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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01431
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/21/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01431
System ID: UF00028308:01431
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text












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www.Iakecityreporter3om


Direct Conflict
Fort White hosts East Gadsden
in district contest.
Sports, I B





porter


Vol. 136, No. 235 0 75 cents


Principal involved in quarrel, police say


Authorities trying
to determine what
sparked fight

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
A Columbia School
District principal and a stu-
dent's parent were involved
in a physical altercation


Wednesday at Challenge
Learning Center and
authorities said they have
launched an investigation.
According to Lake
City Police Department
reports, the incident
occurred around 12:20
p.m. Wednesday afternoon
and police officers were
dispatched to the school at
1301 NW Labonte Terrace
in reference to a distur-


"We will be meeting with our district school safety team,
as well as the individual district staff members who have
input as to what we need to do."

Mike Millikin
Columbia Schools superintendent


bance.
"We go; several phone
calls during the event,"
said Capt. John Blanchard,
the Lake City Police


Department public infor-
mation officer.
Officer Michael
Delcastillo responded to
the calls and spoke with


Tyra Hayes.
"She alleged she had
been in an altercation with
principal Deborah Hill,"
Blanchard said.


During the investigation
Delcastillo also spoke to
Hill, who said she was bat-
tered by Hayes.
Blanchard said the state
attorney's office decided
to ask the involved parties
to submit affidavits before
deciding if charges should
be filed.
School officials declined
PRINCIPAL continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
Prince, Princess candidates
The Fort White Middle School Homecoming Court poses for a
photograph. Pictured are Shelby Bundy (front row, from left),
Brooke Dilmore, Princess Candidates Ashley Cason and Ja'Shari
Blige, Prince Candidate Jonathan Glenn (back row, from left),
Princess Candidates Aiexis Witt, Autumn Hayston and Prince
Candidate Dalton Sweat. Related photo, story on page 3A



County officials

seek 5-year deal

on Web services


Tower lease to
provide Internet
in North Florida.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityrepor ter. com
The county could soon
be entering into a five-year
agreement that will lease
its tower to provide high-
speed wireless Internet
services.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will dis-
cuss the lease, among
other agenda items, at its


meeting today.
The North Florida
Broadband Authority is
seeWk ing
to lease
the tower
located
on Franklin
Street at
a cost of
$1,500 per
Williams month to
the county, but would sub-
let the tower to another
company which would pro-
vide the Internet services,
said Dale Williams, county
WEB continued on 3A


Columbia County

early voting totals

still running high


Voters continue
to take advantage
of early balloting.

Staff reports
The third day of the early
voting period in Columbia
County remained strong,
with 433 total votes cast,
according to Supervisor of
Elections Liz Horne.
Of that total, 334 votes
were cast in Lake City and
99 more in Fort White. On
Monday, the opening day
of the early-voting period, a
total of 394 votes were cast


in the county.
The early voting period
lasts through Oct. 30. Voters
in Lake City can cast their
ballots at the Supervisor
of Elections Office, located
at 971 W. Duval St. In Fort
White, ballots can be cast
at the Conmmunity Center
on State Road 47. Votes
are taken from 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Voters must have
a photo identification with
their signature on it. ,
The general election is
set for Tuesday, Nov. 2 at
precinct locations through-
out the county.


DRAMATIC EXERCISE


Avalon residents get a kick out of

a special visit from CHS students


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School drama students Durren Burch (from left), 16, Devante Bell, 17, and teacher Wendy Cousino exercise
with Jennie Kelly, 84, Thursday morning at the Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center.


By LEANNE TYO and
SAMANTHA COURSON
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn,
scourson@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia
High's drama
students vol-
unteered to
work both
young and old muscles
instead of their acting
skills during a special
exercise Wednesday.
As a community service
project, about 20 Drama
II students donated
their time to join and
exercise with at least
15 elderly residents at
Avalon Healthcare and
Rehabilitation Center in
a routine resident fitness
class.
"We feel it's important
to get out there and do
something for the com-
munity," said Annabelle
Blevins, 15, a 10th-grade


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Porschee Walker (left), 17, helps Helen Baker, 90, bend a pool
noodle during an exercise designed to strengthen her arms.


drama student.
-Amy Nydam, 16, an
11th-grade drama student,
said some of the residents
may not have family or
regular visitors, so the
drama class wanted to
reach out to them.
"We thought it would be
good to let them see other
people they might not see
every day," she said.


Wendy Cousino, CHS
drama teacher, said
spending time with the
residents will expose
the students to different
groups they can serve in
the community and the
importance of taking care
of each another.
"As they grow and blos-
som into adults, they need
to see how they can con-


tribute," she said.
Sandria Morris, Avalon
activities director assis-
tant, said having the CHS
drama students in the
class made the residents
more alert and active,
making for an enjoyable
experience.
"It's great," said Joan
Spector, 75, an Avalon
resident. "It's something
to do. Otherwise you sit
in your room and play
Tiddlywinks with your-
self."
Students said they
liked helping the resi-
dents, too.
"You're putting some-
body ahead of yourself
for a change," said Libby
Taylor, 16, a sophomore.
"It's important because
we are interacting with
other people that is fun
for us and them," said
Katelyn Curry, 16, a
junior. "I hope that we
can do it again soon."


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


85
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
O bituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 3B
Puzzles .......... ...... 2B
H ealth.................. 6A


6~


TODAY IN
HEALTH
Ft-ds: Limit potatoes
offered to children.


COMING
FRIDAY
The U.S. Army's Jazz
Ambassadors.


Finding Spark
Tigers o 0' rebound


Lake



Thursday, October 21, 2010


llllI I










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY. OCTOBER 21, 2010


3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 4-1-1
Evening: 7-4-1


4y.- Wednesday:
Afternoon: 1-6-6-6
Evening: 7-0-4-1


Tuesday:
V A 3-4-5-11-14


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Paltrow to sing at CMA Awards


NASHVILLE, Tenn.


Actress Gwyneth Paltrow
will be taking the stage
at next month's Country
Music Association
Awards as a per-
former.
She'll sing the title track of her
new movie, "Country Strong," and
will be joined by Vince Gill.
Paltrow stars in the film with
Tim McGraw, Garrett Hedlund
and Leighton Meester. She plays a
washed up country singer who gets
romantically involved with a rising
singer-songwriter (Hedlund). They
try to resurrect her career with
a major tour, headed up by her
husband/manager (McGraw) and
featuring a beauty-queen-turned-
singer (Meester.)
The film hits theaters in Los
Angeles and Nashville on Dec.
22 and nationwide on Jan. 7. The
soundtrack will be released Oct. 26.
Previously announced perform-
ers for the CMA Awards include
Kenny Chesney, Lady Antebellum,
Brad Paisley, Rascal Flatts, Reba
McEntire, Taylor Swift, Carrie
Underwood, and Keith Urban. Zac
Brown Band and Alan Jackson will
perform together, and Miranda
Lambert and Sheryl Crow will sing
a duet to honor Loretta Lynn's 50th
anniversary as a recording artist.
The CMA Awards will air live
from Nashville's Bridgestone Arena
Nov. 10 on ABC.

New Zealand may lose
'Hobbit' filming
WELLINGTON, New Zealand
- New Zealand may lose filming of
'The Hobbit" movies, with financial
backers Warner Brothers making
arrangements to shift the produc-
tion offshore, director Peter Jackson


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Honoree actress Gwyneth Paltrow arrives at 'ELLE' magazine's 17th Annual
Women in Hollywood Tribute in Beverly Hills, Calif., Monday.


warned Thursday.
Jackson's production company,
Wingnut Films, and the union
Actors' Equity have been at logger-
heads over pay deals for actors in
the $500 million, two-film prequel
to the highly successful "Lord of
the Rings" trilogy.
Shooting of the two 3-D films is
due to begin in February.
Wingnut Films said in a state-
ment.that the actors' move in


threatening to boycott the pro-
duction had undermined Warner
Brothers confidence in the
industry "and they are now, quite
rightly, very concerned about -
the security of their $500 million
investment."
The statement gave no indica-
tion of where the films' produc-
tion might be moved.

, .Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Joyce Randolph
is 86.
* Author Ursula K. Le Guin
is 81.
* Rock singer Manfred Mann
is 70.
* Musician Steve Cropper
(Booker T. & the MG's) is 69.
* Singer Elvin Bishop is 68.
* TV's Judge Judy Sheindlin
is 68.

Daily Scripture


* Actor Everett McGill is 65.
* Musician Charlotte Gaffey
(The Go-Go's) is 57.
* Actress-author Carrie
Fisher is 54.
* Rock musician Steve
Lukather (Toto) is 53.
* Actor Ken Watanabe is 51.
* Rock musician Che chayy)
Colovita Lemon is 40.
* Actor Will Estes is 32.


"Restore to me the joy of your
salvation and grant me a willing
spirit, to sustain me."


-Psalm 51:12


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakectyreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULAT N
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permls- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service ; for same day re-delivery. After
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418 vice related creditwill be Issued.
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Land mine gets
dropped off
FORT WALTON
BEACH -.Florida
Panhandle officials are
urging residents who find
an unexploded device to
leave it alone and contact
authorities after a training
land mine was delivered
to a fire station.
The mine was found on
a piece of private prop-
eFty near Fort Walton
Beach by two men who
took it to the Fort Walton
Beach Fire Department
Monday afternoon. A
police release says the
device was inert and
posed no danger.
The release says since
the Panhandle is sur-
rounded by the U.S.
military, "the potential for
locating unexploded ordi-
nance is always there."
They ask for residents to
leave the device where
they found it and call for
police and fire assistance.

Man charged with
stealing from mom
ZEPHYRHILLS A 46-
year-old southwest Florida
man has been charged
with draining his mother's
bank account and neglect-
ing the bedridden woman.
Pasco County Sheriff's
deputies said Daniel Braun
moved into his mother's
home after she fell and
took over her personal
care and finances. But 76-
year-old Sally Braun never
gave him permission.
A bank employee called
authorities Monday after
noticing the woman's
account was drained and
signatures on checks
didn't match hers.
According to arrest
reports, Sally Braun said
her son left her in bed
and locked up her clothes,
forcing her to wear only a
diaper. She said she some-
times waited hours for


mm.


MOMOSTMOSTLYTLY PARTLY
SUNNY SUNNY i SUNNY CLOUDY


HI 85 L050 H84L054 HI 83W56 HI83L058


ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASCAR boss goes undercover
Steve Phelps, Chief Marketing Officer for NASCAR, smiles
while working with a pit crew during filming for CBS-TV's
'Undercover Boss' series, at Daytona International Speedway
in Daytona Beach. The show is to be aired Sunday.


meals.
Authorities said Daniel
Braun bought bicycles, a
moped and computer with
the money. He is charged
with exploitation of the
elderly and forgery.

Grenade boy's mom
gets probation
BARTOW The moth-
er of a 9-year-old Lakeland
boy who was critically
injured when he deto-
nated a grenade inside his
home has been sentenced
to a year of probation.
Thirty-nine year-old
Anne Marie Weise was
sentenced Tuesday after
pleading no contest to


contributing to the delin-
quency or dependency of
a minor. She had faced a
felony neglect charge.
Her son was playing
with a grenade stuffed
with firecracker powder
at his home in February
when it exploded. The
explosion ripped through
the roof of his mouth,
knocked out teeth and
blew off most of his nose.
He also lost two fingers.
The boy told authorities
he and his dad tried to
light the grenade in July
2009, but it was a dud so
they forgot about it.
His father also faces
charges.


.SI FO R C r IMfors Ot
IP sa'shg/Tusayngt' o


Tallahassee
S 84/49 ,,..
Pensacola 8 4 .
82/55 a8a16a City
81/60


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


City
Jad8m lle Cape Canaveral
,83/57 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
* aytpia Beach Fort Myers
8a 0 61 Gainesville
/151 Jacksonville
Oriando Cap Caeral ekeWe
86/61 81/65 Lake ity
S Miami
SNaples
West Paln Beach Ocala
85/70 Orlando
o FL Lauderdale Panama City
Wyers 87/70 Pensacola
/65 Naples Tallahassee
85/67 Maini Tampa
Key West 85/72 Valdosta
84 West W. Palm Beach
84/74


MOON
Moonrise today 5:54 p.m.
Moonset today 6:18 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 6:27 p.m.
Moonset tom. 7:13 a.m.

