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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01432
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/22/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01432
System ID: UF00028308:01432
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Looks Deceiving
000 --- to rebound
2-O L H DIGIT 326
GaLeSO FLOOFORI
F F3611-1943




Lake i


Homecoming

Stew
Fort White clashes with East Gadsden.
Sports, I B




inorter


It


Friday, October 22, 2010 www.la


Vol. 136, No. 236 N 75 cents


Collision critically injures Live Oak woman


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter
Authorities rescue 25-year-old Jennifer Lynn Wilson after
the pickup truck she was driving collided with a log truck
Thursday on County Road 240.


Pickup truck
strikes log truck on
County Road 240.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
A Live Oak woman was
critically injured Thursday
when the pickup truck she
was driving collided with a
log truck, authorities said.


Jennifer Lynn Wilson, 25,
of Live Oak, is being treat-
ed at a Gainesville hospital
with injuries she suffered
in the wreck. The driver of
the log truck, Paul Ohara,
42, also of Live Oak, was
not injured in the crash.
The wreck occurred at
around 9:56 a.m. on County
Road 240.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Wilson was driving a 2008


Ford pickup truck travel-
ing eastbound on County
Road 240, while Ohara was
traveling in a 2001 Mack
log truck heading west on
the roadway.
According to information
from a witness who was
traveling behind Wilson's
truck, she had been trav-
eling erratically prior to
the crash with the semi.
For unknown reasons,
Wilson's truck traveled left


of the center line into the
westbound lane towards
Ohara's vehicle.
Ohara braked and
swerved to the right in an
attempt to avoid a collision.
The left of Wilson's pickup
truck struck the left front
quarter of Ohara's vehicle.
The collision caused
Wilson's vehicle to spin
counter-clockwise, strik-
COWSION continued on 3A


'UPRISING' STAGED

Fort White High marks homecoming

with stage plays, and cheerful events


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High School juniors Lisa Glenn (left), 16, and Danielle Leon, 16, portray Lady Gaga and Dorothy, respectively,
during a skit at the Fourth Annual Indian Uprising at Arrowhead Stadium on Thursday. Dorothy, who traveled to Oz in a porta
potty, finds herself in a strange land yearning to make it back to Fort White's Homecoming.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White football player Kevin Poteat (30) says a few words
about their hopeful victory against the East Gadsden Jaguars.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


84
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Fort White junior varsity cheerleading team
deliver a performance Thursday night.

Opinion ................ 4A
: Obituaries .............. 5A
SAdvice & Comics......... 3B
\ j Puzzles ................. 2B
Around Florida .......... 2A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
City hosts horsemanship group
Brad Dicks, owner of The Oaks of Lake City, talks with Christy
Landwehr, chief executive officer of the Certified Horsemanship
Association, David O'Connor, Olympian and U.S. Equestrian
Federation president; and City of Lake City mayor Stephen Witt
during a CHA reception Thursday at the Holiday inn Lake City.
More than 100 people are attending the organization's three-day
international conference at the Oaks Equestrian Center.


County takes step

closer to adopting

abatement process


Commissioners
also adopt use
of tax financing.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
Another step was taken
on the county's path to
perform only abatements
instead of rebates.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners unani-
mously approved with
Commissioner Dewey
Weaver absent hold-
ing a public hearing Nov.
18 to adopt the abatement
process as an ordinance
instead of policy.
The abatement ordi-
nance will set parameters
for future tax abatement
requests and allows the
process to be done in accor-
dance with Florida statute.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said special
counsel recommended at
an Oct. 5 joint workshop
between the board and the
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority
that anyone abating taxes
needs to have an ordinance
in place. Williams said he
misunderstood the opinion
to mean separate ordinanc-
es would be set up for each
company requesting abate-
ment.
"I was reading that opin-
ion wrong," he said.
Williams asked the board
to pay special attention
to language added to the

DAILY
BRIEFING
Jazz Ambassado
cut loose,


ordinance that provides tax
exemptions for companies
other than manufacturing,
language not previously
reviewed.
The board also unani-
mously adopted the use of
Tax Increment Financing
by the IDA if companies
looking to locate to the area
are seeking the incentive.
Within the approval, the
board specified that TIF
money would be used only
for creating infrastructure,
not to help
ness itself
with financ-
ing.
T I F
allows addi-
Wlam tional rev-
Williams enue gen-
erated from
property
taxes -
from prop-
erty value
increasing
due to the
location of
DuPree a new busi-
ness to go back into a
target area for economic
development.
Commissioner Jody
DuPree said he wanted the
county to steer clear from
guaranteeing a loan.
"If we can use the TIF for
economic development and
it don't put us in a binding
situation, then I don't have
a problem with it," he said.
The board unanimously
ABATEMENT continued on 3A

COMING
SATURDAY
rs You bought a digital
camera. Now what?









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


Thursday:
Afternoon: 4-1-7
Evening: 6-1-3


-. t". i Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-1-9-4
Evening: 9-8-4-0


eznatch.
-. Wednesday:
9-12-20-23-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Lady Antebellum performs free


RICHFIELD, Wis.

ple showed up at
a rural gas station
Thursday to help
Lady Antebellum
relive their "worst gig ever."
The country trio played their hit
song "Need You Now" along with
two others during a free concert
outside the Mayfield Mobil station in
suburban Milwaukee.
"This is definitely one of those
things we will remember," said sing-
er Charles Kelley after the show.
"Forever," added singer Hillary
Scott.
On the opening day of Wisconsin's
deer hunting season in 2007, the
fledgling group performed at a
nearby truck stop-diner at 5:30 a.m.
About 15 people were eating break-
fast when they showed up with a
local country radio station, WMIL.
In February of this year, when
a magazine asked the now multi-
platinum-selling band to describe its
worst gig ever, Kelley reached back
to that moment.
"It was at the butt-crack of dawn
to kick off hunting season," Kelley
answered. "Everybody was sitting
there eating. They didn't know who
the hell we were."
On Thursday, Kelley said his com-
ments were taken out of context
because he also said,they had a lot
of fun.

Williams to make his
Broadway tiger debut
NEW YORK Robin-Williams
will make his Broadway debut next
year in the play "Bengal Tiger at the
Baghdad Zoo."
Producers say the award-winning
actor has signed on to join Rajiv
Joseph's dark comedy that will follow


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hillary Scott (left) and Charles Kelley of the country music act Lady Antebellum
greet fans after playing a free show in the parking lot of a gas station as part of the
Worst Gig Ever Tour Thursday.


the fall of Saddam Hussein. It's nar-
rated by a philosophical tiger who
encounters two American marines
and an Iraqi gardener.
Williams will play the tiger.
Moises Kaufman will direct the play,
which premiered last year in Los
Angeles.
Broadway previews begin March
10 with an opening set for March 31.
Williams starred off-Broadway
in 1988 opposite Steve Martin in a
revival of "Waiting for Godot."

NPR fires analyst after
remarks about Muslims
WASHINGTON NPR has


fired longtime news analyst Juan
Williams, also a commentator on
the Fox News Channel, after he told
Bill O'Reilly that he gets nervous on
an airplane when he sees people in
Muslim dress.
In a statement late Wednesday,
National Public Radio said it was
terminating Williams' contract
as a senior news analyst over his
comments on Fox's "'The O'Reilly
Factor."
NPR executives had previously
complained about his remarks on
Fox and asked him to stop using the
NPR name when he appeared on
O'Reilly's show.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Joan Fontaine is
93.
* Nobel Prize-winning author
Doris Lessing is 91.
* Black Panthers co-founder
Bobby Seale is 74.
* Actor Christopher Lloyd
is 72.
* Actor Derek Jacobi is 72.
* Actor Tony Roberts is 71.
* Actress Annette Funicello


is 68,
* Movie director Jan de Bont
is 67.
M Actress Catherine
Deneuve is 67.
M Actor Jeff Goldblum is 58.
M Movie director Bill Condon
is 55.
* Olympic gold medal figure
skater Brian Boitano is 47.
* Actress Valeria Golirio-is 44.


Thought for Today



"I desire to do your will, 0
my God; your law is within my
heart."

Psalm 40:8


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number........ (386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 vice error for samext day re-delivery or sAfter
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vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes n all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake City er, a. 32056 O. Box 1709 is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ..............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
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(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) Mail rates
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To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks ..................$179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man convicted of
strangling wife
PANAMA CITY A
Panhandle man has been
convicted of murdering
his wife and dumping her
body in his car trunk.
Prosecutors said
Michael Parker care-
fully planned the killing,
packing a duffel bag with
gloves, rope and duct tape
and then strangling his
wife, Wendy. Her body was
discovered in the trunk of
his car parked in a motel
parking lot in 2007.
Parker told medics his
wife was in the trunk as
they treated him after a
failed suicide attempt He
later confessed to deputies.
His attorney, Russell
Ramey, said Parker
"snapped" the night he
murdered his wife and
said there was only cir-
cumstantial evidence to
support the murder was
premeditated.

Prehistoric bone
may be found .
VERO BEACH A
fossil collector may have
found a prehistoric bone
with art work on it in
Florida.
Last year, James
Kennedy cleaned off a 15-
inch bone he had found
two years earlier. The lines
on it looked like a four-
inch etching of a walking
mammoth with tusks.
University of Florida
researchers examined the
etching with an electron
microscope. Their tests
showed it was genuine.
The National Museum
of Natural History exam-
ined it. The Smithsonian
Institution's archaeologists
copied and studied it.
The Smithsonian's
Dennis Stanford special-
izes in North American
archaeology. He said no
evidence was found that it
is a forgery. But, he says,


MOSTLY MOSTLY I 0OLATED ISOLATED ISOLATED
SUNNY SUNNY I HOWERS 1 T-STORMS 1 SHOWERS


H1 84 1.052 H185L057 HI 86 LO 60 H184L062 HI 84LO62

i I I


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter

Jazz Ambassadors cut loose
Master Sgt. Jack Wengrosky plays a fluegelhorn as
he warms up before the U.S. Army Field Band's Jazz
Ambassadors' performance Thursday in the Levy Performing
Arts Center at Florida Gateway College. A crowd of 460
people attended the event co-sponsored by the Lake City
Reporter and FGC.


the Smithsonian doesn't
authenticate objects unless
they are donated to the
museum.
Kennedy is hoping to
sell it.

Man stabbed
during meeting
HOLLYWOOD A
South Florida man was
arrested after he report-
edly attacked a speaker
with a pen at a Hollywood
city meeting.
The person who was
attacked suffered a punc-
ture wound but was not
taken-to a hospital. The
South Florida Sun Sentinel
and Miami Herald
reported Wednesday that
54-year-old Monte Frankel
was arrested and charged
with aggravated battery.
Police say the victim
was speaking to the
city's Unsafe Structures
Board Tuesday night
at Hollywood City Hall
about a home that he
said should be declared


an unsafe structure.
The police report says
Frankel shouted "Don't
talk about my mother"
and then punched the
back of the victim's head
and stabbed a.pen at his
shoulder.

Man lights
himself on fire
TAMPA A 41-year-
old southwest Florida
man has been hospital-
ized after, dousing himself
with gasoline and lighting
himself on fire.
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's deputies say a
family member found the
unidentified man stand-
ing on his front yard
Wednesday night covered
in flames and poured
water on him.
Deputy Larry
McKinnon said the victim
is in critical condition
with burns over fifty per-
cent of his body.


