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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01425
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/14/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01425
System ID: UF00028308:01425
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Freedom for All


Trapped Chilean miners
rescued after 69 days.
World, 3A


RIepor


r.com


Vol. 136, No. 2


Warhead found in Columbia County yard


Alachua bomb
squad summoned
to remove device.
From staff reports
A live 1960s-era rocket
warhead was found in a
Columbia County yard
Tuesday, prompting law
enforcement officers to
seal off the area and call


for explosive technicians to
remove the device.
The information about
the warhead was released
Wednesday after the tech-
nicians carried the device
to a safe location outside
Columbia County for
destruction.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports, sheriff's deputies
were dispatched to 925 NW


"Deputies believe that this was most
likely a souvenir brought home by a
military veteran."
Sgt. Ed Seifert
Public information officer
Columbia County Sheriff's Office


Ash Road around 3:45 p.m.
Tuesday in reference to
a potentially live piece of
military ordnance.


Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office pub-
lic information officer, said
deputies on the scene were


able to see the device in the
open yard near the home.
Authorities called Alachua
County Sheriff's Office
explosive technicians to
help with the device.
"AlachuaCountySheriff's
Office deputies were able to
determine that the device
was in fact live and identi-
fied it as a rocket warhead,"
he said. "The device con-
tained a plastic type explo-


sive called Composition B.
Deputies believe the device
was manufactured in the
late 1960s."
The device didn't have
any type of electronic fuse
and was an impact-deto-
nated piece of ordnance,
officials said.
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office has launched
WARHEAD continued on 3A


HELP WA


TED


Habitat seeks volunteers to finish home


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jay Larick cuts a piece of drywall at a Habitat for Humanity house being built at 971 Northwest Dyson Terrace. The three-bed-
room, two-bathroom home is slated for completion in December.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn

More vol-
unteers
will be
needed to
make cer-
tain Lake City-Columbia
County Habitat for
Humanity reaches its goal
- building a new home
for a family to move into
by Christmas.
The local affiliate is
currently constructing its
fourth house since 2003
for a qualifying partner
family. Habitat volunteers
have been working on the
project since March.
Without volunteer help,
building the house would
cost Habitat double the
amount, according to
George Burnham, board
president. The project's
costs have also benefited
from having professional
volunteers with experi-
ence in areas like plumb-
ing, contracting and elec-


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Habitat for Humanity volunteer Paul LeClair, 77, works on a
circular saw while building the organization's newest home.


trical work, he said.
Other volunteers with
no construction experience
are needed for the project
as well, Burnham said.
"It's not necessary to
have all contractors on the
jobsite because we will
work with the volunteers
and give them tasks that'
they can accomplish," he
said.
Perks of donating time
at a Habitat work site


include being a part of the
camaraderie while meet-
ing new people that care
about others, Burnham
said.
"The thing I like about
it is, I have met some of
the most dedicated and
compassionate individuals
that have been blessed in
their own life and believe
in the principle that it's
more blessed to give than
to receive," he said.


Jay Larick, who has
been volunteering at the
house for about a month,
said he likes working
with Habitat because of
the opportunity to meet
the people the home will
serve and to see the fin-
ished product.
"One of the things about
working for Habitat is you
can see the end result,"
Larick said.
Volunteers are needed
at the site 971 NW
Dyson Terrace on
Wednesday and
Thursday from 8 a.m. to
noon and Saturdays from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. To volun-
teer, e-mail Jania Terry at
jterry@hfhlakecity.org.
Burnham also noted
that Habitat is seeking
types of funding, such as
corporate or church spon-
sorship, and is in need of
more partner families to
serve. Contact Burnham
by phone at (386) 590-
0800 or (386) 362-5566, or
by e-mail at musicladylo@
windstream.net.


Officials: Rates

for broadband

face evaluation


Internet services
will link rural areas
of North Florida.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK The
North Florida Broadband
Authority is continuing
to get information to set
up rates to provide broad-
band Internet services to
the rural areas of North
Florida.
During the agency's reg-
ularly scheduled monthly
meeting at the Suwannee
River Water Management
District headquarters


Wednesday, Pat Lien,
North Florida Broadband
Authority system manager,
gave a presentation detail-
ing how far along they are
in the rate study process.
"We're evaluating all the
background information
and research that was pro-
vided and we're taking that
into account in developing
our product offering," he-
said. "An exhaustive study
was done and we're look-
ing at trying to identify the
best mix of products and
services that may be avail-
able in the future."
The product offering
BROADBAND continued on 3A


Newman named

SCORE winner


Entrepreneur
honors go to radio
station owner.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Cesta Newman, owner
of WJTK radio station, was
named Entrepreneur of the
Year at the Annual SCORE
of Suwannee Valley Award
Luncheon Wednesday at
The Country Club at Lake
City.
In a video highlighting
the four finalists, Newman
said it was a pleasure to
bring the talk radio sta-
tion to the community. Bill


Madden, marketing consul-
tant, accepted the award on
Newman's behalf. She was
out of town because of a
family emergency, Madden
said.
"As much as she wants
to be here, family comes
first," Madden said.
Newman was honored
just to be a finalist for the
award, Madden said.
"It is with great grati-
tude I accept this for Cesta
Newman," he said.
Other finalists were Steve
Briscoe, ist Street Music &
Sound Co.; Mike Nelson,
Beef O'Brady's; and Mikel
Koon and MatthewRodgers,


SCORE continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bill Madden (right) of WJTK radio accepts the SCORE of
Suwannee Valley's Entrepreneur of the Year annual award
on behalf of Cesta Newman, owner of the station, during a
luncheon Wednesday. The award was presented by Florida
Gateway College business education professor Sheri Carder.


1 i4Z641 1 l 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


86
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


I.: .. <1 ~ Opinion ................
/ _,.- .4 O bituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................
Around Florida...........


4b
4A
5A .
3B
2B
2A


AROUND
FLORIDA
State to lead
foreclosure probe.


COMING
FRIDAY
Airport terminal
groundbreaking.


T _-~UC~r -*OY* ~-g-1~-


d


* - ?*tl.








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010


" -4


3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 3-3-1
Evening: 9-4-4


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-2-9-9
Evening: 2-7-2-3


fie tci -
Tuesday:
8-12-19-25-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Library of Congress gets sketches


M arilyn Church didn't
even have to ask
Bernard Madoff,
Martha Stewart,
Woody Allen and
John Gotti to sit for their portraits.
She simply found a good seat in
court and pulled out her pad.
The Library of Congress said
Wednesday that it planned to acquire
Church's 3,500 courtroom sketches
and is finalizing agreements with
her.
Church is now in her 60s and
has done work for WABC-TV The
Associated Press and The New York
Times. She tells the AP that her work
has been like having a front-row seat
to "a great spectrum" of history.
She says sketching celebrities is
the most challenging because their
faces are so widely familiar.

Katy Perry, Akon on
runway with VS models
NEW YORK Katy Perry, Akon
and model Adriana Lima in a $2
million fantasy bra are among the
highlights planned for this year's
Victoria's Secret fashion show.
Other models expected on
the runway include Alessandra
Ambrosio, Rosie-Huntington
Whiteley, Chanel Iman and Candice
Swanepoel. Missing from the lineup
is Heidi Klum, who recently parted
with the brand.
The show from the Columbus,
Ohio-based lingerie retailer has
become a holiday tradition of sorts,
with elaborate sets and many of the
catwalkers outfitted in elaborate, fan-
ciful wings and very little else.
The fantasy bra has become a
signature, too: This one created by
jeweler Damiani features diamonds,
sapphires and topaz.
The show will be taped Nov. 10 to
be televised in an hour-long special


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Courtroom sketches of Truman Capote, bottom, and 0. J. Simpson, by artist
Marilyn Church are on display in her studio Wednesday in New York. Church
has been a courtroom artist in the New York area for more than 30 years. She's
sketched portraits of Bernard Madoff, Martha Stewart, Woody Allen, John Gotti and
others.


on CBS on Nov. 30.

Ex-Getty curator
trafficking trial ends
IROME A defense lawyer says a
Rome judge has ended the trial of a
former J. Paul Getty Museum antiq-
uities curator because the statute of
limitations on charges against her
have expired.
Alessandro Vannucci said the
eight-year-long limit against Marion
True ran out in July, and the judge
at Wednesday's hearing in Rome, .
the first since summer, agreed with
True's defense team that the trial
should no longer proceed.
True had denied charges she
had conspired to illicitly traffic in
ancient artifacts from Italy. The trial
began in 2004 against her and fel-
low American defendant art dealer
Robert Hecht.


Vannucci, who is defending
Hecht, said the trial will continue
against his client on charges he
headed an antiquities trafficking
operation. Hecht also says he is
innocent.

Midler joins 'Priscilla
Queen of the Desert',
NEW YORK Bette Midler
has signed up to help produce the
stage version of "Priscilla Queen of
the Desert."
The musical is adapted from the
zany 1994 movie about a trio of
drag queens traveling across the
Australian outback in a bus.
Producer James L. Nederlander
says of Midler: "We are thrilled
that she wants to join'us on the bus
for this magnificent adventure."

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former Surgeon Gen-
eral C. Everett Koop is 94.
* Actor Roger Moore is 83.
* Classical pianist Gary
Graffman is 82.
* Movie director Carroll Bal-
lard is 73.
* Former White House coun-
sel John W. Dean Ill is 72.
* Country singer Melba
Montgomery is 72.


* Fashion designer Ralph
Lauren is 71.
* Singer Sir Cliff Richard is
70.
* Actor Udo Kier is 66.
* Singer-musician Justin
Hayward (The Moody Blues)
is 64.
* Actor Harry Anderson is
58.


Daily Scripture


"For I know the plans I- have for
you," declares the LORD, "plans
to prosper you and not to harm
you, plans to give you hope and
a future."


- Jeremiah 29:1


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445 SINESS
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and a.m. on Sunday.
The Associated Press. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
All material herein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers should
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service vice error for same day re-delivery. After
No. 310-880. 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake City, Fla. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com Circulation ...............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............. ... $26.32
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428 24 Weeks............... $48.79
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com) 52 Weeks..................$83.46
ADVERTISING Rates include 7% sales tax.
ADVERTISING Mail rates
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417 12 Weeks................. $41.40
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) 24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


SUNNY



HI 86LO50


SUNNY



HI82 LO 50


MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY


H183L052 H182L056


. . .- .
Vidos6


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Foreclosure anger is hitting election campaign
Three weeks before the election, anger over tainted home foreclosure documents is burst-
ing into the battle for control of'Congress, especially in hard-hit states such as Nevada and
Florida. Democrats in tight races in the worst housing markets are pressing for a national
moratorium, putting a reluctant White House on the spot. Leading the call for a nationwide
time-out on kicking people out of their'homes is Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid, who is locked in a neck-and-neck re-election contest with tea party-endorsed Sharron
Angle in Nevada, which has the highest foreclose rate in the country. Reid is decrying 'reports
of shoddy and defective affidavit preparation.'


Woman charged
with child abuse
JACKSONVILLE A
Jacksonville woman has
been charged with aggra-
vated child abuse after
authorities say they found
her baby daughter stuffed
in-a gym bag in the back
of a car.
The Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office says
Leendra Glene Dasher
reported her daughter
missing on Oct. 5. She said
she had been alone in her
apartment with the baby
and placed her in a crib
the night before.
Investigators quickly
located the child in the
vehicle.
Dasher is being held on
$150,000 bond and will be
arraigned on Oct. 27.
The child has been
placed in the care of
relatives and is in good


conditionA message
left Wednesday by The
Associated Press for
Dasher's attorney was not
immediately returned.

Florida to lead
foreclosure probe
TALLAHASSEE
- Attorney General Bill
McCollum says Florida
will have a lead role in
a foreclosure investiga-
tion by 50 states and the
District of Columbia.
Attorneys general
Wednesday announced
they jointly will look into
allegations that mortgage
companies mishandled
documents and broke laws
in foreclosing on hundreds
of thousands of homeown-
ers.
McCollum said his
office will serve on an
executive committee with


those of the attorneys gen-
eral of 11 other states and
banking regulators from
Maryland and New York.
The Florida Office of
Financial Regulation also
is participating in the
investigation.

10 children hurt
in bus crash
MARION OAKS Ten
children have been taken
to the hospital after their
school bus was struck by a
car in central Florida.
The Florida Highway
Patrol reports that a 2008
Mustang ran a stop sign
and hit the bus in Marion
Oaks Wednesday morning.
Sixty-five children were
riding on their way to
Dunnellon Elementary
School.


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SValdosta
84149
Lake City
86/50
SainesW
\.85/5


Tam
85/


SUN
84 Sunrise today
57 Sunset today
82 Sunrise tom.
60 Sunset tom.
92 in 1911
47 in 1992 MOON


0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
1.19"
42.32"


Ii'


7lin ursday


7p lay 6a
Friday


Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:32 a.m.
7:01 p.m.
7:33 a.m.
7:00 p.m.

2:14 p.m.

2:52 p.m.
12:56 a.m.


Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov.
14 22 30 6
First Full Last New


On this date in
1966, a late-sea
tornado outbreak
struck Iowa. Twe
tornadoes touched
down, including
an F4 at Belmoni
Behind the storm
the cold air broug
a damaging early
snowstorm, with
mph winds and 4
inches of snow a
Sioux City.


-Fmmtem" Iamp


* Associated Press


7

15miutesto bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Friday
80. .1. 4.
80/58/s
85/72/pc
84/62/s
78/51/s
78/53/s
84/76/t
80/49/s
85/71/pc
84/65/s
80/51/s
82/58/s
78/55/s
79/54/s
79/48/s
83/61/s
76/48/s
84/67/pc


Saturday
60 62 4
80/59/s
84/70/pc
84/61/s
81/52/s
78/52/s
82/74/s
'82/50/s
84/68/pc
84/63/pc
82/51/s
83/58/s
81/53/s
80/54/s
82/47/s
82/61/s
80/46/s
82/65/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weather.com


,,v Forecasts, data and graph-
' Ics 2010 Weather Central
% LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpublisher.com




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id.
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40
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Tallahassee *
86/49 ,..
Pensacola S
83/52 .Pama Cty
84/55


City
*Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
S 86/54 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauiderdale
vile Daytna Beach Fort Myers
32 86'61 Gainesville
Ocala
86/53 Jacksonville
S Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
86/62 82/70 Lake City
Miami
Ipa Naples
65 West Palm Beach Ocala
83/69 Orlando
S FtL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myersl, 84/72 0 Pensacola
*85/65 *Naples Tallahassee
82/67 Miami Tampa
KeWt 84/72 Valdosta
Key West 1" W. Palm Beach
82/75


4 --1 -


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PU TIRM 11 at I A


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


_ii .Njlkjt lt:plo| t erijo-i
Lake C-ItR e







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Suwannee Glass
secretary Amy
Rodgers (left),
wife of Matthew


Rodgers; and
Keni Koon, wife
of Mikel Koon,
accept a cer-
tificate on behalf
of their husbands
on Wednesday.


