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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01430
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/20/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01430
System ID: UF00028308:01430
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Taken Down
Baker County spoils
Richardson homprnmi -
00o016 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


ale


Wednesday, October 20, 2010


Up and Down
Lady Tigers declawed
by Meadowbrook Academy.
Sports, I B





oorter


wwwCireporterom Vol. 136, No. 234 0 75 cents


Water resource center to locate in LC


$500K grant to
generate pipeline
of skilled workers.
From staff reports
Florida Gateway College
will offer a new well-
spring of training for the
state's water utility work-
ers and engineers thanks


to a $500,000 grant from
Workforce Florida, Inc.
The new Employ Florida
Banner Center for Water
Resources was announced
Tuesday afternoon dur-
ing the Florida Earth
Foundation'sWater Choices
Forum at the University of
Central Florida.
It will be the second
Banner Center to locate on


the Lake
City cam-
PE'pus. The
.E, mploy
SFlorida
S Banner
C Center
Hall for Global
Logistics,
also housed at Florida
Gateway College, opened
in 2007.


"Florida Gateway
College is proud to be
home to the Employ
Florida Banner Center for
Water Resources," said Dr.
Charles W. Hall,, president
of Florida Gateway College.
"We know the curricula and
training developed here
will significantly impact
the strength of Florida's
economy and quality of


life moving forward, and it
will bring important career
opportunities to so many
Floridians."
The Banner Center for
Water Resources will offer
training and develop new
curricula for entry-level
and experienced water sec-
tor workers, generating a
pipeline of skilled talent
to address current and


emerging workforce needs.
The center will serve as a
resource for all educational
institutions in the state.
Offerings will emphasize
center sustainability and
access, with online course
delivery that makes training
available statewide and
eventually nationally and
WATER continued on 3A


AMENDMENT






DISCUSSION


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Local resident Mary Lou Perkins asks for clarification during the 'Understanding the Amendments' meeting at Florida
Gateway College on Tuesday.

More than 100 attend Chamber's

forum on proposed amendments


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
ore than
100 people
attended
"Under-
standing
the Amendments," a
discussion of the bal-
lot initiatives to change
Florida's Constitution, at
Florida Gateway College
on Tuesday.
"It's an encouraging
Assign to see
this many.
people
care about
the future
of the.
state," said
FolsomDennille
Folsom Folsom,
Lake City- Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce executive


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Steve Smith, chairman of the Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce Business Enhancement Committee,
raises a point during the 'Understanding the Amendments'
meeting Tuesday.


director.
The event was hosted
by the Chamber and spon-
sored by Brannon, Brown,
Haley & Bullock, PA.


"We felt it was very
important for all citizens
to be educated on the
amendments to the consti-
tution," Folsom said. "It's


a very big deal."
Lindsay Carter-Tidwell,
an attorney at Brannon,
Brown, Haley & Bullock,
provided a brief overview
and pros and cons for
several amendments that
include:
Amendment 1, which
repeals public campaign
financing requirement.
Amendment 2, which
provides for additional
homestead ad valorem tax
credits for military mem-
bers deployed overseas.
BAmendment 5 and 6,
which sets the standards
for legislature to follow in
legislative and congres-
sional redistricting to be
drawn without favor to
a political party of racial
makeup, be compact and

AMENDMENT continued on 3A


Lake City man


claims portion


of lottery prize


Winner picks
lump-sum
payment of $769K
From staff reports
A Columbia County man
came forward earlier this
week to claim his portion of
winnings from a $2 million
lottery ticket.
Maderian Williams, 65,
of Lake City, was a winner
in the Florida Lottery Mega
Money game last week. The
drawing took place Friday
Oct. 8. The winning num-
bers were 1-22-29-39 and
the Mega Ball was 22.
According to Florida
Lottery officials, Williams
came in Monday to claim
his portions of the win-
nings. He chose the one-


time lump-sum payment
option in the amount of
$769,803.
"He was extremely private
and declined the opportu-
nity for a photo," said Shelly
Safford, Florida Lottery pub-
lic affairs specialist.
The winning Mega
Money ticket was sold as a
Quick Pick ticket and pur-
chased at Munchies Food
Store, 1889 E. Duval St.
The retailer received a
bonus incentive for selling
the jackpot-winning ticket.
Mega Money jackpots
start at $500,000 and can roll
to up to $2 million if there
isn't a jackpot winner. Once
the Mega Money jackpot
reaches $2 million, the top
prize pool rolls down and
increases the payouts on all
of the lower-tier prize levels.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School principal Bessie Whitfield (left)
and teacher Bernice Presley talk about the renovation project
Tuesday.


RMS auditorium

refurbished with

major upgrades


Project slated
for completion
in December.
By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter. comn
Dust is being raised in
Richardson Middle School's
auditorium to give the
venue a $75,000 to $90,000
refurbishment.
The project has been
under way for about one


week and is slated to be
finished by the first week of
December in time for holi-
day music concerts, said
Mike Millikin, superinten-
dent of schools, Tuesday.
Funds for the project will
come from the district's
regular maintenance allot-
ment, state dollars that
must be spent on facility
maintenance projects, said
Lex Carswell, assistant
RENOVATION continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


85
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


sv

ZK


O pinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 6A
Advice & Comics .........2D
Puzzles .... ........... 2B
Around Florida........... 2A


DAILY
BRIEFING
Tom Bosley of
'Happy Days' dies.


COMING
THURSDAY
Preview of Fort
White homecoming.


111111111









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


S3 'Tuesday:
Afternoon: 2-5-3
Evening: 6-8-6


t y Tuesday:
Afternoon: 8-0-8-3
Evening: 7-0-0-4


OpAsIP

Monday:
S 2-21-23-28-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Tom Bosley of'Happy Days' dies


LOS ANGELES
I t was a constant in American
television for more than a
decade: Viewers could turn
on their TVs and find Howard
Cunningham in his armchair,
reading the newspaper and provid-
ing a fatherly voice of reason to
young Richie Cunningham and his
friends on "Happy Days."
Tom Bosley made the role famous
during the long-running sitcom,
earning a place as one of the most
memorable fathers in TV history.
Bosley died Tuesday at the age
of 83 after suffering heart failure
at a hospital near his Palm Springs
home. Bosley's agent, Sheryl
Abrams, said he was also battling
lung cancer.
His death brought fond remem-
brances of the nostalgic ABC
show, which ran from 1974 to
1984. On Saturday, TV viewers lost
another surrogate parent, Barbara
Billingsley, who portrayed June
Cleaver in "Leave It To Beaver."
Both shows showcased life in the
1950s before Vietnam, Watergate
and other tumultuous events of the
'60s and '70s when life was sim-
pler.

Elton John says America
needs more compassion
NEW YORK Elton John says
he's heartbroken by a mean tone
that he says is enveloping America.
John spoke at his annual Elton
John AIDS Foundation benefit
Monday night and honored the
memory of AIDS activist Ryan
White, who died 20 years ago. The
teen contracted AIDS through a
blood transfusion and faced ostra-
cism and discrimination. White
worked to combat prejudice and
ignorance associated with the dis-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 27, 1960, file photo originally released by Graphic House, Inc., actor Tom
Bosley is shown in character for the Broadway musical, 'Fiorello!,' based on New
York mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia. Bosley, the patient, understanding father on
television's long-running 'Happy Days,' died of heart failure early Tuesday at a
hospital near his home in Palm Springs, Calif. He was 83.


ease until his death.
John and White became close
friends during White's crusade;
John said White is the reason why
he started his foundation, which has
doled out tens of millions of dollars
to AIDS-related causes.
However, the legendary singer
said some things have not changed
since White died in 1990.
"I'm saddened and disturbed to
realize we are still dealing with the
same problems," John said.

Adrien Brody sues over
release of thriller film
LOS ANGELES Adrien Brody
has sued the makers of a thriller


film for more than $2 million, claim-
ing he hasn't been fully paid for
the project and the movie is being
released in the United States with-
out his permission.
The Academy Award winning
actor sued the makers of "Giallo"
in federal court in Los Angeles on
Thursday, but an emergency peti-
tion to stop the film's DVD release
was denied.
Sales of the thriller set in Turin,
Italy, began on Tuesday. "Giallo"
was shot in 2008.
The judge ruled Brody can still
seek an injunction against the film's
sale, but must first notify the film-
makers.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor William Christopher
is 78.
* Japan's Empress Michiko
is 76.
* Singer Tom Petty is 60. E
Retired MLB All-Star Keith
Hernandez is 57.
* Movie director Danny
Boyle ("Slumdog Millionaire")
is 54.
* Labor Secretary Hilda
Solis is 53.
* Actor Viggo Mortensen is


52.
* Rock musician Jim
Sonefeld (Hootie &.The
Blowfish) is 46.
* Rock musician David Ryan
is 46.
* Rock musician Doug,
Eldridge (Oleander) is' 43.
* Political commentator and
blogger Michelle Malkin is 40.
* Rapper Snoop Dogg is 39.
* Singer Dannii Minogue is
39.


Lake City.
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, RFla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ....-.754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............... $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ............... $41.40
24 Weeks....................$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CLARIFICATION

Dr. Richard Cole is an independent optometrist with
Eyeglass Express in Lake City. He was correctly identified in
a Sept. 8 edition of the Lake City Reporter.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Fight with greeter
leads to probation.
PALM BAY A Palm
Bay man has been sen-
tenced to one year proba-
tion for hitting a' Walmart
greeter last year.
Skyler Lowery pleaded
no contest this week to
battery.
Authorities say Lowery
was leaving the store after
making a purchase in
December 2009 when an,
alarm went off.'A 69-year-
old employee followed
the 24-year-old outside,
wrote down the license
plate number on Lowery's
car and went back inside
the store. Security video
shows Lowery going back
to the store, trying to take
the greeter's clipboard and
punching him in the head.
Lowery later claimed the
attack was self-defense and
that the greeter had used
offensive language to him.

Fla. foreclosure
records sought
MIAMI The
American Civil Liberties
Union is seeking public
records on Florida foreclo-
sures to determine if hom-
eowners' rights are being
violated or if they've been
illegally evicted.
The ACLU filed public
records requests with the
state court administrator
and the chief judges of
Florida's 20 judicial cir-
cuits Tuesday.
ACLU lawyer Larry
Schwartztol said the
records are being sought
to see if thestate's recently
created special foreclosure
courts are taking shortcuts
that may be violating due
process rights.

GOP will pick
senate nominee
TALLAHASSEE A
circuit court judge ruled


. PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 85 LO 56


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rehabilitated hawk released
In this photo provided by Florida Power & Light, Dan Martinelli,
executive director of the Treasure Coast Wildlife Center, releases
a rehabilitated red-shouldered hawk into the wild at the re-opening
celebration of Florida Power & Light Company's Barley Barber
Swamp nature preserve in Indiantown on Monday.


that she cannot put a can-
didate on the November
ballot after removing
another candidate for vio-
.lating Florida's financial
disclosure laws.
Judge Jackie Fulford
ruled Tuesday that she
can't put Kevin Ambler on
the ballot
Ambler, who lost to
Norman in the Aug. 24
GOP primary, sued to kick
Norman's name off the
ballot
Fulford said there
is a rule requiring the
Pasco and Hillsborough
Republican executive com-
mittees to name a replace-
ment nominee.

Cannon demands
health-care data
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's incoming House
speaker complained about
"lack of state executive
leadership" Tuesday as
he demanded that state
agencies better inform
lawmakers on their steps
to implement President
Barack Obama's health
care overhaul.
In a letter to Gov.
Charlie Crist, Cabinet


members and state agen-
cies, Dean Cannon asked
for a complete accounting of
activities related to the new
federal law. He sought infor-
mation on how those efforts
benefit Florida, which state
workers are involved and
the amount of time and
money they are spending
on implementation.

Rodale agrees
to pay $1.3M
TALLAHASSEE
- Rodale Inc. will refund
some Florida customers
and pay up to $1.3 million
to the state in an agree-
ment over whether cus-
tomers were charged for
books and magazines they
never ordered.
The agreement between
the Emmaus, Pa., com-
pany and Florida Attorney
General Bill McCollum's
office solved issues related
to the company's trial
offers, subscription renew-
als and automatic ship-
ments.
The settlement requires
the company to pay up to
$1.3 million for attorneys'
fees and expenses.
* Associated Press


Pensacola
85/60


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


STLi MY l MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY


Hi183L054 HI 83 LO 56
--_T


Gainesville Da
Panama City ,83/57
83/61 Ocala
'3/56
Orand
85/6


Cisnty
5/on8e Cape Canaveral
5/58 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
t BeUah Fort Myers
83'61 Gainesville
Jacksonville
do Cap Canaveral Key West
61 82/61 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
85/66 *0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
85/69 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee


Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. .v" Forecasts, data and graph-
22 30 6 13 rs Ics 2010 Weather Central
Full Last New First LLC, Madison, WIs.
4 -i L www.weatherpubllsher.con


Ge Ionnectel


Daily ScriDture


"Delight yourself in the LORD
and he will give you the desires
of your heart."
Psalm 37:4


Tallahassee *
87/56


SVadosa
84/55
Lake City.
85/56


*aad


Thursday
82/64/s
84/62/s
85/72/s
87/65/s
84/53/pc
84/54/s
84/74/s
84/52/pc
86/71/s
85/66/s
85/55/pc
85/63/s
81/59/s
84/63/pc
83/49/s
86/67/s
82/49/s
85/67/s


Ft Myers,
86/66 0


Friday
82/66/s
.83/63/s
85/74/s
87/65/s
83/54/s
82/56/s
82/73/s
83/54/s
86/72/s
87/67/s
83/56/s
86/63/s
81/61/s
81/62/pc
83/52/s
86/68/s
81/53/s
85/70/s


86/66 Miami Tampa.
86/70 Valdosta
84/74 -"" W. Palm Beach
84/74


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tornm.


84
55
80
58
90,in 1980
36 in 1927

0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.66"
42.79"


7:36 a.m.
6:54 p.m.
7:37 a.m.
6:53 p.m.

5:24 p.m.
5:24 a.m.
5:54 p.m.
6:18 a.m.


7
HMt
15 nimes tDsbu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


---- -- -- -- __ ,, I '


_ _L


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


k 1 THUR


B^FRI


k SATUR


24 UA


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LAKE CiTYALMANIAICB


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Equestrians, horse aficionados

set for major convention in LC


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

'Zombie' helps deputies solve crime puzzle
Columbia County Sheriff's Office deputies Brian Blevins (left) and Matt Grinstead walk
with K-9 Zombie as part of an investigation into an alleged robbery Tuesday morning. The
investigation is ongoing.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Equestrians and horse
lovers from Canada and
several states will converge
on Lake City as part of a
horse trainers national con-
vention.
The Certified Horseman-
ship Association (CHA)
International Convention
will take place in Lake City
during the weekend. The
Certified Horsemanship
Association is composed of
horse-riding instructors.
"We're excited about hav-
ing our national convention
in Lake City," said Christy
Landwehr, CHA chief exec-
utive officer. "We've only
been to southern Florida
before so it's never been up
there to the north. We're
excited that we're so close
to Alabama and Georgia, so
some of our members from
other states will be able
to drive in a little easier.
We're thrilled because the
Oaks Equestrian Center is
an accredited site of ours
and all of the instructors
are certified through us.
There are mnany reasons


why we choose to come to
Lake City."
The Oaks is also an
O'Connor Signature Faci-
lity. Equestrian Olympians
Karen and David O'Connor
are the name behind the
brand.
Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council direc-
tor said convention officials
have started preparing for
the convention and its open-
ing reception, which will
take place at the Holiday
Inn Hotel and Suites from
5 -7 p.m. Thursday. The
Holiday Inn is serving as
the 'host property for the
event. Other convention
activities will begin. Friday
and end Sunday afternoon.
' "There will be classes and
seminars all day Saturday
at The Oaks Equestrian
Village," Campbell said.
During the CHA National
Convention, organization
members will hold the
group's annual board meet-
ing, set next year's fiscal
budget, take part in a annu-
al general membership.
meeting and participate in'
educational seminars.


