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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01428
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/17/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01428
System ID: UF00028308:01428
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text


























Early voting in Columbia begins Monday


Ballot includes
local race for
District 2 post.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
. Political races, state con-
stitutional amendment pro-
posals, resolution adoption
requests and City of Lake


City charter questions will
be on the 2010 ballot for
local voters.
Beginning Monday, -vot-
ers will have-the opportu-
nity to make their voices
heard in the election by
taking part in early voting.
Early voting for the elec-
tion begins Monday and will
conclude Oct. 30. Voting
will take place 8:30 a.m.


to 4:30 p.m., Monday to


Home


Saturday.
Earlyvot-
ers can cast
their bal-
lots at the
Supervisor
of Elections
m a i n
office, 971


W. Duval St., or at the
Fort White office, on State


Road 47 at the Fort White
Community Center.
The general election bal-
lot will feature one local
race in which candidates
Rusty DePratter and Marc
Kazmierski are vying for
the Columbia County
Commission District 2
post.
On the state level, there


are races for the gover-
nor, lieutenant governor,
U.S. Senate, state chief
financial officer, attorney
general, commissioner of
agriculture, state senate
District 14, state repre-
sentative District 10, state
representative District 11,
six Supreme Court judge
positions and five District
Courts of Appeals judge


positions.
The ballot will also
feature seven proposed
amendments to the Florida
Constitution, an amend-
ment for Columbia County
in which voters get to
decide whether to continue
tax abatements and three
questions regarding the
VOTING continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Dogs unleash charm at show
Sherie Luebeker of Jacksonville and Nancy Virden of Ormond
Beach groom their cocker spaniels, Hunker Down and Diego,
before showing them in the sports class at the 31st All-Breed
Dog Show Saturday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds.
Story on page 3A


Shands Hospital

to get renovations

worth $1.6 million


34-page report
suggests $8M
system upgrades.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
The Lake Shore Regional
Medical Center is schedule
for a facelift as a result of the
recent partnership between
Health Management Asso-
ciates and Shands Health.
As a result of the part-
nership, the hospital is get-
ting more than $1.6 million
worth of renovations. Much
of the renovation work
RENOVATIONS continued on 3A


Shands prepares
to launch digital
imaging center
By C.J. Risak
crisak@lakecityreporter. com
Some of the renova-
tions planned for the
Shands Lake Shore
Medical Center, which
will cost more than $1.6
million, are currently
under way. The bulk of
them, however, won't
get started until next
SHANDS continued on 3A


CCSO files charges

vs. suspect in string

of vehicle burglaries


Officials: Man
confessed to Fort
White crimes.

From staff reports
An 18-year-old man was
arrested Friday and charged
with 10 counts of burglary,
all in the Fort White area,
by the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.
Dustyn McArthur
Tolbert, 18, is being held
in the Columbia County
Detention Facility on a
$25,000 bond.
Detectives had been
investigating several vehi-


S 84264 00021 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293


cle burglaries in the Fort
White area on Monday and
Tuesday and were able to
identify Tolbert as a possi-
ble suspect. On Wednesday,
a sheriff's deputy made con-
tact with
Tolbert as
he rode
a bicycle
along U.S.
A. 27 in Fort
White.
Tolbert
Tolbert voluntarily
rode to the Fort White sub-
station, where he confessed
to eight car burglaries and

BURGLARIES continued on 3A


83


SUBSCRIBE TO Sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, I OA


MURAL MANIFESTO


City, business owner cooperate


to preserve downtown artwork


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
John Kuykendall, president of Gulf Coast Financial Services Inc, stands in front of a mural designed and painted by artist
Keith Goodson. A fire escape will be built on the opposite side of the building, saving any damage to the mural.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
There is a happy
ending to the
fate of the
Ichetucknee
Springs mural
on the John Kuykendall-
owned building down-
town.
The City of Lake City
Council agreed to close a
portion of the north side-
walk along NE Veterans
Street, which will allow a
fire exit from that end.
Initially, the mural was
thought to be at risk of
removal when its lease
expired Jan. 12.
Kuykendall plans to ren-
ovate the upstairs of the
building, and fire codes
require installing a new
fire exit. Options for the
new exit were to either
come through the wall on
which the mural is painted
or aside wall on Veterans
Street.
Closing a portion of
the sidewalk will allow

-Opinion .......
Business .......
Obituaries ......
Puzzles ....... .
Life ...........


"Based on everything I know so far,
we've solved the problem."
John Kuykendall
President
Gulf Coast Financial Services Inc.












JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kuykendall discusses the history of the mural and the signifi-
cance it holds for Lake City residents and downtown patrons.


the installation of a new
fire exit from the second
floor of the building on
Veterans Street.
"I'm excited about
my ability to expand,"
Kuykendall said.
Kuykendall said it feels

........ . 4A
......... IC
......... 6A
.. . . 2B
......... ID -


good to know the fate of
the mural.
"I had a customer ask
recently if the mural was
safe," he said. "Based on
everything I know so far,
we've solved the prob-
lem."


TODAY IN
LIFE
Local teacher leaves
for Abu Dhabi.


The sidewalk on
Veterans Street is rarely
used, and it will only
partially be closed, said
City Manager Wendell
Johnson. The area closed
off will be aesthetically
pleasing with decorative
landscaping maintained by
Kuykendall.
City Attorney Herbert
Darby is working on the
terms of the official agree-
ment, Johnson said.
The mural was
completed in 2008 by
Pensacola artist Keith
Goodson. It depicts animal
life and activities on the
Ichetucknee River. It's
$18,000 cost was paid for
by local resident James
Montgomery.
Hearing the city and
Kuykendall reaching an
agreement was exciting
news to him, Montgomery
said.
"I thought they would,"
he said. "It just makes
sense to work something
MURAL continued on 3A


COMING
TUESDAY
Vision Awareness
Day at V/ 1C.







LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


Sevmatch CA$I 3 P34 i

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
6-21-34-40 18 4-21-22-34-35 Afternoon: 7-3-9 Afternoon: 5-5-4-2 1-2-32-35-38-47 12-22-32-34-46
Evening: 1-6-4 Evening: 9-1-0-8


AROUND FLORIDA


Sign on: Babies taught sign language


MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press
PENSACOLA
teacher Robyn
Gates places
three chubby
babies in their
highchairs at
Malena's Mini School and
begins sign language les-
sons.
"Can you say 'Thank
you?'" she asks. Her stu-
dents drool, laugh and
squirm, then baby Haley
reaches a tiny hand to her
mouth and touches it to
her outstretched palm,
making the proper sign.
Sign language has
long been a technique
for psychologists work-
ing with very young
children, but parents
over the last decade or so
have embraced the prac-
tice with special classes,
books, DVDs and online
programs. Interest is so
intense, in fact, that infant
and toddler psychologist
Rahil D. Briggs wonders
whether some parents now
see it as a must-do mile-
stone.
"I worry it is being
seized upon as panacea in
child rearing by market-
ers wanting to capitalize
on very innocent parental
desires for their children-
to do well," said Briggs,
from Montefiore Medical
Center in the New York
City borough of the Bronx.
Parents don't need to
spend hundreds of dol-
lars and hours each day
on baby sign language,
she said. Instead, she sug-
gested starting with a few


signs. Patty cake is a sort
of sign language, she said.
'When you say 'yeah'
and they clap because they
are happy, that is a sign,"
she said.
Briggs and other
experts, however, do
believe that basic sign-
ing reduces frustration
for babies and toddlers
by helping them express
some of their needs and
wants before than can say
the words.
"It does work," said
Mary Benson McMullen,
an early childhood educa-
tion professor at Indiana
University with more than
30 years of experience in
the field.
Within weeks after they
are born, babies begin to
understand a bit of what is
being said around them,
she said. "At 6 months,
they are learning more
and more words and with-
in a year they are learning
hundreds and hundreds of
words," McMullen said.
But most children can't
speak clearly until around
2. By showing infants the
simple signs for words such
as hungry, milk and more,
most infants will eventually
start to use those signs to
tell the parents what they
need.
"Babies are able to use
their hands far sooner than
they can verbally address
their needs," she said.
McMullen said she was
in a preschool classroom
recently and watched an 8-
month-old boy who became
upset when a teacher he
liked, named Mona, left
the room. The baby used


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Oct. 8 photo shows teacher Robyn Gates (right) and
toddler Haley Smith, 20-months-old, as they practice sign
language at Malena's Mini School in Pensacola. Sign lan-
guage has long been a technique for psychologists working
with very young children, but parents over the last decade or
so have embraced the practice with special classes, books,
DVDs and online programs.


his tiny hands and signed
"More Mona hug please."
San Diego mom Monta Z.
Briant began studying baby
sign language in 2000 when
pregnant with her first
child. The signing worked
so well that Briant began '
teaching classes to other
mothers.
"For the first couple of
years I was actually paying


to teach the classes. I'd rent
the room and only a couple
of people would come," she
said.
But in 2003, a publisher
asked her to write a book
about signing for babies.
The book has since been
translated into six lan-
guages. At one point, Target
was ordering 700 copies of
the book each day, she said.


Briant has since created
other books and educational
materials. Her neighbor-
hood classes are hugely
popular. She has up to 70
parents and babies in each
of her six-week sessions.
The idea of teaching
babies to sign became
more popular after the 2004
comedy "Meet the Fockers"
in which Robert De Niro
played an uptight grandfa-
ther determined to make
his grandson into a prodigy
by teaching him to sign,
Briant said.
"It was a movie that
everyone saw and it
brought it into the main-
stream. A lot of people
thought it was trick for the
baby to do that Of course,
they don't learn with all the
drilling and flash cards like
they did in the movie," she
said.
Indeed, babies don't nec-
essarily learn the American
Sign Language way of mak-
ing every sign.
"It has to be a natural
experience between a care-
giver and a baby. If a baby
starts to do something with
their hands and you realize
that is the baby's sign for
"'more," encourage that and
recognize that and that is
fine between you and your
baby," she said.
McMullen said parents
and teachers should make
learning signs fun and
warned parents about the
many, many products offer-
ing to teach babies to sign.
Parents don't need to buy
everything and shouldn't
feel pressured that their
baby has to learn sign lan-
guage to be on track with


other children their age,
she said.
The cost of classes var-
ies widely. For example,
one San Diego teacher
Charges $125 for six, 45-
minute group lessons, while
a Portland, Ore., teacher
charges $89 for the same.
Chloey Usk, 2, began
learning to sign at 10
months. She has been com-
municating with her parents
through sign language for
more than a year. "From a
selfish point of view, it has
cut down on my own level
of frustration," said her
father, Bill lisk.
When Chloey cries, she
often uses sign language to
express things like "hurt"
or "hungry or "milk."
Bill Lisk jokes that his
daughter avoids the signs
for "tired" and "sleep"
because she doesn't like
to take naps. Her parents
figured that out through the
process of elimination, he
said.
Briant recalled that her
daughter used sign lan-
guage at 14 months when
she pointed to the leaf on
a eucalyptus tree in a park
and signed "moon." She
thought the leaf looked
like the moon.
Around that time, Briant
took her daughter to see a
friend who was very preg-
nant and told her that the
woman had a baby in her
stomach. When the baby
came, her daughter made
the signs for "bird" and
"out"
"We had recently been
to the San Diego Zoo and
seen hatchlings in the
incubator," she said.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Hepburn stamps at charity sale


BERLIN
Dispute over an Audrey
Hepburn stamp in
Germany is going to help
poor children in Africa.
A mint-condition sheet
of 10 stamps portraying Hepburn,
a coy smile on her face and a long,
black cigarette holder dangling from
her lips, is expected to fetch at least
400,000 euros ($565,000) at a charity
auction Saturday in Berlin. '
Auctioneer Andreas Schlegel said
he's received interest from four seri-
ous bidders. Two-thirds of money
raised will go to the Audrey Hepburn
Children's Fund, and one-third to
UNICEF Germany.
The sale brings a profitable outcome
to a botched stamp series that should
have been destroyed years ago and
evokes Hepburn's starring role in the
1963 thriller "Charade," in which the
characters chase a set of rare stamps.
The German postal service printed
14 million of the Hepburn stamps in
2001 showing the Belgian-born actress
in her most famous role as the ebul-
lient Holly Golightly in "Breakfast at
Tiffany's."
Only after the stamps were printed
was Sean Ferrer, 50, Hepburn's son
and the chair of the Audrey Hepburn
Children's Fund, contacted to grant
copyright but he refused, arguing
that the image had been altered:

Shooting of 'The Hobbit'
to start in February
LOS ANGELES Its time to cel-
ebrate again in Middle Earth.
Peter Jackson is set to direct "The
Hobbit," the two-part prequel to the
popular "Lord of the Rings" trilogy and
start shooting in February, Warner
Bros. said in a release on Friday.
The movies, based on J.RR.
Tolkien's books, had been delayed by
union issues and the ongoing restruc-
turing of flailing Hollywood studio
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc., which
owns half the project.
Jackson, who directed the "Rings"
trilogy, had originally hired Guillermo
del Toro to direct, but del Toro left the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A reproduction of a set of Audrey-Hepburn stamps that is up for auction is photo-
graphed in Berlin Saturday. The bidding starts at 400,000 euro ($565,000), with the
money donated to the Audrey Hepburn Children's Fund.


project in May because of delays after
working on the project for nearly two
years.
Jackson also co-wrote the screen-
plays with del Toro, his wife Fran
Walsh, and Philippa Boyens.
"Exploring Tolkien's Middle Earth
goes way beyond a normal filmmak-
ing experience," Jackson said in the
statement "We're looking forward to
re-entering this wondrous world with
Gandalf and Bilbo."
The two movies will be shot back to
back using digital 3-D cameras. Earlier
this year, Warner Bros. had been criti-
cized for hastily converting "Clash of
the Titans" into 3-D after shooting it
using regular cameras.
The Time Warner Inc. subsidiary
even canceled plans to bring "Harry
Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part
1" to the screen in 3-D.on Nov. 19
because it wasn't able to complete the
conversion process in time. The final
"Harry Potter" installment will hit the-
aters in 3-D next July.
In the statement, Jackson hinted
at the importance of shooting the
"Hobbit" movies in 3-D from the start
"It's an all-immersive journey into
a very special place of imagination,
beauty and drama," he said.


No release dates for the movies was
given.

'Charlotte's Web' cover
art fetches $155K
NEW YORK The original 1952
cover art for "Charlotte's Web" has
sold at auction in New York City for
more than $155,000.
Heritage Auctions says the art-
work drawn by Garth Williams
fetched more than five times its esti-
mated sale price on Friday and is a
record for any of Williams' art.
Heritage spokesman Barry
Sandoval says the buyer is a New
York collector who wishes to remain
anonymous.
He says 42 of the late artist's origi-
nal illustrations for the celebrated
children's book were auctioned by
his family and brought in more than
$780,000. The total included the
buyer's premium of 19.5 percent for
all winning bids.
E.B. White's "Charlotte's Web" is
about a friendship between Charlotte
the spider and a pig named Wilbur
who is saved from slaughter.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Marsha Hunt is 93.
* Actress Julie Adams is 84.
* Newspaper columnist
Jimmy Breslin is 80.
* Country singer Earl
Thomas Conley is 69.
* Singer Jim Seals (Seals &
Crofts) is 68.
* Singer Gary Puckett is 68.
* Rock musician Michael


Daily Scripture


Hossack is 64.
* Actor Michael McKean is
63.
* Actress Margot Kidder is
62.
* Actor George Wendt is 62.
* Actor-singer Bill Hudson
is 61.
* Astronaut Mae Jemison
is 54.


"May the words of my mouth
and the meditation of my
heart be pleasing in your sight,
O Lord, my Rock and my
Redeemer."

-Psalm 19:14



Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


MURAL
From Page 1A

out"
- Both sides are rea-
sonable people, and
Montgomery said he
was never too pessimis-
tic about the situation.
There was never any
doubt a solution would
be reached to keep the
mural intact, Johnson
said.
There would have not
been enough space to
build a stairwell through
the mural.
With so many closed
businesses downtown,
the mural is one way of
helping revitalize the
area, Kuykendall said.
'The wall belongs
to me but the mural
. belongs to the people,"
e he said.
Montgomery added,
"It really helps down-
town. More people tell
me that when they have
guests come to visit they
take them downtown. Ifs
something to see down-
town."
The mural is a beau-
tiful reflection of the
Springs, Johnson said. It
has become a mainstay
for downtown Lake City.
"I'm glad everything
sorted out to the satis-
, faction of everyone," he
said.


Participants show doggy determination


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
Canine beauty was on
parade during the 31st All-
Breed Dog Show Saturday
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. The show
continues at 8:30 a.m.
today.
The Suwannee Valley
Kennel Club of Florida Inc.,
licensed by the American
Kennel Club, is hosting the
show.
The event is a confor-
mation show and featured
120 breeds of dogs, said
Ruth Dawson, show chair-
woman and club president.
Each dog is evaluated on
how well it conforms to its
breed standards.
"It's a beauty contest,"
she said.


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1~
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ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
Beverly Scaggs of Fort Elle and her dog, Colleen, an Irish red and white setter, exit from the
dog ring Saturday during the 31st All-Breed Dog Show at the Columbia County Fairgrounds.


Dogs were judged in sev-
eral categories: hound, toy,
non-sporting, working, ter-
rier, sporting and herding.
Top exhibitors in each cat-


egory went on to compete
for best in show.
There was also the best
breed by exhibitor variety
group, which allows breed-


ers to showcase their dogs
in the ring, Dawson said.
Typically, dog shows
include a lot of people that
love animals, said Rita


Nagarya, club treasurer.
"Ifs just a fun venue for
people who love animals,"
she said.
Showing off a dog in
the ring shows how close
it comes to standards,
Nagarya said.
This is the fifth year of
competition for Cache, a
Samoyed, said Jeanne St
John of Odessa. Her dog
is ranked seventh in the
country.
St. John said she has had
dogs all her life. After show-
ing a friend's Samoyed and
winning, she began com-
peting.
"It is an addicting sport,"
she said.
The community is invited
to come see the rest of the
show. Admission is $5 for
parking to the event.


SHANDS: Imaging center, medical spa preview event Thursday


Continued From Page 1A
year.
But there's one that's
already completed and
ready for opening. The
Shands Imaging Center
and Women's Medical Spa
will have an open house
and preview event from 5-
7:30 p.m. Thursday.
The Imaging Center is
located in the Westwood


Towers Medical Center
at 289 Stonegate Terrace,
Suite 102. The event is
open to the public.
"It's 'a state-of-the-art
imaging center," said
Rhonda. Sherrod, Shands'.
administrator. "It's the only
one like it in Lake City
- Columbia County, really.
There's nothing like this


within 40 miles."
The center is designed
to be more patient-friendly,
particularly for younger
children who may be intim-
idated by imaging equip-
ment. It has been. labeled
by Shands as "Lake City's
only spa-like. diagnostic
imaging center for the
whole family."


Another of the new
center's draws will be its
women's medical spa, also
touted as something spe-
cial to Lake City.
More than $1 million of
the planned improvements
for Shands, from renovat-
ing the main lobby and
first floor support depart-
ments to upgrading the


energy management sys-
tem, won't get under way
until next year. They are
expected to be completed
by September, 2011.
Thursday's open house
will be at the imaging cen-
ter. Westwood Towers is
located on the south side
of Highway 90, west of
1-75.


RENOVATIONS: Minor improvements within weeks


Continued From Page 1A
scheduled was suggested
in a report the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board
1. commissioned last year.
i The TLC Engineering
Facilities Report said more
than $8 million worth of
equipment and system
enhancements were need-
ed over the next 17 years at
the hospital to keep it oper-
ating at an optimal level.'
The plan called for $2.8
million worth of renovation
work in the first year; based
on the top priorities listed


in the report.
When Shands Health
and HMA formed a part-
nership earlier this year,
HMA agreed to participate
in the renovation work.
According to informa-
tion from the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board
records, HMA plans to
work on $1.6 million worth
of renovations at the hospi-
tal in the near future. Some
of. the minor renovations
are scheduled. to begin
within weeks while other


planned improvements are
scheduled to be under con-
struction through Sept. 30,
2011.
The list of total capital
improvements is made of
14 projects. Replacement
of the medical gas mani-
fold is scheduled to be the
first project, while most of
the other projects are set
to begin during the first
quarter of next year.
The most expensive
projects include spend-
ing an estimated $205,000


for main lobby and reg-
istration-area renova-
tion; around $255,000
to upgrade TraceVue
and Fetal Monitor; and
$286,000 for a telemetry
system replacement.
*The 34-page report
includes supporting docu-
ments, a consolidated
maintenance report and a
spread sheet detailing the
capital equipment replace-
ment costs for selected
equipment for 2009-2023
in the main hospital.


BURGLARIES: Several items recovered i U m a oT 'L


Continued From Page 1A
another burglary of Fort
,White High School last
March. Officers estimated
that $2,000 worth of GPS
units, cash and jewelry was
taken. Detectives also dis-
covered the bicycle Tolbert


VOTING
From Page 1A

City of Lake City's char-
ter..
Liz P. Horne, Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections, said she and her
staff are prepared for the
early voting period.
"We are ready," she said.
"We're excited."
She said she and her staff
worked
through
the week
to prepare
for the
upcoming
election.
"We had
Kazmierski to check
all our
S equipment
and we did
i'- that Friday
morning
and we
were able
to get our
DePratter rooms set-
up in Fort White and the
Lake City office," Horne
said.
Voters need a photo
identification with their
signature on it to be able
to participate in early vot-
S ing.
The identification can be
a driver's license, Florida
identification card, mili-
tary card with signature
and picture or even a cred-
- it card with signature and
picture.
The general election will
take place Tuesday, Nov. 2.
Polls will be open from 7
a.m. to 7 p.m.


had been riding when
stopped had been stolen
from a Fort White home.
Some of the stolen prop-
erties have been recovered
and returned to their own-
ers. Detectives are asking


the public to contact them
to identify the recovered
items at (386) 497-2030.
Other suspects have been
identified, according to
detectives, and additional
arrests are forthcoming.


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A1


* Lifelong resident of Columbia County
* District 2 resident for 17 years
* Graduate of CHS and LCCC
* Married with 2 children
* Paramedic and registered nurse
* Currently flight, nurse at ShandsCair


I0 A COMMON SENSE APPROACH

RI NOT A POLITICIAN


I ADVOCATE FOR CONTROLLED GROWTH


SCy Marc Kazmierski
gA For County Commissioner District 2


I 'a4Iil: 1 rI 49IaI BImsUcII IIz I nl rm i L II .1 IIi


Value Adjustment

Board Hearings

The Columbia County Value Adjustment
Board hearings will be held Wednesday,
October 20 & Thursday, October 21, 2010
at 9:00 a.m. The Hearings will be held
at the Columbia County School Board
Administration Building located at 372
West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida.


FACTORY SALE!


THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
OPEN To Free 1-800-524-2675
611 N. Main St. M-F 9:30-5:30
Gainesville SAT. 9:30-4:00


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


r


- ----- '`---- '--~











OPINION


Sunday, October 17, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Amendment

suggestions

The following are our rec-
ommendations, as voted upon
by our editorial board, for the
proposed Florida Constitutional
Amendments.
As with all of our political
recommendations, these are
the opinion of the newspaper.
The opinions reflect a simple
majority vote of the newspa-
per's editorial board.
In all amendment categories
and with all candidates, we
encourage everyone to get out
and express your opinion by
voting.

Amendment 1 YES
Repeal of public campaign
financing requirement.

This proposes the repeal
of the provision in the State
Constitution that requires pub-
lic financing of statewide politi-
cal campaigns provided candi-
dates agree to spending limits.

Amendment 2 YES
Provides for additional
homestead ad valorem tax
credits for military members
deployed overseas.

This would allow for addition-
al homestead ad valorem tax
credits for deployed military
personnel, whether active mem-
bers of the military or National
Guard or reservists called to
active duty.

Amendment 4 NO
Requires a referenda for
amending any local govern-
ment comprehensive land-
use plan.
If this passes, the recession
may continue indefinitely. This
amendment literally could kill
Florida's future. This would
require the most simple prop-
erty zoning change, or any
land use change, to be placed
on a ballot, wait for an election,
and be determined by a vote of
the people. Our thought This
would paralyze development of
any type, We appoint and elect
zoning boards, city councils
and county commissions to
make these decisions.