Suwannee Glass.
Nominations for the
award come from the com-
munity, said Jim Lestock,
SCORE chairman. A total
of 16 semi-finalists were
narrowed to four. A com-
mittee then examines the
hardships the business
has faced,, its community
involvement and how long
it has been open.
"We picked four of the
best nominees," Lestock
said.


Florida Gateway
College business
education professor
Sheri Carder pres-
ents a certificate
to Mike Nelson,
owner of Beef
O'Brady's, during
the Annual SCORE
of Suwannee Valley
Award Luncheon on
Wednesday at The
Country Club at
Lake City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Steve Briscoe,
the owner of
First Street
Music & Sound
Co., hugs Carder
after accepting
a certificate on
Wednesday dur-
ing the Annual
SCORE of
Suwannee Valley
Award Luncheon
on Wednesday
at The Country
Club at Lake
City.


Radio is a very difficult
business to get into, he
said. Newman put a lot of
effort in the process.
"You have to be persis-
tent," Lestock said.
Joseph Murphy, a mar-
keting consultant from
Jacksonville, was the key-
note speaker.
He spoke about social
network marketing
through Facebook and
Twitter.


Authority board

continues to mull

UF clinic decision


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake Shore Hospital
Authority Board contin-
ued to deliberate Tuesday
about whether to fund
either of the University of
Florida clinics that provide
primary care services for
the board.
University of Florida
Department of Community
Health and Family Medicine
officials are asking the hos-
pital authority board to set
aside $244,000 in its bud-
get for clinic funding. The
funding has been request-
ed on an annual basis, with
hopes that the amount will
decrease annually.
Last month, Dr. R. Whit
Curry Jr., professor and
chairman of the University
of Florida Department of
Community Health and
Family medicine, addressed
the board and explained
that with the new part-


nership between Shands
and Health Management
Associates, the hospital can
no longer offer the same
amount of support for the
clinics as in the past.
HMA has agreed to
operate two family prac-
tices in the same way.
The clinics, UF Primary
Care Southwest and UF
Primary Care West, have
experienced an increase
in the number of patients
since they were first estab-
lished.
According to Lake
Shore Hospital Authority
Board records, the clin-
ics serve about 500
patients. Of those, 38 per-
cent are Authority Board
patients who qualify for
medical services based on
Authority criteria. Roughly
62 percent of the people
who utilize services at the
clinics are not enrolled in
the hospital authority's
program.


BROADBAND: Coming
Continued From Page 1A


amounts are scheduled to
be available within the next
two months, Lien said.
"'We hope to be able to
present at least the first
array of services that will
be available as soon as the
network comes up so we
can begin to pre-sell those


services," he said of the
baseline packages.
The network is expect-
ed to go live, with its first
customers such as schools,
community colleges and
hospitals and network pro-
viders, in the second quar-
ter of 2011.


WARHEAD: 'No foul play'
Continued From Page 1A


an investigation into the ori-
gin of the warhead and how
it ended up in someone's
yard.
"Deputies believe that
this was most likely a sou-


venir brought home by a
military veteran," Seifert
said. "No foul play or sus-
pected terrorist activity ,is
associated with the piece of
ordnance."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Relatives and friends of 33 freed miners celebrate the end
of the successful rescue operation at the camp outside the
San Jose mine near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday.


Last of Chilean

miners is raised

safely to surface


By MICHAEL WARREN
Associated Press
SAN JOSE MINE, Chile
- The last of the Chilean
miners, the foreman who
held them together when
they were feared lost, was
raised from the depths
of the earth Wednesday
night a joyous ending
to a 69-day ordeal that riv-
eted the world. No one
has ever been trapped so
long and survived.
Luis Urzua ascended
smoothly through 2,000
feet of rock, completing a
22 1/2-hour rescue opera-
tion that unfolded with


remarkable speed and
flawless execution. Before
a crowd of about 2,000
people, he became the
33rd miner to be rescued.
The rescue workers who
talked the men through
the final hours still had to
be hoisted to the surface.
When Urzua stepped
out of the capsule, he
hugged Chilean President
Sebastian Pinera and
shook hands with him and
said they had prevailed
over difficult circumstanc-
es. With the last miner by
his side, the president led
the crowd in singing the
national anthem.


EPPHN SCHOOL 8TH A!NNUAill I~iL

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SCORE: Best nominee
Continued From Page 1A


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I












OPINION


Thursday, October 14, 2010


OTHE


OTHER
OPINION


Obama's

foreclosure

disaster

P resident Barack
Obama is in the pro-
cess of vetoing only
the second bill of
his presidency. The
first was largely a technicality
because superseding legisla-
tion had already been passed.
He couldn't have made a more
timely choice for his second.
The bill, the Interstate
Recognition of Notarizations
Act, made almost no waves as it
glided through Congress. The
House approved it by voice vote
and the Senate passed it unani-
mously.
The measure would have
required federal and state
courts to accept documents
generated in other states
and notarized by computer.
Unfortunately, it would have
the unintended consequence of
greatly accelerating a process
foreclosures and evictions
that disclosures in recent
weeks have shown to be
deeply and recklessly flawed
and in places even fraudulent.
Homeowners facing foreclosure
would have even less recourse
than they do now.
Lawyers and loan officials
were signing off on thousands of.
foreclosure documents 8,000
to 12,000 a month for some
examiners without reviewing
their contents, let alone verifying
their accuracy and authentic-
ity. It raised the prospect of an
unknown number of people who
may have wrongfully lost their
homes.
As a result, major lenders
Bank of America, JPMorgan
Chase, Ally Bank's GMAC unit
and PNC Financial have declared
a moratoriiun on foreclosures in
the 23 states where foreclosures
require a court proceeding.
The outcry over the foreclo-
sure mess has generated cries
for investigations by the Justice
Department, federal regulators
and Congress. Meanwhile, the
White House says it will work
with the lawmakers to revise the
notary bill.
The lenders are supposed to
be the grownups in this process,
and the bill should be pigeon-
holed until Congress and the
regulators are satisfied they can
conduct the process fairly, hon-
estly and transparently.
Scripps Howard News Service
Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
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* lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
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Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


A s if the current
state of politics isn't
worrisome enough,
the Associated Press
poses this nightmar-
ish scenario: What if, right after
the Nov. 2 elections, we don't
know which party will control the
next Congress? Or if control will
be split, with one party control-
ling the House and the other the
Senate?
Between an unusual number
of competitive races, write-in
candidates, third-party spoilers
and mail-in ballots that must
be verified in tight races, the
AP says it could take "days,
weeks or even months" before
we know who will pick the next
House speaker and Senate
majority leader.
If it's months, that could take
the indecision past the Jan. 3
date for the new Congress to
convene. Certainly no one in
politics wants to relive a con-
gressional version of the 2000
Florida recount, with the coun-
try not knowing who its next
president would be until the
Supreme Court ruled Dec. 12 in


www.lakecityreporter.com


Obama needs Donilon's advice


Over the decades,
the top presidential
advisers turn out to
be basically type-
cast for the jobs
they get With one exception
the job that is most vital to
our nation's well-being, and the
only one for which there has
been no precast mold:
The national security advis-
ers.
New presidents enter the
Oval Office surrounded by
a protective political cocoon
that is their home-grown inner
circle. JFK's Bostonians. LBJ's
Texans. Carter's Georgians.
Nixon's West Coast Berlin Wall
(Haldeman and Ehrlichman).
Reagan's California Kitchen
Cabinet Clinton's Arkansans,
two Bushels of Texans, and
now Obama's Chicagoans.
Presidents' domestic advisers
tend to be serious and wonky;
their speechwriters naturally
loquacious (see also: news
sources).
But the national security
advisers whose job it is to
make sure their president
gets all the competing advice
from the Pentagon, State and
the intelligence communities
- have been a diverse breed.
We have had some who
became famous (meet and
greet Henry Kissinger and
Colin Powell) and so!ne who
remained faceless (meet and
greet the four who served
President Eisenhower if
you can find anyone who even
knows their names). We have
had some who were decorated
for their military service and
some who never served at
all. We've had a number who
were academics, having taught
international affairs in prestige
places before coming to the
West Wing to shape what they
once taught.
Now President Obama has


Martin Schram
martin.schram@gmail.com
chosen as his new national
security adviser a man whose
credentials are rather unique
for the job in that they can
be described as all the above.
And it may well be that Thomas
Donilon, who will assume the
national security adviser's job
at the end of this month, will
prove to be precisely what his
beleaguered commander-in-
chief needs most in the remain-
der of his presidency.
Donilon's first job after col-
lege was as an intern in Jimmy
Carter's White House and he
launched himself headlong
into politics, working on the
campaigns of Walter Mondale
and Joe Biden. He picked up
international policy skills along
the way and held key State
Department jobs. During the
Bush II years, Donilon, by then
an insider savvy in the ways of
Washington, was a Washington
lobbyist for Fannie Mae.
Given the controversies of
that employer, it was clear that
any appointment requiring
Senate confirmation for a job
such as deputy Secretary of
State would have been problem-
atic. So, pushed by his longtime
pal, Obama chief of staff Rahm
Emanuel, Donilon became
deputy national security adviser
to Obama's departing national
security adviser, retired four-
star Marine Gen. James Jones
- a job requiring no Senate
approval.
Donilon always seemed to
understand the Washington ver-


ity that proximity is power.
He worked for the last two
years squeezed into the small
office that was built for its first
occupant, then-Col. Alexander
Haig, because it was just
steps from Richard Nixon's
national security adviser, Henry
Kissinger.
Bob Woodward, in his lat-
est and easily his finest book,
"Obama's Wars," writes about
how Jones used to fume when
Obama's chief of staff dropped
by to see his deputy, Donilon,
and not Jones. Woodward also
chronicles how Donilon was on-
point at analyzing the holes in
the military's request for 30,000
more troops for Afghanistan.
And how the joint chiefs and
generals were upset at being
asked to re-justify their num-
bers until Defense Secretary
Robert Gates concluded
Donilon was correct.
Woodward wrote: "'We don't
have the numbers right,' the-
secretary of defense said, some-
what chagrined.... I now don't
have confidence in those num-
bers. So please pull the package
from the president, and I'll get
you the right numbers."'
Donilon is not just smart but
also sharp. But he can be off-
putting. Woodward noted that
Pentagon generals were offend-
ed by his "condescension"
and he'll have to watch that if
he is to be most effective.
But mainly: Tom Donilon
rose from intern to insider by
kriowing not just the levers of
power but also the subtleties
that are the key to not just play-
ing the Washington game, but
winning. And that's an outcome
the'president and his inner
circle haven't enjoyed often
enough in these two tough
years.
* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


favor of George W. Bush.
Ominously, Jan Baran, a for-
mer counsel for the Republican
National Committee, told the
wire service: "Both parties have
brigades of lawyers on standby
for possible close races in either
the House or the Senate, and
they will start flying out usually
the morning after the election."
For a long time, it looked as if
this would be a Republican year,
but recent polls have shown a
possible momentum shift, with
the Democrats gaining ground.
The Republicans need to take
40 seats from the Democrats to
win control of the 435-member
House, a large but doable num-
ber.
Control of the House could
be a cliffhanger. The AP notes
that the seven states that permit
mail-in ballots to be postmarked
right up until Election Day fea-
ture more than a dozen competi-
tive House races.
In the Senate, the Democrats
have, counting the two inde-
pendents who vote with them,
a 59-41 edge, but a dozen races
are competitive. Incumbent


Democratic Sen. Patty Murray is
in a tight contest in Washington,
a state where six years ago, what
with recounts and court chal-
lenges, it took seven months to
.settle a governor's race.
And there is a wild card in the
Senate. Incumbent Republican
Sen. Lisa Murkowski, heir to an
Alaskan political dynasty, was
upset in the primary by a Tea
Party-backed candidate with
fairly radical views.
If Murkowski wins and that,
too, could take a while to decide
in Alaska her intentions are
unclear. The Republican leader-
ship hardly rallied around her
after her primary loss and several
senior Republicans suggested
stripping her of her seniority and
committee assignments for the
lame-duck session.
Murkowski might want to stay
an independent and caucus with
the party that makes her the bet-
ter offer.
The election could mean a long
night followed by an even longer
wait for the outcome.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandoll.com


Reducing

a load

of guilt

W hen you travel.
as much as I
do, you learn
to pack fast
and light In
five minutes flat, I can be out
the door with a bag that will
fit in an overhead bin already
stuffed to capacity.
The first time I flew, I was 19
years old, going from Carolina
to California on a standby
ticket that would strand me
in Chicago for the longest
36 hours of my life. I had
crammed everything I owned
into two coffin-sized bags that I
dragged like a dual funeral pro-
cession from gate to gate, hop-
ing in vain to get on a flight It
was during the Vietnam era;
a lot of soldiers were flying. I
learned a few things:
1. Military standbys take
precedence over students on
summer break.
2. Soldiers are good at fight-
ing for our country and help-
ing you carry bags.
3. Never pack stuff for travel
that you don't wear at home.
It gave me a new motto
that I clung to through three
children and a lot of miles:
The mark of any good outing
is how little you have to take
along.
Usually, I pack a minimum of
what I'll need, then put half of it
back. Ifs not pretty, but it's easy
to carry. And its always enough.
But this trip back "home,"
as we say, to the Carolinas
where I grew up will be a bit
longer than usual, combining
work and family, a speaking
engagement and doing some
writing on a novel I set aside
years ago.
My husband will join me for
a weekend and we'll take my
brother (who is totally blind and
totally in love with the Clemson
Tigers) to a game.
The season is changing, so
the weather could be anything.
Instead of packing, I've been
mopping. I'd cleaned up most of
the gunk when my sister called.
"Do you have room in your
suitcase to bring me a jar of
Trader Joe's Instant Coffee?"
I swear, the woman is addict-
ed to that stuff. She got hooked
on it when she came to visit,
but she can't get it in her area.
If this sounds like a plug for
Trader Joe's, fine. I'm just telling
you what she said.
I hate saying no to my sister.
When we were little girls,
after our parents split up, she
told me that sisters stay togeth-
er forever.
When our brother was born
blind, she said his blindness
wouldn't matter except to people
who didn't matter.
When I-got a scholarship for
college and left her behind with
three babies and a bad mar-
riage, she told me to make her
proud.
When we lost our dad to sui-
cide and our mother to cancer, it
was her arms that held me, her
voice that soothed me.
When my first husband died,
she put me to bed and made
me rest Then she took me to
Mexico, and made me pose for a
picture with a live chimpanzee.
"Sorry, Sissy," I said.
That was hours ago. Now I'm
packed, sort of. The column is
nearly finished. The plumber is
due tomorrow before I leave.
And I just ran to Trader Joe's for
two jars of instant coffee.
Sometimes the easiest load to
lighten is the one full of guilt

* Sharon Randall can be
contacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


OTHER OPINION

A nightmarish election scenario










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Herff Jones at FWHS
The Herff Jones repre-
sentative will be at FWHS
today to take final orders
and deposits for class
rings. Ring-order packets
are in the school's front
office.

