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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01427
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/16/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01427
System ID: UF00028308:01427
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Mullen Returns
Gators looking for identity
on offense this year.
000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



Laki eu


v *


Epic Conclusion
CHS escapes with five-set victory
over Fort White.
Sports, I B


orter


Saturday, October 6, 2010


Vol. 136, No. 231 75 cents


Southside's event draws crowd


Today
Humane Asylum
The Lake City Humane
Society and Rountree-
Moore Auto Group pres-
ents the Humane Asylum 6
to 10 p.m. today at the Lake
City Mall. The event is
every Friday and Saturday
through Halloween.
Tickets are $10 at the door
and $5 for veterans, active
duty military, law enforce-
ment and fire personnel
with ID. Children 13 and
younger must be accompa-
nied by an adult.

Community health fair
The Second Annual
Community Health Fair is
9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today
in the Lake City Mall.

Ribfest and street dance
The American Legion
Riders Chapter 47 is having
a ribfest and street dance
from noon to 10 p.m. today
at the American Legion
Post 57, Hwy. 41 S. The
menu is 1/2 slab, baked
beans, coleslaw, and bever-
age ticket for $10. Seconds
are $5. Meals are serviced
noon to 7 p.m. Live music
is from 6 to 10 p.m.

Candidate gala
Republican Candidate
Gala is 6 p.m. today at
the Shrine Club, 771 NW
Brown Road. Admittance
is $20 per person. Meet
candidates running in the
November elections. There
will be dinner and dancing.

Fall family festival
The Filipino American
Cultural Society is hav-
ing a Fall Family Festival
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at
the Alligator Park Main
Pavilion. Call Bob Gavette
at 965-5905.

Birthday celebration
A birthday celebra-
tion for Principal Bessie
Whitfield is 11 a.m. today
at Richardson Middle
School cafeteria.

Pet Show
Suwannee Valley
Humane Society is host-
ing its 25th Annual Pet
Show 11 a.m. today at
the Suwannee County
Coliseum in the Live Oak
Fairgrounds. Registration
starts at 10 a.m. and is $1
per contest for dogs and
cats. Admissions is free.
Call (866) 236-7812 toll free
or (850) 971-9904.

Charity auction
Suwannee Valley
Humane Society is hosting
an antique auction 10 a.m.
today at the Country Store
in Madison, 256 NE Range
Avenue. Preview for the
auction begins at 9 a.m.
Call Jennifer at (850) 973-
2476.


More than 200
children attend
fun day at center.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Playing in bounce
houses, listening to drum
cadences and singers, or
watching a church drama
group perform were just a
few of the activities collect-
ing youngster's attention
as part of the Third Annual
Southside Recreation
Center Homecoming.
The center's homecom-
ing event took place Friday


with an estimated 200 to
250 children attending.
"This event is held
every year," said Wayne
Jernigan, Southside Center
supervisor. "We try to do
an event to bring people in
the community to our cen-
ter. People are enjoying it
and every year I think it
gets a little bit bigger."
The event also featured a
barbecue cook-off, hot dog
contest and a homecoming
queen contest. Children
also had an opportunity
to ride on a carnival-type
train, climb obstacles or
view a Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission boat.


Lisa Ogburn attended
the event to listen to .her
daughter Lauren Ogburn
sing as a soloist.
"I'm having a good
time," she said. 'The event
is very nice. The entertain-
ment is great, the activities
for the children are nice
and I haven't been around
to the food yet, but I'm
sure that's good as well."
Melinda Moses, a Lake
City City council member,
served as one of the event's
master of ceremonies and
seemed to be thrilled to
have the opportunity to
introduce the student
SOUTHSIDE continued on 3A


TITCH IN


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Ramona Dewees, Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild president, shows off a quilt to Bob See
Friday at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture State Park. The quilt, 'Battle of Antietam,' won,
Best of Show honors at the 22nd Annual Stephen Foster Folk Quilt Show and Sale.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Steve Crawford drives the Tiny Mite Choo-Choo as he pulls
a trainload of children through the parking lot during the Third
Annual Southside Recreation Center homecoming Friday
afternoon. An estimated 200-250 children attended the event.


IME


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Ramona Dewess (from left) and Lorraine Miller discuss colors
and patterns on a quilt on display at the 22nd Annual Stephen
Foster Folk Quilt Show and Sale Friday. The show will contin-
ue from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. today and from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday.


State park hosts

quilt show to mark

60th anniversary


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS
Vision, a passion
and time are all
ingredients that
go into making
a quality quilt.
Vision is needed to
arrange the swatches of
cloth into beautiful pat-
terns. Passion is required
to show the perseverance
that it takes to make. the
dream into a reality. And
time is demanded to make
sure ifs a quality job,
which in some instances
takes years.
All those elements were
on display, in the quilts,
Friday at the 22nd Annual
Stephen Foster Folk Quilt
Show and Sale. The event
will continue today from 9
a.m. 5 p.m. and Sunday
from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. at
the Stephen Foster Folk


Culture Center State Park.
The theme for this year's
event is: Diamond Jubilee,
celebrating the 60th
Anniversary of the Stephen
Foster State Park.
Romana Dewees, Lady
of the Lake Quilting Guild
president, said the event
is co-sponsored by the
Florida Park Service,
Stephen Foster Citizen
Support Organization
and the Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild in Lake City.
Bob Giarda, a Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
park service specialist, said
the annual Quilt Show and
Sale is blended in with the
park's 60th anniversary.
"It's a wonderful tie
in because the theme of
the event lends itself to
the anniversary," he said.
"A lot of the quilts are
designed with the anniver-
STITCH continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


80
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ........... .... 4A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics........ 4B
Puzzles ........ ... 2B
Around Florida . . 2A I


FAITH &
VALUES
Mormons: Cruelty
toward gays is wrong.


COMING
SUNDAY
Local teacher leaves
for Abu Dhabi.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010


3 Friday:
Afternoon: 6-0-5
Evening: 4-9-0


Friday:
Afternoon: 4-3-9-3
Evening: 7-7-5-2


"Thursday:
3-7-26-32-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Rapper T.I. headed back to prison


ATLANTA
A federal judge revoked rap-
S per T.I.'s probation Friday
and ordered him back to
prison for 11 months,
according to a spokes-
man for the U.S. attorney's office.
The Atlanta native, whose real
name is Clifford Harris Jr., was in
federal court here following his
arrest last month in Los Angeles on
suspicion of drug possession. He
was on probation after serving 10
months behind bars on federal weap-
ons charges.
During the hearing, T.I. begged
U.S. District Judge Charles Pannell
Jr. not to send him back to prison,
saying he needed to get help for
drug addiction. He told the judge he
"screwed up" and pleaded for mercy.
"I want drugs out of my life. If I
can get the treatment and counsel-
ing I need ... I can beat this," T.I. told
the judge, according to U.S. attorney
spokesman Patrick Crosby. "I need
help. For me, my mother, my kids,. I
need the court to give me mercy."
The Associated Press was relying
on information from the spokesman
because the judge closed the court-
room after it was filled and several
media outlets, including AP, were not
allowed in.
As a condition of TI.'s release
earlier this year, he was ordered
not to commit another federal, state
or local crime while on supervised
release, or to illegally possess a con-
trolled substance. He was also told
to take at least three drug tests after
his release and to participate in a
drug and alcohol treatment program.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Angela Lansbury
is 85.
* Author Gunter Grass is 83.
* Former presidential adviser
Charles W. Colson is 79.
* Actor-producer Tony An-
thony is 73.
* Actor Barry Corbin is 70.
* Sportscaster Tim McCarver


is 69.
* Rock musician C.F. Turner
(Bachman-Turner Overdrive)
is 67.
* Actress Suzanne Somers
is 64.
* Rock singer-musician Bob
Weir is 63.
* Producer-director David
Zucker is 63.


Daily Scriptures


"How great you are, 0
Sovereign Lord! There is no one
like you, and there is no God
but you, as we have heard with
our own ears.


- 2 Samuel 7:22.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 3 file photo, Grammy award winning artist Clifford "TI" Harris, (left)
poses for media with his wife Tameka "Tiny" Harris.


after this season. .
Novak says he's "always been
a big believer" in "Eastbound and
Down" actor Danny McBride but
doesn't know if the show will be able
to get him.
"Eastbound and Down" is in its
second season on HBO.


'Office' star sees Danny Singer Alicia Keys gives
McBride replacing Carell birth to baby boy
T XT tIbby oy


NEW YORK B.J. Novak has a
wish for a replacement for 'Office'
cast mate Steve Carell, who's leaving


NEW YORK It's a boy for Alicia
Keys and her husband, music pro-


ducer/rapper Swizz Beatz.
A representative for Keys said she
gave birth Thursday night in New
York. The couple have named their
son Egypt Dean. Ifs the first child
for the 29-year-old superstar and the,
fourth child for fBeatz, whose real
name is Kaseem Dean. The couple
was married July 31.
Swizz Beatz, 31, took time to tweet
on Friday: "I'm so thankful for every-
thing I been blessed with in my life
wowwwwww!

* Associated Press


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday.through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mer .......754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityrepoer.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter.
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreponter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks.........!........... $48.79
52 Weeks................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................... $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run,
in this space. And thanks for reading.


THE WEATHER


SUNNY



HI 801045


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Senate candidates face off in a debate battle

Florida Senatorial candidates Gov. Charlie Crist (second from left) U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek
(second from right) and Marco Rubio (right) square-off in a debate moderated by John Wilson
(left) in Tampa Friday. Rubio accused Crist of using 'shameful' scare tactics to frighten seniors
about his views on Social Security, but Crist stood his ground while Democratic candidate
Meek said both men are suspect on protecting benefits.


& MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY


HI82L056 HI83L58


80/44 -d city Sunday Monday
00/o 44 i aslm Cape Canaveral 79/63/s 81.65/s
Tallahassee 4l *7/49 Daytona Beach 80/57/s 81/60/s
82/43 Ft. Lauderdale 84/73/s 83/74/s
svi Pensacola Daitta Fort Myers 84/62/s 86/65/s
81/51 Panama Cy /4 58 Ganesville 82/53/s 81/55/pc
S81/53 8a48 Jacksonville 79/54/s 80/57/pc
\1/8 Ca auaveral Key West 84/76/s 83/74/pc
/ 81/59 80/60 Lake City 83/51/s 84/54/pc
81 Miami 85/71/s 84/72/s
a P i TNaples 83/66/s 86/68/s
82/ West Palm Bea Ocala 82/54/s 82/56/pc
S 82/64 Orlando 83/58/s 84/60/s
-' FFt.Lauderdali Panama City 82/56/s 80/57/s
Ft.ll eHYU 84/67 0 Pensacola 81/56/s 79/59/s
84/61 Naples Tallahassee 83/45/s 84/51/s
U 483/62 ii Tampa 83/63/s 85/66/s
S8/68 Valdosta 81/46/s 83/51/s
83/7ey es W. Palm Beach 82/68/s 83/70/s


Pastor cancels
burning, wins car
SOUTH BRUNSWICK,
N.J. Car dealer Brad
Benson made the pitch to
Florida pastor Terry Jones
in one of his quirky radio
ads: If you don't burn a
Quran, '11 give you a new
car.
He was surprised,
though, when a represen-
tative for Jones called to
collect the 2011 Hyundai
Accent, retailing for $14,200.
"They said unless I was
doing false advertising,
they would like to arrange
to pick up the car," Benson
recalled. At first he thought
it was a hoax, so Benson
asked Jones to send in a
copy of his driver's license.
He did.
Jones, of Gainesville, told
The Associated Press that the
free car wasn't the reason
he called off the burning
- and that he didn't even
hear about the offer until
a few weeks after Sept 11,


when he had threatened to
set the Muslim holy book
on fire.
He said he plans to
donate the car to an orga-
nization that helps abused
Muslim women.

Somer Thompson's
mom to be at trial
ORANGE PARK- The
mother of slain 7-year-old
Somer Thompson says she
will be in court every day for
the trial of the man accused
of kidnapping and murdering
her daughter.
Diena Thompson told
NBC's 'Today Show" that
she still feels guilty over what
happened to her daughter.
Somer Thompson disap-
peared while walking home
from school with her siblings
in north Florida last year. Her
body was found two days
later in a Georgia landfill.
Jared Mitchell Harrell has
been charged in her death.
Thompson said Thursday
she had taught her daughter


about stranger danger, but
that parents need to go a step
further.

Ex-ballplayer gets
20-year sentence
MIAMI-A former .
minor-league baseball player
has been sentenced to nearly
20 years in prison for a multi-
million-dollar Medicare fraud
scheme.
A Miami federal judge
imposed the sentence
Thursday on 38-year-
old Ihosvany Marquez.
Prosecutors say Marquez
stole more than $21 million
using seven clinics to submit
false claims for HIV therapy.
Marquez was a Miami
high school pitching star
who played in the minors
for the Boston Red Sox and
Baltimore Orioles organiza-
tions.


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


79
50
81
59
.92 in 1970
38 in 1977

0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.35"
42.48"


7a 1p 7p la 6a
Saturday Sunday







-Fsbcatnmu -"FhAif em


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:33 a.m.
6:59 p.m.
7:34 a.m.
6:57 p.m.

3:26 p.m.,
1:51 a.m.
3:57 p.m.
2:46 a.m.


Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.
22 30 6 13
Full Last New First


7


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to IQ-


On this date in ,
1988. one of the
costlest hailstorms
to ever hit metro
Denver caused an
estimated 87.8 mil-
lion dollars in dam-
age to homes, build-
ings and vehicles. ., mom


M Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
'The Weather
Channel.



weethercorn


Forecasts, data and graph-
cs I 2010 Weathe Central
JS. LLC, Madison, Wis.
Swww.weatherpubllsher.com


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


1! SUNES


MON!