"We'll be working and
teaching with, one another
and becoming better rid-
ing instructors through
the process," Landwehr
said, noting the horses will
be provided by the Oaks
Equestrian Center.
Certified Horsemanship
Association members from
as far away as Canada,
California, Colorado, Wash-
ingtotn, Texas, Arkansas,
Ohio, Indiana, New York,
New Hampshire, Vermont
and other southeastern
states are expected to
attend.
"These are trainers who
teach horses and they also
train people how to safely
and properly handle their
horses," Campbell said,
noting he's expecting 100
to 110 CHA members to
attend the event. "If we
do a good job of hosting
this event, we could be in
a three-year rotation for
hosting it, along with the
Kentucky Horse Park in
Lexington, Ky."
The event is open to the
public.
For additional informa-
tion go to www.cha-ahse.org.


AMENDMENT: Legalese gets clarified


Continued From Page 1A

use geographical boundar-
ies.
Amendment 8, which
revises class-size require-
ments for public schools.
* N Amendment 4, which
requires a referenda for
amending any local gov-
ernment comprehensive,
land-use plans, was dis-
cussed by John Wheeler,
local coordinator of the
Citizens for Lower Taxes
and a Stronger Economy
Inc.
"Amendment 4 is very
simple, perhaps too
simple, to govern our land
use," he said.
Simple technical land
use changes would require
a vote, Wheeler said. It
would cost more jobs as
industry would go else-
where instead of Florida


and create a weaker
economy and higher taxes
if approved.
Statewide, around 350
local organizations and
governments oppose the
amendment, including
the local Chamber, the
Columbia County Board
of Commissioners and the
City of Lake City, he said.
Jim Poole, executive
director of the Columbia
County Industrial
Development Authority,
talked about a local tax
abatement ballot initiative.
It's been used four times
in Columbia County since
2000 to help attract new
industries and is the only
local incentive available, he
said. It has been successful
in job creation in the com-
munity.


Following the discussion
was also a question-and-
answer session.
The event was great for
the community, said Dan
Gherna.
"It left everyone
informed'and gave them
the ability to make an
informed decision about
the amendments," he said.
Information, including
clarification and detailed
explanation of the amend-
ments' details, will help
voters as they head to the
polls.
"These amendments will
impact our lives and our
economy," Gherna said.
The Chamber's intent
was for everyone to leave
with a clear understand-
ing of each amendment,
Folsom said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lindsay Carter-Tidwell, an attorney at Brannon, Haley & Bullock, P.A, answers questions dur-
ing the 'Understanding the Amendments' meeting at Florida Gateway College on Tuesday.


RMS: County's maintenance department performing most of renovation
Continued From Page 1A


superintendent
The renovation's major
upgrades include replacing
the old 1960s seats with
about 800 new seats, lev-
eling of the auditorium's
floor, installing an up-to-
date handicap accessible
ramp and new carpet and
paint.
Bessie Whitfield,


Richardson Middle princi-
pal, said the project's left-
over scrap metal will be
donated to Ray Macatee's
Scrap to Music program.
The county's mainte-
nance department is doing
the majority of the renova-
tion work, with outside con-
tractors taking on special
projects, such as the seats,


Carswell said.
Millikin said the audito-
rium was originally built
when the school building
served as Columbia High
School in the 1960s and
1970s.
"We're fortunate and
really lucky that it is a
holdover from the days
when it was a high


school," he said. "For
very little money, we're
able to update it and give
it a facelift and get more
use out of it."
Whitfield said the school
is excited about the audi-
torium's changes, which
will include adding the
school's colors hunter
green and burnt orange


- to the venue.
"It's going to have
the Richardson Middle
School mind and concept,"
Whitfield said. "Originally
it was set up for a high
school and the renovation
is going to reflect that it's
a middle school."
As a finished product,
the auditorium will serve


both the school and the
community, Millikin said.
"The auditorium is
there and as long as it's
there, we'd like it to be
an attractive one that's
useful for students, fac-
ulty and community mem-
bers that attend functions
at Richardson Middle
School," he said. .


WATER; Entry-level and experienced water-sector workers to benefit


Continued From Page 1A
globally to profession-
als as well as high school
career academies and
students seeking college
credits and certifications.
In its first year, the center
will focus on training certi-
fied utility operators then
expand to address other
water resources workforce
needs.
The center, which will
focus on developing curri-
cula and increasing training
and career advancement
opportunities for water
industryworkers, is acollab-
orative effort with Daytona
State College, Valencia
Community College,
Indian River State College,
the Brevard Public School
District and three Regional
Workforce Boards. Other
Banner Center col-
laborators include the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection,
the Florida Rural Water
Association, Florida Water
and Pollution Control
Operators Association and
Florida Section of American
Water Works Association.
"As Florida's popula-
tion continues to grow,
it is critical that we have


workers skilled in main-
taining a strong, clean and
viable water supply for the
Sunshine State," said Chris
Hart IV, President and CEO
of Workforce Florida. 'This
new Banner Center will
improve employment and
career advancement oppor-
tunities in a sector that is


increasingly significant to.
our state."
With the new Banner
Center's announcement,
the state's population is now
more than 19 million and is
expected to increase to 23.4
million by 2020, according
to the U.S. Census Bureau.
Adequate water resource


development is essential there is a shortage of
to business development trained water sector work-
and economic growth in ers at all experience levels,
Florida, and a healthy
water supply is vital to the
Sunshine State's environ-
mental attributes and the
quality of life for residents .f
and tourists alike. ,
Throughout the state, ,,,;, t'..l//'/


and demand for expertise
in this field is expected to
grow, studies show.


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Sonja Lee Shannon Comenkie
Baldwin Williams
DOB: 9/22/67 DOB: 7/1/78
*- Height: 5' 06"- Weight: 160 lbs. Height: 57"
Hair: Brown Eyes: Hazel Weight: 200 lbs.
. Wanted for: VOP Sale or Delivery of Hair: Black
Controlled Substance; Possession of Eyes: Brown
Controlled Substance With Intent To Wanted For: Criminal Use of
Sell or Deliver; VOP Possession of Personal Identification
1,,, Controlled Substance (additional case) '
WANTED AS OF 10/18/10
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COIUMBIACOUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers. net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Wednesday, October 20, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Federal

deficits

provoke

rampage

Reports from the
campaign trail say
the voters are out-
raged over the fed-
eral government's
huge running budget deficits.
Official figures released last
week by the Obama administra-
tion show they have much to be
outraged about.
The deficit for fiscal year 2010,
which ended Sept 30, came in at
$1.3 trillion, the second highest
ever, the all-time record being
last year's $1.4 trillion. And in the
short-term its not going to get
better. The Obama administra-
tion forecasts the 2011 deficit will
return to the $1.4 trillion level.
The government ran four
straight years of budget surplus-
es but those were vaporized by
Bush tax cuts of 2001 and 2003
that arguably began the run of
deficits that got us to where we
are today. And the Bush admin-
istration never asked Americans
to sacrifice to support the wars
in Iraq and Afghanistan, whose
costs the Center for Defense
Information estimated to total
just over a trillion dollars at the
end of fiscal 2010. Those wars
were and still are being
fought partially on borrowed
money.
Many in Congress are count-
ing on a bipartisan deficit reduc-
tion commission for a solution. It
is due to report on Dec. 1 but the
commission needs the support
of 14 of its 18 members to bring
a recommendation to a vote in
Congress. Among the possible
recommendations: ending tax
expenditures the mortgage
interest deduction and other
incentives for deficit reduc-
tions of $1 trillion a year.
An early test of how serious
Congress is about the deficit is
whether they kill the tax cuts
for families making more than
$250,000 a year. That's a deficit
reduction right there of $700 bil-
lion over 10 years.
The voters may be outraged
over the deficits but they'll likely
be even more outraged by what
it takes to reduce them.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
.Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


* BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


a- LPOSTy 2


Tea Party reawakens US spirit


I just returned to Chicago
with my children from
a four-day trip to New
England. It turned out to
be perfect timing. And not
just because of the postcard-
worthy fall weather.
While the purpose of the
trip was to take my kids to see
grandparents in Vermont and
New Hampshire, we spent a lot
of time in Boston. That meant
walking the "Freedom Trail."
You know: Paul Revere's
house, the Boston Massacre,
the North Church, "one if by
land, two if by sea" and all
that.
Now, think Boston Tea Party
1773. Then think Tea Party
2010. See the connection?
I sure do.
In Boston today, the site
where the colonists famously
threw the tea into the harbor
is now landfill. But that doesn't
diminish what happened there.
In one of the visitor centers
(I'm a sucker for visitor cen-
ters), this quote by Thomas
Paine stood out: "The indepen-
dence of America, considered
merely as a separation from
England, would have been a
matter but of little importance,
had it not been accompanied
by a revolution in the prin-
ciples and practice of govern-
ments."
Radical. Government of the
people, by the people, for the
people as Abraham Lincoln
would put it many years later
in the Gettysburg Address.
Probably few in the
European world at the time
really thought that little rag-
tag bunch of colonists tossing
tea into the harbor would
amount to much. Sound
familiar?
Just a little over a year


LETTERS TO

Talk coming from
politicians is cheap
To the Editor:
I find it interesting, with the
elections coming up, how both
Republicans and Democrats say
their opponent is dishonest and
they've done things illegally. If
this is true why haven't they
been arrested?
If these are not true, then why
haven't there been lawsuits for
defamation?
With high unemployment and
record deficits, why can't the
people running for public office
put in writing what they are
willing to do to fix the problems
instead of smearing their oppo-
nents with ads that have been
put together based on accusa-
tions not facts.
I believe that if the voters had
in writing what the candidates
wanted to do while in office, the
voters would vote on the goal,
not on the person.
Talk is cheap and that's what
we get from our politicians a
lot of words that mean a bunch


Betsy Hart
betsysblogcom
.ago, the elite thought today's
Tea Party was a joke. Last
summer, House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
referred to the movement as
"AstroTurf," her suggestion
that it is a creation of the
GOP.
At the time, a lot of folks
like myself were pretty
despondent at the direction
America was headed.
New President Barack
Obama was more ideologi-
cal than most had imagined,
spending liberally, already
bankrupting my unborn
grandchildren, endorsing
swift government takeovers
of ... just about everything.
Look, I'm the first one to
criticize President George
W. Bush and his Republican
Congress for spending like
drunken sailors for so many
years. But who would have
thought the spending under
Obama and his friends on
Capitol Hill would make the
Bush folks look like ama-
teurs?
I wondered if the unique
American experiment was
beginning to unravel.
Flash forward: Few are
dismissing the Tea Party any-
more. Now we know that at
least on this side of the pond,
when government pushes the
people too far, the people still
respond and say "no more."


THE EDITOR

of nothing.
Irv Crowetz
Lake City

No reason to support
any state candidate
To the Editor:
I am disappointed with the
Lake City Reporter's choices for
the Florida Legislature.
Its not as much with the can-
didates, but with the reasons for
the choices. You don't have any
reasons to support these candi-
dates.
One candidate has Columbia
County on her mind, helped
name Florida Gateway College,
helped sponsor economic
development sites, is an advo-
cate for our freshwater springs
and is the most conservative
Democrat. Not good enough.
The other Democrat profiled
apparently is not conservative
and is credited with one accom-
plishment reducing admission
prices for our military to state
parks and serves on numerous


It's no wonder that this
Tea Party came out of middle
America, with news commen-
tator Rick Santelli's February
2009 "rant" about the Obama
administration on the
Chicago Board of Trade floor.
This is a heartfelt organic
movement from the ground
up and from the heartland.
I don't agree with Tea
Party regulars on everything.
I'm for "building the wall"
across our southern border,
but then dramatically increas-
ing legal immigration and
new citizenship, for instance.
But I have been amazed,
impressed and oh so grateful
at the energy and earnest-
ness with which people are
waking up and demanding
that their government once
again be held accountable to
the people.
By the way, I kinda
like what some call the
movement's "rough edges,"
precisely because I find it
healthy to see smug, elite
thinking in both parties chal-
lenged by real people and the
real issues they face.
The American spirit is alive
and well.
It occurred to me in Boston
that we're seeing a reawaken-
ing of the American sensibil-
ity that changed the world a
few hundred years ago.
Whatever happens on
Election Day, this Tea Party
has long-term implications.
I'm convinced that our coun-
try will be better off for
them.
Kinda makes me proud to
be an American.
* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


committees. Not good enough.
The third profile, a
Republican, serves on numerous
committees and not much else
included in the article. Not good
enough.
If our citizens will pull up
our elected officials' profiles on
myflorida.com their activities
can be viewed. The Republicans
have more accomplishments.
Some candidates are hoping
to cash in on name recognition
at the polls.
Do they have the accomplish-
ments that include job creation,
welfare reform, balanced bud-
gets, America first, education
reform? No!
We send the same people
term after term and they have
the same ideas, contacts, atti-
tudes, interest and will have the
same results.
"When the people fear govern-
ment, there is tyranny; when the
government fears the people, there
is liberty."
Thomas Jefferson
Bill Glover
Lake City


4A


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu


ARTEV"WIBandMYNRGTG0 u
Q8NA MANS V'I TV GROW \E
WIllK Cu NiEXT11 <



P- CT FI Nl LAK
-~ Ar I Irv- a i i '4


Jury duty

provides

valuable

insights

For many citizens,
a summons to jury
duty ranks just a
few.notches above
a draft notice and
a root canal. Who's got time
to re-order his life and report
to the courthouse early on a
Monday morning with a thou-
sand others who have been
similarly inconvenienced?
Nevertheless, beyond a few
expressions of wry commis-
eration, I didn't hear anyone
complaining last Monday at
8:00 a.m. in my county court-
house central jury room. A few'
approached the judge to seek
exemption at least two men
were carrying a small child and
a diaper bag but most waited,
patient and resigned, to be
sorted into one of the many jury
panels required to administer
that week's justice in Nueces
County, Texas.
The process was orderly and
efficient, given the formidable
task facing the courthouse staff-
Checking in and organizing a
multitude of jury candidates,
hearing excuses, calling the
rolls and seating the jury panels,
and satisfying the fluctuating
requirements of the judges,
prosecutors, and defense attor-
neys, who are relentlessly set-
tling, pleading, and postponing
in a dozen courtrooms on the
upper floors of the courthouse,
even as the juries are being
assembled.
In the central jury room
they're fond of quoting Matthew
22:14: "Many are called, but few
are chosen." But after a couple
of hours I found myself on a
panel of 20 citizens undergoing
jury selection. The judge, the
prosecutors and defense attor-
ney talked seriously about jus-
tice and reasonable doubt We
were examined for biases and
previous experiences that might
prejudice our ability to reach a
just verdict
And then there were six of us,
the number of jurors required
to hear a Class A misdemeanor
assault case. The details aren't
important, so let's just say that
a kid was accused of beating up
his girlfriend after the two of
them had been underage cel-
ebrating well into the night
My experience with our sys-
tem of trial by jury says some-
thing extraordinary about our
country:
Domestic abuse isn't a trivial
crime, but it's extremely com-
mon. Yet it's an exceptional soci-
ety that is willing to commit the
costly resources of three law-
yers, a judge, a bailiff, a court
reporter, a police officer, a crime
scene investigator, a translator,
jury room staff, various clerks
and secretaries, and two full
days in the lives of six citizens
to ensure justice in connection
with a half-hour incident that's
more than a year old.
As far as I could see, every-
one connected with the process
was deeply dedicated to a just
outcome.
The jury scrupulously delib-
erated every detail; no one got
in a hurry. The verdict? Guilty
on two counts and a mistrial on
the third, because of rigorous
scruples by some jurors regard-
ing the demands of reasonable
doubt
In short, justice prevailed
and the accused received the
full protection of the law. Now,
that's a country to be proud of.
* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


FACES & PLACES
Scenes from Tuesday's Chamber of Commerce Understanding the Amendments luncheon held at Florida Gateway College.