YEP social
A Lake City Columbia
County Chamber YEP
social sponsored by the
Lake City Lions Club is
5:30 to 7 p.m. today at
Quail Heights Country
Club. Contact sonja@lakec-
itychambercom

NFFAST meeting
The North Florida Food
Allergy Support Team is
meeting at 6 p.m. today
at the Lake City Medical
Center Classrooms.
Contact NFFAST@gmail.
com.

Landlord's meeting
The landlords' monthly
meeting is at 6 p.m. today at
the Lake City Medical Center
Conference Room. Landlords
and rental managers are wel-
come. Call 755-0110 for more
information.


EILEEN BENNETT/ Lake City Reporter
Members of the Providence Piecers show off their 'Downy Touch of Comfort' projects. Downy sends a kit for a 40-inch by 40-
inch quilt for a group to assemble. Completed quilts are sent back to Downy and distributed at the Children's Miracle Network
hospitals. Pictured from left are Barbaia McKinney, Nola Davis, Peggy Cason, Dolores Schmid, Bobbie Olin, Ethel Jackson,
Marie Chaple, Sue Hansens and Barbara Wand.


Juicing Workshop
A juicing workshop is 10
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. today at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State Park.
The fee is $20. Students
will learn how juicing
fruits and vegetables can
improve their health and
increase both energy
and vitality. A workshop
notebook and recipes are
included in the workshop.


Call (386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.org.

Breast cancer forum
Lake City Medical
Center North Florida
Cancer Center and
Columbia County
Resources is hosting the
4th Annual Breast Cancer
Forum at noon today at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet


Hall. Call 1-800-525-3248
to RSVP. Special Guest
Speaker is Dr. Cherylle
Hayes of The Cancer Care
at Lake City..

G-WHO Workshop
The Gateway Wildlife
Habitat Organization
(G-WHO) is hosting a
Gardening for Wildlife
workshop at 7 p.f. Oct.
14 at the Women's and


Garden Club of Lake City,
257 SE Hernando Ave.
The guest speaker is Carol
Buie-Jackson, vice presi-
dent of the North Carolina
Wildlife Federation. She
will speak on how to


create a wildlife habitat,
invasive and native plants,
attracting birds and other
wildlife, the importance of
biodiv1, sky and sustain-
able gardening practices.

Fall canoeing event
The 3rd Annual Fall
Paddle Florida even.
begins today at the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music
Park in Live Oak. The
annual event includes
hiking and bird atch-
ing along the banks of
the Suwannee River. Call
the SOSMP at (386) 364-
1683; e-mail spirit@musi-
cliveshere.com or visit www.
musicliveshere.corn or bill@
paddleflorida.org.

Friday
Open and Youth poultry
show deadline
Poultry forms are due
to the Fair office by 5 p.m.
Friday. Forms are available
in the Fair Office or online
at www.columbiacountyfair
org or call 752-8822.


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OBITUARIES


Hosea Lewis Bickerstaff
Hosea Lewis Bickerstaff was
born in Birmingham, Alabama
on June 20, 1940 to the late Ho-
sea Bickerstaff and Mabel Rich-
ardson. He attended the public
schools of Alabama. Later in
life he moved
to Lake City,
Florida and
established a
janitorial ser-
vice' that was
powered by
his know how
-and trustwor- .
thy nature. He met and later
married Nancy Bell Combs in
1989. With this union came a
son, Hosea Tyler Bickerstaff
and two step sons. Hosea was
known to all that knew him as
a caring man. When asked how
he was doing, you could expect
no less that an enthusiastic, "I'm
doing good and I feel great"! He
met a lot of people over his life
span that grew to know and ul-
timately love him3 Whether you
,called him "Mr. Bickerstaff',
,"Mr. Hosea", "Sam", "Fatsam",
"Uncle Sam", "Fatman", "Ho-
sie", "Pop", "Granddaddy", or
"Dad", you knew he would do
what he could to help in time
of need. He would often take
drives to see the country side and
enjoy the company of Nancy. A
great number of his friendships
were found through "Hosie's"
dedication to finishing jobs that
,he started and making sure the
,customer was satisfied seven
days a week. Most days, "Hosie"
was ready to take calls and fin-
ish jobs, except Tuesdays! This
was the night to meet with his
good friends at the Poker Palace.
He and Nancy took several trips
with their friends in and out of
state, enjoying life and doing
what they liked together, If "Fat-
man" stopped in to see you, a
good friend knew that he would
not stay long. He would say "just
stopped by to hollatcha, to sme if
you're doing ok". Often; Nancy
would call to see when he would
-be home for dinner, if he was late
getting home. He was generally
late because he always stopped
and picked up something for his
special grandson "Pooh Bear".
Hosea always had a way of en-
couraging you to do what makes
you feel good. He always spoke
about communication and fam-
ily being most important. Din-
ner always began with a thankful
prayer for being able to sit as a
family, and fellowship together
with love. The legacy that Ho-
sea Lewis Bickerstaff left for us
to remember is to love life, be
good to yourself, and others. He
is preceded in death by his broth-
er, James "Tookie" Bickerstaff.
Hosea leaves to cherish his mem-
ories: a loving arid dedicated
wife, Nancy; five sons, Tyrone
Stubbs (Yvette), Birmingham,
AL., Andrea Boyd, Chicago, IL,
D'Andrea Combs, Sr., Lake City,
FL., LaQuez Combs, Jackson-
ville, FL., Hosea T. Bickerstaff,
Enterprise, AL.; six grandchil-
dren, Vondric and Varon, Chica-
go, II, Daniel and Brianna, Bir-
mingham, AL, Nikel, Kavoris;
special grandson, D'Andre "DJ"
Combs, all of Lake City, FL; two
brothers, Ronald Richardson
(Theorvis), Birmingham, AL.,
Donald Richardson (Faye), Bir-
mingham, AL; two sisters, Julia
Cotton (Thomas). Detroit, MI,
Quincess Carter, Birmingham,
AL; one, sister-in-law, Sandra


Trowell, Lake City, FL; one,
brother-in-law, Theodore Combs
(Sandra), Jasper, FL; one uncle,
Levert Combs (Colette); three
aunts, Geneva Burke, Pensacola,
FL., Delores Fennell, Lake City,
FL., Gwendolyn Tripp, Pensac-
ola, FL.; and a host of cousins,
nieces, nephews and friends.
A celebration of Hosea's life will
be held 11:00 A.M. Saturday,
October 16, 2010 at New Beth-
el Missionary Baptist Church.
550 NE,,Martin Luther King
Street. Alvin J. Baker, Pastor.
ThefamilywillreceivefriendsFri-
day, October 15, 2010 from 5:00
- 6:30 P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street, Lake
City, Florida, (386), 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Mr. David Sherman
Douglass
Mr. David Sherman Douglass,
Sr., 57 of Lake City passed away
on Tuesday, October 12, 2010
at his home. He was a lifelong
resident of Lake City and a son
to the late James W. and Fran-
ces L. Seagroves Douglass. Mr.
Douglass was a graduate of the
Columbia High School class of
1972, a veteran of the United
States Army and the Florida
National Guard. He was previ--
ously employed with General
Electric, Energizer and Mol-
Tech in Alachua as well as the-
Lake City Veteran's Administra-
tion Hospital in Lake.City. Mr.
Douglass was a member of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter-day Saints Price Creek Ward.
In his spare time he enjoyed
fishing, hunting and spending
time with his friends and family.
He was a man who never met
a stranger and loved animals.
Mr. Douglass was preceded in
death by a granddaughter, Jay-
lynn Marie Douglass in 2008.
Mr. Douglass is survived by his
wife of twenty nine years, Car-
ol Lynne Little Douglass, two
sons, David Sherman Douglass,
Jr. (Sommer) and Jared Ethan


Douglass all of Lake City, two
daughters, Makayla Loran Dou-
glass, Lake City and Melisia
Nichoel Tinsley (James), Rolla,
MO. Three sisters, Ann Milli-
gan (Clarence) and Susan Reed
(John) both of Lake City and
Janice Spivey (Bobby), Crys-
tal River, four grandchildren,
Ella Lynn Tinsley and Miriam
Nichole both of Rolla, MO and
Ethan A. Douglass and Brandon
C. Douglass both of Lake City,
one aunt, Dyan Tyson, Leesburg,
his father and mother in law, Fin-
ley and Eloise Little, Lake City
and numerous nieces, nephews,
cousins and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Dou-
glass will be conducted on
Saturday, October 16, 2010 at
11:00 AM at the Church of Je-
sus Christ of Latter-day Saints
on Old Country Club Road.-In-
terment will follow at Pleasant
Grove Methodist Church Cem-
etery. Visitation with the family
will be from 6-8:00 PM Friday
evening at the funeral home. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME, 2659 SW Main Blvd.,
Lake City. 386-752-2414

Kirkland Alphonso Francis
Kirkland Alphonso Francis, age
51 resident of 629 N.W. Cham-
bira Way, passed away Wednes-
day, October 6, 2010 following
a tragic truck
accident.
Born in 1959
in Thornton
District, St.
Elizabeth. Ja-
maica to Carl-
ton and El-
mena Francis.
Kirkland's father preceded him
in death. Kirkland was educated
at Thornton Primary School,
Maggoty Secondary School, and
Cobbla Training Camp. he also
spent one year in Cuba where
he received his plumbing certi-
fication. Kirkland was very in-
dustrious and a family oriented
person. He loved to cook and
was a great cook. He loved his
job, and considered his co-work-


ers as extended family. Kirkland
loved people and found great
pleasure in making others happy
Kirkland was united in mar-
riage to Patricia, Ann Jones
Together they share seven chil-
dren and ten grandchildren
Kirkland gave his life to the
lord while under discipleship o0
Bishop Lonnie Woodard of the
Whole True Bible Ministry in
Miami, Florida. After moving to
Lake City he served for a season
at House of Miracles, under Pas-
tor Perry Benjamin, and Com-
munity Revival Center undei
Pastor Clyde Douglas. He late
joined Word in Power Ministries
served as a deacon until his death
On October 6, 2010 at 10:35
am Kirkland heard the lov-
ing voice of his heavenly fa-
ther softly calling him home.
He leaves behind those who
celebrate his homecoming and
cherish his memories of lov-
ing and devoted wife, Minister
Patricia Ann Jones-Francis, his
mother Elmena Francis, four
sons, Kenrick, Oreland, Kirkland
Jr. and Terrell. Three daughters,
Petresha, Merva and Joanna.
Four brothers, Vernette, Ainsley,
George and Audley. One sister,
Daliah, two sister-in-laws, Layd-
ia and Mary, three brother-in-
laws, Rev. Charles (Ruthie), Jere-
miah (Deloris) and Cleo (Gloria)
Jones, And a host of other sor-
- rowing relatives and friends.
Funeral services will be 11:00
am Saturday, October 16, 2010
at Union A.M.E. Church, Rev.
Wendell Wallace, Pastor; Min-
ister David Jordan, Eulogy.
Interment will follow in Hunts-
ville Cemetery. The family will
receive friends on Friday, Oc-
tober 15, 2010 at Cooper Fu-
neral Home Chapel from 6-8 pm
Arrangements entrusted
to: COOPER FUNERAL
HOME 251 N.E. Washing-
ton Street, Lake City, Florida
32055, Willis 0. Cooper L.F.D.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


PANSY THERAPY WILL

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2 plants for only. .29

WE'LL DRAW YOU A LANDSCAPE PLAN!
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measurements of the area you want to landscape and we'll draw you a plan


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NOLSi


9248 129th ROAD LIVE OAK
'(386) 362-2333
Monday thru Friday 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Closed
"For Over 30 Years"
www.noblesgreenhouse.com


HWY 90

11TH STREET
*- ,z"F W 0
SaXyi *


Don't Miss

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0V


I There will be three prizes awarded in three categories *
P yl Funny, Unique and Overall Cutest
-i ifAll photos will be published in the
October 20th edition of the Lake
City Reporter and the 3 winners *
"*. will be published on October 31st
$25 entry fee a
S . Deadline for entries is
9 Friday, October 1 5'h
TO ENTER:
Bring in, Mail or e-mail
Lake City Reporter ~
180 E. Duval Street, a
Lake City, FL 32055
E-mail: ads'@lakecityreporter.com n di
y~ f jg~ZTL------- j
I PET COSTUME CONTEST ENTRY FORM*I
Pet's Name:__
Owner's Name:
Address:
Phone:
Please include a self addressed stamped envelope to have your I
pet's photo returned to you. All entries must be prepaid.
L -- -----------j
Lake City Reporter '
S .- "-.. . . d-: d i a .E .. U


I


1


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


d
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.
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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010






NE1 ImiJ Mal oLMW X'A gTT F'1U







Arts & Crafts Open & Youth Poultry Show Open Rabbit Show


Educational Exhibits Handcrafts Needle Crafts Quilting


Baked Goods 4-H Laying Hen Projects



Co]lumbia onyFar earne [ Sect!A111C]mI oI I~ion


1. It is mutually understood and agreed that
the Columbia County Fair shall not be held
responsible for any unforeseen happen-
ing such as personal injuries, delays, strikes,
cyclones, rains, fire or any act of Providence
over which they have no control.
2. The Management will not be responsible
or liable for safety of articles or displays
or personal belongings left unattended.
However, every precaution will be made to
prevent theft or damage to exhibits. (A night
watchman will be on duty each night of the
Fair).
3. Any persons trespassing upon the grounds,
climbing over fences or otherwise fraudu-
lently gaining admission, will be arrested and
prosecuted.
4. All exhibitors, privileged persons and their
helpers shall be subject to such rules as the
committee may set and for refusal to com-
ply may be barred from entrance.
5. Rights are reserved to Inspect, at any time,
any show, concession booth, stall or animal
on the grounds.
6. Exhibitors showing or offering any article
for sale will be considered commercial and
will be charged according to rates set up by
the exhibit committee.
7. Each entry or each unit in a display shall
be considered an exhibit.