19TE'S


F! WENESEl


rJ -CI TYALMANAC IlUVlilNDEX









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010


Pentagon warns gay troops to stay silent for now


By ALLEN G. BREED
and BRIAN WITTE
Associated Press

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -
When word came down of
a judge's ruling that gays
could serve openly in the
military, an Air Force offi-
cer received joyous con-
gratulations from a com-
rade. Realizing there was
someone in the room who
didn't know his sexual ori-
entation, the officer pre-
tended it was a joke and
laughed it off.
He figured it was too
soon and too risky to
celebrate.
On Friday, the Pentagon
agreed, warning gay troops
that in this "legally uncer-
tain environment," com-
ing out now could have
"adverse consequences for
themselves or others." The
warning came a day after
the Obama administration
asked a federal judge in
California to stay her ruling
overturning the Clinton-era
"don't ask, don't tell" policy
while the government pre-
pares an appeal.
Like the Air Force offi-
cer, many gay service
members interviewed by
The Associated Press didn't
need to ask if it was OK
to tell.
"I'm not coming out yet
because of the repercus-
sions I might get," said


Cs1*


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 16 picture, (from left) Petty Officer Autumn Sandeen, Lt. Dan Choi, Cpl. Evelyn Thomas, Capt. Jim Pietrangelo
II, Cadet Mara Boyd and Petty Officer Larry Whitt, stand together after thdy handcuffed themselves to the fence outside the
White House in Washington during a protest for gay rights.


an Army specialist at Fort
Bragg, N.C., who, like oth-
ers reached by the AP, did
not want his name used.
"I've got a year and a half
left ... and I don't want
just one day of me coming
out to destroy all of what
I worked for. I still want
my benefits. I still want the
military to pay for my col-
lege when I get out."
On Tuesday, U.S. District
Judge Virginia Phillips
ordered the Pentagon to


stop enforcing the 17-year-
old ban on openly gay
troops. The military prom-
ised to abide by the order
as long as it remains in
place, but gay rights advo-
cates cautioned service
members to avoid reveal-
-ing their sexuality in the
meantime.
The Air Force officer
was at work on his mili-
tary computer when news
of Phillips' ruling flashed
up on CNN. A friend who


knew his secret ran in and
said, "You can come out of
the closet now."
"I had to push him out
and kind of laugh it off
with the other person there
in the office," the officer
recalled. "It made me real-
ly, really nervous at first,
because my first thought
was, 'Oh, crap. I just was
outed, and I know that the
policy is probably coming
back. What do I do?'"
For the rest of the day,


the officer co-founder
of a support group called
OutServe was worried
some other friend might
inadvertently say some-
thing. He wondered if
he should'go home until
things calmed down.
Then he thought to him-
self: "This 'is probably hap-
pening across other bases
as well."
President Barack Obama
has made it clear that he
wants the policy to end on


his watch. But he wants
Congress to make the
change, not the courts.
And when or even if
- that might happen is
unclear. Repeal legislation
has passed the House but
run into Republican resis-
tance in the Senate.
Under the 1993 law, the
military cannot inquire into
service members' sexual
orientation and punish
them for it as long as they
keep it to themselves.
Jarrod Chlapowski, co-
founder of Servicemembers
United, said his office has
received dozens of calls
.from closeted gay military
members since Tuesday's
ruling.
'We've had people call-
ing us asking us, 'What
should I do? Can I come
out now?'" said Chlapowski,
a former U.S. Army Korean
linguist who decided not
to re-enlist because of the
policy. "All the organiza-
tions, including ours, are
cautioning service niem-
bers not to come out of the
closet, because everything
is still in flux. This injunc-
tion could be stayed or not
be stayed and it probably
will be stayed. We just don't
know when."
Even before Phillips
issued her order, the Air
Force had agreed to delay
the discharge of Lt. Col.
Victor Fehrenbach.


NY officers face stat-fudging charges


By TOM HAYS
and COLLEEN LONG
Associated Press

NEW YORK- Four New
York Police Department
officers are facing internal
charges based on the highly
publicized accusations by
a fellow officer that they
manipulated crime statis-
"fics,'an"NYPD official, sai ..
Friday.
The officers include the
former commanding offi-
cer of the 81st Precinct in
Brooklyn, Deputy Inspector
Steven Mauriello.
Mauriello, a sergeant
and two patrol officers were
served with the charges this
week. A second sergeant
was expected to be served
next week, said the official,


who only named Mauriello.
The official wasn't autho-
rized to speak publicly about
an internal personnel matter
and spoke to The Associated
Press on condition of ano-
nymity.
Mauriello was charged
with purposely tampering
with grand larceny and
car theft reports, and with
'. mis ng, ,intern, inves-
tigators. The sergeant was
accused of failing to verify
that two officers had filed
a robbery complaint;, the
same two officers were
charged with not following
the order to file the com-
plaint.
The officers were not
removed from duty and
were expected to keep
their jobs, the official said.


But they could face lesser
penalties such as loss of
pay or vacation days.
NYPD spokeswoman
Kim Royster confirmed
Friday that administrative
charges had been drawn up
and served but declined to
comment further.
The head of the union
representing Mauriello
described him as a deco-
rated, veteran commander
who's never been in trou-
ble before and predicted
he would be exonerated at
a departmental trial.
Mauriello "feels aban-
doned by the department
he has faithfully served for
over two decades," said
Roy Richter, president of
the Captains Endowment
Association.


The department
launched the probe after
Officer Adrian Schoolcraft.
came forward with accu-
sations that officers were.
under pressure to falsify
records to improve the
'81st Precinct's crime rates.
Schoolcraft made secret
tape recordings of officers.
talking about the alleged
misconduct, then distrib-
uted the tapes to the media
and filed a lawsuit after he
claimed his superiors forc-
ibly removed him from the
force.
Schoolcraft was taken to
a hospital psychiatric ward
last Halloween by fellow
officers and believes he
was taken to the ward as
punishment for spotlight-
ing the misconduct.


STITCH: Show features 160 quilts, 13 categories


Continued From Page 1

sary in mind. We've got
some really nice selections
of quilts and people should
come out and see them."
As part of this year's
event, many of the quil-
ters participated in the
1 Million Pillow Case
Challenge, in which they
attempted to make 60 pil-
low cases in an hour in
honor of the park's 60th
anniversary.
"We made 60 pillow


cases in 47 minutes," she
said. "We had people from
Lake City come up and
make these pillow cases
and we're donating them
to Haven Hospice and'
the Lake City VA Medical
Center Hospice."
Today, the quilters are
scheduled to make "ditty
bags" (personal care item
bags). Half will be donated
to the Haven Hospice and
the remaining half to the


VA Hospice.
This year's show fea-
tured 160 quilts, including
10 quilts made by children
and a total of seven quilt
show shop vendors from
Georgia and Florida. The
quilt show also featured
13 categories of competi-
tion.
"The event is wonder-
ful," said Lorraine Miller,
a volunteer for the annual
event. 'There are a lot of


diverse quilts, very artis-
tic quilts and the people
are great to work with in
the park."


SOUTHSIDE: Fun day


Continued From Page It

performers.
"Who wouldn't want
to do this? It's a gor-'
geous day at Southside
Recreation Center," she
said. "I think this event
just brings a lot of groups


together and -a lot of ages
together. We've got men
cooking barbecue, high
school students playing
musical instruments and
little kids playing on toys.
The event is great."


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Sunday, October 17
Special Guest
Gann Brothers

Service 10am
Lunch to follow
Ice Cream Social and Old
Fashioned Hymn Sing
Activities at 4p.m.

4843 South 441, Lake City


u Lim aro's yl aInaiians
with Al present


October 19- 7 p.m.


ed by


FLORIDA




2010-2011
Lyceum eriec

Levy Performing
Arts Center
Tickets are on sale at the PA C Box Office
from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Cash, check, debit & credit cards
(MasterCard & Visa) are accepted
Dinner will be served in the college's
Lobo Cafe prior to the performance.
For details & reservations call
(888) 845-0925 or (386) 438-5440


For ticket information call

(386) 754-4340


"Enhance the Arts by supporting The Foundation for Florida Gateway College"
If you have a disability and need assistance, please contact (386) 754-4340


Executive Director Sponsors.
L CoCmmunity. e r
Source. J
Lake City Reporter
S..c .-- TARGET

Hotia, inn


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Saturday, October 16, 2010


OTE


OTHER
OPINION


Pink colors

campaign

vs. terrible

disease

ctober is Breast
Cancer Awareness
Month, as evi-
denced by great
national campaigns
that place the color pink in con-
spicuous places, such as on the
equipment, uniforms and cloth-
ing at National Football League
games.
Breast cancer is such a
frightening disease, and we
appreciate all of the efforts
made locally and nationally to
bring this terrible cancer to the
attention of a nation. According
to the American Cancer Society,
about 207,000 new cases of
invasive breast cancer will be
diagnosed in American women
in 2010 alone. About 40,000
women were expected to die of
breast cancer in 2010.
Those are sad statistics, but
it comes with a dose of good
news. The American Cancer
Society reports that after
increasing for more than two
decades, female breast cancer
incidence rates fell by 2 percent
per year from 1998 to 2007.
To keep that number fall-
ing will take continued efforts
to convince women that early
detection can help stave off the
devastating effects of breast
cancer.
Perhaps breast cancer was
a taboo only whispered a few
decades ago, but thafs chang-
ing. We credit these many
promotional campaigns as the
reason.
Officials at several U.S. hos-
pitals ask that women remem-
ber to schedule regular mam-
mograms during their birthday
month. According to the hospi-
tal officials, convenient digital
mammograms are available for
women with busy schedules.
A world without cancer, is a
world with more birthdays.
Today, we join hospitals
around the country and plead
to women to schedule regular
mammograms.
We ask that they do it not
only for themselves, but for the
families who care so much for
them and rely on them for their
love and support

* The Daily Republic (S.D.)

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Gender apartheid goes mainstream


W haft's your
opinion of
polygamy?
Many consider
the practice
immoral and it's illegal in this
country and most of the devel-
oped world. It's probably not
just coincidence that few, if any,
polygamous countries are liber-
al democratic societies in which
women enjoy equal rights.
Anthropologists have noted
that in a polygamous society
many men end up as "bare
branches" sexually frustrated
and prone to enlist in violent
enterprises, especially those
that bring status and glory; a
jihad, for example.
But the sports section of The
New York Times, in a recent
profile of a member of the
Jordanian royal family, gave
the impression that polygamy
is just another lifestyle choice.
The article observes that 36-
year-old Princess Haya bint
al-Hussein has "long challenged
what it means to be a princess"
by pursuing a career as "an
equestrian athlete" who drives
"her horses across Europe in a
custom tractor-trailer." And, oh
yes, by the way, she happens to
be the "worldly junior wife of
Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid
al-Maktoum, 61, making appear-
ances in jeans, her long hair
flowing ..." So it's probably for
the best that, as the Times deli-
cately adds, the Sheik's "senior
wife leads a more private life."
What do you think about the
niqab sometimes also called
a burqa the veil that leaves
only the eyes of a woman uncov-
ered? Critics, not least Muslim
critics such as Fadela Amara,
France's secretary of state for
urban policy, suggest that when
a woman is forced to wear one it
not only deprives her of individ-
uality it is, effectively, a portable
prison. France recently moved
to ban the niqab, as have sev-


Cliff May


eral other European countries.
Nevertheless, a recent New
York Times review of a Yemeni
restaurant in Brooklyn noted
in passing that the diners are
apparently segregated by sex,
and that, next door, is "Paradise
Boutique, where mannequins
model chic niqabs ..."
And what do you think about
the plans to build Park51, aka
Cordoba House, on the edge
of the crater where the World
Trade Center once stood?
Polls find that a majority of
Americans, while acknowledg-
ing that the organizers have
a right to build whatever they
choose, think it inappropriate to
construct an elaborate Islamic
center so near the site of an
atrocity carried out in the name
of Islam.
Washington Post architec-
ture critic Philip Kennicott just
knows thafs hogwash. The
organizers, he writes, are fac-
ing "a groundswell of hostility
whipped up during an election
season that feeds on primitive
emotions directed at a parody of
a supposedly primitive religion."
Kennicott denounces the "hor-
rendous venom directed at the
project," adding that this is "one
of the most shameful chapters
in the civic and intellectual life
of America..."
The examples above illus- ,
trate the extent to which our
media and cultural elites now
accept and even embrace
behaviors they would otherwise
find repugnant e.g. gender
apartheid and insensitivity
toward the victims of terrorism


*- when such behaviors have
Islamic roots.
What's the explanation?
Fadela Amara, the French
official, perceives this as a
consequence of cultural relativ-
ism Westerners declining to
denounce not only polygamy
and the niqab, but even "forced
marriages or female genital
mutilation, because, they say,
it's tradition." Such condescen-
sion, she adds, is "nothing more
than neo-colonialism."
To be sure, it is bigotry to
assume the worst about some-
one because he or she is a
Muslim. But is it not equally
odious to draw a veil over our
ability to acknowledge those
Islamic practices that are inimi-
cal to such Western values as
equality and free speech?
I suspect this is one form that
intimidation takes not people
backing down in embarrass-
ment but people camouflaging
their fears as principles, secretly
hoping that if they refrain from
pointing out anything negative
about Islam, if they can make
themselves inoffensive to
Muslims, they will be safe.
I'm convinced, too, that we've
long been sliding down a slip-
pery slope: Tolerance once
meant you were willing to abide
behaviors you found objection-
able. Then it came to mean not
judging such behaviors at all
or, better yet, respecting them.
Now, it's come to mean celebrat-
ing them.
If that is what is required to
be a member of the enlightened
elite, I'll cast my lot with the
benighted masses who are will-
ing to treat Muslims as equals
and with, respect but won't go
along with those for whom cul-
tural kowtowing has become a
reflex.
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


OTHER OPINION


India's single-family skyscraper


M ukesh Ambani
fell just a wee
bit short of
Indian Prime
Minister
Manmohan Singh's call for
business leaders to be "role
models of moderation."
Ambani, India's richest and
the world's fourth-richest
tycoon with a fortune esti-
mated at $19.5 billion, has just
moved into his new home with
his wife and three children.
"Moderation" is not the first
word that comes to mind to
describe the new digs.
For a start, there's its cost,
$1 billion.
Then there's its height, 27
stories with its sweeping views


of Mumbai and the Arabian
Sea. Its floor space, larger than
the Palace of Versailles'. And
its off-street parking, a 160-car
underground garage. If the
street traffic is bad, there are
three helicopter pads.
And then there's the staff
of 600 needed to keep all that
running, along with the health
club and gym, the ballroom,
dance studio and 50-seat the-
ater, according to Britain's The
Telegraph, which brought this
real-estate news to our atten-
tion.
Ambani is half owner of the
Indian conglomerate Reliance
Industries. The other half is
owned by his younger brother,
with whom he is said to be


feuding.
But the government's call
for moderation a Cabinet
minister urged that "vulgar"
salaries be curbed- did not
fall entirely on deaf ears.
Ambani has slashed his
pay from just over $9 mil-
lion to just over $3 million,
the company explained, as a
reflection of his "desire to set
a personal example of mod-
eration in executive compen-
sation."
Moderation is a good feel-
ing to have when you live in
a $1 billion house. You don't
want to have people think you
got carried away.