Margie Denyko, Lynn Causey and Heather Gray Tammy Eaker, Kim Nicholson and Jayne Wilson


Paul Vann and Marc Vann Roy Markham and Shirley Markham


Mark Hunter and Koby Adams


Connie Anderson and Tammy Clarke


Matt Greene and Dusty Bailey


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


Military recruiters told to accept gay applicants


By ANNE FLAHERTY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
Defense Department said
Tuesday that it is accept-
ing openly gay recruits, but
is warning applicants they
might not be allowed to
stick around for long.
Following last week's
court ruling that struck
down a 1993 law banning
gays from serving open-
ly, the military has sus-
pended enforcement of
the rule known as "don't
ask, don't tell." The Justice
Department is appealing
the decision and has asked
the courts for a temporary
stay on the ruling.
The Defense Department
said it would comply with
the law and had frozen any
discharge cases. But at
least one case was reported
of a man being turned away
from an Army recruiting
office in Austin, Texas.
Pentagon spokeswoman
Cynthia Smith on Tuesday
confirmed that recruiters
had been given top-level
guidance to accept appli-
cants who say they are
gay.
Recruiters also have
been told to inform poten-
tial recruits that the mora-
torium on enforcement of
"don't ask, don't tell" could


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dan Choi (right) an Iraq War veteran and a West Point graduate who was discharged from the military in July because he
announced publicly that he is gay, sits waiting inside the U.S. Armed Forces Recruiting Center in Times Square, hoping to
re-enlist on Tuesday in New York.


be reversed at any point,
if the ruling is appealed
or the court grants a stay,
she said.
The uncertain status of
the law has caused much
confusion within an insti-
tution that has historical-
ly discriminated against
gays. Before the 1993 law,


the Defense Department
banned gays entirely and
declared them incompat-
ible with military service.
Douglas Smith, spokes-
man for U.S. Army
Recruiting Command
based at Fort Knox, Ky.,
said even before the ruling
recruiters did not ask appli-


cants about their sexual
orientation. The difference
now is that recruiters will
process those who say they
are gay.
"If they were to self admit
that they are gay and want
to enlist, we will process
them for enlistment, but
will tell them that the legal


situation could change,"
Smith said.
He said the enlistment
process takes time and
recruiters have been told
to inform those who are
openly gay that they could
be declared ineligible
if the law is upheld on
appeal.


"U.S. Army Recruiting
Command is going to fol-
low the law, whatever the
law is at the time," he
said.
U.S. District Judge
Virginia Phillips, who had
ordered the military to
stop enforcing "don't ask,
don't tell," was expected
to deny the administra-
tion's request to delay her
order. That would send
the case to the 9th Circuit
Court of Appeals. -
After Phillips' ruling
last week, Omar Lopez
- discharged from the
Navy in 2006 after admit-
ting his gay status to his
military doctor walked
into an Army recruiting
office in Austin and asked
if he could re-enlist. He
said he was up front, even
showing the recruiters his
Navy discharge papers.
"They just said, 'I can't
let you re-enlist because
we haven't got anything
down from the chain of
command,'" Lopez, 29,
told the Associated Press
in a telephone interview.
"They were courteous
and apologetic, but they
couldn't help me."
Smith was unable to con-
firm the account She said
guidance on gay applicants
had been issued to recruit-
ing commands on Oct. 15.


Large banks rapidly bidding goodbye to free checking


By PALLAVI GOGOI
Associated Press
NEW YORK Free
checking as we know it
is ending. The days when
you could walk into a bank
branch and open an account
with no charges and no
strings attached appear to
be over. Now you have to
jump through some hoops
- keep a high balance,
use direct deposit or swipe
your debit card several
times a month.


One new account at Bank
of America .charges $8.95
per month if .you want to
bank with a teller or get a
paper statement.
Almost all of the larg-
est U.S. banks are either
already making free check-
ing much more difficult to
get or expected to do so
soon, with fees on even
basic banking services.
It's happening because
a raft of new laws enacted
in the past year, including
the financial overhaul pack-


age, have led to an acute
shrinking of revenue for
the banks. So they are
scraping together money
however they can.
Bank of America, which
does business with half the
households in America,
announced a dramatic
shift Tuesday in how it
does business with cus-
tomers. One key change:
Free checking, a mainstay
of American banking in
recent years, will be nearly
unheard of.


"I've seen more regu-
lation in. last 30 months
than in last 30 years," said
Robert Hammer, CEO of
RK Hammer, a bank advi-
sory firm. "The bottom line
for banks is shifting enor-
mously,. swiftly and deeply,
and they're not going to sit
by twiddling their thumbs.
They're going to change."
In the last year, lawmakers
in Washington have passed
a range of new laws aimed
at protecting bank custom-
ers from harsh fees, like the


$35 charged to some Bank
of America customers who
overdrafted their account by
buying something small like
a Starbucks latte.
These and other fees
were extremely .lucrative.
According to financial ser-
vices firm Sandler O'Neill,
they made up 12' percent
of Bank of America's rev-
enue. On Tuesday, the bank
took a $10.4 billion charge
to its third-quarter earnings
because the new regulations
limit fees the bank can col-


lect when retailers accept
debit cards.
* Bank of America CEO
Brian Moynihan acknowl-
edged in a conference call
that overdraft fees were
generating a lot of income.
But the bank was also losing
customers who were often
taken aback by the high hid-
den fees.
Checking accounts were
being closed at an annual
rate of 18 percent, he said,
and complaints were, at an
all-time.high.


OBITUARIES


LaVonne E. Sipper
LaVonne E. Sipper, 75, of Lake
City, FL, died Monday, October
18, 2010, at Lake City Medical
Center after a lengthy illness.
She was born in Pittsburgh, PA
and had lived in FL since 1978.
Survivors include her beloved
husband of 54 years, Richard
G. Sipper, Lake City, FL; two
sons: Robert C. Sipper (Deb-
bie), Hopkinsville, KY and
James R. Sipper, Cape Coral,
FL and their respective fami-
lies; and one brother: James
Wachter, Finleyville, PA.
Funeral Mass will be held on
Thursday, October 21, 2010, at
10 A.M. at Epiphany Catholic
Church with Father Mike Pen-
dergraft officiating. Interment
will follow in Forest Lawn Me-
morial Gardens. Visitation with
the family will be on Wednes-
day, October 20, 2010 from
5:'00 to 7:00 P.M.. at the funeral
home. In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial contributions may be made
to Epiphany Catholic Church,
254 SW Malone St., Lake
City, FL 32025. GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. US Hwy 441,


Dr. GuyS. Strauss, D.O.,FA
Board Certified Internal Mcdi
Board Certified Critical Cai
Allison B. Baris, A.R.N


Lake City, FL (386-752-1954)
is in charge of arrangements.

Sidney Franklin "FRANK"
Stamper, Sr.
Mr. Sidney Franklin "FRANK"
Stamper, Sr., 68, a lifelong resi-
dent of Lake City, died Saturday,
October 16, 2010 at his resi-
dence following a lifelong ill-
ness that began with polio. Mr.
Stamper was the son of the late
Johnny Stamper and Mrs. Pearl
Bond Stamper who survives her
son. He worked as a manager for


several gas stations until suffer-
ing a career ending injury to his
already handicapped leg. Mr.
Stamper enjoyed singing with
several local bands and espe-
cially enjoyed Merle Haggard's'
music. His favorite time was that
spent with his grandchildren. Mr.
Stamper was of the Baptist faith.
Mr. Stamper is survived by his
mother, Pearl Stamper of Lake
City; a daughter, Shaun Stamper
of Lake City; four sons, Sid-
ney Stamper (Samantha) of
South Carolina; Tony Stamper
(Debbie) of Daytona, Florida;
Stephen Stamper (Mia) of Ala-


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Cal o a ppitmn
Loae nteLaeCt eileB uil ing -V4 .W.Hal f ae Dive UIU Lake ity, FLI~


chua, Florida; Frank Stamper, Jr.
(Laura) of Lake City; three sis-
ters, Ruth Coffee (Bob); Diane
Hodges (Ray); and Susan Nettles
all of Lake City; and four broth-
ers, Bill Stamper (Betty); Harold
Stamper; Murray Stamper (Mag-
gie) of White Springs, Florida
and Allen Stamper all of Lake
City, Florida. Ten grandchil-


)T'







i 1


I,



/


4


dren; three great-grandchildren;
many nieces, nephews, great-
nieces, great-nephews and many
lifelong friends also survive.
Private family memorial ser-
vices will be held at a later
date. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-


ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025'.
(386)752-1234. Please sign
the on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


It


October is National Breast
Cancer Awareness Month.

V In the Lake City Reporter we'd like to take
a moment to salute the strength and courage of
breast cancer survivors and to remember those
whose brave battle has ended.

Publishes Sunday, October 24, 2010

Sample Ad Actual Size


Anne Ratliff
Breast cancer survivor
for 9.years!
The Greatest Mother
& Grandmother!
lie all love you,
Big RicIWhaIt. Richard.
Robert & Randh


Get your 2x2 (3.458inx2in) ad Wit

photo and special message for only $35!

For more information call Bridget or Mary at (386) 754-5440
Or stop by the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Lake City Reporter


) Marc

SKazmierski

For County Commissioner

.L District 2


^OPTIFA


--n


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I


~pprplP4%


u~uirt~d:








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 20, 2010 7A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Medicare counseling
SHINE is providing
free, unbiased and con-
fidential counseling on
Medicare issues 12:30 to 2
p.m. today at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
1-800-262-2243.

Landscaping and
Gardening Series
Suwannee County Master
Gardener Volunteers pres-
ent a free "How and When
to Prune" series of informa-
tion at 10 a.m. today at Live
Oak Library 1848 South
Ohio Avenue Live Oak.
Contact Carolyn Saft at
(386) 362-2771.

Early voting
Early voting for the 2010
general election is 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-
Saturday through Oct.
30. Early voting locations
are at the Supervisor of
Elections Lake City office,
971 W. Duval St. and the
Fort White Community
Center, 17579 SW SR 47.
Voters need to bring a pic-
ture and signature I.D.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fans express frustration over failed attempt,
University of Florida fans react to another failed field goal attempt made by Florida punter
Chas Henry during their 10-7 loss to Mississippi State in Gainesville on Saturday.


Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is offer-
ing flu shots by appoint-
ment Monday through
Friday. The cost is $25, and
Medicare Part B is accept-
ed. Pneumonia vaccinations
are also available for those
eligible at $40. Call for an
appointment at 758-1069.

Thursday
Jazz Ambassadors

The U.S. Army Field


Band's Jazz Ambassadors
- comprised of a 19-
member soldier-musi-
cian ensemble will
give a free concert at'7
p.m. Thursday at Florida
Gateway College's Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Tickets are available at
the Lake City Reporter
office, 180 E Duval Street.
Tickets are still available.

Info fair
Columbia County Senior
Services; Inc. is hosting


a Wealth of Information
Fair at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center at 9
a.m. to noon Thursday.
Call (386) 755-0235.

Medicare counseling
SHINE is providing free,
unbiased and confidential
counseling on Medicare
issues 9 a.m. to noohi
Thursday at the Lifestyle
Enrich Center Health Fair.
Retired Educators meet


The Columbia County
Retired Educators meet at 1
p.m. Thursday at the School
Board Adult Center room
120. Bring men's and wom-
en's socks. Call 752-2431.

Community fun night
The Christian Service
Center is having a communi-
ty fun night 2 to 10 p.m. Oct
21 at Bob Evans. Pick up a
flyer at CSC that will give 15
percent of sales to the organi-
zation. Bob Evans is located
at 3628 W US Hwy. 90. Call
CSC at 755-1770.

Friday
Humane Asylum
The Lake City Humane
Society and Rountree-
Moore Auto Group pres-
ents the Humane Asylum
6 to 10 p.m. Friday and
Saturday at the Lake City
Mall. Tickets are $10 at
the door and $5 for veter-
ans, active duty military,
law enforcement and
fire personnel with ID.
Children 13 and under
must have an adult

Blood donor tickets
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers is giving
away free movies tickets


to all blood donors Friday
to Sunday. Donors must
donate at the donor cen-
ter located just south of
Bascom Norris Road on
State Road 47. Hours are 9
a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday, 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday,
and 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. on
Sunday. Movie tickets are
while supplies last Donor
must weigh at least 110 lbs.
and be at least 16 years old
(with parent permission).

Saturday
Phenomenal program
Gold Standard Chapter
No. 48 Order of the
Eastern Star is host-
ing the Phenomenal
Women's Program
"Celebrating Trailblazers
and Trendsetters within
Our Community" at 4
p.m. Saturday at New
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church, 505 NE MLK St

Pumpkin Fest
The Second Annual
Pumpkin Fest is 3 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m. Saturday at
Big Shoals State Park in
White Springs. There is a
children's pumpkin deco-
rating contest and costume
contest Call (386) 867-1639
for more information.


VOTE BYVOEB
CTO.ER 28TH iAI)iR'S CHOICEm ,EB
HALLOWEEN PET COSTUME OCTOBER CONTEST
HALLOWEEN PET COSTUME CONTEST


2oo OFF|
coupon for 21% Attabov Dog Food 401b Bag
Expires II 2- I
Smith & Son's Feed
(386) 755-4328
-----------------------


W- TLC
Pet Grooming
Extra Aindness shown to all pets
Adopt a pet from )our animal shelter


1lb2 '.E (CR 252
l aike CiiN. I L 320)25


ii ii ~~'~ii.*r'~i I) 1' NI

I.' I, II I-I


ANIMAL HOSPITAL


S'A \V .L,\kI L 11 1 \I"NXIU IYPI'.AL COM 'FAX: (380I670.64 i" :


user 30 learns Experience
i* L.i.ii, .ccomnodationis Actinles Nature \Valk- Inditidual
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r--- - - - - - - -


Vote


for your favorite pets


- -- ------------ -
I


I Name: Phone:
I Vote for one pet per category: Funnies-t Most Unique


Subscriber:


E Yes E No
Cutest Overall


Original ballots please, no photo copies allowed. Ballots must be received by Thursday, October 28 at 5:oop.m.
L_ -Drop off or mail in to the Lake City Reporter Pet Contest, 180 East Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055 I


groomn salo-resort & spf- petboutique


386-754-5553
g 872 SW Main Lake City, FL
(Across from Beef O' Brady's)


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


|iI.i ki lltnui sen lillS.l i








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


.. , . _,.~ ,V ,
* ;' '- '"' t ) -^ -. *; ".

& STRIP: ES.,' :.- ,

& S T R I P E S


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Linebacker Cameron Wimberly (41) assists in taking down a Ridgevilw High runner.

Regrouped Tigers ready to roll


After
consecutive
losses
Columbia High
walked into its
bye week at just the right
time.
The Tigers are


sputtering on offense,
scoring only nine points
in the last two contest
after averaging more than
28 points in the first four
games this year.
This week, the Tigers
travel to Tallahassee to


take 0o Godby High in a
rematch from last season.
Columbia fell in a
21-18 heartbreaker to
the Cougars last season,
but Godby is off to an 0-5
start this season against
monster talent.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High School band perform during the halftime show.


Columbia High offensive lineman
Ridgeview High School.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Danny Ratliff (70) snaps the ball during a game against


2010 Tier Football Schedule


Wk 9 Wolfson H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.


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C H S S TA R


CHS 38, Brooks County 13
CHS 30, South Lafourche 19
CHS 22, Buchholz 14
CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20
Madison 19, CHS 0
Ridgeview 16, CHS 9
Wk 7 Godby A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 8 Ed White A 7:30 p.m.


I


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D, J.


t FCATER P ,: .,.:,,









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkarby@akectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, October 20, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
JUNIOR GOLF
Membership open
for foundation
Membership to the
North Florida Junior Golf
Foundation is open.
The NFJG is the only
non-profit junior golf
tour (ages 8-18) in North
Florida.
It is sponsored and
endorsed by the PGA
Tour and the North
Florida Section Northern
Chapter of the PGA.
Membership fee is
$100 for October to
August.
For details, call
(904) 928-0571 or visit
www.nfig.org.
HUNTING
Game processing
workshop at UF
The University of
Florida Department of
Animal Sciences is
offering a wild game
processing workshop
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday at the UF Meat
Processing Laboratory.
The workshop will
focus on deer and hogs
and teach the steps
needed to take a game
animal from the field to
the table.
Fee is $30 and
registration is due by
today.
For details, call Chad
Carr at (352) 392-2454.
RUNNING
Alligator Lake
5K is Saturday
The 3rd Annual
Alligator Lake 5K is
8 a.m. Saturday at
Alligator Lake Park.
This year's race will be
followed by an
elementary mile run.
Preferred online
registration.of $15 for the
5K and $5 for the fun run
ends today.
Race day registration
is $25 for the 5K (by
7:30 a.m.) and $10 for the
fun run (by 8:40 a.m. for
the 9 a.m. start). Online
registration is at www.
active, corn, keyword
alligator lake run.
For details, e-mail
dusty@halfniletimning.
cornm.
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High, Fort
White High bowling vs.
Suwannee High at Lake
City Bowl, 4 p.m.
SFort White JV
football vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High vol-
leyball vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Friday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Union
County High, 1:45 p.m.
Columbia High
football at Godby High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. East Gadsden
High, 7:30 p.m.
Monday
Columbia High
swimming in District
2-2A meet at Cecil
Field Aquatic Center in
Jacksonville, 9 a.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
volleyball in District 4-5A
tournament at Ridgeview
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Santa Fe


High, 5 p.m.