Amendment 5 YES

Amendment 6 YES
Legislative districts
(Amendment 5) and
Congressional districts
(Amendment 6) must be
drawn fairly without favor
to political parties or racial
makeup, be compact and use
geographical boundaries.

Amendment 8 YES
Revision of the class size
requirements for public
schools.
This would allow local school
districts the flexibility to meet an
average class size assigned to a
teacher in a particular school.
Currently, the law is rigid in a
per-classroom specific number
of students, according to class
grade. If the amendment passes,
it also places the responsibility
for funding on the legislature.

Feds Advisory YES

This non-binding referendum
calls for the federal government
to balance the federal budget
without raising taxes.

Abatement YES

This would give county offi-


cials the option to provide prop-
erty tax abatement incentives to
prospective industrial develop-
ment prospects or existing busi-
ness wishing to expand. This is
important for job creation.


Our picks for Florida legislature


With early vot-
ing beginning
Monday, it's
time to con-
sider who
will best represent Columbia
County in Tallahassee. Based
on a collection of research, vot-
ing records, several interviews
during past weeks and obser-
vations, the following are our
recommendations for the state
races that impact our county.

State Representative
District 11
Current State Rep. Debbie
Boyd is the choice to continue
representing District 11 for
another two years.
Not only has Boyd maintained
a record of keeping Columbia
County in the forethought of the
state legislature, she's shown
herself consistently as the go-
to person for
our county in
Tallahassee.
We watched
as leadership
was needed .
to cement the
name change
at Florida
Gateway Boyd
College. Boyd
led the way
with-representation even
though FGC draws students
from several legislative districts
and the main campus is outside
Dist. 11.
Boyd is willing to step outside
politics-as-usual for the good of
our county. She co-sponsored
legislation and gained bipartisan
support for the Rural Enterprise
Zone Bill that established spe-
cial state-sanctioned economic
development sites in Columbia
.and Suwannee counties.
She has been a staunch sup-
porter of agriculture issues, a
protector of the Florida farmer


COUNTY
COMMISSION

Kazmierski

is our choice

In the Columbia County
Commission Dist. 2 race, our
choice for repre-
sentation is Marc
Kazmierski.
Both candi-
dates are new to s
the political arena .#L
and have passion
to see a better
Columbia County.
We recom- Kazmierski
mend Kazmierski
because through -
the months of campaigning, he has
spoken in more detail about eco-
nomic development, job creation,
and smart government manage-
ment ideas.


and an advocate for our delicate
freshwater springs.
She urges fiscal responsibil-
ity from government, flexibility,
common sense in the state's
approach to education mandates
and is the most conservative
Democrat in sight.
Boyd.has worked for the
greater good and neither her
effort, nor her*voting record
reflects any disappointments for
Columbia County.
Boyd is poised to continue
to be the voice of Columbia
County against the roar of
South Florida shout-outs at the
state level. She deserves the
opportunity to maintain her seat
in Tallahassee.

State Representative
District 10
As a Democratic Ranking
Member, Rep. Leonard Bembry
has shown
himself to be
an effective
leader and
representative
for District 10
since his 2008
election.
He is our Bembry
choice toemry
continue that
leadership.
While it's tough for any new
house member to push legis-
lation into law, Bembry's bill
sponsorship has shown him to
be a champion of issues affect-
ing Columbia County and North
Florida:
His leadership on CS/HB
1145 recognizing the need for
members and veterans of the
U.S. Armed Forces to have dis-
counted access to Florida's state
parks makes an important state-
ment about the representative's
priorities.
Bembry's committee
memberships are also tell-


ing: Agriculture & Natural
Resources Policy Committee,
Economic Development
Policy Committee and Natural
Resources Appropriations
Committee.
As our District 10 representa-
tive, Bembry has hit the ground
running. He should be offered
the chance to continue his
efforts in Tallahassee.

State Senate
District 14
Sen. Steve Oelrich's work in
Tallahassee speaks for itself,
and he is our pick to continue
voicing the needs of Columbia
County on the
Senate floor.'
Oelrich's
committee
membership is
exhaustive.
A member
of the Senate
since 2006,
the senator OeIrich
now claims
membership
in eight committees, includ-
ing chairing the singularly
important Higher Education
Committee and serving as vice
chairman of Military Affairs and
Domestic Security Committee.
As,a retired Alachua County
sheriff, Oelrich's support for
matters affecting state security
come as no surprise, but his
committee work in other areas
such as the Select Committee
on Florida's Inland Waters and
the public utilities commit-
tee are equally important to
Columbia County.
Oelrich has spent a career
offering his myriad experience
to the public service needs of
charitable, medical and security
organizations.
He should be allowed to
carry on that work for another
term in Tallahassee.


This is the time that chal-
lenges Americans to stop talk-
ing and start acting.
It's time to get up, exercise
the American freedom that
too many take for granted and
cast a ballot in a free election.
Go vote.
We've become a country of
complainers, unsatisfied with
our government at nearly
every level. Yet,. many don't
find it important enough to
early vote or visit the polls
on election day and cast their
ballot.
Now is your chance to
make a difference. Early vot-
ing begins Monday and lasts
two weeks. Then election day
is Nov. 2.
Our recommendations


presented here center on can-
didates having a local impact,
constitutional amendment
issues and items that will
appear on all county ballots.
We are not attempting to
push our views on anyone,
but the issues are as pressing
as ever in Columbia County
and Florida. A thorough
examination of the candidates
and the issues is warranted.
Candidate choices are not
based on personalities and it's
not a popularity contest.
On the editorial page,
newspapers have a responsi-
bility to offer opinion.
Readers and residents have
a responsibility to make up
their own minds and vote.
Lake City Reporter


4iL
-- - - - -- - -


4A


Be an American


and cast a ballot


I I


Morris Williams
Phone: (386) 755-8"183
williams_h2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City FL 32055


Educator,

writer and

treasure

Nancy Fouraker
Morgan, North
Florida folk icon,
died Oct. 7 in
Jasper at 97.
I asked White Springs resident
Johnny Bullard, distinguished
educator and writer, to write
his thoughts on his beloved
Aunt Nancy. Here is what he
wrote.
"Aunt Nancy was born near
Tom's Creek, just above the
Florida line, near Fargo, and
she lived most of her adult life
on a farm in the White Springs
area with her husband, the late
Ray Morgan.
"She was- a 'folk icon' and a
national treasure, having won
the Department of State's pres-
tigious Florida Folk Heritage
Award during the early 80s.
She published two books,
"Aunt Nancy's Cookbook," and
"Out of the Pocket," a narra-
tive account of her life. Both
books are still offered for sale
at Cousin Thelma Boltin's Gift
Shop at the Stephen Foster
Memorial in White Springs.
"She attended every Florida
Folk Festival, all 59 of them,
where she displayed her mag-
nificent quilts and sold her
famous 'Corn Cob Jelly' and
her Chicken and Dumplings.
"She was a wife, mother,
grandmother and great-grand-
mother, and, without a doubt,
she had one of the happiest
and most positive attitudes
ever.
"Dr. Peggy Bulger-
Leatherbury, director of
the Center for American
Folklore, Library of Congress,
Washington, D.C., who began.
her career in White Springs as
a state folklorist, said, 'Nancy
Morgan did more to help
perpetuate and preserve the
folk traditions of the upper
Suwannee region than anyone
I knew. She was a national
treasure.'"
"Rest in peace 'Aunt' Nancy
Morgan. You were quite a lady,
a marvelous inspiration, and
an irreplaceable treasure to us
all."

Museum thanks
School Museum thanks
go to retired teacher Gladys
Connor for her donation of
seven Kindergarten Center
yearbooks. To Tommy and
Betty Pat Witt and their daugh-
ters,Gigi Register and Patti
Summerlin, for a donation of
many 1940s-era CHS football
programs, graduation pro-
grams, school play programs
and similar materials from
the Mason City School. To
former school superintendent
Mike Flanagan for a miniature
CHS football from 1967 and a
copy of the late CHS teacher
Ola Lee Means' poetry book,
"Heartsease."
* Morris Williams is a local
historian and longtime Columbia
County resident.
Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter, com.


Today
Robinson and Wheeler
family reunion
The Robinson and
Wheeler family reunion is
noon today at the Mason
City Community Meeting
Center. Lunch will start at
12:30 p.m. Bring a covered
dish to share with every-
one. Call Jane Ritch at
755-6705.

Monday
Early voting
Early voting for the 2010
general election is 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-
Saturday through Oct.
30. Early voting locations
are at the Supervisor of
Elections Lake City office,
971 W. Duval St., and the
Fort White Community
Center, 17579 SW SR 47.
Voters need to bring a pic-
ture and signature I.D.

Ballot initiatives
discussion
"Understanding the
Amendments," a discus-
sion of the ballot initia-
tives to change Florida's
Constitution is 11:30 a.m.
Monday at the Florida
Gateway College gym/
conference center. Tickets
are $12 and lunch will be
served. Call the Lake City
Chamber of Commerce at
752-3690.

Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Classrooms at Lake City
Medical Center. Meetings
are for people Who have
had weight-loss surgery,
contemplating surgery or
just trying to lose weight
on their own. E-mail theth-
innerme@gmail.com or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.

Vision Awareness Day
The North Florida South
Georgia Veterans Health
System will host the 18th
Annual Vision Awareness
Day Open House 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Monday at the Lake
City VA Medical Center,
619 South Marion Avenue.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

Young musicians hit right notes at Southside
Richardson Middle School drumline percussionists Daniel Deubler (from left), Kenny Paul,
Toby Harrell and Lee Trowell warm-up before performing at the Southside Recreation
Center's Homecoming Friday.


offering flu shots by
appointment Monday
through Friday. The cost
is $25, and Medicare Part
B is accepted. Pneumonia
vaccinations are also avail-
able for those eligible at
$40. Call for an appoint-
ment at 758-1069.

Holiday production
Auditions for "A
Christmas Carol" are 7
p.m. Monday and Tuesday
at the'High Springs
Community Theater. The
show will be performed as
a radio-on-stage drama.
Needed are -10 male and
female actors of varying
ages. Performances are
on weekends Dec. 3-19 for
nine shows.

Tuesday
FGC performance
Florida Gateway College
presents "Guy Lombardo's
Royal Canadians with Al
Pierson" at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Tickets are
$15 for adults, $14 for
seniors age 55 and over,
and $13 for students. Call
386-754-4340.

Wednesday
Medicare counseling
SHINE is providing free,
unbiased and confidential
counseling on Medicare
issues 12:30 to 2 p.m.
Wednesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call 1-
800-262-2243.


Landscaping and
Gardening Series
Suwannee County
Master Gardener
Volunteers present a free
"How and When to Prune"
series of information at 10
a.m. Wednesday at Live
Oak Library 1848 South
Ohio Avenue Live Oak.
Contact Carolyn Saft at
(386) 362-2771.

Thursday
Info fair
Columbia County Senior
Services, Inc. is hosting
a Wealth of Information
Fair at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center at 9
a.m. to noon Thursday.
Call (386) 755-0235.

Medicare counseling
SHINE is providing
free, unbiased and con-
fidential counseling on
Medicare issues 9 a.m.
to noon Thursday at the
Lifestyle Enrich Center
Health Fair.

Retired Educators
meeting
The Columbia County
Retired Educators meet
at 1 p.m. Thursday at
the School Board Adult
Center room 120. Bring
men's and women's socks.
Call 752-2431.

Friday
Humane Asylum


The Lake City Humane
Society and Rountree-
Moore Auto Group pres-


ents the Humane Asylum
6 to 10 p.m. Friday and
Saturday at the Lake City
Mall.
Tickets'are $10 at the
door and $5 for veterans,
active duty military, law
enforcement aqd fire per-
sonnel with ID.
Children 13 and young-
er must be accompanied
by an adult. All proceeds
.benefit homeless animals.

Blood donor tickets
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers is giving
away free movie tickets to
all bjood donors Friday to
Sunday.
Donors must donate at
the donor center located
just south of Bascom
Norris Road on State Road
47. Hours are 9 a.m. to 7
p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Sunday. Movie
tickets are available while
supplies last. Donor must
weigh at least 110 lbs. and
be at least 16 years old


(with parent permission).

Saturday
Phenomenal program
Gold Standard Chapter
No. 48 Order of the
Eastern Star is host-
ing the Phenomenal
Women's Program,
"Celebrating Trailblazers
and Trendsetters Within
Our Community" at 4
p.m. Saturday at New
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 505 NE MLK St.

Pumpkin Fest
The Second Annual
Ptfmpkin Fest is 3 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m. Saturday at
Big Shoals State Park in
White Springs. There is a
children's pumpkin deco-
rating contest and costume
contest. Admission is $2
per person or $4 per car-
load and includes entry
into all contests, drinks
and snacks, live music and
twilight camp fire. Call
(386) 867-1639.


.0wphalt emov
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Accepting New Patients

Specializing in adult medical care including:
Primary Care. Arthritis
High Blood Pressure Backache Evaluation
Heart Disease and Treatment
Lung Disease Full Dizziness,
Gastrointestinal vertigo and balance
High Cholesterol diagnosis and
Diabetes treatment
Women's Health Optifast' Weight
Headache Evaluation Loss System
and Treatment

Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


Senior Services, Inc. is hosting a This Wealth of Information Fair promotes a "one stop shop" where you can find out how physical activity, social
"Wealth of Information Fair" connection, mental stimulus and good nutrition can promote "independent living for a lifetime."
Thursday, October 21, 2010 from Join the following teams to learn more:
8am-Noon at The Lifestvle .


Enrichment Center
386-755-0235


Categories Medical Supplies (Home) Screening
Health Screening & Speech l Home & Personal Needs / Mental Health Eyes -Hearing
Home Health Care Legal Needs Dental Mental Health
Support Groups Transportation Needs Foot & Anke Diabetes
Insurance Needs Ramps & Safe Hme Layout Design Blood Pressure Cholesterol
Nutrition Security & Medical Home Monitoring Balance Skin
Pharmacy Needs Chiropractic & Massage Therapy Bone
Foundation & Association Participants: Alzheimer's Association, American Diabetes Association, Parkinson Disease Association, AARP Foundation,
CARC, Lake City Medical Center, American Council for the Blind, Epilepsy Foundation, American Red Cross, SHINE Program, United Way, Haven
Hospice, Ombudsman Program, Florida Telecommunication Relay, Inc., Meridian, and Arthritis Foundation.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


LEC celebrates 25th anniversary .


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Everydaythe FortWhite
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center is open, Lucy Mae
Lewis makes sure she's
there.
"I love it," she said. "I
just love it. We get to do
good thifigs and a lot of
it."
Lewis was joined by oth-
ers in the community who
came out to celebrate the
25th anniversary of the
center Saturday.


Fort White's LEC is a
part of Columbia County
Senior Services Inc.,
said Debbie Freeman,
executive director. It was
previously housed in
Antioch Baptist Church's
Fellowship Hall before
moving to its current loca-
tion, which was built by the
County Commissioners,
in 2007. 1
Center activities include
exercise, crafts, baking,
socializing and more.
"It "gives (seniors) a
place to. come and enjoy.


life instead of sitting up
and withering at home,"
said Deborah Rhoades,-
site manager.
Fort White is in a rural
setting, and seniors at
the center are kept from
isolation, Freeman said.
Regular attendees at the
center have become a
tight-knit group.
The group is always
looking to expand and
serve more people in the
community.
"I do my seniors the way
I want to be treated when


I get their age," Rhoades
said. "I want it to grow
even more," she said.
The center is open from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-
Thursday. It is located at
8829 Hwy. 47 South, and
the number is (386) 497-
1504.
Rhoades said she wants
the center to be a home
away from home for its
seniors.
"I love doing what I do,"
she said. "It's for them. It's
not about me. It's about my
seniors."


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Lucy Mae Lewis and Deborah Rhoades fold up a blanket.
made by participants at the Fort White LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center celebrated its 25th anniversary Saturday.


Christopher James "Chris"
Ratliff
Mr. Christopher James "Chris"
Ratliff, 25, of Lake City, died
late Thursday evening October.
7, 2010 of injuries sustained
in an automobile accident. A
native of Lake City, Chris had
lived in both the Lhke City and
Olustee, Florida areas all of his
life. He worked with his dad in
the pulpwood and timber indus-
tries. Chris was an avid Florida
Gator football fan and enjoyed
hunting and fishing. He was a
Christian and had attended the
Olustee Bap-
tist Church
and. more
recently the
Watertown
Congrega-
f. *. r tional Meth-
odistChurch.
Chris is sur-
Ratliff vived by his
Ratliff mother, Ruth

of Olustee; his father, James
"Lucky" Ratliff of Lake City,
Florida; his sister, Rachel Hodg-
son of Glen St. Mary, Florida;
a daughter, Kyra Leanne Brady
of Lake City; his niece, Hailey
Elizabeth Hodgson of Glen St.
Mary, Florida; his grandmoth-
ers, Alma Johnson of Lake City
and Betty Ruth Walker of Zolfo
Springs, Florida; his grandfa-
ther, Glenn Ray Tillman Sr. of
Lake City; and his great-grand-
mothers, Sue Alford of Lake
City and Ruth Elizabeth Col-
lier of Zolfo Springs, Florida.
Chris was preceded in death by
his grandfather, Cecil Ratliff.
Funeral services will be conducted
at 6:00 P.M. Monday, October 18,
2010 in the Watertown Congre-
gational Methodist Church with
Rev. Randy Ogbum officiating.
Interment services will be an-
nounced at a later date. Arrange-


OBITUARIES

ments are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025. (386)752-1234. Please
sign the on-line family guestbook
at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com
Carolyn W. Witt
Mrs. Carolyn W. Witt, 72, a life-
long resident of Lake City, died
early Friday morning, October 15,
2010 at home surrounded by her
family. Mrs. Witt had courageous-
ly battled cancer for two years.
The daughter of the late Amos and
Ella Gaskins Williams, Mrs. Witt
had co-owned and operated the
Witt Animal Clinic with her hus-
band Dr. Paul Witt for many years
prior to retiring. Mrs. Witt very
much enjoyed
mullet fishing
from her dock






Georgia Bulldogs play ball. She
attended theSuwannee Ban-ptist
Church in Suwannee, Florida.ing



Mrs. Wit was preceded in death
Mrs. Witt is survived by her be-
lovedhusbando heforty-nine years
Dr. Ralph "Paul" Witt, Jr.; her
daughters, Sherri Cason (DeWitt)
of Lake City and Libby Carver
(Larry) of White Springs, Flori-da.
da; her sons, Danny "Bear" Witt
(Lynn) and Steve Witt (Jodi) both
of Lake City; a brother, John Wil-
liams (Alice) of Old Town, Flor-
ida; her grandchildren, Covington
"Cov" Woodley, John Woodley
(Katie), Bryan Cason (Erin), Matt
Cason (Carrie), Lars Carver, Dan-
iel Carver (Cathy), Laura Maxwell
(Bryon), Paul Witt IV (Ashley),,


Nikki Bush (Jeff), Trevor Witt,
Trey Witt, Caitlyn Witt, Leah Ke-
aton (Chris) and Jamie Taylor and
her great-grandchildren, Hunter
Manning Woodley, Jackson Lee
Montgomery Woodley, Aiden
Bush, Whitley Bush, Tristen Witt,
Bruella Witt, Kaylin Witt, Au-
brey Witt, Connor Cason, Bryan
Cason, Austin McGinnis, Kory
Cason, Aubrie Carver, Brianna
Carver, Beth Shafer, Connor Sha-
fer, James Taylor Jr. and Dustin
Taylor. Her special friends, John
and Marion Scott of Lake City
and Roy and Myrt Arnett of Su-
wannee, Florida also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Witt
will be conducted at 11:30 Mon-
day morning, October 18,2010 in
the First Baptist Church of Lake
City with Rev. Fred Edwards,
pastor of the Suwannee Baptist
Church, officiating. Interment
will follow in Memorial Cem-
etery. The family will receive
friends from 2:00-4:00 Sunday
afternoon in the Chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home. Her grandsons, Covington
"Cov" Woodley, John R. Wood-
ley, Jr., Trey Witt, Trevor Witt,
Daniel Carver, Ralph "Paul"
Witt IV will serve as pallbear-
ers. In lieu of flowers the family
requests that memorial donations
be made to the Suwannee Bap-
tist Church, P.O. Box 147. Su-
wannee, FL 32692 or to Hi. en
Hospice of the Suwannee \jl-
ley, 6037 US Highway 91 \.est..
Lake City, FL 32055. -\rranfe-
ments are under the direction ol
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERALHOME,455S MNl-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 3,2125
(386)752-1234 Please sign itie
on-line family guestbook at pai-
rishfamilyfuneralhome comr
ObitOaries "are daidt:l advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Symptoms of Depression

may include:

* Change in appetite

* Loss of energy or loss of

interest in activities

* Feeling nervous, tense

or stressed out


BRIEFS


Dispute leads to
stabbing, 2 injured

TAMPA Two men
are being treated with stab
wounds in a Tampa hos-
pital after arguing over a
woman.
Police say one man was
with his friends visiting his
girlfriend when another
group of men drove up and
began talking to her. The
two groups argued and a
fight ensued. One unidenti-
fled man took out a pocket
knife and began stabbing the
others.
Police say 21-year-old Eric
Payne began shooting at a


car. No one was shot One
person stabbed is in serious
condition, while the other is
stable.
Payne was arrested and
charged with shooting at
a vehicle, being a felon in
possession of a weapon and
violating probation for a pre-
vious charge of carrying a
concealed firearm.

Police: Officer did
nothing wrong
ORLANDO The
Orlando Police Department
has decided an officer's
takedown maneuver that
broke an 84-year-old man's


y LMari's Royal C nadian

with Al ieor presented by


October 19- 7 p.m.


neck last month was prop-
erly performed.
Police Chief Val Demings
said Friday that Officer
Travis Lamont performed
the maneuver within
department guidelines. The
department still is review-
ing it's use-of-force policy
and could make some
changes.
Police reports show that
Lamont knocked Daniel
Daley to the ground on
Sept. 18 in what officers
describe as a "dynamic
takedown" when the man
became belligerent about
his car getting towed.
* Associated Press


FLORIDA
4' M


2010-2011
Lyceum cries

Levy Performing
Arts Center
Tickets are on sale at the PAC Box Office
from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Cash, check, debit & credit cards
(MasterCard & Visa) are accepted
Dinner will be served in the college's
Lobo Cafe prior to the performance.
For details & reservations call
(888) 845-0925 or (386) 438-5440


For ticket information call

(386) 754-4340


"Enhance the Arts by supporting The Foundation for Florida Gateway College"
If you have a disability and need assistance, please contact (386) 754-4340


Sarkis Clinical is currently conducting a clinical

research study of an investigational medication for

depression. You may qualify to participate if you

are between the ages of 18-80 and are suffering

with depression.

Qualified participants may receive:

study-related medication

study-related examinations

compensation for time and travel


www.SarkisClinicalTrials.com

To find out if you qualify Sarkis Clinical Trials


or to receive more

information, please

contact:


611 NW 60th Street

Suite C

Gainesville, FL 32607

r: (352) 333-0094


YOUR FIEX PLAN
R E- R
I N S R A N C


Executive Director Sponsors
S Community.
Lake City Reporter
As ., cwamn.,** **- TARGET
3 ,S


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












4 S Oviedo-based company


K 1 introduces new red celery


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Red celery will hit selected supermarkets Dec. 1, in time
to add some eye-catching color to holiday tables, said Dan
Duda, president of Duda Farm Fresh Foods, which was
unveiling the new-look celery at a produce industry trade
show in Orlando.