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SVadesta
82/52 *Jacksonde
I k CiO 0 1n/61


e nty, ,/01 Daytona Beach
/52 \ Ft. Lauderdale
ainesville Dayna Beach Fort Myers
84/55 8V63 Gainesville
Ocala5/56 Jacksonville
5 Oriando Cape Canaveral Key West
86/64 8W1/66 Lake City
Miami
85/6T3,,, Naples
85/3 West Palm Beach Ocala
84/75 Orlando
", Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers, 86/75 Pensacola
86/65 *e Naples Tallahassee
'88/69 Miami Tampa
'W x 85/77 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
84/74


S. Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
.! f LLC, Madison, WIs.
v www.weatherpubllsher.com


114 ,']S



Get Connected


'=A' 'q l|- >i. 1d| ]I [

i I II


On this date in
1996, Wichita, Kan.,
saw 0.2 inches
of snow for their
earliest snowfall on
record. Snow was
recorded over the
Texas and Oklahoma
Panhandles. Topeka,
Kan., set its great-
est October snowfall
with 8 inches.,


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Pensacola
83/58


La.e
84
Gi
' .


Tallahassee*
84/52 ....

"Panama City
82/59


City Saturday
Cape Canaveral 81, 69, pC


85/67/s
85/72/pc
87/67/s
84/57/pc
81/64/s
84/73/pc
85/57/pc
85/75/pc
89/71/s
86/59/pc
86/66/s
82/65/s
83/64/pc
84/57/s
87/66/s
83/57/pc
84/74/pc


Sunday
8.3, 69, pC
85/65/pc
85/74/s
88/70/pc
86/61/s
83/66/pc
85/74/t
86/60/pc
85/77/pc
87/73/s
87/62/s
88/68/pc
81/67/pc
83/66/pc
86/60/pc
87/68/pc
86/60/pc
85/76/pc


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:37 a.m.
6:52 p.m.
7:38 a.m.
6:51 p.m.


84
59
80
58
89 in 2005
33 in 1989

0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.80"
42.93"


MG
30Dmrtestobum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
---,t
... .,.. ^ U


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weathe.com
wterco


MOON
Moonrise today 6:27 p.m.
Moonset today 7:13 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 7:04 p.m.
Moonset tom. 8:09 a.m.


Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.
22 30 6 13
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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LAKE CITY REPORTER' LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


Feds: Firm scammed US by using dementia patients


By KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

MIAMI Federal
authorities charged the
nation's largest chain of
community mental health
centers Thursday with
Medicare fraud, alleging
the Miami-based company
preyed on patients with
severe dementia to bill
$200 million for services it
never delivered.
Prosecutors allege that
American Therapeutic
Corp. and its sister com-
panies faked medication
and care charts and paid
the owners of assisted liv-
ing facilities and halfway
houses to bring patients to
their seven mental health
centers in south and cen-
tral Florida for therapy ses-
sions that were never held.
Some patients also
cashed in on the scheme by
providing their Medicare
numbers, while others were
"not coherent enough" to
demand kickbacks, accord-
ing to the investigation by
the departments of Justice
and Health and Human
Services.
The alleged scam is
"unlike anything we've
seen before in terms of
the nature and size of the
scheme," said Assistant
Attorney General Lanny
Breuer.
Federal authorities
arrested four of the compa-
ny's owners and top man-
agers Thursday and served
search warrants at several
of the centers
Repeated telephone calls
to ATF went unanswered


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A unidentified patient is questioned by a federal agent who later escorted her off the property in Miami, Thursday. Federal
*authorities charged the nation's largest chain of community mental health centers with Medicare fraud, alleging the Miami-
based company preyed on patients with severe dementia to bill for services it never delivered.


Thursday.
The grand jury indict-
ment alleges that ATC rou-
tinely billed Medicare for
therapy and other services
for patients suffering from
Alzheimer's and severe
dementia even though they
weren't eligible because
their mental capacity was
so impaired they couldn't
benefit from therapy.
Employees met regu-
larly for "charting parties"
where they falsified medi-
cal charts to make it look
like patients had a mental


illness and needed medi-
cation and therapy to be
stabilized, Breuer said. But
those patients were already
stabilized or didn't require
medications.
Authorities are still
investigating whether the
company actually withheld
medication from patients or
just doctored the charts.
The therapy was sup-
posed to be intensive coun-
seling for patients suffering
acute mental illness and
are on the verge of hospi-
talization, but federal offi-


cials said ATC didn't give
any counseling. Instead,
patients were bused in and
sat in rooms watching TV
and playing games, author-
ities said.
"Elderly and informed
patients were left in rooms
for hours and hours...and
were not event cognizant
of where they were or what
was happening around
them," Breuer said.
Marianella Valera, one
of ATC's owners, manipu-
lated records so patients
would have to stay longer


at the facility racking. up a
higher bill for Medicare,
the indictment says.
Officials said the indict-
ment culminates a months-
long investigation into the
latest Medicare service to
be targeted by scammers
- mental health care.
They say crooks have
moved from medical equip-
ment and HIV infusion
scams to home health care
services as federal authori-
ties have cracked down on
the estimated $60 billion
to $90 billion a year prob-


lem. Miami has long been
the epicenter of Medicare
fraud, responsible for
roughly $3 billion a year.
Cleaning up Medicare
fraud will be key to pay-
ing for President Barack
Obama's health care over-
haul. Federal officials have
allocated more money and
manpower to fight fraud,
setting up strike forces in
several cities. So far, the
operations are responsible
for more than 810 indict-
ments that' collectively
billed the Medicare pro-
gram more than $1.8 bil-
lion.
Authorities started
investigating the company
after an employee contact-
ed them.
Lawrence Duran, anoth-
er ATC owner, visited
Congresswoman Ileana
Ros-Lehtinen in January to
discuss health care reform
and recorded a YouTube
video of the meeting, say-
ing his centers treat more
than 450 patients daily.
"We want to try to pro-
tect them, make sure the
patients we're provid-
ing services for are well
treated," he says in the
video.
It was not immediate-
ly known if Valera and
Duran had attorneys.
Suspects trying to take
advantage of the" unique-
ly vulnerable population"
served by mental health
centers "should expect
to pay a heavy price,"
said Daniel R. Levinson,
Inspector General of the
Department of Health
and Human Services.


Senator: Feds should probe


high-prescribing doctors


By KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

MIAMI A key U.S.
Senator is asking federal
officials to investigate after
reviewing data that shows
doctors across the coun-
try prescribing alarmingly
high numbers of power-
ful mental health drugs
paid for by Medicare and
Medicaid.
U.S. Sen. Charles Grassley
of Iowa studied Medicare
and Medicaid prescription
rates from doctors around
the country, revealing few
consequences for doctors
with high prescription rates.
The findings include a Miami
doctor who wrote nearly
97,000 prescriptions in 18
months for mental health
drugs for Medicaid patients
and an Ohio physician who
wrote about 102,000 pre-
scriptions in two years.
A Texas doctor wrote
14,170 prescriptions for the
anti-anxiety drug Xanax in
2009, far exceeding other
high prescribers in that state.
The 10th highest prescriber


in Texas for Xanax wrote
1,696 prescriptions in 2009,
according to Grassley.
"The federal government
has an obligation to figure
outwhat's going on here. The
taxpayers are footing the bill,
and Medicare and Medicaid
are already strained to the
limit," Grassley said in an
email to The Associated Press
on Wednesday. "These pro-
grams can't spare a dollar
for prescription drugs that
aren't properly prescribed.
The' conclusion might be
that there isn't any fraud,
but it's important to reach
a conclusion one way or the
other and fix whatever is
broken."
The Republican senator is
a ranking member of the
Senate Finance Committee,
which oversees Medicare
and Medicaid.
The federal government
does not investigate doctors
who prescribe suspiciously
high rates of drugs for fraud,
and instead lumps them into
a separate category where
they are referred for medical
review or education, accord-


ing to Grassley's investiga-
tion. ,
Critics say the medical
reviews are nothing more
than a slap on the wrist
for doctors, allowing the
Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services to ignore
the role prescription drug
fraud plays in the estimat-
ed $60 to $90 billion a year
Medicare fraud problem.
The agency contracts with
private providers who are
responsible for monitoring
Medicare prescription rates
and other billing aberra-
tions. State health depart-
ments monitor similar data
for Medicaid.
Grassley sent a let-
ter Wednesday asking
Department of Health
and Human Services Sec.
Kathleen Sebelius to explain
how the agency ensures
contractors are properly
monitoring and reporting
the data. He also. asked her
to explain why "possible
overutilizers" are treated
differently than those sus-
pected of fraud.
CMS did not immedi-


ately comment Thursday
morning.
"Medicare's contrac-
tors could be evaluating
prescription patterns in
real-time to assess wheth-
er abusive practices are
occurring. It is like read-
ing the receipt before you
pay the bill something
most Americans do every
day," said attorney Kirk
Ogrosky, former federal
prosecutor and partner at
Arnold & Porter
Grassley did not name.
the doctor, butstaterecords
obtained by The AP show
Dr. Fernando Mendez-
Villamil wrote an average
of 153 prescriptions a day
for 18 months ending in
March 2009. That's nearly
twice the number of the
second highest prescriber
in Florida, who wrote a
little more than 53,000
prescriptions, according
to a list compiled by state
officials.


Columbia's voters

take advantage

of early balloting

Staff reports ballots at the Supervisor of
S. " lctibn 'Office, located at
Voting totals continue 971 W. Duval St. In Fort
to run relatively high in White, ballots can be cast
Columbia County's early at the Community Center
voting period. on State Road 47. Votes
On Thursday, 380 votes are taken from 8:30 a.m. to
were cast in Lake City and 4:30 p.m. Monday through
106 more in Fort White for Friday. Voters must have
a total of 486 votes. That a photo identification with
surpassed Wednesday's their signature on it
one-day total of 433 votes. The general election is
The early voting period set for Tuesday, Nov. 2 at
lasts through Oct 30. Voters precinct locations through-
in Lake City can cast their out the county.


COLLISION: Victim taken to Shands
Continued From Page 1A

ing the rear tandem axles the westbound ditch and at the University of Florida
of the semi tractor before partially on the roadway. by helicopter.
coming to rest. Wilson had to be extri- Charges in connection
The log truck jackknifed cated from the vehicle by with the wreck are pend-
off the right side of the emergency workers and ing completion of an FHP
roadway, coming to rest in was later taken to Shands investigation.


ABATEMENT: Ordinance will set rules
Continued From Page 1A


approved, with Weaver
absent, a feasibility study
for creating a TIF area at
the Ellisville interchange.
In other discussion and
action:
The board unanimous-
ly approved, with Weaver
absent, filling a vacant
Litter Control Operator
position at the land fill. The
position's starting salary is
$21,882.
The board will con-
tinue discussion on a five-
year lease of its tower on


Franklin Street to the North
Florida Broadband Authority
at its Nov. 4 meeting. NFBA
will sublet the tower* to a
company to provide high-



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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














OPINION


Friday, October 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Exercise

your right

to vote


than two weeks
away and, as always,
there are people
who won't go to the
polls because they are either
uninterested in the process
or figure their one vote won't
make a difference in how
things play out
Not exercising your right to
vote is, of course, a personal
choice. But if you make that
choice, consider what you're
giving up. You are giving up
the right to have a voice in
selecting the people who will
be making decisions that affect
our nation, state and local com-
munities for the next few years.
For example, consider the
race for Congress. By not vot-
ing you are saying you don't
care who that voice is or who
speaks for you. You don't care
how that person votes on taxes,
health care, education, unem-
ployment and a host of other
issues, all of which will have
an impact on you one way or
another.
Or how about the race for
governor? And what about
races for the Legislature, the
courthouse and constitutional
offices? All those positions will
have an impact on our lives
and if you want to have a say
on what that impact will be, the
only way to do so is to vote for
the person you think is best
equipped to handle the job.
Every election is important
because it gives people the
chance to express their opinion
on wo w be M pu 'ollc fice
and making the decisions that
affect us every day.
Since we have to live with the
impact of the decisions those
people make, we should have
a voice in deciding who those
people are.
That's why it's important to
vote.
Watertown Public Opinion (S.D.)