Taken down


Baker County
spoils Richardson
homecoming.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Richardson Middle
School football picked a
tough opponent for home-
coming and made it worse
by not taking care of the
ball.
Baker County Middle
School (7-0) spoiled the
celebration for Richardson,
60-22, at Columbia High
Stadium on Tuesday.
Turnovers killed us,"
Wolves head coach Al
Nelson said. "No matter


what level of football, it is
hard to recover from five
turnovers. That has been
our Achilles' heel over the
last few games."
After a fumble on a
kickoff, the Wolves trailed
14-0 before ever running
an offensive play. The defi-
cit reached 26-0 before
Richardson made a move.
Richardson scored on a
30-yard halfback pass from
Deon-tay Jones to Kenneth
Paul with no time left on
the second quarter clock.
Quarterback Terrivio
Williams led the 64-yard
scoring drive with four com-
pletions and a 15-yard run.
WOLVES continued on 2B


Up and


Columbia High senior Haley Dicks (14) battles for the ball at the net against Meadowbrook Academy on Tuesday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Lady Tigers fall to Meadowbrook Academy


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It looked like it would be
a quick win for Columbia High
against Meadowbrook Academy on
Tuesday, but looks deceived.
The Lady Tigers took an early
25-13 win before Meadowbrook
rallied to win the final three sets
20-25, 14-25 and 23-25 to take the


match.
Columbia (13-8, 4-4) pulled up
a few girls from the junior varsity
and coach Casie McCallister was
pleased to get the underclassmen
some playing time.
"We pulled two girls up and
were able to get one in," McCallister
said. "Hollianne Dohrn played
well."
McCallister wasn't as


pleased with her teams
performance.
"I thought we looked great
in the first game," she said.
"We just have so much poten-
tial, and they don't live up to it.
Ashleigh Bridges did play well and
played hard. She gave it all she
had and that's all I ask of any of
them."
Taylor Messer led the Lady


COURTESY PHOTO
Coach Doug Wohlstein stands with Fort White High's four seniors (from left) Brett Sealey,
Kaycee Baker, Brigitte LaPuma and Holly Polhill.


Tigers with 10 service points and
six aces.
Haley Dicks had eight kills to
lead Columbia.
Beth Williams led with 20 assists
and Kelbie Ronsonet led the team
with five blocks.
The Lady Tigers will face Union
County High for Senior Night at
7 p.m. Tuesday in Columbia's last
game of the season.


LaPuma leads


Fort White on


Senior Night


Lady Indians roll
past Hamilton.
in three sets.
From staff reports

Brigitte LaPuma saved
her best for Senior Night
to lead Fort White High to
a three-set victory against
Hamilton County High
Monday in Fort White.
The Lady Indians cruised
to victory 27-25, 25-15
and 25-11 behind strong
play from the seniors, but
Lapuma was the star.
The senior led the Lady
Indians with 24 service


points, including 18 aces.
LaPuma also added nine
digs and three kills.
"Eighteen aces is impres-
sive," Fort White coach
Doug Wohlstein said.
Kaycee Baker had seven
service points, seven kills
and eight digs. Holly Polhill
had three service points,
four kills and three digs.
Brett Sealey had eight digs,
three service points, two
kills and one block.
"We played OK,"
Wohlstein said. "It was a
big game for Brigitte with
the 18 aces. Overall, it was
a solid win and a good
match."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School's Russell Baxter leads a group of tacklers against Baker County
Middle School's Brody Crews during Tuesday's game at Tiger Stadium.


down for CHS


_ II- I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, American League
Championship Series, game 5, Texas at
N.Y.Yankees
7:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game 4, Philadelphia
at San Francisco r
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, World Finals, first
round, at Las Vegas

BASEBALL

AL Championship Series

New York vs. Texas
New York 6,Texas 5
Texas 7, New York 2
Monday
Texas 8, New York 0
Tuesday
Texas at New York (n)
Today
Texas at New York, 4:07 p.m.

NL Championship Series
San Francisco vs. Philadelphia
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3
Philadelphia 6, San Francisco I
Tuesday
San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 0
Today
Philadelphia at San Francisco,
7:57 p.m.
Thursday
Philadelphia at San Francisco,
7:57 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


N.Y. Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland

Kansas City
Oakland
Denver
San Diego


East
W L TPct PF PA
5 I 0.833 159 101
4 I 0.800154 116
3 2 0.600 89 112
0 5'0.000 87 161
South
W L TPct PF PA
4 2 0.667153 167
4 2 0.667163 125
4 2 0.667 162 98
3 3 0.500 110 167
North
W L TPct PF PA
4 I 0.800114 60
4 2 0.667112 95
2 3 0.400100 102
I 5 0.167 88 125
Wpst
W L..T,PcqFf. Pk.,
3 2 0.600 108.92
-2 -4 0.333 120 151
2 4 0.333 124 140
2 4 0.333 157 126


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas

Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


East
W L
4 2
4 2
3 3
1 4
South
W L
4 2
4 2
3 2
0 5
North
W L
4 2,
3 3
2 3
1 5
West


T Pct PF PA
0.667 134 118
0.667 153 120
0.500113 119
0.200 102 111

T Pct PF PA
0.667 130 101
0.667130 108
0.600 80 111
0.000 52 110

T Pct PF PA
0.667 112 97 "
0.500 139 112
0.400 87 88
0.167146 140


W L TPct PF PA
Arizona 3 2 0.600 88 138
Seattle 3 2 0.600 98 97
St.Louis 3 3 0.500 103 113
San Francisco I 5 0.167 93 139
Sunday's Games
Seattle 23, Chicago 20
Miami 23, Green Bay 20, OT
Houston 35, Kansas City 31
Pittsburgh 28, Cleveland 10
St. Louis 20, San Diego 17
N.Y. Giants 28, Detroit 20
New England 23, Baltimore 20, OT
Philadelphia 31,Atlanta 17
New Orleans 31,Tampa Bay 6
N.Y. Jets 24, Denver 20
San Francisco 17, Oakland 9
Minnesota 24, Dallas 21
Indianapolis 27,Washington 24
Monday's Game
Tennessee 30,Jacksonville 3
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona,
Carolina
Sunday, Oct. 24
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m.
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati atAtlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Tennessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 phm.
Monday, Oct. 25
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit,
Houston

College scores

Thursday
Lambuth (2-4) at Tenn.-Martin (3-4),
7 p.m.


Ark.-Pine Bluff (3-3) at Alcorn St.
(3-3), 7:30 p.m.
UCLA (3-3) at Oregon (6-0), 9 p.m.
Friday
Cent. Connecticut St. (4-2) at Albany,
N.Y. (3-3), 7 p.m.
South Florida (3-3) at Cincinnati
(3-3), 8 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Justin Timberlake Shriners
Hospitals for Children Open
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC Summerlin (7,224 yards,
par 71).
Purse: $4.3 million. Winner's share:
$774,500.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
5-8 p.m., 11 p.m.-2 a.m.; Friday-Sunday,
5-8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.- 1:30 a.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
PIPGATOUR
Sime barDy' LPGA Malaysia
.Site: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Kuala Lumpur Golf& Country
Club (6,182 yards, par 71).
Purse: $1.8 million. Winner's share:
$270,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday-
Sunday, noon-2 p.m.).
Last year: Inaugural event.
Online: http/ www.lpga.com
CHAMPIONSTOUR
Administaff Small Business Classic
Site:The Woodlands,Texas.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course:TheWoodlands Country Club
(7,018 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.7 million. Winner's share:
$225,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 8:30-
10:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 4-6 a.m.,
8:30-10:30 p.m.; Monday, 4-6 a.m.).
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Castello Masters Costa Azahar
Site: Castellon, Spain.


Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Club de Campo del
Mediterraneo (7,111 yards, par 71).
Purse: $2.78 million. Winner's share:
$463,600.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday-Sunday, 8:30-
. 1 1:30 a.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Jacksonville Open
Site: PonteVedra Beach
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC Sawgrass, Dye's Valley
Course (6,864 yards, par 70).
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
2-4:30 p.m.; Friday, 2:30-4:30 a.m.,
2-4:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 2-4 a.m.,
2-4:30 p.m.; Monday, 2-4 a.m.).

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Monday's Games
Orlando 102,Atlanta 73
Charlotte 102, Miami 96
Memphis 96, New Orleans 91
Oklahoma City II1, San Antonio 102
Golden State 100, Portland 78
Tuesday's Games
Philadelphia vs. Cleveland (n)
Washington vs. Detroit (Ai)
New Jersey at NewYork (n)
Indiana at Minnesota (n)
Oklahoma City at Denver (n)
Utah vs. L.A. Lakers (n)
Golden State at Phoenix'(n)
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
New Orleans at Charlotte, 11 a.m.
Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Columbus,
Ohio, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Oklahoma City,
8 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10 p.m.
Golden State vs. L.A. Lakers at San
Diego, Calif, 10 p.m.

NBA calendar

Friday Preseason ends.
Monday Rosters set for
opening day.
Tuesday 2010-11 regular season
opens.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Toronto (n)
Colorado at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Ottawa at Pittsburgh (n)
Dallas at Tampa Bay (n)
St. Louis at Chicago (n)
Tuesday's Games
Boston at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Carolina at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Today's Games
Buffalo at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Chicago, 9 p.m.
Carolina at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Washington at Boston, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at'Colorado, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.


NFL fines, doesn't suspend,


three players for hits to head


By RACHEL COHEN
Associated Press

NEW YORK The
NFL imposed huge fines-
Tuesday on three players
for dangerous and flagrant
hits last weekend and
warned that, starting with
this week's games, violent
conduct will be cause for
suspension.
Pittsburgh Steelers line-
backer James Harrison was
docked $75,000 on Tuesday,
while New England Patriots
safetyBrandonMeriweather
and Atlanta Falcons corner-
back Dunta Robinson will
lose $50,000 each.
In the past, players were
either fined or ejected for
illegal hits. However, after
the series of recent flagrant
tackles, several of which
resulted in concussions,
the NFL ramped up the
punishment.
Football operations
chief Ray Anderson indi-
cated the suspensions
could start immediately
- that is, involving play
from last weekend's games.
However, NFL spokesman
Greg Aiello said the league
wanted to give teams fair
warning and would send a
memo Wednesday outlin-
ing the changes.
Ravens tight end Todd


Heap took a vicious hit
from Meriweather that
Heap called "one of those
hits that shouldn't happen."
Robinson and the Eagles'
DeSean Jackson were
knocked out of their game
after a frightening collision
in which Robinson launched
himself head first to make
a tackle. Both sustained
concussions.
Harrison was punished



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

CERDY|


for his hit on Mohamed
Massaquoi. His hit on
Joshua Cribbs did not fig-
ure in the fine, although it
also caused a concussion;
the league said Monday it
was permissible.
Harrison's agent, Bill
Parise, called the fine "stag-
gering" and said it would be
appealed. He emphasized
that neither play drew a
penalty.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


F Y WHEN THE
LAAA 4 EXHAUST-EP
| SPY WENT TO BEP,
FRIEVY I
S -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:L
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GUILD ACRID MARLIN AVENUE
I Answer: The couple went for a spin in the storm
because it was -- "DRIVING" RAIN


RECREATION ROUNDUP



Lake City Pop Warner Pee


Wee team makes playoffs


From staff reports

The Richardson
Community Center/Annie
Mattox North Advisory
Council's Lake City Pop
Warner Pee Wee football
team defeated Live Oak's
Suwannee Dog Pound
team, 12-0, at Memorial
Stadium on Saturday.
With the win the Lake
City Pop Warner Pee Wees
advance to the league
championship game at
9 a.m. Oct. 30 in Starke.
Live Oak and Lake City
are the two newest mem-
bers of the Putnam Athletic


Association Pop Warner
program, and both Pee Wee
teams entered Saturday's
game at 5-1.
Lake City led 6-0 at half-
time on a touchdown by
Michael Jackson.
Lake City's defense
turned away several Live
Oak drives in the second
half. The final stop set Lake
City up with a first-and-goal
and Ron Collins scored the
insurance touchdown.
"Head coach Richard
Keen expressed his appre-
ciation to his coaching
staff and the tremendous
support received from the


community," Lake City
Pop Warner football presi-
dent Mario Coppock said.
"It was the largest Pop
Warner football crowd to
date. A special thank you
to Mrs. Wilda Drawdy and
the Lake City Cheerleading
Associations' Jaguar cheer-
leaders and staff for provid-
ing additional support."
The Lake City Pee Wees
are soliciting donations for
transportation expenses
for the playoffs. Those
interested in donating to
this effort are asked to con-
tact league secretary Kim
Stephens at 623-2954.


Eye of the Tiger girls win at


Little Everglades Pre-state


From staff reports

The Eye of the Tiger girls cross coun-
try team came in first place at the middle
school two-mile challenge for the Little
Everglades Pre-State Invitational in Dade
City on Friday.
Four teams competed in the girls
portion. The Eye of the Tiger boys placed
fourth out of seven teams.
Timothy Pierce led the boys with a
sixth-place time of 12:28.
Shawn Ziegaus was ninth in 12:36,
followed by Ridge Bringger (26th-13:50),
Austin Barwick (27th-13:58) and Jerome
Tucker (51st-19:36).
The top 25 finishers received awards
and six girls qualified Emma Tucker
(3rd-12:45), Samantha Ziegaus (4th-13:14),
Nicole Morse (6th-13:58), ShiAnn Steed
(12th-18:11), Shannon Evans (18th-19:28)
and Taylor Seay (25th-20:27). Leia Rivera
placed 34th in 30:06.


COURTESY PHOTO '
Timothy Pierce leads the way for the Eye of
the Tiger boys at the Little Everglades
Pre-State Invitational in Dade City on Friday.


26


from three players. Brody
Crews scored four times,
Carl Jefferson added three
touchdowns and Kyler
McCray scored twice.
Richardson (3-3) plays
Lake City Middle School at
7 p.m. Oct. 26 in the annual
'Commander's Cup game.


83-yard touchdown return
with 2:55 left in the game.
Zyeric 'Woods scored the
PAT.
Alex Doughty had a
70-yard touchdown return
negated by a penalty.
Baker County got nine
rushing touchdowns


Answer to Previous Puzzle

UR L RE F R G
_TOE A E R T
H RP. T A
APEITIFANT I
HERNON ION
NN HOC


YEAR D M IDA


E LS SE RECA
A HS RIO
MOIRIPH GOAP
TBAR WELLP I
N-IC E H U GO0 REJD
SEES OR EO PRRY


Gowns
Did a fall
chore
Graph part
Thicken
Kind of tire


9 Disney CEO
Bob -
10 You, formerly
11 Auricle
17 Raze
19 "Titanic" mes-
sage
22 Van Gogh's
medium
23 Music
media
24 Ambiance
25 Marble streak
26 Helsinki native
27 Colorless
28 Satisfy fully
30 Tizzy
32 Any ship
34 Rubber city
35 Bridge sup-
ports
37 Fuse unit
38 Way off
40 Sweater style
(hyph.)
41 Mme. Gluck of
opera
42 San Obispo
43 Lamb's pen
name
44 Fossil fuel
45 Moon ring
46 Winged insect
47 Dorm coverer
49 Crone


Continued From Page li
Richardson's scores -in
the second half came on
kickoff returns.
Jones sliced through the
right side of the coverage to
score on an'82-yard return.
He also ran in the extra
point at 5:38 of the third
quarter. Jones added an


1 s
5
8
12
13
14C
15

16
18C
20

21

22 C
a
23 S
h26
26 M


ACROSS 36 Darth's real
name
Summery 38 Muscle cell
Dusting cloth 39 A-Team heavy
Observance (2 wds.)
Milky Way unit 40 Kilmer of films
Logging tool 41 Purina rival
Ottoman title 43 Add vitamins
Autry 46 River from
of oaters Lake Tana
Plover (2 wds.)
Clumps 48 Beery or
Blarney Stone Webster
ocale 50 Arab chief
Grassy 51 "Old" London
surface theatre
Caviar, 52 Benefit often
actually 53 Fluency
Stone Age 54 Wild ox of
homes Tibet
Meadows 55 Plow through


29 Club fee
30 Door part
31 Go team!
33 Mr. in Bombay
34 Blyth and
Miller
35 Canape
topper


DOWN


1 Chow mein
additive
2 List detail
3 Superboy's
girlfriend


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
12 13 14 r 5 16 17 M 8 19 110 Ill


10-20


2010 by UFS, Inc.