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Dan K.Thomasson



Religious

zealots

test free

speech

We Americans
like to sound
off. It's as
natural to us
as breathing.
Thus, the most cherished
of rights protected under
the Constitution is the free-
dom of speech in the First
Amendment and not, as some
would have us believe, the
right to bear arms in the
Second Amendment.
So important to the American
way of life is the ability to
speak one's mind that the U.S.
Supreme Court has extended it
to flag burning and other activi-
ties that sometimes don't seem
related. But some clearly obnox-
ious and tasteless self-expres-
sions clearly tax our tolerance
and leave us wondering just how
far the privilege goes.
We know that protected
speech doesn't extend to shout-
ing fire in a crowded theater
or advocating the overthrow of
the government or inciting a
riot or taunting opponents with
such vile epithets or slanderous
comments that they are consid-
ered fighting words. We have a
responsibility not to engage in
that kind of rhetoric or verbal
assault So-called hate speech
that can bring about violence fits
in this category and more and
more has become an object of
legislative attention.
Perhaps the most distasteful
example of hate speech these
days is aimed at the gay com-
munity and is being carried
out by a family of misanthropic
religious freaks who claim they
are doing so in the name of
Christianity. The Phelps family,
as many of you already know,
run a tiny "Baptist" church in
Topeka, Kansas, from which
they regularly sally forth to
commit acts that challenge the
very teachings they profess to
uphold.
There are few words that can
describe just how despicable
these people really are under
the leadership of Fred Phelps,
an octogenarian lawyer, minister
and all around troublemaker
whose rabidity would make
Kansas' John Brown wince.
While his taunts aimed at homo-
sexuality are jarring, causing
him and his followers to be
banned in the United Kingdom,
they almost pale in the hate-
fulness of the family's most
publicized act disrupting
the funerals of American ser-
vice members killed in action.
According to the Phelps clan,
God hates not only gays but
also soldiers and presumably
their families and has assigned
the Phelps clan to carry out His
work.
Now the U.S. Supreme Court
has announced that it will decide
whether this indescribable
violation of human decency is
protected by the Constitution,
which a U.S. appeals court said
is the case.
As a journalist, the First
Amendment has been the guid-
ing light throughout my career.
The defense of its freedoms has
been a constant aim. At times, it
seems we must accept that free
speech comes in many forms
whether we like it or not But we
must also understand there are
boundaries to this freedom that
shouldn't be crossed. Whatever
the court decides will become
the law. We only hope we can
live with it


* Dan K. Thomasson is former,
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010


Engineer took charge


in rescue of miners


VIVIAN SEQUERA
,Associated Press

SAN JOSE MINE, Chile
- Three days after 33 men
were sealed deep within a
gold mine, Andre Sougarret
was summoned by Chile's
president.
The Chilean leader got
right to the point: The
square-jawed, straight-talk-
ing engineer would be in
charge of digging them
out
At first Sougarret wor-
ried no one knew if the
miners were alive, and the
pressVre was on to reach
them. And he knew he
would be blamed if the men
were found dead "because
we didn't reach them or the
work was too slow."
But eventually, contact
was made, the work was
on, and the miners below
were calling him "boss."
The mission was unprec-
edented. No one had ever
drilled so far to reach
trapped miners. No one
knew where to find them.
From the first confusing
days to this week's glori-
ous finale, the 46-year-old
Sougarret was the man
with the answers.
And at the end, the last
miner to reach the surface,
shift foreman Luis Urzua,
would tell him: "People
like you are worth a lot of
money in Chile."
Sougarret's management
of the crisis was so success-
ful that nearly all the res-
cued miners walked out of
the hospital Friday perfect-
ly healthy. While a hand-
ful left through one door
into a news media storm,
most of the others were


secreted away through a
side entrance to be taken
home, hospital officials
said. Two of the miners
required more attention
and were transferred to
other hospitals.
In an interview with The
Associated Press, Sougarret
told how he assembled
a team of. experts and
methodically worked the
problem that would become
the biggest challenge of his
life.
In choosing the young
Chilean mining expert,
President Sebastian Pinera
had turned to the man who
ran the world's most pro-
ductive subterranean mine,
El Teniente, for Chile's
state-owned Codelco cop-
per company.
A methodical engineer.
who stays cool-headed
under pressure, Sougarret
said he tried not to dwell
too much on the men he
was trying to save. ,
"I never allowed myself to
think about what was hap-
pening with them that's
anxiety-causing," he said.
"I told myself, 'My objec-
tive is to create an access, a
connection. Put that in your
head.'"
"Why they were there
and what happened, that's
not my responsibility. My
responsibility is to get there
and get them out"
Sougarret flew immedi-
ately to the mine in Chile's
northern Atacama desert,
and encountered a nest
of confusion, with rescue
workers, firefighters, police
officers, volunteers and
relatives desperate for word
about the fate of their men
down below.


Gently but firmly,
Sougarret made his first
move: ordering out the res-
cue workers until there was,
in fact, someone to rescue.
He asked for any maps of the
mine and assembled a team,
starting with Rene Aguilar,
the 35-year-old risk manager
at El Teniente.
In the weeks that followed,
the two men built an opera-
tion that grew to more than
300 people.
Among their first steps
was to ride into the mine in
a truck
"We knew it collapsed.
What does collapsed mean?'
Sougarret said. "What we
found was a block,' a tomb-
stone, like when you're in an
elevator and the doors open
between floors."
The smooth, solid wall
was part of a huge block of
stone that cut off the shaft
that corkscrews for more than
four miles (seven kilometers)
to a depth of 2,625 feet (800
meters). They later deter-
mined the cave-in started at a
depth of about 1,000 feet (355.
meters), and brought down
the very center of the mine,
some 700,000 tons of rock.
Drilling through would risk
provoking another, collapse,
crushing anything below.
So, an entirely new shaft
would have to be drilled to try
to reach the' men. And they
needed to call in more exper-
tise: the miners who had nar-
rowly escaped being crushed
in the Aug. 5 collapse.
These men knew what
was in the lower reaches
of the mine: tanks of water,
ventilation shafts, a 48-hour
food supply in a reinforced
refuge far beneath the sur-
face.


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter

A changing of the guard, and a fond farewell

Koby Adams (from left), Lake Shore Hospital Authority Board chairman-elect, shakes hands
with Marc Vann, the outgoing board chairman. New Hospital Authority Board officers for 2011
were elected during the board's meeting Tuesday.


Administration delays its


report on China currency,


MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON The
Obama administration
announced Friday it will
delay a scheduled report on
whether China is manipu-
lating its currency to gain
trade advantages until after
an upcoming meeting of the
world's major economies
next month.
TheTreasuryDepartment
said the administration will
wait until after President
Barack Obama meets with
other leaders of the Group of
20 nations in Seoul in early
November.
The administration's
announcement was certain


OBITUARIES


Aubrey Jennings (J.W.)
Williams
Aubrey Jennings (J.W.)Williams,
83, a resident of Lake City, FI
passedaway October 14, 2010 in
the Suwannee Valley Care Center.
Mr. Williams was a native and
lifelong resident of Columbia
County. He is the son of the late
Aubrey and Bertie Williams. He
attended the Watertown Congre-
tional United Methodist Church.
Mr. Williams' greatest accom-
plishment was overcoming .his
physical handicap and doing
many things he should not have
been able to do. He lived with
tenacity, hardheadedness,,a posi-
tive attitude and a good sense
of humor. He was loved and
will be missed. He is preceded
in death by his wife, Julia and
his daughter, Jean, one brother,
Francis and one sister, Lavinia.
Survivors include his daughter
and son-in-law, Carol and Carl
Cooper, one grandson, Jason
Cooper, one brother, Warren
Williams, one sister, Myrtle
Godwin and many nieces and
nephews. Also included are his
special friends and caregivers,
Marvin and Tracy Barnwell.
Funeral services for Mr. Wil-
liams will be conducted Mon-
day, October 18, 2010 at 2:00
P.M. in the Watertown Congre-
tional United Methodist Church
with the Rev. Randy Ogburn,
officiating.. Interment will fol-
low in the Memorial Cemetery.
The family will receive .friends
Monday from 1:00-2:00 at the
church just prior to the service.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME
2659 SW Main Blvd Lake City
is in charge of arrangements.

Mrs. Carolyn W. Witt
Mrs. Carolyn W. Witt, 72, a life-
long resident of Lake City, died
early Friday morning, October
15, 2010 at home surrounded
by her family. Mrs. Witt had
courageously battled cancer for
two years. The daughter of the
late Amos and Ella Gaskins Wil-
liams, Mrs. Witt had co-owned
and operated the Witt Animal
Clinic with her husband Dr.
Paul Witt for many years prior
to retiring. Mrs. Witt very much
enjoyed mullet fishing from
her dock at Suwannee, spend-
ing time with her grandchildren
and great-grandchildren and
watching her beloved Geor-
gia Bulldogs play ball. She at-
tended the Suwannee Baptist
Church in Suwannee, Florida.
Mrs. Witt was preceded in death
by a son, Ralph Paul Witt III.
Mrs. Witt is survived by her
beloved husband of forty-nine
years, Dr. Ralph "Paul" Witt,
Jr.; her daughters, Sherri Ca-
son (DeWitt) of Lake City and
Libby Carver (Larry) of White
Springs, .Florida; her sons, Dan-
ny "Bear" Witt (Lynn) and Steve
Witt (Jodi) both of Lake City;
a brother, John Williams (Al-
ice) of Old Town, Florida; her


grandchildren, Covington "Cov"
Woodley, John Woodley (Katie),
Bryan Cason (Erin), Matt Cason
(Carrie), Lars Carver, Daniel
Carver (Cathy), Laura Maxwell
(Bryon), Paul Witt IV (Ash-
ley), Nikki Bush (Jeff), Trevor
Witt, Trey Witt, Caitlyn. Witt,
Leah Keaton (Chris) and Jamie
Taylor and her great-grandchil-
dren, Hunter Manning Wood-
ley, Jackson Lee Montgomery
Woodley, Aiden Witt, Whitley
Witt, Tristen Witt, Bruella Witt,
Kaylin Witt, Aubrey Witt, Con-
nor Cason, Bryan Cason, Austin
McGinnis, Korie Cason, Aubrie
Carver, Brianna Carver, .Beth
Shafer, Connor Shafer, James
Taylor Jr. and Dustin Taylor.
Her special friends, John and


Marion Scott of Lake City and
Roy and Myrt Arnett of Su-
wannee, Florida also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Witt
will'be conducted at 11:30 Mon-
day morning, October 18, 010 in
the First Baptist Church of Lake
City with Rev. Fred Edwards,
pastor of the Suwannee Baptist
Church, officiating. Interment
will follow in Memorial Cem-
etery. The family will receive
friends from 2:00-4:00 Sunday
afternoon in the Chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home. Her grandsons, Covington
"Cov" Woodley, John R. Wood-
ley, Jr., Trey Witt, Trevor Witt,
Daniel Carver, Ralph "Paul"
Witt IV will serve as pallbearers.
In lieu of flowers the family re-


quests that memorial donations
be made to the. 'Suwannee Bap-
tist Church, P.O. Box 147, Su-
wannee, FL 32692 or to Haven
Hospice of. the Suwannee Val-
ley, 6037 US Highway 90 West,
Lake City, FL 32055. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234 Please sign
the on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


October is National Breast

Cancer Awareness Month.

In the Lake City Reporter we'd like to take
a moment to salute the strength and courage of
breast cancer survivors and to remember those
whose brave battle has ended.