STEVE KARNOWSKI
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS Is
America ready for red cel-
ery? A Florida produce com-
pany thinks so and has bet
consumers will bite on the
colorful crunch of its new
product
Red celery will hit selected
'supermarkets Dec. 1 in
time to add some eye-catch-
ing color to holiday tables,
said Dan Duda, president
of Duda Farm Fresh Foods,
which was set to unveil the
new celery at a produce
industry trade show in
Orlando on Saturday.
"Ifs bright, its red, it's
different, its unique," said


Duda, who added that it has
the same flavor and crunch
of regular green celery.
It was nearly 20 years in
the making, he said. One
of the family owned compa-
ny's celery breeders, Larry
Pierce, started develop-
ing it in 1991, working off
a European heritage vari-
ety using natural breeding
methods.
Jean Ronnei, who over-
sees the award winning
school meal programs of the
St Paul public schools, said
the new celery could be a
"perfect fit" for her cafete-
rias, which run "coolest new
veggie" contests to encour-
age students to try fresh
produce.


"We do eat with our eyes,"
Ronnei said, adding that she
hoped it would be priced low
enough for the school lunch
market
"If there are efforts under
way to jazz up veggies, I'm
all for that," she said.
Red celery will be test
marketed first on the west
coast and in the northwest
and southwest, Duda said. It
will carry a premium price
that will vary by location as
they gauge how much extra
shoppers are willing to pay.
It will be rolled out nation-
wide sometime later. Duda
declined to go into much
detail about the company's
marketing plans for competi-
tive reasons and would not


say which retailers would
carry it or specify which cit-
ies.
American consumers
used an average of just over
6 pounds of fresh celery per
person last year, compared
with about 8 pounds of fresh
carrots, according to U.S.
Departnient of Agriculture.
The 2009 celery crop totaled
1.97 billion pounds, with a
total value of $364.8 million.
Based in Oviedo, Du'da
Farm Fresh Foods says it
cultivates 39,000 acres of
produce in Florida, Georgia,
California, Arizona and
Michigan and ranks as one
of the world's largest celery
producers.


Attacks hit Kandahar, killing 2 Afghan civilians


By MIRWAIS KHAN
Associated Press

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan
A series of blasts killed
at least two civilians and
wounded several others
Saturday in Afghanistan's
main southern city, the
scene of several recent
deadly attacks on police.
Helicopters patrolled
above the city as NATO
and Afghan troops were
deployed to seal off the
attack sites. Ambulances
with sirens wailing ferried
victims to local hospitals.
In one attack, a motor-
ized rickshaw carrying
explosives detonated
behind police headquar-
ters in the center of. the
city, said Zelmai Ayubi,
spokesman for the gover-
nor of Kandahar province.
One bystander was killed
and three others wounded,
Ayubi said.
On the eastern side of the
city, insurgents attacked
an oil tanker with gunfire,
causing it to explode. One
civilian was killed and
at least two others were
wounded.
A rocket fired by mili-
tants slammed into a pris-
on compound in the city's
west, police said. No casu-
alties were immediately
reported. Another explo-
sion went off in the city's
business district, also in
the west. Details were not
immediately available."
Kandahar city has been
a target for militants this
month. Two explosions
killed nine people and
wounded two dozen others
on Oct. 6. Three blasts just
minutes apart killed three
Afghan police officers in
the city Oct. 5.
International and Afghan
troops' have been ramping
up security in Kandahar.
city for months in an effort
to grasp control of the
country's largest southern
city, where Taliban influ-
ence is high. A series of
checkpoints have been set
up around the city in an
attempt to keep insurgents
from entering and carrying
out attacks.
Control of Kandahar, the
Taliban movement's birth-
place, is seen as key to
reversing Taliban momen-
tum in the war. The nearly
150,000 international troops
and 220,000 Afghan secu-
rity forces are still strug-
gling to gain the upper
hand against an estimated
30,000 insurgents.
The embattled south
is the scene of Operation
Dragon Strike, launched
last month by NATO and
Afghan forces in 'areas
around Kandahar to flush
out entrenched Taliban
fighters and destroy their
strongholds.
Separately, two NATO
service members were
killed Saturday one
after a homemade .bomb
exploded in the south and
one in an insurgent attack
in the north. NATO did not
disclose their nationalities
or details of their deaths.
Forty-six U.S. and inter-
national troops have been


killed in Afghanistan so far
this month.
The nine-year war has
also inflicted a mounting
toll on Afghan civilians who
are caught in the crossfire.
In the Afghan capital, just
a few weeks after breaking
down in tears while talk-
ing about his son's future
in Afghanistan, President
Hamid Karzai said he
had high hopes for a new
peace council to negotiate
with Taliban leaders he's
been meeting, according
to a statement released
Saturday by his office.
The president's com-
ments echoed a drumbeat
of optimism being voiced
by U.S. and NATO mili-
tary officials and the head
of the peace council, who
said he is convinced the
insurgents are ready to
negotiate.
It's unclear whether there
is enough evidence to sup-
port claims that the U.S.
and international forces
are reversing the Taliban's
momentum. NATO mili-
tary officials said troops
are engaged in fierce fight-
ing and its premature to
declare that the tide of the
war has turned against the
insurgents.
Still, with President
Barack Obama's December
review just weeks away,
political pressure is mount-
ing to show progress.
Obama administration offi-
cials this week threw their
support behind the 70-mem-
ber peace council that is
charged with setting up a
formal dialogue with insur-
gents, following informal
discussions that Karzai has
had with Taliban leaders.
"I have had personal
meetingswith someTaliban
leaders, and my colleagues
from my government have
had some meetings in and
outside Afghanistan with
the Taliban," he said in an
interview with Al-Jazeera's
David Frost, according to
the statement released by
his office.
"These have mostly been
unofficial after contact was
initiated countryman-to-
countryman talks," he said.
"But now is the time for us
to begin to talk with the
Taliban at a fixed address
and with a more open


- The Family of the late
Emma Louise Hart I
Dandy Allen
gratefully acknowledges the
generous outpouring of love,
prayers, telephone calls, cards,
plants, flowers, and other
expressions of sympathy
extended at the passing of our
beloved mother.
May God forever bless you.


agenda to tell us how to
bring peace to Afghanistan
and Pakistan."
In the interview, aired
Friday, Karzai said the for-
mation of the peace coun-
cil was an important step
toward finding an end to
the 9-year-old war, the state-
ment said.
The Taliban, which has
denied that its leaders are
in talks, has long said it
will not come to the nego-
tiating table until after U.S.
and NATO troops leave the
country.
In the interview, Karzai
said U.S.-Afghan relations


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were strong. He sought
to reassure Afghans that
there would not be a mass
exodus of U.S. troops in
July 2011, when Obama
wants to begin to withdraw
American forces if condi-
tions allow.
"July 2011 was never the
date of the end of mission
of the international troops
in Afghanistan," Karzai
said, according to the state-
ment.
An upbeat Karzai said it
makes him happy to see
the flag of Afghanistan fly-
ing along with banners of
other nations.


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An Afghan. soldier performs the call for prayers at Howz-e-
Madad Forward Operating Base, Kandahar, Afghanistan.


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NOTICE OF MEETING CANCELLATION
OF THE LAKE CITY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT

AGENCY


The meeting of the Lake City Community Redevelopment Agency scheduled to take place
on Monday, October 18, 2010 at 6:45 PM, or soon thereafter, at the Council Chambers
located on the second floor of City Hall located 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City
Florida, has been cancelled.

MICHELE L. GREENE
Deputy City Clerk


~8Lillernr*l~cPruamwMlp~~irploluu~l~a~as


..-


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


;leple r,\D


STATE & WORLD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


Obama: End tax breaks to stop overseas hiring


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama walks to board Air Force One
at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, just outside
Washington, Saturday.


By JULIE PACE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON End
tax breaks that reward
some U.S. companies with
overseas subsidiaries and
encourage those business-
es to create jobs in other
countries, President Barack
Obama is telling Congress.
Yet it's an idea that
has raised concerns even
among some lawmakers in
the president's own party.
At issue is a bill, now
stalled in the Senate, that
would do away with some
tax credits and deferrals for
U.S. companies for opera-
tions abroad.
"There is no reason why
our tax code should active-
ly reward them for creat-
ing jobs overseas," Obama
said in his weekly radio and
Internet address Saturday.


"There is no reason why our tax code
should actively reward them for cre-
ating jobs overseas."

President Obama


"Instead, we should be
using our tax dollars to
reward companies that cre-
ate jobs and businesses
within our borders."
Though Obama singled
out Republican opposi-
tion, the bill also failed to
get support from some
Democrats, including the
chairman of the Senate
Finance Committee, Sen.
Max Baucus (D-Mont.). He
has expressed concern that
the change would put the
U.S. at a competitive disad-
vantage.
The ending of the tax
provisions has run into


opposition from business
groups, including the
National Association of
Manufacturers.
Obama said that while
companies that conduct
business internationally do
make an important contri-
bution to the U.S. econo-
my, it doesn't make sense
to grant them tax breaks
when companies at home
are struggling to rebound
from the economic crisis.
Obama has said he wants
revenue collected from end-
ing the tax provisions to go to
other business tax breaks, by
making permanent research


and development tax cred-
its and allowing businesses
next year to write off all new
equipment costs.
In the GOP address, Rep.
Mike Pence (R-Ind.) urged
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi
(D-Calif.) to call Congress
back into session to take an
immediate vote on whether
to extend Bush-era tax cuts.
'The prosperity of the
American people is more
important than the political
fortunes of any politician or
any political party," Pence
said.
Pelosi and Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.)
have said the tax issue will
be taken up after the Nov. 2
election.
The tax cuts have been
a point of contention
between the president and
Republicans in the lead-up,
to the midterm elections.


OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT

GENERAL ELECTION

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FL

NOVEMBER 2, 2010


NEED AN ABSENTEE BALLOT?
CALL. 758-1026
OR COME BY THE OFFICE


EARLY VOTING
Monday- Saturday,
8:30 AM 4:30 PM
LAKE CrTY: 971 W. DUVAL ST, SUITE 102
FORT WHITE: 17579 SW STATE ROAD 47
OCTOBER 18 30, 2010


THESE RACES APPEAR
ON ALL BALLOTS
YfdCDT WA1lFl IMrNllrATFrl


THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS
IN PRECINCTS: 1,3,5,6,7,8,9,11,13,14,
16,17,18,19, 22 AND 23
AND PART OF 15,21 AND 24

STATE SENATOR
DISTRICT 14
(Vote for One)

0 Steve Oelrich REP
C Perry C. McGriff, Jr. DEM



THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS
IN PRECINCTS: 2,10 12, 20,24,25
AND PART OF 9,15 AND 21

STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 10
(Vote for One)

-0 David A. Feigin REP
CD0 Leonard L. Bembry DEM



THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS
IN PRECINCTS: 1,3,4,5,6,7,8,11,13,14,
16,17,18,19, 22AND 23
AND PART OF 9,15, AND 21

STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 11
(Vote for One)

CD. Elizabeth Porter REP
CD0 Debbie Boyd DEM
C John Ferentinos TEA


JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Charles T. Canady of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
0 YES
CD NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Jorge Labarga of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?


C YES
CD NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice James E. C. Perry of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
CD0 YES
CD NO
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Ricky L. Polston of the
Supreme Court be retained.in office?
CDYES
C NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Nikki Ann Clark of the First
District Court of- Appeal be retained in
office?

C YES
0 NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Paul M. Hawkes of the First
District Court of Appeal be retained in
office?

CDYES
CD NO


A VOTE is a terrible thing to waste.



Liz P. Horne


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS, COLUMBIA COUNTY


Office (386) 758-1026 Fax (386) 755-7233
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3734
www.votecolumbia.com Email: election@votecolumbia.com
Branch Office:
17579 SW SR 47 Fort White, Florida 32038


DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Charles J. Kahn, Jr. of the
First District Court of Appeal be retained in
office?

O YES
C ONO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL

Shall Judge Phil Padovano of the First
District Court of Appeal be retained in
offilde? : 1 ... ;.." . .. ... .,


0 YES
CD NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Lori S. Rowe of the First
District Court of Appeal be retained in
office?

CD YES
O NO

DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Kent Wetherell of the
First District Court of Appeal be
retained in office?

C YES
CD NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Jim Wolf of the First
District Court of Appeal be retained In
office?

CD YES
CD NO


THIS RACE APPEARS ON BALLOTS
IN PRECINCTS: 1,3,6, AND 18
NONPARTISAN

COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 2
(Vote for One)

0 Rusty DePratter
CD0 Marc Kazmierski


Mark Ballot This Way
Completely fill in the oval opposite the
name of each candidate or issue you
wish to vote for.
USE ONLY THE MARKING PEN PROVIDED


VOTE BOTH SIDES OF THE BALLOT


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)

Q Marco Rubio REP'
D Kendrick B. Meek DEM
0 Alexander Andrew Snitker LBT
Bernie DeCastro CPF
Q Sue Askeland NPA
D Bruce Ray Riggs NPA
C- Bobbie Bean NPA
C) Rick Tyler NPA
Charlie Crist NPA
) Lewis Jerome Armstrong NPA
SWrite-in
UNITED STATES
REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 4
(Vote for One)
0 Ander Crenshaw REP
Troy D. Stanley NPA
Write-in
GOVERNOR & LIEUTENANT
GOVERNOR
(Vote for One Pair)

C Rick Scott REP
Jennifer Carroll

CD0 Alex Sink DEM
Rod Smith

0 Peter Allen IDP
John E. Zanni

0 Michael E. Arth NPA
Al Krulick

0 Farid Khavari NPA
Darcy G. Richardson

0 C.C. Reed NPA
Larry Waldo, Sr.

CD0 Daniel Imperato NPA
Karl C.C. Behm

O
Write-in '
ATTORNEY GENERAL
(Vote for One)
0 Pam Bondi REP
C Dan Gelber DEM
0 Jim Lewis NPA
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
(Vote for One)
CD Jeff Atwater REP
O Loranne Ausley DEM
CD0 Ken Mazzle NPA
0 Tom Steams NPA
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
(Vote for One)
0 Adam H. Putnam REP
0 Scott Maddox DEM
0 Ira Chester TEA
0. Thad Hamilton NPA


c~ ~


r- %.I l VF=F=IM IF%^I L


Vote!


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


Explosion at China coal mine kills 21, traps 16


By CARA ANNA
Associated Press Writer

BEUING China joined
the world in breathless cov-
erage of the Chilean mine
rescue, but when a gas blast
killed 21 Chinese miners
and trapped 16 Saturday,
the national TV evening
news didn't say a word.
Rescuers said they were
fighting tons of coal dust to
reach the miners, who have
been located but whose
condition was unknown.
The rescuers also faced
dangerous gas levels and
the risk of falling rocks as
.they worked their way into
the mine pit.
The early-morning
explosion in central China
happened as the world still
was celebrating Chile's suc-
cessful rescue of 33 min-
ers trapped more than two


months. Chinese media had
detailed coverage as the
men emerged to cheers.
Some in China asked
whether their own officials
would make as much of an
effort in a similar disaster,
and be just as open about
the progress of rescue
efforts.
The test came quickly
for China, whose mining
industry is the most dan-
gerous in the world.
Saturday's blast at a
state-run mine in Henan
province occurred as work-
ers were drilling a hole to
release .pressure from a
gas buildup to decrease the
risk of explosions, the state
work safety administration
said.
Another gas blast at
the same -mine two years
ago killed 23 people, state
media said.


Saturday's blast at the
Pingyu Coal & Electric Co.
Ltd. mine unleashed more
than 2,500 tons of coal dust,
an engineer for one of the
mine's parent companies,
Du Bo, told the state-run
Xinhua News Agency.
A rescue spokesman told
Xinhua that workers had
located the 16 trapped min-
ers but must clear tons of
coal dust from the mine
shaft to reach them.
It wasn't clear if the min-
ers were alive or how far
underground' they were
trapped in the mine in the
city of Yuzhou, about 430
miles south of Beijing.
China Central
Television's news channel
had an excited live broad-
cast from the mine early in
the afternoon, but then did
not mention the accident
for several hours, and there


was no word of it on the
main TV evening news.
A report later in the eve-
ning consisted mostly of
information from the state
news agency read by an
announcer, suggesting that
authorities had decided to
limit reporting on the acci-
dent and rescue efforts.
The gas level inside the
mine was 40 percent, far
higher than the normal
level of about 1 percent,
state media said.
The gas wasn't specified,
but methane is a common
cause of mine blasts, and
coal dust is explosive.
The more than 70 res-
cuers working in shifts at
the scene also must clear
chunks of coal loosened by
the blast that fell into the
shaft, Xinhua said.
At least 21 miners were
confirmed dead, it said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo distributed by China's Xinhua news agency,
rescuers prepare to go underground after an explosion at the
state-run Pingyu coal mine in Yuzhou city, central China's
Henan province on Saturday. Rescuers battled dangerous
levels of gas, tons of coal dust and the risk of falling rocks as
they worked to free miners after the explosion.


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

htto://election.dos.state.fl.us/intiatives/initiativelist.asp?vear=initstatus=


ALL&MadeBallot=y&ElecTvDe=Gen


THE CONSTITUTIONALAMENDMENTS
AND THE COUNTY RESOLUTION
APPEARS ON ALL BALLOTS


http://edr.state.fl.us/conferences/constitutionalimpactcitizensinitative.htm


Mark Ballot This Way
Completely fill in the oval opposite the
name of each candidate or issue you
wish to vote for.
USE ONLY THE MARKING PEN PROVIDED


NO. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE II, SECTION 7
Referenda. required for adoption and
amendment of local government
comprehensive land use plans
Establishes that before a local
government may adopt a new
comprehensive land use plan, or amend a
comprehensive land use plan, the
proposed plan or amendment shall be
subject to vote of the electors of the local
government by referendum, following
preparation by the local planning agency,
consideration by the governing body and
notice. Provides definitions.
The amendment's impact on local
government expenditures cannot be
estimated precisely. Local govcmmonto
will incur additional costs due to the
requirement to conduct referenda in order
to adopt comprehensive plans or
amendments thereto. The amount of such
costs depends upon the frequency, timing
and method of the referenda, and includes
the costs of ballot preparation, election
administration, and associated expenses..
The impact on state government
expenditures will be insignificant.

Q YES
C NO
NO. 5
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 21
Standards for legislature to follow in
legislative redistricting
Legislative districts or districting plans
may not be drawn to favor or disfavor an
incumbent or political party. Districts shall
not be drawn to deny racial or language
minorities the equal opportunity to
participate in the political- process and
elect representatives of their choice.
Districts must be contiguous. Unless
otherwise required, districts must be
compact, as equal in population as
feasible, and where feasible must make
use of existing city, county and
geographical boundaries.
The fiscal impact cannot be determined
precisely. Slate government and state
courts may incur additional costs if
litigation increases beyond the number or
complexity of cases which would have
occurred in the amendment's absence.

Q YES
CD NO


NO. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 20
Standards for legislature to follow In
congressional redistricting'
Congressional districts or districting plans
may not be drawn to favor or disfavorf an
incumbent or political party. Districts shall
not be drawn to deny racial or language
minorities the equal opportunity to
participate in the political process and
elect representatives of. their choice.
Districts must be contiguous. Unless
otherwise required, 'districts must be
compact, as equal in population as
feasible, and where feasible must make
use of existing city, county and
geographical boundaries.
The fiscal impact cannot be determined
precisely. State government and state
courts may incur additional costs if
litigation increases beyond the number or
complexity of cases which would have
occurred in the amendment's absence.


C YES
C NO


4


NO. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE IX, SECTION 1
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 31
Revision of the class size requirements
for public schools
The Florida Constitution currently limits
the maximum number of students
assigned to each teacher in public school
classrooms in the following grade
groupings: for prekindergarten through
grade 3, 18 students; for grades 4 through
8, 22 students; and for grades 9 through
12, 25 students. Under this amendment,
the current limits on the maximum number
of students assigned to each teacher in
public school classrooms would become
limits on the average number of students
assigned per class to each teacher, by
specified grade grouping, in each public
school. This amendment also adopts new
limits on the maximum number of students
assigned to each teacher in an individual
classroom as follows: for prekindergarten
through grade 3, 21 students; for grades 4
through 8, 27 students; and for grades 9
through 12, 30 students. This amendment
specifies that class size limits do not apply
to virtual classes, requires the Legislature
to provide sufficient funds to maintain the
average number of students required'by
this amendment, and schedules these
revisions to take effect upon approval by
the electors of this state and to operate
retroactively to the beginning of the 2010-
2011 school year.

0 YES
CD NO
Nonbinding Statewide Advisory
Referendum
Balancing the Federal Budget
A Nonbinding Referendum Calling for
an Amendment to the United States
Constitution
In order to stop the uncontrolled growth of
our national debt and prevent excessive
borrowing by the Federal Government,
which threatens our economy and national
security, should the United States
Constitution be amended to require a
balanced federal budget without raising
taxes?

CD YES
CD NO
COUNTY RESOLUTION


COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
RESOLUTION NO. 201OR-7
Shall the Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County be authorized to
grant, pursuant to Section 3, Article VII of
the State Constitution, Property Tax
Exemptions to New Businesses and
Expansions of Existing Businesses?
0 YES
CD NO


A VOTE is a terrible thing to waste.




Liz P. Home
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS,


THESEAMENDMENTS ARON
BALLOTS IN PRECINCTS 12AND 13
AND PART OF 10,14,2122AND 24

LAKE CITY AMENDMENTS


CITY CHARTER AMENDENDMENT ONE
Composition; eligibility; districts;
election and terms of office.
That Section 301(b) of the City Charter be
amended to provide that only' qualified
voters who have resided in the City for
one or more years prior to qualifying for a
seat on the City Council, and are eighteen
years or older,, shall be eligible to hold
office, and all Council members,. except
the Mayor, shall have resided in the
district which they represent at least one
year prior to qualifying for office.


CD YES
CQ NO

CITY CHARTER AMENDMENT TWO
Appointment, Qualification and
Compensation of City Manager.
That Section 401 of the City Charter
be amended to provide that the City
Council shall appoint a City Manager
for an indefinite term whose
compensation shall be fixed by the
Council and who shall hold a
Bachelor's Degree from an accredited
four year college or university and
have either ten years of progressively
responsible experience in municipal or
corporate management in a senior
management position o.r any
equivalent combination of training and
experience.
C YES
Q NO
CITY CHARTER AMENDENDMENT
THREE
Assumption of Office
That Section 509 of the City Charter
be amended to provide that
Candidates elected at either the
regular or runoff election to the
designated seats shall take and
subscribe to the required oath or
affirmation and assume office at the
first regularly scheduled City Council
Meeting following the immediate
preceding November state general
election.


CD YES
C NO


COLUMBIA COUNTY


Office (386) 758-1026 Fax (386) 755-7233
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3734
www.votecolumbla.com Email: election@votecolumbia.com


VOTE BOTH SIDES OF THE BALLOT


PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENTS

NO. 1
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE V.I, SECTION 7
Repeal of public campaign
financing requirement
Proposing the repeal of the provision
in the -State Constitution that requires
public financing of campaigns of
candidates 'for elective statewide
office who agree to campaign
spending limits.


C YES
Q NO
NO. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 3
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 31
Homestead ad valorem tax credit
for deployed military personnel.
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to require the Legislature
to provide an additional homestead
property tax exemption by law for
members of the United States military
or military reserves, the United States
Coast Guard or its reserves, or the
Florida National Guard who receive a
homestead exemption and were
deployed in the previous year on
active duty outside the continental
United States, Alaska, or Hawaii in
support of military operations
designated by the Legislature. The
exempt amount will be based upon
the number of days in the previous
calendar year that the person was
deployed on active duty outside the
continental United States, Alaska, or
Hawaii in support of military
operations designated by the
Legislature. The amendment is
scheduled to take effect January 1,
2011.

CD YES
C)NO


- -Ir I


I


- --


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


THE WEATHER



SUNNY SUNNY PARTLY PARTLY MOSTLY
) |CLOUDY CLOUDY SUNNY


HI SLO HI85LO 1i H1I84LO s- HI 84LO : HIBILO:


a 7 '7i f -


NATIONAL FORECAST: Cool and breezy conditions are anticipated in the Northeast today as
a cold front moves through the region. The front will have limited moisture to work with, allow
ing for only a few showers in northern New England. Meanwhile, an upper-level trough of low
pressure over the West will bring wet weather to the region.