WOLVES: Commander's Cup Oct.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 '1


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
San Francisco Giants shortstop Juan Uribe makes a play on a ball hit by Philadelphia
Phillies' Placido Polanco during the eighth inning of Game 3 of baseball's National League
Championship Series in San Francisco on Tuesday.


Cain outduels Hamels,

Giants take 2-1 NLCS lead


By JANIE McCAULEY
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO
Cody Ross keeps giv-
ing his best Barry Bonds
imitation.
With the home run king
watching and cheering from
a front-row seat, Ross deliv-
ered again, Matt Cain out-
dueled Cole Hamels and the
San Francisco Giants beat
the Philadelphia Phillies 3-0
Tuesday for a 2-1 lead in the
NL championship series.
Picked up late in the
season from Florida, Ross
added to his quickly grow-
ing postseason legacy.
He homered three times
in the first two games at
Philadelphia and hit an RBI
single in Game 3 to break a
scoreless tie.
"He plays with no fear,"
Giants manager Bruce
Bochy. "That's what you
like about the guy."
Bochy even tinkered
with his lineup, moving
Ross up into the No. 5 spot
The good-natuied guy who
aspired to be a rodeo clown
.as a kid came to the plate to
chants of "Cody! Cody!"
"I'm just going up there
trying to relax, stay calm,
make something happen,"
Ross said.
San Francisco grabbed
the edge in their best-of-
seven series against the
two-time defending NL
champions with two
more games in their home
ballpark.
The Giants have never
won the World Series since
moving to San Francisco
for the 1958 season. They
came close in 2002, led by
Bonds' slugging.
The last time the Giants
franchise won the World
Series was 1954, when it
played in New York. On a
team that included future


Hall of Famer Willie Mays
and other big-name players,
it was a part-time outfielder
who hit .253 in his career
- Dusty Rhodes who
emerged as the Series star
with two homers in six
at-bats.
So far this postseason,
that role of unlikely hero
belongs entirely to Ross,
an outfielder with a career
.265 mark.
Ross hit an RBI single in
the fourth inning to break
a scoreless tie and fellow
playoff first-timer Aubrey
Huff followed with a run-
scoring single.
This marked the third
impressive pitcher's duel
in as many games of this
NLCS. First, it was Roy
Halladay vs. Tim Lincecum,
then Roy Oswalt and
Jonathan Sanchez.
Joe Blanton will start for
the Phillies in Game 4 on
Wednesday night. He last
pitched one inning of relief
on the final day of the sea-
son, an 8-7 loss at Atlanta,
and has riot. started since
Sept 29.
Rookie Madison
Bumgarner starts for the
Giants. He pitched the
division series clincher at
Atlanta.
On a beautiful and festive
fall day in the Bay Area,
the Giants delivered back
home in front of 43,320
towel-waving fans at AT&T
Park. Bochy's moves cer-
tainly worked.
Along with Ross moving
up, Aaron Rowand earned
a start in center field,
then doubled and scored
on Freddy Sanchez's fifth-
inning single.
Cain allowed two hits
over seven innings, struck
out five and walked three in
a strong 119-pitch effort.
Javier Lopez pitched the
eighth and Brian Wilson


finished it for his fourth
postseason save and sec-
ond in as many tries this
series. .
Cain and 2008 World
Series MVP Hamels each
began with three scoreless
innings. The left-handed
Hamels didn't allow a hit
until Edgar Renteria's sin-
gle to start the fourth, while
Carlos Ruiz's one-out single
in the third was the first off
Cain.
After Renteria's hit,
Sanchez sacrificed him
to second. Buster Posey
struck out swinging and
former Phillies outfielder
Pat Burrell walked. Ross
followed with his single. .
San Francisco managed
only four hits in losing 6-1
on Sunday night at Citizens
Bank Park. The Giants
knew they needed to do
more Tuesday to swing the
momentum back in their
favor.
Bochy started Rowand
in center field against
his former club in place
of the struggling Andres
Torres. Bochy said Torres
would be back in the line-
up Wednesday against a
right-hander.
Freddy Sanchez in the
No. 2 hole was the only
Giant to stay in the same
spot in the order.
Shortstop Renteria
moved into Torres' regular
leadoff hole, while Huff was
moved down to sixth from
third.
Juan Uribe played after
he was scratched late before
Game 2 with a bruised
left wrist. An MRI exam
Monday showed no struc-
tural damage.
Rowand doubled in
the fifth and scored on
Sanchez's single two outs
later. The first person to
greet Rowand in the dugout
was Torres.


NFL, Favre meet


about texts, photos


By DAVE CAMPBELL
Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- Brett Favre spoke with
an NFL security official
Tuesday about text mes-
sages and lewd photos he
allegedly sent to a New
York Jets employee two
years ago when he played
for the team, according to
a person with knowledge of
the situation.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on condi-
tion of anonymity because
details of the meeting
between Favre and NFL


vice president for securi-
ty Milt Ahlerich were not
made public.
ESPN first reported the
meeting, citing unidentified
sources.
Commissioner Roger
Goodell said previously the
Vikings quarterback would
meet this week with a league
official about the messages
and graphic photos he alleg-
edly sent to Jenn Sterger,
now a TV personality with
the Versus network. The
website Deadspin reported
the story about the mar-
ried quarterback's alleged
behavior toward Sterger,


who has not commented on
the report.
Favre arrived at Vikings
headquarters in the morn-
ing, and reporters across
the street saw his agent Bus
Cook drive out of the park-
ing lot in Favre's vehicle
in the afternoon about 6'12
hours later. Vikings play-
ers have Tuesdays off, but
many of them show up for
treatment or film study.
On the other side of the
Twin Cities at a promotion-
al union event, NFL play-
ers association executive
director DeMaurice Smith
declined to provide details.


GOLF REPORTS


Davis team wins Walmart event

for Children Miracle Network


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey
The Walmart. tour-
nament to support the
Children's MiracleNetwork
Foundation was Friday.
There were 112 players
and 28 teams. The round
started with a speech wish-
ing good luck and fun. A
steak lunch and door priz-
es followed the 18 holes.
The winners were Bennie
Davis, Greg Wellstead, Cliff
Munger and Jim Stoshak
with a 47. The second-place
team of John Livingston,
Mike Smith, Justin Gille
and Brian Shamblin shot a
51 and won by a match of
scorecards. The third-place
team was Daniel Prevatt,
Bill Adams, Darrell Dugat
and Charlie Baker.
.Thanks to everyone-
who supported this great
cause.
Wednesday Blitz win-
ners from Oct 13:
A Division- Chet Carter
and Mike Kahlich +7, tied
for first; Mike Kahlich +4,
third;


COURTESY PHOTO
The team of Bennie Davis, Greg Wellstead, Cliff Munger
and Jim Stoshak fired a 47 to win the Walmart tournament
for the Children's Miracle Network Foundation on Friday.


B Division Ralph
Beekman +9, first; Jim
Evans +7, second; Rocky
Ford + 6, third;
C Division Frog
Niewisch +7, first; Jack
Tuggle +1, second; Joe
Herring Even, third;
D Division Larry
Boone +8, first; Jerry
Perkins +6, second; Keith
Denmark +1, third.
There were nine skins
among the 24-person field.
Niewisch took two, with


one each for A.J. Lavin, Bob
Wheary, Randy Heavrin,
Pete Skantzos, Carter,
Evans and Boone.
Flo Neu won the Ladies
Blitz on Oct. 12. with +4.
Susie Mick was second at
+3.
Joe Herring won the top
of the Hill on Oct. 11 with
+5. Ronnie Ash was second
at +3.
Quail Heights hosted the
District 4-1A high school
tournaments on Tuesday.


Moon golfers light up course


The 911 calls reported
that lighted UFOs and
prowlers were onr the
course Friday night, but it
was only Moon Golf.
Tournament winners:
Gross Dakota Smith,
Chad. Hunter, Bryce
Hawthorne and Tim
Bagley tied at' 32 with
Donald Roberts, Jason
Watts, Russell Phillip and
Dustin Walker;
Net first place Brian
Prevatt, Dan Bryant, Nick
Vercher and Steve Lane
with 21; second place
-- Dalton Maudlin, Tim
Bagley, Ty Williams and
Andrew Johnson with 24.
In the Wednesday Blitz,
Chad Hunter built a big
lead with three early
birdies and coasted to a
six-shot win with +9. Keith
Shaw took second at +3.
Jonathan Allen topped
the skins game with two,
followed by Steve Patterson,
Donald Roberts and Hunter
with one apiece.
Steve Patterson's two
late birdies were enough


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

to pull him into a first-place
tie with Mike Carr at +3 in
the Saturday Blitz. Steve
Thomas put up five bird-
ies, including four in a row,
on the front nine for a solo
third-place finish.
Four of Thomas' birdies
held up in the skins game.
Patterson collected on
two winners. Scott KiFhton
and Dennis Crawf6r4each
had one. r;-
The Good Old, Boys
three-way match featured
big team scores, led by
the threesome of Jerry
West, Terry Mick and
Jerry Snowberger in a
14-10 win over Mark
Risk, Jim Bell and Bobby
Simmons..
Monty Montgomery, Jim
Stevens and Tom Elmore
were third with a respect-
able 8 points.
Scores in the two-way
match were more conven-


tional, with a 6-3 win for
Eli Witt, Merle Hibbard,
Nick Whitehurst and Dan
Stephens over Ed Snow, Joe
Persons, Howard Whitaker
and Mike Spencer.
Risk took medalist hon-
ors for the second straight
week with a round of
34-35-69.Otherscoresofnote
came from Montgomery
(35-38-73), West (36-39-
75), Snow (3740-77) and
Simmons (3940-79). Merle
Hibbard (38) had the nine-
hole win over Eli Witt (39)
on the back side.
Ladies got to "select a
drive" to play in the LGA
net score event Caroline
Stevens made the best of
her choices for a net 64
win. Roberta Whitaker and
Natalie Bryant tied for sec-
ond at 66.
The MGA Cup tourna-
ment, played in'a Ryder
Cup format, is Saturday
and Sunday.
Tee times begin at
8:30 a.m. both days. Pairings
will be drawn at 7 p.m.
Friday in the clubhouse.


Parcells no longer


working with Dolphins


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press i

MIAMI Bill Parcells
has again reduced his role
with the Miami Dolphins:
He stopped coming to
work.
Parcells cleared out his
office and no longer works
at the team complex, but
the Dolphins said he'll
continue as a consultant
to general manager Jeff
Ireland and coach Tony
Sparano.
"Whether he is physically
here or not is really immate-
rial to the contributions that
he will make on an ongoing
basis," chief executive offi-
cer Mike Dee said Tuesday.
"From the football opera-
tions point of view, it really is
business as usual. Nothing
has really changed."
However, the 69-year-old
Parcells' role has become
even more limited since
he gave control of the foot-
ball operation to Ireland
shortly before the season.
At that time, the Dolphins
said Parcells would remain
involved daily, but that may
no longer be the case.
"The role is fluid," Dee
said, "and how it shapes
going forward is Bill's deci-
sion." Dee wouldn't specu-
late about whether Parcells
is likely to help with next
year's draft.
Parcells was hired


nearly three years ago by
owner Wayne Huizenga,
who subsequently sold
the team to Stephen Ross.
Dolphins radio announcer
Jim Mandich, who won two
Super Bowl rings with the
team as a player, was among
those to complain that
Parcells is stepping back
with his job unfinished.
"When somebody comes
in and they don't respect or
revere or treat our fran-
chise like they love it I
never had the feeling Bill
Parcells was emotionally
engaged," Mandich said at
the weekly fan luncheon
he hosts. "He was a hired
gun. He was a personality.
He came in; he leaves two
years later. I feel like tak-
ing Listerine and washing
my mouth out, because it
doesn't feel good to me."
Ross hasn't commented
publicly since Parcells
handed over control to
Ireland. Dee described
as "not accurate" specula-
tion that a rift developed
between Parcells and
Ross, Ireland or Sparano,
prompting the transition in
control.
"I think Bill just decided
it was the right time," Dee
said. 'There were no adver-
sarial, contentious issues
I'm aware of between own-
ership or anybody. This is
a group that continues to
work closely together. Jeff


and Tony are here togeth-
er because of Bill."
Parcells was hired as
Miami staggered to the end
of a 1-15 season in 2007,
and Ireland and Sparano
came aboard shortly
thereafter.
The Dolphins staged a
remarkable turnaround in
2008, when they went 11-5
and won the AFC East, but
they finished a disappoint-
ing 7-9 last season. They're
3-2 this season going into
Sunday's game against
Pittsburgh.
"I speak for Steve when
I say we love the team we
have," Dee said. 'Tony and
Jeff have Steve's full confi-
dence. It has been that way
since Steve got here, and
especially in the last six
weeks."
Parcells worked a full
schedule his first two years
in Miami. He arrived early
each day, watched practic-
es from a golf cart, poured
over video of games and
offered players frequent
feedback.
That routine ended
at the conclusion of this
year's training camp, but
Parcells has continued to
attend some practices.
"You've still got to
watch over your shoul-
der, because you know he
could be standing there,"
Pro Bowl tackle Jake Long
said.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

WE'RE MOVING YOU SAVE!
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New double wides from the low 40s and one remaining triple wide in the 90s!
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HURRY BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE!!!

PRESTIGE 3973 HWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY
HOME CENTERS 186'75-i7 *' O ~ '.) ,385
ORT WHITE indian.

of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High defenders Kevin Calhoun (41), Jordan Shaw (40) and A.J. Legree team up
for a tackle in the North Florida Christian game.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Josh Faulkner (27) trips up a runner from North Florida Christian, as other
Indian defenders close in on the ball.

Homecoming at Fort White


Fort White High
football returns
from a week of.
rest to decide
the District 2-2B
playoff teams with three
consecutive games.
The first for the Indians
is homecoming, against
East Gadsden High at
7:30 p.m. Friday.
East Gadsden (4-3)


played last week and lost
to FAMU High, 26-20. The
Jaguars are 1-1 in district
play, with a 13-8 home win
over Florida High and a
57-17 whipping at Taylor
County High.
Fort White won 2009's
First meeting of the two
schools, 19-12. The Indians
are 4-2 overall and 2-0 in
district play.


Corey Fuller is the new
head coach of'the Jaguars.
Fuller played cornerback
at Florida State.
East Gadsden opened
the season with a win
over West Gadsden
High. Following a loss to
Wakulla High, the Jaguars
reeled off three straight
wins before losing the last
two weeks.


A'r~


~, A..-



~ ~ A,.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High kicker Colton Jones (17) kicks off in the Indians' game against North
Florida Christian School on Oct. 1.

2010 Indians Football Schedule


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0
Fort White 14, Newberry 13
Fort White 52, Suwannee 22
Fort White 31 Union County 12
N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28
Fort White 30, Florida High 27
Wk 7 East Gadsden,H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 8 Taylor County A 7:30 p.m.