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
On Oct. 22, 1962, President
John F. Kennedy announced a
quarantine of all offensive military
d equipment shipped to Cuba,
following the discovery of Soviet-
built missile bases on the island.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
,Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
.publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Will argument deter pot use?


have no problem with
marijuana being used to
genuinely relieve discom-
fort for the ill. But I am
concerned about the slop-
py movement in that direction
- and things like the marijuana
"truffle shop."
I recently strolled past one
of countless such legal dispen-
saries all over Colorado that
make pot and presumably other
hallucinogens that seem like no
big deal to kids. They are a big
deal.
Meanwhile, California is
likely to make marijuana legal
for adults, when folks there vote
on a referendum to that end on
Nov. 2.
It fiWver'ceaes't6 amaze me
that the same people who act
like one cigarette will literally
kill you and run if they are
within a one-mile radius when
you light up are some of the
same ones arguing that the
right to freely and regularly
inhale pot deep into their lungs
is some sort of civil right.
Anyway, at the moment mari-
juana's recreational use remains
illegal and will likely stay that
way in most of the country. So
while there are lots of good rea-
sons to not use pot, I recently
explained to my children some-
thing they hadn't probably con-
sidered before: When they see
news of innocent people dying
in the drug war in Mexico, or
kids getting killed over drug
wars on the streets of Chicago,
my children have to consider


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com
that if they ever buy pot or any
illegal drug then they have
blood on their hands too. They
are enabling the drug wars.
I'm not sure outright legaliza-
tion of marijuana would change
that picture much, by the way.
These things have a way of not
being very predictable, and
leading to lots of unintended
consequences.
In any event, respected
national surveys suggest that
about 40 percent of high school
students have tried or now use
marijuana. That means there
are a lot of parents who are
naive (part of the "my kid would
never do that crowd") or they
are deliberately turning a blind
eye to their child's illicit drug
use or they somewhere else on
that continuum.
So then the parents might at
some level be enabling the drug
trade too? All those parents who
are so relieved they live in afflu-
ent suburbs far away from
the violence of those "inner city
kids" are part of the reason
those poor kids are often living
violent lives, if their own chil-
dren are using illegal drugs and
they aren't doing everything


possible to stop them.
So I talked to my kids about
the children who live in the
crime-ridden areas of Chicago,
those innocents who will likely
never have the chances my chil-
dren do.
For those inner-city kids,
every day is about survival,
about walking to school without
getting shot, in part because the
gangs in their neighborhoods
are battling over who gets to
sell drugs to the affluent kids in
the suburbs.
I reiterated to my children
that if they ever partake in
such a transaction no matter
how minimally, they share in
the guilt of the perpetrators of
the violence many of whom
become victims of the violence
themselves of course.
Do I think my children are
moved by the "blood on their
hands" argument and that will
keep them away from pot and
other drugs? I have no idea.
But at least it's a way of com-
municating to them that a deci-
sion about illegal drug use, like
almost any moral decision, isn't
just about them as the "make
good choices" campaigns con-
sistently reiterate.
It's about a community they
are part of, and have a respon-
sibility to, even if it's far away.
Today we don't often look at
moral issues that way. Too bad.
That may be when it's most
likely to "take a village."
Betsy Hart, hosts the "It Takes
a Parent" radio show on WYLL-
AM 1160 in Chicago.


g s0


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Protect your future on Nov.


Nov. 2 will determine your
future.
You must vote responsibly if
you care about your future. Are
you aware of what has happened
in the past two years?
Congress has been following
an arrogant, incompetent leader,
Barack Obama, who ignores the
wishes of those who elected him.
His agenda is to take your money
and give it to those who do not
Have as much, commonly known
as spread the wealth.
Higher taxes will be taken


from you.
Barack Obama has succeeded
in passing a health care bill that
will destroy your future ability to
enjoy the benefits of our present
system.
We all agree that our pres-
ent health care needs attention.
Adding millions to the medical
umbrella without first provid-
ing the additional doctors and
specialist surgeons is ludicrous.
Long waits to see a doctor can be
fatal in an emergency.
On the state level, you must


decide if you want a small gov-
ernment kind of leadership or
(do you) want those who follow
Obama and his socialist leanings
who tell you the government can
care for you better than your-
self.
Don't think life is easy. Ask
your parents what a struggle it is
to make ends meet today.
Protect your future by using
your own voting privilege to your
own advantage.
Milton F. Muskewitz
Lake City


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com


Obama's

stimulus

is an $814

billion flop

The Democrat stimu-
lus is a massive,
bank-busting flop.
Those who foisted
this 12-figure folly
on the American people should
suffer at the polls.
President Obama signed the
Recovery Act in February 2009.
Budgeted at $787 billion, it rose
to $814 billion a 3.4 percent
cost overrun. Absent the stimu-
lus, the White House assured
taxpayers, the then-7.6 percent
unemployment rate affecting
11.6 million Americans would
climb to 8 percent
Joblessness surpassed 8
percent anyway, shooting to
10.1 percent in October 2009
before settling at 9.6 percent,
where it seems stuck today,
frustrating 14.8 million job
seekers. Unemployment has
equaled or exceeded 9.5 per-
cent for 14 months, the longest
such stretch since the Great
Depression.
The stimulus has done less
than nothing. In a forthcoming
study, the Congressional Joint
Economic Committee's GOP
staff discovered that total non-.
farm payroll employment fell in
17 of America's 20 largest met-
ropolitan areas between March
2009 and August 2010. Positions
"created or saved" by the stimu-
lus have cost taxpayers dearly.
In late September, the White
House released "100 Recovery
Act Projects That Are Changing
America." This 28-page paper
details infrastructure, clean-
energy, social service, and other
initiatives that "invest in a strong
foundation for a 21st century
economy." These ventures, the
White House explains, mirror
others across the country. "The
projects in this report represent
just a small fraction of the tens
of thousands of projects the
Recovery Act is supporting."
While analyzing these 100
programs, I gave the Obama
Administration the benefit of
the doubt and simply accepted
the claims its paper presented.
When the White House said
Project 4's $24.8 million in
stimulus money would help
GE's energy-efficient-appliance
factory in Louisville, Kentucky
create 800 jobs through 2013,
I counted all 800 posts today.
When Smith Electric got $32
million for 220 direct and
indirect jobs in Kansas City,
Missouri (Project 66), I tallied
them as direct jobs. Likewise,
NV Energy's $137.9 million to
create 400 to 500 temporary
jobs in Las Vegas (Project 84)
counted as 500 full-time slots.
Of the White House's 100
showcased projects, 90 offer
specific employment data.
Among these, $7,602,006,850
in stimulus funds "created or
saved" 29,957 jobs. Thus, each
stimulus position cost taxpayers
an average $253,764.
This is just the peak of
the pyramid. In May, 2009,
Washington Democrats sent
$250 stimulus checks to 17,000
prisoners (cost $4.25 million)
and to 72,000 dead people (cost
$18 million). These Democrat
gaffes among innumerable
others recently led Fox
Business analyst John Layfield
to express an inescapable truth:
"This government couldn't run a
one-car parade."
New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with


the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Friday, Oct. 22
Humane Asylum
The Lake City Humane
Society and Rountree-
Moore Auto Group pres-
ents the Humane Asylum
6 to 10 p.m. today and
Saturday at the Lake City
Mall. Tickets are $10 at
the door and $5 for veter-
ans, active duty military,
law enforcement and
fire personnel with ID.
Children 13 and under
must have an adult All
proceeds benefit homeless
animals.

Blood donor tickets
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers is giving
away free movies tickets
to all blood donors today
through Sunday. Donors
must donate at the donor
center located just south
of Bascom Norris Road
on State Road 47. Hours
are today 9 a.m.-7 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m.-6 p.m.,
and Sunday 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Movie tickets are while
supplies last. Donor must
weigh at least 110 lbs. and
be a minimum of 16-years-
old (with a parent's per-
mission).


Saturday
Writing Workshop with
Sudye Cauthen
A workshop about incor-
porating writing into our
busy lives will be conduct-
ed at 2 p.m. Saturday at
the Columbia County Main
Library. The workshop
will detail how to. keep the
words coming, whether
poetry, fiction, or nonfic-
tion; exercises to sharpen
skills of observation; open-


COURTESY PHOTO
Tickets available for Epiphany's annual raffle

Epiphany Catholic School will have its annual raffle Saturday with cash prizes totaling
$15,000 to be given away, as well as a number of door prizes. Only 400 tickets will be sold at
a cost of $100 each. Call the school office at 752-2320 or contact a student, teacher or staff
member to get your ticket. Pictured above are Gilberto Bolanos (from left), Camille Florez,
Sarah Mehalko and Ryan Kasak.


ings and closings: This
workshop requires pre-
registration. To register,
please call Katrina Evans
at 758-1018.

Children's yard sale
A children's yard sale
is at 8 a.m. Saturday at
Happy House, 544 NW
Lake Jeffery Road. It will
have children's clothing,
toys, books and more.
Proceeds will help fund
the scholarship program.
Call 752-4736.

Pulled pork dinners
The Christian Service
Center is having a pulled
pork dinner from noon to
3 p.m. Saturday. Meals are
$6 and include pulled pork,
baked beans, cole slaw
and a soft drink. Dine in or
take out. Call 755-1770.


Pumpkin Fest
The Second Annual
Pumpkin Fest is 3 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m. Saturday at
Big Shoals State Park in
White Springs. There is a
children's pumpkin deco-
rating contest and costume
contest. Admission is $2
per person or $4 per car-
load and includes entry.
into all contests, drinks
and snacks, live music, twi-
light camp fire with marsh-
mallows roasting and a
park ranger lead hike
with hundreds of Mexican
free-tailed bats. Call (386)
867-1639.

Lake City Veterans
Benefit Car Show
There will be a car show
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
at the Fair Ground. The
event will include goody


bags, door prizes, contests
and a DJ. Registration is
$20. Call (386) 365-8839 or
(386) 365-3101.

Sunday
Early voting
Early voting for the 2010
general election is 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-
Saturday through Oct.
30. Early voting locations
are at the Supervisor of
Elections Lake City office,
971 W. Duval St. and the
Fort White Community
Center, 17579 SW SR 47.
Voters need to bring a pic-
ture and signature I.D.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is
offering flu shots by
appointment Monday


through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Local Authors Book Fair
Come meet local
authors, talk to them about
their books, ask questions
about writing and publish-
ing, and purchase books
at 2 p.m. Sunday at the
Columbia County Main
Library. Featured authors
include Barbara BarkerJoe
Bullard, Sudye Cauthen,
Befaithful Coker, Helen
Hill ,Avalyn Hunter, Pierce
Kelley, Lorraine Kirkland
with illustrator Helen
Beaty, Anna McDonald,
Mike Mullis and Joyce
Marie Taylor, Cheryl
Norman, Janet Post, and
Morris Williams.