.~-.-~- -


56 42V.i.-_I!
) f Sratl~e ,- -^ ^ Iinijnmiliunij
r ._. 5 *~~~-- __ ,,,,, t .1 f"'"'-
Fom~afl.-~j 50SaL
O6443 Billings F 1 nna ,
) Boise - J 5140
f66 34 / Rac -
-- .4 50


Pensacola
80/56


Valdosta
81/44

Tallahassee Lake Cit)
83/43 83/49
0 Gainesville *
PanamaP ity 82/51


81/54


Tam
83/


I F --B--DBlsPlYB~~~ B-


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


83
51
81
59
94 in 1925
40 in 1978


0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.43"
42.56"


Ocala


* Jacksonville
;.1 '.,


Daytona Beach
79/57
a


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


2/2 w Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
82/58 78/59 MiLake City
ipa Naples
'63 West Palm Beach Ocala
83/66 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 84/68 0 Pensacola
84/62 Naples Tallahassee
85/64 Miami Tampa
85/69 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
82/74


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7.34 a.m.
6:57 p.m.
7:35 a.m.
6:56 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 3:57 p.m.
Moonset today 2:46 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 4:26 p.m.
Moonset tom. 3:39 a.m.


Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.
22 30 6 13
Full Last New First


Monday


84/72/s
86/65/s
83/55/s
81/57/s
81/75/pc
85/54/s
85/71/s
86/67/s
84/56/s
84/61/s
82/59/s
82/60/pc
84/51/s
85/66/s
83/50/pc
84/68/s


Tuesday
*! 6E : "

85/74/pc
86/67/pc
84/57/pc
83/59/pc
82/73/sh
84/56/pc
85/73/s
85/70/s
84/58/pc
87/64/s
81/63/s
82/62/pc '
85/56/s
85/68/pc
82/54/s
85/71/s


j; .-



15 mmtes to bin

u lr : ...:.l 7 ,
rdiationn r-I r .


WETIE*r Con'
so. --- .


.. Forecasts, data and graph-
-* Ics 2010 Weather Central
. LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


' T ..? s- NfT- ,AL- *- Hig 9 - - - I.'.--, .'- FZ-, 'M .
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 920. El Centro. Calif. Low: 180. Angel Fire, N.M.


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
'Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
E, las
Daytona Beach
Denver


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
57/46/0 61/37/pc
72/50/0 74/51/pc
33/29/0 43/33/r
74/47/0 79/48/s
65/46/0 69/47/s
50/34/0 57/35/c
77/42/0 81/46/s
59/37/0 54/31/sh
70/51/0 66/34/pc
58/44/0 62/42/s
57/42/0 59/40/pc
72/45/0 78/53/s
64/38/0 73/42/s
70/39/0 78/44/s
58/39/0 69/39/pc
70/40/0 63/45/pc
70/35/0 75/43/pc
62/40/0 61/42/pc
73/42/0 80/46/s
83/53/0 85/62/s
82/52/0 79/57/s
62/38/0 77/45/pc


Saturday Today


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
76/49/0
64/40/0
80/58/0
17/10/0
69/42/0
59/48/0
82/73/0
84/54/0
69/38/0
83/45/0
78/49/0
80/47/0
87/66/0
81/47/0
65/62/0
78/47/0
85/67/0
66/46/0
82/49/0
85/56/0
58/51/0
84/51/0


Hi/Lo/W
65/45/pc
61/44/pc
82/54/pc
27/13/c
76/47/s
64/38/s
86/70/s
85/60/s
70/45/pc
85/55/s
79/53/s
75/51/pc
85/64/pc
85/55/s
64/58/c
85/57/s
85/69/s
57/40/c
82/54/s
82/59/s
68/48/s
84/56/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
74/49/0
84/56/0
63/54/0
88/71/0
61/39/0
53/46/0
55/43/.01
70/42/0
62/41/0
70/47/0
68/47/0
77/56/0
77/44/0
74/45/0
79/52/0
69/66/0
65/57/0
54/42/0
51/33/0
84/59/0
- 82/60/0
67/52/0


Hi/Lo/W
66/44/pc
82/58/s
70/48/s
92/69/pc
62/38/pc
60/36/s
'64/43/s
77/46/s
61/36/c
60/47/sh
76/48/s
72/55/sh
76/52/pc
70/47/sh
82/64/pc
67/64/c
62/54/sh
58/42/s
56/32/s
83/63/s
85/61/pc
72/49/s


j i i n in-i ri.
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1 -r ,ir i :e., i



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I lrii- .. Tri :l ,an.3-
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Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturc
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/
Acapulco 88/75/0 87/77/pc La Paz 59/34/0 59/38/sh Rio 88/77
Amsterdam 0.0 1 'I.1 1 Lima 66/59/0 67/59/pc Rome 68/52/
Athens .: 6 0 6 London 55/43/.09 52/42/s St. Thomas VI 84/77/
Auckland j.: :. i 5. :r. Madrid 66/41/0 62/37/s San Juan PR 91/78/
Belling 6.J 1 6'' ) p.: Mexico City 73/43/0 ,74/51/pc Santiago 77/43
Berlin 4.r. ': J1 : : ... Montreal 54/45/1.06 52/36/s Seoul 72/48
Buenos Aires 64 It. 1: 6.'. 46i Moscow 37/30/0 41/30/s Singapore 93/81
Cairo 09 : 9 ;, : Nairobi 82/61/0 82/60/s Sydney 63/52
Geneva -i 4b 15 J. JO 6r. Nassau 86/79/0 84/73/sh Tel Aviv 91/73
Havana 2 :, J'.; r, New Delhi 95/78/0 92/73/s Tokyo 73/68
Helsinki '3 :tu 01 413i08 p: Oslo J 45/27/0 44/29/pc Toronto 59/41
Hong Kong n2a ,i 0 .. 06, i,0L ,Pqama b" I ;1 0 i is, ;,I Vienna 52/4i
...Kingston ........ .-~JlQw id 45... 5.2 3WZ. .Warsaw 50/3;
S KEYTOd'COND1T NS:.:=:.I....,, drdnl ..f t ar fg.=ig. r,=r,.l I ic=pprtly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunty,
In= .:v. ,;. in-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w=windy.


/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
7/0 80/71/t
.72 69/53/pc
.21 85/75/pc
.55 87/77/pc
3/0 78/48/s
8/0 63/47/s
1/0 89/77/t
2/0 68/55/s
3/0 88/71/s
3/0 73/63/c
1/0 60/45/pc
5/0 48/42/sh
2/0 47/32/pc


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. October 17. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

RUNNING
Alligator Lake
5K is Saturday
The 3rd Annual
Alligator Lake 5K is
8 a.m. Saturday at
Alligator Lake Park. This
year's race will be
followed by an
elementary mile run.
Preferred online
registration is $15 for the
5K and $5 for the fun run
by Wednesday. Race day
registration is $25 for the
5K (by 7:30 a.m.) and $10
for the fun run (by 8:40
a.m. for the 9 a.m. start).
Online registration is at
www.active.com, keyword,
alligator lake run.
For details, e-mail
dusty@halfmiletiming.
comn.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call
John Henry Young Jr.
at 623-4817 or Mario
Coppock at 754-7095.
TRAINING
Outer Extreme
class offered
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
is offering Outer
Extreme, a high
intensity, full-body
workout using a
combination of training
techniques.
Classes are
5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays
outside of Teen Town
Recreation Center.
Instructors are Tara
Black, Nikki Griswold
and Alesha Waller. Cost
is $5 per class or $45 per
month.
For details, call Black
at (386) 697-3947 or
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Hamilton
County High, 6:30 p.m.
(JV-5)
Tuesday
Columbia High
girls golf in District 2-2A
tournament at Panama
City Country Club,
8 a.m.
Columbia High
boys golf in District
2-2A tournament at
Killearn Country Club in
Tallahassee, 9 a.m.
Columbia High vol-
leyball vs. Meadowbrook
Academy, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Oak Hall
SSchool, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Columbia High, Fort
White High bowling vs.
Suwannee High at Lake
City Bowl, 4 p.m.
Fort White JV
football vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High vol-
leyball vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Friday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Union
County High, 1:45 p.m.
Columbia High
football at Godby High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. East Gadsden


High, 7:30 p.m.


Homecoming


nightmare
Mullen returns with a signature win for
second-year coach Dai
to Florida, Gators Mullen.
fall to Bulldogs. Mississippi State (5-2
fall SEC) controlled the


By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE- Vick
Ballard ran for 98 yards,
Chris Relf added 82 and
a touchdown on the
ground and Mississippi
State upset No. 22
Florida 10-7 on Saturday
night
The Bulldogs ran early,
ran late and ended up
running out of the Swamp


r
n


clock, dictated the tempo
and kept Florida's mostly
inept offense on the side-
line.
The Gators (4-3, 2-3)
lost consecutive home
games for the first time since
2003 and dropped three
in a row for the first time
since the Steve Spurrier
era. Yep, coach Urban
Meyer has. accomplished
something that even
former coach Ron Zook
never did.


Escape


.JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mississippi State linebacker K.J. Wright (34) brings down Florida's Mike Gillislee (23) before
he can gain yardage during the homecoming game at Gainesville on Saturday.


FROM THE SIDELINE

a /


artist

S ,Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420


ASSOCIATED
Florida State's Burt Reed (right) allows the block of Jermaine Thomas to score a touchdown against Boston College in t
fourth quarter of an NCAA college football game on Saturday in Tallahassee. Florida State won 24-19.

FSU shakes off Boston College, 24-]


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
No. 16 Florida State needed
just a little bit of trickery to
overcome its own mistakes
and avoid being upset by
Boston College.


Bert Reed's 42-yard
touchdown run on a reverse
lifted the Seminoles to a
24-19 win Saturday as they
survived four turnovers
by quarterback Christian
Ponder to win their fifth
straight.
"I saw nothing but green


grass," said Reed, who pretty
much had clear sailing down
his own left sideline as the
beneficiary of blocks by tail-
,back Jermaine Thomas and
wideout Taiwawn Easterling.
"We knew we had to do
something drastic," Florida
State coach Jimbo Fisher


Texas cruises to 7-2 victory


Rangers even
series 1-1 with
win over Yankees.
By STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Texas
- The Rangers relievers
got quick redemption, and
Texas finally has won a
postseason game at home
for the first time in its 50-
season history.
Elvis Andrus got the
Rangers off to a running
start, David Murphy led
a parade of extra-base
hits and the bullpen that
faltered the night before
held strong this time as
Texas got even in the AL
championship series with
a 7-2 victory over the New
York Yankees in Game 2
on Saturday.
The Rangers again built


an early 5-0 lead and
stayed ahead this time,
unlike the series opener
when the Yankees had
their biggest postsea-
son comeback in the
seventh inning or later.
Texas snapped a 10-game
postseason losing streak
against New York.
The best-of-seven series
now switches to Yankee
Stadium for Game 3 on
Monday night, when
Texas will have hired ace
left-hander Cliff Lee on
the mound. Lee has won
his last four starts in New
York, including a complete
game for Philadelphia in
last year's World Series.
Colby Lewis limited
New York to two runs over
5 2-3 innings and the bull-
pen rebounded the eighth-
inning debacle in Game 1
that allowed the defend-
ing World Series champion


Yankees to escape with a 6-
5 victory even though CC
Sabathia lasted only four
innings.
New York's postseason
winning streak over the
Rangers included knock-
ing them out of the playoffs
in their only three previous
postseason appearances
(1996, 1998 and 1999).
These Rangers don't
plan to be easily dismissed
by the Bronx Bombers,
who have won 27 World
Series titles and 40 pen-
nants.
Andrus led off the first
with an infield single on a
chopper that deflected off
starter Phil Hughes' glove.
Andrus went to second
on a wild pitch, then stole
third before Josh Hamilton
drew a walk.
With Nelson Cruz bat-
ALCS continued on 2B


.-

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas Rangers' Elvis Andrus (left) slides home to score
past New York Yankees' catcher Jorge Posada on a double
steal in the first inning of Game 2 of the American League
Championship Series Saturday in Arlington, Texas.


said. "We made one
play than they did. It v
pretty."
Boston College (2-
Atlantic Coast Confer
took a 19-17 lead ea
the fourth quarter on


bDinf leymaKectyreportercom

Upset

avoided

makings of an
upset. After a huge
road win against
in-state rival
Miami, the Seminoles
returned home for a
Boston College team that
was ripe for an upset.
Florida State played
like it was still enjoying
the win against the
Hurricanes in the 24-19
win at Doak Campbell
Stadium Saturday.
A rushing offense
that came in averaging
more than 220 yards a
game had trouble moving
the ball on the ground,
Christian Ponder had
trouble maintaining
possession of the ball
and Boston College did
everything to play the
S underdog.
In the end, however,
he Florida State was able
to come away with one
L 9 big play the helped
9 bthe Seminoles survive.
Trailing in the fourth
more quarter, Bert Reed took
wasn't a 42-yard reverse to the
house and the Florida
4, 0-3 State defense was able to
ence) hang on.
rly in It's these kind of
Nate games that separate the


NOLES continued on 2B FSU continued on 2B


II


*s .AN











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
EXTREME SPORTS
4 p.m.
NBC Dew Tour Championships,
at Las Vegas
GOLF
10 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Portugal
Masters, final round, at Vilamoura,
Portugal
1:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee
Championship, final round, at Miami
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Frys.com Open,
final round, at San Martin, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA Challenge, final round.
at Danville, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game 2, San
Francisco at Philadelphia
MOTORSPORTS
I p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, Australian
Grand Prix, at Phillip Island, Australia
(same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Ddoubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC Indianapolis at Washington

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, American League
Championship Series, game 3,'Texas at
N.Y.Yankees
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN -Tennessee at Jacksonville
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Colorado at N.Y. Rangers

BASEBALL


AL Championship Series

Friday
NewYork 6,Texas 5
Saturday
Texas 7, New York 2
Monday
Texas (Lee 12-9) at NewYork (Pettitte
11-3), 8:07 p.m
Tuesday
Texas (Hunter 13-4) at New York
(Burnett 10-15), 8:07 p.m.


NL Championship Series

Saturday
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
Today
San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 8:19 p.m.
Tuesday
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at San
Francisco (Cain 13-1 I),4:19 p.m.
Wednesday
Philadelphia at San Francisco,
7:57 p.m.-

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
N.Y.Jets 4 I 0.800 135 81
New England 3 I 0.750 131 96




NOLES

Continued From Page 1B

Freese's fourth field goal
of the game. That followed
a Ponder fumble at the
Eagles' 44.
Montel Harris rushed for
191 yards and safety Jim
Noel had two of three BC
interceptions, including one
he returned 43 yards for
a third quarter touchdown
that pulled the .Eagles to
within 17-16.
But the Eagles' offense
couldn't get into the end
zone, and the Seminoles
took advantage.
"We've got to get touch-
downs," Boston College
coach Frank Spaziani said.
"We weren't able to pound
it and get it in."
Boston College freshman
Chase Rettig completed 9 of
24 apses for 95 yards in his
second career start.
"He did some nice things
and he did some freshman
things," Spaziani'said.
For that matter, so did
Florida State's Ponder.
"Dumb mental mistakes,"
said Ponder, who suffered
through one of his poorest
performances in three years
as a starter. "I've got to thank
my teammates. They pulled
me out of it. I didn't give us
a chance to win."
Ponder completed 19 of
31 passes for 170 yards and
a pair of touchdowns 3
yards to fullback Lonnie
Pryor and 10 yards to tight
end Beau Reliford.


Miami
Buffalo

Houston
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Indianapolis

Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland

Kansas City
'Oakland
Denver
San Diego
NATIONAL

Washington
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Dallas

Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina

Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

Arizona
Seattle
St. Louis
San Francisco


2 2 0.500 66 92
0 5 0.000 87 161
South
W L TPct PF PA
3 2 0.600 118 136
3 2 0.600 107 137
3 2 0.600 132 95
3 2 0.600 136 101
North
W L TPct PF PA
4 I 0.800 92 72
3 I 0.750 86 50
2 3 0.400 100 102
I 4 0.200 78 97
West
W L TPct PF PA
3 1 0.750 77 57
2 3 0.400111 134
2 3 0.400104 116
2 3 0.400 140 106
kL CONFERENCE


East
W L
3 2
3 2
3 2
1 3
South
W L
4 1
3 1
3 2
0 5
North
W L
4 1
3 2
1 3
1 4
West
W L
3 2
2 2
2 3
0 5


T Pct PF PA
0.600 89 92
0.600 106 98
0.600 122 103
0.250 81 87

TPct PF PA
0.800113 70
0.750 74 80
0.600 99 102
0.000 52 110


T Pct PF
0.800 92
0.600 119
0.250 63
0.200 126


PF PA
88.138
75 77
83 96
76 130


Today's Games
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m..
Miami at Green Bay, I p.m.
Kansas City at Houston, I p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, I p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Baltimore at New England, I p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, I p.m.-
New Orleans atTampa Bay, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Denver, 4:05 pmn.
Oakland at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Washington, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona,
Carolina
Sunday, Oct. 24
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m.
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Tennessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 25
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit,
Houston

College scores

Saturday
Texas 20, Nebraska 13
Virginia Tech 52,Wake Forest 21
Pittsburgh 45, Syracuse 14
Rutgers 23,Army 20, OT
Navy 28, SMU 21
Jacksonville 86,Valparaiso 7
Miami (Ohio) 27, Cent. Michigan 20
Michigan St. 26, Illinois 6
Ohio 38,Akron 10
Purdue 28, Minnesota 17
Colorado St.43, UNLV 10
Auburn 65,Arkansas 43
Clemson 31, Maryland 7
Florida A&M 31, Savannah St. 0


Florida St. 24, Boston College 19
Georgia 43,Vanderbilt 0
Georgia 43, Vanderbilt 0 Albion 27,
Hope 14
Ashland 40,Wayne, Mich. 35
Augustana, S.D. 17,Winona St. 0
Benedictine, III. 32, Concordia.Wis. 6
Case Reserve 41, Hiram 0
Concordia, St.P. 17.Wayne, Neb. 14
Dayton 33, Butler 13
DePauw 23,Adrian 19
Defiance 33, Earlham 0
E. Michigan 41, Ball St. 38, OT
Hillsdale,24, Michigan Tech 17
Indiana 36,Arkansas St. 34
Iowa 38, Michigan 28
Kalamazoo 33, Olivet 13
Minn. Duluth 49, Mary 0
Minn. St., Mankato 48, Upper Iowa 14
Monmouth, III. 27, Lake Forest 10
Mount Union 45, Heidelberg 7
N. Michigan 22, Ferris St. 20
North Central 38, Millikin 7.
Notre Dame 44,W. Michigan 20
Northwood, Mich. 51 Tiffin 27
Ohio 38,Akron 10
UAB 21, UTEP 6
SFriday
Cincinnati 35, Louisville 27

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Friday's Garpes
New Orleans at Indiana (n)
Boston at Toronto (W)
Detroit vs. Minnesota (n)
Dallas at Chicago (n)
Saturday's Games
Houston vs. New Jersey (n)
Detroit vs. Charlotte (n)
Chicago at Orlando (n),
Utah at LA. Clippers (n)
New York vs. Boston (n)
Milwaukee at Memphis (n)
Atlanta.vs. New Orleans (n)
Golden State at Portland (n)
Denver at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Phoenix atToronto, I p.m.
Washington at New York, 6 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Minnesota at Sioux Falls,
S.D., 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Orlando at Atlanta, 7. p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio,
8:30 p.m.
Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
Atlanta S.Anaheim 4, SO
Colorado 3, New Jersey 2
Toronto 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, OT
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, OT
Chicago 5, Columbus 2
Montreal 2, Buffalo I
Los Angeles 4,Vancouver I
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (n)
Ottawa at Montreal (n)
Boston at New Jersey (n)
Colorado at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Tampa Bay at Florida (n)
Washington at Nashville (n))
Columbus at Minnesota (n)
St. Louis at Dallas (n)
Buffalo at Chicago (n)
Detroit at Phoenix (n)
Edmonton at Calgary (n)
Atlanta at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Phoenix at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Carolina atVancouver, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.


FSU: Defense holds

Continued From Page 1B


good teams from the rest
of the pack. Over the
past decade, Florida State
had a tendency to lay
down after a big win. On
Saturday, the Seminoles
answered the call.
The win might not have
been in dominating fashion
but its a win. At the end of
the season, Florida State
won't look back at this as
a game that got away. The
Seminoles will be able to
look at Boston College as a



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

SOURE I


2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
PAWMS -



SHRUPE I

Ci


tale of survival.
Montel Harris may have
rushed for 191 yards for
the Eagles, but the Florida
State defense kept the
Boston College offense out
of the end zone.
If Florida State is to
, continue on its undefeated
streak, the backbone will
be the defense. Saturday
was a performance that
reminded of Mickey
Andrews' units in the late
90s.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHEN THE C.ON-
PUCTOR PROPOSE-
TO THE HARPIST,
IT WAS --


11 -- U j u% Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
i suggested by the above cartoon.

A: TO(III

(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: FAMED BEFOG WHITEN RAREFY
Answer: What the forecaster experienced when he
faced the fire A WARM "FRONT"


Auburn quarterback Cameron Newton (2) dives in on for a one-yard touchdown run as
Arkansas Isaac Madison (6) defends during the second half of an NCAA college football
game in Auburn, Ala., Saturday.


Tigers remain unbeaten


Associated Press

Auburn's national cham-
pionship hopes are still on
the rise. Meanwhile, Texas
gave Nebraska a send-off all
right knocking the wind
out of the Cornhuskers'
national championship
hopes:
Unbeaten Auburn should
be. right in the mix thanks
to another brilliant perfor-
mance by Cam Newton.
The quarterback Cam
Newton ran for 188 yards,
passed for 140 and account-
ed for four touchdowns as
No. 7 Auburn beat No. 12
Arkansas 65-43.
In Licoln, Neb., Garrett
Gilbert ran for two -touch-
downs and Texas' defense
* shut down Taylor Martinez
to lead the Longhorns
to .a 20-13 upset of No. 5
Nebraska.
This was the most antici-
pated game in Lincoln of
the season, fans and play-
ers looking to avenge last
year's loss in the Big 12
championship game and say
goodbye to the Longhorns
before heading to the Big
Ten next season.
Texas (4-2, 2-1 Big 12),
surprised Nebraska (5-1,.
1-1) by turning Gilbert
loose in the run game for
the first time this season.
The quarterback ran for
a 71 yards on 11 carries,
scoring from 3 yards and
1 yard, and Cody Johnson


ACROSS

1 Not very many
4 Warm-up
8 Young goat
11 Yes vote
12 Bursts of
laughter
13 Ms. Hagen
14 Flowering tree
(2 wds.)
16 PC key
17 Most chilling
18 Excessive
interest
20 Moo goo pan
21 Tooth fixer's
deg.
22 Access the
Web (2 wds.) -
25 Remote place
29 Dogpatch verb
30 Get tangled
31 House site
32 E. Lansing
campus
33 Stretchy
bandage
34 Vegas game


had 58 of his 73 yards in 23-0 in the second half.
the second half.
No. 15 Iowa 38,
No. 4 TCU 31, BYU 3 Michigan 28


FORT WORTH, Texas
- Andy Dalton threw four
touchdown passes, includ-
ing two barely a minute
apart late in the first half,
and TCU narrowly missed
a third consecutive shut-
out.
, The Frogs led just 3-0
with two minutes left before
halftime when a sack forced
the Cougars to punt from
their 4-yard line. Given
good field position, Dalton
found Josh Boyce on a 35-
yard score two plays later.
TCU (7-0, 3-0 Mountain
West) got the ball right
back on an interception,
and Dalton hit a wide-open
Jimmy Young in the end
zone for a 14-yard score
that made it 17-0 with 26
seconds left in the half.

No. 13 Michigan St. 26,
Illinois 6

EAST LANSING, Mich.
- Kirk Cousins threw a
48-yard touchdown pass
to B.J. Cunningham in
the third quarter, helping
Michigan State to its best
start in more than four
decades.
The Spartans (7-0,3-0 Big
Ten) started slowly a week
after beating Michigan, but
they outscored the Illini


35 Request
earnestly
38 nova
39 got it!
40 Huntsville's st.
41 Reddish tint
44 Charms
48 In olden days
49 Interior-
51 Down for the
count
52 Mandate
53 Elev.
54 Vane dir.
55 Dull-witted one
56 Most of the
Earth

DOWN

1 Watch part
2 Rochester's
Jane
3 Have on
4 Soft drink
choice
5 Wholly
absorbed
6 Pipe fitting


ANN ARBOR, Mich.
- Ricky Stanzi threw his
third touchdown pass to
Derrell Johnson-Koulianos
early in the fourth quarter
and Michael Meyer kicked
a 30-yard field goal with
2:53 left, helping Iowa hold
off Michigan.
The Hawkeyes (5-1, 2-0
Big Ten) led the Wolverines
(5-2, 1-2) by three TDs early
in the fourth quarter.