Wk 9 Bradford H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


,*


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3 2ox Foaunmtain Drtk
and got a Hhbey
Candy Ba for
only 254
(A V*&#)


Eme,, *o


I.hTHWAO. 4 *00D .AT AN LCTION


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590 SW Arlington Blvd. #113 Lake City, FL
Phone (386) 752-0580
Lic. # RR282811326


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"I I e (RIItTy iReI


























Have a holiday

heart-to-heart
3C


Wednesday, October 20, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


IC


Debby Freeman
(386) 755-0235 ext. 112


Change

of seasons

issues a

reminder
T he cool weather
and the return
of fall have
brought a smile
to many in
Columbia County during
the past week.
A change in seasons
often foretells something
wonderful like the upcom-
ing holiday season and
more opportunities to
enjoy the great outdoors.
However, a change of sea-
sons; especially leading
into the holidays, can be a
grim reminder of all of the
people and things that we
have lost.
The holiday season
is often the time when
depression and sickness
take hold of us.
This change of seasons
reminds us of holidays in
the past when we had all
of our family members
and we could still cook
the Thanksgiving turkey
and make all of the pies
and side dishes for which
we have become famous
or produce toys from the
workshop for our grand-
children.
Life is a steadily evolving
process.
Change does not come
easily.
Sometimes our families
decide that they will help
us to do things, but do not
realize that we interpret.
this "as we are too old to
cut the mustard anymore."
AS I age, it is easier for
me to respect my mother's
wishes to let her live alone
and to continue to respect
her abilities.
I also understand how
lonely she gets if we
should get so busy with
our own lives that we have
not called or visited when
she expects us to. Family
dynamics only get harder
as we age and have aging
parents.
In this past two weeks,
Carol Ross (Wellness
Consultant), George Eby -
(retired nurse) and I had
the privilege of participat-
ing in a Leaders Course
to help teach people tech-
niques for "self-manage-
ment."
These selfmanagement
techniques are proven
ways in which to handle
overwhelming events,
such as the diagnosis of a
chronic disease which has
the possibility of changing
our lives in a permanent
fashion.
When these kinds of
changes occur, we cannot
stop them, however, we can
accept that the change has
occurred and follow the

SEASONS continued on 4C


Home away from home



Local veterans' domiciliary seeks donations


JASON MAFTHEW WALKER :i-- ,h-:..:,,
Amber Baughman, activities director and donations coordinator at the Robert H. Jenkins Jr. Veterans' Domiciliary Home, assists resident Thomas Head, 55,
in picking out a shirt donated to the facility's clothing room. Clothing, toiletries and other personal items for both men and women are needed. 'It's great,'
Head said. 'I came here with stuff. There are lots of those who came here with nothing, so this is a blessing.'


By LEANNE TYO '
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The local veter-
ans' domicili-
ary is always in
need of dona-
tions to pro-
vide for its residents' basic
needs and activities.
The Robert H. Jenkins
Jr. Veterans' Domiciliary
Home of Florida in Lake
City relies on donations
to help stock its clothing
room and hobby shop for
the residents' use.
"Any donations that
come into our home we
use it for our veterans,"
said Amber Baughman,
activities director and
donations coordinator.
"Staff can't touch it. It's all
for our veterans."
While the veteran
assisted living facility can
house 149 residents, it
is currently home to 125
residents from ages 32 to
about 99.
"We have a pretty large
range there as far as who
we have herewith us,"
Baughman said.
Of those 125 residents,
about 10 are women.
"A lot of times, people
just don't even think that
we have women, so we get
very little donations for
women," Baughman said.
The home's clothing
room, stocked with basic
hygiene necessities and
clothing, is open three
days a week for veterans
to peruse and take what
they need in a monitored


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Domiciliary residents Tim Simmons (left), 78, and Howard Ellsperman, 92, read a book from
the library's collection.


setting.
Allowing residents the
chance to take advantage
of the clothing room is a
way to help them adjust to
moving into a new, unfa-
miliar place with a large
amount of other people,
Baughman said.
"You didn't have all
these people trampling
through your house, so
it can be an adjustment
process, and it can be
depressing, so we try to
make this as least of a
restrictive environment
as possible," she said. "Of
course we have to have
rules, but I try to keep my


residents maintaining as
much dignity and control
and independence as pos-
sible. Otherwise, they're
not going to be happy."
Items available in the
clothing room come at no
cost to the residents.
"Everything is free,"
Baughman said. "We do
not charge the resident,
so it's basically like going
shopping, but its free."
Items needed most
often for the clothing
room are underarm
deodorant, toothpaste,
body soap, facial tissue,
big bottles of shampoo,
after shave lotions and


denture cream or denture
cleaning tablets.
The domiciliary is also
in great need of adult-
appropriate donations
that can be used for the
residents' activities or the
home's hobby shop, an
activities room for veter-
ans to enjoy.
Baughman said items
like fishing poles, military-
inspired model airplanes
or helicopters appropriate
for adults and a sewing
machine are items the
residents have expressed
interest in. She stressed
the domiciliary will accept
a wide range of things


that can be used for adult-.
appropriate activities.
"There's just so many
things that spark 149 per-
sons' interests," she said.
Other suggestions
for donations are large-
font crossword puzzles,
games for the home's Wii
Nintendo video game sys-
tem, gym equipment and
items that could be used
in a possible chapel at the
home, Baughman said.
People should con-
sider donating to the
domiciliary because it
helps to boost residents'
morale when they can
have their basic needs
met, Baughman said, such
as having body wash or
another pair of clothes to
change into.
"And we're just trying
to create more of a com-
munity-type environment
here, more of a home
lifestyle versus a sterile,
institution-like setting,"
Baughman said. "That's
my biggest goal working
here."
No donations will be
turned away, Baughman
said, and people donating
will receive a thank-you
note from the residents
and a form to write the
donation off on their
taxes.
Baughman said that
clothing donations should
be usable and clean.
For a list of what the
domiciliary is in need of
and to make a donation,
contact Baughman at
(386) 758-0600, ext. 3112.


I -








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


Hospice care center offers the comforts of home


An inpatient hos-
pice care cen-
ter offers all
the comforts of
home, as well
as the compassion and
care that patients and fami-
lies need during an espe-
cially challenging time.
While most hospice
patients prefer to be at
home, a care center pro-
vides "a home away from
home" when patients
require more intensive
symptom management
and pain relief than they
can receive at home or in
a hospital. It's also a place
where a caregiver who
needs a break can trust
that a loved one will be in
good hands.
At Haven Hospice's care
centers, you'll find beauti-
ful indoor and outdoor
spaces such as sunrooms
and courtyards; cozy


patient rooms; chapels for
reflection; and playrooms
to keep children occupied.
The families Haven
serves tell us how much
these care centers mean to
them.
One family member
wrote, "You have the most'
beautiful and peaceful
surroundings any family
would want for their loved
one." A young woman
who was a child when
her grandfather died in
Haven's care wrote: "The
playroom became the
place I ran to when my
feelings became too much
for me. I am so grateful for
that."
Inpatient hospice care
centers are actually rare
both in Florida and nation-
wide. Only about 300 of
the 4,600 U.S. hospice
organizations operate
freestanding hospice inpa-


Diana Wayne
www.hovenhospice.org
tient care centers. Haven's
four hospice care centers
have been nationally
recognized, and they're
strategically located
throughout the state to be
as accessible as possible.
In Florida, care centers
can only be built when the
Florida Agency for Health
Care Administration
(AHCA) has approved
them. Last month, ACHA
granted Haven Hospice
a Certificate of Need to
break ground 'on an 18-bed


care center in the Clay
County area. Hundreds
of people throughout the
community wrote letters
of support for the project,
knowing what a difference
an inpatient care center
can make for their family
at the end of life.
The patient care staff
plays a large part in
making the hospice care
center feel like home. The
staff is focused on mak-
ing each patient comfort-
able, as well as providing
needed support for fami-
lies who are preparing to
lose someone they love.
Haven's care centers
offer a second home aind
a sense of community for
everyone who enters.
The Suwannee Valley
Hospice Care Center in
Lake City, with 16 beds,
is known as much for the
healing power of art as


for the staff who cares for
patients and their families.
The center hosts artists
from two area art associa-
tions, and the sale of their
work helps to support
patient care. Very often,
the picture that is hung by
a patient's room is the one
a patient's family seems
to need. Each family's cir-
cumstances touch the staff
deeply because "they go
through so much," one of
the nurses says. The staff
devotes a lot of time to
comforting the families. *
"At Haven, we believe
that everyone deserves
compassion, care and
comfort, especially during
life's final journey," said
Haven Hospice President
Tim Bowen. "It's an honor
and a privilege to offer
inpatient care centers to
enhance the care we pro-
vide."


Haven Hospice is North
Florida's expert in end-
of-life and palliative care
and is one of three 2008
Circle of Life Award@
winners nationwide to
be recognized as leaders
in improving the care of
patients near the end of
life oivwith life-threatening
conditions. Haven Hospice
has also been recognized
as a Florida Pacesetter for
its leadership in promot-
ing living wills. Haven
Hospice has served more
than 45,000 patients and
families since 1979 and has
been licensed in Florida
as a not-for-profit hospice
since 1980. For more
information, visit www.
havenhospice.org or call 1-
800-727-1889.

M Diana Wayne is public
relations coordinator for
Haven Hospice.


Fed: Inflation too low to increase retirement benefits


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Another year without an
increase in Social Security
retirement and disabil-
ity benefits is creating a
political backlash that has
President Barack Obama
and Democrats pushing to
give a $250 bonus to each
of the program's 58 million
recipients.
The Social Security
Administration said Friday
inflation has been too low
since the last increase in
2009 to warrant a raise for
2011. The announcement
marks only the second year
without an increase since
automatic adjustments for
inflation were adopted in
1975. This year was the
first
House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi promised to sched-
ule a vote after the Nov. 2.
election on a bill to provide
one-time $250 payments to
Social Security recipients.
Obama endorsed the pay-
ment, which would be simi-
lar to one included in his
economic recovery pack-
age last year.
Obama had pushed,
for a second payment
last fall, but the proposal
failed in the Senate when
a dozen Democrats joined
Republicans on a procedur-,
al vote to block it. Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid
(D-Nev.), said Friday that
in the post-election session
"I will be working hard to
gain Senate passage for a
proposal that ensures that
America's seniors are treat-
ed fairly."
Michael Steel, a spokes-
man for House Republican
leader John Boehner of
Ohio, said that if Democrats
were serious about a bonus,
they would have voted on
it before lawmakers went
home to campaign for re-
election.
Barbara Kennelly, a for-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Betty Dizik is seen near her home in Tamarac Thursday. Dizik, 83, said she was working as a tax preparer until April, when
she was laid off. She said she has not been able to find other work, so she gets by on a monthly Social Security check of
$1,200. She said it's her only source of income. The Social Security Administration has announced that more than 58 million
retirees and disabled Americans will have to go a second straight year without a cost-of-living increase in benefits.


mer Democratic congress-
woman 'from Connecticut,
applauded Pelosi's promise
to vote on the payments.
But, she said, she doesn't
understand why Congress
didn't vote on the bill before
recessing for an election
in which Democrats are
in danger of losing their
majorities in both the
House and Senate.
"I just don't understand
it," said Kennelly, now
president and CEO of the
National Committee to
Preserve Social Security
and Medicare. "I don't care,
Republican or Democrat,
they say they care about the
senior vote. They' could've
done it."
Annual cost-of-living


adjustments, or COLAs,
are automatically set each
year by an inflation mea-
sure that was adopted by
Congress in the 1970s.
Friday's announcement
was triggered by the Labor
Department's release
of inflation numbers for
September. The report
showed that consumer
prices are still lower than
they were two years ago,
ivhen the last COLA was
awarded.
The increase for 2009
was 5.8 percent, the larg-
est in 27 years. It was trig-
gered by a sharp but short-
lived spike in energy prices
to above $4 a gallon in the
summer of 2008. When the
price of gasoline later fell


- to below $2 a gallon
- so did the overall infla-
tion rate. Seniors, however,
kept their increase in ben-
efits.
"They received a nearly
6 percent COLA.for infla-
tion that no longer really
existed," said Andrew
Biggs, a former deputy
commissioner at the Social
Security Administration
and now a resident scholar
at the American Enterprise
Institute. "It looks bad, but
they're actually not being
treated unfairly."
By law, the next increase
in benefits won't come until
consumer prices as a whole
rise above what they were
in the summer of 2008.
The trustees who oversee


Social Security project that
.will happen next year. They
predict the increase at the
start of 2012 will be 1.2
percent.
A little more than 58.7
million retirees, disabled
Americans and surviving
spouses and minor children
of enrollees receive Social
Security or Supplemental
Security Income. Social
Security was the primary
source of income for 64
percent of retirees who got
benefits in 2008.
The average Social
Security benefit: $1,072 a
month.
Social Security is sup-
ported by a 6.2 percent
payroll tax paid by both
workers and employers -


on wages up to $106,800.
Because there is no COLA,
that amount will remain
unchanged for 20.11.
The absence of inflation
will be of small comfort
to many older Americans
whose savings and home
values haven't recovered
from the recession.
"They are absolutely
livid that Congress has
bailed out banks, bailed
out Wall Street, bailed out
big car manufacturers and
they didn't get a COLA,"
said Mary Johnson, a pol-
icy analyst for the Senior
Citizens League. "Their
costs. are going up, and
they cannot understand
the government's measure
of inflation. They feel it's
rigged."
Betty Dizik, a retired tax
preparer and social work-
er from Tamarac, said- an
increase in benefits would
help her'pay for medicine
she can no longer afford
to treat her kidney disease.
At 83, her only source of
income is a $1,200 month-
ly payment from Social
Security.
"I think seniors are
going to be upset because
, gas has gone up, food has
gone up, things in the store
are expensive to buy," Dizik
said. "Let's face it, prices are
rising and I don't know how
they do the cost of living."
Claire Edelman of Monroe
Township, NJ., said she was
so hard up that at the age of
83 she applied for a tempo-
rary job as a census taker for
the 2010 Census. She didn't
get the job, so she gets by on
a small pension from her job
with the state and a monthly
Social Security payment of
$1,060.
"I can't understand why
the Congress hasn't seen
that there's been an increase
in everything," Edelman
said. "They say that noth-
ing went up last year?" she
added. "What's the matter
with them?"


US researchers creating tests to help

determine when to hand over the keys


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Scientists are creating
tests to show when it's
time for people with early
Alzheimer's disease to stop
driving.
It's one of a family's most
wrenching decisions, and
as Alzheimer's increasingly
is diagnosed in its earliest
stages, it can be hard to tell
when a loved one is poised
to become a danger.
Factor in that much of
the country lacks public
transportation, and quit-
ting too soon restricts inde-
pendence for someone who
otherwise may function
well for several years.
"That's a real cost to
the individual and family
and society," says Jeffrey
Dawson of the University


of Iowa. "You have to have
some sort of trade-off
between the individual's
independence along with
the safety of the driver and
with other people on the'
road."
Typically, specialists
say, patients gradually
scale back their driving,
avoiding busy freeways
or night trips or left-turn
intersections. Alzheimer's
Association adviser Sue
Pinder, 58, recently gave
up big-city driving even
though it meant fewer vis-
its to a daughter in Dallas.
Shortly after Pinder's
diagnosis in 2004, she
signed a form designat-
ing her husband to decide
when she'll quit driving
altogether. He gave her a
GPS system ,for her last
birthday. It helped Pinder


navigate unfamiliar streets
when, to be near another
'daughter, the couple recent-
ly moved to West Monroe,
La., from a nearby town.
"That's helped a lot where
I don't have to worry, I
can concentrate on my driv-
ing and not the directions,"
Pinder says.
Working on ways to help
similar patients, Dawson's
team in Iowa developed an
intricate behind-the-wheel
exam: A 35-mile drive
through rural, residen-
tial and urban streets in
a tricked-out Ford Taurus
able to record just about
every action the driver
takes, much like an air-
plane "black box" does.
Lipstick-size video cameras
were positioned to show
oncoming traffic, too.
Researchers recruited


40 people with early-stage
Alzheimer's who still had
their driver's licenses to take
the road test, and compared
how 115 older drivers with-
out dementia handled the
same trip.
The results, reported in
the journal Neurology, are
striking. On average, the
Alzheimer's drivers commit-
ted 42 safety mistakes, com-
pared with 33 for the other
drivers.
Lane violations, such as
swerving or hugging the
center line as another car
approaches, were the biggest
problem for the Alzheimer's
drivers. They performed 50
percent worse.
But some Alzheimer's
patients drove just as well
as their healthier counter-
parts, stresses Dawson,
a biostatistics professor.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


IIm


family's past i ave a ..,
to prevent

type 2 diabetes H ea rt to

inyour future

FAMILY FEATURES
The holidays are known as a time for family gatherings, catching up with relatives, and sometimes even
the occasional family conflict. Like drama at the holiday dinner table, in many ways your health -.for
better or for worse is influenced by-your family. This year, why not start a conversation that benefits
everyone? Gather your family health history.


Why it's important
Family history of disease is an important part of understanding
your risk for developing a number of serious diseases, including,
type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease that, if left untreated,
can lead to serious health problems including blindness, loss of
limb, kidney failure, heart disease, and early death. In fact, most
people with type 2 diabetes have a family member such as a
mother, father, brother, or sister with the disease.
The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) encourages
all families to gather their family health history this holiday season
and help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in future generations.
By knowing your family health history, sharing it with your
health care team, and taking important steps such as maintaining
a healthy weight or losing a small amount of weight if you are
overweight, making healthy food choices, and being physically
active, you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes (as well as other
serious diseases) and help ensure that you will be enjoying holiday
family gatherings for years to come.