0310
Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.
22 30 6 13
Full Last New First


On this date in
1996, a power-
ful coastal storm
dumped over a
foot of rain over
Massachusetts,
New Hampshire,
and Maine, causing
a state of emergen-
cy to be declared.
Portland, Maine,
recorded 7.92
inches of rain in 24
hours.


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


5esta
83/50


Lake City.
85/50
* Gainesville
\,84/51
\ Oc

85/


Friday
82 66.s
82/63/s
85/73/s
86/66/s
83/54/s
81/61/s
84/73/s
84/54/s
85/73/s
87/66/s
84/56/s
84/63/s
81/62/s
82/59/s
84/52/s
85/65/s
83/53/s
84/71/s


FLM
86/


Saturday
81,67's
83/66/s
85/72ps
87/66/s
83/56/s
81/62/pc
85/73/s
83/56/s
85/75/s
87/71/s
84/57/s
84/65/s
80/66/s
82/62/pc
84/58/s
86/65/s
84/56/s
85/74/s


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:37 a.m.
6:53 p.m.
7:37 a.m.
6:52 p.m.


83
56
80
58
91 in 2006
38 in 1989

0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.73"
42.86"


I


Snimbsb iIn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

g!- -I
4?r.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weathercome


Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


7niursday p 1Prilnay







-*Fohan dtemapmi Fn . E.*-


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


[!i STBSBIpY


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SLAK3iE CRYALMANAC












Church to recognize local women trailblazers


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Local women in the
community will be recog-
nized for their efforts at
the inaugural Phenome-
nal Women's Program
"Celebrating Trailblazers
and Trendsetters Within
Our Community" 4 p.m.
Sunday at New Bethel


Missionary Baptist
Church.
The event is hosted by
Gold Standard Chapter No.
48 Order of the Eastern
Star and will honor six
trailblazers and 17 trend-
setters in the community,
said Marva Udell, event
coordinator. Honorees
include: Muriel Disbrow,
the first woman firefighter;


Alyce Ceasar, funeral home
director; Cleopatra Steele,
founder of a homeless shel-
ter and soup kitchen; and
judge Leandra Johnson.
"Trailblazers are the
women who paved the path
for the trendsetters," she
said. "Trendsetters are
those who are continuing
to open the road for our'
future."


The event speaker is
the Rev. Al Nelson, assis-
tant pastor at Shiloh
Missionary Baptist
Church, 505 NE MLK St
Men are always being
recognized for contribu-
tions in sports, politics
and community service,
Udell said.
"We thought it would
be good to let everyone


know we have some very
talented and wonderful
women in the communi-
ty," she said.
The chapter plans to
make the program an
annual event, Udell said.
"We'll make it bigger"
next year," she said. "This
is the first one we're
doing and we'll see how
it goes."


The program will hope-
fully encourage a younger
person, Udell said.
"I would encourage pe'o-
ple to come out to the pro-
gram," she said. "A lot of
people don't know women
who are doing things in
the community. They can
see what they're doing
and how women are mak-
ing an impact."


PRINCIPAL: Fight probed
Continued From Page 1A


comment. But Mike
Millikin, Columbia
Schools superintendent,
issued a statement
"There was an incident
at Challenge Learning
Center today (Wednesday)
and it involved a parent
and staff member," he
said. "There were no stu-
dents that were directly
involved, but we notified
law enforcement and they
came over and they're
conducting an investiga-
.tion."
Millikin said he was told *
the proper school protocol
was followed by school
employees.
"My initial informa-
tion is that our staff acted
appropriately to keep the
disturbance from spread-
ing and escalating on the
campus," he said.
Police reports and infor-
mation from school dis-
trict officials indicate both
Hayes and Hill suffered
minor injuries as a result


of the altercation.
"I didn't see anything
where anyone needed
to go to the hospital.
According to the officer,
there were no visible inju-
ries. on Hill," Blanchard
said. "The report said
photos were taken of the
injures on Hayes neck and
no injuries were visible on
Hill."
Millikin said Hill was
slightly injured in the
altercation.
The incident has
spurred some discussion
among school district offi-
cials about placing campus
security at local schools.
"We will be meeting with
our district school safety
team, as well as the individ-
ual district staff members
who have input as to what
we need to do, not only at
Challenge, but all of our
schools to make sure there
is adequate law enforce-
ment staffing at all of those
schools," Millikin said.


WEB: High-speed link
Continued From Page 1A


manager..
He said the possible
provision of the servic-
es is part of the federal
stimulus grant money of.
more than $30 million
the NFBA received in
February.
The funding is meant


to enable and enhance
broadband and high-
speed accessfor 14 North
Florida counties.
Services provided
through the tower will be
available to any county
resident within the ser-
vice area, Williams said.


COURTESY PHOTO
Fort White High School's Homecoming Court delivers a pose
Caleb Bundy (from left), Ayla Gonzalez, Lynce' Stalnaker, Danielle Leon, Brandon Sharpe, Chantel Soria, Tim Ledbetter,
Katleyn Albright, Da'Leecia Armstrong, Justin Kortessis, Catherine Trisch and Rebecca Staehnke are members of the Fort
White High School's Homecoming Court.


Fort White Indians plan 'uprising'


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@/lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE The
Fort White High and
Middle School Indians
have an "uprising" planned
to help kick off the school's
annual homecoming.
' Beginning today and
running through Friday,
the school will host various
homecoming festivities at
its Arrowhead Stadium for
the students and commu-
nity to partake in.


A mega-party pre-event
will begin at 2 p.m. and end
at 6 p.m., featuring games,
ride-size blow-up activities
and various campus club
booths offering carnival-
type food.
The Fourth Annual
Indian Uprising will start
at 7 p.m., a community pep
rally celebrating homecom-
ing, said Sheri Keen, activi-
ties director.
With the theme "Indians
Brew Jaguar Stew," the
Uprising will showcase all


middle school and high
school cheerleaders and
dance teams, the Warrior
Band, the chorus and the
football team. Each high
school grade will perform
a skit, which goes toward
the homecoming trophy
competition.
The high school
Homecoming Court will
be presented and the 2010
Homecoming King will'be
crowned.
The 2010 Prince and
Princess will also be


crowned from the mid-
dle school Homecoming
Court.
The Uprising will con-
clude around 9:30 p.m. with
a professional fireworks
display and bonfire.
On Friday night at 7:30
p.m., the Indians will face
the East Gadsden Jaguars
for the homecoming foot-
ball game. Homecoming
Queen- candidates will-be
recognized at the game's
halftime and a Queen will
be crowned.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Thursday, October 21, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


O
0 P


THEIR
INION


'Don't ask,

Don't tell'

should be

put to rest

U.S. District Judge
Virginia Phillips of
California didn't
mince words in
ordering a perma-
nent end to the military's "don't
ask, don't tell" ban on openly
gay men and women serving.
In her order Oct 12, Phillips
said the 1993 law "infringes on
the fundamental rights" of mili-
tary men and women, violates
their freedom of speech and
negates their right "to petition
the government for redress of
grievances" in order to keep
their jobs.
She's right. "Don't ask, don't
tell" put gay members of the
military in an impossible posi-
tion, allowing them to serve
only if they lied about who they
are or if no one else found out
and made a complaint More
than 13,500 service members
have been discharged under
the policy.
The Obama administration
has said it plans to appeal
Phillips' order. The administra-
tion should decline an appeal
and let this flawed policy die.
At the same time, the president
should speed up efforts to pass
a repeal of the law in Congress,
so the issue is put to rest once
and for all.
The fundamental flaw of
"don't ask, 'don't tell" is that it
forces gay men and women in
the military to give up their
rights in order to defend ours.
That's wrong and it should
end now.
* Times-Picayune

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Thursday, Oct. 21,
the 294th day of 2010. There
are 71 days left in the year.
On Oct. 21, 1805, a British
fleet commanded by Adm.
Horatio Nelson defeated a
French-Spanish fleet in the
Battle of Trafalgar; Nelson,
however, was killed.
In 1879, Thomas Edison
perfected a workable electric
light at his laboratory in Menlo
Park, N.J.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -'Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Tod'd Wilson, publisher
Sup Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Get out of Afghanistan now


WASHINGTON
How does one negoti-
ate with zealots,
especially the
religious variety?
Better yet, how
does one delude oneself that
sharing control of anything,
particularly a government, with
them is anything but a recipe
for disaster? Entrenched ideol-
ogy rarely yields to reason.
Still, that seems to be
where President Obama and
his administration along with
the current Afghan regime of
Hamid Karzai seem headed in
opening the door for talks with
the Taliban.
How extraordinary! At the
same time U.S and Afghan
troops are attempting to over-
come gains by this force of
fanatics whose ideological roots
are firmly planted in the 11th
century, Karzai, apparently with
White House blessing, is ready
to do business with them.
Perhaps those of us who are
unsophisticated in the finer
points of foreign affairs just
don't understand, but it seems
to some that fruitful conver-
sations with the Taliban are
impossible, that trusting any-
thing they say would be an invi-
tation to self destruction.
In fact, any talks aimed at a
coalition government are con-
trary to the purpose that the
U.S. presumably got involved
in this historic nightmare of a
country in the first place. Isn't
it because the Taliban threaten
our national security with its ter-
rorist alignments?
The amount of time it would
take this insidious movement
to reestablish its repressive
agenda over the entire nation
after "good faith" negotiations
would be about as long as it
would take Karzai to hustle onto
a plane and head west, follow-


Dan K.Thomasson

ing his U.S. backers and leaving
the country's women to suffer
indescribable indignities under
a regressive regime that consid-
ers them little better, than chat-
tel. That's the way if was before
9/11 and there is nothing to
convince any sensible person
that it would be any different.
Better it would seem that
Obama end this conflict at mid-
night next week and instantly
begin removing Americans from
harm's way. He already has
undercut his "surge" aimed at
neutralizing Taliban effective-
ness by announcing he wanted
to get out by the summer of
2011. The decapitators and'
women stoners have little to
do but bide their time if they
are smart. So forget the decent
interval and get us out now.
There was a time immediately
after the terrorist attack on
America when U.S. forces had
the Taliban on the.run and a
reasonable chance of success in
eliminating much of their force
and capturing or killing Osama
bin Laden.
But then George W. Bush
made the foolish decision to
invade Iraq and U.S. military
focus and resources were
diverted. We just blew it. Then
came Gen. Stanley McChrystal
who was right in what was
needed but was undiplomatic
in how he expressed it and the
president was forced to end
both the general's assignment
as Afghanistan's top U.S. mili-
tary manager and his career.


But that was then and this ,
is now with things seemingly
deteriorating rapidly despite the
surge and Karzai desperately
reaching out to his enemies
with at least some support from
the White House.
The reason for us being there
was to eliminate a source of ter-
rorism. The haven they offered
bin Laden and his al Qaeda lieu-
tenants was justification enough
for venturing into this swamp.
But terrorists have found
"caves" throughout the world
from which to operate.
And what about Pakistan,
which has its own problems?
This unstable, nuclear-armed
"ally" would in some areas
be left completely vulnerable
should the Taliban somehow
affect a shared status with the
current Afghan government
The Taliban already controls
some parts of Pakistan's border
with Afghanistan.
These talks offer another
problem. The U.S. has increas-
ingly depended on Afghan war-
lords and strongmen to keep
the Taliban from gaining con-
trol. Where would they be left?
All the questions seem aca-
demic given the fact that they
will be answered in time wheth-
er we talk with the Taliban or
not.
The inevitability of the
destruction of any sort of
democracy in this historically
tribal country is not in dispute.
It is merely a matter of when.
But to carry on talks or even
make overtures for negotia-
tions while American men and
women are actively engaged, it
seems to me, would trample on
a lot of graves and create more.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION

Let's slaughter Fed farm subsidies


American taxpayers
say they're sick of
federal bailouts, but
here we go again.
This year, the gov-
ernment expects to pay almost
$12 billion directly to one small
sector of the economy where
incomes have skyrocketed even
as the recession has hammered
so many others.
Wall Street bankers? Nope,
your friendly family farmers.
Seems like the government
can never do enough. Recently,
another gift arrived in the form
of new environmental rules
allowing the sale of motor fuel
with an increased percentage of
ethanol, which U.S. producers


brew from corn. It's a great way
to keep grain prices high and
they have just set a two-year
record.
Funny how you haven't heard
much about farm subsidies in
the run-up to the Nov. 2 elec-
tion. Farm lobbyists, and the
landowners who mainly benefit
from these programs, know
enough to lie low when the
money is pouring in.
And is it ever: The current
farm programs pay almost as
much in good times as in bad.
During August, federal analysts
forecast a 24 percent gain in
farm incomes this year, on top
of banner years in the recent
past. For every dollar of that


income $77 billion in all -
taxpayers contribute 16 cents.
After the election, lawmak-
ers need to approve a federal
budget.
The farm lobby is gearing
up to fend off the predictable
attacks on their little piece of it,
hoping at least to postpone the
day of reckoning until the cur-
rent farm bill expires at the end
of 2011.
The nation faces its third con-
secutive trillion-dollar federal
deficit this fiscal year.
Wasteful and trade-distorting
agricultural subsidies have to be
led to the slaughterhouse.