OPEN DIVISIONS
No entry fee required for participation

1. Any article of merit, not listed as a LOT
number will be registered under miscella-
neous and the decision of the Judges will
determine eligibility of premium money.
2. Any person ACTIVELY employed as a
professional and wishing to exhibit will be
judged in a separate category from the
non-professionals.
3. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone
Number and Item description securely at-
tached.
4. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-
rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
5. All checks for premium monies awarded


8. The Fair Association will provide backdrop
and side curtains for each booth and or dis-
play. Each group will need to furnish materi-
als for construction of display racks, shelves,
etc. not to exceed 4' in height on each side.
No display materials shall extend outside the
marked booth space.
9. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES are you al-
lowed to pin, tape, or wire anything to the
curtains. They have been treated with a fire-
retardant.You will be requested to remove
any Items or they will be removed by Fair
Officials.
10. In each of the other Exhibit Buildings
or Outside Exhibitors, the Exhibitor will be
responsible for building siding (not to ex-
ceed 4 feet in height) and backing for your
booth. Each group entering any booth will
be responsible for furnishing materials for
construction of display racks, shelves, etc..
No display may extend outside the marked
booth space.
11. No crates, barrels or packing boxes will
be permitted to remain within exhibit areas
after the contents have been removed. No
coolers, drink bottles or other litter will be al-
lowed in any aisle.
12. Exhibitors will be held responsible for the
cleanliness of their exhibits and the space
surrounding them.


in connection with the fair shall be negoti-
ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days
from the date of the check, time being of
essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely
negotiate said check, all monies due recipi-
ent/payee shall be deemed to have made
an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said
monies to the fair.
6. No person will be allowed more than
one premium In connection with the same
article.
7. In case of one (1) entry, the Judge will
award suitable ribbon and/or premium.
8. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per
individual will be accepted.
9. All items must be clean, in good condition
and be the work of the exhibitor.
10. Divisions are considered OPEN CLASS


13. All exhibits in the various departments
must be in the building and completed
for display no later than 5:00 pm, Thursday,
October. 28, 2010, unless otherwise indicated
in this bulletin. Booths will be judged Friday,
October 29, 2010 at 9:00 am. Absolutely no
one will be admitted into exhibit areas dur-
ing hours of judging or during closed hours
of the fair.
14. You may not sublet your space out. All
rentals must come through the Fair Office.
15. EXHIBIT BUILDINGS will be open for set up
as follows: Monday, October 25 Thursday,
:October 28: 8:00 am 5:00 pm NO EXCEP-
TIONS WILL BE MADE
16. Exhibitors are responsible for the delivery
of their supplies before and during the Fair.
17. EXHIBITS may not be removed from the
grounds until Monday, November 8, 2010.
All exhibits must be removed by 5:00 pm
Tuesday, November 9. Any materials left will
be sold to cover cleanup costs.
18. PREMIUMS will be designated by ribbons;
FIRST blue; SECOND red; THIRD white.
19. ALL FIRST PLACE premiums and other
claims will be paid by the Fair Association
within 30 days AFTER the close of the Fair.
20. NO premium will be awarded when
exhibit is regarded as unworthy.
21. All items MUST have Name, Address,


unless other wise noted and exhibitors need
not be residents of Columbia County.
11. Premiums will be paid for FIRST PLACE
awards only and as marked in the Judges
Notebook, NOT from ribbons that may be
attached to exhibit.
12. Judged Division will be as follows:
(YD) Youth Division open to all youth 17 &
under (green).
(AD) Adult Division open to all non-profes-
sional (white).
(EC) Exceptionally Challenged This divi-
sion Is open to anyone who Is physically
challenged by the inability to use hands or
arms, or anyone who is mentally challenged
(yellow).
(PR) Professional Division open to all profes-
sional (orange).


Phone Number and Item Description se-
curely attached.
22. Premiums will not be paid without ALL
correct information filed In on ALL registra-
tion forms.
23. All checks for premium monies awarded
in connection with the fair shall be negoti-
ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days
from the date of the check, time being of
the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to
timely negotiate said check, all monies due
recipient/payee shall be deemed to have
made an unconditional and irrevocable gift
of said monies to the fair.
24. No person will be allowed more than
one premium in connection with the same
article.
25. The Fair Association reserves the right to
determine all questions in connection with
the Fair and to postpone, change or call off,
for cause, any item or classification.
26. Qualified judges will be provided and'
their decision will be final.
27. For further Rules & Regulations please
refer to each Division Section posted on our
web sit at www.columbiacountyfair.org.


13. Unsuitable exhibits or exhibitors of poor
quality will be refused.
14. Competent judges will be provided and
their decision will be final,
15. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the
blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom-
panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST
OF CLASS In each Division a BEST OF SHOW
will be chosen, accompanied by a $25.00
premium. From the BEST OF SHOW winners,
one (1) BEST OVERALL will be chosen, ac-
companied by a $100.00 premium.
16. No person will be allowed more than
one premium in connection with the same
article.
17. Any article not claimed at the appropri-
ate time for pick up will become property of
the Columbia County Fair Board.


Col *u m bia. [0.*y.9 O p *Ia] *Y *iiP *ulry *how]


GENERAL RULES and REGULATIONS
Poultry will be checked in on Monday, No-
vember 1,2010 between 2:00 pm and 6:00
pm. All exhibits must be picked up Saturday,
November 6 between 10:00 pm and 11:00
pm.
1. All animals must be owned by exhibitor at
least 30 days prior to fair,
2. Poultry may not be placed in cages
until approved by inspector. All animals will
be tested for negative pullorum-typhoid
through a blood test. A state veterinarian will
be available at check-in only.
3. The superintendent reserves the right to
refuse the entry of any poultry which shows
signs of disease, are infested with mites, lice
or fleas, or are dirty.
4. The Fair Association will provide feed, wa-
ter and care for the Open and Youth Poultry'
Show exhibits during the week of the fair.
5. Exhibitors must make their own arrange-
ments for delivery and pick-up of all exhibits.
Any exhibit left after the date and time set
for pick-up will become the property of
the Columbia County Fair Association. NO
EXCEPTIONS!!!
6. The Modified Danish System of judging will


be used. Date for judging will be announced
during check-In. No one will be allowed in
the exhibit area during judging.
7. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone
Number and Item Description securely at-
tached.
8. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-
rect information filled In on ALL registration
forms.
9. All checks for premium monies awarded In
connection with the fair shall be negotiated
by the recipient/payee within 60 days from
the date of the check, time being of the
essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely
negotiate said check, all monies due recipi-
ent/payee shall be deemed to have made
an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said
monies to the fair.
10. The decision of the judge is final.
11. No substitutions will be allowed.
12. Entries must be made on official entry
form, available from the fair office, 4-H
Agents, FFA Advisors or show superintendent.
Forms must be returned to Columbia County
Fair Office by October 21,2010 at 5:00 pm.
13. Open Show Is opened to anyone Inter-
ested in exhibiting poultry. Youth Show Is


.open ONLY to bona fide Columbia County
4-H and FFA members.

DIVISIONS:
1. Commercial Production: Champion and
Reserve
2. Large Fowl: Champion and Reserve
3. Bantams: Champion and Reserve
4. Waterfowl: Champion and Reserve
5. Turkey: Champion and Reserve
6. Game Birds: Champion and Reserve
7. Miscellaneous: Champion and Reserve
8. Laying Hen: (4-H and FFA members)

AWARDS
1. Blue, red and white ribbons will be award-
ed to all entries.
2. Champion and Reserve of each division
(youth and open) will receive a rosette.
3. Best of Show (youth and open division) will
receive a trophy.
4. Reserve Best of Show (youth and open
division) will receive a trophy.


PREMIUMS
YOUTH DIVISION
Blue
Red
White
Champion
Reserve

OPEN DIVISION
Blue
Red
White
Champion
Reserve


$6.00
$4.00
$3.00
$8.00
$7.00


$3.00
$2.00
$1.00
$5.00
$4.00


NOTE: No person will be allowed more than
one premium in connection with the same
article or animal.

ADDITIONAL CLASSES .
Additional "fun" classes may be added.
These may include but are not limited to:
crowing contest, ugliest bird contest, etc.
Announcement of these additional classes
will be posted at check-in along with awards
given.


L *]lum i] C [unty .Open*an d*] *u t* *io1


GENERAL RULES and
REGULATIONS
Rabbits will be checked in on Monday, No-
vember 1,2010 between 2:00 pm and 6:00
pm. All exhibits must be picked up Saturday,
November 6 between 10:00 p5m and 11:00
pm.
1. All animals must be owned by exhibitor at
least 30 days prior to the fair.
2. Rabbits must be 8 weeks of age or older.
3. Each exhibitor will be allowed a maximum
of 3 rabbits (with the exception of meat rab-
bits), with a maximum of 6 pens per family.
4. The superintendent reserves the right to
refuse the entry of any rabbit which shows
signs of disease, are infested with mites, lice
or fleas, or are dirty.
5. The Fair Association will provide feed, wa-
ter and care for the Open and Youth Rabbit
Show during the week.
NOTE: The Exhibitor is responsible for provid-
ing their own feed and water dishes.
6. Exhibitors must make their own arrange-
ments for delivery and pickup of all exhibits.
Any exhibits left after the date and time .


DIVISION 1
Community Booths
The Division is open to all Community Clubs
in Columbia County. These exhibits are to
represent the activities of community service
embracing exhibits from home, community,
school, club work and community activities.
Do not try to tell the whole story of the group
activities In one exhibit. Let each activity
have its own story and goal. Be interesting,
educational and pleasing to the public.


set for pickup will become the property of
the Columbia County Fair Association. NO
EXCEPTIONSI!
7. The Modified Danish System of judging will
be used. Date for judging will be announced
during check-in. No one will be allowed in
the exhibit area during judging.
8. The decisions of the judge Is final.
9. No substitutions will be allowed.
10. Entries must be made on official entry,
available from the Fair Office, 4-H agents,
FFA Advisors or Show Superintendent. Forms
must be returned to Columbia County Fair
Office by October 21, 2010 at 5:00 pm.
11. Open Show is open to anyone interested
in exhibiting rabbit. Youth show is open ONLY
to bona fide Columbia County 4-H and FFA
members.
12. All items MUST have Name, Address,
Phone Number and Item Description se-
curely attached.
13. Premiums will not be paid without ALL
correct information filled In on ALL registra-
tion forms.
14. All checks for premium monies awarded


Each exhibit must have a written theme.

CLASSES I and II
CLUB AND ORGANIZATIONS
Awards will be made on the modified Danish
Systems. Awards will depend on the number
of and quality of exhibits.

CLASS III
COMMERCIAL
Awards will be made on the basis of one


In connection with the fair shall be negoti-
ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days
from the date of the check, time being of
the essence. If the recipient/payee falls to
timely negotiate said check, all monies due
recipient/payee shall be deemed to have
made an unconditional and Irrevocable gift
of said monies to the fair.

DIVISIONS:
1. Pure Breed Champion and Reserve (New
Zealand, Dutch, Netherlands, French, Lops,
Rex, Flemish Giants and mini versions)
2. Mixed or Cross Breeds Champion and
Reserve
3. Meat Rabbits: Champion and Reserve
4. Mothers and babies, up to 8 weeks of age.
Champion and Reserve.

AWARDS
1. Blue, red and white ribbons will be award-
ed to all entries.
2. Champion and Reserve Champions of
each division (youth and open division) will
receive a rosette.


Blue, one Red, one White and as many hon-
orable mentions as exhibit quality warrants.

SCORE CARD FOR JUDGING DIVISION I
Classes I, II, III
1. Presents overall pleasing appearance
15 points *
2. Uses effective caption or title sign 5 points
3. Draws attention 15 points
4. Promotes decision and action 10 points
5. Workmanship, Appearance


3. Best of Show (youth and open division) will
receive a trophy.
4. Reserve Best of Show (youth and open
division) will receive a trophy.


PREMIUMS:
YOUTH DIVISION
Blue
Red
White
Champion
Reserve .

OPEN DIVISION
Blue
Red
White
Champion
Reserve


$6.00
$4.00
$3.00
$8.00
$7.00


$3.00
$2.00
$1.00
$5.00
$4.00


NOTE: No person will be allowed more than
one premium in connection with the same
article or animal.


(cleanliness, neatness & good condition),
30 points
6. Choice of purpose or use practical or
appropriateness, 15 points

Total 100 points

Divisions I & II will be judged Friday, October
29 at 9:00 a.m.


i I I Il ~1 I~ __lc~J~p-- a I_ I


CToltmbia CountTy Far e'nra RIul e


Colmba*ouny a* Edcaio. Ehiit










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY. OCTOBER 14, 2010 7


Col]umbIia ]Cok@1untyl Fa[0ir E.duc[at~ i[o] Exh4ibitcni] IrnuedmIaU#@


DIVISION II
COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM

All exhibits will be designed to increase un-
derstanding and cooperation between the
people of Columbia County and the public
school systems.

Displays will pertain to regular, remedial and
special activities of some or all of the ten
(10) public day school centers and to the
free evening classes of the public. Adult and
Community School program. (Public school
exhibits will not compete for prizes)

Divisions I & II will be judged Friday, October
29 at 9:00 a.m.

DIVISION III
GENERAL CANNING / FOOD PRESERVATION
SPECIAL RULES:

1. Exhibits will be registered during the follow-
ing hours:
Tuesday, October 19 to October 22 from 3-5
pm in the Fair Office and on Saturday, Oct.
23 from 9-12 in the banquet hall.
2. Judging will take place on Saturday, Octo-
ber 23 at 12 noon using the Modified Danish
System.
3. All entries in this Division must have been
canned within the past twelve (12) months
and must be the work of the exhibitor.
4. USDA Guidelines must be followed as to
proper canning methods and use of proper
jars.
5. Jar tops must be new and free from rust.
Rings must be removed by the exhibitor.
6. No item will be accepted for judging that
has previously been exhibited at the Colum-
bia County Fair.
7. NO premium will be awarded when exhibit
is regarded as unworthy.
8. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone
Number and Item description securely at-
ta6hed.
9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-
rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
10. All checks for premium monies awarded
in connection with the fair shall be negoti-
ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days
from the date of the check: time being of
the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to
timely negotiate said check, all monies due
reclplent/payee shall belong to the fair and
the recipient/payee shall be deemed to
have made an unconditional and irrevo-
cable gift of said monies to the fair.
11. All entries that spoil before release will not
receive premiums.
12. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per
Individual will be accepted.
13. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the
blue ribbon winners In each Class, accom-
panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST
OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF
SHOW will be chosen, accompanied by a
$25.00 premium. From all the BEST OF SHOW
winners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be cho-
sen, accompanied by a $100.00 premium
14. All exhibits may be picked up on Monday
& Tuesday, November 8 & 9, following the
Fair, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00
pm.
15. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.
16. NO ENTRY FEES ARE REQUIRED.