Publishes Sunday, October 24, 2010

Sample Ad Actual Size


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Or stop by the Lake City Reporter at 180 L Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Lake City Reporter


to disappoint U.S. manu-
facturing companies, labor
unions and lawmakers who
contend that China is keep-
ing its currency undervalued
to gain trade advantages.
The report surveying
currency practices of other
nations is by law required
to be submitted to Congress
on Oct 15 and April 15.
However this administra-
tion and others have often
missed that deadline.
The administration
announced the delay hours
after saying it was launch-
ing an investigation into
.Chinese trade practices that
could keep American work-
ers from gaining high-pay-
ing green jobs.
U.S. Trade Representative
Ron Kirk announced that
the government would look
into the United Steelworkers
complaint that Chinese busi-
nesses are able to-sell wind
and solar equipment on the
international market at a
cheaper price because they
receive subsidies from the
Chinese government The
union said the subsidies are
prohibited by global- trade
rules.
The timing of the inves-
tigation could be intended
to show lawmakers that the
administration is getting
tough with China on trade
policy while postponing


the more delicate currency
issue until after the Nov. 2
midterm elections.
Sen. Charles Schumer, a
vocal critic of China's trade
practices, welcomed the
trade case but said he was
disappointed the admin-
istration did not issue a:
report citing China as a
currency manipulator.
"An investigation into
China's illegal subsidies
for dean energy indus-
try is overdue, but it's nd
substitute for dealing with
China's currency manipu-
lation," Schumer, D-N.Y.,
said in a statement.
The administration
could bring a case against
China before the World
Trade Orgafnization, if it
finds the allegations by
the Steelworkers to be
true. If the WTO found in
America's favor, it would
clear the way for the
United States to impose
penalty' sanctions on
Chinese imports unless
the Chinese government
halted the practices.
Schumer is not waiting
for that ruling. He vowed
to push ahead with his leg-
islation that would impose
sanctions on Chinese prod-
ucts unless China moves
more quickly to let its cur-
rency rise in value against
the dollar.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












FAITH


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATER-lji


Angie Land
angieland3@windstream.net


Pay close

attention

to your

words

'Just then Boaz arrived
from Bethlehem and greeted
the harvesters, The Lord be
with you!'
The Lord bless you!' they
called back.
Boaz asked the foreman of
his harvesters, 'Whose young
woman is that?'
The foreman replied, 'She
is the Moabitess who came
back from Moab with Naomi.
She said, Please let me
glean and gather among the
sheaves behind the harvest-
ers.' She went into the field
and has worked steadily from
morning till now, except for a
short rest in the shelter'
So Boaz said to Ruth, My
laughter, listen to me. Don't
go and glean in another field
and don't go away from here.
Stay here with my servant
girls. Watch the field where
you are harvesting, and fol-
low after the girls. I have told
the men not to touch you.
And whenever you are thirsty,
go and get a drink from the
water jars the men have
filled."
Ruth 2:4-9
So far the.only
thing we have
learned about
Boaz is that
he was related
to Naomi through her
deceased husband. Sinice
you never get a second
chance to make a good first
impression, let's make sure
we get it right!
According to Matthew
12:34, we can rest assured
that "... out of the overflow
of the heart the mouth
speaks." It means that even
without a personality profile
or a lengthy r6sum6, we can
learn plenty about someone
by paying close attention to
the words they speak and
the way they interact with
others.
The first words we hear
from Boaz are a greeting to
his employees, "The Lord be
with you!"
Webster's Dictionary
defines a greeting as an
expression of kind wishes.
In his commentary on the
book of Ruth, Matthew
Henry points out," ... lan-
guage such as this would
not be heard in our fields,
but on the contrary, that
which is immoral and cor-
rupt"
Would an outsider listen-
ing in to your workplace
conversations form a very ,
different opinion than what
we see in Boaz? How we
speak to those we work with
is a true test of character,
especially those who are
under our authority.
The Bible records James
3:2 to remind us that "we
all stumble in many ways.
If anyone is never at fault in
what he says, he is a perfect
man, able to keep his whole
body in check." From begin-
ning to end, Boaz's speech
was respectful, kind and
helpful to others. How much
more productive our own
relationships could be if we
followed his example.

Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scott Trotter, spokesman for the LDS Church (left), accepts a box of 100,000 signatures on a petition demanding that LDS apostle Boyd K. Packer
'correct' his statements that being gay is 'unnatural' and 'impure' and can be overcome. The signed petition came from Joe Solomese, president of the
Human Rights Campaign, a national gays rights organization.


Mormons: Cruelty toward gays is wrong


By JENNIFER DOBNER
Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY
The Mormon
Church chided
its members
Tuesday to
consider ,
whether their attitudes
toward all people
including gays fol-
lowed Christian principles,
responding to activists'
demand that a church
leader withdraw anti-gay
statements.
The Human Rights
Campaign, the nation's larg-
est gay civil rights organiza-
tion, delivered a petition
letter carrying 150,000
signatures to The Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints' headquarters, ask-
ing leader Boyd K Packer
to retract his statements
in an Oct 3 sermon that
same-sex relationships are
unnatural and can be over-
come. /
Packer, 86, is the second-
highest ranking Mormon
church leader and the next
in line for the presidency
of the 13.5 million-member
faith.
Activists said such rheto-
ric is harmful, factually inac-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gay rights activist Thomas Hutchings of Salt Lake City sits
on the sidewalk near The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints' temple Thursday in Salt Lake City.


curate and can result in the
kind of bullying that leads
some lesbian, gay, bisexual
and transgender youth to
attempt suicide. At least
four gay teens killed them-
selves last month across
the country after reportedly
experiencing anti-gay bully-
ing and harassment
In an official church
statement about an hour
after the activists delivered
their petition, spokesman
Michael Otterson called
those deaths tragic.
"We join our voice with
others in unreserved


condemnation of acts of
cruelty, or attempts to.
belittle or mock any group
or individual that is dif-
ferent whether those
difference arise from race,
religion, mental challenge,
social status, sexual orienta-
tion, or for any other rea-
son," Otterson said. "Such
actions simply have no
place in our society."
Otterson said church
history is replete with
examples of discrimina-
tion against Mormons and
that members should be
"especially sensitive to


the vulnerable in society,"
including gays.
The statement also
reiterated the faith's belief
that all sexual relations
outside of marriage are
wrong and said the church
defines marriage as being
only between a man and a
woman. Since the 1990s,
the church has worked
to prevent the passage
of laws legalizing same-
sex marriage nationwide
and helped generate mil-
lions to fund California's
Proposition 8 in 2008.
The three-page state-
ment fell short for activists
seeking a reversal and an.
acknowledgment that same-
sex attraction is .an immu-
table human characteristic
that cannot be changed.
"Unfortunately, the
church did not use this
golden opportunity to
correct the record about
their inaccurate and
dangerous statements,"
HRC Vice President of
Communications Fred
Sainz, said in an e-mail
to The Associated Press.
"Every human being
deserves the God given
right to love and be loved.
It's simply not reasonable
to say 'don't act on tempta-


tions."'
In his sermon, Packer
initially sad: "Some sup-
pose that they were born
preset and cannot over-
come what they feel are
inborn tendencies toward
the impure and unnatural.
Not so! Why would our
Heavenly Father do that to
anyone? Remember he is :
our father."
In a transcript of the ser-
mon on the church's web-
site, the word "temptations"
has replaced "tendencies"
and the question about
God's motives has been
removed entirely.,
Church public relations
officials said the changed
wording was part of a rou-
tine practice that allows '
conference speakers to edit
their speeches to clarify
their meaning.
While Packer's remarks
have drawn the ire of activ-
ists, faithful Latter-day Saints
have flooded the social net-
working site Facebook with
messages of support On
Tuesday the "I support Boyd
K Packer" page had nearly
10,000 fans and more than
17,000 Mormon youth had
pledged to write Packer
a support letter on a sec-
ond site.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Fall Festival
Shiloh Baptist Church
in Fort White is having
a fall festival from 1 to
4 p.m. today. Come for
games, hayrides, good
food and lots of fun. Call
Tina Whitaker at 497-3259.

Choir anniversary
Mount Tabor AME
Church male chorus is
celebrating its seventh
choir anniversary at 7 p.m.
today. Call George Moultrie
at 754-0376 or 965-8920 or
Jerome Miller at 365-1165.
The church is located at
519 SW L.M. Aaron Drive.

Ughthouse Children's
Home singers
Fort White Church
of God is hosting teen
girls from Lighthouse
Children's Home in
Tallahassee. The teens
are singing from 11 a.m.
to noon today. A covered
dish lunch w.il be served
in the fellowship hall after


the morning service. The
church is located at 252
SW Wilson Springs Road.

Gospel sing
Watertown Congre-
gational Methodist
Church is hosting a gospel
sing at 7 p.m. today. It will
feature the McCormick
Family. Refreshments will
be served. Call 752-1329
or 965-4706.

Sunday
Revival services
Athens Baptist Church
revival services are 6 p.m.
Sunday and 6:45 p.m.
Monday to Wednesday at
Athens Baptist Church,
C.R. 240. Pastor Charles
Johnson is the speaker.
A fish fry is at 5 p.m.
Sunday. Dinner is at 6 p.m.
Monday to Wednesday.

Church anniversary
Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church is cel-
ebrating its 108th anni-
versary at 11 a.m. 'and 4
p.m. today. Dr. John E.


Guns, St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church pastor
in Jacksonville, is the.
morning speaker. The
Rev. Kevin E. Thorpe,
Faith Missionary
Baptist Church pastor in
Gainesville, is the evening
speaker. Call Ronald V.
Walter, Pastor at (386)752-
1990.

Homecoming service
Lulu Baptist Church
is having a homecoming
service at 10:30 a.m. today.
The guest speaker is
Jack Douglas. A covered
dish luncheon will follow
the service. Call Pastor
Jackson at 754-2761.

Pastor's appreciation
services
Magnolia Missionary
Baptist Church in Raiford
is celebrating its third
pastor's appreciation at
11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
today. The morning
speaker is the Rev. Jewelle
Warren, pastor of Greater
Elizabeth M.B.C. in Lake
Butler. The evening


speaker is the Rev. Alvin
Greene, pastor of St. Paul
M.B.C. in Lake City.

Bethel homecoming
An annual homecom-
ing celebration is 10 a.m.
today at Bethel United
Methodist Church. Special
guests are the Gann
Brothers. Lunch will fol-
low. An ice cream social
and old-fashioned sing-a-
long activities are at 7 p.m.
The church is located at
4843 South 441.

Homecoming
Fort White Baptist
Church in Fort White is
celebrating homecoming at
11 a.m. today. The service
will be led by Pastor Milton
Smith. A covered dish
lunch will follow after the
service in the Fellowship
Hall. The Church is located
at 18302 SW State Rd. 47 in
Fort White. Call 497-1388.

Wednesday
Revival Services
Calvary Baptist Church
is having revival services


at 7 p.m Wednesday to
Saturday. The Rev. Brian
Mimbs, pastor of Chapel
Hill Baptist Church in
Tallahassee, is the evan-
gelist Calvary Baptist
Church is located at 776
County Road 25A. Rev. Ivan
Clements is the pastor.

Friday
Foot washing and more
Trinity Praise and
Worship Center is
having a communion foot-
washing service and hymn
sing at 7 p.m. Friday. A
special bringing-in-the-fall-
season supper will follow
the service. Call the Rev.
Joyce Hunter, pastor, at
752-3706.
Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes
in writing no later than 5
p.m. Tuesday by e-mailing
arobinson@lakecityreport-
er.com, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or drop-off at 180 E.
Duval St., Lake City. Call
(386) 754-0425 with ques-
tions.


Saturday, October 16, 2010









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010 7A


Pumpkin seeds planted in

the spring produce bright

orange orbs come autumn.

Tulip bulbs placed in the

ground in the autumn produce'

vibrantly colored flowers come

springtime. There is another

seed...the seed of faith...

that may be planted in the

springtime of youth or the .

autumn of life. Whenever faith 1

is planted, God has promised

love and mercy when

we accept Him as our ,.,
Father. Visit your .
.. .0, .,
house of worship this I

week; plant your seed

of faith in the care of '

the Creator. He tends

pumpkins...and tulips.

Wedesday Thursday Friday Saturday
;Mcah Micah Micah Micah
4.1-13. 5.1-15 6.1-16 7.1-20

Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


To Advertise in
this Directory,
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
I[ US 90 WEST552427

GWHunter, Inc.
Chen Chevron Oil
W Jobber





I"Quality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944-


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


RICK'S (CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A 4
(Old Valdosta Hwy) t1
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours E R

To-Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane AXe
386-75.39400
Sunday School. 9:45AMI
Sunday Service. 11 (iAM
Wednesday Service. 7 NIPM

GLAD IIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake leffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship i'-j siAMii 6PM
Wed. Farm. Bible Study 7:00PM
'A church where JESIJS is Real

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30.AM
Sunday Worship 10.45AM & 6PMN
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: Lanrry E Swear
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave. *386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9.45A 1
Sun. Worship I 1AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mig/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Win
FIRST BAPTSr CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9 15AI
Sunday Worship 10 30AM & 6:i0PPM
Wed. 6:uOPM Prayer Service, i
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City *752-5422
Rev Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N E navis Seet
(3861 752-199u
Ronald V Walters. Pasioi
Sunday School 9 45AM
Sunday Morning Worship II 00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6 00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd 7520681
Lake City. Flonda 32055
www pbclc comn
Sunday School 830,945& IAM
SundayWorship 945& IIAM&6PM


AWANA
Evening Worstup
Wed Eve Schedule
Family Supper (Reservaoon)
Children's Ministry
Youth Worship
Prayer Meeting


5:30 PM
6:00 PM

5PM
6PM
6:00 PM
6:00 PM


Thursday Evening Schedule SL 8121/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor- Michael A. Taem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-26FA
Sunday Bible Study q 45,AM
SundayWorship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPHST
Sunday Services 10'30 AM
Pastor Elder Herman Griffin
752 419 I
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
338 S E Bdya D3rie '53.53
Sunday.


