring
partnership problems to the
attention of the person con-
fusing you. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Making an as-
- sumption will probably lead
to trouble. You will be high-
ly emotional and not likely
to see clearly what's going
on around you. Get things
out in the .open but do more
listening and less talking.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): What you do
for others will benefit you
in the end. Love is on the
rise but you must not get
involved with someone who
is already attached. Secrets
will cause problems for you
professionally and person-
ally. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Get out with
friends or plan a party or
get-together with friends
and family. Your generos-
ity and kindness will be ap-
preciated and reciprocated.
Children are in the picture
and will play a role in a de-
cision you make regarding
your future. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Don't take what some-
one says to heart. In the
heat of the moment, emo-
tions can take you in two
different directions. Choose
to be passionate and loving,
not critical and cold, and
you will overcome whatever
obstacle you face. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Getting out or away
from home will be enticing.
Make plans to visit a friend
or travel. Communication
and learning something
new should be your goal. A
change in attitude will help
you relate better to someone
you are close to. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take everything in
stride. There is no point in
getting upset over past re-
grets. Listen to what's be-
ing said or offered but don't
believe everything you are
told. Empty promises are
likely. Nothing is a bad as
you think. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Socializing will
bring about some interest-
ing conversations and ideas
that you can put into motion.
Romance is highlighted, so
plan evening events. If you
want something to happen,
you have to do your best to
make it so. ***


SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Put a little
effort into your home, fam-
ily and surroundings before
someone accuses you of be-
ing neglectful. A surprise
may be made with good in-
tentions but not everyone
will be as excited abput it
as you. Protect your reputa-
tion. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You are well-
positioned and should be
able to make a move that will
enhance your life and your
future. Your professional
and personal status will get
a boost if you network. Mix-
ing business with pleasure
will pay off. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't make
promises if you cannot
deliver. A problem will de-
velop in conversations you
have. Be prepared to make
some necessary changes.
Adaptability will be the key
to stabilizationand greater
security. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Stop worrying
so much and start doing
what counts. It's not what
everyone else wants, ,it's
about what you are com-
fortable doing. Contracts,
legal matters, settlements
and financial gains are all
highlighted. Put everything
you've got into achieving
your goals. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals V
"ZLCRXEXM BR BT RLCR ZBAA
JMBDS WX RLX MXZCMP NY
UCMCPBTX, B'AA PN RLX JXTR B
HCD." CDDX JCDHMNYR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "On the one hand, we'll never experience childbirth.
On the other hand, we can open all our own jars." Bruce Willis
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-23


CLASSIC PEANUTS


IT CAN DETECT A SPECK OF LIGHT
IN THE DARKEST AMAZON JUNGLE
AND. ZAP IT TO YOUR LAPTOP IN A
S NANOSECOND'


~


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010


don't understand how I can
love two men so differently.
The love I feel for my lover
is unconditional. When we
are together it just feels right
I love my husband because
he's a good man and father
who would do anything for
me. In other words, I love the
person he is, but not the man
himself.
My lover is younger than
I am, and married. He's my
best friend and I can con-
fide anything to him. I have
met some of his family, and I
suspect some of them know
about us.
My husband and I tried
marriage counseling, but I
can't seem to have with him
what I have with my lover. I
broke off the affair in an at-
tempt to work things out with
my husband, but it didn't
work. I don't know what else
to do. TORN IN FREE-
HOLD, NJ.
DEAR TORN: Because
ending your affair and mar-
riage counseling with your
husband weren't able to fix
what's missing in your mar-
riage, perhaps it's time to
call it quits. Your husband
has done nothing wrong, and,
frankly, he deserves some-
thing better than half a wife.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.













Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
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' You can also fax or e-mail your ad
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FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
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Friday Thurs,10:00a.m. Turs., 9:00 a.m.
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Ad Errors- Please read your ad
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only the charge for the ad space
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Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply

regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the, first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
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Legal

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of FANTAS-
TIC FENCING at 549 SW HORSE-
SHOE LOOP, FORT WHITE, FL.,
32038

Contact Phone Number: 386-454-
9630 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Elliot McFarlan
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ ELLIOT MCFARLAN
Name: Randy Smith
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ RANDY SMITH

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 21st day of October, A.D. 2010.
by:/s/ KATHY TROWBRIDGE
Commission # DD966319