JUDGING STANDARDS
1. Product in jar should be uniform in size and
color.
2. Product should be essentially free of air
bubbles.


3. The proper amount of head space should
be allowed:
Vegetables/Meats/Soups/Broth 1 inch
Fruits/Tomatoes 1/2 inch
Jelly/Honey/Conserves/Butters/Marma-
lades/Jams 1/4 inch
4.Paraffin wax SHOULD NOT be used to seal
product in jar or as a substitute for the water
bath or pressure canner process

The Educational Committee wants to en-
courage all entrants to enter their canning
and food preservation items in the county
fair. It is our hope that the above guidelines
will assist you in producing a quality product.
For a copy of the USDA guide lines or for
more information, please call the Columbia
County Fairgrounds at 752-8822.

DIVISION IV
CREATIVE HAND CRAFTS
SPECIAL RULES:
1. Exhibits will be registered during the follow-
ing hours:
Tuesday, October 19 to October-22 from 3-5
pm in the Fair Office and on Saturday, Oct.
23 from 9-12 in the banquet hall.
2. Judging will take place on Saturday, Octo-
ber 23 at 12 noon using the Modified Danish
System.
3. All entries in this Division must have been
completed within the past twelve (12)
months and must be the work of the exhibi-
tor.
4. All articles must be clean and in good
condition.
5. NO premium will be awarded when exhibit
is regarded as unworthy.
6. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone
Number and Item description securely at-
tached.
7. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-
rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
8. All checks for premium monies awarded in
connection with the fair shall be negotiated
by the recipient/payee within 60 days from
the date of the ch9ck: time being of the
essence. If the recipient/payee falls to timely
negotiate said check, all monies due recipi-
ent/payee shall belong to the fair and the
recipient/payee shall be deemed to have
made an unconditional and irrevocable gift
of said monies to the fair.
9. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per
Individual will be accepted.
10. No item will be accepted for judging that
has previously been exhibited at the Colum-
bia County Fair.
11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the
blue ribbon winners In each Class, accom-
panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST
. OF CLASS In each given Division a BEST OF
SHOW will be chosen, accompanied by a
* $25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW
winners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be cho-
sen, accompanied by a $100.00 premium.
12. Exhibits may be picked up on Monday &
Tuesday, November 8 & 9, following the Fair,
between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm.
13. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.
14. NO ENTRY FEES ARE REQUIRED.

JUDGING STANDARDS
1. Overall general appearance of item.
2. Use of compatible materials.
3. Attention to detail and craftsmanship.
4. Suitable finish consistent with technique.
5. Appropriate presentation of Item.

DIVISION V
NEEDLE CRAFTS
SPECIAL RULES:


1. Exhibits will be registered during the follow-
ing hours:
Tuesday, Oct. 19 to Oct. 22 from 3-5 pm in
the Fair Office, and on Saturday, Oct. 23 from
9-12 in the banquet hall.
2. Judging will take place on Saturday, Octo-
ber 23 at 12 noon using the Modified Danish
System.
3. All entries in this Division must have been
completed within the past twelve (12)
months and must be the work of the exhibi-
tor.
4. All articles must be clean in good condi-
tion.
5. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per
individual will be accepted.
6. No item will be accepted for judging that
has previously been exhibited at the Colum-
bia County Fair.
7. NO premium will be awarded when exhibit
is regarded as unworthy.
8. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone
Number and Item description securely at-
tached.
9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-
rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
10. All checks for premium monies awarded
in connection with the fair shall be negoti-
ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days
from the date of the check: time being of
the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to
timely negotiate said check, all monies due
recipient/payee shall belong to the fair and
the recipient/payee shall be deemed to
have made an unconditional and Irrevo-
cable gift of said monies to the fair.
11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the
blue ribbon winners in each Class, daccom-
panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST
OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF
SHOW will be chosen, accompanied by a
$25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW
winners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be cho-
sen, accompanied by a $100.00 premium.
12. Exhibits, may be picked up on Monday &
Tuesday, November 8 & 9, following the Fair,
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00
p.m.
13. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.
14. NO ENTRY FEES ARE REQUIRED.

JUDGING STANDARDS
1. Overall general appearance of item.
2. Use of compatible materials.
3. Attention to detail and craftsmanship.
4. Suitable finish consistent with technique.
5. Appropriate presentation of item

DIVISION VI: TRADITIONAL QUILTING
SPECIAL RULES:
1. Exhibits will be registered during the follow-
ing hours:
Tuesday, October 19 to Oct. 22 from 3-5 pm
in the Fair Office and on Saturday, Oct. 23
from 9-12 in the banquet hall.
2. Judging will take place on Saturday, Octo-
ber 23 at 12 noon using the Modified Danish
System.
3. All entries in this Division must have been
made within the past twelve (12) months
and must be the work of the exhibitor.
4. All articles must be clean and in good
condition.
5. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per
Individual will be accepted.
6. No Item will be accepted for judging that
has previously been exhibited at the Colum-
bia County Fair,
7. NO premium will be awarded when exhibit
Is regarded as unworthy.
8. All Items MUST have Name, Address, Phone
Number and Item description securely at-
tached.
9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-


I o u bi o ny ar *Hotc lur u e eE t rai m n uid n


4-H / LAYING HEN PROJECT
This show is open to 4-H and members
enrolled in Columbia County Schools or an
accredited home school program.
1. Must be a bona fide member of Columbia
County 4-H.
2. Chicks will be distributed at the Extension
Office on a designated date.
3. Each child will receive 5 day old chicks to
raise for the purpose of showing at the fair.
4. Members may show up to 5 pullets during
the fair.
5. Each hen will receive either a blue, red or
white ribbon.
6. Ribbon premiums will be as follows:
Blue $6.00
Red $4.00
White $3.00
Champion $8.00
Reserve $7.00
7. Grand and Reserve champion trophies will
be presented to the best laying hen project
during the week of the fair.
8. All decisions of the Judges will be final.

4-H DEPARTMENT: GENERAL RULES
.1. Only bona fide Columbia County 4-H
Members with current enrollment form on file
may enter articles he/she has grown, made
or prepared.
2. Entries must be the work of the individual
and be completed within the last 12 months.
A project book is not considered an entry,
but articles made as part of the project can
be entered in Class 7.
3. Age groups are as follows (as of Septem-
ber 1):
Division I, Clover Bud, age 5 to 7
Division II, Junior, age 8 to 10
Division Ill, Intermediate, age 11-13
Division VI, Senior, age 14 and up
4. Clover Bud participants are limited to
seven (7) total entries. Junior, Intermediate
and Senior participants will be limited to five
(5) entries per class (Maximum one per lot
number).
5. All entries will receive either a blue, red or
white ribbon. Blue ribbon entries will receive
cash award of $3.00.
6. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the
blue ribbon winners.in each class, accom-
panied by $8.00 premium.
7. Best in Class will be awarded to the best
Junior. Intermediate and Senior blue ribbon
entries in each class.
8. No person will be allowed more than
one premium in connection with the same
article.
9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-
rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
10. All checks for premium monies awarded
in connection with the fair shall be negoti-
ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days
from the date of the check, time being of


the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to
timely negotiate said check, all monies due
recipient/payee shall be deemed to have
made an unconditional and Irrevocable gift
of said monies to the fair.
11. All entries must be entered through
individuals in charge of the 4-H Booth in the
Entertainment Building.
12. All entries must have an official, fully
completed entry tag attached.
13. Canning exhibits must be In standard
canning jars.
14. Fresh Agricultural Products (Class 8) can
be composed of several Items arranged
in an attractive display. Unusual or large
specimens may be entered singly. These
products should retain most of their original
appearance and quality during the duration
of the fair.
15. A recycled item that uses "trash" to make
another article.
16. The 4-H Program will not be responsible
for loss of valuable articles.
17. Houseplants, cactus, hanging baskets,
etc. need to have been cared for by exhibi-
tor. Must be repotted from original container.
18. All "food" entries must have recipe at-
tached. No commercially prepared mixes
can be used except when using "Quick
Breads from Mixes" 4-H Project Book.

SPECIAL RULES:
1. Judging will take place in an "Interview"
setting. 4-H members will present articles
to judges, sit and discuss articles with the
judges and receive ribbon placing all at the
same time.
2. Only exhibitors may meet and speak with
judges. Parents are not allowed near judges
at any time.
3. "Best of Class" will be awarded after all
exhibits have been judged. Exhibitors need
not be present for "Best of Class" awards.
4. Judges decisions are final.
5. Each article must have an official entry
tag attached.
6. All items needing refrigeration will be
stored properly until the start of the fair.
7. Judging will take place Thursday, October
28, 2010 from 2:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.

AGRONOMIC CROPS CONTEST
TIME: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010
1. Show open to adults, F-H members and
FFA members.
2. A limit of two (2) exhibits will be allowed
each entrant per category.
3. An exhibit shall consist of one eighth
bushel per exhibit.
4. All exhibits must be of sound standard
quality or better to be accepted for judging.
5. All items MUST have name, address, phone.
number and item description securely at-
tached.
6. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-


rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
7. All checks for premium monies awarded in
connection with the fair shall be negotiated
by the recipient/payee within 60 days from
the date of the check, time being of the
essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely
negotiate said check, all monies due recipi-
ent/payee shall be deemed to have made
an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said
monies to the fair.
8. Agronomic crop exhibits can be turned
Into the Extension Office any time prior to
the opening of the Fair or to the Fair Office
no later than 12:00 noon on Friday, October
29,2010.

AWARDS
Category I Peanuts.
1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $8.00
2nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $7.00
3rd Place Exhibit (White Ribbon) $5.00

Category II Corn
1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.00
2nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.00
3rd Place Exhibit (White Ribbon) $3.00

Category III Soybeans
1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.00
2nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.00
3rd Place Exhibit (White Ribbon) $3.00

Category IV Wheat
1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.00
2nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.00
3rd Place Exhibit (White Ribbon) $3.00

Category V Other Crops
1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.00
2nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.00
3rd Place Exhibit (Yellow Ribbon) $3.00

YOUTH INCENTIVE PROGRAM
In order to provide an education agenda
for students participating In the Uvestock
Programs, we realize the need to provide
further training in Livestock Production and
Husbandry.

Exhibitors work hard to develop their proj-
ects, but from time to time need advice and
direction on taking the project to fruition.
Through the Youth Incentive Program they
will learn how to contact potential buy-
ers, sponsors, and advisors while obtaining
knowledge. We have all been in a position
with our jobs or personal lives, to approach
someone and present a convincing discus-
sion on an idea, but the ability was not at
hand.

This program will provide the following:
* How to develop a presentation
* How to contact potential sponsors / buyers


* How to respond to questions
* How to set goals
* How.to work with others to the successful
conclusion of the program

The Program
1. Allf contributions will be deposited into the
Incentive Program special account.
2. ONLY qualified exhibitors will be allowed to
participate (exhibitors whose animals do not
make ending weight, etc)
3. Total funds will be used in the following
manner:
a) Any exhibitors bid not valued at current
market price, will be funded to increase the
sale of their animal to an established low bid.
b) Balance will then be distributed equally
among all qualified exhibitors.
c) Pledges and monies (minimum of $50.00)
may be sent to:
Columbia County Resources, Inc. LLC
Post Office Box 1376
Lake City Florida 32056-1376
to the attention of the Livestock Sale on or
before November 5, 2010.
d) Any exhibitor accepting funds outside this
program can and will be disqualified.

Red and Pink Hat

Competition entry

forms available at

Columbia County

Fair Office or

www.columbiacountyfair.org



For More




Information




and




Entry Form



(386) 752-8822


m


_ I I-1 II LI


rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
10. All checks for premium monies awarded
in connection with the fair shall be negoti-
ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days
from the date of the check: time being of
the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to
timely negotiate said check, all monies due
recipient/payee shall belong to the fair and
the recipient/payee shall be deemed to
have made an unconditional and irrevo-
cable gift of said monies to the fair.
11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the
blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom-
panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST
OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF
SHOW will be chosen, accompanied by a
$25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW
winners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be cho-
sen, accompanied by a $100.00 premium.
12. Exhibits may be picked up on Monday &
Tuesday, November 8 & 9, following the Fair,
between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.
13. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.
14. NO ENTRY FEES ARE REQUIRED.

DIVISION VII: BAKED GOODS
SPECIAL RULES: Bring entries and recipes
1. Exhibits will be registered during the follow-
ing hours:
Thursday, Octobe.r 28, 2:00 pm 6:00 pm
2. Acceptance will be at the Extension Of-
fice Meeting Room.
3. Items must be on disposable bases.
4. Any person employed in a bake shop and
wishing to exhibit articles will be judged In a
separate category.
5. Exhibit item must be labeled and recipe
attached to bottom.
6. NO premium will be awarded when exhibit
is regarded as unworthy.
7. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone
Number and Item description securely at-
tached.
8. Premiums will not be paid without ALL cor-
rect information filled in on ALL registration
forms.
9. All checks for premium monies awarded in
connection with the fair shall be negotiated
by the recipient/payee within 60 days from
the date of thq check: time being of the
essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely
negotiate said check, all monies due recipi-
ent/payee shall belong to the fair and the
recipient/payee shall be deemed to have
made an unconditional and irrevocable gift
of said monies to the fair.
10. Judging will take place on Friday using
the Modified Danish System.
11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the
blue ribbon winners In each Class, accom-
panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST
OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF .
SHOW will be chosen, accompanied by a
$25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW
winners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be cho-
sen, accompanied by a $100.00 premium.
12. A PEOPLES CHOICE Contest will be held
after regular judging Is completed.
This will be held in conjunction with the
Opening Ceremonies at 4:00 p.m. the
opening day of the Fair. Baked goods are
displayed and dignitaries vote for their
favorite one.
13. Ribbons and awards may be picked up.
on Tuesday, November 9, after the Fair, be-
tween the hours of 9:00 am and 6:00 pm..
14. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.
15. NO ENTRY FEES ARE REQUIRED.