No. 20 Oklahoma St. 34,
Texas Tech 17

LUBBOCK, Texas
- Justin Blackmon had
a career-high 207 yards
receiving with a touchdown
to lead Oklahoma State to
its first win in Lubbock
since 1944.
Blackmon's 62-yard touch-
down catch in the third quar-
ter was the longest play of
the game and put the contest
out of reach for the Cowboys
(6-0, 2-0'Big 12).

No. 21 Missouri 30,
Texas A&M 9

COLLEGE STATION,
Texas Blaine Gabbert
threw for a 361 yards
and three touchdowns
and Missouri remained
undefeated.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

J AMB APB SC AM

USER UR L URSA
NINO 0 FOURBITS
G A U N A



A P L MM EDES


S T WA|RN YU K


AGE LAO ROL E S
THUMBSUPIMEMO
TEoR|I E | S ANI L
NEION LEl DARE


Fake
Striped
antelope
Ovid's road
Actress Tyne
Hymn of praise


15 Intolerant per-
son
19 9-digit no.
21 Be too fond
22 Gentle one
23 River into the
Seine
24 Wildebeests
25 Fugue
composer
26 Monsieur's
islands
27 Practically
forever
28 Portico
30 Kitchen spice
34 Eucalyptus
eater
36 Half of zwei
37 Hemmed and
hawed
38 Say without
thinking
40 Former Exxon
rival
41 Ocean fish
42 They often
clash
43 Bump or knot
44 Like vinegar
45 Sorority letters
46 Painted
tinware
47 Veracruz Ms.
50 Shoguns' capital


10-18 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010 3B


h ^District golf tourneys Tuesday


COURTESY PHOTO
Zilla 2000 is just one of the cars that will take place int the Crash-A-Rama series at Columbia
Motorsports Park at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

Crash-A-Rama coming to

Columbia Motorsports Park


From staff reports

Columbia' High's golf
teams are heading west for
District 2-2A tournaments
on Tuesday.
The matches begin at
9 a.m. local time.
The Lady Tigers play


3" *. 4 .--' .- - -
r, i'. -.. ...' '".. ,
llF C'3. .1 .L.. .. .


-at Panama City Country
Club, while the boys will be
at Killearn Country Club in
Tallahassee.
Both CHS teams placed
third in their respective
Alachua County tourna-
ments on Thursday.
'Brittany Boris shot 84 at


Turkey Creek and tied for
fifth. Darian Ste-Marie was
seventh with 85.
Nick Jones shot 81,
good for fourth place, at
Gainesville Country Club.
Dean Soucinek (82) tied for
fifth and Bryce Hawthorne
(84) tied for ninth.


. U. MERCANTILE B
. .- MERCANTILE BANK


From staff reports

.The Crash-A-Rama series
is coming to Columbia
Motorsl5orts Park and it
does play up to its name.
The Crash-A-Rama series
will involve extreme racing
that involves lots of destruc-
tion, but not just with
ordinary cars. There will
also be boats, trailers and
even buses when Crash-
A-Rama invades Columbia
Motorsports Park at
7:30 p.m. Saturday.


Creator Robert Hart's
series invades with "Night
of Fire" and the name
plays to the series' overall
theme.
Among the vehicles
involved will be Green
Mamba. Green Mamba is
jet-engine powered and will
light up the night's sky to
play into the "Night of Fire"
theme.
Jimmy "Elvis" will also
perform during the event
with a' car jump involv-
ing fire. Fordzilla, who is


famous for driving through
campers and boats, will
be on hand in his custom
made pick-up truck, but
that's just the beginning of
the destruction."
Tickets are available
prior to the show at S&S
Food stores at $15 for
adults, $10 for children ages
seven to 11 and free for chil-
dren under six. For more
information about the
event contact Columbia
Motorsports Park at (386)
752-8811.


ALCS: Pettitte takes mound Monday


Continued From Page 1B
ting and two outs, Hamilton
took off for second base,
and Andrus ran home when
Jorge Posada threw the ball
to second. The double-steal
put Texas up 1-0 before
Cruz's inning-ending strike-
out.
Murphy homered off the
facade of the second deck
of seats in the second for a
2-0 lead, then an inning later
he and Bengie Molina had
consecutive RBI doubles to
make it 5-0.
Texas had lost its first
seven home playoffs
games, the most by any


team before finally get-
ting a victory in front of its
own fans, according to the
Elias Sports Bureau. Five
of those losses had been
to New York, plus two to
Tampa Bay last weekend
in the first round when the
Rangers had to go back to
Florida for a deciding Game
5 with Lee pitching to win
a postseason series for the
first time ever.
Andy Pettitte pitches for
the Yankees on Monday
night. Manager Joe Girardi
decided before this series
started to swap the order


for Hughes and Pettitte in
the rotation.
After the Rangers
built a 5-0 lead through
four innings in Game 1
and chased Sabathia, they
didn't tack on any more.
runs.
New York then finally
scored on Robinson Cano's
homer in the seventh and
rallied for five runs off five
pitchers in the eighth.
Cano homered again
Saturday, his 435-foot
solo shot deep in the sec-
ond deck of seats in right
making it 7-2 in the sixth.


Presenng Sponsor
Gold Sponsor Mercantile Bank
rGull Cor.-at Fin.a.c,-ial S r.,.- :


Bronze Sponsors
Flor d3 Pro'er & Lighi
Holiday Inn
State Farm Irsurnce (John Burns III1
Columbia Bank
CCA-Lake- Cr/C.=,rrecr,.hal Fa.:il,t,
Columba Grai & Ilr.wredienr,
i,1ame- Foc.-d Taco B;.11,' Kyn/tal
Campus USA Credt Union
ShandsLAkeShore


State Corporate Sponsor
Publix
Silvar Sponnoi
B y PFarniac,.
Lake Cry Medical Cer.tr Aj/uulary
Mujre.ir. and 'Verr Lloyd
Ediward Jone. Ir...esimar nilSe.e .Jne.)
S.TEL
D North Flord. P di,atr,,:.
Dee.-Parrish Family Funeral Home


Md .iaSpan.sors
Lal,- Cn, rc ric.
L I'.- Citl AJ.err,4er
Suwjanee Dn'octri'Lr
rNl enan Br.-,adcwnTro',L
9rS 5 The jeT
Nenima;. le j.a
rl,- Q4 3
Oldres 0'
rN.,rthlIloridar, .i- cr,


AW*f A0 ,. JA'L~o4w4


Stop By Any Rountree Moore Store Andl..
WE CAN HELP REBUILD B
YOUR CREDIT SCORE
ROUNTREE MOORE TOYOTA D TOYOTA




ALL OFFERS ON SELECT VEHICLES, PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE, REGISTRATION AND INCLUDES DEALER FEE, WITH APPROVED CREDIT. "TRADE IN ALLOWANCE WILL BE BASED ON ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS SUGGESTED RETAIL BASE PRICE AS LISTED IN THE CURRENT N.A.D.A. GUIDE, ALLOWANCE NOT TO EXCEED NA.D.A. LOAN VALUE PI US
20%, EXCLUDES MODELS WITH M.S.R.P. ABOVE S25,000, DEDUCTIONS FROM ALLOWANCE WILL BE MADE FOR EQUIPMENT FAILURE, BODY DAMAGE, RECONDITIONING COSTS & MILEAGE (20 CENTS PER MILE). "-UP TO $10,000 OFF RECENT KELLEY BLUE BOOK OFFER. OFFERS NOT IN COMBINATION OR CONJUNCTION., NO PAYMENTS
UNTIL JANUARY 2011 BASED ON 750+ BEACON SCORE, WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NEGATIVE EQUITY WILL SOMETIMES BE ADDED TO AMOUNT FINANCED. QiALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. SEE DEALER FOR COMPLETE DETAILS RMTO P0043B


* *< I*


I







4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17,2010


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Ground Chuck
Family Pack
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@jokecityreporter.com


BUSINESS


Sunday, October 17, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


BUSINESS CORNER


Project eyed to attract local commerce


Jim Poole


County's tax

abatement

generates

incentives

he voters of
Columbia
County autho-
rized tax abate-
ment as a local
incentive in 1990 and re-
authorized it in 2000.
Voter approval allows
the County Commission
to authorize tax abatement
as a recruitment incentive
to locate businesses in
Columbia County.
Tax abatement allows
a new company or an
expanding existing busi-
ness, for a limited period
of time, to use some of the
tax money that its project
will generate to assist in
the start-up cost of the new
business. No existing tax
is used for the abatement.
Since 2000, when voters
approved the reauthori-
zation of tax abatement,
the Columbia County
Commission has approved
the use of the abatement
for four new companies.
The four companies have
created more than 400 jobs
with an annual payroll of

ABATEMENT continued on 2C


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Project to
help county
officials deal
with emerging
affic patterns
is expected to result in
additional commercial
properties.
Property owners on the
north side of the Village
Square Shopping Center
are clearing a portion of
the property and Scott
Stewart, one of the owners
of Westfield Investment
Group, said the move is
aimed at helping anticipat-
ed county traffic patterns.
"We've joined together
with Bud Espenship, who
owns part of the property,
to devise a plan to help
the county continue their
transportation plans for
better flow of transporta-
tion," he said, noting the
plan calls for extending
Real Road to the north.
"One of the turbulent
areas for bypasses and
transportation in that area
is extending Real Road to
the north, over to Lowe's
and on over to Branford
Highway. They're looking
at that whole area for long-
term plans for transporta-
tion."
Westfield Investment
Group owns just over 10
acres of the property,
while Espenship owns
around three acres.
"Bud has started to do
some clearing on his land
just in preparation of that
and we've been work-
ing ;with the Suwannee
River Water Management


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Concrete slabs and pipes are found Saturday on Bob Espenship's property in Lake City. Clearing a portion of the property is
expected to result in additional commercial establishments.


District in getting all the
permits in place to facili-
tate the project," Stewart
said. "We've been working
with Dale Williams, coun-
ty manager, and Columbia
County (officials) in the
process."
Stewart said he,
Espenship and local
engineer Greg Bailey are
working with the county
on the project.
Westfield Investment
Group purchased the
property about six years
ago and the first two
phases of the project


were to get Village Square
completed. Now there are
plans for additional com-
mercial space as part of
the project.
"The next phase will
be Village Commercial
properties for the prop-
erty that is back in there,"
he said, noting Westfield
Investment Group has not
established an anticipated
date of completion for its
portion of work. "We'll


have several commercial
lots for sale and it will also
be part of the by-pass road
system, we believe. It's a
great location. It's a high-
traffic area in town and
Real Road is a good road
to be on."
Williams said the proj-
ect won't be part of the
Bascom Norris connector
road project, but it is cer-
tainly a project that will
benefit Bascom Norris.


"The county commis-
sion approved joint par-
ticipation in the project
longer than two years
ago, but there were too
many unknowns," he said.
"In order for it to maxi-
mize the benefits to the
county, we simply needed
more information and
that information hasn't
materialized until recently

PROJECT continued on 2C


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I - I I I -


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


Share Prices
in Context
Q Is a company priced at $100
per share in better shape than a
company with a $30 share price? -
L.L., Palmdale, Calif
A This is a critical concept,
and the answer is no. Never
examine a stock's price in isolation.
Lots of other things need to be
taken into account, such as how
many shares there are (many
companies have millions, and
others have billions), how much
income the company is earning
per share, and how the price relates
to the company's earnings, cash
flow and other measures.
If a company is saddled with a
lot of debt and its earnings have
been shrinking, it's probably not an
attractive investment, no matter its
price. If an outfit with a $30 or $100.
stock price is growing rapidly,
increasing its profit margins and
gaining market share in its industry.
it's well worth considering, unless its
stock price has zoomed beyond its
intrinsic worth
Remember that a $3 stock can
really be worth $1, and a $100 stock
might be %%orth $200. Investors need
to do some research before drawing
hasty conclusions.


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training do stockbrokers need'
-PC, Alarrinsvdle. Ind. /
A A college degree generally
A isn'trequired, but they must
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Series 65 exams, too. The successful
completion of these permits brokers
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you, and execute transactions on :
your behalf.
These tests don't measure
the ability to discern outstanding
investments, though. Worse still.
brokers don't have to abide by the
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of stock in Scruffy's Chicken Shack
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return is 12 percent. ($5,600
divided by $5,000 equals 1.12.)
But remember inflation, which
makes money worth less as prices
rise. While your investment grows
and takes two or three
steps forward each year,
inflation makes it take one
step back. Let's say, infla-
tion was 3.0 percent during the
year of your investment.
Subtracting that from your 12
percent return yields an inflation-
adjusted return of 9 percent.
(Inflation alone can wipe out
much of a money market fund's
return.) When you read about a
"real return," it typically refers to
one adjusted for inflation.
But let's make it even more real,
with taxes. Let's say you're in the 28
percent tax bracket, forking
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rak
four
in 19(
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Know tihe ans
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keeping 72 percent. Take your 9 per-
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her returns, ask what her tax bracket
is. It might look like she's earning a
higher return than you until
you figure in taxes.)
The tax picture is less gruesome
for long-term returns for now.
Since 2003, gains on stocks held for
more than a year have been taxed at
15 percent for most people. Folks in
Washington are discussing whether
to change that, and for whom.
Always compare your investment's
return to a benchmark such as the
Standard & Poor's 500 index, which
measures the performance of 500 of
the biggest and best companies
around. If your portfolio returned 12
percent and the S&P 500 advanced
9 percent during the same period,
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reconsider your investment strategy
- or just invest in an S&P 500
index fund or Standard & Poor's
Depositary Receipts.


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PROJECT
From Page 1C
due to the work on the
bypass road." Officials
are attempting to build
a road that would allow
travel east-west, north
of Walmart connecting
the bypass to Real Road.
The proposed road would
go on the east side of
the bypass and connect
to Cole Road, which is
between the old K-mart
Shopping Plaza and for-
mer Publix Shopping
Center location.
"The whole purpose
is to disburse traffic with-
out having to get on U.S.
Highway 90," Williams said.
"That then gives the travel-
ing public three locations
to access U.S. Highway
90 with traffic signals, as
opposed to the current one
traffic signal."
Williams said there is no
time frame on the project
'"We're working with the
private landowners that are
involved and the only one
that we're really working
with and have had numer-
ous conversations with is
Scott Stewart," he said.
"The county is definitely
interested in working with
these private landowners
because there is definitely a
benefit to the public."


Government reports $1.3 trillion deficit


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama waves as he walks out of the Oval
Office of the White House in Washington on Friday, before
his departure from the South Lawn on the Marine One heli-
copter. Obama's administration officials said Friday the fed-
eral deficit reached $1.3 trillion for the budget year.


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
and ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
Obama administration said
Friday the federal deficit
hit a near-record $1.3 tril-
lion for the just-completed
budget year.
That means the govern-
ment had to borrow 37
cents out of every dollar it
spent as tax revenues con-
tinued to lag while spend-
ing on food stamps and
unemployment benefits
went up as joblessness
neared double-digit levels
in a struggling economy.
While expected, the
eye-popping deficit num-
bers provide Republican
critics of President Barack
Obama's fiscal stewardship
with fresh ammunition less
than three weeks ahead of
the midterm congressional
elections. The deficit was
$122 billion less than last
year, a modest improve-
ment.
Voter anger over deficits
and spending are a big
problem for Democrats
this election year.
Republicans are slamming
Democrats who face big


losses in November for
votes on Obama's $81.4
billion economic stimulus
last year and on former
President George W.
Bush's $700 billion bailout
of Wall Street.
Democrats say the
recession would have been
worse if the government
hadn't stepped in with
those programs to prop up
the economy. They also
note that most of the bail'-
out, which began during
the previous administra-
tion and was supported
by many Republicans in
Congress, has been repaid.
Outside of the bailout,
the federal budget went
up by 9 percent in the
2010 budget year to $3.5
trillion, the Congressional
Budget Office reported
last week. Food stamp pay-
ments rose 27 percent as
record numbers of people
took advantage of the pro-
grams, while unemploy-
ment benefits rose 34 per-
cent as Congress extended
benefits for the long-term
jobless.
'"The FY 2010 deficit
remained elevated as a
result of the severe eco-
nomic recession, high


unemployment, and the
financial crisis inherited
by the current administra-
tion," Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner and act-
ing White House budget
director Jeffrey Zients said
in a statement announcing
the results.
Rising deficits will pres-
ent headaches for policy-
makers 'regardless of which
party controls Congress
after November.
The administration is
projecting that the deficit
for the 2011 budget year,
which began on Oct. 1, will
climb to $1.4 trillion. Over
the next decade, it will total
$8.47 trillion. Deficits of
that size will constrain the
administration's agenda
over the next two years and
will certainly be an issue in
the 2012 presidential race.
Government revenues
rose by $57.4 billion in
2010 compared to 2009, but
more than two-thirds of that
increase reflected higher
payments from the Federal
Reserve to the Treasury
on all the investments the
central bank has made to
support the economy and
the financial system during
the recession.


ABATEMENT: Voters behind tool to attract new business in Columbia County
Continued From Page 1C


more than $15 million.
The companies contrib-
ute to schools, charities
and other community
issues and invested more
than $200 million in build-'
ing the four facilities in
Columbia County.
The Columbia County
School System has
received in excess of $1.1
million in new taxes to
help fund our school sys-
tem since the new compa-
nies opened for business.


It is important to
remember that only the
county's portion of the
ad valorem tax is abated
for a project and that is
only for a limited period
of time. Schools, hospital
authority and water man-
agement districts receive
the additional taxes that
are generated from the
new projects.
Without tax abatement,
the four parcels of land
that have been developed


would generate about
$28,000 in taxes a year, of
which the schools would
receive about $14,000.
You can see the num-
bers generated by new
business makes a major
impact.
The best solution for
lowering or maintain-
ing taxes is to increase
the tax role. Utilizing
tax abatement as a tool
to accomplish this has
worked, as previously


mentioned.
The four new com-
panies add immediate
additional revenue to the
schools and after a short
period will add revenue
to assist with providing
the infrastructure that we
require for the future in
Columbia County.
The new company
locations also provide
the catalyst for addi-
tional retail and other
services that all of us as


residents of Columbia
County will enjoy and
use.
Thirty-nine of
Florida's counties offer
tax abatement in some
form. Voters across the
state have agreed that
utilizing money generat-
ed by the local company
is the most cost-effective
means. Thanks to you,
the voters of Columbia
County, tax abatement
has been a good tool


for attracting new busi-
ness. With your support,
those efforts will con-
tinue.
Remember: Vote on
Nov. 2 or during early
voting starting Monday.
Voting is a privilege
provided to us as citi-
zens of a country that
has more freedom than
any other nation.
Voting ensures that we
maintain the rights we
have.


ri-l' i Ask -the


, 2010 THE MOTLEY FooLDir. BY UNIVERSAL UcHIK (IFOR R I SLIs 10/14/2010)


I


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Will This Harley Crash?
Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG)
is an iconic American brand. Yet
challenges surrounding it and its
beloved baby boomer demographic
could make investing in this stock
an-accident waiting to happen.
Harley-Davidson has fans so loyal
that some of them tattoo the brand
on themselves. Whenever you see
customers who "bleed the brand,"
that suggests there's something spe-
cial going on that could lead to win-
ning investments. Harley-Davidson
is one such enterprise.
But inked skin eventually sags,.
and Harley's demographic is aging.
The company's core customers are
middle-aged men, and it gets harder
to be an easy rider with every pass-
ing year. Meanwhile, younger cus-
tomers just don't feel the same fer-
vor for the brand.
The nasty economy has put
boomers in a precarious financial
position as they transition into
retirement. Some companies simply
cater too strongly to this weakened
consumer group that may have
increasing difficulty justifying dis-
cretionary purchases. With its
expensive bikes, Harley-Davidson
fits that description perfectly.
It's not even a cheap stock idea
right now. Its revenues and earnings
have been falling steadily for sev-
eral years. Over the last 12 months,,
sales fell 15.7 percent and earnings
per share dropped 73.1 percent.
Granted, Harley has turned its
business around before, such as in
the 1990s. Maybe it can do it again
but it will need to reinvigorate
the brand for younger people.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


NYSE Amex Nasdaq
7,520.60 442.18 2,100.63 +29.48 2,468.77 +66.86


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DaqoNEnn 14.21 +4.08 +40.3
KingPhrm 14.16 +3.85 +37.3
MPG pfA 14.05 +3.30 +30.7
Fabrinetn 19.19 +4.13 +27.4
CtrySCkg n32.75 +7.00 +27.2
CKanghui n 19.43 +3.82 +24.5
LDK Solar 12.12 +2.32 +23.7
QntmDSS 2.76 +.47 +20.5
ChinaEd 5.55 +.91 +19.6
VersoPap 3.70 +59 +19.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GrtAtIPac 3.07 -1.01 -24.8
MGM Rsts 11.06 -2.50 -18.4
ChiMYWdn11.15 -2.45 -18.0
DeVry 41.72 -9.18 -18.0
StJoe 20.56 -4.41 -17.7
ITTEd 56.45-12.02 -17.6
BkAm wtB 2.11 -.40 -15.9
Venoco 16.56 -3.08 -15.7
LeeEnt 2.43 -.44 -15.3
TCFFnwt 5.20 -.80 -13.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 39373173 3.95 -.24
BkofAn 14883766 11.98-1.20
S&P500ETF8326256117.70+1.16
SPDR Fncl4989021 14.35 -.36
GenElec 4263771 16.30 -.82
WellsFargo3636494 23.58-2.37
MGM Rsts3470661 11.06-2.50
JPMorgCh3461503 37.15-2.16
KingPhrm 3246458 14.16 +3.85
FordM 2920481 13.80 +.14

Diary
Advanced 1,895
Declined 1,243
New Highs 630
New Lows 21
Total issues 3,188
Unchanged 50
Volume 23,530,089,597


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PhrnAth 3.19 +1.74 +120.0
LGLGrp 33.20 +7.45 +28.9
NIVS IntT 2.65 +.57 +27.4
Geokinetics 7.45 +1.45 +24.2
RenhngPh 2.14 +.39 +22.3
ChinaPhH 3.03 +.53 +21.2
BioTimewt 3.70 +.60 +19.4
ChiMarFd 6.36 +1.03 +19.3
Hyperdyn 3.43 +.54 +18.7
PudaCoal 9.35+1.47 +18.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NewConcEn 4.20 -1.09 -20.6
CagleA 5.90 -1.07 -15.4
CAMACn 3.25 -.52 -13.8
InvCapHId 3.75 -.59 -13.6
Versar 2.81 -.35 -11.1
Rubicon g 3.76 -.36 -8.7
TmsatlPtn 3.12 -.25 -7.4
SearchMed 2.03 -.15 -6.9
Vringon 2.84 -.21 -6.9
Gainsco 9.51 -.69 -6.8

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Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Taseko 431593 6.76 +.60
PhrmAth 278248 3.19+1.74
GoldStrg 173446 5.25 +.21
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GrtBasG g 169466 2.66 +.14
LibertyAcq 124209 10.59 +.33
NovaGldg 116220 9.47 +.22
KodiakOg 112238 4.05 +.22
Hyperdyn 100634 3.43 +.54
VimetX 97395 17.20+2.12

Diary
Advanced 304
Declined 233
New Highs 74
New Lows 8
Total issues 561
Unchanged 24
Volume 574,660,469