Four questions you should ask
The answers to these key questions could help you prevent type 2
diabetes in your future.
Does anyone in the family have type 2 diabetes? Who has
type 2 diabetes?
Has anyone in the family been told they might get diabetes?
Has anyone in the family been told they need to lower their
weight or increase their physical activity to prevent type 2
diabetes?
Did your mother get diabetes when she was pregnant? This is
also known as gestational diabetes (GDM).
If the answer to any of these is yes, or you have a.mother, father,
brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes, you may be at an increased
risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor and visit,
www.YourDiabeteslnfo.org to learn more about managing your
risk and preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes.

Your history affects your child's future.
While you're gathering your family's history, you need to take
your own into consideration as well.
Gestational diabetes mellitus, or GDM, is a type of diabetes
that occurs during pregnancy and affects about 7 percent of all
U.S. pregnancies or about 200,000 pregnancies each year. If
you had gestational diabetes when you were pregnant, you and
your child have a lifelong risk for getting diabetes.
Women with a history of gestational diabetes have a 40 to 60
percent chance of developing diabetes in the 5 to 10 years
after delivery.


The children of pregnancies where the mother had gesta-
tional diabetes are also at increased risk for obesity and
type 2 diabetes.
*. Women who have had gestational diabetes should be tested
for diabetes six to 12 weeks after their baby is born, and at
least every three years after that. Mothers should let their
child's doctor know that they had gestational diabetes.
Women with a history of gestational diabetes can lower their
risk for developing diabetes by making an effort to reach and
maintain a healthy weight, making healthy food choices, and
being active for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Keeping
a healthy lifestyle helps mother and child lower their risk for
getting diabetes in the future.


For a free tip sheet on gestational diabetes, including steps to
reduce the risk of developing diabetes, call the National Diabetes
Education Program (NDEP) at 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) or visit
its website at www.YourDiabeteslnfo.org.


Hea


Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors
In addition to family history and gestational diabetes, there are other
factors thit increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.
If one or more of the following items apply to you, be sure to talk
with your health care team about your risk for developing type 2
diabetes and whether you should be tested.
I am 45 years of age or older.
I have been told by my doctor to lose weight.
My family background is African American, HispanicLanno,
American Indian, Asiah American. or Pacific Islander
I have been told that my blood glucose (blood sugar) levels are
higher than normal.
My blood pressure is 140/90 or higher, or I have been told that
I have high blood pressure.
My cholesterol (lipid) levels are not normal. My HDL cholesterol
i"good" cholesterol) is less than 35 or my triglyceride level is
higher than 250.
, I am physically active less than three times a v eek.
* I have been told that I have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).,
, The skin around my neck or in my armpits appears dirty no matter
how much I scrub it. The skin appears dark, thick, and velvety.
I have been told that I have blood vessel problems affecting my
heart, brain, or legs.


Losing weight by making healthy food choices is one way to help reduce the risk of
developing type 2 diabetes. Serve your family a quick and healthy dish like this as you
gather around the holiday dinner table.
Cumin Pork and Sweet Potatoes with Spiced Butter
Serves 4


2 8-ounce sweet potatoes, pierced
in several areas with fork
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
Paprika to taste
4 4-ounce boneless pork cutlets,
trimmed of fat
Topping e
2 tablespoons reduced-fat
margarine
2 tablespoons packed dark brown
sugar
1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest
1/4 teaspoon vanilla, butter, and nut
flavoring
1/8 teaspoon ground .nutmeg
4 small oranges, quartered
Cook potatoes in microwave on HIGH
setting for 10 to 11 minutes or until fork
tender. Meanwhile, place a large nonstick


skillet over medium-high heat until hot.
Sprinkle cumin and paprika evenly over
pork chops and season lightly with salt
and pepper if desired. Cook pork chops
4 minutes on each side or until barely pink
in center.
In small bowl, stir together topping ingre-
dients until well blended.
Cut potatoes in half lengthwise, fluff with
a fork, and spoon equal amounts topping
mixture on each half. Serve with quartered
oranges alongside.
Nutritional Information: Calories 335,
Calories from Fat 90, Total Fat 10.0 g,
Saturated Fat 3.4 g, Trans Fat 0.0 g,
Cholesterol 60 mg, Sodium 125 mg,
Total Carbohydrate 37 g, Dietary Fiber 5 g,
Sugars 22 g, Protein 24 g


Photo courtesy of Burwell and Burwell Photography

Copyright 2010 American Diabetes
Association. From 15-Minute Diabetic
Meals. Reprinted with permission from
The American Diabetes Association.
To order this book, call 1-800-232-6733
or order online at http://store.diabetes:org.


Look at your


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


weekend HOME PROJECTS


ONA



BUDGET


Easy Outdoor
Improvements

FAMILY FEATURES
While the outdoor living trend
continues to grow, many
homeowners are electing to
do projects themselves and
opting for simple and cost-
effective outdoor improvements.
According to a 2010 American Society of
Landscape Architects (ASLA) survey of residen-
tial landscape architects, larger scale projects
such as outdoor kitchens remain popular, but the
appeal of more basic projects homeowners can
perform themselves has increased.
Here are some of the projects homeowners are
interested in tackling this year that could be done
over a weekend and on a budget:
m Ornamental water features such as fountains
or splash pools 86.7 percent
Decks 83 percent
Fencing (includes gates) 82.9 percent
If your to-do list includes any of these
improvement-related projects, here's what you
need to know to get some of them done in just
one weekend.
Setting Posts
Fence posts, deck footings, trellises and arbors ...
they all require solid posts set into concrete to
make them stable. This project guide will show
you the basics for your post project.
Required Tools and Materials
Quikrete Fast-Setting Concrete Mix -
poured dry from the bag and into
the hole
Quikrete All-Purpose Gravel or
crushed stone
Plumb line or level
a Shovel or post hole digger
Pressure treated wood posts or
galvanized steel posts
Wood braces and nails (if needed)
Deck or fencing hardware (if
needed)
Note: To figure out how much concrete
you will need for your post project, visit
quikrete.com/calculator.
1, The diameter of the posthole should
be 3 times the post diameter. Hole
depth should be 1/3 the overall post
length, plus 6 inches (150mm) for the
'gravel base.
When the post is to be used for
structural support, such as for deck-
ing, the hole must extend at least 6
inches (150mm) below the frost line.
Deck hardware, if applicable, should
also be kept away from water as a
safeguard versus rust and other corro-
sives. When installing basketball goal
poles or other equipment that requires
a solid footing for safe use, follow the
manufacturer's recommendations con-
cerning mounting hole depth and size.
2. Tamp the sides and bottom of the hole
until firm and place 6 inches (150mm)
of gravel or crushed stone in the hole
to aid in drainage. Tamp it down with
the post, a 2 x 4 or tamping tool.
3. Position the post, checking that it is
level and plumb.
4. Pour the concrete mix dry from the
bag into the hole until it reaches 3
to 4 inches (100mm) from the top.
Recheck the post for plumb and brace
as needed.
5. Pour water onto the dry mix and allow o q
it to soak in. Depending on soil condi- ,
tions, you will need about 1 gallon
of water for each 50 pound bag of
concrete mix placed in the. hole. Dig
larger, dish-shaped holes for posts set
in loose or sandy soil.
6. Fill the remainder of the hole with
soil dug from the hole.
7. The concrete sets in 20 to 40 minutes.
Wait 4 hours before applying heavy
loads to the post, such as a basketball
backboard. (If the temperature is
below 72 degrees, additional time for
curing will be required.)
For Best Results
Use presstire-treated lumber or apply
creosote equivalent to prevent below-
ground deterioration. Galvanized metal
should also be used to prevent rust.


a ia


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Weekend
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landscaping and home
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including:
Concrete patios and
sidewalks
Fences and trellises
Garden water
features
Garden walls
Concrete landscap-
ing borders
Get step-by-step guides
for these and other home
projects at quikrete.com.


Elderly man killed by swarm of bees


Associated Press

ALBANY, Ga. An
elderly man in southwest
Georgia is dead after
being stung more than
100 times by honeybees


while cleaning a yard.
Authorities say 73-
year-old Curtis Davis
died Monday morning
in Dougherty County.
Authorities say he was
cleaning up burning


brush with a tractor when
he hit a beehive.
Family members called
for help after being unable
to reach Davis because
of the large number of
bees.


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Skilled Professionals
are Available
24 Hours A Day,
7 Days A Week


SEASONS: Family Caregiver Groups


Continued From Page 1C
techniques for self-man-
agement to give us back
"self-determination."
The Staff of CCSS, Inc.
provide many ways in
which to learn "self man-
agement" techniques.
Family Caregiver
Support Groups and
Alzheimier's Caregiver
Support Groups are two
ways in which to learn


"self-management."
The "Wealth of
Information Fair," sched-
uled at 9 a.m. on Thursday,
Oct. 21, will showcase
around 45 organizations
and vendors that support
the needs of family dynam-
ics in change.
In the winter of 2011,
Carol, George and I will
offer a six-week course


using our new skills in self-
management.
Let us help you learn
how to look forward to all
of the seasons of your life.
We hope that you will
join us.
Please call me at 755-
0235 ext. 112, if I can
answer questions or refer
you to a service that you
need.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














0olu ia In

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010 1D



CARC serves people with disabilities


sincee its humble
beginnings in
1974 the CARC
Advocates
for Citizens with
Disabilities, Inc. has
helped offer training and
services for individuals
with disabilities.
"The CARC is an organi-
zation that provide choic-
es, opportunities and train-
ing for more independent
functioning for people with
disabilities," said Carol
Jewett, executive director.
The organization was
formed by concerned par-
ents and friends of people
with disabilities.
"A group of parents
wanted something more
for their children with dis-
abilities," she said.
It started off as a small
program and has grown
over the years to currently
a not-for-profit organiza-
tion, Jewett said. A board
of directors governs the
organization and oversees
its policies and proce-
dures.
Several programs help
clients within the organiza-
tion.
Adult day training pro-
vides specialized activi-
ties dealing with daily
living, adaptive and social
skills, vocational skills
and more.
Companion services
provides supervision and
socialization activities at a
person's home. Assistant
is provided for activities
such as meal preparation.
laundry and shopping.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Carol Jewett (right), the executive director of the CARC Advocates for Citizens with Disabilities, Inc. enjoys a game of
Checkers with some of the organization's clients. Pictured are William Gorski (from left), Barbara Freeman, Michelle Murrey,
Kendra Kitchen and Jewett. 'It's a great experience seeing them grow and learn and become independent,' Jewett said. 'I
think our staff knows (our clients') capabilities and pushes them to reach goals.'


A group home with 13
beds is available to train
clients in independent liv-
ing and functioning.
Personal care assis-
tance helps clients with


activities such as bath-
ing, dressing and more.
Employment services
help train, assist and
support clients in work-
ing in the community. .


"We're there to help
them on the job," Jewett
said.
Employment opportu-
nities are also available
through the lawn service,


she said. The lawn service
provides job training for
clients in various areas.
Money from the service
is used to support CARC
programs. It employs 40


people with disabilities.
CARC operates a ,
thrift show, the House
of Bargains, which also
serves as a training
ground for the Adult
Day Training program,
Jewett said. Clients also
create and sell recycled
greeting cards, which
can earn them wages.
In total the organiza-
tion employs 75 people
with disabilities in the
Columbia County area.
The CARC is always
looking for volunteers
to help its mission, she
said.
It is also looking for
a new executive direc-
tor. Jewett is retiring in
January.
"You have to have a
heart for providing for
people with disabilities,"
she said.
A lot of people are not
aware of the CARC and
its services, Jewett said.
Publicity in the Lake City
Reporter helps spread
its message of being an
advocate for citizens with
disabilities.
It can connect people
needing services to the
CARC, she said.
The CARC is located
at 512 S. W. Sisters
Welcome Road: The
phone number is (386)
752-1880 and the fax is
(386) 758-2031 The e-
mail is carc@lakecity-carc.
com.
"We provide a much
needed service in the
community," Jewett said.


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600,









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES




T, jr .? / W I}
Tb U A ALI mcT
Tl49OUG TPE EAThJG Dar
VUoo YO


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Hookup with friend's husband

leaves woman full of guilt


DEAR ABBY: I lived
with my best friend and her
husband for a few months
after moving to a new state.
They recently went through
a rough patch and she took
a vacation to cool off. In her
absence, and under the influ-
ence of a great deal of alco-
hol, her husband and I slept
together. We decided it hap-
pened only because we were
drunk and decided never to
speak of it again.
The problem is it hap-
pened again, this time with
almost no alcohol involved at
all!
I'm reluctant to tell my
friend about our trysts. I think
telling her will do more harm
than good. On the other hand,
the guilt eats at me every day
to the point that I cry over
what I've done to her. Her
husband doesn't want to tell
her, ever. What should I do?
- TO TELL OR NOT TO
TELL
DEAR IT OR NOT
IT: Own your guilt. You've
earned it. And confess your
sin to your religious adviser.
But if you feel that telling your
friend will do more harm than
good, remain silent.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band of 20 years is kind, lov-
ing and well-respected. He is
one of the greatest guys you
would ever meet. We have a
great marriage, rarely fight
and have many things in com-
mon. My problem? When he
speaks, he frequently says


Abigail Yan Buren
www.dearobby.com
"youse guys," and it drives me
insane.
I have a brother-in-law
who uses "I seen" instead of
"I saw," and I know it drives
my sister crazy. How do we
broach the subject with our
hubbies without hurting their
feelings, making them feel in-
adequate or angering them?
I am not going to correct my
husband in public, but when
he says "youse guys" around
our friends, I cringe. Help!
- LANGUAGE POLICE IN
WISCONSIN
DEAR LANGUAGE PO-
LICE: I'ri surprised that af-
ter 20 years of marriage you
would only now be asking for
advice on how to persuade
your husband to use proper
English. My advice is to tell
him you love him and ask if
he would like you to help him
lose the "youse." If he agrees,
start reminding him when
he forgets. But if he says no,
leave it alone and concentrate
on his many virtues. In the
scheme of things, isn't his one
flaw rather insignificant?
DEAR ABBY: I recently
sent an expensive flower ar-
rangement to a dear friend in


the hospital to let her know
how much she means to me.
When I went to visit, the
flowers were not in her room.
When I asked about them,
she said she had given them
to her nurse to display at the
nurses' station. I'm assuming
the gesture was to show her
appreciation for the service
they have given her.
I am disappointed and hurt
because they were meant
to bring her some joy. I un-
derstand that when you give
someone a present the person
has every right to do whatev-
er he or she wants with it, but
I wish she would have waited
until she was discharged to
give the flowers away. Am I
wrong to feel hurt? DIS-
APPOINTED IN CLEVE-
LAND
DEAR DISAPPOINT-
ED: The problem with nurs-
ing a hurt in silence is that it
may be based on an incorrect
assumption, so clear the air
with your friend. If you ask
her why she gave her flow-
ers to the nurses, she may tell
you she thought they were
so lovely she wanted to share
them with everyone who
came to the floor. And that
would mean your bouquet
has brought joy many times
over, which is what I would
consider getting a big bang
for your buck.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-. THE LAST WORD
April 19): You may be Eugenia Last
feeling down but that is no
reason to take your frustra- 22): Changing your geo-
tion out on someone else., graphical location will give
Immerse yourself in a proj- you a different perspective
ect and you will ease the on life and how you should
stress you are undergoing ..-proceed. Not everyone will
Productivity and jatience be in J,,of the choices"
be n. "Opti "hb... "


are me cures to wnat ais
you. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Problems while
traveling can be expected,
so leave plenty of time
to avoid being late. Keep
things simple, even if ev-
eryone around you is try-
ing to complicate matters.
Love is on the rise. '***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Two wrongdo-
ings will notwipe each other
out Think before you give
the wrong impression. Sta-
bility and security should
be what you are striving
to maintain, not chaos and
inevitable change and con-
sequences. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You know what's
best for you, so stop hesi-
tating and start making
things happen. Love is on
the rise, so get out and
socialize. Take advantage
of any chance you get to
make self-improvements.
Your efforts will not go un-
noticed. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.


you make but you have to
do what's best for yourself.

.VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Make whatever
changes are required to
get into a positive position,
conducive to reaching your
goals. Don't be afraid to put
pressure on someone who
owes you or has the poten-
tial to help you out. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Stop.feeling sorry for
yourself and start making
changes that will help you
get on with your life. Now
is not the time to complain
or criticize. Don't let any-
one bully you into making
a decision you aren't ready
to make. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Stop procras-
tinating and start making
things happen. Promote
your ideas and launch what
you've prepared so far.
Children will give you a
different slant to what's go-
ing on in your personal life.
Someone loves you more


than you realize. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Expect the
unexpected and accept the
inevitable. Once you know
where you stand, you will
be able to make decisions.
Say little and observe more
and you will avoid notoriety
for the wrong reason. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stifled emo-
tions and resentment are
likely to crop up in con-
versations. Someone you
consider to be an authority
figure will cause you griet.
Keep a. low profile and
avoid reactions that will tie
up your time and cause you
emotional stress. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Keep your emo-
tions out of the equation.
Focus on money and how
you can earn more. You
will know instinctively how
to, talk your way in- or out
of'a deal. Your negotiation
skills will be good. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Get ready to
take action, propose deals
and tie up loose ends. Mon-
ey is in the stars and, with a
little finagling on your part,
you should find a way to
invest or negotiate a favor-
able deal. Change is good
and it's heading your way.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals C
"TB KD ZL RCB FMJI RDPB B MBS HI,

WFDM FT ZOMFDKMNB KMS RCB

VKDBMR FT KMOBD KMS CKRB." -

B SX KDS KJW B DR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Be brave enough to live life creatively. The creative
place where no one else has ever been." Alan Alda
(c) 2010 by NEA; Inc. 10-20
CLASSIC PEANUTS


I THINK vif'V EN RIDIN6 IN
/ C ^LS---E-x CAN'T
C FIND THf OUTPOST 1

YOU CANt'T WE TH
FO9Tge$ FO0 9 h

.C L -L frow>- o-to


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter ClaSsifieds!

755-5440


l!UiBL



i'Sragay'TI


F Tii


-I.


$100a m 2 5adsettalngS00oles
One Item per ad a
4 lines 6 days a sai tonal
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
t Each item must Include a price.



This Is a non-refundable rate.







4 ie 6"p Ec ditona
One item per ad




nm da, Each additional
4 lines 6 ys line $1.15




Rate applies to private individuals selling
Each Item must Include a price.















personal mehandisetotaling 4,00 or less.
This Is a non-refundable rate.













One stem per ad Each additional
4 lines 6 days line $1515
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.








e Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate. .





O item per a Eachadditional
nes aysline $1.45
Rtapletopiat individuals selling |
peRalpp ecshans totalling $2,500 or less.
Eac item must nclud a -
ll^^ This I a m-eudablera.t'.' ^




One item er ad al
4 lines* 6 aa s ^'^lne $al.5
Rtapletopiate Individuals selling |
Spersoal merc ands totalling $4,000 or less.
i. E~ ~~achie ut Include a price. j
HS^^ his i a no-refundable rate. rm





Alin^ s 6i days 1ac11additionatI
Rate applies "' p rivate Individuals sellng |
personal merchandise totallIn, $6,00; or less. J
IL Each item must Include a price. j
ls This Is a non-refundable rate. i l


4 lines 1 50
3 days
Incliddes 2 signs t l l 5



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440, -
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon,, 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon, 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri, 10:00a.m. Fi., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fn., 9:00 am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice,




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment. '


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

in 1 IotlOnline
WWW,' '"* ,'': '*" *-'* .co i


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 10-213-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NEDRA DAVIS
A/K/A NEDRA MORGAN DAVIS,
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
NEDRA DAVIS, deceased, whose
date of death was August 22, 2010;
File Number 10-213-CP, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE ALL
CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: October 13, 2010.
Personal Representatives:
/s/ Montie J. Morgan
MONTIE J. MORGAN
339 SE Sable Lane
Lake City, Florida 32025
/s/ Michael W. Montgomery
MICHAEL W. MONTGOMERY
7684 SW 115th Lane
Lake Butler, Florida 32054
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tives:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Marlin M. Feagle
Marlin M. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0173248
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
04541954
October 13, 20, 2010
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Ply-
mouth Park Tax Services, LLC of
the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued thereon. The certificate num-
ber and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property and name in
which it was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 2846
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 00
TWN 00 RNGOO PARCEL NUM-
BER 12767-000
C DIV: NE 1/4 BLOCK 44. ORB
826-448,900-1152, 913-842
Name in which. assessed:
CHARLES BROWN III
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be, sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day
of
October, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS-
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04541963
October 20, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
ww.Iakecitvreporter.com


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


Legal

JN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI-
SION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000227
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA F/K/A FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff
vs.
SHAWN D. WILSON A/K/A
SHAWN WILSON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SHAWN D. WIL-
SON A/K/A SHAWN WILSON, IF
ANY, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; STATE
OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF
REVENUE; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated September
22, 2010 entered in Civil Case No.
12-2010-CA-000227 of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for COLUMBIA County, LAKE
CITY, Florida, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the
COLUMBIA County Courthouse lo-
cated at 173 NE HERNANDO AVE
IN LAKE CITY, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 27th day of October,
2010 the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 10, OF GLENWOOD UNIT I,
A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK4,
PAGE(S) 96, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 27th day of September,
2010.
P.DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J.
STERN, PA., ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF
900 South Pine Island Road Suite
400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954)233-8000
09-78127
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact COURT AD-
MINISTRATION at least 7 days be-
fore your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7
days, at the COLUMBIA County
Courthouse at 386-758-1342; if you
are hearing impaired or voice im-
paired, call 711

05524260
October 20,23, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2009-48-DP
M. N. T. DOB:12/12/2006
MINOR CHILD.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO:Shakera Tillman
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vemrnon
Doulas,. Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse. Lake
City. Florida, on NOVEMBER 10,
2010. at 11 A.M., for a Termination
of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED HEREIN.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT.*****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 12th day of Octo-
ber 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: T. Brewington
Deputy Clerk

James W. Kirkconnell, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 21044
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437

Special Accommodations. In accord-
ance with the Americans with Disa-


abilities Act, if you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,


Legal

Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired,, call 711.

05524143
October 13, 20,27, 2010
November 3, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 12-2009-CA-000493
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL-
LON FKA THE BANK OF NEW
YORK, AS TRUSTEE, FOR
CWABS, INC, ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-13,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
MARSHALL JONES, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated March 22, 2010 in the
above action, I will sell to the highest
bidder for cash at Columbia Florida,
on November 3, 2010, at 11:00
A.M., at 3rd Floor of courthouse -
173 N.E. Hernando Ave., Lake City,
FL 32055 for the following descri-
bed property:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 1 IN BLOCK 23
OF "LAKE FOREST UNIT NO. 4,
PLAT NO. 3" AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 79 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN
THENCE NORTH 00' 59' 30"
EAST, 174.20 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 88' 40' 34" EAST, 458.66
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 27' 19'
.34" WEST, 175.68 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 88* 51' 12" WEST, 356.10
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT; THENCE SOUTH 89' 08'
17" WEST, 24.88 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale. The Court, in its discretion,
may enlarge the time of the sale. No-
tice of the changed time of sale shall
be published as provided herein.
DATED: October 4,2010
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio '
Deputy Clerk of the Court
"If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the ADA Coor-
dinator, Ms. Barbara Dawicke at
P.O. Box 1569, 173 N.E. Hemando
St., Room 408, Lake City, FL 32056;
telephone number 386-758-2163 two
(2) working days of your receipt of
this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Serv-
ices at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY); if
you are voice impaired, call the Flor-
ida Relay Services at 1-800-955-
8770."
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Road
Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

04541920
October 13, 20, 2010


020 Lost & Found

EXOTIC
PIGEON
Call
386-752-4966

Lost boat key near Hwy 242 &,47,
white float attached, near BP gas
station, would appreciate call
small reward 386-466-3641
STOLEN White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
Reward being offered
Please call 386-697-1197


060 Services

Adult Family Home, seeking new
residents, 24 hr care, meals, phone,
transportation to Drs. Enjoy our
country living! 386-397-2920

100 Job
SOpportunities

04541945
Senior Teller Position

Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing, cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace
Exec.Dir.- nonprofit working with
people with disabilities. Manages
agency with $2M bgt./120 empl.


Reports to 14 mbr.board. 3 yrs.
admin. exp incl. budgeting,
community relations, fundraising,
implementing policies/programs
required. BA degree preferred.
Email resume
prenew(@lakecity-carc.com.


too Job
100 Opportunities

04541946
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
.ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V.EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA, SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056

PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity to
learn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
email to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information.

Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to
northfloridaiobs( gmail.com

F DA


F- ,'6. ( C. ,,mt my Cneg,
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS'
'SPRING 2011
*College Level Mathematics
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree In mathematics or a Master's degree
with 18 graduate semester hours in
mathematics. Contact Paula Cifuentes at
paula.clfuentes.@fqc.edu
*Chemistry
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree in chemistry or a Master's plus 18
graduate hours in chemistry. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at.paula.cifuentesifgc.edu
.Statistics
Online and/or evening classes. Masters
degree in statistics or a Master's plus 18
graduate hours in statistics. Contact Paula
SCifuentes at paula ciuentestfoc.edu
*Programmable Logic Control (PLC)
At least five years of full-time, in-fleld work
experience and expertise in the installation,
maintenance, operation and troubleshooting
of current technology automated process
controls and associated systems Including
PLC's, variable frequency drives,
instrumentation and process control
systems, hydraulic and pneumatic systems.
Experience In training both factory
technicians and operations personnel. For
additional information contact Bob Deckon at
386-754-4442 or robert.deckonafqc.edu
*Lean Six Sigma
Must have Six Sigma Black Belt with multiple
projects. Must have Master's degree in
engineering, management or quality, or
Master's degree with 18 graduate hours In
some combination of the above fields.
Bachelors degree with PE certification or
five years experience as a practitioner.will
be considered. Teaching experience and/or
curriculum development preferred. For more
Information contact Bob Deckon at 386-7&4-
4442 or robert.deckonitfqc.edu
*Developmental Mathematics
Gilchrist Center. Minimum requirement is a
Bachelor's degree in mathematics or a
mathematics-related field. Contact Carrie
Rodesller at crrie.rodesiler/fagc.du
*Medical Billing and Insurance'
Classes meet on Monday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is at least two
years of experience in Medical Insurance/
Billing with a certificate In this or related
area. AA pr AS degree and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to atracv.hckmnn fc.edu
*Basic Medical Coding
Classes meet on Wednesday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is certified
medical coder with at least two years of
experience in Medical Coding. AA or AS
degree with certification and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to aY..h.|.k.aor.@f.l.c..s.d.i,!
*Nursing Clinical
BSN Required. Masters degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent
clinical experience required. Contact Mattie.
Jones at 386-754-4368 or
mattle.lones@fgc.edu.
College aippication and copies of transcrips
reqiiiir'ed..4lJrogni tarnicript. ,nati he
Application available at yw w.f,.ethii
VP,/ABAtiA, 1O (dtIllo r c Ikdmnn & it ,lrlta


100 Job
Opportunities

05524238
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a Projects
Superintendent. Position
provides management oversight
for all phases of County
construction projects, including
coordination of workers, materi-
als, & equipment. Ensures that
specifications and plans are
followed & that work is
proceeding on schedule & with-
in budget. Minimum Require-
ments: Graduate of a four-year
degree program in construction
management or construction
science and five years or more
of experience assisting with or
supervising construction proj-
ects of increasing complexity; or
an equivalent combination of
training & experience. Must be
currently registered or certified
as a General Contractor or
Building Contractor under
Chapter 489, Florida Statutes.
Valid FL driver's license req.
Salary: $47,486 annually plus
benefits. Successful applicant
must pass pre-employment
physical & drug screening.
Applications available at the
Human Resources Office, Board
of County Commissioners,
135 NE Hernando, Suite 203,
Lake City, FL 32055, or online
at www.columbiacountyfla.com
(386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139.
Application deadline: 11/05/10.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care
Pre-school & Daycare.
Tow Truck Operator. Bryant's
Towing is now hiring Drivers!
Must have a clean MVR never
been charged with or convicted of
a felony. 6 day work week, night
& weekend hours required. Salary
386-752-7799

110 Sales
Employment

05524246
Outside Sales Experience? You
have the sales skills maybe just
the wrong product? Would you
like to make $1000 $1500 a
week? If you are a people
person, we need to talk
-904=472-3626

05524247 I
Promotions Rep
$500 is a bad day for our reps.
Are you an outgoing people
person? Would you like to
make $1000 a week?
Call 904-472-3626


120 Medical
120 Employment

05524099
SLEEP center is hiring a sleep
technician trainee; requirements
include high school diploma and
at least 6 months of direct patient
care experience; 2-4 night shifts;
please e-mail resume to
viducan1065@yahoo.com

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494
P/T Exercise Tech, Fit For Life
Physical Therapy. Clinic in Lake
City Open Tues & Thurs 8-5,
exp preferred.Apply at
application@fitforlifept.com or
call Roberta at 352-514-4565


190 Mortgage Money

FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
2 Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?







'an








Apply Online or In Persont 1152 SW Business Point Dr
40 Lake City, FL 32025
S386.754.8562
l L www.sitel.com EOE


- ADvantage


III










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


310 Pets & Supplies
CHOCOLATE LAB Pups
$300, hlth cert/reg'd
Wellborn
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

S Livestock &
330 Supplies
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215
Mini Horses w/tack,
can hold small children,
* reduced to $400 each
will deliver locally, 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-262'1

402 Appliances
Amana Upright Frost Free White
Deep Freeze
$150
386-752-8978
GE Refrigerator,
front milk door,
36x311/2, height 681/2,
6 yrs old $450, 386-752-1811
GE Washer/Dryer Set,
$250
less than two years old
386-752-8978

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Nightstand
Brown wood, 2 drawers
$10
386-752-8978
Student Desk
by "Woods" 3 drawers
Light Blue $20
386-752-8978

410 Lawn & Garden
4 0 Equipment
Sears Seed & Fertilize .
P...s. hjSpreader ......
works great! $45 .
386-752-8978

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

05524160
"Jack's Gone" Estate Sale
Fishing, hunting, guns, coins,
tools, antiques, household,
furniture, office
715 Miracle Ct (off Pinemount)
386-752-6947

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Thurs only, 8-2,.children/men's
clothes, household, Barbie's & ac-
cessories, books, Forest Country
Subdiv.,off 247, "follow signs"

440 Miscellaneous
FIRM QUEEN Mattress, still in
plastic. Never been used!
$150
Call 386-288-8833
Grill (charcoal)
used a couple of times
$10
SOLD
S Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cubes &
tables, asking $75-$25 each
386-965-2231

h450 o Things
S Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853
630 Mobile Homes
30 for Rent
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,


References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
Ibedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Residential
RV lots. Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2/1 S/W, front kitchen, CH/A
$375. mo. plus
$200. dep
386-752-2254
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450


S Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
$575 monthly ,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $550
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
DWMH, Spacious 4/2, on 5
acresjust south of Lake City,clean,
quiet, great location, storage shed,
$850 mo, 1st, last & $300 sec,
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
For Lease, 3br 2ba, DWMH on 10
ac., fenced, 3 mi S of Columbia
City (off hwy 47) $800 mo. plus
$500 security. 727-415-5071
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White: Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
S386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/A BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-86-7-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
2.5 acres in Olustee, close to
Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 i For Rent
05239/77-/
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,.
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA with carport, screen
porch, Privacy Garden.
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
* on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 396-397-3568
SReduced, spacious, 2/1,.duplex
w/garg, 1300 sq ft, W/D nook up,
CH/A, $625 plus dep & bckgmd
chk, 352-514-2332 / 386-397-2108
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 U For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Furnished Farm House. 3/2,re-
modeled, wrap around porch, hors-
es welcome, on 160 ac, 5 miles to
1-75,2 miles to 1-10, $1200 month
386-362-8708 or 386-3624114
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CR/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45,4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
Irg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres, approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances. ,
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,


1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & I-10
813-286-2323


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo,
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

82O Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2000 obo
386-965-2215

951 Recreational
Vehicles
Carriage LS 36 ft, fifth wheel,
$26K obo, can see by appt. only
(will sell w/F350 package)
serious offers only 386-755-0653

W .SSSSSSBf" 7`7VWf ^i~j~~f


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---------


Classified Department: 755-5440






6D LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010


and


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