JUDGING STANDARDS
1. General Appearance
2. Frosting or crust
3. Lightness
4. Grain
5. Texture
6..Flavor


4 t 4









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY. OCTOBER 14, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shauna St. Clair from Georgetown Hospital tells African-American seniors about stroke signs
and what steps they should take, during a community meeting at Hattie Holmes Wellness
Center in Washington, D.C., Monday.


Research aims to reduce

disparities in stroke care


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press

WASHINGTON When
her stroke hit, Edna Wooten
somehow stopped her car.
Then her grown daughter
ignored her slurred protests
and raced her to the hospital
-- in time for a drug to dis-
solve the blood clot causing
her stroke.
Wooten was lucky: Too
few stroke sufferers get that
clot-busting treatment, espe-
cially black and Hispanic
patients who are at highest
risk of having a stroke and
also may be particularly hes-
itant to seek fast care.
New research is targeting
those underserved popula-
tions to better spread the
word that "time is brain"
- the faster you move the
more brain you save.
"We basically scare people
so much about stroke, it moti-
vates them to denial," says
Dr. Lewis Morgenstern of
the University of Michigan,
an expert on stroke dispari-
ties. "What we haven't done
a good job of is telling people
there is an effective treat-
ment, that people are in con-
trol of their own destiny."
That was the message
stroke educator Shauna
St. Clair of Georgetown
University took to a senior
center in a predominantly
black neighborhood in the
nation's capital last week,
part of a project funded by
the National Institutes of
Health.
Most strokes are like
a clogged pipe, St. Clair
explained: Break up the clog
and blood can resume feed-
ing starving brain cells on
the other side, which is what


happened when Wooten, 61,
was treated at a nearby hos-
pital.
"Damaged brain cells we
can fix. That's why we want
you to get treatment as soon
as possible," St Clair told the
rapt group. "If they stay dam-
aged, they die."
i About 795,000 Americans
have a stroke every year. It is
the nation's leading cause of
disability and the No. 3 killer.
Symptoms include: sudden
numbness or weakness in
the face, arm or leg, espe-
cially on one side; sudden
trouble speaking or under-
standing speech, seeing or
walking; a sudden super-
severe headache.
While some strokes are
caused by bleeding in the
brain, the vast majority are
ischemic strokes, the clot
kind that the drug TPA can
help treat but only if it's
given within a few hours of
the first symptom.
Yet 14 years after TPA hit
the market, overall only about
5 percent of U.S. patients get


it That's partly due to prob-
lems within the health care
system but also partly
because only about a third
of stroke sufferers get to the
hospital in time for testing
to tell if they're a good can-
didate.
Everyone needs to know
to act fast if they experience
or witness stroke symptoms.
The new research comes
because African-Americans
have strokes at twice the
rate of whites and are more
likely to die. Hispanics are
at increased risk of stroke
as well. Worse, both popula-
tions tend to have strokes
at much younger ages than
whites.
Georgetown researchers
tracked ischemic strokes
for a year in Washington,
and found black patients
received TPA less often
than whites in part because
of slower hospital arrival
- despite community sur-
veys that found widespread
knowledge about stroke
symptoms.


All about pancreatic cancer


EAR DR.
GOTr: My
husband's
parents both
died of pan-
creatic cancer. Is there
any test my husband and
his siblings could get dur-
ing their regular checkups
to screen for this cancer?
DEAR READER:
Pancreatic cancer is a
quiet, fast-spreading dis-
ease. According to the
National Cancer Institute,
in 2010, about 43,000
people will be diagnosed
and just under 6,000 will
survive. Often, symptoms
are not present until very
late, when it has spread
to other areas and surgi-
cal removal is impossible.
Those who are diagnosed
early have about a 22.5
percent five-year survival
rate compared to those
with late-stage disease at
the time of diagnosis who
have a less than 2 percent
five-year survival.
Risk factors for devel-


.\.;. '\ CO
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LA A Z


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PAIN CONDITIONS
WE TREAT
*Back pain
eNeck pain
@Joint pain
*Nerve pain


SERVICES WE OFFER
*Comprehensive evaluation
*EMG/NCVtest
*Medical treatment
ePhysical therapy/rehab
eSpine injections
*Vertebroplasty
*Other minimally invasive
treatment


ON HEALTH

f-is


Dr. Peter Gott

oping pancreatic cancer
include being overweight
or obese, having pan-
creatitis (chronic inflam-
mation of the pancreas),
being a smoker, having a
family history of pancre-
atic cancer, having diabe-
tes and a family history of
genetic syndromes that
increase cancer risk and
age, especially in those
over age 60.
Symptoms can include
loss of appetite, jaundice
(yellowing of the skin and
eyes), unexplained weight
loss, blood clots, depres-
sion and upper abdominal


pain that radiates to the
back.
Treatment depends
on the stage of cancer
and which part of the
pancreas is affected when
first detected. In the early
stages, surgical removal
of part or all of the organ
may be beneficial. As
the disease spreads, this
may not be an option.
Chemotherapy and
radiation therapy are often
used before or after sur-
gery or when surgery is
not an option. In advanced
cases, chemotherapy may
be combined with target-
ed drug therapy..
To date, there are no
screening tests available
to the general population.

Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," a. id_:.,e at
most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


MPREHENSIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT
OF NORTH FLORIDA


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Offices:


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352-331-0909


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352-629-7011


October is National Breast

Cancer Awareness Month.

In the Lake City Reporter we'd like to take
a moment to salute the strength and courage of
breast cancer survivors and to remember those
whose brave battle has ended.

Publishes Sunday, October 24, 2010

Sample Ad Actual Size


SAnne Ratliff






Get y r 2x2 h,4,inn) ad with,,.
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photo and special message for only $35!

For more information call Bridget or Mary at (386) 754-5440
Or stop by the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Lak e City Reporter,


( EYE CENTER North Fra
General Eye Care & Surgery


S "


Lake City
386-719-9663
r. 'i N


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby.
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, October


14,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH SOCCER
Winter league
sign-up today
Columbia Youth
Soccer Association's
winter recreational
league registration for
ages 3-16 is 6-7:30 p.m.
Thursday and 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday through
October at the CYSA
clubhouse. Registration
fee of $65 includes
uniform and year-end
award. Team requests
are limited; early
registration is suggested.
For details, call Scott
or Melody Everett at
288-2504 or 288-4481.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Travel team
tryout Saturday
The North Florida
Blaze 10-under travel
team has a tryout
planned for 10 a.m.
Saturday at the Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call
Tim Williamson at
(386) 234-0423.

Travel team
tryout Oct. 30
An open tryout for
9-under travel baseball
team players is 10 a.m.
Oct. 30 at the Southside
Recreation Complex
practice fields. The team
will emphasize
improving fundamental
baseball skills and play in
monthly travel ball
tournaments from
November through July.
For details, call
manager Todd Gustavson
at 365-2133.
GATORS
Packages for
football games
"Journey to the
Swamp" is a Columbia
County Tourist
Development Council
initiative with Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites and
Fabulous Coach Lines
to provide packages and
transportation from Lake
City to the Florida games
against Mississippi State
and South Carolina.
Holiday Inn is offering a
two-night package, and
Fabulous Coach Lines
will provide motor coach
transportation. Local fans
can take advantage of the
transportation.
For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or call
the Holiday Inn.
E From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
golf in Alachua County
Tournament, 11 a.m.
Columbia High
swimming vs. Suwannee
High, 5 p.m.
Columbia High
Freshman football vs.
Santa Fe High High,
canceled
Columbia High
volleyball at Gainesville
High, 6 p.m. (JV-7:30)
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Cornerstone
Academy, 6:30 p.m:
(JV-5)
Fort White JV
football vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Fort White
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV5)
Saturday
Columbia High cross
country meet at Alligator


Park, TBA


Lady Tigers on win streak


Fort White rolls
past Union
County volleyball.
From staff reports

Columbia High reeled
off its fifth-consecutive win
against Robert E. Lee High
on Tuesday in three-straight
sets, 25-9, 25-15 and 25-6.
The Lady Tigers were
led by Beth Williams with
14 assists in the match, 15
service points, five aces
and a kill. Taylor Owens
led in kills with eight in the
match. She added 12 ser-
vice points, seven aces, two
blocks and a dig.
Taylor Messer and Jessie
Bates each had 10 service
points.
"The girls really looked


good," Coach Casie
McCallister said. "Everyone
played hard and we are play-
ing as more of a team than
we have all season. I am
happy with our progress
and I hope that we contin-
ue to improve at this pace.
We have one more week
of regular season, then the
district tournament. So, we
are starting to peak at the
right time."
Columbia takes. on
Gainesville High at 6 p.m.
tonight in Gainesville.
"This will be a good indi-
cator of where we are and
will allow us to identify
.what we need to improve in
preparation of the district
tournament," McCallister
said.
Columbia rounds out
the week with a Columbia


County clash against Fort
White High. The match
begins at 6:30 p.m.

Fort White volleyball
Fort White High volley-
ball spotted Union County
High the first game, then
rolled to a 21-25, 25-20,
25-15, 25-19 victory in Lake
Butler on Tuesday.
The Lady Indians were
led by Sarah Stringfellow
with 16 service points, five
aces and 17 digs. Brigitte
LaPuma has 12 service
points (three aces), nine
digs and six kills. Holly
Polhill had seven service
points (one ace), 12 digs
and five kills.
Fort White (10-11, 6-2)
hosts CornerstoneAcademy
at 6:30 p.m. today.


Stepping


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Taylor Messer (17) and Haley Dicks (14)
attempt to block' Fort White's Angel Dowda (8) on Sept. 29.


up


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High running back JR Dixon attempts to avoid a defender against Union County High earlier this season.


Dixon fills Blake's shoes


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort White High
football proved the importance of a
1-2 punch at running back.
When the Indians lost Alexis Blake
for the season in week five, JR Dixon
stepped in to continue making good
use of a veteran offensive line.
Dixon ran the ball 42 times last
week at Florida High and gained 201
yards. He also had a 144-yard game
against North Florida Christian
School and has totaled 529 yards on
101 carries this season. Dixon has


scored six touchdowns.
Before his injury in the North
Florida Christian game, Blake had 71
carries for 491 yards and scored 10
touchdowns. At the time, he was tied
for the team lead in receptions with'
six for 41 yards.
Fullback Zach Cormier has 12 car-
ries for 61 yards and quarterback
Andrew Baker has rushed 33 times
for 94 yards.
Baker is 27-of-53 passing for 317
yards with two touchdowns and three
interceptions.
A.J. Legree has both of the touch-
down catches among his season total


Ohio State takes top

ranking to Wisconsin
Tough tests for who play their first game as
nation's top-rated No. 1 this season at No. 18
Wisconsin on Saturday.
schools this week. The picks:
THURSDAY
By RALPH D. RUSSO South Florida (plus


Associated Press


When it comes to being
No. 1, Ohio State is No. 3.
For the 94th time in the
history of The Associated
Press college football poll,
which dates to 1936, Ohio
State is in the top spot. The
only teams to be No. 1 more
often are Oklahoma (97)
and Notre Dame (95).
Catching the Sooners
and Fighting Irish won't
be easy for the Buckeyes,


of eight receptions for 125 yards.
Trey Phillips has seven catches for
106 yards.
Donnell Sanders has three catches
for 27 yards from his tight end spot.
He has one touchdown on a fumble
return.
Soron Williams has three carries
for 18 yards and has scored touch-
downs on a kickoff return and a
fumble recovery.
Colton Jones has a total of 29
points on three field goals and 20
PATS.


INDIANS continued on 2B


1071) at No. 25 West
Virginia
For Big East's sake,
Mountaineers need to run
away with league title ...
WEST VIRGINIA 28-14.
SATURDAY
UPSET SPECIAL
No. 1 Ohio State
(minus 4) at No. 18
Wisconsin
Another No. 1 goes down?
... WISCONSIN 28-23.


PICKS continued on 2B breezes into the end zone during the game on Saturday.


JV runs

wild

on GHS

Columbia's junior
varsity beats
Hurricanes 42-12.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
With the varsity on a
bye week, Jayce Barber
stepped down to the
juni6r-varsity level to help
the Columbia High Tigers
defeat the Gainesville High
Hurricanes, 42-12, at Tiger
Stadium.
Braxton Stockton opened
the scoring for the Tigers
with a two-yard run on the
games opening drive and
Barber added a run from
three yards out with 5:11
remaining in the first quar-
ter for an early 16-0 lead
after consecutive two-point
conversions.
Gainesville battled back
with a pass from Jack
Cornell to Maurice McLeod
from 30 yards away to cut
the lead to 16-6. The score
remained locked there
through the half.
Stockton again helped
pace the Tigers on the open-
ing drive of the second half.
The running back capped
off the drive from 14 yards
to put the Tigers up 22-6.
* Gainesville continued.
to fight with a Alphonso
Danzy run to the two-yard
line. The Hurricanes would
score two plays later to cut
the lead to 22-12.
Stockton's third rushing
touchdown came with 6:09
remaining in the game to
build the Tigers' lead to
29-12. Brandon Roberts
added the extra point.
CHS continued on 2B


"0? -P.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida running back Michael Gillislee (23) brushes off LSU's Morris Claiborne (17) as he


- -4 - I I










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
3:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Bank of America 500. at
Concord, N.C.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Bank of America 500, at
Concord, N.C.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN South Florida at West
Virginia
FSN Kansas St. at Kansas
GOLF
10 arm.
TGC European PGATour, Portugal
Masters, first round, at Vilamoura,
Portugal.
1:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee
Championship, first round, at Miami
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Frys.com Open,
first round, at San Martin, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA Challenge, first round,
at Danville, Calif.
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS -Tampa Bay at Philadelphia
PREP FOOTBALL
9p.m.
ESPN2 Abilene (Texas) at Midland
Lee (Texas)

BASEBALL

AL Championship Series
Friday
New York (Sabathia 21-7) at Texas
(Wilson 15-8), 8:07 p.m.
Saturday
New York (Pettitte 11-3 or Hughes
18-8) at Texas (Lewis 12-13 or Hunter
13-4),4:07 p.m.

NL Championship Series

Saturday
San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10) at
Philadelphia (Halladay 21-10), 7:57 p.m.
Sunday
San Francisco (Cain 13-11) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 8:19 p.m.