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening horltip
Wednesday;
AWAiNA
Praer & Ibible Study


9:15 AM
10.30AM
6:15PM
5:45PM
6:15 PM ',


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Bapsil
144 SEMontroseAve. 75'-4 -74
Sunday Schoonl 10 AM
Sun Mom Wurship 11 AM
SundayEve. h PM
Wed Prayei Meeunp 7 30 PM
Pastor Mike Norman
THE VINEYARD
AS-,uthern BaputiChurch
2 V191 SW Main Blvd *623. 0026
Sunday Worship lf:00A1AM
Wivere less is Prejched
and leans are appropriate
Pasior. Bu Hammock

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany C.urt 752 -147
Saruiday Vigdl Ma)s 5 I)J PM
SundayMass 8:15 ,AM, 130 1AM,
5 JOPM(spanishiEnglishi
Sunday Schofl/Religiuus ducanon
1 ill I I

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE BayaAve.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun, Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM

NEWHORIZON i
church of Christ
Directions & Times 755-1320
Jack ExumJr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167.Ermine St. *752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School '9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: TheRev.MichaelArmstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
11,2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hy 90). 15 milesernsi lN*.75721.8 i7
Sunday Worrhip 0 0 iJAM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worhiup 7PM
Vica lohn David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Service,
Iradinorial Services A 30 & 11 00,AM
8mt.-7 .1353
mybetielutrric cr.n
Fist United Methodist Church
973 S. Maron Aie.
386-7524488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Connemporary Senrice 8:.lUAM
Tadmdn,)Il Srrn e II-"IIll I,-\
Program opporrunines available in all
areas lor all ages
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
7,.4488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane* 752..5135
lAdjaceni to Summer. School)
Sunday School 4:00AM
Worship 8't-00&10:01AM
Nursery provided
Praise &' Worship 6.00PN
AWANA starts 9/15 Wed. 5:00PM
Pastor. The Rev. I Louie Mabrey
wm,.3wesleymemx.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGCUIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.s 9 E turn on Cortez (nmA Iu Quality
rid I right on Okinmawa
Sunday School 9 45 AM
Sun. Worship I 1AI & 6 PM
Wed Night Serce 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


LAKE Cm' CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9.45AM
Sunday Worship IU:451M, 6.30PM
Wednesday 6 30PM
Adult. tuuth Mmistry. Children's M inivr
Pasior: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azea ParkPlace

FIRST PRESBYIERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Driven 752-0670
Sunday Contemporary 90 1AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
TradionalService 11.00 AM
NURSE) P-'ROi'DED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A NMaron
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE lones Way & NE Washingfrn St
Sunday School 101t11 ,4A
Morning Wurship 111110 AM
Evangelistc Semce 6 111 PM
South Senices Wednesday 7 uPM
Mid-week Semce Wednesday 7 t PMNI
rror ink r. all7 1 .l0 E eryoi'netlu'om:
Pastor Rei. Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday .9:00tAM
Sunday Morning I -00,AM
Wednesday Servce 00PMN
217 Dyal Ave., form Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome lid.. go 5 miles, South,
churdi on lesh .55.255
Lead Pastor L:nnie lohns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebranon 10 30 AM
SPastor Chns Jones, 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 PM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIA EVANGELICA
S APOSENTO ALTO
17077 25th Rd- L/C FL32055
Service Fri: 7:00PM, Sun: 1:00PM
S Arturo Suarez* 386-754-1836
NE BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MomingWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church EveryoneWelcomed
(386) 755-5197,
"MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir:Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM


Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit FilledWorship
Healing and Deliverance


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Call





752- 1293!


TaIdets Iih sCu Ir rCl7-4


SClay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register ,.
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St. Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
1,.c.. Heating & Air Condtioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

PIL 752-2308 U

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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




17S." 755-7050


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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


1


FOOn STORES
pn7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all tings tirough Christ which strengtlhnch me"
Philip-aB 4:13


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Call Mary
755-5440






A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16,2010

Color this Haunted Halloween Scene for your big chance to win terrorific prizes!


COLO W CONTwEST


RO110W TO ENTER
Color the Halloween picture
below and complete the
entry form. Drop off at, or
Mail to: Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval St., Lake City,
FL. 32055 Before 4:00 pm
Monday, October 25, 2010


S*CO *OR1INGCONEST *TRYI FR


m----m--i-


City: State:__ Zip:
Phone:
THANK YOU FOR COLORING!
Mail or bring your entry to:
Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval St. Lake City, FL 32055
One Winner In Each Age Group 4-6 Years 7-9 Years 10-12 Years
DEADLINE: MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2010 4:00 P.M.


i ---


9 1Viere .f',(w-: .o7ug0'/eyM
"Ifo ,,,/ or,1 ,/'w, if.

DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
Funeral Services
Cremation Services
Prearrangement Planning
458 S. Marion Ave, Lake City
752-1234
www.parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com


m--i


Haircut
Good at any of
our 4 Locations
Branford Hwy 1
752-0006
Hwy 90 West
961-8119
Baya Avenue
758-3093
Gate Way Plaza
752-0706





southwest grill
Spooky Geed!
Every Mendoy is
Mee Monday!
Any Burrile & Medium Brink
$500+ tox
2941 W US Highway 90 # 101
Lake City, FL
(386) 754-9373
www mel com


Contest Rules:
1. The Contest is open to children ages 4 12.
Employees and immediate families of Lake City
Reporter are not eligible.
2. Entries will be judged solely on creative value.
One winner will be chosen from each age group.
3. Decisions of the judges will be final..
4. Entries must be received by Lake City Reporter,
no later than 4 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 25,2010.
Entry form must accompany the drawing.
5. Winners' photo will be published in the Lake
City Reporter, Sunday, Oct. 31, 2010 edition.
6. All entries must be from Newspaper Print.
NO COPIES, please.
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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@laokecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, October 16, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Mullen returns to Florida,

faces reeling former team


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420 -
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

Gators


face


old


coach
loss this
week and
the bottom
Aor the boys
of ole' Florida. The
Gatornation is in disarray
after back-to-back
losses and in comes an
upstart Mississippi State
team ready to make a
statement.
Dan Mullen was the
architect of Florida's
offense during two
national championships
under Urban Meyer, but
this time Mullen will lead
the Bulldogs looking to
do their best Sylvester
Croom impersonation by
knocking off the Gators.
Without Mullen calling
the shots, Florida has
been stagnant on offense.
Sure, Florida had some
solid showings without
Mullen last season,
but the Gators also
had arguably the best
college football player in
the history of the game
under center.
This season, the
Gators have yet to make
an offensive impact.
Florida's longest passing
touchdown through six
games is 25 yards.
It's that loss of
firepower that has some
Florida fans worried in
only the second back-to-
back losses for the Gators
under Meyer, but there's
reason to be worried..
There's an old saying
in football that statistics
are for losers (and
fantasy football) and it
couldn't be more true for
the Gators. Rarely do you
hear of a team talking
about statistics on the
winning end of things.
When a team is losing,
statistics seem to come
to the forefront.
Among the most
daunting of stats falls
on the Gators in the red
zone. During the last
two games, Florida has
converted on just 25
percent of their attempts
inside the opponents 20-
yard line.
The truth is, there's
still a lot to play for in
Gainesville. It may seem
like the world has ended
for most in orange and
blue, but the reality is
Florida still has a shot at
winning the SEC. When
a team has been in the
national-title picture
through December for
the last three seasons,
it might seem like all is
lost when a title is out
of the question during
the second week of
October. Still, there are a
lot of schools that would
love to be in Florida's
position.
The good news is
that Florida's defense
has played pretty well
despite the scores the
Gators have allowed
over the past two games.

PICKS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 2, Florida quarterback John Brantley looks on
prior to the first half of an NCAA college football game
against Alabama at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa,
Ala.


Epic


CHS escapes with
five-set victory
over Fort White.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Football was on a bye
week, but the Columbia
and Fort White high school
volleyball teams gave us
overtime either way.
Colfmbia escaped with
a five-set win against
the Lady Indians after
dominating the first two
game's.
The Lady Indians were
equally as dominant, dur-
ing games three and four,
but Columbia topped Fort
*White in the fifth set for
the win.
In all, Columbia won
25-9, 25-20, 5-25, 18-25 and
15-12.
"We came out with the
right attitude and played
hard," Columbia coach
Casie McCallister said.
"Beginning in the third
game, we played as indi-
viduals and not as a team,
but winning in five sets
did more to build charac-
ter than winning in three


would have."
Fort White coach Doug
Wohlstein was proud of the.
effort, but let down by the
final.
"This was probably the
fourth or fifth time that


Gators looking
for identity on
offense this year.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Dan
Mullen's final four games at
the Swamp were special.
With Mullen calling
plays, and quarterback
Tim Tebow and receiver
Percy Harvin executing
them, Florida scored 240
points in wins against LSU,-
Kentucky, South Carolina
and The Citadel in 2008. It
was the most points over a
four-game home stretch in
school history.
The Gators scored in
every quarter and were suc-
cessful 21 of 23 times in the
red zone. There were few
groans, even fewer boos.
Oh, how things have
changed in Gainesville.
When Mullen returns on
Saturday night for the first


time since taking the head
coaching job at Mississippi
State, there will be some
who would love to have him
back on Florida's sideline.
The 22nd-ranked Gators
(4-2, 2-2 SEC) have hit a
rough patch, losing con-
secutive games to Alabama
and LSU and getting jeered
at home.
The problems are evi-
dent. Quarterback John
Brantley doesn't fit the
spread option, causing
problems near the goal line.
The offensive line, which
was considered the team's
strength, has been average.
Running back Jeff Demps'
foot injury turned out to be
a major setback, leaving the
offense with no home-run
threats.
Throw in the defense's
inconsistent pass rush,
missed tackles and blown
coverages, and the Gators
have looked out of whack
on both sides of the ball.
"Obviously, everybody


has to get better," center
Mike Pouncey said. "We
just have to stay together
as a team and keep fighting
because it ain't over yet
To point fingers at position
groups just ain't right It's
a team effort and we're all
in here with one goal, and.
that's to get back here to
Atlanta."
Florida's main goal is still
in reach. In fact, the Gators
control their destiny in the
East Division, needing only
to beat the Bulldogs (4-2, 1-
2), Georgia, Vanderbilt and
South Carolina to earn a
third consecutive trip to the
conference title game.
"Some .things don't fall
the way you want to, but the
good thing is we still have
that spark of light at the end
of the tunnel," linebacker
Brandon Hicks said. "That's
something we're all taking
pride in."
Getting things turned
GATORS continued on 2B


conclusion


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Beth Williams prepares for a serve against Fort White High in Lake City on Friday. The Lady Tigers won in
five sets.


we've came down to the
fifth game against CHS," he
said. "I know what it meant
to the girls, because ifs a
great rival. The good thing
about volleyball is we play
again on Monday."


Arden Sibbersen led the
Lady Tigers with 18 service
points, Taylor Messer had
10 service points and four
kills and Jessie Bates had
eight service points and
nine digs.


Sarah Stringfellow led
the Lady Indians with 17
service points, six aces, two
kills and 17 digs. Lync6
Stalnaker had 11 digs and
Alison Wrench had 14
assists.


Reeling BC visits sizzling

'Noles in ACC road test


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami wide receiver Travis Benjamin (3) can't make a catch
as Florida State Seminoles linebacker Nigel Bradham (13)
pursues in Miami, on Oct. 9.


Florida State
looks to avoid
letdown today.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Boston College plans to
start a freshman at quar-
terback Saturday against
the nation's leading pass
rush defense when it visits
16th-ranked Florida State in
a matchup of teams going
opposite directions.
The Seminoles (5-1, 3-
0 ACC)' are riding a four-
game winning streak while
the visiting Eagles (2-3, 0-
2) have lost three straight
games in which they've
been outscored 94-30..
Freshman quarterback
Chase Rettig will make
his second career start for


Boston College, lining up
against a Florida State pass
rush that leads the nation
with 26 quarterback sacks.
"It's not an easy prob-
lem to say the least," con-
cedes Eagles coach Frank
Spaziani. "The quarterback
is where it all starts."
Mike Marscovetra, who
replaced Rettig in a 31-13
loss to Notre Dame on
Oct 2, will be the backup
Saturday with freshman
Josh Bordner in the wings
if necessary. Last year's
starter, Dave Shinskie, is
out with a concussion.
Rettig started against
the Fighting Irish but left
the game after he sprained
his left ankle in the second
quarter. He was 5 of 10 for
72 yards and a touchdown
before being hurt
He hopes that brief expe-
rience benefits him against


the Seminoles.
"I feel like I can go out
there a little bit more confi-
dent and a little bit less ner-
vous about what to expect,"
Rettig said. "You're trying
to tell yourself to focus on
what your job is."
Rettig will be the third
straight true freshman to
start against the Seminoles
in Tallahassee. BYU's Jake
Heaps and Wake Forest's
Tanner Price didn't have
much success, manag-
ing only 66 yards passing
between them.
Despite the uncertainty
of its quarterback situation,
Boston College's players
are taking a nothing-to-lose
approach to the game.
"We have to be, like coach'
Spaz says, 'running scared,"'
said defensive end Alex
NOLES continued on 3B


I


~rcl~~l;r~l~rYu~rY*~LL*r~~uit-~Cu











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010


The North Florida Blaze
10-under travel team has a
tryout at 10 a.m. today at
Southside Sports Complex.
For details, call
Tim Williamson at
(386) 234-0423.

TravAl t-am truAEot


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 p.m.
ABC NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Bank of
America 500, at Concord, N.C.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Boston College at Florida St.
or Minnesota at Purdue
ESPN2 Minnesota at Purdue or
Boston College at Florida St.
FSN Missouri at Texas A&M
2:30 p.m.
NBC -W. Michigan at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Iowa at
Michigan or Texas at Nebraska
CBS Arkansas at Auburn
ESPN Regional coverage, Texas at
Nebraska or Iowa at Michigan
FSN California at Southern Cal
4 p.m.
VERSUS BYU at TCU
6 p.m.
ESPN2 South Carolina at
Kentucky
7 p.m.
ESPN Ohio St. at Wisconsin
FSN Iowa St at Oklahoma
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS -Arizona atWashington St.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Mississippi at Alabama
10:15 p.m.
ESPN Oregon St. atWashington
GOLF
10 a.m.
TGC -European PGA Tour, Portugal
Masters, third round, at Vilamoura,
Portugal
1:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee
Championship, third round, at Miami
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Frys.com Open,
third round, at San Martin, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA Challenge, third round,
at Danville, Calif.
HORSE RACING
4 p.m.
ESPN2 NTRA, LIVE: Nearctic
Stakes, E.P. Taylor Stakes, and Canadian
International, at Rexdale, Ontario; SAME-
DAY TAPE: Emirates Champion Stakes, at
Newmarket, England
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, American League
Championship Series, game 2, New York
Yankees at Texas
7:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game I, San
Francisco at Philadelphia
MOTORSPORTS
I a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, Australian Grand Prix, at
Phillip Island,Australia
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, West
Bromwich at Manchester United

BASEBALL

AL Championship Series

Friday
NewYork at Texas (n)
Today
New York (Hughes 18-8) at Texas
(Lewis 12-13),4:07 p.m.
Monday
Texas (Lee 12-9) at NewYork (Pettitte
11-3), 8:07 p.m
Tuesday
Texas (Hunter 13-4) at New York
(Burnett 10-15), 8:07 p.m.