Phenomenal women
program
Gold Standard Chapter
No. 48 Order of the
Eastern Star is host-
ing the Phenomenal
Women's Program...
"Celebrating Trailblazers
and Trendsetters within
Our Community" at 4
p.m. Sunday at New .
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 505 NE MLK
Street.

Habitat for Humanity
needs help
Morning construction
volunteers are needed
from 8 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 971 NE Dyson
Terrace. E-mail jterry@
hfhlakecity.org or call


Sheila at (386) 590-0766.
Regular meetings are 7
p.m. the first Tuesday of
each month at the Lake
City Medical Center.

Monday
Garage sale
The Shands Lakeshore
Regional Medical Center :
Auxiliary, Inc. is having a
garage sale in the hospital
on Monday. The proceeds
will be matched by the
Auxiliary and will be used
to provide scholarships to
the staff wishing to study
advanced degrees. It is
open to the public.

Yard Sale
The Shands Lakeshore
Regional Medical Center
Auxiliary, Inc. is holding
a yard sale at the hospital
on Monday. The pro-
ceeds will be matched by
the Auxiliary and will go
towards scholarships for
the staff who wish to study
for advanced degrees.

Photography workshop
A digital photography
workshop is 10 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 2 to 4:30
p.m. Monday and Nov. 1 at
Stephen Foster State Park.
These Monday workshops
teach participants how to
plan good photography,
create photographic com-
position, and the shooting
effects of both color and
black & white. Presented
by Don Williams, the
workshop fee is $25 and
includes park admission.
Call (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org. To learn more
about the park, visitwww.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
plienfoster.


OBITUARIES


Mr. Floveal Campbell
Mr. Floveal Campbell, Lake City
was called home pn Monday,
October 18, 2010. Born August
8, 1955, in Slidel, Louisiana.
long time resident of Columbia
County. He was employed as a
truck driver. He was predeceased
in death by his father; Alex
Campbell, two sisters; Elaine
Carlisle & Vonda Hall; one.
brother; Glen, mother; Mildred
Campbell. He leaves to mourn
his passing, devoted step mother
Katie Campbell, four sisters;
Velma, Alma Janice & Tammy
of Lake City, Three brothers;
Colon of Lake City, Edward &
Gregory of Slidel, LA. Long
time friend Gwendolyn Reed
Numerous nieces nephews, and
friends in Lake City. He delight-
ed in finding fun in everyday
life. He was very much a people
person. His favorite song was
"I want to be at the meeting.".
He will be laid to rest at Rocky
Hill Church in Greenburg, LA.
Richardson Funeral Home,
Amite, LA. Obit. by his niece
Billy Jean Lake City, FL.

Molly Marva Phillps
Molly Marva Phillps, age 73 res-
ident of 1704 N. W. Combs Terr,
Lake City, Florida, passed away
Tuesday, October 19, 2010 at her
residence terminating an illness.
Born in Lake City, Florida, she
was the daughter of Mr. Norman
and Mrs. Mamie Hagan Jones.
She attended the public school
system of Columbia County and
later graduated from Boylan Ha-
ven Prep School Class of 1956.
Molly, was the only female of
her siblings
to serve in the
U.S. Armed
Forces. Mol-
ly served in



able discharge.
She was the
mother of one
child, Der-
ryl, who preceded her in death.
Survivors include her siblings;
Minnie Brown, Groveland,
Florida, Harold Jones (Estoria),
Miami, Florida, Edward Jones
(Mary), Lake City, Florida, Ge-
neva Cooper (Harvey), Miami,
Florida, Inez Coats (Bernard),
Miami, Florida, Hilda Stafford
(John), Jacksonville, Florida,
Patsy Wise (Raymond), Oca-
la, Florida, Maxine Steward,
Gainesville, Florida, Isadore
Jones, Lake City, Florida, Effie
Adams (Nelson) Miami, Flori-


da, Emory Jones (Rose), Lake
City, Florida, Bonnie Williams
(David), Port St. John, Florida,
Talin Jones, Lake City, Florida,
Della Jones, Lake City, Florida,
Step-Mother; Terry B. Jones,
Ocala, Florida, Granddaughters;
Takisha (Christipher) of Logan-
ville, Georgia, Syreeta (Benja-
min) Ready, Doraville, Geor-
gia. Daughter-in-law; Martha
Jones. Three great grandsons;
Benjamin Ready, Eligh Ready,
Charles-Lyndon Cullberson.
One great granddaughter; Bri-
anna Ready, and a host of niec-
es, nephews, cousins and other
sorrowing relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Molly
Marva Phillips, will be 12:00
noon, Saturday, October 23,
2010 at the Northside Church
of Christ with Dr. I. C. Spivey,
pastor, officiating. Interment
will be Monday, October 25,
2010 at Florida National Cem-
etery in Bushnell, Florida 11:30
am with full Military Honors.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 N.E. Washington Street,
Lake City, Florida, 32055,
Willis 0. Cooper, L. F. D.


4
V


I rnmemver:
each day
so special


and sweet.
much more
4 in our future v
v if you will

Marrny Me


Ralph J. Tolliver
Mr. Ralph J. Tolliver, age 60
resident of Olustee, Fl. passed
away Wednesday, October 13,
2010 in Macclenny, Fl. fol-
lowing an extended illness.
Born in Duval County in 1950
he was the son of the late
James and Caroline Tolliver.
Survivors include one (1) son,
Ronald Tolliver; one (1) sis-
ter Rosa Lee Wilcox, Olustee,
Fl.; two (2) brothers, Nathan-
iel (Joan) Tolliver, Jackson-
ville, Fl. and Articuss (Bettye)
Tolliver, Orlando, Fl.; four (4)
grandchildren; a host of aunts,
uncles, nieces, nephews, cous-
ins, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Ralph J.
Tolliver, will be 11:00 a.m.
Saturday, October 23, 2010 at
McCray Chapel Rev. John L.
Morgan, Pastor, officiating. In-
terment will follow in Olustee
Memorial Cemetery, Olustee, Fl.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake
City, Fl. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Do You Need to

POP THE
QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
,ho Bridget


TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!

755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm



34 V i6


AMENDED NOTICE OF TAX

FOR SCHOOL CAPITAL OUTLAY



The Columbia County School Board will

soon consider a measure to amend the

use of property tax for the capital outlay

projects previously advertised for the

2010-201 1.



New projects to be funded:



MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASES

Purchase of Two (2) trucks tor

Maintenance and Transportation



Amended projects to be funded:

Fort White Middle School Wings

and Fort White Middle School

Kitchen Addition



All concerned citizens are invited to a

public hearing to be held on October 26,

2010, at 7:00 P.M., at the Administrative

Complex Auditorium, 372 W. Duval Street,

Lake City, Florida.



A DECISION on the proposed amendment

to the projects funded from CAPITAL


OUTLAY


TAXES


meeting.


will be made at this


e


'
.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak 754-0427


Ad hav tbepaeby4m


I wy ,,n,,l







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


FACES & PLACES
Scenes from Thursday's open house and preview event held at Shands Imaging Center and Women's Medical Spa.

Photos by ANTONIA ROBINSON
Lake City Reporter


Randy Gay, Angie Altman and Leroy Sherrod Mark Hunter, Sheila Thompson and Zac Bielling


~1


Melanie Gay and Tara Crosby


Jack Berry and Jeff Hudson


Lisa Pitts and Michele Clay Sharon Gay, Lillian Bembry and Ralph Gay


Elonor


Our


SHeroes!
The men and women of our military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.
That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


Thank you for your
years of service.
We Salute Nou


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actual size

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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


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P O N I
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GOP gay rights group fights against gay troop ban


By JULIE WATSON
Associated Press
SAN DIEGO -- When
he left the Bush adminis-
tration in 2009, R. Clarke
Cooper decided he had to
raise his voice.
The decorated Iraq war
veteran had been serving
in the Army, with some
in his unit aware that he
was gay. And yet, he said,
no one had ever tried to
get the officer discharged
under the military's "don't
ask, don't tell" policy.
"This is not an example
of why the policy works,


it's an example of why it is
broken," he said.
Almost two years later,
Cooper finds himself
leading a 19,000-member
group for gay Republicans
that has managed to
accomplish what its fellow
gay rights activists on the
left have not bring the
1993 Clinton-era law closer
than it has ever been to
being abolished.
A federal judge ruled
last month in a lawsuit
brought by the Log Cabin
Republicans in 2004
that the ban on openly
gay troops was uncon-


stitutional, and ordered
the Pentagon to stop its
enforcement. An appeals
court has temporarily
frozen'that order while it
considers a government
request to suspend it pend-
ing an appeal of the case.
Even getting this far
hasn't been easy for
Cooper or the Log Cabin
Republicans.
They have never been'
entirely embraced within
the gay rights movement,
which generally finds a
more receptive audience
in Democrats. Many in
the movement viewed the


group's six-year quest to
overturn the policy as
quixotic.
"I heard that repeatedly.
I heard that as recently
as seven months ago,
people saying this case
didn't have a prayer," said
Christopher Barron, the
Log Cabin Republican's
former political director
and the founder of a rival
group for gay conserva-
tives.
The liberal gay rights
groups' approach to
ending the ban in' 2004
involved suing on behalf
of one sympathetic service


member at a time, while
they also lobbied Congress
to overturn the law. Some
advocates also cringed at
the idea of joining forces
with Republicans.
They "saw the Log
Cabins as people, frankly,
who want their taxes cut
and are willing to affiliate
with a party that is grossly
anti-gay because of that,"
said Aaron Belkin, execu-
tive director of the Palm
Center, a think-tank on
gays and the military at
the University of California
Santa Barbara who was an
expert in their case.


The Justice Department
tried to block the Log
Cabin Republican's lawsuit
from going to trial, arguing
that the organization did
not have members who
were directly affected by
the policy.
The group initially filed
its lawsuit on behalf of
John Does and said they
were active military mem-
bers who could not be
identified for fear of being
discharged. The group
later named gay veteran
Alexander Nicholson as
a plaintiff to better its
chances.