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68
AbtLab 1.76
AberFitc .70
Accenture .90
AMD
Aeropostls ...
Aetna .04
Agilent
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
Altria 1.52
AmbacF h ...
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.68
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .88
Annaly 2.60
Apache .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.34
Avon .88
BB&T Cp .60
BHP BilILt 1.74
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .51
BcoSantand .80
BcoSBrasil .33
BkofAm .04
BkNYMel .36
Barclay .22
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.16
BerkH Bs ...
BestBuy .60
Blackstone .40
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ...
BoydGm ...
BrMySq 1.28
CB REIlis ...
CBS B .20
CF Inds .40
CIGNA .04
CMS Eng .84
CSX 1.04
CVS Care .35
Cameron
CapOne .20
CapitlSrce .04
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
ChNBorunn...
Citigp pfN 1.97
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56
CocaCE
CocaCI 1.76
ConAgra .92


+.35 -7.4 12.32
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-.09 -19.0 6.26
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-.24 +19.3 3.95
-1.64 +46.5 67.54
+1.55 +65.8 24.10
+.53 +5.2 59.94
+.55 -2.7 22.42


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASML HId .27
ATPO&G ...
Actividen ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
Adtran .36
AkamaiT ...
Alexza
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMall .28
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHId .12
ArubaNet ...
AscentSol ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AvanirPhm ...
BMC Sit ...
Baidu s
BrigExp
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .16
Cadence
CdnSolar ..
CareerEd ..
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
ChrmSh
ChkPoint ...
ChilNSOn h...
CienaCorp ..
Cirrus


.. +3.31 -3.8
... +1.53 -14.6
... +.96 +37.4
16 +.26 +2.3
31 +1.09 -23.7
21 -3.05 +43.1
58 +1.16 +85.8
...-1.71 -45.0
19 +.48 +31.8
68 +9.09 +22.4
6 +.14+157.8
12 +.32 +.2
10-13.54 -39.6
26+20.67 +49.4
25 +.20 -13.8
... +.03 -52.1
... +.50 +120.3
... +.18 +90.1
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... +.12 +82.0
44 +1.89 +31.1
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19 +2.48 +11.4
... +.04 +139.9
66 -.84 +50.6
32 +1.99 +19.9
20 +.39 -21.9
15 +.35 -1.3
... +.34 +33.1
13 -.01 -46.3
9 -3.32 -27.2
32 +.38 +4.5
... +.04 -62.6
... -.02 -44.5
21 +1.52 +15.9
... -.12 -81.0
.. -.94 +33.8
19 -.13+135.9


Name DIv
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy.40
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
CrwnCstle ...
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
DeanFds
Deere 1.20
DelMnte .36
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBulls ...
DirxSCBull 4.77
DirxLCBear ...
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
Dynegy rs ...
EMC Cp ...
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGld g .05
EmersonEl 1.34
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FairchldS ...
FstBcpPR ...
FstHorizon .72
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .60
FordM ...
ForestLab ...
FMCG 1.20
FrontierCm .75
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenMart .04
GenMills s 1.12
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAtIPac ..
GpTelevisa .52
HSBC 1.70
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwIllntI 1.21
HostHotIs .04
Huntsmn .40
iShGold s ..
iSAstla .81
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn .16
iSh Kor .39
iSMalas ,25
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver
iShChina25 .68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20 T 3.82
iS Eafe 1.38
iShR2K .79





Name DIv
Cisco
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
CorinthC
Costco .82
Cree Inc ...
Crocs r..
CypSemi
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ..
EricsnTel .28
EvrgrSIr h ...
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ..
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .04
Finisar
Flextm
FocusMda ...
FresKabi rt ...
GT Solar ...
GenBiotc h ...
Genzyme ...
GeronCp
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC s...
Gymbree ...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCiyv .60


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
FstFmkln 14.16 +6.41 +82.7
Phazar 5.24 +2.34 +80.7
SigaTech h 13.23 +4.74 +55.8
ChinaMda 16.20 +5.45 +50.7
ChinaRitar 4.12 +1.33 +47.7
AcMIvden 3.23 +.96 +42.3
ArtsWay 10.10 +3.00 +42.3
Kingtone n 3.80 +1.08 +39.7
AscentSol 4.69 +1.29 +37.9
KellySB 14.30 +3.79 +36.1

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DJSPun 2.96 -3.11 -51.2
MetaFincl 18.95-13.92 -42.3
EducMgmt 9.90 -3.96 -28.6
ApolloGrp 36.58-13.54 -27.0
YRC Ww rs 3.70 -1.35 -26.7
CorinthC 4.73 -1.58 -25.0
BOSLtd rs 2.33 -.77 -24.8
Wowjnt un 5.00 -1.50 -23.1
Strayer 131.48-32.72 -19.9
FstBkshs 5.90 -1.35 -18.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Intel 4365726 19.32 -.20
PwShs QQQ363951651.49+1.74
SidusXM 3483336 1.38 +.09
Microsoft 2699225 25.54 +.97
Yahoo 2306233 16.25 +1.76
Cisco 2135286 23.36 +.88
Oracle 1899036 28.90 +.90
MicronT 1750974 7.61 +.02
Dell Inc 1424003 14.49 +.80
SeagateT 1376613 15.51 +3.31

Diary
Advanced 1,818
Declined 990
New Highs 362
New Lows 60
Total issues 2,877
Unchanged 69
Volume 10,069,427,842





Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Cho Last


11 +1.17
19 +.79
14 +.33
1 +.59
9 +.41
... -.12
... -.26
14 -.11
21 +.53
9 -.20
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13 +1.53
... -.02
23 +.62
...-1.04
... +.55
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14 +.15
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49 -.34
21 +.25
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19 +.73
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14 +.46
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8 +.14
15 +1.39
13 +2.84
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8 -1.76
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... -.46
16 +.30
26 +.30
... -.08
3 +.10
... +.42
8 -1.97
18 +.40
... -1.01
-.09
... -.18
27 +1.09
8 -.18
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54 +.31
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11 +1.67
17 -1.19
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+.51
+.36
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-.03
.. +1.37
+.25
... -.09
-.04

+.12
-.12
.. +1.02
.. +1.80
... +.49
... -3.95
... +.66
... +1.01


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-19.3 40.20
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... 11.38
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-34.2 11.26
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-86.0 .32
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-16.5 18.32
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+7.8 80.40
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+4.1 10.14
+16.8 55.64
+32.0 14.02
+4.8 13.59
+43.6 23.75
+9.3 46.20
+12.6 46.72
+11.5 100.27
+4.1 57.53
+12.6 70.29


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T nc NY 1.68 28.33 +.11 +0.4 +1.1
AMD NY ... 7.12 +.07 +1.0 -26.4
Alcoa NY .12 13.13 +.24 +1.9-18.5
AutoZone NY ... 232.96 +.15 +0.1 +47.4
BkofAm NY .04 11.98 -1.20 -9.1 -20.5
BarVixShTNY ... 14.42 -.99 -6.4 -57.7
BobEvans Nasd .80 29.20 -.31 -1,1 +.8
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.71 +.22 +1.6 -14.3
CSX NY 1.04 59.54 +2.05 +3.6 +22.8
Chevron NY 2.88 83.61 -.33 -0.4 +8.6
Cisco Nasd ... 23.36 +.88 +3.9 -2.4
Citigrp NY 3.95 -.24 -5.7 +19.3
CocaCI NY 1.76 59.94 +.53 +0.9 +5.2
Delhaize NY 2.02 69.18 -1.17 -1.7 -9.8
DirFnBear NY 13.11 +.55 +4.4 -32.5
DrxFBull s NY ... 21.51 -1.07 -4.7 -13.0
EMCCp NY ... 21.09 +1.22 +6.1 +20.7
FamilyDIr NY .62 45.57 +.06 +0.1 +63.7
FordM NY .. 13.80 +.14 +1.0 +38.0
GenElec NY .48 16.30 -.82 -4.8 +7.7
HomeDp NY .95 30.70 -1.19 -3.7 +6.1
iShEMkts NY .59 46.72 +.49 +1.1 +12.6
iShR2K NY .79 70.29 +1.01 +1.5 +12.6
Intel Nasd .63 19.32 -.20 -1.0 -5.3
JPMorgCh NY. .20 37.15 -2.16 -5.5. -10,7
KingPhrm NY ... 14.16 +3.85 +37.3 +15.4
LVSands NY ... 38.67 +1.37 +3.7+158.8
Level3 Nasd ... .88 -.02 -2.2 -42.5


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chq %Chg Last


iShREst 1.88
IngerRd .28
IBM 2.60
IntlGame .24
!ntPap .50
Interpublic
Invesco .44
ItauUnibH .59
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JanusCap .04
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk ...
Keycorp .04
Kimco .64
KingPhrm ...
Kinross g .10
Kohis
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar .
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
LillyEli 1.96
United .60
LincNat .04
UzClaib ..
LyonBas A ..
MBIA
MEMC
MGIC


+.73 +19.9
+.09 +8.4
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-.15 -22.5
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+.34 +46.5
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+.15 +.8
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+.30 -1.7
-.05 +74.2


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


Lowes NY .44
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
OccPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .33
PrUShS&PNY
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.31
SearsHIdgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd .
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDRFnclNY .16
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
Yahoo Nasd ...


-1.14 -5.0 -7.8
-2.50 -18.4 +21.3
+1.38 +1.8 +24.1
+.02 +0.3 -27.9
+.97 +3.9 -16.2
-.35 -4.2 +2.5
+.26 +3.2 -33.0
+.40 +0.7 +4.7
-.35 -3.6 -9.1
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+.90 +3.2 +17.8
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+.29 +1.7 -2.4
-.79 -0.5 +33.6
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-.57 -2.0 -20.9
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+1.16 +1.0 +5.6
+3.22 +4.5 -10.2
+.09 +7.0+130.0
-.03 -0.1 +13.1
+.11 +2.5 +25.4
-.36 -2.4 -.4
+.48 +1.5 +9.1
-1.06 -1.9 -.2
-2.37 -9.1 -12.6
+1.76 +12.1 -3.2


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards,
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has spht by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vi = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed, wl =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front toad (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the weekGainersa nd
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
nuL.- *l ;ri.7 Source: Fr, Asr aa FcS Sae guies a'e ure.al


Currencies
Last Pvs Day


AAusirltia


Britain 1.5985 1.5987
Canada 1.0133 1.0070
Euro .7162 .7114
Japan 81.43 81.43
Mexico 12.4270 12.4170
Switzerlnd .9598 .9529
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Name DIv YId
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20 .8
Manitowoc .08 .7
Manpwl .74 1.4
MarathonO 1.00 2.8
MktVGold .11 ...
MarlntA .16 .4
MarshM .84 3.5
Marshlls .04 .6
Masco .30 2.7
MasseyEn .24 .7
McMoRn ...
McAfee
MedcoHIth ... ...
Medtmic .90 2.7
Merck 1.52 4.1
MetLife .74 1.9
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
Monsanto 1.12 2.0
Moodys .42 1.6
MorgStan .20 .8
Mosaic .20 .3
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .29 ...
NatGrid 7.17 6.4
NOilVarco .40 .8
NatSemi .40. 3.1
NewellRub .20 1.1
NewmtM .60 1.0


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... -2.50 +21.3 11.06
17 -.18 +44.3 24.18
...-1.17 +12.8 11.25
+1.16 +.1 54.66
14 +.27 +14.5 35.75
... +.11 +24.2 57.41
35 -.57 +30.6 35.60
18 +.20 +8.3 23.92
... -.41 +29.0 7.03
...-1.05 -20.3 11.01
... +.23 -16.2 35.22
... -.65+129.9 18.44
28 +.21 +16.7 47.36
18 +.71 -16.6 53.33
11 -.16 -24.3 33.29
14 +.04 +1.1 36.95
11 +.04 +10.9 39.22
18 -.31 +39.6 10.65
... -.34 -5.9 4.63
26 +5.91 -30.5 56.78
14 -.40 -1.1 26.50
8 -.30 -15.5 25.02
30 +2.78 +14.5 68.39
47 -.35 +2.5 7.95
15 +.18 +28.2 14.27
85 +.96 -10.7 19.55
... +.15 -49.5 2.33
+.44 -6.1 45.87
13 +1.99 +10.2 48.60
12 +.01 -15.1 13.04
15 -.17 +20.7 18.11
16 -1.01 +30.8 61.88


NextEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.08
NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .56
Nordstrm .80
NorflkSo 1.44
Novartis 1.99
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt
OfficeMax ...
OilSvHT 2.66
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMI Grp ,
PNC .40
PPL Corp 1.40
Pactiv
PatriotCoal
PeabdyE .28
PennWst g 1.80
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.18
Petrobras 1.18
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
Pridelntl
PrinFncl .50
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ ...
ProUltSP .43
ProUShL20 ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUFin rs .09
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500..
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp .16
ProLogis .60
Prudent .70
PulteGrp
QntmDSS ...
QwestCm .32
RadianGrp .01
RangeRs .16
Raytheon- 1.50
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola
RepubSvc .80
RiteAid
SLM Cp
SpdrDJIA 2.55
SpdrGold ...
S&P500ETF2.31
SpdrHome .12
SpdrKbwBk .11
SpdrKbw RB .30
SpdrRetll .57
SpdrOGEx .20
SpdrMetM .35
Safeway .48
StJoe
StJude
Saks
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemlHTr .60
SiderNac s .58
SilvWhtng ...
SmRihfF


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 18 +.88 -2.4 23.36
... 47 -.47 +42.2 59.19
.. ... -.08 +2.5 6.93
34 +2.35 +46.8 66.55
2.0 15 +.96 +13.0 18.95
2.1 14 +.92 +12.3 17.87
3 -1.58 -65.6 4.73
1.3 22 -.59 +7.7 63.70
... 39 +4.26 +.3 56.56
... 22 -.69+144.0 14.03
... 77 +.47 +24.1 13.11
... 17 +.80 +.9 14.49
., ... -1.40 +43.9 37.83
... 28 +.56 +27.9 42.65
... 18 -.07 -21.0 4.60
... ... -.13 -16.6 14.67
... 14 +1.07 +9.1 25.68
... ... -1.69 -10.1 15.96
2.6 ... +.07 +18.1 10.85
... ... +.24 -38.4 .93
1.0 21 -.47 +8.1 27.82
... 28 +.07 +11.9 48.37
... 55 +2.51 +83.5 97.20
.3 ... -.25 +24.4 12.13
.. +1.80+137.0 21.14
18 +.14 -16.1 6.13
... ... +.08 +51.4 24.00
... ... +.00 -88.7 .03
... 14 +.73 +63.1 9.07
... ... -.05 -28.3 .38
... ... -.56 +47.3 72.19
... ... +.62 +7.2 5.95
... 11 +1.40 -12.8 37.73
... 24+65.10 -3.0"601.45
... 59 +3.01 +10.4 29.99
.. 18+12.03 +49.3 64.98
... ... +.15 -46.2 2.57
5.1 10 -.30 -14.8 11.70


Name


Wee"n ",- ...



Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials 3.86
Close: 11,062.78
1 -week change: 56.30 (0.5%) MON
11,500


10.06


TUES


75.68 -1.51 -31.79


WED THUR FRI


10,500


10,000- ..... ..


. .......W .......


9,500 A M J J A S O



MUTUAL FUNDS
TotalAssets Total Return/Rank Pct MinInit
Name Obj ($Mins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetls Cl
Vanguard TotStIdx LB
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Rdelity Contra LG
American Funds CpWldGrIA m WS
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard Instldxl LB
Vanguard 5001nv LB
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Amedcan Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA
Amencan Fundrs NewPerspA m. WS
Var.]ur Tid rtSAdm LB
Amrercr, Fur i FninvA rr, LB
AiTrencar. Fund, BalA mr MA
V i'.u.ius1,C500Admi LB
Vanguard Welitn MA
PIMCOTotRetA om CI
American Funds BondA m CI
Vanguard Totlntl d FB
Vanguard InstPlus LB
Fidelity GrowCo LG


144,752
67,000
62,279
57,298
55,855
53,561
50,016
48,658
47,989
46,302
40,048
39,751
38,548
36,847
35,095
32,274
31,425
31,061
30,461,
30,004
29,323
29,123
28,457
27,A72
27,753
27,516
26,604


+11.7/B8
+10.4/A
+7.8/D
+8.8/C
+14.4/A
+6.5/D
+12.6/A
+9.5/B
+9.3/B
+8.7/C
+5.7/C
+7.7/A
+7.0/B
+10.9/A
+11.4/B
+13.8/A
+9.7/B
+10.6/A
+9.0/8
+10.6/B
+9.5/B
+8.7/C
+11.2/B
+10.2/C
+7.0/B
+9.5/B
+15.4/A


+8.6/A
+2.5/B
+3.0/C
+4.9/C
+5.4/A
+5.9/B
+4.6/B
+2.0/C
+1.9/C
+2.5/B
-0.3/D
+6.0/A
+7.2/A
+1.8/B
+8.4/A
+5.5/A
+86.6/A
+2.6/B
+4.6/A
+3.7/C
.+2.0/C
+5.6/A
+8.2/A
+4.0/E
+5.4/B
+2.0/C
+6.2/A.


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
3.75 1,000
3.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 200,000,000
NL 2,500


CA -ConservaiveAllocation, CI -iedite-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB orgn Large Blend, FO -Foreign Lar wFV m
Large Value, IH -Wod Aloctioa, LB .Lr e Blend, LG -.ao Growth, LV -Lare vlue, MiA 4 Moderate Allocatio, MB Mid-Cap Bn, MV
Mid-C ie,SH .Speialeah, WS -World S Retu im: Chri N with d riveted. ank owunpemd v
others with same obedive:A is in op 20%, Ein bom 20%. M Init nvt num $ needed toinvest und. Source: Monigsar


14 +.40 +4.7'
16 +.03 +15.6
21 -.04 +24.1
6 +1.78 -11.8
... +.05 -15.3
17 -.26 +3.2
18 +.98 +17.3
14 +.85 +8.4
84 -.67 -15.9
17 +1.76 +4.4
... +.26 -24.7
27 +1.24 +22.4
... +4.30 +1.0
14 +.12 +5.0
... +.12 +79.8
10 -1.66 -2.8
21 -.18 -14.8
17 +.11 +37.3
22 -.35 -14.2
26 +.02 +14.5
... +.82 +27.9
27 +1.38 +27.3
17 +.93 +9.7
22 +.27 -26.9
... +.55 -24.8
-.39 -28.1
9 +.29 -2.4
16 +1.91 +21.5
31 -.79 +33.6
... -.06 -3.2
43 +.68 +.1
12 -.88 +10.1
... -.49 -9.9
... -.57 -20.9
... +4.95 +22.5
... -.97 -30.4
+.82 +9.4
... +2.47 -31.5
... +.58 -19.1
.... -1.80 -2.5
.. -.49 -36.2
... -.78 -32.3
... -.42 -17.5
13 -.41 +15.1
... -.18 -7.5
8 -.22 +8.2
... -.26 -20.3
92 +.47 -5.8
23 ... +50.6
... -.14 +20.0
... +.91 -24.6
9 +.31 -11.3
-.36 +33.5
-.07 +173:.7
25 -.48 +8.6
... -.06 -41.1
7 -.06 -.4
... +.62 +6.4
... +2.02 +24.6
+1.16 +5.6
... -.30 +3.3
... -1.07 +6.1
-.29 +3.7
... +1.20 +23.7
... +.68 +8.5
... -.08 +9.0
... +.57 +2.2
... -4.41 -28.8
15 +.14 +8.5
... +.80 +50.0
... +2.51 +46.9
... -.33 -43.1
16 +.63 +22.1
25 +.94 -.9
30 +.31 -22.9
... +.12 +1.9
... +.06 +10.2
50 +1.07 +84.4
35 +1.89 +11.0


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAiri .02
SwstnEngy ...
SprintNex ...
SP Matis 1.05
SP HIthC .58
SP CnSt .77
SP Consum .43
SPEngy 1.00
SPDR Fncl .16
SP Minds .60
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.27
StateStr -.04
Stryker .60
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .40
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
ThermoFis ...
TimeWam '.85
Total SA 3.23
Transocn
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSols ..
Tycolnti .85
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Airwy ...
UnionPac 1.32
UtdContl ...
UPS B 1.88
UtdRentals ...
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
US OilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
Vale SA .76
Vale SA pf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg. .55
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
VimpelCn ...
Visa .50
VMware
Walgm .70
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArty ,06
WDigital ...
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20
WmsCos .50
XL Grp .40
Xerox .17
Yamana g .08
YingliGm ...
YumBmds 1.00
Zimmer


15 -.03 +13.1
... -.09 +13.3
21 +.75 -28.2
... +.11 +25.4
... +.35 +4.8
... +.38 +.3
... +,42 +8.1
... +.35 +16.6
... +.85 +3.9
.. -.36 -.4
... +.04 +16.0
... +.78 +5.1
... +.05 +2.8
... +1.06 -8.0
17 -.64 -2.6
82 -.29 -2.8
... +.37 -43.4
...-2.45 +20.2
7 +.73 -3.9
... +.04 +26.8
15 +.67 +4.5
... -.02 -9.6
29 +.08 +21.0
15 +.13 +12.3
'... +.93 +29.9
16 -.20 -18.0
12 +.45 +6.2
27 +.39 +4.1,
14 -.01 +10.2
... -.11 +14.4
21 +1.33 +2.3
15 +.48 +9.1
... +1.18 -14.3
8 +4.10 -19.0
8 +.82 +7.6
11 -.66 +3.3
17 +.61 +6.4
57 +.35 +25.2
... +.12 +14.7
... +.63 +100.4
19 +.35 +33.3
... -.29 +102.6
24 +1.78 +20.8
... +1.50 +66.0
16 +.23 +.1
... -.15 -43.7
... -.68 -9.7
... -2.24 -20.8
10 +1.63 +18.0
... +.49 +11.4
.. +.69 +16.4
... +.21 +8.1
+.48 +15.7
... -.40 +4.8
13 +.59 +27.4
.., +.51 -19.3
21 +3.60 -11.3
... -1.56 +83.2
16 +.60 -5.8
... +.95 +3.9
5 +2.77 -.9
9 -2.37 -12.6
29 +.55 +4.5
5 +2.99 -27.8
... +.95 +41.2
15 +.15 -5.1
... -.30 -2.0
29 +1.52 +.8
28 -.04 +20.2
16 +.11 +30.7
33 -.27 -1.0
28 +.35 -17.0
21 +1.45 +39.7
16 -.74 -13.3


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


HumGen ... ... ...-1.79 -10.5 27.36
HuntJB .48 1.3 25 +.56 +11.7 36.05
Intel .63 3.3 10 -.20 -5.3 19.32
Intuit ... ... 26 +.80 +51.7 46.63
JA Solar ... ... 20 +.01 +59.8 9.11
JDS Uniph ... ... ... -.03 +48.5 12.25
JetBlue ... ... 37 -.13 +20.9 6.59
KLATnc 1.00 2.8 62 +1.22 -1.4 35.67
Kulicke 5 +.32 +14.5 6.17
LeapWirlss'.... ... ... -.41 -33.6 11.66
Level3 ... ... ... -.02 -42.5 .88
LUbtyMIntA ... ... 16 +.36 +33.8 14.50
Uncares .80 2.9 17 +2.33 +11.8' 27.67
LinearTch .92 3.0 16 -.22 +.6 30.74
MarvellT ... ... 21 +.34 -17.6 17.11
Mattel .75 3.3 13 -1.50 +12.4 22.45
Maximlntg .84 4.4 48 +.09 -6.3 19.04
MelcoCrwn ... ... ... -.01 +65.8 5.57
Microchp 1.37 4.4 21 +.03 +6.7 31.00
MicronT ... ... 4 +.02 -27.9 7.61
Microsoft .64 2.5 7 +.97 -16.2 25.54
MyriadG ... ... 13 +2.39 -25.9 19.34
NII HIdg ... ... 21 -4.98 +13.3 38.03
NetApp ... ... 37 +1.57 +46.5 50.33
Netflix ... ... 62 +6.08 +182.7 155.72
NewsCpA .15 1.1 15 +.31 +3.6 14.19
Novell ... ... .. +.09 +46.4 6.08
NuanceCm ... ... 13 +.29 -.6 15.44
Nvidia ... ... 28 +.43 -39.6 11.29
OnSmcnd ... ... 13 +.18 -18.1 7.22
Oracle .20 .7 23 +.90 +17.8 28.90
PMCSra ... ... 17 -.02 -16.7 7.21
Paccar .48 1.0 80 +.22 +39.2 50.47
PacEthh ... ... ... -.01 +43.7 1.02
PattUTI .20 1.0 ...+2.30 +27.3 19.54
Paychex 1.24 4.5 21 +.13 -9.9 27.61
PeopUtdF .62 4.7 42 -.17 -21.3 13.15
Popular ... ... ... +.06 +25.7 2.84