NL Championship Series

Today
San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10) at
Philadelphia (Halladay 21-10), 7:57 p.m.
Sunday
San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 8:19 p.m.
Tuesday
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at San
Francisco (Cain 13-11),4:19 p.m.
Wednesday
Philadelphia at San Francisco,
7:57 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday's Games
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m.
Miami at Green Bay, I p.m.
Kansas City at Houston, I p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, I p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Baltimore at New England, I p.m.


Atlanta at Philadelphia, I p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Washington, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona,
Carolina
Sunday, Oct. 24
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m.
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati atAtlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Tennessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 25
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit,
Houston

College scores

Thursday
West Virginia 20, South Florida 6
Kansas St 59, Kansas 7

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Ohio State at No. 18Wisconsin,
7 p.m.
No. 3 Boise St. at San Jose St., 8 p.m.
No.4 TCU vs. BYU, 4 p.m.
No. 5 Nebraska vs.Texas, 3:30 p.m.
No. 6 Oklahoma vs. Iowa State, 7 p.m.
No. 7 Auburn vs. No. 12 Arkansas,
3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Alabama vs. Mississippi, 9 p.m.
No. 9 LSU vs. McNeese State, 7 p.m.
No. 10 South Carolina at Kentucky,
6 p.m.
No. I I Utah atWyoming, 6 p.m.
No. 13 Michigan State vs. Illinois,
Noon.
No. 15 Iowa at Michigan, 3:30 p.m.
No. 16 Florida State vs. Boston
College, Noon.
No. 17 Arizona at Washington State,
7:30 p.m.
No. 19 Nevada at Hawaii, 11:30 p.m.
No. 20 Oklahoma State at Texas Tech,
3:30 p.m.
No. 21 Missouri at Texas A&M, Noon.
No. 22 Florida vs. Mississippi
State, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Air Force at San Diego State,
8 p.m.
No. 24 Oregon State at Washington,
10:15 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Bank of America 500
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (ABC,
7-11:30 p.m.).
Track: Charlozte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 501 miles, 334 laps.

Bank of America lineup

At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C. -
Thursday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
191.544.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 191.455.
3. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
190.921.
4. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
190.914.
5. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 190.678.
6. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 190.644.
7. (83) Reed Sorenson, Toyota,
190.409.
8. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
190.382.
9. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 190.382.
10. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
190.342.
II. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
190.322.
12. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 190.275.
13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
190.275.
14. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
190.121.
15. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 190.101.
16. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
190.067.
17. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 190.007.
18. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
189.813.
19. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
189.793.
20. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
189.753.
21. (82) Scott SpeedToyota, 189.707.
22. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 189.607.
23. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,


189.527.
24. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
189.52.
25. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 189.494.
26. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 189.334.
27. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
189.268.
28. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
189.255.
29. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
189.168.
30. (10) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
189.023.
31. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
189.009.
32. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
188.89.
33. (46) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet,
188.871.
34.(42)Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
188.857.
35. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford,
188.805.
36. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 188.719.
37. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 188.232..
38. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet,
187.669.
19. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota,
187.533.
40. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 187.363.
41. (37) Dave Blaney, Ford, Owner
Points.
42. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (64) Jeff Green,Toyota, 187.305.
Failed to Qualify
44. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
187214.
45. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 186.935.
46. (55) Mike Bliss,Toyota, 186.599.
47. (66) Jason Leffler,Toyota, 185.81.
48. (07) Kevin Conway,Toyota, 185.79.
49. (23) Johnny Sauter, Toyota,
183.561.

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Thursday's Games
Orlando 86, Charlotte 73
Milwaukee 96,Washington 88
Cleveland 106, San Antonio 80
Utah 108, Phoenix 97
Denver 100, LA. Clippers 95
Friday's Games
New Orleans at Indiana (n)
Boston atToronto (n)
Detroit vs. Minnesota (n)
Dallas at Chicago (n)
Today's Games
Houston vs. New Jersey at Guangzhou,
China, 7:30 a.m.
Detroit vs. Charlotte at Columbia,
S.C., 6:30 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Utah at LA. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.
New York vs. Boston at Hartford,
Conn., 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Atlanta vs. New Orleans at Johnson
City.Tenn., 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 10 p.m.
Denver at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m..
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at Toronto, I p.m.
Washington at New York, 6 p:m.
Milwaukee vs. Minnesota at Sioux Falls.
S.D., 8 p.m.

NBA calendar

Friday Preseason ends.
Oct. 25 Rosters set for
opening day.
Oct. 26 2010-11 regular season
opens.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 3, Philadelphia 2
Ottawa 3, Carolina 2
Nashville 4, St Louis 3
Minnesota 4, Edmonton 2
Dallas 4, Detroit I
Florida 3, Calgary 0
Friday's Games
Colorado at New Jersey (n)
Toronto at N.Y. Rangers (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh (n)
Chicago at Columbus (n)
Montreal at Buffalo (n)
Atlanta at Anaheim (n)
Vancouver at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at .Florida, 7 p.m.
Washington at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Atlanta at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Phoenix atAnaheim, 8 p.m.
Carolina atVancouver, 9 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


rfCol IIIUunI meia a ervlces, inc.
All Rights Reserved.

GEFOB
I.I



WENITH I


z
, ^
<^ _ /


I


,,-V ,, I,-", L YARFER
set for Oct. 30

A tryout for a 9-under


travel team is 10 a.m.
Oct 30 at Southside.
For details, call Todd
Gustavson at 365-2133.

* From staff reports


Ans: A L XT
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: DUCHY NOOSE RADIAL HAZING
I Answer: When the sculptor copied the prized bust, the
police said he was A "CHISLER"


10-16


BOWLING


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lori Davis
244; 2. Linda Davis 232; 3. Mary
Lobaugh 191. 1. Bill Dolly 241; 2.
Tom Sewejkis 237; 3. Steve Fancy
227.
High scratch series: 1. Linda
Andrews 543; 2. Mary Lobaugh 533;
3. Lori Davis 519. 1. Tom Sewejkis
626; 2. Bill Dolly 604; 3. Mark Davis
589.
High handicap game: 1. Lori
Davis 284; 2. Carla Nyssen 233;
3. Danni Fair 229. 1. Bill Dolly 258;
2. Steve Fancy 257; 3. Marshall
Campbell 251.
High handicap series: 1.. Unda
Andrews 687; 2. Pat Frazier 633; 3.
Amanda Meng 630. 1. Will Frazier
714; 2. Mark Rowland 658; 3. Steve
Greaves 651.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
179. 1. Tom Sewejkis 201.
(results from Oct. 5)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Lucky Strikers
(22-10); 2. Spare Us (21-11); 3. Legal
Ladies (20-12).
High handicap game: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 223; 2. Susan Newbern
219; 3. Betty Carmichael 218.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 620; 2. Susan Newbern
599; 3. Harriett Woods 596.
(results from Oct. 12)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(22-10); 2. Pin Droppers (19-13); 3.
Farmers (18-14).
High scratch game: 1. Joanne
Denton 188; 2. Louise Atwood 176; 3.
Bea Purdy 170. 1. Art Joubert 192; 2.


.1


COURTESY PHOTOS


Remarkable rollers

Bill Duncan (left) bowled the ninth 300-game in his 30-plus
years of bowling during Monday Night Mavericks league play
on Sept. 27. Duncan is the first left-hander to roll a perfect
game at Lake City Bowl. His 278-226-300-804 series was
the highest of his career. Cody Howard recently won the
Saturday morning Youth Scholarship Jackpot by bowling a
709, his first 700-plus series and only the fourth youth to
record the milestone at Lake City Bowl.


Ross Meyers 185; 3. Dan Ritter 184.
High scratch series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 482; 2. Joanne Denton 466; 3.
Bea Purdy 464. 1. Ross Meyers 549;
2. Art Joubert 523; 3. Earl Hayward
504.
(results from Oct. 12)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Team 12 (127-
53); 2. Neil Hoffman's Auto Transport
(120.5-59.5) 3. Lake City Bowl (115.5-
64.5).
High scratch game: 1. D.J. Suhl Jr.
279; 2. Dale Coleman 269; 3. Ricky


Hewett 262.
High scratch series: 1. Dale
Coleman 774; 2. Ricky Hewett 687; 3.
Zech Strohl 685.
High handicap game: 1. D.J. Suhl
Jr. 301; 2. Joey Bisque 279; 3. (tie)
Ricky Hewett, Timmy Harris 274.
High handicap series: 1. Dale
Coleman 774; 2. John Sherry 762; 3.
D.J. Suhl Jr. 750.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
233.39; 2. Mike Koon 219.67; 3. Bill
Duncan 216.67.
(results from Oct. 4)


GATORS: Demps may play if healthy


Continued From Page I

around won't be easy, espe-
cially against Mississippi
State. The Bulldogs rank
fourth in the league in total
defense and have allowed
just 17.5 points a game.
Although the defense has
just 10 sacks, it employs
steady blitzes from all
directions the kind of
unpredictable scheme that
has given Branfley trouble
in recent weeks. Plus, the
junior is playingwith injured
ribs, a sprained thumb and
a sore shoulder.
If that doesn't give the
Bulldogs hope, three
straight wins over Georgia,
Alcorn State and Houston
has given them confidence
they can snap a 16-game los-
ing streak in Gainesville.
'These are games that
-we're going to have to start
winning if we're going to
get to the level we want to


ACROSS


Door frame
PD dispatch
Hoax
Net surfer
Web addr.
Bear constella-
tion
Mexican lad
Half a dollar (2
wds.)
Scrawny
Drop --- line
"Humph!"
Vanna and Pat
Navynoncom
Orange coating
Arcade foul
Not quite
Kind of cover-
age
Twin drum
Sugarbush
trees
Move a little
Alert
Hearty laugh
Ralph Waldo


get to," Mullen said.
Mullen spent four years
running Meyer's offense
and helped the Gators win
two national champion-
ships. Although criticized
at times, he never went
through what his succes-
sor, Steve Addazio, is deal-
ing with these days.
Addazio's play-calling
was booed repeatedly
against LSU, even on the
go-ahead drive late in the
game. There were several
"Fire Steve Addazio" signs
in the stands, and www.
firesteveaddazio.com is up
and running.
"Hey, this is not a sport
for the thin-skinned, now,"
Addazio said. "It's a tough
business and I think we've
talked about this before
here. You came here for
a reason. There are high
expectations. That's why


45 Birthday count
48 Mekong native
49 Thespians'
needs
53 Gesture of
approval
(hyph.)
56 Written
reminder
57 Hatcher or Garr
58 Paul Anka's "-
Beso"
59 Indigo plant
60 Motel sign
61 Luau welcome
62 Risk it

DOWN

1 Carl Gustav
2 Everest locale
3 Bill of fare


you're here. That's what
it's all about. You better
embrace that. If you don't
embrace that, then you are
at the wrong place."
Meyer defended Addazio
this week, saying "an
offense minus big plays is
tough in this day and age
and real difficult"
The Gators aren't sure
how to fix it, either.
Demps, if healthy, and
speedy receiver Andre
Debose might make a dif-
ference. If not, there could
be more boos for the home
team.
There probably won't be
any for Mullen, especially if
fans remember his last four
games at the Swamp.
"Now that I'm gone,"
he said, "the Florida fans
like me more than when
I was there, that's for
sure."


Answer to Previous Puzzle



AHOY AERO EGO
DIOR NARRATED
SOLICIT C ZARS








ARO E R EPL
WILTIH ID W ROVE





A L-AETOE E Lr A
YOM, EWLER EL-L


4 Roaeo mount
5 Wiedersehen 9 Corn storage
6 Ads 10 Film terrier
7 Most melan- 11 Squeeze
choly 17 Wharf denizen
8 Periscope's 19 Upper body
place 23 Shack


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right-Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


24 Dance move
25 Yellow
vehicles
26 Story line
27 Former
Atlanta stadi-
um
30 Casually
31 "Instead of"
word
32 Chore
34 Man-eating
giant
35 Large
estate
37 Bride's new
title
39 Mink or
ermine
40 Provoke
43 Sports org.
44 Wanderer
45 Envelope
abbr.
46 Clarified but-
ter
47 EEC currency
50 Jazzy Horne
51 Qatar ruler
52 One-and-only
54 Max opposite
55 Taro dish


2010 by UFS, Inc.