Clinton

remarks

trigger

debate

By MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Senators from both parties
criticized Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton
on Thursday for signaling
likely U.S. support for a
$7 billion pipeline to carry
Canadian oil to refineries
along the U.S. Gulf Coast
Sens. Mike Johanns and
Ben Nelson of Nebraska
and Jeff Merkley of Oregon
called Clinton's comments
premature and damag-
ing to the integrity of the
federal review process.
.The lawmakers cautioned
Clinton to consider all sides
-before deciding whether
to grant a permit allowing
TransCanada's Keystone
XL pipeline to cross the U.S-
Canadian border.
Clinton stirred up con-
troversy on both sides of
the border last week after
saying she was "inclined"
to back the project, which
would carry crude oil nearly
2,000 miles from tar sands
in Alberta, Canada, to Port
Arthur, Texas, via Montana,
South Dakota, Nebraska,
Kansas and Oklahoma.
"We're either going to be
dependent on dirty oil from
the Gulf or dirty oil from
Canada," Clinton said after
an Oct 15 speech at the
Commonwealth Club in San
Francisco. "And until we
can get our act together as a
country and figure out that
clean, renewable energy is
in both our economic inter-
ests and the interests of our
planet" the U.S. will remain
dependent on oil, she said.
Clinton's remarks have
become a flashpoint in the
debate over the Keystone
XL pipeline, which oppo-
nents call an ecological
disaster waiting to happen
and supporters call a'boon
for U.S. jobs and energy pro-
duction in North America.
The 'massive pipeline net-
work about five times the
length of the trans-Alaska
oil pipeline is projected
to move up to 1.1 million
barrels of Canadian oil each
day to U.S. refineries.
Calgary-based
TransCanada Corp. has
said its pipelines pose no
threat to the environment.
Oil began flowing through
the 36-inch Keystone pipe-
line in June.
Environmental groups,
Indian tribes and others
have rallied opposition to
the pipeline in the wake
of the disastrous BP oil
spill in the Gulf of Mexico
and a pipeline accident in
Michigan in late July that
spewed 1 million gallons of
crude into the Kalamazoo
River.
Jeremy Symons, senior
vice president of the National
Wildlife Federation, called
the project the most impor-
tant environmental decision
Clinton has faced in two
years in office.
"Building a pipeline to
import the dirtiest fuel on
the planet from Alberta will
create jobs in Canada but
cost us clean energy jobs
here at home," he said.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes,754-0424


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JASON MATTHEW WALK6R/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High defenders Kevin Calhoun (41), Jordan Shaw (40) and A.J. Legree team up
for a tackle in the North Florida Christian game.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Josh Faulkner (27) trips up a runner from North Florida Christian, as other
Indian defenders close in on the ball.

Homecoming at Fort White


Fort White High
football returns
from a week of
rest to decide
the District 2-2B
playoff teams with three
consecutive games.
The first for the Indians
is homecoming, against
East Gadsden High at
7:30 p.m. Friday.
East Gadsden (4-3)


played last week and lost
to FAMU High, 26-20. The
Jaguars are 1-1 in district
play, with a 13-8 home win
over Florida High and a
57-17 whipping at Taylor
County High.
Fort White won 2009's
-first meeting of the two
schools, 19-12. The Indians
are 4-2 overall and 2-0 in
district play.


Get Connected




w mkeottyirporter.ci n


Corey Fuller is the new
head coach of the Jaguars.
Fuller, played cornerback
at Florida State.
East Gadsden opened
the season with a win
over West Gadsden
High. Following a loss to
Wakulla High, the Jaguars
reeled off three straight
wins before losing the last
two weeks.


india ek


of the week


- ..t.*~.


.. ..,_


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High kicker Colton Jones (17) kicks off in the Indians' game against North
Florida Christian School on Oct. 1.

2010 Indians Football Schedule


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0
Fort White 14, Newberry 13
Fort White 52, Suwannee 22
Fort White 31 Union County 12
N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28
Fort White 30, Florida High 27
Wk 7 East Gadsden H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 8 Taylor County A 7:30 p.m.


Wk 9 Bradford H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


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I-











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, October 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lokecityreportercom


Kirkman

takes the

mound
e had
warmed up
a couple
of times in
this game,
and his whole life, before
finally getting the call.
Lake City native and
Columbia High graduate
Michael Kirkman took
the mound for the Texas
Rangers in the sixth
inning of Game 5 of the
ALCS.
This was the most
hallowed mound in
baseball history and
Kirkman carried a
little piece of every little
league, Dixie Youth and
Babe Ruth Baseball kid
that ever played
catch-and-throw in
Columbia County.
Kirkman, 24, came
through those leagues
and he worked hard to
excel at CHS.
As a junior, Kirkman
led Columbia to a district
title and a rare playoff
win, and the Tigers
returned to the playoffs
as runners-up in 2005.
He pitched a no-hitter
in the 3-1 semifinal win
over Ridgeview High
in 2004 and saved the
district-clinching win for
Aaron Wolff.
The 2-1 first-round win
over Fernandina Beach
went 10 innings with
Wolff getting the win.
Kirkman started and
struck out 18 Pirates in
eight innings.
Kirkman struck out
107 in 641 innings with a
2.07 ERA as a junior. In
his senior year, he struck
out 124 in 67/, innings and
had an ERA of 1.43.
Kirkman maintained
that perseverance after
signing out of high
school with the Rangers.
He finally made it to the
Majors in August and
went on a relief rampage.
Kirkman was left off
the 25-man roster for the
ALDS, then was added
for the ALCS.
His regular-season
stats: 14 games, 16'3a
innings, nine hits,
10 walks, 16 strikeouts,
1.65 ERA.
Kirkman went 0-2 on
the first four batters he
faced Wednesday, but
this is the big leagues.
Curtis Granderson
worked the count to
3-2 and doubled. Brett
Gardner sacrificed and
Derek Jeter walked. Nick
Swisher hit a shot to
second that was turned
into a double play.
In the next inning,
Robinson Cano flied
out and Alex Rodriguez
walked on a 3-1 count.
Rodriguez stole second
before Kirkman got
Marcus Thames to pop
out to second. Lance
Berkman worked an 0-2
count to 3-2 and Kirkman
struck him out.
Texas is one win away
from the World Series
where Kirkman could
experience the biggest
stage of all.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Looks deceiving

for 1-5 Cougars


Tigers look to
rebound from two
losses after bye.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
Despite Godby High's
record, the Columbia High
football team will have its
hands full with the Cougars
in an out-of-district game
tonight in Tallahassee.
Columbia (4-2, 1-1 dis-
trict) enters the contest
after a bye week looking to
get back on the right track
after falling in its last two
games.
Godby enters the con-
test at 1-5 after winning
its first game last week
against Chiles High. The


record is deceiving as the
Cougars' five losses came
against some of the state's
top powers including Leon,
Pace, Jackson, Niceville
and Madison County high
schools.
"They have the tough-
est schedule in the state,"
Columbia coach Craig
Howard said. "We never
look at a teams' record.
High school football is kind
of funny in that you can play
teams with a good record
that aren't as good as teams
with a bad record."
The Cougars have a new
coach this season as Ronnie
Cottrell has taken over the
program. He comes in
with collegiate coaching
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High center Danny Ratliff (right) snaps a ball earlier this season. Ratliff could make
the switch to guard this week against Godby.


Homecoming


Fort White takes
on East Gadsden
in district play.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's football team
is looking to provide the
final ingredient for the
"Indians Brew Jaguar Stew"
homecoming feast.
Fort White (4-2) hosts
East Gadsden High (4-3) at
7:30 p.m. today in a District
2-2B matchup.
The Indians are 2-0 in
district play and seeking to
stay perfect. The Jaguars
are 1-1 and looking at a
deep hole with a loss.
In the other district
games this week, Taylor
County High (2-0) hosts
Union County High (0-2)
and Bradford High (1-1)
hosts Florida High (0-2).
Indians head coach
Demetric Jackson had
a couple of reminders to
keep his team focused dur-
ing homecoming festivities.
"We have been preach-
ing all week that we have
worked to be in this posi-
tion," Jackson said. "We
lost homecoming last year
because they allowed the
distractions to get to them.
This year, we beat Florida
High at their homecoming
and we told the guys this is
not a feeling you want."
Jackson said the Indians
would have the same start-
ers and philosophy.
"We will keep grinding
and if they give us the pass


a ~


stew


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's AJ Legree tries to trip up a North Florida Christian running back earlier this season in Fort White.


we will take it," Jackson
said.
The Jaguars have a first-
year coach in Corey Fuller.
Fuller played at Florida
State and had a 10-year
NFL career. A Rickards
. High graduate, he coached


at his alma mater and West
Gadsden High before tak-
ing over for the Jaguars.
Jackson played at Florida
and the college careers of
the two coaches overlapped
by a year or two. Both were
on the respective rosters


when their team won its
first national champion-
ship.
Fort White has dis-
patched district teams
Union County and Florida
High this season, but the
rest of 2-2B remains in play.


The Indians can shorten
that list with a win today.
"The guys know not to
allow the distractions of
homecoming to interrupt
us doing our job," Jackson
said. "We need to prepare
well to do our part."


Senior showcase

for Columbia


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High senior Taylor Messer (17) attempts to make a point against Meadowbrook
Academy on Tuesday.


Lady Tigers defeat
Union County in
three-straight sets.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For Columbia High
coach Casie McCallister,
Thursday was an indication
of just how far the Lady
Tigers have come this vol-
leyball season. After falling
to Union County in a five-
set match at the beginning
of the year, the Lady Tigers
closed out the regular sea-
son with a three-set victory.
Columbia's closest match
came in the first game as
the Lady Tigers escaped
with a 26-24 win before


closing the match out with
25-18 and 25-21 wins.
"I think that the girls
were able to pull back
together after an emotional
night, in a good way, as
they were able to reflect on
their careers during senior
night," McCallister said.
"Union is very scrappy and
we did a good job adjust-
ing."
Senior Taylor Messer led
the group on Senior Night
with 18 service points,
seven aces and five kills
against Union County.
Other seniors to contrib-
ute were Arden Sibbernsen
(10 service points, six digs
and four kills), Taylor Owens
TIGERS continued on 2B
















SCOREBOARD .


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
11:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Turns Fast Relief 500, at
Martinsville,Va.
I p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, final
practice for Kroger 200, at Martinsville,
Va.
3 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Tums Fast Relief 500, at
Martinsville,Va.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Gateway 250, at
Madison, IllI.
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Kroger 200, at Martinsville,
Va. (same-day tape)
I a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
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COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 South Florida at Cincinnati
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TGC European PGA Tour, Castello
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Spain
Noon
TGC LPGA Malaysia, first round, at
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TGC Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville
Open, second round, at Ponte Vedra
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5 p.m.
TGC PGATour, Shriners Hospitals
for Children Open, second round, at
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8:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Administaff
Small Business Classic, first round, at The
Woodlands, Texas (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, American League
Championship Series,game 6, N.Y.Yankees
at Texas
NBA BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN Preseason, Orlando vs.
Miami, at St. Petersburg
10 p.m.
ESPN Preseason, Golden State vs.
LA. Lakers, at Ontario, Calif.
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, World Finals, third
round, at Las Vegas

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m. I
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati atAtlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Tennessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San .Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit,
Houston
Sunday, Oct. 31
Denver vs. San Francisco at London,
I p.m.
Washington at Detroit, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, I p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Dallas, I p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. I
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: N.Y. Giants, Philadelphia,


CHS

Continued From Page 1B

experience including time at
Florida State and Alabama.
Howard said that the
team hasn't taken into
account the heartbreaking
loss Columbia suffered to
the Cougars last season
when Godby scored in the
final seconds to take a 21-18
win in Lake City.
"Both teams were prob-
ably better at this time last
season," Howard said. "We
haven't talked to the kids
at all about it. Our goal this
year is to win. We can't look
back."
Howard doesn't expect
much of a change to the
game plan under a new
coach.
"They're a little different,
but kind of the same," he
said. '"Theyll take some deep
shots to their big and tall
wide receivers. Their quar-
terback (Dennis Andrews)
can keep a coaching staff up
late at night with his ability
to breal contain. He's like a
waterbug, hard to contain."
Kickoff is at 7 p.m.
at Chiles Stadium in
Tallahassee.