04542054
October 23, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI-
SION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000227
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA F/K/A FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff
vs.
SHAWN D. WILSON A/K/A
SHAWN WILSON; UNKNOWN
SPPOUSE OF SHAWN D. WIL-
SON A/K/A SHAWN WILSON, IF
ANY, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING. BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; STATE.
OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF
REVENUE; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated September
22, 2010 entered in Civil Case No.
12-2010-CA-000227 of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for COLUMBIA County, LAKE
CITY, Florida, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the
COLUMBIA County Courthouse lo-
cated at 173 NE HERNANDO AVE
IN LAKE CITY, FloridA, at 11:00
a.m. on the 27th day of October,
2010 the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 10, OF GLENWOOD UNIT I,
A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK4,
PAGE(S) 96, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an 'interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 27th day of September,
2010.
P.DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J.
STERN, P.A., ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF
900 South Pine Island Road Suite
400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954)233-8000
09-78127
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact COURT AD-
MINISTRATION at least 7 days be-
fore your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7
days, at the COLUMBIA County
Courthouse at 386-758-1342; if you
are hearing impaired or voice im-
paired, call 711

05524260
October 20,23, 2010







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
++** ** ******************


Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000503
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LISA M. MARTIN, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: LISA M. MARTIN
Last Known Address: 437 NW Ash
Dr. Lake City, FL 32055-5142
Current Address: Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST: COM-
MENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4
AND RUN THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SEC-
ONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
33.68 FEET TO THE NORTH
TIGHT-OF-WAY OF ASH ROAD;
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
385.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE NORTH 89 DEGREES 17 MI-
NUTES 42 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-
WAY OF ASH ROAD A DIS-
TANCE OF 133.26 FEET; THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MI-
NUTES 40 SECONDS 0 WEST A
DISTANCE OF 225.26 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DlE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 14 SEC-
ONDS EAST. A DISTANCE OF
133.24 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 21 MINUTES 40 SEC-
ONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
227.20 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF ASH
ROAD AND THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. IN COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. THE FOREGOING
DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS ALSO
KNOWN AS LOT NO. 28 OF
SEALEY SOUTH, AN UNRE-
CORDED SUBDIVISION.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND
APPURTENANCE THERETO DE-
SCRIBED AS 2006 FLEETWOOD
BEARING VIN NUMBERS
GAFL53SA90708BH21 AND
GAFL53SB90708BH21
A/K/A 437 NW ASH DR., LAKE
CITY, FL 32055-5142
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after
the first publication, if any, n Alber-
telli Law, plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa,
FL 33623, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court wither before
service on Plaintiff's attorney, or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once a
week for two consecutive in The
Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS mu hand and the seal of
this court on this 15th day of Octo-
ber, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Please send invoice and copy to:
Albertelli Law
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
- 10-41787
**See the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should call Jacquetta
Bradley, ADA Coordinator, Third
Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-
7428 within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing impaired call (800) 955-
8771; if your voice impaired, call
(800) 955-8770. To file response
please contact Columbia County
Clerk of Court, 173 NE. Hemando
Ave., Lake City, FL 32056-2069;
Fax: (386) 758-1337.

04541998
October 23, 30, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 09-00478
DIVISION: MF
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY FORMERLY
KNOWN AS BANKERS TRUST
COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG
BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2001-1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES K. TONAC, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated October 6,
2010, and entered in Case No. 09-
00478 of the Circuit Court of the
Third Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida in which
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-


pany formerly known as Bankers
Trust Company of California, N.A.,
as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage
Loan Trust, 2001-1, is the Plaintiff
and James K. Tonac, David B.
Brown, Charles B. Brown, III, Cindy


Legal

Tonac, are defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
in/on on the third floor of the Colum-
bia County Courthouse at 173 N.E.
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055, Columbia County, Florida
at 11:00 AM on the 10th day of No-
vember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment of Foreclosure:
THE NORTH 140 FEET OF LOT
79, HI-DRI ACRES, UNIT 2, A
SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 9 AND 9A,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
TOGETHER WITH 1996 MOBILE
HOME.
A/K/A 427 SOUTHWEST GULL
DRIVE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated in Columbia County, Florida
this 6th day of October, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
09-21638
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should call Jacquetta
Bradley, ADA Coordinator, Third
Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-
7428 within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice, if you are
hearing impaired call (800) 955-
8771; if your voice impaired, call
(800) 955-8770. to file response
please contact Columbia County
Clerk of Court, 173 NE. Hernando
Ave., Lake City, FL 32056-2069;
Fax: (386) 758-1337.