SB RIEF S Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
YOUTH BASEBALL
DAFEM 0
Travel team tryout -

today for 10U ... T e M Si


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


|


E








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
Tebowmania has taken
a timeout.
For once in his life,
Tim Tebow doesn't have
a legion of football freaks,
fans and haters alike, cri-
tiquing his every move.
What really can one say
about a man spending his
Sunday on the sidelines,
biding his time while learn-
ing the NFL ropes? That
he looks good in his spiffy
uniform maybe? That he
looks buffed and ready to
go whenever his number
is called?
Sure, the branding of
Tim Tebow continues
unabated. His No. 15 jer-
sey is still flying off racks,
he's still getting lots of face
time pitching products for
Jockey, EA Sports and
Nike. His Facebook and
Twitter pages were imme-
diate hits just like the haz-
ing haircut shots of him
looking like a monk that
went viral in August.
Now that the season's
in full throttle, though, the
Tebowmaniacs who lined
the practice fields during
training camp to cheer him
on even while he stretched
his hamstrings or ran
wind sprints are having to
wait patiently just like the
Denver Broncos' rookie
quarterback for his time
to come.
Broncos coach Josh
McDaniels was downright
giddy when he drafted the
former Florida star in the
first round six months ago
but by the summer, he was
preaching patience with
Tebow, who was pokily
morphing from combina-
tion college quarterback
into a prototypical. pro
passer.
While Tebow, whom
many consider the best
college player ever, was
creating the kind of buzz
with Broncos fans that
John Elway did back in
1983, McDaniels said that
once the season started,
the fans' focus would turn
to more pressing matters,
and it has.
The debate in Denver is
over how McDaniels gave
up on Peyton Hillis, who's a
huge hit in Cleveland, and
how Alphonso Smith could
be a bust as a Bronco and
a star in Detroit Others are
curious how the team could
pull an 11th-hour contract
extension offer from the
table before Champ Bailey
could put his signature on it
The chatter isn't about
when "Tebow Time"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo taken Oct. 3. Denver Broncos quarterback
Tim Tebow walks on the sideline during the fourth quarter
of an NFL football game against the Tennessee Titans in
Nashville, Tenn.


starts.
While Elway touted
Tebow's talents and sug-
gested the Broncos would
find ways to get him on the
field, Kyle Orton's heady,
steady play, has relegated
Tebow to being a bench
warmer biding his time
while taking,. in the ver-
nacular of NFL backups,
"mental reps.",
Tebow spends his
Sunday wondering "What
Would Tebow Do?" as
he watches Orton do his
thing.
With a deep cast of
receivers that has made
fans quicklyforgetBrandon
Marshall, Orton is on a
record-breaking pass-
ing pace with 1,733 yards
through the air already.
Tebow's contributions?
Two 1-yard runs in
the Broncos' opener at
Jacksonville, his home-
town.
Nothing since.
Even the Broncos' red-
zone issues and running
woes they're averaging
a league-low 2.3 yards a
carry haven't provided
an opening for Tebow, who
ran for 57 touchdowns with
the Gators.
So, what does Tebow do
nowadays? He prepares as
though he'll be the one
calling the plays on game
day but he gets precious
few snaps during the week
and none on Sunday. Some


weeks he's the backup,
others he's the backup to
the backup, Brady Quinn.
Instead of returning to
work on Monday with a
collection of game film to
go over, Tebow watches
what Orton did and tries
to learn from the steely
eyed starter who has such
a stranglehold on the posi-
tion that .he was given a
contract extension through
2011 last summer.
"I'd say definitely the
last few weeks has been
quieter," Tebow told The
Associated Press this
week. "And for me, every
week it's knowing my role
and also the whole game
plan to just, be ready for
anything, because you
never know what could
happen. And also, every
day constantly working
on things that I need to
improve on as a quarter-
back. So, that's kind of my
focus right now."
Tebow spent much
of the time follow-
ing his selection as the
25th-overall draft pick
working on his footwork
and throwing mechan-
ics that had some scouts
speculating his transition
to the pro game would
be an extensive work in
progress.
Now, his focus isn't so
much on fundamentals as
it is on game plans and
opponents.


NOLES: Defense playing strong


Continued From Page 11

Albright. "He explained ifs
riot scared, but just kind of
like your backs are against-
the wall."
His teammate, Billy
Flutie, agrees.
"It's just another oppor-
tunity to take down one of
the big dogs," said Flutie,
the nephew of former
Heisman Trophy winner
and Boston College icon
Doug Flutie. "We beat
them the past couple of
years and I think we can do
it again."
And that alone worries
first-year Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher.
"They are still big and


strong up front," Fisher
said. "A physical football
team."
Boston College pits its
top-ranked run defense
in the ACC against the
Seminoles' veteran offen-
sive line, which helped
them average 223.5 yards
per game on the ground,
mostly behind tailbacks
Jermaine Thomas and
Chris Thompson.
And the Boston College
defense, led by linebackers
Luke Kuechly and Mark
Herzlich, will also have to
contend with Florida State
quarterback Christian
Ponder. He's completed


60.3 percent of his passes
for 1,017 yards with 10
touchdowns and four inter-
ceptions.
"You see what the matu-
rity has done for the quar-
terbacks that we've played
the past couple of weeks,"
Albright said.
Florida State's defense
will try to slow down
Boston- College tailback
Montel Harris. The former
prep star from Jacksonville
has run for 300 yards and
three touchdowns in victo-
ries over the Seminoles the
last two years. *
Those wins evened the
series at 4-4.


PICKS: OSU going down this week


Continued From Page 11

Better yet, Florida knows
what Mississippi State is
going to throw at them.
If Florida can't get past
the Bulldogs, the wheels
could come off.
Florida 27,
Mississippi State 20
Others. ...Florida State


faces a potential letdown
against Boston College,
but the Seminoles escape
in a game closer than
expected. ...Iowa hands
Michigan its second-
consecutive loss by a
'shoelace'. ...Arkansas
hands Auburn its first loss
of the season behind Ryan


Mallett'fs golden arm. ...
Wisconsin upsets Ohio
State and the nation's top-
ranked team goes down
for a second-consecutive
week.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


PREP ROUNDUP


Tebow goes about


his NFL education


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Katherine Mathis participates in one of the Lady Tigers' swim meets earlier
this season.


Lady Indians second


in cross country meet


From staff reports

Fort White High's cross
country team competed in
a seven-team match host-
ed by Chiefland High on
Tuesday. The Lady Indians
placed second and Fort
White's boys took third.
Fort White's Ashley
Jones and Matt Waddington
won the first-place trophies.
Jones ran 22:34, while
Waddington ran 19:01.
Other Lady Indian run-
ners were: Seaira Fletcher
(fourth-25:09), Marissa
Fletcher (12th-28:46), Sitia
Martinez (31:35), Taylor
Douglass (32:59) and
Hannah Chamberlain.
Joining Waddington
were: Andy Hart (11th-
24:49), Alex Southerland
(14th-25:50), Paul Glenn
(15th-26:20), Brandon
Lam (17th-26:26), Wesley
Blakley (18th-26:38), Dillon
Moseley (19th-27:23) and
Caleb Regar (21st-39:14).
Fort White will run at
Baker County High in Glen
St. Mary at 3:30 p.m. on
Oct. 28

Columbia bowling
Columbia High's girls
bowling team won the sec-
ond tri-meef of the season
against Suwannee High and
Fort White High.
The teams bowled at
Thunder Alley In Live Oak
on Oct. 6.
Scratch totals for match
one were: Columbia 680,
Suwannee 601, Fort White
577; for match two CHS
797, Suwannee 634, Fort
White 489.
Columbia bowled 125 and
Suwannee bowled 115 in a
third match, scored under
the Baker system.
Leading Columbia were
Courtney Schmitt with
games of 212-156, Christine
Peters 175-148, and Victoria
Wise 135-117.
Other top scores for
CHS were Shea Spears
137, Linden Barney 134,
Savannah Bowdoin 134,
Katie Bannister 118 and
Natalie Martinez 109.
The three teams face off
at Lake City Bowl at 4 p.m.
Wednesday.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Fort White High cross country runners Seaira Fletcher (left)
and Andy Hart placed fourth and 11th, respectively, at the
meet hosted by Chiefland High on Tuesday.


Columbia swimming

Columbia High's' swim
team doubled up on
Buchholz High at home on
Oct. 9. The Lady Tigers
won 215-94, while the boys
won 91-72.
Heather Burns (200
free, 100 fly) and Katherine
Mathis (50 free, 100 back)
were double winners for
CHS.
Michaela Polhamus won
"the 500 free and placed sec-
ond in the 100 fly. Lauren
Lee won the 100 breast and
Aleena Fields won the 200
IM.
Kaicie Chasteen placed
second in the 500 free and
100 breast. Kayla Williams
was second in the 200 IM
and third in the 500 free.
Vicki Duncan was second
in the 100 back and third in
the 100 fly.
Sara Woodfield placed
third in the 200 IM and 100
free. Cyntaria Anderson
was third in the 100 breast
and fourth in the 50 free.
Meghan Collins (200 free),
Cheyenne Brown (50 free)
and Joana Mata (100 back)
had third-place finishes.
Tammy Roberts placed
fourth in the 100 free and
200 free.
The Lady Tigers placed
first (Burns, Mathis, Lee,
Polhamus) and second
(Duncan, Brown, Williams,
Sydney Morse) in the 200
medley relay.
Columbia also was 1-2
in the 200 free relay with
Brown, Williams, Chasteen
and Fields winning, and


Mata Roberts, Roberts,
Anderson and Duncan in
second.
Mathis, Polhamus, Lee
and Burns won the 400 free
relay, with Fields, Chasteen,
Collins and Woodfield in
third.
David Morse (50 free,
100 breast) was the only
double winner for the CHS
boys. Alan Henry won the
100 fly and was third in the
100 back. Levi Harkey won
the 500 free.
Jonathan Smith placed
second in the 100 free and
third in the 200 free. Joseph
Piccioni was second in the
50 free and, third in the
100 free. Cody Smith was
second in the 200 -IM and
fourth in the 100 back.
Jacob Finley was second in
the 500 free and fifth in the
200 free.
Justin Tompkins placed
third in the 100 breast
and fourth in the 200 IM.
Marlon Polintan was third
in the 500 free. Cale Shaw
was fourth in the 100 fly.
Jackson Nettles was fifth
in the 50 free and 100 free.
Carlos Diaz was fifth in the
100 breast and sixth in the
200 free.
Columbia placed fi st
(Morse, Harkey, Henry,
Piccioni) and second (J.
Smith, Tompkins, Shaw,
Nettles) in the 200 free
relay.
The Tigers were second
in both the 200 medley relay
(C. Smith, Shaw, Tompkins,
Diaz) and the 400 free relay
(Henry, Morse, Harkey, J.
Smith).


V www, lakecitepoe:com
_,Lake City
,Reporter
onliiyp:c


J-'i '
.. -













V.10
. ...








,44.H^


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010


DiLBERT


BLONDIE
THIS NEW "BATVISION" qOOO-HD
MOVIE CAMERA CAN MAKE A PITCH-
BLACK CAVE LOOK LIKE
,6,? TROPICAL
BA CH!


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Single mom wonders when

to introduce son to suitors


DEAR ABBY: I'm a sin-
gle mom to my 10-year-old
son. I have dated on and off
for six years. My question
is, how soon is too soon to
introduce male friends who
may become boyfriends?
I don't want to scare a
guy away, and I also don't
want to risk having my son
become attached to some-
one who may not be in the
picture long. YOUNG
IDAHO MOM
DEAR YOUNG MOM:
Does your son know you're
dating? Do the men you're
seeing know you have a
child? Any man who would
be scared off after learning
you have a son isn't for you
anyway.
Ten-year-olds today are
not as sheltered as they
once were. If you are see-
ing someone regularly, your
boy may be curious to meet
him. Some women wait until
a man is ready to commit be-
fore making an introduction.
Others wait six months to a
year. There are no hard and
fast rules. Play it by ear.
DEAR ABBY: I'm- a
sophomore in high school,
and I really like this girl, but
there's a problem. I never
know what to say to her -
or any girl, for that matter.
The right words never come
to mind. All my guy friends
are what I guess you would


Abigail Van .Buren
www.dearobby.com
call "ladies' men," and I'm
tired of everyone else mak-
ing fun of me.
I have liked this girl for a
long time but she's how
do you say it "out of my
league." I have seen her
turn down guys just like me.
What should I do? SHY
GUY IN PENNSYLVA-
NIA
DEAR SHY: Start talk-
ing to girls in general. Ask
questions about school,
athletic events, movies or
television shows they may
have seen. The more you
do it, the more comfortable
you will become. You don't
need to put yourself on the
line by immediately asking
anyone out. Just try to get
to know them and their in-
terests and let them get
to know you. If you do, your
chances of a girl saying yes
'when you ask one out will
be better.
DEAR ABBY: I have
been having an affair for
several years. I deeply love
this man. I love my husband,
too, but in a different way. I


don't understand how I can
love two men so differently.
The love I feel for my lover
is unconditional. When we
are together it just feels right.
I love my husband because
he's a good man and father
who would do anything for
me. In other words, I love the
person he is, but not the man
himself.
My lover is younger than
I am, and married. He's my
best friend and I can con-
fide anything to him. I have
met some of his family, and I
suspect some of them know
about us.
My husband and I tried
marriage counseling, but I
can't seem to have with him
what I have with my lover. I
broke off the affair in an at-
tempt to work things out with
my husband, but it didn't
work. I don't know what else
to do. TORN IN FREE.
HOLD, NJ.
DEAR TORN: Because
ending your affair and mar-
riage counseling with your,
husband weren't able to fi.
whafs missing in your mar'
riage, perhaps it's time to
call it quits. Your husband
has done nothing wrong, and
frankly, he deserves some-
thing better than half a wife.
M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't stop be-
lieving in yourself. Disci-
pline and hard work will get
whatever chore you face
done and out of the way.
Don'tbe afraid to showyouri
serious side and to bring
partnership problems to the
attention of the person con-
fusing you. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Making an as-
sumption will probably lead
to trouble. You will be high-
ly emotional and not likely
to see clearly what's going
on around you. Get things
out in the open but do more
listening and less talking.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): What you do
for others will benefit you
in the end. Love is on the
rise but you must not get
involved with someone who
is already attached. Secrets
will cause problems for you
professionally and person-
ally. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Get out with
friends or plan a party or
get-together with friends
and family. Your generos-
ity and kindness will be ap-
preciated and reciprocated.
Children are in the picture.
and will play a role in a de-
cision you make regarding
your future. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Don't take what some-
one says to heart In the
heat of the moment, emo-
tions can take you in two
different directions. Choose
to be passionate and loving,
not critical and cold, and
you will overcome whatever
obstacle you face. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Getting out or away
from home will be enticing.
Make plans to visit a friend
or .travel. Communication
and learning something
new should be your goal. A
change in attitude will help
you relate better to someone
you are close to. A****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take everything in
stride. There is no point in
getting upset over past re-
grets. Listen to what's be-
ing said or offered but don't
believe everything you are
told. Empty promises are
likely. Nothing is a bad as
you think. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Socializing will
bring about some interest-
ing conversations and ideas
that you can put into motion.
Romance is highlighted, so
plan evening events. If you
want something to happen,
you have to do your best to
make it so. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Put a little
effort into your home, fam-
ily and surroundings before
someone accuses you of be-
ing neglectful. A surprise
may be made with good in-
tentions but not everyone
will be as excited about it
as you. Protect your reputa-
tion. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You are well-
positioned and should be
able to make a move that will
enhance your life and your
future. Your professional
and personal status will get
a boost if you network. Mix-
ing business with pleasure
will pay off. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't make
promises if you cannot
deliver. A problem will de-
velop in conversations youi
have. Be prepared to make
some necessary changes.
Adaptability will be the key
to stabilization and greater
security. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Stop worrying
so much and start doing
what counts. Ift's not what
everyone else wants, it's
about what you are com-
fortable doing. Contracts,
legal matters, settlements
and financial gains are all.
highlighted. Put everything
you've got into achieving
your goals. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals V
"ZLCRXEXM BR BT RLCR ZBAA
JMBDS WX RLX MXZCMP NY
UCMCPBTX, B'AA PN 'RLX JXTR B


H C D ."