Chicago, Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland

College games

Today
Cent. Connecticut St. (4-2) at Albany,
N.Y. (3-3), 7 p.m.
South Florida (3-3) at Cincinnati
(3-3), 8 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Saturday's Games
No. 3 Oklahoma at No. 18 Missouri,
8 p.m.
No. 4TCU vs. Air Force, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Auburn vs. No. 6 LSU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Alabama at Tennessee, 7 p.m.
No. 8 Michigan State at Northwestern,
Noon.
No. 9 Utah vs. Colorado State, 6 p.m.
No. 10 Wisconsin at No. 13 Iowa,
3:30 p.m.
No. II Ohio State vs. Purdue, Noon.
No. 12 Stanford vs.Washington State,
5 p.m.
No. 14 Nebraska at No. 17 Oklahoma
State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 15 Arizona vs. Washington,
10:15 p.m.
No. 19 South Carolina at Vanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 20 West Virginia vs. Syracuse,
Noon.
No. 21 Arkansas vs. Mississippi,
12:21 p.m.
No. 22 Texas vs. Iowa State, Noon.
No. 23 Virginia Tech vs. Duke, Noon.
No. 24 Mississippi State vs. UAB,
7 p.m.
No. 25 Miami vs. North Carolina,
7:30 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL Championship Series

New York vs.Texas
NewYork 6,Texas 5
Texas 7, NewYork 2
Texas 8, NewYork 0
Texas 10, NewYork 3
Wednesday
NewYork 7,Texas 2,Texas leads series
3-2
Today
New York (Hughes 18-8) at Texas
(Lewis 12-13), 8:07 p.m.
Saturday
NewYork (Pettitte 11-3) atTexas (Lee
12-9), 8:07 p.m., if necessary

NL Championship Series

San Francisco vs. Philadelphia
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3
Philadelphia 6, San Francisco I
San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 0
Wednesday
San Francisco 6, Philadelphia 5
Thursday
Philadelphia at San Francisco(n)
Saturday
San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 3:57 p.m. or
7:57 p.m., if necessary
Sunday
San Francisco (Cain, 13-11 I) at
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11 I), 7:57 p.m.. if
necessary

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Turns Fast Relief 500
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
11:30 a.m.-I p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,
3-4:30 p.m.; Saturday, practice (Speed,
10-11 a.m., ESPN2,6:30-7:30 p.m.); Sunday,
race, I p.m. (ESPN2, noon-1 p.m., ESPN,
I-5 p.m.)
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles).
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
NATIONWIDE
5-Hour Energy 250
Site: Madison, III.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
4:30-6 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2,
10:30 a.m.-noon), race, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
3-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Gateway International Raceway
(oval, 1.25 miles).
Race distance: 250 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS


Kroger 200
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
1-2 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 6-7 p.m.);
Saturday, race, I p.m. (Speed, 12:30-
3:30 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway.
Race distance: 105.2 miles, 200 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Korean Grand Prix
Site:Yeongam, South Korea.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
1-2:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 1-2:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 2 a.m.
(Speed, 1:30-4 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Korean International Circuit
(road course, 3.493 miles).
Race distance: 192.1 miles, 55 laps.


BASKETBALL |


NBA preseason

Wednesday's Games
Charlotte 105, New Orleans 98, OT
Chicago II 0,Toronto 103
Orlando 101, Dallas 76
Philadelphia 118, New York 91
Boston 107, New Jersey 92
Thursday's Games
Milwaukee vs. Cleveland (n)
New Orleans at Oklahoma City (n)
Miami at Atlanta (n)
Houston at San Antonio (n)
Denver at Portland (n)
Golden State vs. LA. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New York vs. Toronto at Montreal,
Quebec, 7 p.m.
Orlando vs. Miami at Tampa, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Golden State vs. LA. Lakers at Ontario,
Calif., 10 p.m.
End preseason

GOLF

Golf week

NATIONWIDE TOUR
Jacksonville Open
Site: PonteVedra Beach
Schedule:Through Sunday.
Course: TPC Sawgrass, Dye's Valley
Course (6,864 yards, par 70).
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today
2-4:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 2-4 a.m.,
2-430 p.m.; Monday, 2-4 a.m.).

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Chicago 2,Vancouver I, SO
Buffalo 4,Atlanta I
Columbus 3,Anahelm I
Los Angeles 4, Carolina 3
Thursday's Games
Washington at Boston (n)
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto (n)
Anaheim at Philadelphia (n)
Calgary at Detroit (n)
New Jersey at Montreal (n)
N.Y. Islanders atTampa Bay (n)
Dallas at Florida (n)
Pittsburgh at Nashville (n)
San Jose at Colorado (n)
Minnesota at Edmonton (n)
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
Calgary at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay atAtlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington. 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Florida, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Carolina at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Edmonton, 10 p.m.


TIGERS: Crush Union

Continued From Page 1B


(seven blocks, seven ser-
vice points and four kills),
Haley Dicks (three kills and
two blocks) and Simone
Williamson (one block).
Columbia improved to



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

CLUNE


14-8 (4-4, district) on the
season with the win. The
Lady Tigers will open up
the district tournament at
5 p.m. Tuesday against
Middleburg at Ridgeview.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


I_ I A ANOTHER NAME
z c FOR A GREAT
REBURB / MAGICIAN.
S - Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: IMBUE LEAFY GARISH OXYGEN
Answer: What Mom got from "one hug" -
ENOUGH


k -II


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White junior Ali Wrench (14) makes a play against Columbia High's Arden Sibbernsen
(15) in action earlier this season.



Lady Indians look to



Dig Pink for cancer


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn

Fort White High's last
game of the volleyball sea-
son will serve as not only
a warm up for next week's
district tournament, but
also as a fundraising event
for breast cancer aware-
ness.
The. Lady Indians
will "Dig Pink" at 2 p.m.
today for the Side-Out
Foundation.
"It's going to be our nor-
mal in-school volleyball
game, but it will also be a
fundraiser for Dig Pink,"
Fort White coach -Doug
Wohlstein said. "They set
up several events through-


1
8

11
13

14
15(


16N

17
18N


out the nation."
The Lady Indians will
host the Union County
Tigers, who have already
had a similar event this sea-
son that Fort White was
also a part of. Both teams
will wear pink uniforms
and the competition will
use a pink ball.
Donations will be accept-.
ed at the gate and the con-
cession stands.
"We will have something
set up at the gate and con-
cessions for donations,"
Wohlstein said. "We will
split the gate and conces-
sion money as well."
Wohlstein expects main-
ly students to attend the
game due to the time of the


ACROSS 36 Is incorrect
37 Poetic adverb
Port structure 38 Previous to
Lacking 39 Entry permits
authenticity 40 Rural sts.
Qar or antelope 41 Halfway
"Close, but no 42 Orange pekoe
cigar" 44 Have ambitions
1066 raider 47 Picks
Group that 51 Calpurnia's
travels togeth- husband
er for safety 52 Wreck, as a
Wrinkle-nosed train
dog 53 Innsbruck
Osaka sash locale
Writer John 54 Sneezy's pal


Passos
21 Oafs
23 Tack on
26 Floe or berg
27 Joie de vivre
28 Foal's parent
29 Riverbank bur-
rower
31 Seer's deck
32 Make by braid-
ing
33 Study closely
35 Tibetan monk


DOWN


Prevail
MD employer
Showery mo.
Gangplank
"Madame
Bovary"
author
Splotches
All, in combos
State VIP


event and will have chanc-
es for those to attend to
win prizes. Still, the main
attraction is helping out a
noble cause.
"Union County was able
to raise about 400 or 500
dollars," he said. "We'd
love to do the same thing.
If we do more, that'd be
great."
Wohlstein expects the
game to be closely con-
tested.
"Both teams are about
equal," he said. "We have
the same kind of pro-
grams."
Fort White is 11-13
(6-2, district) entering the
contest.
Admission is $2.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BEOO SWAT FOI ND
LD TIE U SER
EOPRENE L IV
ORRIS MELEE
OPTS TERRY


EN IRNE T VRA









ARP SITRS FUR


9

10
12

13


Bob Hope
sponsor
Sow's pen
Where Luanda
is
Oak product


18 Golf-ball
feature
19 Of the eyes
20 Tahini base
22 Shoot-'em-ups
23 More open
24 Talked on and
on
25 Restrains from
acting
28 Well-known
uncle
30 Korean auto
31 Like a fez
34 For adults
only (hyph.)
36 Fluffy quilt
39 Like the flu
41 Japanese
soup
43 Flight prefix
44 Not hesitate
45 Express in
words
46 Each
48 Spending limit
49 Dead heat
50 Cunning


10-22 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SPUMGY
T r-Y l N-I


I











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


DILBERT
I'M UPDATING MY
FRIEND RESOURCE
MATRIX AND I HAVE
A FEW GAPS.


BABY BLUES
WERE ARE MY 5HOES?
I CANT FIND MY ISOES!


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Mom is hurt by daughter's

refusal to confide in her


DEAR ABBY: My 12-.
year-old daughter, "Skye,"
is starting to go through
puberty. She's not comfort-
able discussing things with
me; instead she goes to
her older sister with all her
questions. They talk to each
other in whispered tones in
their bedroom with the door
closed and locked.
When I try to discuss
things with Skye, she be-
comes red in the face and
refuses to talk to me. She is
now ashamed to even have
me see her undressed, but
has no shyness about her
body with her sister.
They have always had a
close relationship, and I am
pleased about that, but I feel
shut out of what should be
something between a moth-
er and a daughter. I do not
feel I have ever done any-
thing to make Skye feel un-
comfortable with me about
such things, and I feel hurt
to be excluded like this.
My older daughter was
very open with me about
what she was experiencing
when she was going through
puberty. I have tried to ask
Skye what the problem is;
she won't talk to me. What
can I do? SHUT OUT IN
KANSAS CITY
DEAR SHUT OUT:
No two children are alike,
and it appears that your
younger daughter is mod-
est to the extreme. It's pos-
sible that because Skye has


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
always shared a room with
her older sister, that's the
reason she's more comfort-
able discussing the changes
that are occurring with her
rather than you.
My advice is to step back
and don't push Skye. Be
glad she can confide in her
sister, and check with your
older girl periodically to find
out if there is anything you
should know.
DEAR ABBY: Due to
.the war on terror and a re-
newed sense of patriotism,
more individuals and busi-
nesses are displaying Amer-
ican flags. However, many
appear to be unfamiliar with
flag etiquette.
With Veteran's Day ap-
proaching (Nov. 11), please
encourage readers to in-
spect their flags and make
sure they are being dis-
played correctly. If the flag
is torn or dirty, it should be
cleaned and mended, or dis-
posed of with dignity.Aprop-
erly handled flag is a sign of
respect to those who have
served, and currently serve,
to protect the freedoms we
Americans often take for