* Chicago Tribune


Sharon Randall
wwwshoronrandall.com


Roots


can still


flourish

As a mother, I made
mistakes, but few
that I regret as
much as failing to
take my children
more often to visit my family
and the place where I grew up.
Traveling 3,000 miles with
five people was costly. And
there was so little time for
school, work, sports, whatever.
But still, visiting my family in
the South was somehow never
the priority that it should've
been.
Maybe ifs a sign of age to
look back at life and wish we'd
done things differently. But
it's a sign of maturity to realize
that while we can't change the
past, we've still got a shot at
the present.
The older I get, the more I
want to stay connected to my
roots, to the people and the
land that sheltered me the first
20 years of my life. I want my
children (and their children)
also to feel connected to those
roots, to see them as their
own.
So recently, when I planned
a trip to the Carolinas, I was
thrilled that my daughter said
she'd come along for a few
days.
This was no small thing. As
a newlywed third-grade teach-
er with two dogs, she doesn't
have a lot of spare time. But
she has learned early on what
her mother took years to real-
ize: Roots need to be tended.
We flew in late Tuesday
and spent part of Wednesday
getting settled in a cottage on
Lake Lanier in Landrum, S.C.,
the town where I grew up.
Then for the next two days, I
watched her reconnect with
her big Southern family her
aunt, uncles, cousins and their
babes.
"Cree," she said to my neph-
ew's 10-year-old, "what will you
be for Halloween?"
Cree grinned up from a toy
frog he "was dismembering.
"My daddy'll paint my face
and I'll wear camouflage and
hide in the leaves and scare
people."
I wish you could have heard
her laughing at that. I wish
you could've seen her eating
collard greens and fried pork
chops and drinking sweet
iced tea. I wish you could've
watched her feeding the ducks
on the lake; snapping photos
for her students; asking ques-
tions on our lineage; basking
in the glow of a Carolina moon
and the love of a family that
adores her.
Saturday, I dropped her at
the airport and drove back to
the lake to spend my first night
alone here. Talk about quiet .
This evening the ducks
showed up looking for her. So
I took my last crust of bread
out to feed them. When the
bread was gone, they swam
away, leaving me alone on the
dock.
A dog barked in the dis-
tance. The lake looked like
an old mirror dark, milky
green, reflecting the reds and
yellows of the dogwoods and
hickories and maples sur-
rounding it
Long-neglected roots with
people and places can flourish
with a little care. We can't go
back to change the past But we


can try to make the best of the
present And maybe, if we're
lucky, it will make the best of us.
* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


4A










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION THURSDAY. OCTOBER 21. 2010


Students allege

police brutality

after NY shooting


JIM FITZGERALD
Associated Press

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y.
- Three college football
players who saw a teammate
get fatally shot by police out-
side a suburban bar were
brutalized by officers and
arrested when they tried to
help their mortally wound-
ed friend, their lawyer said
Wednesday.
One player knows CPR
and begged the police to
let him try to save Danroy
Henry, but instead "they
put a gun to his ribs and
they told him to back ... up
or he would be next," attor-
ney Bonita Zelman told The


Associated Press.
She said the other two
teammates were zapped with
stun guns when they tried to
intervene. They said Henry,
"was on the pavement, hand-
cuffed and dying, and no one
was helping him," she said.
Kieran 01'eary, a spokes-
man for the Westchester
County police, which made
the arrests, said the depart-
ment had received no formal
complaint regarding exces-
sive force.
Henry, 20, of Easton,
Mass., was killed early
Sunday by gunshots fired
through his windshield after
police were called to a distur-
bance that spilled out of a bar.


Oil siphon could be in use in weeks


HARRY R. WEBER
Associated Press

TAMPA The senior
manager of a project to build
a more efficient system to
contain oil in deep water
said Wednesday that once
built and tested, the cap-and-
siphon contraption could be
deployed and in use within
weeks of a future well blow-
out
Exxon Mobil's Lloyd
Guillory said he is confident
the never-before-attempted
effort will be successful. He
said the $1 billion system
that isn't expected to be
ready for use until early 2012
will be adaptable to different
blowout scenarios.
Guillory told The
Associated Press during a
break in a major oil spill
conference in Florida that


prevention is the real answer
for the industry. He said if
prevention is done right, the
system would never have to
be used.
The system will work,"
Guillory said. "It will be pur-
pose built and tested."
'Exxon Mobil Corp. is
leading a coalition of oil
companies building the one-
of-a-kind system designed to
contain an oil leak in up to
10,000 feet of water twice
the depth of the BP blowout
BP has joined the project
and agreed to submit the
equipment it used to eventu-
ally kill its runaway well.
Drawings of the proposed
system show .a cap and a
series of undersea devices
- including cables, a riser,
a manifold and a piece of
equipment that would pump
dispersant Lines would be


OBITUARIES


Edward Lincoln Burke
Dr. Edward Lincoln Burke, 95,
died on Tuesday, October 19,
2010 at his home after a brief ill-
ness. He was the
son of the late
Eugene and Cora
Lee Andrews -. $
Burke. A native
of Arizona, Dr. Burke has been
a resident of Columbia County
since 1965. Dr. Burke attained
his Bachelors Degree at the
University of Arizona then at-
tended Tulane University Medi-
cal School in New Orleans. He
served faithfully in the United
States Army during World War
II, and was the Chief of Surgery
at the V.A. Hospital in New Or-
leans, after which, he was Chief
of Staff for the Area Offices of
the V.A., (Southeastern Region)
in Atlanta, then Dr. Burke was
the Chief of Staff here at the V.A.
Medical Center in Lake City. Dr.
Burke was an avid reader and en-
joyed playing golf during his free
time. He is preceded in death by
his brother, his sister and his wife
of 66 years, Susan Mercer Burke.
Survivors include a very spe-
cial longtime friend, Gerthena
Pearce of Lake City, FL;. cous-
ins, Joe & Gracie Kleindienst of
Pine Grove, CA and Jerry & Jane
Kleindienst of Bakersfield, CA.
Funeral services for Dr. Edward
L. Burke will be conducted at
10:00 a.m. on Friday, Octo-
ber 22, 2010 in the chapel of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596 U.S.
Hwy 441 S., Lake City, FL
32025 with Dr. Bill Wood and
Rev. Lowell O'Steen officiating.
Interment will follow in Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens. In
lieu of flowers, the family asks
that donations be made in Dr.
Burke's memory to either the
Lake City/Columbia County Hu-
mane Society-Lake City Animal
Shelter 1392 NW Shelter Glen,
Lake City, FL 32055 or the Su-
wannee Valley Care Center (Ha-
ven Hospice) 6037 U.S. Hwy
90 West, Lake City, FL 32055.
Please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn. corn

Glenda Taylor Federico
Glenda Taylor Federico, from
White Springs, DOD: Octo-
ber 15, 2010 in Lake City, FL -

Karl A. Mack
Karl A. Mack, 46 of Marga-
retta, Florida departed this life
on Friday, October 15, 2010 in
Shands at the University of Flor-
Gainesville,
Florida. Karl
was born in
Miami, Florida
on September
23, 1964. He
attended the
local schools
of Baker County, graduat-
ing with the class of 1982. He
was a member of New Jerusa-
lem Church of God In Christ
where he served as a Deacon
for many years. He was em-
ployed by the Publix warehouse,
working until his health failed.
Survivors include: Wife, Re-
gina, children, Karlicia and Karl
II, Margaretta, FL; father, Rev-
erend Bernest Mack, Miami, FL;
god-daughter, Briya McGuire,
Lake City, FL.; sisters, Vickie
Paige (Leon), Jacksonville, FL.,
Alzonia Mack (Daniel), Marga-
retta, FL., mother-in-law, Wil-
lie Pearl Stoutamire (Sidney),
Margaretta, FL.; sisters-in-law,
Patricia Carter, Valdosta, GA,
Livia Ruise (Cornelius, Jr.),
Margaretta, FL., special mom,
Zelma Joseph, Miami, FL; spe-
cial uncle, Elder Japan Ruise, Sr.
(Edith), Margaretta, FL; special
niece, Socariya Jones, Marga-
retta, FL; special cousin, Henry
Crosby (Mary), Macclenny, FL;
special friends, Stacy Davis,
Margaretta, Fl; Raymond Hen-
derson, Jacksonville, FL; a host
of other relatives and friends.
A celebration of his life will
be held Saturday, October 23,
2010 at 1:00 P.M. at New Je-
rusalem Church of God In
Christ, Margaretta, Florida.
Elder Japan Ruise, Pastor. In-
terment will follow at Quit-
man Cemetery, Sanderson, FL.


The family will receive friends
Friday, October 22, 2010 from
5:00 7:00 P.M. at New Jerusa-
lem C.O.G.I.C., Margaretta, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
"The Caring Professionals"

Frank Salvagno
Frank Salvagno, 85, ofLake City,
FL, died on Tuesday, October 19,
2010, at Suwannee Valley Haven
Hospice in Lake
City after a brief
illness. He was
born in New .
York, New York
and was the son
of the late Joe & Theresa Marie
Santore Salvagno. Before com-
ing to live in Lake City in 1990, he
had served in the Navy in WWII
at Normandy on D Day and had
worked in the dairy industry in
New York. He enjoyed putting
jigsaw puzzles together, watch-
ing old movies, feeding' wildlife
and cooking. He was preceded
in death by his beloved wife of
fifty-five years Evelyn Salvagno
in 2001 and a son Jesse Kelly.
Survivors include one son:
John F. Salvagno (Vonda),
Buena Park, CA; one brother:
Danny Salvagno, NC; and one
sister: Irene Salvagno, NY;
and one grandson: John Glenn
Osburn, Buena Park, CA.
Graveside funeral services
will be held Friday, Octo-


ber 22, 2010 at 1:00 P.M.
In the Forest Lawn Memo-
rial Gardens Cemetery with
Father Rob Trujillo officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be held one hour prior to service
time at Gateway-Forest Lawn
Funeral Home Arrangements
are under the direction of the
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South
Hwy 441, Lake City. 386-752-
1954 Please sign the guest book
at www.gatewayforestlawn.comr

Wilbur Stewart
Wilbur Stewart, native of Baker
County, departed this life, Sun-
day, October 17, 2010 at North-
east Florida
Community
Hospice, Jack-
sonville ,
Florida. Wil-
bur was born
May 18, 1943
in Sander-
son, Florida I -.q
to Ms. Pearl Stewart. He was
educated in the public schools
of Baker County. He attended
Kingdom Christian Fellow-
ship International. Wilbur was
employed by Northeast Florida
State Hospital and ,at Ray's
Nursery for many years. He is
preceded in death by his moth-
er, Pearl Paige; daughter, Vicki
Givens; sisters, Cynthia Harris,
Totsie Copeland (Nathaniel).
He leaves to cherish his memo-


'f onor



V ~Our



zieroes,
The men and women of our, military have always been
there to answer the call of duty. From the time this Great
Country was founded, our military has had the self
sacrificing task of protecting our Great Nation.