Division Series

Tampa Bay vs.Texas
Texas 5,Tampa Bay I
Texas 6,Tampa Bay 0
Tampa Bay 6,Texas 3
Tampa Bay 5,Texas 2
Tuesday
Texas 5, Tampa Bay I, Texas wins
series 3-2
NewYork 3, Minnesota 0
New York 6., Minnesota 4
New York 5, Minnesota 2
NewYork 6, Minnesota I

Philadelphia 3, Cincinnati 0
Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 0
Philadelphia 7, Cincinnati 5
Philadelphia 2, Cincinnati 0

San Francisco 3,Atlanta I



CHS

Continued From Page 1B


Monterrance Allan
returned a fumble on the
Hurricanes' following pos-
session from 15 yards away
to put the Tigers up 36-12
following another Roberts'
PAT.
Columbia caught a bit
of fortune on the following
kickoff with Jeremy Bradley
.recovering a fumble.
The fumble recovery
allowed the junior varsity to
put in some of the younger
players and David Pierce
helped put the Tigers in the
end zone a final time. This
time, Columbia would score
from the two-yard line for
the 42-12 final.



INDIANS

Continued From Page 1B


On defense, the Indians
have interceptions from
Xavier Wyche, Josh
Faulkner, Phillips and
Legree.
Fort White is 4-2 over-
all and 2-0 in District 2-2B.
The Indians are enjoying a
bye week, then host East
Gadsden High for home-
coming on Oct. 22.


bi I


EmdtON


laeiyeorter*c


San Francisco I,Atlanta 0
Atlanta 5, San Francisco 4., 11 innings
San Francisco 3,Atlanta 2
San Francisco 3,.Atlanta 2

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Sunday's Games
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m.
Miami at Green Bay, I p.m.
Kansas City at Houston, I p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, I p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Baltimore at New England, I p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, I p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Washington, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona,
Carolina
Sunday, Oct. 24
Buffalo at Baltimore, I p.m.
Washington at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Tennessee, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at New Orleans, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 25
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit,
Houston

College games

Today
South Florida (3-2) at West
Virginia (4-1), 7:30 p.m.
Kansas St. (4-1) at Kansas (2-3),
7:30 p.m.
Friday
Cincinnati (2-3) at Louisville (3-2),
8 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Bank of America 500
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
3:30-5 p.m.), qualifying (7-9 p.m.); Friday,
practice (ESPN2, 5-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
race, 7:30 p.m. (ABC, 7-11:30 p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 501 miles, 334 laps.
Next race: Turns Fast Relief 500, Oct.
24, Martinsyille Speedway, Martinsville.Va.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
ihNATIONWIDE
Dollar General 300
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, practice, Friday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 3-5 p.m.), race, 8 p.m.
(ESPN2,7:30-11 p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Gateway 250, Oct. 23,
Gateway International Raceway, Madison,


1
6

10

12
14

15

16
18
19

21 I
23


CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race: Kroger 200, Oct. 23,
Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville,Va.
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Korean Grand Prix, Oct.
24, Korean International Circuit,Yeongam,
South Korea.
Online: http://www.formulol.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Next event: NHRA Las Vegas
Nationals, Oct. 29-21. The Strip at Las
Vegas Motor Speedway, Las Vegas. Online:
http://www.nhro.com

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Tuesday's Games
Washington 107,Atlanta 92
Philadelphia 103, Boston 92
Chicago 109,Toronto 90
Minnesota 122, Denver 108
Memphis 116, Oklahoma City 96
San Antonio 100, LA. Clippers 99
Utah 105, Phoenix 100
Sacrament6 116, Golden State 97
Wednesday's Games
New Jersey vs. Houston
Dallas vs. Detroit (n)
Minnesota at Indiana (n)
Philadelphia at Toronto (n)
Boston at New York (n)
Miami at New Orleans (n)
Sacramento vs. LA. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Charlotte at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee atWashington, 7 p.m.
SanAntonio vs. Cleveland at Pittsburgh,
Pa., 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
New Orleans at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Detroit vs. Minnesota at Syracuse,
N.Y, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.

NBA calendar

Oct. 22 Preseason ends.
Oct. 25 Rosters set for
opening day.
Oct. 26 Regular season opens.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Colorado 5, Detroit 4, SO
Los Angeles 3,Atlanta I
Wednesday's Games
New Jersey at Buffalo (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Washington (n)
Tampa Bay at Montreal (n)
Toronto at Pittsburgh (n)
Nashville at Chicago (n)
Vancouver at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Florida at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Colorado at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


ACROSS 37 High spirits
38 Shaggy-haired
Four-footed pal oxen
Mae West per- 40 NFL scores
sona 42 "Didn't I tell
Swanson of you?"
old films 43 Your Highness
Call again 45 Undershirts
Deletes, as 47 Pea's container
expletives 50 Diamond, actu-
Apollo's priest- ally
ess 52 Thin-blooded
Rose pests 54 Rock band
Kids' cereal crew member
Palace 58 Debris
entrance 59 Nook
Overly docile 60 Court order
Whale blubber 61 Foundry output


24 Salsa or gua-
camole
26 Remove, as a
hat
29 Entice
31 Corn on the -
33 DEA operative
35 Garfield's vic-
tim
36 Memorable
decade


DOWN

1 Frequent 007 foe


Pop Warner playoff implications


From staff reports

Lake City Pop Warner is
hosting Saturday's round
of games and there are
playoff implications on the
line. The four-game sched-
ule begins at 1 p.m. at
Memorial Stadium.
The Lake City Pee Wee
team plays Suwannee Dog


Pound in the final game
at 6 p.m. Both teams are
5-1 and tied for first in
the division with Alachua
Santa Fe.
Alachua Santa Fe hand-
ed Lake City its lone loss,
18-12, while Suwannee
lost by the same score to
Gainesville.
Two of the three teams


will advance to the Pop
Warner southeast region
playoffs.
All of Saturday's early
games pit Lake City teams
against Keystone Heights.
The Tiney Mites (4-1-1)
play at 1 p.m., followed by
the Mitey Mites (1-5) at
2 p.m. and the Junior Pee
Wees (3-3) at 4 p.m.


PICKS: Wisconsin 'Badgers' OSU


Continued From Page 11


No. 3 Boise State
(minus 39']) at San Jose
State
Spartans have already
played Alabama, Wisconsin
and Utah. Left's ask them
who's No. 1 ... BOISE
STATE 55-10.
BYU (plus 29) at No.
4 TCU
Cougars' down year is
killing Frogs' schedule
strength ... TCU 42-10.
Texas (plus 9/') at No.
5 Nebraska
Cornhuskers have been
gearing up for this good-
bye party for a while ...
NEBRASKA 31-14.
Iowa State (plus 24) at
No. 6 Oklahoma
Cyclones just gave up
68 to Utah ... OKLAHOMA
52-14
No. 12 Arkansas (plus
3%) at No. 7 Auburn
Don't forget about
Razorbacks. They still
could be best in SEC West
... ARKANSAS 38-31.
Mississippi (plus 211)
at No. 8 Alabama
Unless Rebels pick up
Alshorr Jeffrey, Tide should
be OK ... ALABAMA 42-17.
McNeese State (no
line) No. 9 LSU
Tigers fans need a men-


tal health day ... LSU 35-7.
No. 10 South Carolina
(minus 5) at Kentucky
Steve Spurrier is really
worried about this game
- and he should be ...
SOUTH CAROLINA 31-28
No. 11 Utah (plus
201/Z) at Wyoming
According to Sagarin
computer ratings, Utah's
strength of schedule is
136th in nation ... UTAH
38414.
Illinois (plus 7) at No.
13 Michigan State
Illini playing much better
defense under new coor-
dinator Vic Koenning ...
MICHIGAN STATE 28-17.
No. 15 Iowa (minus
3) at Michigan
Shoelace shoots back to
front of Heisman race ...
MICHIGAN 35-28.
Boston College (plus
21'%) at No. 16 Florida
State
Seminoles look set to
do some severe -damage to
ACC ... FLORIDA STATE
42-14.
No. 17 Arizona (minus
231') at Washington St.
Cougars getting better.
Really. But still... ARIZONA
41-21.
No. 19 Nevada (minus


7) at Hawaii
If you can stay up late,
should be entertaining ...
NEVADA 48-42.
No. 20 Oklahoma
State (plus. 3h) at Texas
Tech
Cowboys can't defend
pass unless other team is
throwing them the ball ...
TEXAS TECH 42-38.
No. 21 Missouri (plus
3 1) at Texas A&M.
Two straight losses
have Aggies coach Mike
Sherman fending off critics
... TEXAS A&M 28-21.
Mississippi State (plus
7) at No. 22 Florida
Gators might not want to
let Dan Mullen leave town
... FLORIDA 28-17.
No. 23 Air Force
(minus 1) at San Diego
State
Aztecs are improved, but
Falcons have won three
straight in series .., SAN
DIEGO STATE 35-28.
No. 24 Oregon State
(pick'em) at Washington
Beavers are best 3-2
in country ... OREGON
STATE 35-30.
Lastweek: 14-5 (straight);
11-8 (vs. points).
Season: 96-19 (straight);
55-47-3 (vs. points).


LOCAL RACING


Col. Motorsports Park
Results of races on Saturday:
SPORTSMAN
1. 07 Jeff Prescott, 2. 44 Charlie
Seroki, 3. 14 Oral Tanner, 4. 1M Nevin
Gainey, 5. 16 Brian Hull, 6. 06 Josh
Wise, 7. 76 Jim Higginbotham, 8. 1
Bobby Ford;
PURE STOCK
1. 12 Jason Garver, 2. 18 John
Roling, 3. 71 Jason, Warsing, 4.
58 Larry Welter Jr., 5. 81 Morris
Richardson, 6. 19 John Parrish, 7. 96


Answer to Previous Puzzle

QU BUILT GRIDS
AUNTIE BOOK IE
BE FALL ORIENT
BUILT AX EL
YETI WRY EVER
COAT ADAGE
CAR IRISH LAPP
AGO NECKS EDS
WHACK LEON
SANE DEW USSR
DEUS PLATO
PALATE GALLON
OPERAS OCEANS
TRESS TEDDY


2 Not in the pink
3 Sock filler 8 Jagger of the
4 Fido's reward Stones
5 Barked 9 Sanskrit dialect
6 Skilled 11 Pale blond
7 Oklahoma 12 Took the trolley
town 13 Law, to Caesar


17 Trader
19 Tastelessly
showy
20 Courtyards
22 Hong -
23 Sitcom wait-
ress
25 Luge surface
27 Bogus
28 Dislodges
30 Cartoon
shrieks
32 Awful
34 So-so grade
39 Etna's island
41 Pub perches
44 Rev the
engine
46 Legislate
47 Golf score
48 Difficult duty
49 Credit card
balance
51 Lingerie buy
53 CEO degree
55 Woodland
creature
56 been
robbed!
57 Moray


110-14 2010byUFS, Inc.


Don Cruce;
HORNETS
1. 69 Mark Copeland, 2. 46 Kim
Alldredge, 3. 60 Doyle O'Bryant, 4. 1
Robert O'Neail, DNS-7 Tyler Prescott,
44 Carl Taylor;
V-8 BOMBERS


1. 85 Larry Welter Sr., 2. 28 Tony
Deas, 3. 8 Morris Richardson, 4. 11
Todd Breer, DNS-76 Andy Nichols;
E-MODS
1. 01 J.F. McClellan, 2. 85 Wayne
Parker, 3. 6 Mickey Wright, 4. 9 Dan
Partelo, DNS-7 Stuart Lycett.


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description,of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


For Mo*re etils CallI


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


| I WHAT THE
L L kIA kA EXECUTIONER PIP
WHEN HE WASN'T
BUSUDE WORKING.
"--r r Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: EXACT JUMBO FLORID BASKET
Answer: When he worked in the hose barn, it
was a "STABLE" JOB


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
HERI AND TOOTSIE ARE GOING ON HOW CAN HER GET S UT YOU THAT ISN'T THE POINT! HER
A CRUISE FOR AN ENTIRE MONTH! AWAY FROM WORK THINK LONG DOESN'T KNOW HOW TO
E FOR A MONTH TO CRUISES ARE APPRECIATE BORING
I TAKE A CRUISE? ) RING, THES WAY I1 O
\ !DEAR


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Couple flirts with marriage

for a second time around


DEAR ABBY: Do you
have any data on the suc-
cess of remarrying your
ex-spouse? After being mar-
ried to my husband for 25
years, we divorced due to
his infidelity. We have been
divorced for eight years and
have had no contact.
A family member's fu-
neral brought us face-to-face
again, and we have been in
touch ever since. Neither of
us has remarried or been in a
relationship. We realize that
we still have feelings for each
other and have discussed re-
marrying in the future.
I love him, but I'm wary
of being hurt again. What do
you think? Does remarrying
your ex ever work? HAV-
ING SECOND (TIME)
THOUGHTS
DEAR SECOND
THOUGHTS:' It can work,
provided you're both will-
ing to deal with the issues
that broke you up in the first
place. By that, I mean that
you must be ready to exam-
ine whether there was some-
thing missing in the marriage
that caused your husband to
cheat, or whether he has a
character flaw and would re-
peat his infidelity.
I strongly recommend you
do this with the assistance of
a licensed marriage counsel-
or. If you both go through the
process, remarrying your ex
could work. If you don't, you