11glg


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You may want
to rethink your strategy or
at least what you. are going
to say before you blurt out
something you'll regret An
intense situation will have
a favorable outcome. Get
ready to make some chang-
es. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Meeting someone
halfway to settle a pending
matter will be in your best
interest. Love is on the rise
and a chance to spend time
with someone you care for
should be worked into your
agenda. Don't be tricked
into helping someone with a
sob story. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Trust in your own
abilities, not the promises
of someone unreliable. It's
important to handle your
own affairs and to keep your
private life a secret The less
people know about you, the
easier it will be to get ahead.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't let a poor-
me attitude hold you back
when you have so much go-
ing for you. Be adventurous
and try your hand at some-
thing new. The more you
socialize and network, the
better your chance for pro-
fessional advancement. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Troubles at home or
with your residence can be
expected. Take care of.prob-
lems quickly before things
escalate. By speaking up
and offering suggestions,
you will be considered a me-
diator instead of a trouble-
maker. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't sit back waiting
for someone to take over.
You be the boss, the one
making the decisions and
using persuasive means to
get what you want. Positive
gains are within reach if you
are true to your beliefs and
follow through with your
plans. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): The weekend may be
approaching but work or
finding a better job should
be your prime concern. Call
on people you have worked
with in the past Reconnect-
ing can lead to a position
with greater growth po-
tential and a higher salary.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Infiltrate a group
or organization that can
help you reach your goals.
Your ability to create oppor-
tunities and mysteriously
find a place or situation that
highlights your talent and


skills will be masterfully ex-
ecuted. ***
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll be en-
tertaining and will attract
a lot of attention. Make
sure you don't -xaggrate
or compromise. Criticism
can be expected if you are
not fair. Answer questions
with honesty and integrity.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Get involved
and help the underdog. Tak-
ing on a power position will
enable you to enhance your
reputation, as long as you
are honest regarding your
motives. Your status will
get a boost professionally or
personally. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take on a project
or get involved in a deal that
will help bring you the free-
dom you've been searching
for. Don't let someone get
the better of you emotion-
ally. Travel plans should be
put on hold. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): It's never too
late to learn something new.
What you experience now
you will be able to use in
the future. Signing a con-
tract or making a move or
investment will all lead to
greater prosperity. Love and
romance are highlighted.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals J
"JX AFZ JXZ FDXN UZ'WW XZYZO
ZKGZOCZXTZ TFCWNRCOAF. JX AFZ
JAFZO FDXN, UZ TDX JGZX DWW
JSO .JUX PDOV." ROSTZ UCWWCV
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "What could be more beautiful than a dear old lady
growing wise with age?" Brigitte Bardot
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-22


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I ALREADY HAVE A
FRIEND WITH A TRUCK,
A FRIEND WHO GIVES
ME FREE TICKETS, AND
A FRIEND WITH TOOLS.
__)


I'VE GOT OPENINGS FOR
A COMPUTER EXPERT
FRIEND AND A FRISKY
FRIEND WITH LOW
STANDARDS.
|:- O,/ I'LL TRY THE ::.
COMPUTER ONE..


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


granted. PROUD FAM-
ILY MEMBER OF A VET-
ERAN
DEAR PROUD FAK-
ILY MEMBER: Your :t-
ter is timely and inmoortant.
Proud Americans who dis-
play flags should be aware
of a rule of flag etiquette that
states that the flag should
be in good condition. Sadly,
I have seen more than a few
that looked like faded red,
white and blue rags.
According to the U.S.
Flag Code, "When a flag has
served its useful purpose, it
should be destroyed, pref-
erably by burning." The
pamphlet "Flag Etiquette"
published by the American
Legion states: "For individ-
ual citizens this should be
done discreetly so that the
act is not perceived as a pro-
test or desecration."
Many American Legion
posts conduct Disposal of
Unserviceable Flag ceremo-
nies on June 14, Flag Day,
each year. The Boy and Girl
Scouts of America also are
able to conduct these cer-
emonies. If you're ready to
dispose of yours, check with
the local Boy or Girl Scout
Council or wait until the
Girl Scout cookie sales start
locally and offer the flag to a
troop during a sale at a small
business.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


- ADvantage


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One hem per ad $250
4 lines 6 days a iiiona
Rate applies to pvate individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $10 or less.
This s a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad i
4 lines 6 days itional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal m handise totalling $500 or less.
Each item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One em per ad 6
4 lines 6 days ch additional
line $1.15
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal mercihandisen totan 1,000 or less.
Each item mtust Include a price
This refundable rate.




One Item per ad 3
4 lines 6 days ch additional
Rte applies to pr individuals selling






4 lines 6 days ch additional

li ne $1.65
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,00 or less
This is a non-refundable rate.


One Item per ad H a |


4 lines 6 days line |
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.t
Each item must Include a price.
This Is a non-retndable rate.

.J..,-


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person., and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 100a.m. Mn., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed, 9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs, 10:00 am. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00am. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fi., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a:m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print vii Online
WWW.I:1.v". t r', .1 fic.col l


Legal

PUBLIC AUCTION
1999 Ford SUV
vin# 1FMRU1764XLA76546
1997 Chevy van
vin# 1GNDM19WXVB206562
1986 Nissan 4 dr.
vin# JNIHT211XHT083057
1986 Ford 4 dr.
vin# 2FABP42F3GX210963
1990 Ford Truck
vin# lFTDF15NN2LNA36516
1996 Dodge Seabring
vin# 4C3AU42Y7TE26518G
1999 hyundai 4 dr
vin# KMHVD34NXXU430635
in Columbia County
on November 6, 2010 at 2:00 pm
at Flash Wrecker Service
10042 South US 441 *
Lake City, Florida
386-755-0993
04542006
October 22, 2010

NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license to practice nurs-
ing of
Aranda E. Williams, C.N.A.
1166 S.E. St. Johns Street Lot #2
Lake City, Florida 32025
CASE NO.: CNA 136466
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (85.0)245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by November
24, 2010, the matter of the Adminis-
trative Complaint will be presented
at an ensuing meeting of the Board
of Nursing in formal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-
en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850)245-4640, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (v),
via Florida Relay Service.
04541997
October 22, 29, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000425
CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERV-
ICES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
.vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEE OF
MURTON LEE TOMPKINS, DE-
CEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS,
TRUSTEES OF ROBERT LOWE,
DECEASED; KATHLEEN D.
TOMPKINS A/K/A KATHLEEN
LITTRELL A/K/A KATHLEEN L.
LITTRELL F/K/A KATHY TOMP-
KINS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF KATHLEEN D. TOMPKINS
A/K/A KATHLEEN LITTRELL
A/K/A KATHLEEN L. LITTRELL
F/K/A KATHY TOMPKINS;
KATHLEEN D. TOMPKINS A/K/A
KATHLEEN LITTRELL A/K/A
KATHLEEN L. LITTRELL F/K/A
KATHY TOMPKINS, HEIR; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
KATHLEEN D. TOMPKINS A/K/A
KATHLEEN LITTRELL A/K/A
KATHLEEN L. LrITRELL F/K/A
KATHY TOMPKINS, HEIR; VAL-
ERIE D. TRAINUM, HEIR; AM-
BER TOMPKINS, HEIR; WALTER
LEE LITTRELL, JR.; THE UN-
,KNOWN SPOUSE OF WALTER
LEE LITTRELL, JR.; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-
SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS,
AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTH-
ER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
FENDANT(S); STATE OF FLORI-
DA; CLERK OF COURT OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY
EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH
ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR








Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
**************************** *

Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


Legal

TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFEND-
ANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUST-
EES OF MURTON LEE TOMP-
KINS, DECEASED; UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIE-
NORS, TRUSTEES OF ROBERT
LOWE, DECEASED.
Whose residence are/is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file
your answer or written defenses, if
any, in the above proceeding with
the Clerk of this Court, and to serve
a copy thereof upon the plaintiff's at-
torney, Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive,
Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone
(813) 915-8660 facsimile (813) 915-
0559, within thirty days of the first
publication of this Notice, the nature
of this proceeding being a suit for
foreclosure of mortgage against the
following described property, to wit:
THE NORTH 1/2 OF A PART OF
SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, DE-
SCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT
THE NE CORNER OF THE SW 1/4
OF NE 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1
AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES
MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4, 720.02
FEET TO THE WEST R/W LINE
OF A 60 FOOT ROAD; THENCE
SOUTH 0 DEGREES 59 MINUTES
55 SECONDS WEST, 640.85 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 59
MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST,
640.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 22 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS WEST 680.40 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 59
MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST
640.85 THENCE SOUTH 0 DE-
GREES 59 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST 640.40 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
To include a:
1990 Redman Industries, Inc. VIN
14605362A and 61864777
1990 Redman Industries, Inc. VIN
14605362B and 61864765 -
If you fail to file your answer or
written defenses in the above pro-
ceeding, on plaintiff's attorney, a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or Petition.
DATED at COLUMBIA County this
6th day of October, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the American
with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceeding
should contact he ASA Coordinator
no later than seven (7) days prior to
the proceedings. If hearing impaired,
please call (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or
(800) 955-8770 (voice), via Florida
Relay Service.
04541968
October 15, 22, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO
ISSUE AIR PERMIT
Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection
Northeast District
Draft Minor Source Air Construction
Permit
Project No. 0470002-073-AC
White Springs Agricultural Chemi-
cals, Inc.
Suwannee River/Swift Creek Com-
plex
Hamilton County, Florida
Applicant: The applicant for this
project is White Springs Agricultural
Chemicals, Inc. The applicant's au-
thorized representative and mailing
address is: Mr. Terry L. Baker, Gen-
eral Manager, White Springs Agri-
cultural Chemicals, Inc., Suwannee
River/Swift Creek Complex, PO Box
300, White Springs, Florida 32096.
Facility Location: White Springs
Agricultural Chemicals, Inc. operates
the existing Suwannee River/Swift
Creek Complex, which is located in
Hamilton County at 15843 SE 78th
Street, White Springs in Hamilton,
Florida.
Project:. This air construction permit
authorizes EUs. 039 "C" Auxiliary
Boiler, EU040 "D" Auxiliary Boiler,
EU064 SCM Rock Dryer and EU068
"E" Auxiliary Boiler to use Better
Grade Fuel Oil. When No. 6 fuel oil
is specified in this permit, a better
grade may be substituted.
Permitting Authority: Applications
for air construction permits are sub-
ject to review in accordance with the
provisions of Chapter 403, Florida
Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters 62-4,
62-210 and 62-212 of the Florida
Adtiinistrative Code (F.A.C.). The
proposed project is not exempt from
-air permitting requirements and an
air permit is required to perform the
proposed work. The Permitting Au-
thority responsible for making a per-
mit determination for this project is
the Department of Environmental
Protection's Air Resource Section in
the Northeast District Office. The
Permitting Authority's physical ad-
dress is: 7825 Baymeadows Way,
Suite B-200, Jacksonville, Florida
32256-7590. The Permitting Au-
thority's mailing address is: 7825
Baymeadows Way, Suite B-200,
Jacksonville, Florida 32256-7590.
The Permitting Authority's tele-
phone number is 904/807-3300.
Project File: A complete project file
is available for public inspection dlur-
ing the normal business hours of
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday (except legal holi-
days), at the physical address indical-
ed above for the Permitting Authori-
ty. The complete project file in-
cludes the Draft Permit, the Techni-
cal Evaluation and Preliminary De-
termination, the application and in-
formation submitted by the applicant
(exclusive of confidential records un-
der Section 403.111, F.S.). Interest-
ed persons may contact the Permit-
ting Authority's project engineer for
additional information at the address