That's why we're proud to offer this chance to show
your appreciation to the men and women in service.
Simply fill out the form and send it with $40.00 &
Photo if applicable to the address below to be included
in our military tribute page, appearing on 11/11/10.
It's the perfect way to give our soldiers of the past and
present the recognition they deserve.


r-.
!M


I- --


Your Name:
Address:
Town:_
Dayt)ime Phone:
Servicemember's Name:
Branch of Service:


State: Zip:


Dotes Served:


Bnng tis in or Send o. Lke City Reporter, IW E D l lake ON. F32055. '55-5O fo more o
Submissions musi be received 3:30 p.m.. Monday, \o>. 8,2010. All photos sill be returned by indcding w th your entry.


ries: son-in-law, Ronnie Giv-
ens; grandchildren, Zachary
and Alexis Givens, Macclenny,
FL; sister, Rita Givens, broth-
ers, Henry Paige (May), Ver-
non Paige (Wanda), both of
Sanderson, FL, Morris Paige,
(Ola), Raiford, FL, FRoosevelt
Paige (Nita), Lake City, FL.
Funeral services will be held
Friday at 6:00 P.M. October 22,
2010 at Combs Funeral Home
Chapel. Elder Joe Nathan Ruise
andRev. Henry Ortiz, officiating.
Interment will follow Sat-
urday, October 23, 2010 at
11:00A.M. at Quitman Cem-
etery, Sanderson, Florida.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
"The Caring Professionals"


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


hooked up to vessels on the
surface.
The two-day Clean Gulf
conference at a convention
center in Tampa was billed
as a look at lessons learned
from the April 20 Deepwater
Horizon explosion and result-
ing oil spill, and an analysis
of solutions for the future. In
attendance were top officials
from every Gulf state, the
U.S. government, and the oil
and gas industry.
Some local officials and
seafood wholesalers in
Louisiana complained that
the industry-sponsored
conference was short on
concrete ways to handle
future disasters and long
on self-congratulation and
criticism of the media. Billy
Nungesser, the 'president
of oil-soaked Plaquemines
Parish, La., and a frequent
critic of BFPs and the gov-
ernment's response to the
Gulf of Mexico spill, said he
was leaving town before the
second day of sessions.
"I fear we won't see any-
thing changed," he told the
AP before he left.


Wednesday's opening ses-
sion began with the industry.
sponsors which included
BP and other major oil com-
panies presenting appre-
ciation plaques to several
Gulf states and the U.S. Coast
Guard. Hundreds of people
clapped.
A panelist from Texas then
thanked BP for stepping up
and doingagoodjobinthe Gulf
spill response. A Mississippi
official on the panel also con-
gratulated the Coast Guard
and urged people to visit his
state because, he asserted,
there was very little impact
there from the spill. A Coast
Guard official told those gath-
ered it is important to never
forget your successes.
The show director for the
event's organizer said in an
e-mail to the AP that it was
only natural for the event
to have focused on what
occurred in the past with
respect to the Deepwater
Horizon incident, but she
maintained there was appro-
priate emphasis on preven-
tion and preparedness for
the future.


EPIPHANY SCHOOL 8TH ANNUAL

'$ EXTRAVA&ANZA


3 CHANCES TO WIN!

FIRST PRIZE $10tO00! $
SECOND PRIZE $3,000! THIRD PRIZE $2,000!.
Grand prize drawing will be held Saturday. October 23rd, 2010 at a reception beginning at 4pm
in the Social Hall at Epiphany. Drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be served from 4-6:00pm.
All proceeds go to Epiphany Catholic School!

$100.00 Donation Do not have to be present to win

Thank you for your sup'pod! $
For more information please. stop by the school office at 1937 SW Epiphany Court or call 752-2320.


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'_ www.noblesgreenhouse.com 714,


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21. 2010


ON HEALTH


Feds: Limit potatoes offered to kids


Dr. Peter Gott
MD


Can stress

cause

diabetes?


GOTT: On
May 18, 2009,
I was injured
when a heavy
metal door was slammed
down on my head. Since
then, I have suffered from
severe neck pain and head-
aches that have caused
serious sleep disruption
and constant fatigue. All
of these symptoms are
unprecedented for me.
I have had physical
therapy, an epidural steroid
injection, numerous pre-
scriptions for pain, muscle
relaxers and have done
home exercises recom-
mended by my physical
therapist. All provided
only temporary relief, and
my doctor has said I'ye
reached my maximum
medical improvement
Actually, there has been no
improvement
Despite my best efforts,
I have had absences from
work in excess of my for-
mer employer's guidelines
and, after six years, was
terminated. This, of course,
has resulted in financial
problems.
After five to six weeks of
feeling lethargic, experienc-
ing extreme thirst, blurred
vision and weight loss, I
visited my doctor on Aug.
27, 2010, and was diag-
nosed with type 2 diabetes.
No one in my family has
ever had diabetes.
Could the physical dis-
tress and mental anguish
from my accident have con-
tributed to this condition?

DEAR READER: If I
understand you correctly,
you were diagnosed with
diabetes 466 days after
your accident In the inter-
im, you obviously saw a
number of health care pro-
viders who failed to either
order lab work or zero in
on the diagnosis.
Glucose is the primary
source of energy in our
cells that make up muscles
and other tissues. As
food is digested, sugar is
absorbed into the blood-
-stream. With the aid of
insulin, cells are able to
absorb the sugar and con-
vert it to energy. When
type 2 diabetes occurs,
cells become resistant
to the insulin and/or the
pancreas is unable to pro-
duce adequate amounts of
insulin. As a result, sugar
builds up in the blood-
stream..
Long-term complications
can include nerve dam-
age, pain, and tingling and
numbness that commonly
begin in the toes and fin-
gers and gradually spread
upward through the body
over a period of months or
years.
There is evidence that
stress can cause sugar
levels to elevate in known
diabetics. This still leaves
a big question unanswered
as to whether stress is a
trigger in a person with
no prior history. Perhaps
some light can be shed on
the matter if your physician
has lab results in your file
done prior to and follow-
ing the accident Request
a review of the results to
determine whether there
was a gradual increase in
readings that might not
have been identified prior.

Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," available at
most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently


published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, Nd Sugar Cookbook."


By SHANNON DININNY
Associated Press
GLEED, Wash.
P potato growers
are fighting
back against
efforts to ban
or limit pota-
toes in federal child nutri-


tion programs, arguing
the tuber is loaded with
potassium and vitamin C
and shouldn't be consid-
ered junk food.
One Washington man
is so exasperated by the
proposals that he's in the
midst of a 60-day, all pota-
to diet to demonstrate that
potatoes are nutritious.
"We're just really
concerned that this is
a misconception to the
public that potatoes aren't
healthy," said Chris Voigt,
head of the Washington
Potato Commission. "The
potato isn't the scourge of
the earth. It's nutrition."
Healthy food advocates
said they're not anti-pota-
to, but they think children
need a greater variety
of fruits, vegetables and
whole grains to fight a tri-
pling of child obesity rates
in the past 30 years.


In this Sept. 30 photo, school cook Mavis McDowell (left) serves up tater tots to second-
grader Madison Nunley at Naches Valley Primary School in Gleed, Wash. Potato growers
are worried that potatoes could be limited in the federal school lunch program.


"The potato is the
most common veg-
etable," said Diane Pratt-
Heavner, spokeswoman
for the School Nutrition
Association. "My impres-
sion is that the goal is
to increase the amounts
of fruits, vegetables and
whole grains. I don't
believe anyone is specifi-


cally attacking the potato."
With that in mind, the
Institute of Medicine, the
health arm of the National
Academy of Sciences, rec-
ommended that the U.S.
Department of Agriculture
stop participants of the
federal Women, Infants
and Children program,
known as WIC, from buy-.


Alarms raised over radiation

from thyroid cancer patients


By RICARDO A. ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Reports of thyroid cancer
patients setting off radia-
tion alarms and contami-
nating hotel rooms are
prompting the agency in
charge of nuclear safety to
consider tighter rules.
A congressional inves-
tigation made public.
Wednesday found that
patients sent home after
treatment with radioactive
iodine have contaminated
unsuspecting hotel guests
and set off alarms on pub-
lic transportation.
They've come into close
contact with vulnerable
people, including pregnant
women and children, and
trash from their homes
has triggered radiation
detectors at landfills.
The Nuclear Regulatory
Commission is consider-
ing new rules to address
the problem, in particular
curbs on sending patients
to hotels after treat-
ment, a spokesman said
Wednesday.
"The assumption was
that patients would be
going home," said David
McIntyre. "Now that we
see there are some who


ing potatoes with federal
dollars. The institute also
called for the USDA-
backed school lunch
program to limit use of
potatoes.
Under an interim rule,
the USDA agreed to bar
WIC participants from
buying potatoes with their
federal dollars. Potatoes


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"There is a strong likelihood that
members of the public have been
unwittingly exposed to radiation
from patients."


Rep. Edward Markey (D-Mass.)


are not, we are developing
new guidance." It's unclear
whether the radiation expo-
sure occurs at levels high
enough to cause harm.
The agency is also look-
ing to make sure that
risks of exposing pregnant
women and children are
more clearly communicat-
ed to patients, McIntyre'
said, after a commission
meeting on the issue.
Rep. Edward Markey
(D-Mass.) says the prob-
lem stems from a decision
years ago by the NRC to
ease requirements that
thyroid cancer patients
remain in the hospital a
few days after swallowing
doses of radioactive iodine
to shrink their tumors.
'There is a strong likeli-
hood that members of the
public have been unwit-
tingly exposed to radiation
from patients," Markey
wrote in a letter to the
NRC that details findings
by investigators on his


Research: Obesity care

costs twice of estimates


By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer

ATLANTA Nearly
17 percent of U.S. medi-
cal costs can be blamed on
obesity, according to new
research that suggests the
nation's weight problem
may be having close to
twice the impact on medi-
cal spending as previously
estimated.
One expert acknowl-
edged that past estimates
likely low-balled the costs
and said the new study -
which places obesity-relat-
ed medical costs at around


$168 billion probably is
closer to the truth.
"I think these are the
most recent and perhaps
statistically sound estimates
that have come out to date,"
said Kenneth Thorpe, a
health policy researcher at
Emory University.
The new research was
done by John Cawley of
Cornell University and
Chad Meyerhoefer of
Lehigh University. It was
released this week by
the National Bureau of
Economic Research, a non-
profit, nonpartisan research
organization.


fEYE CENTER odtNat id.r
SGeneral Eye Care & Surgery


staff. "This has occurred
because of weak NRC reg-
ulations, ineffective over-
sight of those who admin-
ister these medical treat-
ments, and the absence of
clear guidance to patients
and to physicians."
About 40,000 people
a year develop thyroid
cancer, which generally
responds well to treatment.
Certain types are treated
by swallowing radioactive
iodine, or iodine-131. It
concentrates in the thy-
roid, but small amounts
are excreted through
urine, saliva and sweat.
People given high doses
may be kept in the hospi-
tal, but many patients are
sent home with instruc-
tions on how to minimize
exposure to others over
the next few days.
, Most of the radiation
is gone in about a week,
says the National Cancer
Institute's website for
patients.


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are the only vegetable not
allowed. Next year, the
agency will roll out a final
rule on the WIC program,
which last year served 9.3
million children and preg-
nant and breast-feeding
women considered at risk
for malnutrition.
The WIC program
is a supplemental food
program, and the deter-
mination was made that
consumption of white
potatoes was already
adequate, said Christine
Stencel, spokeswoman for
the Institute of Medicine.
'"The recommendation
was made to encourage
consumption of other
fruits and vegetables,"
she said.
Jean Daniel, spokes-
woman for USDA's Food
and Nutrition Service,
said the WIC program
was updated for the first
time in 30 years after a
study showed more con-
sumption of leafy greens
and other veggies was
needed.
The USDA is expected
to release changes to
the federal school lunch
program by the end of
the year.










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirb/y okecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, October


21,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Kirkman

pitches

inALCS
Lake City native
delivers scoreless
innings for Texas.
From staff reports

Lake City's Michael
Kirkman saw his -first
postseason action as
a member of the Texas
Rangers in Game 5 of
the' American League
Championship Series on
Wednesday in New York.
New York stayed alive
in the best-of-seven series
with a 7-2 win, with Game
6 on Friday in Arlington,
Texas. Texas leads the
series, 3-2, after split-
ting the first two games
at home and winning
Monday and Tuesday at
Yankee Stadium.
Kirkman took over for
starter C.J. Wilson in the
sixth inning with Texas
trailing 6-1. He pitched
two scoreless innings, but
the Rangers did not rally.
Kirkman gave way to Alexi
Ogando, who pitched the
eighth inning.
Kirkman gave up one
hit, walked two and struck
out one.
New York jumped on
top with three runs in
the second inning. Jorge
Posada and Granderson
had run-scoring singles,
and another run scored
on an error by right field-
er Jeff Francoeur.
Nick Swisher and
Robinson had back-
to-back home runs in
the third inning and
Granderson added a solo
shot in the eighth.
Matt Trainor homered
in the fifth inning and had
an RBI-grounder in the
sixth.
CC Sabathia, who gave
up 11 hits and struck out
seven, got the win. Kerry
Wood pitched two innings
and Mariano Rivera closed
it out.
Texas' Colby Lewis
faces New York's Phil
Hughes on Friday.