CDDX J C D HMNYR


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "On the one hand, we'll never experience childbirth.
On the other hand, we can open all our own jars." Bruce Willis
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-23


CLASSIC PEANUTS


IT CAN DETECT A SPECK OF LIGHT
IN THE DARKEST AMAZON JUNGLE
AND ZAP IT TO YOUR LAPTOP IN A
*^S^^\ NANOSECOND; f--

/ 4


IS THAT THE INSIDE OF OUR
REFRIGERATOR




-I

10-23


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010

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Friday The Pub10:00am Tlisher, 9:who0 am.
Saturday Fri.,10:001am. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to chang wit rhout notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorre first Insertion, and
only the charge forf the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
ancelomisslation of advertisements ordertiin










deo adublines apply for fo an cellation.
killing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.










Should further information be
requigarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nacredit limits, your call will be trans-
publiferred to the accoundations. Standepart-


abbreviations arl by the acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.laliecityreporter.coin


Legal

FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-216-CP
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALEX GENE
TRAIL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ALEX GENE TRAIL, deceased,
whose date of death was July 31,
2010, and whose social security
number is is pending
in the Circuit Court for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 N.E.
Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is October 9, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Patsy E. Trail
PATSY E. TRAIL
219 S.W. Fielding Way
Fort White, Florida 32038-8260
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ Wayne P. Castello
E-Mail Address:
waynel9@bellsouth.net
Florida Bar No. 131284
LAW OFFICES OF WAYNE P.
CASTELLO
2772 NW 43 Street, Ste. W.
Gainesville, Florida 32606-7434
Telephone: (352) 377-4422
04541935
October 9, 16, 2010
REGISTRATION OF Fictitious
Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Christian
Service Center of Columbia County,
Inc., d/b/a CSC Lighthouse, 441
N.W. Washington Street, Lake City,
FL 32055
Contact Phone Number: 386-755-
1770 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Christian Service Center of
Columbia County, Inc.
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Sandra Turman, Treasurer
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 7 day of October, A.D. 2010.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04541978
October 16, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 09-00478
DIVISION: MF
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY FORMERLY
KNOWN AS BANKERS TRUST
COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG
BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2001-1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES K. TONAC, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated October 6,
2010, and entered in Case No. 09-
00478 of the Circuit Court of the
Third Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida in which
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-
pany formerly known as Bankers
Trust Company of California, N.A.,
as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage
Loan Trust, 2001-1, is the Plaintiff
and James K. Tonac, David B.
Brown, Charles B. Brown, III, Cindy
Tonac, are defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
in/on on the third floor of the Colum-
bia County Courthouse at 173 N.E.
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055, Columbia County, Florida
at 11:00 AM on the 10th day of No-


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
****************************


Legal

vember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment of Foreclosure:
THE NORTH 140 FEET OF LOT
79, HI-DRI ACRES, UNIT 2, A
SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 9 AND 9A,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
TOGETHER WITH 1996 MOBILE
HOME.
A/K/A 427 SOUTHWEST GULL
DRIVE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated in Columbia County, Florida
this 6th day of October, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
09-21638
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should call Jacquetta
Bradley, ADA Coordinator, Third
Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-
7428 within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice, if you are
hearing impaired call (800) 955-
8771; if your voice impaired, call
(800) 955-8770. to file response
please contact Columbia County
Clerk of Court, 173 NE. Hernando
Ave., Lake City, FL 32056-2069;
Fax: (386) 758-1337.
04541962
October 16, 23, 2010


020 Lost & Found
EXOTIC
PIGEON
Call
386-752-4966
FOUND
Female, puppy, approx 13 weeks
old, found on Monday, Oct 11 at
US90 & Eadie St 386-754-2229
Lost boat key near Hwy 242 & 47,
white float attached, near BP gas
station, would appreciate call
small reward 386-466-3641


060 Services
Adult Family Home, seeking new
residents, 24 hr care, meals, phone,
transportation to Drs. Enjoy our
country living! 386-397-2920

-1 Jo10b
1A0 Opportunities

04541945
Senior Teller Position
Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, FI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace

04541946
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
MiF/D/V EQE
Drug Free Workplace

05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA. SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056

Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to


northfloridajobst@gmail.com
Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care
Pre-school & Daycare.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05524132
SV4Cs
Teachers FT Early Head Start
(birth to 3 yrs old) -positions
in Lake City-
HS Diploma/GED,
CDA (Child Development
Associate) or FCCPC
(Fl Child Care
Professional Credential)
and bilingual (Span/Eng)
preferred. $8.65/hr
(if credentialed), sick & annual
leave, holiday pay, health insur-
ance, retirement + add'l bene-
fits. Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
current 1St Aide/CPR pref.
To apply- e-mail:
arobinson@sv4cs.org, call
(386) 754-2222 or Fax 386-754-
2220, apply in person @ 236
SW Columbia Ave, Lake City F1
EOE

05524191
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a Credit Administration
Asst. position available. Provide
oversight to ensure credit files
meet policy guidelines. Assist
with committee meetings
includ-
ing organization of packages,
minutes and facilitate amend-
ments. Assist with credit review
process. Requires excellent
organizational skills with strong
attention to detail. Minimum
three years previous administra-
tive experience required, pref-
erably in a lending environment.
Full benefits package. Applica-
tions may be obtained from any
First Federal Branch and
submitted to Human Resources,,
P 0 Box 2029, Lake City, FL
32056 or e-mail resume to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05524193
General Clerical Position, White
Springs, Florida Consulting
firm. Qualified applicant should
have the ability to deal with
multiple tasks at one time. Ap-
plicant must have a working
knowledge of Microsoft Office.
Applicant must have a strong
work background and excellent
references. All applicants must
have a high school diploma or
equivalent. Fax resume to
1-888-737-1652

PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity to
learn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
e-mail to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information.


f120 Medical
12v Employment

05524099
SLEEP center is hiring a sleep
technician trainee; requirements
include high school diploma and
at least 6 months of direct patient
care experience; 2-4 night shifts;
please e-mail resume to
viducanl065@yahoo.com

05524152
Assistant Business Office
Manager, must have knowledge
of Medicare/Medicaid billing.
Full time position,
competitive pay and benefits
Send reply to Box 05057, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

05524179
Wanted Exp CNA or Medical
Assistant for family practice,
must be able to multi-task,
F/T, benefits and
great bunch to work with,
Mail resume to:
Three Rivers Medical
208 NW Suwannee Ave,
Branford, 32008 or
fax to 386-935-1667

05524179
Wanted exp Medical Recep-
tionist for family practice, must
be able to multi-task and stay
cheerful under pressure, starting
pay $9 hrly, benefits and great
bunch to work with, mall
resume to: Three Rivers Medical
208 NW Suwannee Ave,
Branford, 32008 or
fax to 386-935-1667

Busy Family Practice Office
in need of Nursing Assistant
for full-time position.
Must have experience in
patient care/triage and injections.
Fax resume to 386-719-9494

HEALTHCORE Physical
Therapy has an immediate opening
for an energetic,team player li-
censed, Physical Therapy Assistant
for our outpatient clinics. $25 hrly.
Fax resume to: 386-961-9170
or email to:
healthcoreinfo@bellsouth.net.
All resumes kept confidential


P/T Exercise Tech, Fit For Life
Physical Therapy Clinic in Lake
City Open Tues & Thurs 8-5,
exp preferred.Apply at
application@fitforlifept.com or
call Roberta at 352-514-4565


190 Mortgage Money 430 Garage Sales


FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
240t Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-10/26/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Rottwieler puppies, pure bred, 6
weeks old, looking for excellent
homes only, price neg,please call
386-935-3791 for appt

330 Livestock &
3J Supplies

Free Pot Belly Pig
to good home, male,
6 months old,
386-754-6779


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
Amana Upright Frost Free White
Deep Freeze :
$150
386-752-8978

GE Washer/Dryer Set,
$250
less than two years old
386-752-8978


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

IBM Computer,
'$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Nightstand
Brown wood, 2 drawers
$10
386-752-8978
Student Desk
by "Woods" 3 drawers
Light Blue $20
386-752-8978

S 10 Lawn & Garden
11 Equipment'
38" YARDMAN RIDE-ON LAWN
MOWER, 3 years old, in great
condition, $500 (386) 752-3464 or
(386) 466-7550 to leave message.
Sears Seed & Fertilize
Push Spreader
works great! $45
386-752-8978
Weedeater,
like new,
$50
386-344-1783


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

05524160
"Jack's Gone" Estate Sale
Fishing, hunting, guns, coins,
tools, antiques, household,
furniture, office
715 Miracle Ct (off Pinemount)
386-752-6947

10/15 & 10/ 16, 7-?, 175 SW Cot-
tage Gin., 90 W to 252-B on left,
household goods, kitchen stuff,
clothes, stove, refrig., lots of misc.
5 Family, Fri & Sat, 7a-lp, house-
hold, clothes, antiques, appliances,
X-mas Deco, off Lake Jeffrey,
597 NW Spring Hollow Blvd
Dollhouse Lady!,


Sat yard sale/(2)items left,
please call
386-752-9047


Estate Sale,Sat & Sun, tools,
building materials, metal shed, re-
frigerators, microwave, and more
330-407-0055
Fri only, 8-?, golf bag carrier,
printers, clothes (boys)14 husky,
(girls) 3T, lamps, Dewalt Drill
7719 NW Lake Jeffery Rd,
FRI. 10/15 & SAT. 10/16th, 8-3,
800 N.W. Emerald Lakes Drive in
Emerald Lakes Subd., tools, hutch,
fum., dishes, lawn equip., misc.
Large Moving Sale, Sat only,
8a-?; furti, clothing, games,
etc."Creek Side Subdivision",
off Sisters Welcome, follow signs
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun, 9-6,clothes, elec items,
glassware, bedding,unusual stuff!
8 miles N of I-10 on 441, 1/2 mile
S of Milton's Store, 386-752-7068
Sat only 7-1, girls clothes, brat
dolls/barbie's & access.,in great
cond., household, Near DOT
144 SE St Margaret Rd,
Sat only, 7a-?, Moving to Vegas!,
Everything Goes!
(off of 47,near 75, across from
Subway) 1249 SW Ridge St
Sat,Oct 16, 8am-? Annual Deer
Creek Subdivision, Many yards!
252-B,(signs),Guns, antiques (car-
nival glass),Handmade X-mas
deco, fast built computer, tow bar,
(Rain Date Oct 23)
Saturday only, 8a-4p,
household, clothes, party dresses,
near Cannon Creek Airport
2077 SW Sisters Welcome Rd


440 Miscellaneous

Grill (charcoal)
used a couple of times
$10
SOLD
New Interior Lights (6),
Valued at $60,
Will sell for $30
386-344-1783

450 GGodThings
450 to Eat
Fresh Mayport Shrimp,
$3 a lb, Call to order
904-509-3337 or
904-485-6853

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent .

1 bd/l bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
386-752-1941 or 386-965-0932
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or'386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
$575 monthly,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $500
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
DWMH, Spacious 4/2, on 5
acres,just south of Lake City,clean,
quiet, great location, storage shed,
$850 mo, 1st, last & $300 sec,
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
For Lease, 3br 2ba, DWMH on 10
ac., fenced, 3 mi S of Columbia
City (off hwy 47) $800 mo. plus
$500 security. 727-415-5071
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961:0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
inc water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833, 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com '
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
2.5 acres in Olustee, close to
Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

3Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from. $436!
Windsong Apartments
__ (386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867


2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972


Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles,'lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 ot 755-0133.


SADvantage











6B LAKE CITY REPORTER


710 Unfurnished Apt. 790 Vacation Rentals


CLASSIFIED


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813

clouded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec,
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
70 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2/1 w/den, on west side, 1 wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water, and
trash included, $650 month +
security 386-719-9702
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st &,sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Beautiful 3br/2ba. Spacious home
w/lg. fenced yard. Callaway S/D
$1200. per mo. plus deposit.
386-984-5987
Furnished Farm House. 3/2, re-
modeled, wrap around porch on
160 ac, 5 miles to 1-75, 2 miles to
1-10, $1200 month 386-362-8708
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45, 4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
Irg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

075 Business &
75 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
SN441 & 1-10
813-286-2323
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N441&I-10
813-286-2323


Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex;
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms &
2O Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to tbn acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


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ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.
1 II -


2004 Nissan Sentra
SE 4
4dr, auto, tinted, yellow
ext., sport int., elect.
windows/doors.
$3,500 firm
Call
386-755-4751 or
965-5176


Carriage LS
36' 3 slide fifth wheel.
High end model. Too many
extras to list. By appt. only.
$27,000 OBO
Can sell as a pkg. w/F-350 with
low miles. $47,000
Call
386-755-0653


Fo More De'~ tails CallI
M ar at 3 B 7 5 5 5 4 4 0


$25 Prize Weekly Winner

Contest rules and official entry blank in Tuesday's paper.


Lake City Reporter


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