Legal

and phone number listed above. In
addition, electronic copies of these
documents are available on the fol-
lowing web site:
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/air/emis-
sion/apds/default.asp.
Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit:
The Permitting Authority gives no-
tice of its intent to issue an air con-
struction permit to the applicant for
the project described above. The ap-
plicant has provided reasonable as-
surance that operation of proposed
equipment will not adversely impact
air quality and that the project will
comply with all appropriate provi-
sions of Chapters 62-4, 62-204, 62-
210, 62-212, 62-296 and 62-297,
F.A.C. The Permitting Authority
will issue a Final Permit in accord-
ance with the conditions of the pro-
posed Draft Permit unless a timely
petition for an administrative hearing
is filed under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, F.S. or unless public com-
ment received in accordance with
this notice results in a different deci-
sion or a significant change of terms
or conditions.
Comments: The Permitting Authori-
ty will accept written comments con-
ceming the proposed Draft Permit
for a period of 14 days from the date
of publication of this Public Notice.
Written comments must be received
by the Permitting Authority by close
of business (5:00 p.m.) on or before
the end of the 14-day period. If writ-
ten comments received result in a
significant change to the Draft Per-
mit, the Permitting Authority shall
revise the Draft Permit and require,
if applicable, another Public Notice.
All comments filed will be made
available for public inspection.
Petitions: A person whose substan-
tial interests are affected by the pro-
posed permitting decision may peti-
tion for an administrative hearing in
accordance with Sections 120.569
and 120.57, F.S. The petition must
contain the information set forth be-
low and must be filed with (received
by) the Department's Agency Clerk
in the Office of General Counsel of
the Department of Environmental
Protection at 3900 Commonwvealth
Boulevard, Mail Station #35, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32399-3000 (Tele-
phone: 850/245-2241) Petitions
filed by any persons other than those
entitled to written notice under Sec-
tion 120.60(3), ES. must be filed
within 14 days of publication of this
Public Notice or receipt of a written
notice, whichever occurs first. Un-
der Section 120.60(3), F.S., however,
any person who asked the Permitting
Authority for notice of agency action
may file a petition within 14 days of
receipt of that notice, regardless of
the date of publication. A petitioner
shall mail a copy of the petition -to -
the applicant at the address indicated
above, at the time of filing. The fail-h
ure of any person to file a petition
within the appropriate time period
shall constitute a waiver of that per-
son's right to request an administra-
tive determination (hearing) under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.,
or to intervene in this proceeding and
participate as a party to it. Any.sub-
sequent intervention (in, a proceeding
initiated by another party) will be on-
ly at the approval of the presiding of-
ficer upon the filing of a motion in
compliance with Rule 28-106.205,
F.A.C.
A petition that disputes the material
facts on which the Permitting Au-
thority's action is based must contain
the following information: (a) The
name and address of each agency af-
fected and each agency's file or iden-
tification number, if known; (b) The
name, address and telephone number
of the petitioner; the name address
and telephone number of the peti-
tioner's representative, if any, which
shall be the address for service pur-
poses during the course of the. pro-
ceeding; and an explanation of how
the petitioner's substantial rights will
be affected by the agency determina-
tion; (c) A statement of when and
how the petitioner received notice of
the agency action or proposed deci-
sion; (d) A statement of all disputed
issues of material fact. If there are
none, the petition must so state; (e) A
concise statement of the ultimate
facts alleged, including the specific
facts the petitioner contends warrant
reversal or modification of the agen-
cy's proposed action; (f) A statement
of the specific rules or statutes the
petitioner contends require reversal
or modification of lhe agency's pro-
posed action including an explana-
tion of how the alleged facts relate to
the specific rules or statutes; and, (g)
A statement of the relief sought by
the petitioner, stating precisely the
action the petitioner wishes the agen-
cy to take with respect to the agen-
cy's proposed action. A petition that
does not dispute the material facts
upon which the Permitting Authori-
ty's action is based,shall state that no
such facts are in dispute and other-
wise shall contain the same infornna-'
tion as set forth above, as required by
Rule 28-106.301, F.A.C.
Because the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate final
agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the Pennritting Authori-
ty's final action may be different
from the position taken by it in this
Public Notice of Intent to Issue Air
Pemrit. Persons whose substantial
interests will be alTfected by any such
final decision of the Permilting Au-
thority on the application have the
right to petition to become a party to
the proceeding, in accordance with
the requirements set forth above.
Mediation: Mediation is not availa-
ble for this proceeding.
04542037 '
October 22, 2010


020 Lost & Found

STOLEN White. female,. bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/palches
Reward being olTcrcd
Please call 386-697-1197


100 Job
S Opportunities

05524275
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
For Our NEW Store on
Pinemount & Birley Rd
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental.& life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colbum Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
pm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
serits seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
one of these positions to qualify
for the job. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all
managers before they are hired.

Exec.Dir.- nonprofit working with
people ,with disabilities. Manages
agency with $2M bgt./120 empl.
Reports to 14 mbr.board. 3 yrs.
admin. exp incl. budgeting,
community relations, fundraising,
implementing policies/programs
required. BA degree preferred.
Email resume
prenew(aolakecity-carc.com.
Secretary-Needed FT for a busy
Doctor's office. Excellent skills in
MS Word (speed 60wpm or
above), & MS Excel.
Fax Resume to 386-758-5987
Tow Truck Operator. Bryant's
Towing is now hiring Drivers!
Must have a clean MVR never
been charged with or convicted of
a felony. 6 day work week, night
& weekend hours required. Salary
386-752-7799
WELLBORNHorse Farm
needs someone to clean stalls, feed
and general care'of horses. "
AM & PM. (352)213-8270

no Sales
110 Employment

05524246,
Outside Sales Experience? You
have the sales skills maybe just
the wrong product? Would you
like to make $1000 $1500 a
week? If you are a people
person, we need to talk
904-472-3626

05524247
Promotions Rep
$500 is a bad day for our reps.
Are you an outgoing people
person? Would you like to
make $1000 a week?
Call 904-472-3626


20 Medical
1 Employment

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494

190 Mortgage Money

FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
240 Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE Refrigerator,
front milk door,
36x311/2, height 681/2,
6 yrs old $450, 386-752-1811


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY USED APPLIANCES
Working or not.
Don't scrap that machine.
Call 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 &'up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

05524160
Estate Sale, Thurs-Sat 8-1
Tools,antiques, riding
lawn mower, household,
furniture, clothing, toys
715 Miracle Ct (off Pinemount)
386-752-6947

10/23 Sat 7-1, Camping, fishing
gear, fools, household items, col-
lectibles 1/2 mi. S of CR18 on
Tustenuggee Ave. 386-965-1308
COMMUNITY YARD-SALE
Sat only, 7a-? Rolling Meadows
Subdivision, turn on Callahan Rd,
off Branford Hwy, (follow signs)
ESTATE SALE Sat Oct 23. 8-?
147 SW Petunia Pl. in Azalea Park
off SR 47. Furniture, TVs, pic-
tures, kitchenware, books, misc.
Fri & Sat. 8-2. Christmas items
galore, beads, stuffed animals,
storage bins, craft supplies, kitchen
items, tent 698 SW CR 242.
Fri, Sat, 8a-2p,
287 SW Ridgeview Place
(Cypress Lakes)
off US 90 W
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat-Sun 8-12. 460 SW Beden-
baugh, off Tustenuggee. (1st house
on Rt w/red roof. LR/BR Furn.,
wall hangings, lamps, nick nacks,
& more. 1996 Red Cavalier Con-
vertable. Look for signs 344-2736


440 Miscellaneous

FIRM QUEEN Mattress, still in
plastic. Never been used!
$150
Call 386-288-8833 (
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231

450 Good Things
to Eat

Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of townNO Pets
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
Ibedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2/1 S/W, front kitchen, CH/A
$375. mo. plus
$200. dep
386-752-2254
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2br/2ba MH on 2.5 ac located 10
min from Lake City, quite area.
Washer/Dryer, all appliances incl.
$600/mo. Amanda 386-365-6493.
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
$575 monthly,


plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932


BUYmIT


SE~LLIT^

LafL ITTib











Classified Department: 755-5440


63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $550
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
3BR/2BA MH on private
property. Excellent condition.
$650 mo 1st and last.
386-365-7402
DWMH, Spacious 4/2, on 5
acres,just south of Lake City,clean,
quiet, great location, storage shed,
$850 mo, 1st, last & $300 sec,
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
2.5 acres in Olustee, close to
Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA with carport, screen
porch, Privacy Garden.
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208


Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One ,bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $625 plus dep & bckgrnd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 386-397-2108
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
307 Home For Rent
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543


LAKE CITY REPORTER


73A Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Furnished Farm House. 3/2,re-
modeled, wrap around porch, hors-
es welcome, on 160 ac, 5 miles to
1-75, 2 miles to 1-10, $1200 month
386-362-8708 or 386-3624114
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45, 4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, fplace,CH/A,
krg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & I-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


82O Farms &
2O Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2000 obo
386-965-2215
1994 FORD Ranger.
$1,500 obo
386-397-4912

951 Recreational
95 Vehicles
Carriage LS 36 ft, fifth wheel,
$26K obo, can see by appt. only
(will sell w/F350 package)
serious offers only 386-755-0653
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


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PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


Carriage LS
36' 3 slide fifth wheel.
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only.
$26,000 OBO
Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with
low miles. $47,000
Call
386-755-0653


In Print,

& Online

One Low

Price!


For More De~j.tais al
Mar ~'~kat 386-755-5440 I


$25 Prize Weekly Winner


Contest rules and official entry blank in Tuesday's paper.


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Lake City Reporter


CLASSIFIED







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010


C H S S TA R S & ST R I P E S


If'


Linebacker Cameron Wimberly (41) assists in taking down


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
a Ridgeview High runner.


Regrouped Tigers ready to roll


after
A consecutive
losses
Columbia High
walked into its
bye week at just the right
time.
The Tigers are


sputtering on offense,
scoring only nine points
in the last two contest
after averaging more than
28 points in the first four
games this year.
This week, the Tigers
travel to Tallahassee to


Get Connected




www.lakeoltyreporter.com

L __ L .^ ^


take on Godby High in a
rematch from last season.
Columbia fell in a
21-18 heartbreaker to
the Cougars last season,
but Godby is off to an 0-5
start this season against
monster talent.


tiger


p of the week
of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High School band perform during the halftime show.


Columbia High offensive lineman Danny Ratliff (70) snaps the ball during a game against
Ridgeview High School.


2010 Tiger Football Schedule


CHS 38, Brooks County 13
CHS 30, South Lafourche 19
CHS 22, Buchholz 14
CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20
Madison 19, CHS 0
Ridgeview 16, CHS 9
Wk 7 Godby A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 8 Ed White A 7:30 p.m.


L. """ Z L "m: L. "
The Predator
$48,900
4BR/2BA, 1800sqft
(386)754-8844 73OD
imm~v^mmM mIM~


-
GMIZ


Call And Check Our Prices On
Tires and Accessories!


Ov 50O (ws of

SAWiobdA&f C44s4oAs!


Wk 9 Wolfson H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.


This Week
7:30 p.m.
S6 ....


BUY
32oz Fountain Drink
and get a Hershey
Candy Bar for
oni 254.


tru ***u
10 0 ~Full Service Autobody & Paint?
Custom Paint Cars,
Trucks & Motorcycles


685 NW Waldo
Lake City, PL 3Ea


Ed & Linda McOuatters
Phone (386) 750.4415


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Eat More, Pay Less.! Fresh
......... .. ... .... .. .. B a ke d

SALADS COMBO Cookies
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