GAMES

Today
Columbia High vol-
leyball vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Friday
N Fort White High
volleyball vs. Union
County High, 1:45 p.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Godby High,
7 p.m. (at Chiles High)
Fort White High
football vs. East Gadsden
High, 7:30 p.m.
Monday
Columbia High
swimming in District
2-2A meet at Cecil
Field Aquatic Center in
Jacksonville, 9 a.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
girls golf in Region 1-2A
tournament at The Golf
Club at Summerbrooke,
8 a.m.
Columbia High
boys golf in Region 1-2A
tournament at Panama
Country Club, 9 a.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Santa Fe
High, 5 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Middleburg
High in District 4-5A
tournament at Ridgeview
High, 7 p.m.
Wednesday
Columbia High,
Fort White High
bowling vs. Suwannee


High at Thunder Lanes in
Live Oak, 4 p.m.


Direct conflict


FortWhite hosts
East Gadsden in
district contest.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Football goals will be in
direct conflict on Friday
when Fort White High
hosts East Gadsden High.
Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
Fort White's goal is to
host a playoff game and that
will be helped along with a
win over East Gadsden in
the District 2-2B matchup.
The Indians are 4-2 overall
and 2-0 in district play.
East Gadsden (4-3,
1-1) is looking to make the
playoffs for the first time
and, with a loss to Taylor
County High on the books,
this would likely be a must-


win game.
It is homecoming for Fort
White and follows an open
date. Both have allowed the
Indians to focus.
"It was a great time for
us," Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson said.
"We needed the rest and to
regroup a little bit, from the
mental aspect as well as let-
ting the guys recoup."
Jackson gave the players
Friday and Monday off last
week.
'The way we practiced
on Monday, you could tell
they were a little more
refreshed," Jackson said.
"Their legs were up under
them a little better."
Fort White beat East
Gadsden, 19-12, on the road
last year in the first meeting
INDIANS continued on 2B


Finding a


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Josh Faulkner (27) chases down a runner from North Florida Christian School.


spark


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Nigel Atkinson (12) scrambles to find an open receiver at Tiger Stadium in Lake City.

Tigers look to rebound following bye week


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
Ifts been nearly a month
since the Columbia High-
football team has tasted a
victory and coming off the
bye, the Tigers look to right
the ship.
After scoring only six
points in the last two con-
test, the Tigers look to


shake things up on offense
to create a spark.
"We're giving more
reps to both quarterbacks
(Nigel Atkinson and Jayce
Barber)," Columbia coach
Craig Howard said. "Nigel
brings more speed at wide
receiver. He's a heck of an
athlete."
The two contrast in style
both at quarterback and


receiver, but Howard feels
that both bring positive
aspects to the Tiger lineup.
"We'll use both at QB,
and we might stick with
one if they get a hot hand,"
Howard said. "Then again,
we might rotate by series or
rotate considerably. They're
both good athletes. Nigel's a
little bit faster, but Barber's
a rugged runner. There are


certain plays that both of
them are better at."
Atkinson has taken the
majority of the snaps this
season completing 74-of-
152 passes for 1007 yards
and only four interceptions.
Barber hasn't played at the
varsity level, but received
extra snaps in a junior varsi-
CHS continued on 2B


Golfers

advance

to region

Columbia girls
place second in
district tourney.
From staff reports

Columbia High's girls
golf team advanced to
region with a second-
place finish in the District
2-2A tournament at
Panama Country Club' in
Lynn Haven on Monday.
Columbia's boys fin-
ished tied for fourth and
out of the team money at
Killearn Country Club in
Tallahassee, .but had two
individual qualifiers.
Chiles High won both
tournaments. For the
girls, Chiles shot 390 to
428 for the Lady Tigers.
Leon High was third with
446. The top three teams
advance to region.
Brittany Boris shot 87
to lead Columbia. Darian
Ste-Marie shot 100, with
Ashley Mixon at 119 and
Shelby Camp at 122.
For the boys, Chiles
shot 309, with Mosley
High at 313 and Leon
High at 317. Columbia
shot 330.
Dean Soucinek fired a
77 and tied for fifth to
advance as in the individ-
ual field. Nick Jones also
made the region field with
an 82. Bryce Hawthorne
shot 84, Michael Creech
shot 87 and Andrew
Johnson shot 90.
Region for the girls
is at the Golf Club
at Summerbrooke in
Tallahassee. The boys
play at Panama Country
Club.
Both tournaments
begin at 8 a.m. local time
on Tuesday.


Freshman team makes easy work of Eastside


Defense sparks Tigers
to 21-6 victory in final
game of their season.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia High's freshman team
used its defense on the way to a
21-6 victory against Eastside
High. at Tiger Stadium on
Wednesday.
After a scoreless first quarter,
the Tigers defense turned it up to
help the offense get going.
Akeem Jones recovered a
fumble and returned it for a touch-
down at 9:38 remaining in the sec-
ond quarter.
A block in the back would negate


the touchdown, however, and the
game remained in a scoreless
tie.
Jarrod Harris put the Tigers in
great field position later in the quar-
ter with a sack on fourth down to
give Columbia the ball in Eastside
territory.
The offense capitalized with aJ.T.
Bradley pass to Andre Williamson
with 36 seconds remaining in the
first half for the first score of the
game.
Bandon Roberts added the extra
point.
Columbia had a bit of fortune
turn its way with just four seconds
remaining in the half.
Eastside elected to call a time-
out, and the Tigers' defense took
advantage.


Monte Tisdale intercepted a pass
at the Columbia 40-yard line and
made a cut back across the field
before finding his way into the end
zone for a 14-0 halftime lead.
The Rams tried to get tricky
to start the second half, but
Columbia's Carlos Vega was aware
enough to recover an onside-kick
attempt.
The Tigers wouldn't take advan-
tage of the field position, but
another special teams play would
set Columbia up for its final
score.
Following a three-and-out from
Eastside, Jeremy Bradley came
through untouched on the punt
attempt for a block.
Tyrone Sands fell on the ball
at the Rams' 34-yard line, and


Columbia was in business with
5:30 remaining in the third
quarter.
This time it only took a couple
of plays for the Tigers to find their
way into the end zone.
Davin Pierce's rushed to the end
zone on two runs to give the Tigers a
21-0 lead.
Columbia held the Rams score-
less through the rest of the third
quarter, but Eastside would find its
way into the end zone in the final
period.
A long run for the Rams' quar-
terback helped Eastside get a first
down inside the Columbia 10-yard
line. On third-and-goal the Rams'
quarterback found a tight end in
the back of the end zone for the
final margin of 21-6.












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Korean Grand Prix, at Yeongam. South
Korea
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN UCLA at Oregon
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour. Castello
Masters, first round, at Castellon, Spain
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville
Open, first round, at PonteVedra Beach
5 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Shriners Hospitals
for Children Open, first round, at Las
Vegas
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game 5, Philadelphia
at San Francisco
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT Preseason, Miami at Atlanta
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR.World Finals, second
round, at Las Vegas
SOCCER
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, New England at New
York

BASEBALL

AL Championship Series

NewYork vs.Texas
NewYork 6,Texas 5
Texas 7, New York 2
Texas 8, New York 0
Tuesday
Texas 10, NewYork 3
Wednesday
NewYork 7,Texas 2,Texas leads series
3-2
Friday
New York (Hughes 18-8) at Texas
(Lewis 12-13), 8:07 p.m.

NL Championship Series

San Francisco vs. Philadelphia
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3
Philadelphia 6, San Francisco I
Tuesday
San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 0
Wednesday
Philadelphia at San Francisco (n)
Today
Philadelphia at San Francisco,
7:57 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m.
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Tinnessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.


INDIANS

Continued From Page 1B

of the teams. It flooded in
the first half. The rain was
so bad the only marching
the Fort White band did
was back to the bus.
It was a breakout game for
Alexis Blake, who rushed
for 125 yards and two
touchdowns. Alex Gilmer
andRoyBlakehookedupfora
60-yard touchdown catch-
and-run for the Indians'
other score.
Jamal Williams had
two interceptions for the
Jaguars and returned
one 80 yards for a touch-
down. East Gadsden had a
touchdown pass with less
than a minute left in the
game.
Jarrell Reynolds rushed
for 65 yards and is back
with the Jaguars. He had
a 27-yard touchdown catch
in .the 57-17 loss at Taylor
County.
Daryl Smith had a
78-yard touchdown run in
the 13-8 win over Florida
High.
Quarterback Austin
Parker was 17 of 28 for 205
yards against Florida High,
and 15 of 36 for 213 yards
and two touchdowns against
Taylor County.
OJ Brian Johnson had
10 catches for 195 yards
against the Bulldogs and
Chris Daniels had a touch-
down catch.
"They have enough talent
where, if you don't play well,
they can hurt you," Jackson
said. 'They run 4-5 wide
and they air it out Their
quarterback does a good
job in the passing game and
they have a couple of receiv-
ers who can go get it"


Oakland at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

College games
Today
Lambtth (2-4) at Tenn.-Martin (3-4),
7 p.m.
Ark-Pine Bluff (3-3) at Alcorn St.
(3-3), 7:30 p.m.
UCLA (3-3) at Oregon (6-0), 9 p.m.
Friday
Cent Connecticut St (4-2) at Albany,
N.Y. (3-3), 7 p.m.
South Florida (3-3) at Cincinnati
(3-3), 8 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

NATIONWIDE TOUR
Jacksonville Open
Site: PonteVedra Beach
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: TPC Sawgrass, Dye's Valley
Course (6,864 yards, par 70).
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108.000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
2-4:30 p.m.; Friday, 2:30-4:30 a.m.,
2-4:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 2-4 a.m.,
2-4:30 p.m.; Monday, 2-4 a.m.).

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Turns Fast Relief 500
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
11:30 a.m.-I p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,
3-4:30 p.m.; Saturday, practice (Speed,
10-11 a.m., ESPN2,6:30-7:30 p.m.);Sunday,
race, I p.m. (ESPN2, noon-I p.m., ESPN,
1-5 p.m.)
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles).
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
Next race: Amp Energy 500, Oct. 31,
Talladega Superspeedway;Talladega,Ala.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
5-Hour Energy 250
Site: Madison, III.
Schedule: Friday, practice (ESPN2,
4:30-6 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2,
10:30 am.-noon), race, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
3-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Gateway International Raceway
(oval, 1.25 miles).
Race distance: 250 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: O'Reilly Auto Parts
Challenge, Nov. 6,Texas Motor Speedway,
Fort Worth,Texas.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Kroger 200
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 1-2
p.m.), qualifying (Speed., 6-7 p.m.); Saturday,
race, I p.m. (Speed, 12:30-3:30 p.m.).
Trackl Martinsville Speedway.
Race distance: 105.2 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Mountain Dew 250, Oct.
30, Talladega Superspeedway, Talladega,
Ala.
FORMULA ONE
Korean Grand Prix
Site:Yeongam, South Korea.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
I-2:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 1-2:30 a.m.); Sunday. race, 2 a.m.
(Speed, 1:30-4 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).