Name DIv Y
Power-One...
PwShsQQQ.33
QIAGEN ...
QIogic
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ..
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
SigaTechh ..
SiriusXM
SkywksSol ...
Solarfun
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
TD Amerir ...
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .72
TibcoSft ..
TriQuint
UrbanOut ...
Veecolnst ..
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.32.
WamerCh s8.50
WholeFd ...
Windstrm 1.00 1
Wynn 1.00 1
Xilinx .64
YRCWwrs ...
Yahoo ....
Zagg n
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
'Id PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.06+137.2 10.32
.6 ... +1.74 +12.5 51.49
... 33 +1.25 -17.7 18.38
... 31 +.11 -8.6 17.24
1.7 22 +.03 -3.2 44.79
... 19 +.13 +37.9 6.58
9 -.67 -27.9 48.69
9 -.31 -+35.3 39.21
5 +3.31 -14.7 15.51
.+4.74 +128.1 13.23
+.09+130.0 1.38
27 +1.32 +53.8 21.82
... 20 -.56 +45.1. 11.07
1.7 18 +.23 -15.4 20.81
1.9 26 +1.47 +19.4 27.54
2.1 15 -.30 -19.0 14.35
... 40 +.31 -40.4 14.12
... 16 +.72 -12.1 15.73
16 +.01 -15.2 16.44
1.1 15 +.08 +33.1 7.56
1.3 20 +1.62 -2.6 54.70
39 +.70 +89.8 18.28
... 22 -.28 +58.5 9.51
20 -.28 -11.4 31.00
.. 17 +3.92 +22.4 40.43
.7 ... +.27 +44.0 24.23
4.9 ... +1.04 +16.6 26.92
... 12 +2.23 +21.3 24.51
31 +3.73 +39.5 38.30
8.1 19 +.22 +12.5 12.36
1.0 ... +8.09 +75.1 101.94
2.4 15 +.40 +5.7 26.48
...-1.35 -82.4 3.70
... 27 +1.76 -3.2 16.25
... 48 +1.99 +94.6 7.63
.2 ... -1.17 +61.5 20.72


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AlexcoR g ...
AllIdNevG
AmO&G
Anooraq g ...
Augusta g ...
Aurizon g ...
Banro g
CAMACn ...n
CanoPet ...
CapGoldn ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn...
ChiArmM
ChinNEPet ...
ClaudeR g ...
CrSuiHiY .32
Crossh glf ...
Crystallx g ...
DenisnM g ...
Endvrlnt
EndvSilvg ...
EntGaming ...
Fronteer g ..
GascoEngy...
GenMoly
GoldStrg
GranTrra g ..
GrtBasG g ...
Hyperdyn ...
InovioPhm ...
IntTowerg ...
KodiakOg ...
UbertyAcq...
UbAcq wt ...
LonqweiPI ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
5.9 ... +.08 +13.9 7.08
...... +.09 +60.5 6.04
... 46 -1.04 +69.2 25.52
.. 24 +.14 +107.4 8.71
...... +.16 +64.4 1.43
... .:. +.04 +69.0 4.09
...... +.12 +56.7 7.05
...... +.27 +46.4 2.85
...... -.52 -30.4 3.25
... ... +.01 -52.9 .46
... 18 -.07 +28.7 4.58
... 10 -.00' -25.7 .51
... ... +.02 -22.2 .70
.1 ... +.55 +28.4 17.70
... ... +.09 +19.0 2.88
... 29 +.58 +44.3' 4.57
... 4 +.71 -16.8 7.70
... ... -.03 +29.7 1.53
10.9 ... ... ... 2.93
... ... +.02 +21.1 .23
... ... +.01 ... .38
... ... +.17 +57.5 2.00
... ... +.08 +31.5 1.42
... ... +.31 +33.5 4.86
+.06 +54.8 .39
-.07 +87.8 7.38
+.02 -32.1 .36
+.18 +95.7 4.07
53 +.21 +68.3 5.25
+.10 +32.3 7.58
... ... +.14 +55.6 2.66
...... +.54 +294.3 3.43
... ... -.06 +7.0 1.22
S ... ... +.58 -1.1 7.01
...... +.22 +82.4 4.05
...... +.33 +9.5 10.59
... ... +.08 +149.3 1.72
... 8 +.39 +10.0 2.97


Name DIv
MagHRes ...
Metalico
Minefnd g ...
NIVS IntT ...
Nevsun g ...
NDragon ...
NwGold'g
NAPallg ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsands g
OrienPapn ..
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth
PolyMetg .
ProceraNt
Protalix
PudaCoal
RadientPh ...
RareEle g ...
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SulphCo
Taseko
TmsatlPtn ...
US Gold ...
Uluru
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold ...
WidePoint ...
YM Bio g ..
ZBB Engy ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... +.44+204.5 4.72
... 28 +.23 -10.4 4.41
... ... -.05 -9.5 9.32
... .... +.57 +2.7 2.65
... ... +.27 +131.7 5.63
... ... ... -69.2 .04
... ... +.10 +93.4 7.04
... ... +.27 +30.6 4.57
... 97 -.25 +55.6 18.42
... 21 -.03 -5.8 2.90
... ... +.22 +54.5 9.47
-.05 -59.6 .47
... 2 +.35 -53.6 4.86
... ... -.03 +20.0 1.74
+1.74 +62:8 3.19
-.25 -44.1 1.71
+.01 +20.5 .53
S-.12 +41.8 9.39
11 +1.47 +27.2 9.35
+.04 +175.0 .66
... ... +.30 +97.2 7.65
... ... +.18 -1.6 1.21
... ... -.36 -20.2 3.76
... ... +.08 -31.3 .46
... ... +.60 +60.2 6.76
... ... -.25 -8.8 3.12
... ... +.33 +119.8 5.45
... ... -.00 -54.1 .10.
... ... +.27 +63.0 1.25
... ... +.14 +35.1 1.76
... +.40 +5.3 3.98
... 54 -.01 +1.2 1.63
... 13 +2.12 +485.0 17.20
... +.11 +13.9 2.79
... 38 -.08 +70.7 1.28
... +.13 +49.6 2.02
... +.11 -51.7 .57


The Week in Review


S Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights I STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.14 0.12,
6-month 0.17 0.16
5-year 1.18 1.09
10-year 2.57 2.38
30-year 4.00 3.74


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


'


7 1101 1 0000










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the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

S a. n nd Online


p: IT"


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.



Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.


I


Legal

PUBLIC AUCTION
Will be held by Davis Towing & Re-
covery, Inc, in Columbia County at
1226 NW Main Blvd., Lake City, Fl.
32055
Date October 29, 2010
Time: 9:00 A.M.
2007 Ford Focus
VIN#1FAFP34N67W236954
04541976
October 17, 2010


020 Lost & Found

EXOTIC
PIGEON
Call
386-752-4966

FOUND
Female, puppy, approx 13 weeks
old, found on Monday, Oct 11 at
US90 & Eadie St 386-754-2229
Lost boat key near Hwy 242 & 47,
white float attached, near BP gas
station, would appreciate call
small reward 386-466-3641


060 Services

Adult Family Home, seeking new
residents, 24 hr care, meals, phone,
transportation to Drs. Enjoy our
country living! 386-397-2920
100 Job
Opportunities

04541830
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
No CDL, No Problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236

Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to
northfloridajobs() gmail.com

FLORIDA

..... m ase
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2011
*College Level Mathematics
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree in mathematics or a Masters degree
with 18 graduate semester hours in
mathematics. Contact Paula Cifuentes at
paula.c=duentesifoc.edu
*Chemistry
Online and/or evening classes. Masters
degree in chemistry or a Masters plus 18
graduate hours in chemistry. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at paula.cifuenles(fqc.edu
*Statistics
Online and/or evening classes. Master's
degree in statistics or a Master's plus 18
graduate hours in statistics. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at paula.cifuentesa4fqc.edu
*Programmable Logic Control (PLC)
At least five years of full-time, in-field work
experience and expertise in the installation,
maintenance, operation and troubleshooting
. of current technology automated process
controls and associated systems including
PLC's, variable frequency drives,
instrumentation and process control
systems, hydraulic and pneumatic systems.
Experience in training both factory
technicians and operations personnel. For
additional information contact Bob Deckon at
386-754-4442 or robert.deckontfqc.edu
*. Lean Six Sigma
Must have Six Sigma Black Belt with multiple
projects. Must have Master's degree In
engineering, management or quality, or,
Master's degree with 18 graduate hours in
some combination of the above fields.
Bachelor's degree with PE certification or
five years experience as a practitioner, will
be considered. Teaching experience and/or
curriculum development preferred. For more
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-754-
4442 or robert.deckoni f c.edu
*Developmental Mathematics
Gilchrist Center. Minimum requirement is a
Bachelor's degree in mathematics or a
mathematics-related field. Contact Carrie
Rodesiler at carrie.rodesilerCtfqc.edu
*Medical Billing and Insurance
Classes meet on Monday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is at least two
years of experience in Medical Insurance/
Billing with a certificate in this or related
area. AA or AS degree and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to tracy hickmanifFiqc edu
*Basic Medical Coding
Classes meet on Wednesday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement Is certified
medical coder with at least two years of
experience in Medical Coding. AA or AS
degree with certification and experience
preferred. Contact Tracy Hickman at 386-
754-4324 or send resume and unofficial
transcripts to iracy.hickrtian(d)fqc.edu
Nursing Clinical
BSN Required. Master's degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent
clinical experience required. Contact Mattie
Jones at 386-754-4368 or
mattie .onestiqc aedu.
Codlfge pplication ad copiI ofI trn.'crip'i
required. All foreign iruanicrilt. ,iwi.i be
suiinitiled with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at www.fgt'c.ed
t G iC ,a,.c..ikd h i 5l ',,nl A f ',' o Cx i tCiiv l iSih,,ti
VPA DAL:AIA ('+fiec)e in Id.Aictin & I nipluynicm


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


I


)Your skills,
and
positive alii!ude.
44/


if ... ; .
i -


Apply Online or In Persont


SiTEL


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City,'FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04541945
Senior Teller Position
Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing, cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, FI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.orglM/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace

04541946
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City. Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA, SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056,

05524132
SV4Cs
Teachers FT Early Head Start
(birth to 3 yrs old) -positions
in Lake City-
HS Diploma/GED,'
CDA (Child Development
Associate) or FCCPC
(Fl Child Care
Professional Credential)
and bilingual (Span/Eng)
preferred. $8.65/hr
(if credentialed), sick & annual
leave, holiday pay, health insur-
ance, retirement + add'l bene,
fits. Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
current ISt Aide/CPR pref.
To apply- e-mail:
arobinson@sv4cs.org, call
(386) 754-2222 or Fax 386-754-
2220, apply in person @ 236
SW Columbia Ave, Lake City Fl
EOE

05524191
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a Credit Administration
Asst. position available. Provide
oversight to ensure credit files
meet policy guidelines. Assist
with committee meetings
includ-
ing organization of packages,
minutes and facilitate amend-
ments. Assist with credit review
process. Requires excellent
organizational skills with strong
attention to detail. Minimum
three years previous administra-
tive experience required, pref-
erably in a lending environment.
Full benefits package. Applica-
tions may be obtained from any
First Federal Branch and
submitted to Human Resources,
P 0 Box 2029, Lake City, FL,
32056 or email resume to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.


386-292-2170(
IBM Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

05524225
SUWANNEE COUNTY
PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR
LIVE OAK, FLORIDA

The Suwvannee County Board of
County Commissioners is
currently seeking applicants for
the full-time position of
Public Works Director.
Salary range is $58,000 -
$88,000 annually. Interested
applicants may obtain a detailed
job description and an applica-
tion at the Suwannee County
Administrative Services Depart-
ment, 224 Pine Avenue, Live
Oak, Florida 32064 (386) 362-
6869. Applicants are encouraged
to submit resumes, letters of ref-
erence, or other biographical
information with their applica-
tion. Successful completion of a
drug test is a condition of
employment. Background
checks may be required. Within
six months from date of hire
must reside in Suwannee Coun-
ty. Deadline for submitting
applications is November 19,
2010 at 4:30 p.m. The Suwan-
nee County Board of County
Commissioners is an equal
employment opportunity
employer that does not discrimi-
nate against any qualified
employee or applicant because
of race, color, national origin,
sex including pregnancy, age,
disability, or marital status.
Spanish speaking individuals are
encouraged to apply.
EE/AA/V/D

Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care
Pre-school & Daycare.

PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity to
learn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
e-mail to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information.

120 Medical
Employment

05523992




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
PRN RN and LPN
F/T & PRN C.N.A.

Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center

Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke

Case Manager
Child/Adult
G'Ville/Trenton
Live Oak/Starke/LakeCity

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Therapist
LCSW/LMHC/Preferred
Masters/CAP Required
Discharge
Planner/Addictions
Emergency
Screener/Outpatient
Therapeutic Foster
Care/Residential
Day Treatment
$35-$57 K
G'Ville/Lake City
Bronson/Trenton/Starke

Counselor
(Bachelors in Human Srvcs)
F/T & PRN
Residential /Rehab/Outpatient
G'Ville & Lake City

Cook
PRN & P/T

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP


www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
* 2.5 acres in Olustee. close to
Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192


- ADvantage


120 Medical
120 Employment

05524099
SLEEP center is hiring a sleep
technician trainee; requirements
include high school diploma and
at least 6 months of direct patient
care experience; 2-4 night shifts;
please e-mail resume to
viducanl065@yahoo.com

05524152
Assistant Business Office
Manager, must have knowledge
of Medicare/Medicaid billing.
Full time position,
competitive pay and benefits
Send reply to Box 05057, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

05524179
Wanted Exp CNA or Medical
Assistant for family practice,
must be able to multi-task,
F/T, benefits and
great bunch to work with,
Mail resume to:
Three Rivers Medical
208 NW Suwannee Ave,
Branford, 32008 or
fax to 386-935-1667

05524179
Wanted exp Medical Recep-
tionist for family practice, must
be able to multi-task and stay
cheerful under pressure, starting
pay $9 hrly, benefits and great
bunch to work with, mail
resume to: Three Rivers Medical
208 NW Suwannee Ave,
Branford, 32008 or
fax to 386-935-1667

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient, care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494
HEALTHCORE Physical
Therapy has an immediate opening
for an energetic,team player li-
censed, Physical Therapy Assistant
for our outpatient clinics. $25 hrly.
Fax resume to: 386-961-9170
or email to:
healthcoreinfo@bellsouth.net.
All resumes kept confidential
P/T Exercise Tech, Fit For Life
Physical Therapy Clinic in Lake
City Open Tues & Thurs 8-5,
exp preferred.Apply at
application@fitforlifept.com or
call Roberta at 352-514-4565


190 Mortgage Money
FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
t Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-10/26/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Rottwieler puppies pure bred, 6
weeks old, looking for excellent
homes only, price neg,please call
386-935-3791 for appt

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Free Pot Belly Pig
to good home, male,
6 months old,
386-754-6779


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Amana Upright Frost Free White
Deep Freeze
$150
386-752-8978
GE Washer/Dryer Set,
$250
less than two years old
386-752-8978


407 Computers

HP Computer,.
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 oi"


408 Furniture

Nightstand
Brown wood, 2 drawers
$10
386-752-8978
Student Desk
by "Woods" 3 drawers
Light Blue $20
386-752-8978

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
38" YARDMAN RIDE-ON LAWN
MOWER, 3 years old, in great
condition, $500 (386) 752-3464 or
(386) 466-7550 to leave message.

Sears Seed & Fertilize
Push Spreader
works great! $45
386-752-8978
Weedeater,
like new,
$50
386-344-1783


420 Wanted to Buy

'K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
-NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Dollhouse Lady!,
Sat yard sale/(2)items left,
please call
386-752-9047

Estate Sale,Sat & Sun, tools,
building materials, metal shed, re-
frigerators, microwave, and more
330-407-0055
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All.Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only 7-1, girls clothes, brat
dolls/barbie's & access.,in great
cond., household, Near DOT
144 SE St Margaret Rd,


440 Miscellaneous

Grill (charcoal)
used a couple of times
$10
SOLD
New Interior Lights (6),
Valued at $60,
Will sell for $30
386-344-1783

450 Good Things
5 to Eat

Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
3 for Rent
1 bd/1 bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
386-752-1941 or 386-965-0932

14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
2/2 (full baths), S/W, I acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
$575 monthly ,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $500
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
DWMH, Spacious 4/2, on 5
acres,just south of Lake Cityclean,
quiet, great location, storage shed,
$850 mo, 1st, last & $300 sec,
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
For Lease, 3br 2ba, DWMH on 10
ac., fenced, 3 mi S of Columbia,
City (off hwy 47) $800 mo. plus
$500 security. 727-415-5071
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
inci water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA. in the
country, Branford area. t $5)0t mo.,
386-867-1 S33 386-590)-0642


I


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CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


710 i Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
wmw-------
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

7 0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent
2/1 w/den, on west side, 1 wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water and
trash included, $650 month +
security 386-719-9702
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Beautiful 3br/2ba. Spacious home
w/lg. fenced yard. Callaway S/D
$1200. per mo. plus deposit.
386-984-5987
Furnished Farm House. 3/2, re-
modeled, wrap around porch on
160 ac, 5 miles to 1-75. 2 miles to
1-10, $1200 month 386-362-8708
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45, 4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
lrg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

750 Business &
I Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales '
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & 1-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race. color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference. limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

82O Farms &
2O Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
LAKE CITY REPORTER


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has to offer:
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ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
-boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
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Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


2004 Nissan Sentra Iai. : s
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ext., sport int., elect. High end model. Too many
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$3,500 firm $27,000 OBO
Call Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with
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Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@takecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, October 17, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Ready for

strawberry

planting

time?

an early summer
crop in much
of the country,
but in Florida
they grow best during the
cooler months of the year.
October through mid-
November is the time to
plant strawberries here in
Columbia County.
Strawberry plants are
low-growing and spread
into clumps by runners.
These plants are normally
grown elsewhere as peren-
nials which live year after
year. In Florida, how-
ever, strawberry plants are
grown as annuals because
they usually decline with
our high summer tempera-
tures.,
There are many cultivars
on the market, but not all
of them will grow well in
Florida.
Purchase your trans-
plants in the fall, but make
certain that the ones you
choose can take our cli-
mate. Several cultivars for
use in the south are Sweet
Charlie, Camarosa, Oso
Grande, and Festival.
Homeowners can grow
strawberries in a variety
of ways. You can plant
them in the garden, spac-
ing them about 12 inches
apart.
The crown should be set
just above the soil line. For
best results, amend your
garden soil with organic
matter, water often for the
first two weeks, and fertil-
ize regularly with a bal-
anced fertilizer.
Plastic mulch or pine
straw can be used beneath
the plant to keep the fruit
clean and off the ground.
If space is a problem, try
growing strawberries in
containers, raised beds, or
hydroponically.
Getting the plants up
from ground level will
save your back. Using an
alternative growing method
may also save you from
your least favorite garden-
ing task, weeding.
Whether your plants
are in containers, raised
beds or in the ground, if a
frost or freeze is predicted,
cover your plants with a
lightweight cloth or blan-
ket
They are tough, but the
cold will set them back and
damage tender blooms.
Harvest will begin in the
spring and continue into
May. Unless you want to
share your crop with local
wildlife, you may need to
cover the ripening berries
with netting made to keep
the birds out. Pick your
berries when they are near-
ly all red because they will
not sweeten any more after
they have been picked.
Call the UF Master
Gardeners at 752-5384 and
visit http://www.solutionsfo-
ryourlife.com for answers to
your gardening questions.
Master Gardeners will
also test your soil pH at no
charge.
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sally Sluder, a local second- and third-grade ESE teacher at Eastside Elementary School, looks through a Scholastic book, 'To the Vet,' one of many educa-
tional tools she will-use during her time in Abu Dhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirates, where she will teach kindergartners for a school year.






ACHINGG TO LEARN



Local teacher leaves for the Middle East


to mentor, understand another culture


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Knowing only
three words
of the Arabic
language,
Sally Sluder
of Lake City is taking her
first international venture
to the Middle East. And
it's not for a vacation.
Sluder's plane landed
Saturday in Abu Dhabi,
marking the beginning
of a one-year teaching
experience Sluder is
taking on in the United
Arab Emirates' capital
city.
After three years of
teaching second- and
third-grade Exceptional
Student Education at
Eastside Elementary
School and six years of
teaching collectively,
Sluder, 50, will teach
Abu Dhabi's kindergar-
ten students in math,
reading and science
while introducing them
to the English language
at the same time.
Sluder said Abu
Dhabi is currently tak-
ing advantage of the
wealth found from its oil
production to invest in
building infrastructure,
tourism and education,
before the oil runs out.
"They're in the
middle of a 10-year
education reform where
they are completely
revamping, updating
and Westernizing their
educational approach,"
she said.
The Abu Dhabi
Education Council
school district is bring-
ing in administration,
curriculum and Western
teachers through edu-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sally Sluder, who served as a teacher at Eastside Elementary School, poses as she shares
her views about moving to a Middle Eastern country to gather a new teaching experience.


national companies like
Nord Anglia the com-
pany Sluder is working
for to co-teach the
students with Arabic
teachers. Western
teaching approaches
and aid in professional
teaching development
will be introduced.
Sluder happened upon
the opportunity to teach
in Abu Dhabi through
Nord Anglia when she
was searching for tutor-
ing jobs on craigslist.
org during the summer.
After applying for the
job and interviewing,
Sluder said it became a
reality.
"I got absolutely
jazzed because it's
something I wanted to
do but I just thought it
was more of a fact-find-
ing thing," she said. "I
was talking to my family


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sluder rummages through a storage closet full of educa-
tional material before leaving for the Middle East.


going, 'Guys, this could
happen. I'm going to do
this, I do think. If they
offer me the job, I'm
going.'"
While Sluder's four
children and her hus-
band will remain in the
U.S., she will go on to


teach in Abu Dhabi for
the rest of the school
year on a renewable
annual contract.
The career move will
enhance her teaching
experience, Sluder sait.
"It's a huge oppor-
tunity professionally


to expand my teaching
experience outside of
our borders," she said.
"I personally think that
those kind of experi-
ences outside of our
system probably make
us better teachers in the
long haul."
Sluder said she is
most looking forward
to living within Abu
Dhabi's cultural differ-
ences and experiencing
its pace of life, gaining
a better understanding
of Islam and getting to
know Islamic women
and their perspectives
outside of the "misun-
derstanding" that they
are oppressed.
"And I can't wait
to experience all the
things .that are the
source of everybody's
fears," Sluder said, such
as a moving to a Middle
Eastern country for a
new experience.
"That's the best way
to get rid of those fears
anyway, to experience
something different,"
she said.
While Sluder said
she will miss the sup-
port of the teachers at
Eastside Elementary
- but won't miss the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test she
is glad for the chance to
bring a new element to
her teaching career.
"I just hope to bring
back more experience
tliat's going to make
me a better teacher,"
she said. "The more
people I learn to deal
with under different cir-
cumstances, the better
that's going to make me
as a classroom teacher
and as a peer."












LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


Blahnik: A surprising fan of Americana


By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
AP Fashion Writer

EW YORK His
new book title is
"Manolo's New
Shoes," but top
footwear designer
Manolo Blahnik has old-school
styles on his mind.
He'd like to see more women
in elegant heels, adorable flats
or even classic American saddle
shoes instead of the "clunky"
platforms his word that
have been so popular in recent
seasons.
"I'm suspicious of platforms.
They're the wrong shape for the
leg," he says.
Blahnik, the man at the heart
of the pop-culture shoe craze
thanks largely to regular men-
tions in "Sex and the City," also
waxes nostalgic on soda foun-
tains, malted milkshakes and old
movies.
It's an appreciation of simple,
well-made things, he explains.
He travels all the time and he
laments that so few hotels have
the classic-movie cable channel
TCM, which he uses as an end-
less source of inspiration.
But don't mistake Blahnik's
affinity for things from yester-
year as a sign that a new era is
passing him by. He's plugged
into new materials, new runway
fashion and red-carpet stars.