04541962
October 16, 23, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-34-CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
.FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
V.
JASON JENKINS and JACKIE
JENKINS; any and all unknown par-
ties claiming by, through, under, or
against the herein named through,
under, or against the herein named
individual Defendant(s) who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties may claim an
interest as spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees or other claimants; John
Doe and Jane Doe as unknown ten-
ants in possession,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given the P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County Flor-
ida, will on the 17th day of Novem-
ber, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Co-
lumbia County courthouse in the
City of Lake City, Florida, offer for
sale and sell. at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the
following described property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:
Lot 32 of Country Creek, according
to the plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 4, at Page 81, of the public re-
cords of Columbia County, FL
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 10-34-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from .the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court, this 13 day of October,
2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04541999
October 23, 30, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION NO.
PLANTATION AT DEEP
CREEK, LLC, a Florida limited
liability company,
16525 Temple Boulevard
Loxahatchee, FL 33470
Plaintiff,
vs.
ADVERSE POSSESSION,
QUIET TITLE
P.G. BROWN, LULA HARDEE
BROWN,
E.V. BROWN, W.S. BROWN, JAN-
IE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B.
SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN, JR.,
E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH B.
HEATH,
addresses unknown, and their un-
known spouses and children, their
heirs, devisees, and personal repre-
sentatives and their or any of their
heirs, devisees, executors, adminis-
trators, grantees, trustees, assigns, or
successors in right, title, or interest to
the hereinafter described property
and any and all persons claiming by
or through them or any of them; and
all claimants, persons or parties, nat-
ural or corporate, or whose exact le-
gal status is unknown, claiming un-


der any of the above named or de-
scribed defendants, claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in and to
the lands hereinafter described, the
addresses of whom are unknown;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION


Legal

TO: P.G. BROWN, LULA
HARDEE BROWN, E.V. BROWN,
W.S. BROWN, JANIE
B. FUQUA, P.H. BROWN, JESSIE
B. SUMMERALL, P.G. BROWN,
JR., E.C. BROWN and ELIZABETH
B. HEATH, addresses unknown, and
their unknown spouses and children,
their heirs, devisees, and personal
representatives and their or any of
their heirs, devisees, executors, ad-
ministrators, grantees, trustees, as-
signs, or successors in right, title, or
interest to the hereinafter described
property and any and all persons
claiming by or through them or any
of them; and all claimants, persons
or parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants,
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in and to the lands herein-
after described, the addresses of
whom are unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action seeking an order of ad-
verse possession for and to quiet the
title of the following property in Co-
lumbia County, Florida:
A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF
(W 1/2) OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE
17 EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA,' BEING THOSE LANDS
DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1007,
PAGE 2420 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF'
SAID SECTION 31; THENCE
NORTH 00205'09" WEST ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF SAID NE 1/4
A DISTANCE OF 825.05 FEET TO
THE INTERSECTION OF SAID
WEST LINE WITH THE NORTH-
ERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF NORTHWEST
CANSA ROAD AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL;
THENCE CONTINUE NORTH
0005'09" WEST ALONG SAID
WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF
566.67 FEET TO THE SOUTH
LINE OF THOSE LANDS DE-
SCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 1021,
PAGE 826 OF THE AFORESAID
RECORDS; THENCE SOUTH
61207'42" EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE A DISTANCE OF
353.29 FEET TO A REBAR ON
THE' AFORESAID NORTHERLY
MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE; THENCE SOUTH 3755'01"
WET ALONG SAID NORTHER-
LY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF
502.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
CONTAINING. 2.01 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
SAID LANDS SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Clay
A. Schnitker, Davis, Schnitker,
Reeves & Browning, P.A., Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Drawer 652, Madison, Florida
32341,' on or before November 24,
2010, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
Dated October 21, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Court
By:B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04542045.
October 23, 30, 2010
November 6, 13, 2010



020 Lost & Found

STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197

100 Job
100 Opportunities

05524275
S & S Food Stores

(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
For Qur NEW Store on
,Pinemount & Birley Rd
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
pm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
sents seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
one of these positions to qualify
for the job. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all
managers before they are hired.


Secretary Needed FT for a busy
Doctor's office. Excellent skills in
MS Word (speed 60wpm or
above), & MS Excel.
Fax Resume to 386-758-5987


100 Job
100 Opportunities *

05524295
Need experienced
CNC Machine Programmer
and Operator.
Must have some Supervisory
Experience, Send Resume to
Grizzly Mfg. Attn: Guy
174 NE Cortez Terrace
Lake City FL, 32055

Exec.Dir.- nonprofit working with
people with disabilities. Manages
agency with $2M bgt./120 empl.
Reports to 14 mbr.board. 3 yrs.
admin. exp incl. budgeting,
community relations, fundraising,
implementing policies/programs
required. BA degree preferred.
Email resume
prenewa(lakecity-carc.com.
Operations/MGR Position
Exceptional people skills,
Proficient with Quickbooks req,
Marketing exp req, M-F, some
travel, job demanding but reward-
ing, fast paced medical industry,
fax resumes to 386-758-9047
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity to
learn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
email to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information
Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage,
kitchen. Send resume to
northfloridajobs@ gmail.com
Tow Truck Operator. Bryant's
Towing is now hiring Drivers!
Must have a clean MVR never
been charged with or convicted of
a felony. 6 day work week, night
& weekend hours required. Salary
386-752-7799
WELLBORN Horse Farm
needs someone to clean stalls, feed
and general care of horses.
AM & PM. (352)213-8270

ion Sales
J.IU Employment

05524246
Outside Sales Experience? You
have the sales skills maybe just
the wrong product? Would yolt
like to make $1000 $1500 a
week? If you are a people
person, we need to talk
,904-472-3626