Continued From Page 1i

ty game during the Tigers'
bye week.
Helping out the passing
game will be the return of
Barnabus Madison to full
health.
"Barnabus has really
only played one game and
he rushed for 140 yards,"
Howard said. "He's been
mostly injured. It's going
to be nice to have two
running backs this week.
Next week, we'll bring up
Braxton Stockton, who has
been playing well for the
freshman team."
Howard isn't sure how
much senior defensive
tackle Timmy Jernigan
will be used at running
back.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
BUIME I


SIGAHR


z
GOYNEX



Print your answer here:

vetera,,,.' I Jumbles: DECRY


Track Korean International Circuit
(road course. 3.493 miles).
Race distance: 192.1 miles, 55 laps
Next race: Brazilian Grand Prix. Nov.
7, Interlagos, Sao Paulo. Brazil.
Online: http J/www.formui. Icom
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Next event: NHRA LasVegas Nationals.
Oct. 29-21. The Strip at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway, Las Vegas.
Online: http:/www.nhro.com

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Tuesday's Games
Cleveland II I. Philadelphia 95
Detroit 98,Washington 92
New York 117, New Jersey I l
Indiana 128, Minnesota 124, OT
Denver 130, Oklahoma City I 15
Utah 82, LA. Lakers 74
Phoenix 92, Golden State 87
Sacramento 96, L.A. Clippers 94
Wednesday's Games
New Orleans at Charlotte
Chicago at Toronto (n)
Dallas at Orlando (n)
New York at Philadelphia (n)
New Jersey at Boston (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Columbus,
Ohio, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Oklahoma City,
8 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10 p.m.
Golden State vs. LA. Lakers at San
Diego, Calif, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New York vs. Toronto at Montreal,
Quebec, 7 p.m.
Orlando vs. Miami at Tampa, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Golden State vs. LA. Lakers at Ontario,
Calif., 10 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Boston 3,Washington I
.Calgary I, Nashville 0, OT
Minnesota 6,Vancouver 2
Carolina 5, San Jose 2
Wednesday's Games
Buffalo at Atlanta (n)
Anaheim at Columbus (n)
Vancouver at Chicago (n)
Carolina at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Boston, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey it Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
NY. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m..
'Dallas at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Calgary at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota atVancouver, 10 p.m.


"He's hurt'his hand and
had it in a half cast in the
last game," Howard said.
"With his hand hurt, ifs
limited his ability. I wish
he was healthy .against
Ridgeview. It would have
been nice to give him the
ball."
Still, Howard expects
Madison to make a dra-
matic improvement to the
team's rushing team.
"He's averaging six
yards per carry," Howard
said. "He hasn't scored a
touchdown, but it gives us
more distribution. It can't
be just one guy."
The game will be played
at 7 p.m. at Chiles High in
Tallahassee.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


L WHAT MOM
GOT FROM
*ONe HUG.'
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
ROBOT SUNDAE VERIFY


I Answer: When the exhausted spy went to bed, he
was UNDER COVER


LOCAL RACING


COURTESY PHOTO
Kevin Underwood celebrates his first Box Stock Division feature win Saturday at North
Florida Speedway.


Underwood snags first win


From staff reports

North Florida Speedway
provided dirt racing fans
with intense racing action
on Saturday.
. Leading the program was
the Street Stock Division.
The two points leaders
fell victim to mechanical
problems early in the night
and the field was ripe for
opportunities. Ultimately,
it was Sammy Hatcher in
No. 1B, who out-raced his
competitors and captured
the checkered flag.
The open-wheel mon-
sters of the Modified Class
experienced a "lack of conti-
nuity" as competition made
way for multiple interac-
tions. Pile-ups brought out
the caution flag on more
than one occasion. In the
end, it was Jeff Mathews in
the No. 23 car out-driving


the field to Victory Lane.
After the aggressive
battle of the Modifieds,
the Box Stock Division
appeared almost docile.
The action heated up,
however, andafterthepoints
leader spun out, the battle
was between top-contender
Chuck Kuester and new-
comer Kevin Underwood.
The planets were aligned
in Underwood's favor, as
he faked to the left then.
passed high on the right
during the last lap to cross
the finish line for his first-
ever victory.
Last to take to the dirt
oval were the local boys
and track favorites the
Pure Stock Division. The
No. F16 of Jerry Fortner
dominated most of. the
race, with the battle for
second being the primary
focus. Then, unexpectedly,


Columbia Motorsports Park

Results of races on Oct. 16:
SPORTSMAN
1. 16 Patrick Mennenga, 2. 14 Oral Tanner, 3. 16
Brian Hull, 4. 76 Jim Higginbotham, 5. 06 Josh Wise,
6. 44 Charlie Seroki, 7. 1 Bobby Ford, 8. 07 Jeff Prescott,
DNS-11 Cody Clark;
PURE STOCK
1. 18 John Roling, 2. 22 Randy O'Neal, 3. 39 Tim
Alldredge, 4. 58 Larry Welter Jr., 5. 16 Mike Johnson,
6. 96 Don Cruce, 7. 5 Jason Floyd;
HORNETS
1. 69 Mark Copeland, 2. 2 Bert Daugherty, 3. 46 Kim


ACROSS


- and hiss
Cuff
Doting
Like
Methuselah
Bicycle part
PC owner
Synthetic
rubber
Roman
historian
Martial-arts
actor
Fracas
Makes a deci-
sion
HI or AK, once
Uniform color
Sappho's verse
Toon pooch
Extremely
urgent
Ore hauler
Family rooms
Road map info
Spacewalk, to
NASA


41 Resembling
43 Friar's home
45 Carpenter's
wedge
47 Morse clicks
49 It swims with
crocs
51 Rain cloud
55 Puffin cousins
56 Orchestral
piece
58 Gourmet
cheese
59 Prop for
Sherlock
60 Pharm.
watchdog
61 Marshal Wyatt

62 Is idle
63 Cat hair

DOWN

1 German city
2 Fridge stick
3 Scent
4 Banded
5 Actress Dianne


Fortner's engine imploded,
leaving the remaining field
in a frenzied scramble for
the finish.
The top points contend-
ers of Shane Taylor, Rick
Reed, David Hess and
Andy Olson traded posi-
tions repeatedly during the
remaining laps, with the
No. 82. of Taylor sliding
into the lead and winning
another trophy for his wall.
This Saturday, Top Gun
Sprints and Florida Mini-
Sprints arrive to wow the
crowds. Additionally, the
Pure Stocks and Limited
Mods will return, with a
special guest appearance of
the DAARA.
. Also scheduled is the
Kids Halloween Costume
contest, which will contrib-
ute to a scary and exciting
night of racing action at
North Florida Speedway.


Alldredge, 4. 71 Bill Bollier, 5. 60 Doyle O'Bryant, 6. 7 Tyler
Prescott, 7. 1 Robert O'Neail; .
V-8 BOMBERS
1. 85 Larry Welter Sr., 2. 16 Brian Hull, 3. 11 Todd Breer,
4. 2 James Cook, 5. 77 Dan Berkowitz, 6. 76 A.C. Morrow,
7. 28 Tony Deas;
E-MODS
.1. 51 Jason Garver, 2. 41 Adam Hitt, 3. 12 John Zedek,
4. 6 Mickey Wright, 5..01 J.F. McClellan, 6. 85 Wayne
Parker;
SGMP HOBBY STOCK
1. 74 Jay Middleton, 2. 33 Eric Law, 3. 31 Roy Crain,
4. 41 Adam Hitt, 5. 67 Russell Patterson, 6. 88 Ronnie
Cook.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


TAR RAXEAG G H
GENEK KILLDEER

SOD OEVA









BLUE I LE NOAH
EMIR VIC GALA
EASE YAK SLO1G


6 Comic-strip
prince
7 Swarm
8 Maximum extent
9 Basket-maker's
twig


Want more puzzles?,
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10 Firm refusal
11 Good for cacti
16 B.C. or Que.
20 Paris season
22 Did mail work
24 California fort
25 Remick or
Trevino
26 Motor lodge
28 Scottish river
31 Rub the wrong
way
33 CSA
defender
34 Blvd.
35 Might
37 Makes a mis-
take (2 wds.)
39 Lampoons
42 Bratty kid
44 Cellar, briefly
45 NFL coach
Don
46 Trail walker
48 All thumbs
50 Sorry!
52 Yellowish
shade
53 Lahore
language
54 Char a steak
55 Honest prez
57 Sundial
numeral


@ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


CHS* Game now at 7 p.m.





Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


10-21









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY OCTOBER 21, 2010 3B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


m- )- i
02010 John L Hart FLP JIOZl Di O by CteatotsSymJkale "a't wwv.JohnrHarlStudios.corn

FRANK & ERNEST

POLITICIANS TALKING IT'$ SORT OF NT6TAINING
AMOUTw HAT / IF YOU 1
THY'L Oo \D ISCONNECT |
IF THNY'g,- \ ll YOUR LO6I C
EL6CTD'---iNOWO I CIRS(UIT5 U
CAN YOU FIRST.
ARTCH B THIST'R O S


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY.


Measure of a man doesn't


always turn on height


DEAR ABBY: Regard-
ing the letter from "Lost in
the Land of Aloha" (Sept 1)
and whether short men are
considered less desirable
height- is relative. I am
5'3" and dated taller men,
usually 6 feet and over, be-
cause those were the guys
who just were around and
seemed to be attracted to
me.
Then I met my husband.
He's 5 feet 6 inches and ab-
solutely wonderful. Before
me, he dated much taller
women. He's kind, loving,
showers me with affection,
offers me understanding,
is a fantastic father and a
complete kid-magnet He
cooks, washes dishes, does
laundry, changes diapers,
and actually picks things up
off the floor instead of vacu-
uming around them. I am
the luckiest woman on this
planet, and I know it.
Never pass up a short
guy. They're not short -
they're fun-sized!- VERY,
VERY HAPPY WIFE IN
TEXAS
DEAR WIFE: I received
a tsunami of responses to
my question, "Does height
.really matter?" And it shows
there's no "shortage" of
support for men like "Kal'"
("Aloha's" friend) and your
honey of a husband. Read


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
on:
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I are both 5 feet
6 inches. In the past I was
concerned that we didn't
fit the stereotype of the
. man being taller than the
woman, but it has actually
worked out great We can
switch cars without hav-
ing to adjust the seats and
mirrors. Our lips line up ex-
actly when we kiss. I never
have to stand on my toes!
On our wedding day, I wore
gorgeous ballet flats. "Kal"
will eventually find a wom-
an who appreciates him for
the breadth of his heart and
not the length of his body.
- SEEING EYE TO EYE
IN ILLINOIS
DEAR ABBY: It's all a
matter of personal prefer-
ence. I need to think the
man I'm with will be able
to protect mne if need be. I
don't have that feeling with
a short guy. And it doesn't
matter how muscular he is
it's the height that counts
in my mind. LIKES


LOOKTNG UP AT THE
GUY
DEAR ABBY: You bet
a man being tall makes -
difference. I'm an average-
sized bachelor who works
around many attractive
women. I get plenty of flirt-
ing and interest, but every
time I meet one of my co-
workers' husb -,ds, he's a
tall athletic.stud. That's just
the way it goes. THE
SHORT OF IT IN LONG-
MONT, COLO.
DEAR ABBY: This may
seem shallow, but height
does matter to me. I'm a tall
woman, and when I date
men who are shorter than
I am, I feel even bigger.
It makes me uncomfort-
able, which does not make
for a good date. TALL
DRINK OF WATER IN
EUGENE, ORE.
DEAR ABBY: Aren't
you aware that the vast ma-
jority of females prefer taller
men? "Heightism" is a ram-
pant and virulent prejudice.
Even if a guy is an inch or
two taller than the woman,
he will be considered too
short if he isn't taller than
she is when she's wearing
heels.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Let go of rela-
tionships that are not a ben-
efit Moving on will allow
you to befriend someone
new with something to offer
or share with you. Express-
ing confidence will help you
get ahead. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Take heed of what's
being said and make sure
you do things by the book.
Stand tall and speak your
mind. Don't be afraid to put
pressure on someone you
don't feel is measuring up to
your standards. It's time to
move forward. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You may think oppor-
tunity is knocking but, at
the same time, you can ex-
pect a tailspin that will leave
you confused. Insincere
gestures of friendliness are
apparent. Don't offer pri-
vate information unless you
don't care if it is made pub-
lic. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): There is a time
and- place- for everything
and, although you will be
a little emotional, take, ad-
vantage of any possibility. A
romantic connection is evi-
dent and, whether it is with
someone you are already
involved with or someone
new, the forecast is superb.
**
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
EugeniaLast

22): Don't give in to some-
one who is bossy or stand-
ing in the way of your per-
sonal progress. Love issues
may surface dueto' jealousy
or possessiveness. It's time
to make a decision about
the future of a relationship.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Take the lead position
in whatever event, project or
activity you are participating
in and you will make new
friends and get credit for
your contribution. A change
in your current income is ap-
parent and is likely to come
to you as a surprise, gift or
bonus of some sort ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't underestimate
what a partner or competi-
tor will do in order to come
out on top. Protect your as-
sets as well as your well-be-
ing. Problems at home will
result in uncertainty and
confusion. Don't show your
true feelings. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take action,
make changes and concen-
trate on your goals. Take ad-
vantage of any opportunity
to network. Plan 'to spend
some quality time with
someone you love or whose
company you enjoy. There


is plenty you will discover.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Give some
thought to the people who
have supported you. You
may want to do something
nice to show your appre-
ciation. A surprise will help
to seal a deal. Don't give in
to someone who has dis-
appointed you in the past.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Use your will
power and you will accom-
plish all you set out to do.
Don't let someone burden
you with something that is
not your problem. Put any
emotional entanglement in
your life on the back burner.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't get mixed
up with the wrong crowd.
Get serious about some-
thing that can help you earn
more money or improve
your living arrangements.
Stick to the rules or you'll
pay the price. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Being passion-
ate about what you do or
how you handle a situation
will lead to financial free-
dom. Strive for perfection
and present the best pos-
sible product, suggestion
or service. Your enthusiasm
will inspire those around
.you. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals F
" RPGE A J B KL VH WJ Y H VHGBECUB K
EPGO G LHGY JKL KGLM DYJRCOD
R C T H RCEP GDH?" VYCDCEEH
V G Y L J E

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Fear is the only true enemy, born of ignorance and
the parent of anger and hate." Edward Albert


(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc.