He is also an avid fan of new
films, with "The Social Network"
at the top of his must-see list.
"When I see a movie, it's like I'm
there. I'm the sort of spectator of
movies or viewer of TV that lives
inside whatever it is I'm watch-
ing," he says.
The lesson to be learned from
icons such as Audrey Hepburn
in "Sabrina" and Natalie Wood in
"Sex and the Single Girl" is the
confidence a woman gains when
she knows she looks good.
A flattering shoe is simply an
easy tool for her to accomplish
that goal, he says.
"There are those moments,
even if it's only seconds, when
you walk differently in a great
new pair of shoes, you feel dif-
ferently. Heels do that for you.
Flats can do it for you, too, but
they're much harder," Blahnik
says.
Lately, there's been an
increased demand for kicky,
flirty kitten heels, he says, which
are lower than his signature
stilettos. These are a nice option
for women because the foot isn't
at such a high angle, although
they're usually a very thin heel.
Blahnik, 67, raised in the
Canary Islands and now based
in London, was in New York on
Wednesday for an on-air appear-
ance on "The Martha Stewart
Show." The episode is slated
to air Friday on the Hallmark
Channel. He and Stewart whip


up coconut-chocolate and
almond-vanilla milkshakes.
Stewart wore pointy-toe,
ankle-tie high heels in a black-
and-white pattern by Blahnik
that she says could take her
from her daytime outfit of black
capris with white button-down
shirt to a fancier evening look.
"I love all his shoes. They
really work," Stewart told The
Associated Press after the tap-
ing.
She says she likes that his
designs are stylish and hit the
trends but have a timelessness
thanks to the artful materials
and shapes. (Each style starts
with a hand-painted sketch.)
A shoe's construction is quite
precise and has technical as well
as aesthetic aspects to be con-
sidered, Blahnik says in an inter-
view in his private, backstage
green room. In Stewart's world,
a finely crafted shoe is more sim-
ilar to a food recipe than a floral
arrangement, he adds.
He's fighting tendinitis at the
moment, but it's a general rule
that he wears shoe samples
- including the high heels -
around the office to make sure
they're right. His own personal
shoe wardrobe is full of matador
slippers like the turquoise ones
he's wearing on this day, more
formal Beau Brummel-inspired
lace-ups and, yes, saddle shoes.
Says Blahnik: "Those shoes
defined a generation."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Martha Stewart and top footwear designer Manolo Blahnik on the set of
'The Martha Stewart Show' in New York on Wednesday. Blahnik, raised in
the Canary Islands and now based in London, was in New York for an on-
air appearance on the show.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A wood stork (left) takes flight from it's perch in a pine tree alongside a lake on Pine Lakes golf course on Jekyll Island, Ga., Wednesday. Two deer (center) peer out from the underbrush bor-
deringd the golf course and another wood stork snags a small fish in the shallow waters off the beach. The 18-hole golf course recently received certification in Environmental Planning from
the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program for golf courses.


Golf course gets green light as wildlife habitat


By ERIKA CAPEK
The Brunswick News
JEKYLL ISLAND, Ga.
There's no short-
age of wildlife
on Jekyll
Island's Pine
Lakes Golf
Course. Deer roam close
to the tree canopies and
wood storks roost in the
trees. ,
Pink-colored roseate


spoonbills, herons and palm
warblers fly overhead, all -
while golfers spend their day
on the greens.,
When it comes to
enhancing and protecting
its wildlife habitat on the
course, Pine Lakes Golf
Course is on the right track.
The course, which is
the newest and longest
course on Jekyll Island,
recently received certifi-
cation in Environmental


Planning from the Audubon
Cooperative Sanctuary
Program for golf courses.
The 18-hole golf course
was originally designed and
built in'1968, and was reno-
vated in 2002.
It now includes new
lakes and bunkers, rede-
signed greens and drain-
age improvements and
other property preserva-
tion and enhancement
efforts which helped the


course earn its environ-
mental certification.
"By joining and partici-
pating in the (sanctuary
program), Pine Lakes Golf
Course will be involved
in projects that enhance
habitats for wildlife and
preserve natural resources
for the benefit of the local
community," said Erica
England, communications
specialist for the Jekyll
Island Authority.


According to the certifi-
cation status report, Pine
Lakes displayed a great
amount of promise toward
becoming an accommodat-
ing sanctuary, with areas
of opportunity in strength-
ening a previous commit-
ment to wildlife and habi-
tat management, chemical
use reduction .and safety,
water conservation, water
quality management, plus
outreach and education.


The program provides
an advisory service to help
existing golf courses, such
as Pine Lakes develop effec-
tive conservation and wild-
life enhancement programs.
Projects may include
placing nesting boxes for
birds such as bluebirds and
swallows, using integrated
pest management tech-
niques, conserving water
and maintaining food and
cover for wildlife.


America's halloween classic

serves role as cookie monster


By ALISON LADMAN
Associated Press
Molasses and
spice make
for great
autumnal
flavors.
In this cookie sandwich
we've taken a chewy gin-
gerbread pumpkin cut-out
cookie and added fun
jack-o-lantern faces and a
lightly sweetened cream
cheese filling.
For another fall theme,
the cookies also could be
made with leaf-shaped
cutters.
If your dough gets too
warm, put it in the freezer
for 5 minutes for easier
cutting. A thin metal'
spatula works well for
transferring the unbaked
cookies to the prepared
baking sheet.

Jack-o-lantern cookies
Start to finish: 3 hours (1
hour active). Makes 20 cookie
sandwiches
For the cookies:
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground
cloves


1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
12 tablespoons (1 1/2
sticks) butter, room
temperature
2 cups packed brown
sugar
1/2 cup molasses
1/4 cup milk
For the filling:
Two 8-ounce packages
cream cheese, softened
1 cup powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla

To make the cookies,
in a medium bowl, whisk
together the flour, cin-
namon, ginger, cloves,
allspice, salt and baking
soda.'
In another bowl, use
an electric mixer beat
together the butter and
brown sugar.
Mix in the molasses
and milk, then the dry
ingredients. Refrigerate
until firm, about 2 hours.
When ready to bake,
heat the oven to 350 E
Lightly coat 2 baking
sheets with cooking spray
or line with parchment
paper.
' On a lightly floured
surface, and working with
half the dough at a time,


roll out the dough to 1/8
inch thick. Use a 4-inch.
pumpkin-shaped cookie
cutter (and rerolling
scraps as needed) cut out
a total of 40 cookies.
Use a paring knife or
very small cutters to cut
out a jack-o-lantern face
on 20 of the cookies.
Transfer the cookies
to the prepared baking
sheets, leaving 1 inch
between each cookie.
Bake for 12 to 15
minutes, or until golden
around the edges.
Transfer the cookies
to a rack and allow to
cool.
To make the filling, in a
medium bowl use an elec-
tric mixer to beat togeth-
er the cream cheese,
sugar and vanilla until
smooth and creamy.
Add a tablespoon of
filling to the bottom cook-
ies (without faces) and
spread to within a 1/4
inch of the edges.
Place a top cookie on
each to create a sand-
wich. Store in an airtight
container in the refrig-
erator between layers of
waxed paper or parch-
ment.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


* A 1 I












Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Woman in throes of first love


can't get him out of her mind


DEAR ABBY: I'm a 25-
year-old woman who is in-
volved in a serious relationship
with a wonderful man. We've
been together for about three
months and we're very much
in love.
My problem: I think I'm
obsessed with him. I am hap-
py only when we spend time
together. When we're not, I
feel sad and alone. I spend my
time following his activities on
social networking sites and
constantly checking my cell
phone, hoping he sends me a
message.
This is my first serious rela-
tionship, I know he loves me as
much as I love him because he
has mentioned marriage and
having kids together someday.
Is what I am experiencing nor-.
mal? LOVESTRUCK IN
NEW YORK
DEAR LOVESTRUCK.
It's not unusual for a first rela-
tionship, but you're right to be
concerned. Take a step back
and look at what you're doing.
We cannot depend on some-
one else to make us happy or
make us whole. When a wom-
an spends all her time tracking
what her boyfriend is doing
when he's not with her and
waiting for the phone to ring,
it makes her a less-interest-
ing person to be around than
she could be. And that kind of
dependency can drive a man
away.
It is important that you cre-
ate a balance between what's


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

going on in the relationship
and continuing to develop
yourself as an individual. Your
boyfriend seems to have no
problem doing this.
DEAR ABBY: I have a
hard time empathizing with
people who are sick. My moth-
er suffered from all sorts of
medical issues and it affected.
me greatly.
My husband, "Glen," and
I are in our 50s. He's nearing
60, and as we age I expect
our health will decline. Glen
already takes medications for
several conditions. I, on' the
other hand, have always en-
joyed excellent health.
I find myself becoming im-
patient when Glen is sick. It's
not that I think he's faking; I
just think he needs to "get over
it" and not let it affect him. I
hide my feelings pretty well. I
take care of him, make chick-
en soup, let him rest, pick up
his medicine or whatever. But
I'm afraid if he were to become
seriously ill that I wouldn't
take good care of.him. I love
him dearly, but I don't seem to
be able to work up sympathy


when he (or anyone) is sick.
I'm afraid to tell this to Glen
because I'm afraid he'll keep
his conditions from me and
think I don't want to be there
for him. How can I increase my
"caring gene"? I have had ther-
apy for other issues. What can
I do? NURSING A FLAW
IN TEXAS
DEAR NURSING: Lack
of empathy is the inability to
relate, to the feelings of others.
Some individuals have such
an overabundance of empathy
that they become literally para-
lyzed by the pain of another
person. Be glad you aren't one
of those.
When a spouse becomes
sick and dependent, it can be
a challenge. You can minimize
or ignore it, or you can choose
to be solicitous and helpful.
Tolerating the complaints that
go along with being ill isn't
always easy, but if you visual-
ize how you would want to be
treated if the situation were
reversed, it might help you be
less impatient.
I'm sorry you weren't more
forthcoming about the issues
that sent you into therapy. If
you really feel you might be
emotionally absent when the
chips are down, contact your
therapist and start working on
it NOW.

M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.,


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Playful, positive ac-
tion will attract someone
you care for. Put your work
aside and focus on personal
aspirations. There is plenty
of room to make changes that
can alter your future and your
geographical location. Be cre-
ative. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Pushy behavior won't
help you get further ahead.
Getting involved in a worthy
cause that puts you in contact
with people who can utilize
your skills will be a worth-
while endeavor. Taking action
without being asked will leave
a good impression. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Draw the line if some-
one continually wants some-
thing for nothing. You may
want everyone to like you but
you cannot buy approval or
respect. An older or younger.
person will shed an interest-
ing view on a situation you are
currently facing.. *****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Give and take will be re-
quired if you'want to get ahead
or get- along. Spending time
taking care of your needs will


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
help to boost your confidence
and give you a new lease on
life. Love and romance are
highlighted. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Family matters must take pri-
ority and, in the end, can help.
you avoid a personal situa-
tion with someone you aren't
quite sure you want to spend
time with. Don't make a move
to do something that can jeop-
ardize your reputation. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sepit
22): Focus more on getting
as much as you can for as
'little as possible. Comparison
shopping and refraining from
impulse purchases will be the
key. Profits can. be made but
only if you are moderate and
invest wisely. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): The sky is the limit if
you put your time and effort
into something you do well
or believe in. Someone from
your past will be able to help
you find opportunities that
are sure to turn into a profit-
able endeavor. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals Y
"OICMCHM IBH TCX H MSDMZCDH PA


PZH FBASDO."


"XCMMHM, HJHD PA


PZH ICB, IB H EHISPCNST. "


- QB H Y


EIBBLRABH
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I always arrive late at the office, but I make up for it
by leaving early." Charles Lamb


Nov. 21): A creative en-
deavor you've been work-
ing on should be launched
whether it's finished or not.
The response you get will
be overwhelming. Don't let
personal duties stand in your
way when you are so close to
achieving your goals. -**
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't instigate
changes at home or you may
get more than you bargained
for. The emphasis should be
on travel, learning and ex-
ploring new avenues that can
help you earn more money.
Reconnecting with someone
from your past is a bad idea.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): If you need help,
say so, instead of falling be-
hind. Take action and make
the necessary changes so you
have more time for pamper-
ing and self-improvement. It's
time to have some fun. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Interact with
people who can give you the
information you need to get
ahead. Taking on a creative
.investment or finding a way
to put your skills to better use
will pay off. Don't be fooled by
an old lover who wants to be
part of your life again. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Look at your assets and
decide what's worth keeping
and what's not. Investing in
something you believe in or
a creative endeavor you can
offer as a service will pay off.
Don't bverspend initially try-
ing to get it off the ground.
***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


DRIVERS' TRANSLATIONS By Patrick Merrell / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 1 E [31


Across
1 "Applesauce!"
6 The pulp in pulp
fiction.
11 "That ticked me
off!"
16 Bob and pageboy
19 1987 #1 Heart
song that starts
"I hear the
ticking of the
clock"
20 Sauce made with
garlic and olive
oil
21 Adrenaline
producer
22 Dog show org.
23 YOUR TAX
DOLLARS AT
WORK ...
26 Call of support
27 Some run to get
in it
28 "Batman" fight
scene sound
29 Blender brand
31 Hold 'em bullet
33 MERGING
TRAFFIC ...
.38 Flies that don't
go far from home
40 Removed fold
marks
41 Places to pray
42 Know-it-___
(cocky types)
43 Cuzco native
44 Range rover
45 STOP ... .,
51. Some '50s'Fords
55 Suffix with hatch
56 Special ___
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone *
hone. 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


57 Reply from a
I polite young'un
59 It's often pointed
in gymnastics
60 Ermine, e.g.
61 CONGESTION
NEXT 10 MILES

65 Wearers of
jeweled turbans
71 Neurotransmitter
associated with
sleep
72 NO THRU
TRAFFIC ...
76 However, briefly
77 Genetic material
78 Open mike night
format, perhaps
80 From ___ Z
81 Wizened woman
84 Winged celestial
being
88 STAY IN LANE

91 Kind of
translation
93 Setting for the
biggest movie of
1939
94 Sailing
95 Number system
with only O's and
l's
98 Cheesesteak
capital
101 Earthlings
103 NO STOPPING
OR STANDING

106 Ultimate degree
107 Like some legal
proceedings'
108 Ha-s an angle
109 Syrian president
111 Comprehend
112 SPEED LIMIT
65 M.P.H. ...
119 Guffaw syllable


120 "None for me,
thanks"
121 Field Marshal
Rommel
122 Feeling when
called to the
principal's office
123 Literary
monogram
124 Cockeyed
125 Requiring an
umbrella
126 Brings in

Down
1 Unchallenging
reading material
2 ___-mo
3 Roughhousing
4 Egyptian symbol
of life
5 Online program
6 City in a "Can-
Can" song
.7 Common inhalant
8 Creator of the
detective C.
Auguste Dupin
9 Architectural
addition
10 Oriole who
played in a
record 2,632
straight games
11 Small crustacean
12 Low-level
position
13 Queen of double
entendres e
14 Cannonball's
path
15 Took an alternate
route
16 The Wright
brothers' Ohio
home
17 Michael of
"Caddyshack"
18 Gobbles (down)
24 Mortgage figs.


25 Part of 24-Down
30 Awakens
31 Swiftly
32 Kind of
commentator
34 Pub order
35 Don Marquis's
six-legged poet
36 Lion or tiger or
bear
37 Tony Hillerman
detective Jim
39 ___ Intrepid
43 Connections
44 Investment unit
46 Roadies work on
them
47 First name in TV
talk
48 Spanish bear
49 Actress Thurman
50 Ggllivants
52 School for Prince
Harry
53 Anderson of
"WKRP in
Cincinnati"
54 Spotted
58 Harm
60 Trol'l dolls or
Silly Bandz
62 Gambino boss
after Castellano
63 Group values
64 Place with
feeding times
65 Supermarket
V.I.P.'s: Abbr.
66 Best-of-the-best
67 Frozen dew
68 Betty, Bobbie
and Billie
followers on
"Petticoat
Junction"
69 Bandleader Shaw
70 Woodlands male
73 "The Situation
Room" airer


74 Japanese
vegetable
75 Slowpoke
79 "The Power of
Positive
'Thinking" author
80 "I get it now"
81 Like some
matching pairs
82 Representative
83 Grind together
85 Anacin
alternative
86 Famed Russian
battleship


87 "That's just ___
feel"
89 Little
Tenderness"
90 Houston after
whom the Texas
city is named
92 Toilet tissue
superlative
95 Worry for a
farmer
96 Leader whom
Virgil called
"the virtuous"


97 Jean-Paul who
wrote "Words
are loaded
pistols"
98 Particular form
of government
99 Jabba the -. .
"Star Wars"
villain
100 Bond offerer,
e.g.
101 It may wind up
at the side of the
house
102 All the pluses


104 "Criminy!"
105 Sideshow
worker
110 Taj Mahal site
113 Bird in New
South Wales
114 New Deal inits.
115 Breathalyzer
determination,
for short
116 One, for Fritz
117 It's often picked
up at the beach
118 QB's stat.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
0 HIG 01DN I C|H|AIT B AS E D S~AIC
P O LL EN I E V E N T PE R PR Y
TRAILOFTHECENTURY INC
T R A I N L FI TI E C E N T U|R|Y ERN C
E N R 0LLEE C HoSEN R RAL
DYE TDAREASTARGAZE

FR IEDA GARNET TIES
RECT TES DORIA ONSIDE
ALOHA 0 T HELO IN KING TOW

EN IRMEM IH N EE IWN A I TR
E CRE E VR MISE IE RE
U F 0 S ANI AST C CAS
SML FRENCHF I RES SKATE
G A L GE L AF NES NSER
APE EN SAVEAS CHEERY E
CAROB MAR ITALLAW

AIATE SIENNA SCRAMBLE
EX 0 D NTT UCHTHATDALI1

ESS LEASH SUGAR TI LED


8 L I 1 6 L- 9 9


7L9 9 8 L 6


C 8 L 9 Z 9 6 V L


9 V ZL 869 CL


L 96 L V 8 89

'-J-
L Z L 8 6 LVE 9 6


9 S 8 6 L Z 9 L V

6917 L1 91L 8
i.AjL^AA.L


7 1 3


4 2 8 3 6


8 2


52 6 7


1 3 8 7 5


95 1


9 6


5 7 3


41 9 2


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17. 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kevin Richardson, aka the 'lion whisperer,' walks in front of one of his lions inside their enclosure at the Kingdom of the White Lion Park in Broederstroom,
near Johannesburg, South Africa. A new film opening in the United States on Friday about a rare white lion who escapes becoming a trophy on a wall is a
rare happy ending in a country where more than 1,000 lions are killed legally each year.





The 'Lion Whisperer'



Movie tracks wild issues behind South Africa's trophy hunts


By MICHELLE FAUL
Associated Press

South Africa Lions
raised in captivity in
South Africa are set
loose in enclosed areas
where hunters, many from the
United States, gun them down.
Th.- toll: about 1,000 lions each
year.
Kevin Richardson hopes a new
movie "White Lion," which opens
in a few U.S. cities on Friday, will
give people second-thoughts about
participating in such hunts.
"I just can't understand how
anyone would want to shoot a lion '
that is clearly confined to a finite
space with absolutely no hope
... of ever escaping the so-called
hunter," said Richardson, a self-
taught "Lion Whisperer" and first-
time film producer. "Canned lion
hunting, in my opinion, is likened
to fishing with dynamite in a pond
and then calling yourself a fisher-
man."
"White Lion" is about a rare
white lion, who as a cub is cast out
of his pride because of his color.
He is near starvation when he
befriends an older lion who teach-
es him the ways of the wild. John
Kani, a Tony Award-winning actor
and playwright, is the storyteller.
A young man helps the lion,
whose name is Letsatsi, because
his Shangaan tribal tradition says
a white lion is God's messenger
and must be protected.
Tension builds as Gisani
becomes a tracker on a game farm
where he and a foreign hunter
encounter Letsatsi.
Trophy hunting is big busi-
ness in South Africa, worth $91.2
million a year, according to the
Professional Hunters Association
of South Africa. Foreign tourists
pay up to $40,000 to shoot a lion.
The government promotes
hunting as a revenue source and
calls it a "sustainable utilization
of natural resources." Provincial
governments sell permits allowing
hunters to kill rhinos, elephants
- even giraffes. Hunters killed
1,050 lions in 2008, the last year
for which figures are available,
according to the South African
Predator Breeders Association.
The hunters' association says
16,394 foreign hunters more
than half from the United States
- killed more than 46,000 animals
in the year ending September
2007.
Almost all lions hunted under
permit in South Africa are bred
in captivity. But a new report
by Animal Rights Africa says
animals that wander out of the
huge Kruger National Park into
neighboring private reserves have


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Richardson snuggles a lioness to his chest Monday in an enclosure at the
Kingdom of the White Lion Park near Johannesburg, South Africa.


"I just can't
understand how
anyone would want
to shoot a lion that
is clearly confined
to a finite space
with absolutely
no hope ... of ever
escaping the
so-called hunter."

Kevin Richardson
'Lion Whisperer'

become fair game.
About 3,600 lions were kept
in breeding facilities in 2009,
to be sold to zoos, safari farms
and for hunting on game farms,
said Albi Modise, spokesman
for South Africa's Department of
Environment.
Animal Rights Africa says tro-
phy hunting is incompatible with


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Richardson calls himself an 'ambas-
sador of lions' and hopes the film
will enlighten foreign tourists who
are willing to pay up to $40,000 to
shoot a big cat.

South Africa's push into ecotour-
ism, noting that ad campaigns pro-
moting tourism and game viewing
showcase the same species that
are offered up to be hunted. The
government in 2007 introduced
legislation that would reduce the
financial incentive to breed lions
for the hunt but the Predator


Breeders Association challenged
the laws and earlier this year won
an appeal.
Richardson, the movie's pro-
ducer, first befriended a pair of
lion cubs at the Lion Park outside
Johannesburg 12 years ago, when
the cubs were 6 months and he
was 23. He began shortening his
hours as a therapist in postopera-
tive rehabilitation to play with his
new friends. Soon, park owner
Rodney Fuhr offered him a part-
time job which became full time.
Today, Richardson cares.for
39 lions at his 800-hectare (2,000-
acre) Kingdom of the White Lion
in Broederstroom, an hour and
a half drive from Johannesburg,
where the film was shot to include
tawny gold lions as well as those
born white because of a recessive
gene.
Lions are nocturnal and spend
most of the day sleeping, so film-
ing was limited to a couple of
hours in the morning and perhaps
another couple in the afternoon
- if the cats were willing. Letsatsi
was portrayed by several differ-
ent lions over the four years it
took to make the movie. A cuddly
cub filmed in the summer of 2006
might be sprouting a mohawk-
style tuft of hair the following
year, the precursor to a mane.
Richardson said he breaks
every rule in the book in handling
lions. On a recent morning, the
lions welcomed Richardson with
rumbling purrs. One shut his eyes
in ecstasy and rolled onto his back
as Richardson scratched his chin.
Another licked Richardson's hand,
the tongue as rough as sandpaper.
Too many licks can cause bleed-
ing.
Two 400-pound lions wrestled
him to the ground and a lioness
jumped on his back, covering
Richardson for a tense minute.
He emerged from a tangle of
furry blond limbs, face red.
One lion threw a casual paw on
Richardson's shoulder.
"Ugh, no claws you naughty
boy!" he admonished, slapping "
away a paw larger than his face.
He's been attacked by his
lions twice. Once during film-
ing, a lion named Thor grabbed
Richardson's arm and pinned him
against the cage holding the cam-
era crews, who looked on terrified
and unable to help.
"I thought: There goes my arm,
and it's my own fault. I was pro-
voking him to get a fight sequence
that we needed," Richardson said.
The lion stared him in the eyes
for what seemed five minutes but
couldn't have lasted more than
a few seconds, before releasing
him, he recalled.
"Lions are 99 percent chill and 1
percent lethal," Richardson said.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424




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