05524247
Promotions Rep
$500 is a bad day for our reps.
Are you an outgoing people
person? Would you like to
make $1000 a week?
Call 904-472-3626


Medical
120 Employment

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494


190 Mortgage Money

FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com
240 Schools &
240 Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330v Supplies

BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details


386-965-2215
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


I


IBUYI



SELL II'


FND IT^











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2010


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
GE Refrigerator,
front milk door,
36x311/2, height 681/2,
6 yrs old $450, 386-752-1811

407 Computers
IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
Panasonic Tough Book Laptop
metal casing, touch screen, recent
diag, works great, upgraded mem-
ory/anti-virus $150 386-623-2443
Panasonic Tough Book Laptop,
runs Windows XP, works great,
recent diagnostic $100
386-6232443

420 Wanted to Buy
I BUY USED APPLIANCES
Working or not.
Don't scrap that machine.
Call 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


10/23 Sat 7-1, Camping, fishing
gear, tools, household items, col-
lectibles 1/2 mi. S of CR18 on
Tustenuggee Ave. 386-965-1308
COMMUNITY YARD-SALE
.Sat only, 7a-? Rolling Meadows
Subdivision, turn on Callahan Rd,
off Branford Hwy, (follow signs)
ESTATE SALE Sat Oct 23. 8-?
147 SW Petunia Pl. in Azalea Park
tures, kitchenware,books, misc.
Fri & Sat. 8-2. Christmas items
galore, beads, stuffed animals,
storage bins, craft supplies, kitchen
items, tent 698 SW CR 242.
Fri, Sat, 8a-2p,
287 SW Ridgeview Place .
(Cypress Lakes)
off US 90 W
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat-Sun 8-12. 460 SW Beden-
baugh, off Tustenuggee. (1st house.
on Rt w/red roof. LR/BR Furn.,
wall hangings, lamps, nick nacks,
& more. 1996 Red Cavalier Con-
vertable. Look for signs 344-2736

440 Miscellaneous
FIRM QUEEN Mattress, still in
plastic. Never been used!
$150
Call 386-288-8833
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231

450 Good Things
Sto Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent1
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,NO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2br/2ba MH on 2.5 ac located 10
min from Lake City, quite area.
Washer/Dryer,all appliances incl.
$600/mo. Amanda 386-365-6493.
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3/2 S/W MH, 1 acre fenced lot,
close to town, near new Elem
school, $700 mon, 1st & last
at move-in 352-281-0549
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $550
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
DWMH, Spacious 4/2, on 5
acres,just south of Lake City,clean,
quiet, great location, storage shed,
$850 mo, 1st, last & $300 sec,
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017


Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u: Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448


Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

S71 Unfurnished Apt.
.10 For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
S1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town ,
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA with carport, screen
porch, Privacy Garden.
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/Al g walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $625 plus dep & bckgmd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 386-397-2108
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626 -


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle il print and online.




In Print,
Carriage LS
36' 3 slide fifth wheel. & Onle ic
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only. OI e Low
$26,000 OBO w
Can sell as a pkg. wlF-350 with i e
low miles. $47,000P i
Call
386-755-0653


720 furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sands.
Columbia. All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge. microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. 0.50 mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Furnished Farm House. 3/2,re-
modeled, wrap around porch, hors-
es welcome, on 160 ac, 5 miles to
1-75, 2 miles to I-10, $1200 month
386-362-8708 or 386-3624114
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$500. mo. 386-752-3225
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45, 4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
Irg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90'NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
I+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619.

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
15.2 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. -sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes.Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N441&I1-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair .
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

82O Farms&
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!


$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2000 obo
386-965-2215


940 Trucks

1994 FORD Ranger.
S1,500 obo
386-397-4912







951 Recreational
951 Vehicles

Carriage LS 36 ft, fifth wheel,
$26K obo. can see by appt. only
(will sell w/F350 package)
serious offers only 386-755-0653


I Lake C~it eo


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Lak Ciy epote


05524160
Estate Sale, Thurs-Sat 8-1
Tools,antiques, riding
lawn mower, household,
furniture, clothing, toys
715 Miraclb Ct (off Pinemount)
386-752-6947


1 i




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