10-21


CLASSIC PEANUTS


SO WHAT TIME 00 YOU THINK
VOUR CHEESECAKE WILL 5E
READY, BUMSTEAD?
YOU CAN
PRO5A.LY
DROP BY
7 O'CLOCK,
-A.








LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THuRSDAY OCTOBER 21. 2010


Race: Tums Fast Relief 500
Where:. Martinsville Speedway
When: Sunday, 1:00 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN
2009 winner Denny Hamlin.(right)


I 0M 'i1 -I
Race: 5-Hour Energy 250
Where: Gateway international Raceway
When: Saturday. 3:00 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN2
Inaugural Race


Race: Kroger 200
Where: Martinsville Speedway
When: October 23, 12:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2009 winner: Timothy Peters


Jamie McMurra', in.er o1 trie No 1 Chevrolet does
a turnout t3er wiring Sarurday's Bank of America
500 at Charlone Motor Speedway (NASCAR photo)


McMurray wins again, inspired by father and faith


Right in the middle of a Chase that ,
doesn't seem to be exciting fans as
much as the NASCAR powers that be
had hoped for, along comes a heart-warming
story involving a popular non-Chase driver.
Jamie McMurray, the odd man out at ,I
Roush Fenway RAihg'last year, sped away
from Chasers Kyle Busch and Jimmie i;i
Johnson Saturday night at Charlotte Motor
Speedway and grabbed his third Sprint Cup
victory of an improbable comeback season.
He's already won the sport's two biggest
races, the Daytona 500 and the Brickyard
400, plus a Nationwide Series race at
Atlanta Motor Speedway in Dale Earnhardt
Jr.'s car.
In Victory Lane, McMurray took time to
talk about what winning races means to
him these days, and to explain more about
why he was in tears and almost unable to
speak after winning the Daytona 500 back
in February.
But first he talked about how much it
meant for him that his dad Jim McMurray,
a regular fixture around the tracks who
somehow missed seeing his son take two
checkered flags this year, was finally able to
see his son take the checkered flag.
"It's very special," McMurray said. "My
dad and I are really good friends, and he is
certainly what got me involved in racing.
We still race go carts together, we fish
together, we do all kinds of stuff together;
and he is really one of my best friends. It's
important to have him here."
He also talked about being able to dedi-
cate his win to the family of Shane Hmiel,
gravely injured in a dirt-track race the week
before. Hmiel's father Steve, a longtime
NASCAR crew chief and team manager, is
one of the key players on McMurray's Chip
Ganassi-owned team.
"Shane Hmiel had a terrible racing acci-


dent, and our team is thinking about him,"
McMurray said. "We'd certainly like to dedi-
cate our win tonight to him and the whole
Hmiel family. I wish Steve could've been
here; he is a huge part of our success."
And then he talked about his emotions
back at Daytona in February.
"I don't think I ever really got to explain
that and why I cried and what was going on
there," he said. "I had a tough year last
year; I found out the power of prayer and
what that can do for you. When you get to*
Victory Lane and you get to experience this,
it just makes you a believer. And it's some-
thing that is obviously very important to me
and my family."
Later, in his post-race session with the'
media, McMurray, who is now married and'
expecting a child, expanded even more on
his faith and what it means to have prayers
answered. He also said that he considers it
selfish to pray for success on the race track
ahead of other things in life.
"Certainly it's not the first thing that I
pray about every day," he said. "But every-
one wants to be successful and you want to
do well in life, so when you feel like that's
been answered, it's emotional."
He said he was pondering those com-
ments as the laps wound down at Charlotte.
"I was like, 'If I win this race, Lord, if you
don't throw a caution ... and I win this race,
I'm going to explain to people my feelings
and why I felt that way,'" he said.
"And I think that's important.
"I watch other professional athletes -
whether it's bull riders or basketball players
or motorcycle riders you hear them get
out, and you hear them thank God and talk
about the power of prayer, and I just think
that that's important for people to under-
stand, and understand why my feelings
were the way they were."


Jamie McMurray after winning the Bank of America 500
at Charlotte Motor Speedway Oct 16. (NASCAR photo)


t


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~- Is in.


':


2010 CHASE CONTENDERS
Points standirtgs,r results from SaturdayW
Bank of America 500 at Charlotte Speedway
and commentary by. Rick Minter
1. Jimmie Johnson 5,843 (finished third)
He overcame an ill-handling car and an
early race spin to lead the race at one point
and pad his points lead heading into his best
track, Martinsville Speedway.
2. Denny Hamlin -41 (finished fourth)
His solid finish keeps him right in the title
hunt heading to Martinsville, where he.has
three wins in the past five races and no fifiish-
es worse than sixth since the spring of 2006.
3. Kevin Harvick -77 (finished eighth)
The points leader' for much of the 26-race
regular season had a strong run at one of his
worst tracks and remains within striking dis-
tance of the Chase points lead. "Hopefully
that is something we can build on going for-
ward."
4. Jeff Gordon -156 (finished 23rd)
After winning the pole and looking like a
winner in the early going, he had alternator
and battery problems, got caught speeding
on pit road and had a loose wheel. "We had
about everything go wrong that could go
wrong."
5. Kyle Busch -177 (finished second)
He led a race-high 217 laps, but had his
late-race lead erased by a caution flag for
debris'. "It's very, very disappointing. Had the
best car all night and gave it up."
6. Tony Stewart -177 (finished 21st)

getting into bis pits and was the last driver
errors." crew chief Darian Grubb said. "We
evidently just missed it on the setup ... We
just weren't fast enough on restarts or any-
thing."
7. Carl Edwards -200 (finished 12th.I
He wasn't nearly as fast as he felt he should
be. "Fundamentally there's something wrong
with the way we set our Fusion up for this place
It's frustrating because I know we can run bet-
ter than that."
8. Greg Biffle -225 (finished fifth)
As has been the case in recent weeks. he had
the fastest Ford and had to work it hard in the
end. "We made a pretty big change and had to
restart all the way at the back and got all the
way back into the top five."
9. Kurt Busch -237 (finished 30th)
He was trying to become the first driver ever
to wm the All-Star race and the two Cup races
at Charlotte in the same seasorr, but hit the
wall on the 25th lap and wound up two laps in
arrears.
10. Jeff Burton -239 (finished 20th)
After looking like a championship contender
early in the Chase he's struggled to post good
finishes in recent races.
11. Matt Kenseth -256 (finished sixth)
It took a late-race surge to finish as good as
he did. "We started the race incredibly far off
and had to make a lot of pit stops and adjust-
ments The guys did a really good job recover-
ing from where we were."
12. Clint Bowyer -300 (finished 17th)
Take away his 150-point penalty from New
Hampshire and he'd be fourth in the stand-
ings despite a mediocre run at Charlotte. "We
unloaded bad and just really never got it."


AO




NASCA SIDER'
AM
By: ..Newsp
RICK-MINTER Cbx aiDergW -41
w -I,.


F--


^- *tw -"",7.












Classified Department: 755-5440


Bm
SEi'LfLT



FINDI~IfJu


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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One Hem per ad additional
4 lines 6 days ne $1.10na
Rate applies to private IndivJduals selling



personal merchandise totalling .500 or less.



S Each item mute Include a pri ce.




One item per ad 61
4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.15








Rate applies to private Individuals selling
persona merchandise totalling $,000 or les.








Each hem m d a rice.




One item per ad IHO \
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 orless.
Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




|$10.80 e ach ad ditional line
ad for each Wednesday insertion.55
















You can call us iatndividuals selling755-5440,
a.m. to persona5:00 p.m.rchanse totalling 4,000 or ls.
Som Each p people prefmust include a price their





clasnes item ads in person, and some
14lines *asline $1.65
ad cate appgories willto rivate quvidre prepay-ling














Eas t Duval Street.u price.














You can also fax or e-mail your ad
This Is a non-refundable rate.





















copyLimited to service type advertis-r.

4 lines, one month....'92.00
Includes an additionalakecit$2.00 pre

















portercom





Ad is to Appear.. Call by: FaxEmil by:
Tuesday Mon., ...0aa. M n,9:00a.m0
ad for each Wednesday insertiona.m.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. F .
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Ourfir ce is located at 180
East Duval Street. y
You can also fax orrect e-mail your and
copy tothe Reporter ad space
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad istoAppear. Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mopply for .,10:00cancellat.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday WInquiries- Call 755-549:00a.m.
Friday T furs.,10:0her ia.nf. Thuormats.ion9:00 a.m.
Saturday it limits, 10:00your call wFri., 9:00be trans-m.
Sferreday to the n.,10:00a.ccounting dei.,900partm.
These deadlines arthe righsubject to changedithout notice.














or classify all advertisements under
apprors-iate ease rea. Copy should
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect first insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion andof billingadjustments. ordered












Cancellations- Normal advertisingmust comply
with Federal, State or cancellawstion.

regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nacredit limits, your call will be trans-d
publiferred accommodations. Standepart-d





abbreviation. Credit for putablshed errorsw-





abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.latkcityreporter.coni


Legal

LOW POWER PUBLIC NOTICE
W23AQ,. Lake City, FL
On September 14, 2010, Trinity
Christian Center of Santa Ana, Inc.
filed an assignment application with
the Federal Communications Com-
mission (FCC) seeking approval to
transfer the license for W23AQ,
Channel 23, Lake City, FL to Minor-
ity Media Telecommunications
Council, Inc.
W23AQ is authorized to broadcast at
38.6kw kilowatts from its transmitter
site located at 1.3 Km W Jet SR 252
and Birley Road in Lake City FL, at
geographical coordinates 30 degrees,
09 minutes, 52 seconds North Lati-
tude, 82 degrees, 44 minutes, 55 sec-
onds West Longitude.
Individuals who wish to advise the
FCC about any facts relevant to this
assignment application or the public
interest can contact the FCC at Fed-
eral Communications Commission,
Washington, DC 20554.

04541974
October 21, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000247CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
VS.
ALLEN L. PRIDGEN et. al.
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated September 30, 2010, and
entered in Case No. 10000247CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein SUN-
TRUST MORTGAGE, INC, is a
Plaintiff and ALLEN L. PRIDGEN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALLEN
L. PRIDGEN; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2
are the Defendants. P. DeWITT CA-
SON as The Clerk of the Circuit
Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at 173 NE HER-
NANDO AVENUE, COURT
ROOM 1, LAKE CITY, FL 32055,
at 3rd on November 2010 at 11:00
a.m., the following described proper-'
ty as set forth in said Fihal Judgment,
to wit:
EXHIBIT A
Section 10, Township 4 South Range
16 East:
Commence at the Northwest comer
of the NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said
Section; thence S 10 45' 54" E along
the West line of said NW 1'/4 of SW
1/4, a distance of 442.74 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence N 870 59'
09" E and parallel to the North line
of said NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, a distance
of 1026.23 feet to the West line of a
50.00 foot street, said street being
know as Asena Avenue; thence S 10
42' 30" E along said West street line
and parallel to the East line of said
NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, a distance of
442.72 feet; thence S 870 59 09" W
and parallel to said North line, 1025.
79 feet to the West line of the NW
1/4 of SW 1/4; thence N 10 45' 54"
W along said West line, 442.72 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The
above tract of land being Lots 7 and
8 of an unrecorded subdivision in the
NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section.
TOGETHER WITH A 2007 FLEET-
WOOD DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME, I.D. #GAFL634A/B80069-
SH21
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 1st day of October, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 1 day of October, 2010.
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329

04541921
October 14, 21, 2010






Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
****************************


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000401
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TINA M. BONDS A/K/A TINA
MARIE BONDS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: TINA M. BONDS, A/K/A TINA
MARIE BONDS
Last Known Address:
200 Northwest Michelle Place
Lake City, FL 32055
Current Address:Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address:Unknown
Current Address:Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SECTION 2,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 39 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 2,
617.23 FEET TO THE WESTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY OF U.S. NO. 41;
THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 33
MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY,
791.98 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 39 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 576.32 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 39 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 141.00 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 01
MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST,
309.54 FEET TO THE SOUTHER-
LY RIGHT OF WAY OF MICHEL-
LE STREET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 39 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY, 141.00 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 01
MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST,
309.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 28,
BLOCK B, NORTHWOOD
ACRES, AN UNRECORDED SUB-
DIVISION. ALL LYING AND BE-
ING IN COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH MOBILE
HOMES LOCATED THEREON AS
PERMANENT FIXTURES AND
APPURTENANCES THERETO,
DESCRIBED AS 2007 SCOTBILT
HOMES MODEL #3276114SPP
A/K/A 200 NORTHWEST MI-
CHELLE PLACE, LAKE CITY, FL
32055
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after
the first publication, if any, on Alber-
telli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa,
FL 33623, and file the original with
this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once a
week for two consecutive weeks in
the Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court on this 17th day of Sep-
tember, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Please send invoice and copy to:
Albertelli Law
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
- 10-34918
**See the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should call Jacquetta
Bradley, ADA Coordinator, Third
Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-
7428 within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing impaired call (800) 955-
8771; if your voice impaired, call
(800) 955-8770. To file response
please contact Columbia County
Clerk of Court, 173 NE. Hemando
Ave., Lake City, FL 32056-2069;
Fax: (386) 758-1337.

04541729
October 21, 28, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 10-164-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF JESSIE EARL
BOLER
a/k/a JESSE E. BOLER,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of JESSIE
EARL BOLER a/k/a JESSE E. BO-
LER, deceased, File No. 10-164-CP,
by the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 135 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055;
that the total cash value of the estate
is $0 and that the names and address-
es of those to whom it has been as-
signed by such order are:
NAME Donna M. Boler


ADDRESS: 4520 NW Noegel Rd,
Wellborn, FL 32094
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, on


Legal

whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of
the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is October 14, 2010
Attorney for person giving notice:
/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Boy, 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No 052454
Person giving notice:
/s/ Donna M. Boler
Donna M. Boler
4520 NW Noegel Rd
Wellborn, FL 32094

05524128
October 14, 21, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-111-CP
PROBATE DIVISION
In re the Estate of:
ROBERT FILER BURNS,
Decedent.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of
ROBERT FILER BURNS, deceased,
File Number 2010-111-CP, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against Decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, on whom a copy
of this Notice is served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF. 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is: October 14, 2010.
/s/; ROBERT T. MAGILL,
ESQUIRE
Florida Bar. No. 064371
Fishback, Dominick, Bennett, Step-
ter, Ardaman, Ahlers & Langley,
LLP
1947 Lee Road
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone No. (407) 425-2786
Facsimile No. (407). 425-2863
rmagill@fishbacklaw.com
Register Agent
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
/s/ STACY LANIER
Personal Representative
107 Anderson Place
Ocoee, Florida 34761

04541936
October 14,21, 2010
NOTICE OF SALE
Gateway Mini-Warehouses will offer
for sale the contents of the following
units which contain personal and/or
household goods:
Unit # Name:
#10 Jason R. Kimball
#12 Cynthia Bickel
#19 Audrey Miller
#23 Cynthia Bickel
#47 Rebecca Bassett
#58 Joy Tjemberg
#59 Fatimah Ruise
#66 Cathy Little
#73 Adrian Davis
#89 Miquelle Jones
#106 Unknown
#118 Patsy Swinson
#119 Hilda Reams McClellan
#121 Anniece White
#131 Chain Williams
#156 Glenda Milton Buckner
#163 Nancy McDaniel
#186 Nicholas Tonetti
#198 Elizabeth Wetherington
#200 Roger Cothran
#208 Ann Jones
#211 Ashlee Townsend
#275 Robert Thompson & Lori
Meads
#279 Gary Lee Lamb
#280 Tomeka Thompkins
#288 Mahaley Simmons
#300 Anna Henderson
#326 Leslie & Tyrone White
#377 Michelle Graves

The sale will be held on November
9, 2010 at 9:00 AM at:
Gateway Mini-Warehouses
4158 West US Highway 90
Lake City, Florida 32055
(some units located at NW Christian
Ct.)
The contents of the units may be
viewed at this time and bids submit-
ted. Upon notification of acceptance
of bid, payment must be made in
full, cash only, and the contents re-
moved. Sale is subject to cancella-
tion in the event of settlement be-
tween the owner and the obligated
party. Gateway Mini-Warehouses re-
serves the right to bid.
04541996


October 21, 28, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


020 Lost & Found

STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197


060 Services

Adult Family Home, seeking new
residents, 24 hr care, meals, phone,
transportation to Drs. Enjoy our
country living! 386-397-2920


00 Jb01
SOpportunities

04541945
Senior Teller Position
Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing, cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace

04541946
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA, SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056

05524275
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
For Our NEW Store on
Pinemount & Birley Rd
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colbum Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524276
Taco Bell and Krystal will be
having a Job Fair on Tuesday,
November 2nd from 9:00 am to
12:00 pm and 2:30 pm to 6:00
pm at the Lake City Florida
Taco Bell. Our company repre-
sents seven locations in North
Central Florida Area (Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Starke
and Chiefland) We are currently
hiring Shift Managers, Assistant
Managers and General Manag-
ers. All candidates must have a
minimum 2 years experience in
one of these positions to qualify
for the job. Pay scale is based on
experience and salaries range
from 20K to 45K annually.
Please bring your resume along
with previous employer contact
information. Background checks
will be conducted on all
managers before they are hired.

Exec.Dir.- nonprofit working with
people with disabilities. Manages
agency with $2M bgt./120 empL
Reports to 14 mbr.board. 3 yrs.
admin. exp incl. budgeting,
community relations, fundraising,
implementing policies/programs
required. BA degree preferred.
Email resume
prenew(5)lakecitv-carc.com.

PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.


This is an excellent opportunity to
learn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
email to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information.


100 Job
SOpportunities
Tow Truck Operator. Bryant's
Towing is now hiring Drivers!
Must have a clean MVR never
been charged with or convicted of
a felony. 6 day work week, night
& weekend hours required. Salary
386-752-7799
WELLBORN Horse Farm
needs someone to clean stalls, feed
and general care of horses.
AM & PM. (352)213-8270

10 Sales
Employment

05524246
Outside Sales Experience? You
have the sales skills maybe just
the wrong product? Would you
like to make $1000 $1500 a
week? If you are a people
person, we need to talk
904-472-3626

05524247
Promotions Rep
$500 is a bad day for our reps.
Are you an outgoing people
person? Would you like to
make $1000 a week?
Call 904-472-3626


20 Medical
S Employment

05524099
SLEEP center is hiring a sleep
technician trainee; requirements
include high school diploma and
at least 6 months of direct patient
care experience; 2-4 night shifts;
please e-mail resume to
viducanl065@yahoo.com

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494
P/T Exercise Tech, Fit For Life
Physical Therapy Clinic in Lake
City Open Tues & Thurs 8-5,
exp preferred.Apply at
application@fitforlifept.com or
call Roberta at 352-514-4565


190 Mortgage Money

FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com.

240 Schools &
240 Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cett/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

30 Livestock&
J33 Supplies

BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215 .

Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fumrn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE Refrigerator,
front milk door,
36x311/2, height 681/2,
6 yrs old $450, 386-752-1811


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or


386-292-2170

IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.




t I ,


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED


THURSDAY. OCTOBER 21. 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


420 Wanted to Buy
I BUY USED APPLIANCES
Working or not.
Don't scrap that machine.
Call 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

05524160
Estate Sale, Thurs-Sat 8-1
Toolsantiques, riding
lawn mower, household,
furniture, clothing, toys
715 Miracle Ct (off Pinemount)
386-752-6947

COMMUNITY YARD-SALE
Sat only, 7a-? Rolling Meadows
Subdivision, turn on Callahan Rd,
off Branford Hwy, (follow signs)
ESTATE SALE Sat Oct 23. 8-?
147 SW Petunia PI. in Azalea Park
off SR 47. Furniture, TVs, pic-
tures, kitchenware, books, misc.
Fri & Sat. 8-2. Christmas items
galore, beads, stuffed animals,
storage bins, craft supplies, kitchen
items, tent 698 SW CR 242.
Fri, Sat, 8a-2p,
287 SW Ridgeview Place
(Cypress Lakes)
off US 90 W
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat-Sun 8-12. 460 SW Beden-
baugh, off Tustenuggee. (1st house
on Rt w/red roof. LR/BR Fum.,
wall hangings, lamps, nick nacks,
& more. 1996 Red Cavalier Con-
vertable. Look for signs 344-2736

440 Miscellaneous
FIRM QUEEN Mattress, still in
plastic. Never been used!
$150
Call 386-288-8833
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231



Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

63n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2/1 S/W, fr6nt kitchen, CH/A
$375. mo. plus
$200. dep
386-752-2254
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2br/2ba MH on 2.5 ac located 10
min from Lake City, quite area.
Washer/Dryer, all appliances incl.
$600/mo. Amanda 386-365-6493.
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
$575 monthly,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $550
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
DWMH, Spacious 4/2, on 5
acres,just south of Lake City,clean.
quiet,,great location, storage shed,
$850 mo, 1st, last & $300 sec,
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
For Lease, 3br 2ba, DWMH on 10
ac., fenced, 3 mi S of Columbia
City (offhwy 47) $800 mo. plus
$500 security. 727-415-5071
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
2.5 acres in Olustee, close to


Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

7 0 Unfurnished Apt.
710) For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
2BR/IBA with carportn. screen
porch. Pnvacy Garden.
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. S425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in specials available.
1 & 2 bedroom units.
starting at $350 per month.
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
Reduced, spacious, 2/1, duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up,
CH/A, $625 plus dep & bckgmd
chk, 352-514-2332 /386-397-2108
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Until. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2I For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
V Home For Rent
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250-deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 non.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Furnished Farm House. 3/2,re-
modeled, wrap around porch, hors-
es welcome, on 160 ac, 5 miles to
1-75, 2 miles to 1-10, $1200 month
386-362-8708 or 386-3624114
In Country. 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45, 4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
Irg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft ofoffice space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & 1-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City. FL.
low down. easy qualifying. and
low monthly payments.
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race. color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof.
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
* 3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

82O Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2000 obo
386-965-2215
1994 FORD Ranger.
$1,500 obo
386-397-4912

951 Recreational
SVehicles
Carriage LS 36 ft, fifth wheel,
$26K obo, can see by appt. only
(will sell w/F350 package)
serious offers only 386-755-0653


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ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.




In Print,
Carriage LS
36' 3 slide fifth wheel. & Online
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only. One Low
$26,000 OBO O L
Can sell as apkg. wF-350 with Prce!
low miles, $47,000
386-755-0653


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A Awesome Deals At Prestige Homes"

Our lot models are priced to sell. It's a MUST SEE TO BELIEVE. Many of
our models are reduced as much as s6,000. Take our "Scott" model,
it's a nice 3BR/2BA with an office space. Spacious Kitchen, built in
entertainment center and large master bath.

Was W57,995

Now reduced to $53,995.
A savings of 4,000. Come See!


DON'T BE FOOLED BY FALSE PROMISES
All of our prices include: Delivery and Set-up,
New Air Conditioning, New Skirting, and New steps

PRESTIGE 3973 HWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY
HOME CENTERS 386-752-7751 or 1-800-355-9385


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