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
would be courting another
dose of heartache.
DEARABBY: I have been
dating "Nick" for more than
a year. We have both been
married before Nick's a
widower, and I am divorced.
He says he cares for me, but
doesn't feel passionate about
me, nor does "love" describe
how he feels about me.
We are intimate, are great
friends and spend almost ev-
ery day together. He treats
me great, dates no one else
and I can be myself around
him. But am I cheating my-
self by accepting the status
quo? Our intimate times
aren't satisfying because of
the lack of emotional ties, but
I'm torn because I enjoy his
company. I am confused. Any
words of wisdom, Abby? -
NOT QUITE FULFILLED
DEAR NOT QUITE
FULFILLED: You and Nick
are friends with benefits. Be-
cause you have no future with
him beyond what you have
now, and because intimacy
with him is not satisfying
because of his inability (or


refusal) to emotionally com-
mit I'd have to say he's
reaping more of the benefits.
The status quo is a substitute
for what you really want, and
yes, you are cheating your-
self.
DEAR ABBY: I have
been .going through photo
albums recently. Oh, the joy
of seeing all those familiar
faces again! However, when
I turned the pictures over
to verify people's last names
and the dates they were tak-
en, I was disappointed to find
them blank.
The vacations depicted in
the photos were wonderful,
and I'm sure I thought we'd
never forget the year. But
the years go by ... So this is
a reminder to take the time
to label the back-of photos
with ,pertinent information.
Believe me, it will be appreci-
ated in later years. SHUT-
TERBUG IN CANON
CITY, COLO.
DEAR SHUITERBUG:
The situation you describe
is one that countless people
have experienced and
something folks ofteq don't
think about until it is too late.
Thank you for the timely sug-
.gestion. It's one that I hope
readers will make the time to
follow.
N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Make your de-
cisions based on sound ad-
vice and only after you have
given plenty of thought to
the possible outcome. Part-
nerships can go either way,
depending on your diploma-
cy. Respond cordially. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Your current
status can be enhanced
through a position you ap-
ply for or the company
you keep. Don't let your
emotions get in the way of
a business decision. Plan
something special with your
current partner. *****
GEMINI (May 2 1-June
20): There is money to be
made but you mustn't make
purchases based on specu-
lation. Take it one step at
a time and you will acquire
greater stability in both
your personal and financial
lives. Share your ideas or
partner with someone who
can contribute to your game
plan. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You will attract
negative and positive peo-
ple. Filter through what's
being offered and asked for
and consider who can come
through for you. Emotional
matters will escalate and
additional burdens may be
placed on you. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Put love on hold and *
sort out what you are do-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

ing professionally. Once
you have your finances in
order, you can approach
the people you care about
regarding your plans. Hav-
ing a concrete idea to work
with will make the differ-
ence. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Mistakes made can
sometimes be a saving
grace. Rely on past experi-
ence to get you through any
confusion or uncertainty re-
garding a friend or depen-
dent You can gain ground if
you look at the positives in
your life instead of the nega-
tives. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't let criticism stop
you from getting things
done. Use what is said to
better yourself so that your
performance is improved
and your understanding of
what's expected of you isn't
holding you back. The sup-
port you get will help you
get back on track. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Love is on the
rise and a change in atti-
tude will help you express
your feelings, enabling you
to move forward personally.
Make alterations to your
surroundings that will im-
prove your work and emo-
tional well-being. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Someone
may throw you a curve ball
and you will have to act fast
to avoid being questioned
about something you aren't
prepared to talk about Hon-
esty will be your only way
out. An old relationship can
disrupt your life if you let it

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Someone you
meet will challenge you or
lead you in a direction that
will confuse you regarding
your beliefs and lifestyle.
You may be attracted to
someone you meet through
work but, before you make
a move, consider the out-
come. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't let your
feelings lead you in the
wrong direction. Avoid any-
one who makes you feel
inadequate. You have a lot
more going for you than you
realize. Believe in yourself
and so will others. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You'll tend
to overreact and overdo
but, in the end, that will be
what attracts someone yotf
are interested in to your
side. There are exceptions
that have to be considered
which may mean recon-
necting with someone with
whom you had a falling out
Making amends will lead
to a workable agreement.


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: X equals P
"GN TMK LVZPE'S FMS GS, NVAP GS !
SMM RLMBS? JPVB CGF LGFL LPPYR.,
CKS IM XBVOSGOP JVYAGEF!" -
ZGOSMBGV CPOALVD
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "We are running.ourselves into a damaged earth... As
a human race, we are very young and quite primitive." John Astin
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-14


CLASSIC PEANUTS


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


Page Editor: Emogene Graham,










LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010


Race: Bank of America 500
Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway
When: Saturday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ABC
2009 winner: Jimmie Johnson (right)


Race: Dollar General 300
Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway
When: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN2
2009 winner: Kyle Busch


Race: Kroger 200
Where: Martinsville Speedway
When: October 23, 12:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2009 winner: Timothy Peters


Marcus Smith (third from left) at a Charlotte Motor Speedway promotional event last May. (NASCAR photo)


Young track president is upbeat in down times


There's probably no bad time to be
named president of a NASCAR race
track, but for Marcus Smith, taking
over at Charlotte Motor Speedway two
years ago did present some challenges. For
starters, he was following H.A. "Humpy"
Wheeler, the man many consider.the great-
est racing promoter ever. And then there's
the economy that is hammering auto racing
about as hard as any part of the economy.
But Smith, the 36-year-old son of track
owner Bruton Smith, was mostly smiling
and upbeat recently as he talked about this
weekend's races at Charlotte.
"We're really focused on making the race
better every single time the fans come back,
where they'll really enjoy it as a thing you
go to with friends or with family," he said.
Part of making the races more enjoyable
is making the tickets more affordable. And
it's not the easiest thing to do for a person
like Smith, who also is responsible for deliv-


ering profits to his dad's company and to its
shareholders.
These days in racing, the strongest mar-
ket for tickets seems to be the individuals
who buy from two to four tickets at a time.
In NASCAR's recent boom times, corpora-
tions bought tickets by the stack and dis-
tributed them to their employees, associates
and customers. But not lately.
"Corporate ticket sales have been soft, but
we're starting to see that come back a bit
just now," Smith said. "They really fell off
the cliff with the recession. It's tough times."
And he's responded appropriately, he said.
"We've lowered prices in a lot-of areas," he
said. "And we offer extra amenities for peo-
ple who buy a lot of tickets or season tick-
ets. We've also lowered prices for people that
are just looking to come in for the least
amount. That's good for the fans and in the
long run it's good for NASCAR."
But will that policy paint him in a corner


LMARCUS SMITH I BRUTON SMITH

Marcus Smith, left, and his father Bruton Smith, at a press conference on January 19, 2009, in Concord, North
Carolina. (NASCAR photos)


where he'll find it difficult to raise prices
when the economy recovers?
"It's no different than any other business,
whether you're selling cereal or race tickets,
you have certain expectations of what a fair
price is," Smith said. "We still have tickets
that are expensive, $100 or more, but they
come with a lot of benefits. And we still
have great tickets that used to be $79 and
now they're $49. Sure we'd like to charge
more, but at this time we have to charge a
fair price for the times we're in.
"We're very happy to be able to lower
prices in a way that will be responsible to
fans and to our company."
Smith also argued that the media atten-
tion on empty seats at NASCAR races,
attention that largely comes because of the
sport's successes in the past, is unfair today.
"If you flip on ESPN and see empty seats
at baseball or football games, you don't see
stories about attendance being in the toilet,"
he said. "We have a history of tremendous
sellouts ... but on a bad day we're still
bringing in 120,000 or 100,000, and that's
more than a baseball stadium gets in five or
six games during regular season.
"It's a bad economy, but thankfully some
people are starting to see it level off and
turn around. As things turn around, we'll
start back getting great big crowds."
Smith also is making strides to emerge
from the shadows of his predecessor, Humpy
Wheeler. His biggest project to date is a
Humpy-like improvement on the back-
stretch of the track.
That's where he's building what he describes
as the world's biggest HD video screen, one
that will be 200 feet wide and 80 feet tall.
Construction is expected to begin after
this weekend's races.
"He's been talking about that since the
first day he took over," said track
spokesman Scott Cooper. ,


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UP...


2010 CHASE CONTENDERS
Points standings race results from Sunday's
Pepsi Max 400 at Auto Club Speedway
and commentary by Rick Minter

1.. Jimmie Johnson 5,673 (finished third)
After starting the Chase with a 25th-place
finish at New Hampshire. he's had finishes of
first at Dover, second at Kansas and third at
California. "One race down, still in the points
lead, but a lot of racing left," he said.
2. Denny Hamlin -36 (finished eighth)
He started 42nd but drove through the field
to remain the chief threat to stop Johnson's
championship streak at four. "I can't be too dis-
appointed with it, especially from where we
started. It's somewhat uplifting that we got
out of here with a top-10."
3. Kevin Harvick -54 (finished seventh)
Another solid performance from the regu-
lar season points leader, who did get busted
for speeding on pit road, still in the hunt for
the championship. "We need to step it up, and
we are still ih striking distance in the points
battle."
4. Jeff Gordon -85 (finished ninth)
A pit-road speeding penalty knocked him out
of contention for the win, but he and his team
did a masterful job of minimizing the damage.
He came back from 28th place to score a top-10
finish.
5. Tony Stewart -107 (finished first)
Even with the victory, he's still a long way:
from challenging Johnson for the points lead
unless some of those ahead of him falter in
the coming weeks. "We're going to need some
help. but we're doing everything we can do."
6. Kurt Busch -140 (finished 21 st
He'd soldiered through a so-so day and was
poised for a. decent points finish when late-
race contact with David Ragan left him with
a disappointing finish.
7. Carl Edwards -162 (finished 34th)
An ignition problem sent him to the garage
for 15 laps and put him in an underdog position,
points-wise. "We've got six races left and we're
162 points back, so over six races that's not a lot
of points per race, so I think we can do it."
8. Jeff Burton -177 (finished 23rd)
For the second straight week, his car's han-
dling went away in the closing laps. Now he's
going to have to rely on the misfortunes of oth-
ers to move up in the standings.
9. Kyle Busch -187 (finished 35th)
One of the pre-Chase favorites to win the
championship is now in a deep hole, thanks to
a blown engine at California on the heels of a
crash with David Reutimann at Kansas.
10. Greg Biffle -215 (finished 41st)
The winner at Kansas never really got going
at California His Ford engine that was so
strong at Kansas failed him at Auto Club,
effectively putting him out of the title hunt.
"We were trying hard to win the title and it
isn't going to happen this year."
11. Matt Kenseth -241 (finished 30th)
Like his teammate Biffle, he suffered engine
problems that spoiled a promising run and
6nded any reasonable hope of a championship.
12. Clint Bowyer -247 (finished second)
His 150-point penalty from New Hampshire
effectively took him out of the title hunt, but
he's proving that his team belongs in the
Chase. "We're a race-winning team and we
need to go out and prove that that last one
wasn't a hoax."


*


'fIT











Classified Department: 755-5440


BUYWI
SLhiLllT



FIN_ IE4


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI-
SION
CASE NO.:2009-CA-000785
BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN H. KIRKLAND; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN H.
KIRKLAND, IF ANY, ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE HERE-
IN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE
, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS; STATE OF
FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF
REVENUE; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
Defendants)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated September
23, 2010 entered in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-000785 of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for COLUMBIA County, LAKE
CITY, Florida, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the
COLUMBIA County Courthouse lo-
cated at 173 NE HERNANDO AVE
IN LAKE CITY, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 27th day of October,
2010 the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 57, OF THREE RIVERS ES-
TATES SUBDIVISION, UNIT 19,
A SUBDIVISION AS PER THE
PLAT THEREOF FILED AT PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 13, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER
WITH A 2006 CLAY SWMH, VIN
#30SP116763BH06.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 23rd day of September,
2010.
P.DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J.
STERN, P.A., ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF ,
900 South Pine Island Road Suite
400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954)233-8000
09-78127
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact COURT AD-
MINISTRATION at least 7 days be-
fore your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7
days, at the COLUMBIA County
Courthouse at 386-758-1342; if you
are hearing impaired or voice im-
paired, call 711

05524046
October 7, 14, 2010
PUBLIC AUCTION
Type of Ad Legal
Public Auction
1999 FORD
VIN# 1FAFP58U5XA183240
1993 FORD
VIN# 1FTCR10A8PTA73501
2005 HENSIM
VIN# LUAHYJCC551001755
To be held 10/30/2010, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055

04541964
October 14, 2010
PUBLIC AUCTION
Type of Ad Legal
1996 JEEP
VIN#1J4FT68S9TL295154
To be held 11/15/2010, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055

04541966
October 14, 2010

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440









Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

'Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Free Clean Up! Pick up unwanted
metals. Tin, scrap vehicles, lawn
mowers & more. We Recycle
386-623-7919 or 755-0133.

Construction


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3rd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-000516
Division #:
UNC: ,
BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Angela Lynn Dyson a/k/a Angela
Lynn Liedtke a/k/a Angela L Liedtke
a/k/a Angela Dyson Individually and.
as Co-Personal Representative of the
Estate of Roberta Lillian Dyson a/k/a
Roberta L. Dyson, Deceased and
Kelly D. Monge a/k/a Kelly Monge
a/k/a Kelly A. Dyson, Individually
and as Co-Personal Representative of
The Estate of Roberta Lillian Dyson
a/k/a Roberta L. Dyson, Deceased
and all other Persons Claiming By,
Through, Under and Against the
named Defendant(s); Citibank, Na-
tional Association; Unknown Ten-
ants, in Possession #1; Unknown
Tenants in Possession #2 If living,
and all Unknown Parties claiming
by, through, under and against the
above named Defendant(s) who are
not known to be dead or alive,
whether said Unknown Parties may
claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs,
Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claim-
ants
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION TO FORE-
CLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROP-
ERTY
TO:
Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees,
Assignees, Creditors, Lienors and
Trustees of, Roberta Lillian Dyson
a/k/a Roberta L. Dyson, Deceased,
and all other Persons Claiming By,
Through, Under and Against the
Named Defendant(s): ADDRESS
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: n/a
Residence unknown, if living, in-
cluding any unknown spouse of the
said Defendants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of said De-
fendants are dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s) and the afore-
mentioned named Defendants and
such aforementioned unknown De-
fendants as may be infants, incompe-
tents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an
action has been commenced to fore-
close a mortgage on the following re-
al property, lying and being and situ-
ated in Columbia County, Florida,
more particularly described as fol-
lows:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, RUN
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 30
MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST,
58.61 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE
ROAD 138; THENCE SOUTH 88
DEGREES 09 MINUTES 31 SEC-
ONDS WEST ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
260.77 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 02 MINUTES 41 SEC-
ONDS WEST ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
50.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 826.15 FEET TO
-THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 456.48 FEET;-
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 02
MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST,
264.16 FEET; THENCt SOUTH 00
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 456.41 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 03
MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST,
264.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. ALL LYING AND
BEING IN THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION
22, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE
16 EAST OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING SAID EASE-
MENT LYING 30.00 FEET TO
THE LEFT OF THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED LINE: COMMENCE
AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 22,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 58.61 FEET TO THE
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF STATE ROAD 138; THENCE
SOUTH 88 DEGREES 09 MI-
NUTES 31 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE, 260.77 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 02
MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 50.40 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF SAID LINE;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 30
MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST,
826.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF
TERMINATION.
more commonly known as 432
SOUTHWEST DART DRIVE,
FORT WHITE, FL 32038
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any,
upon SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP,
Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 4630 Woodland Corporate
Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614,
within thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this notice and file the
original with the clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately there after;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on the 27th day of Sep-
tember, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Circuit and County Courts


/s/: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
10-181637

05524054
October 7 14,,2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000022
DIVISION:
JAMES B. NUTTER AND COM-
PANY,
Plaintiff,
vs,
LILLIAN M. MCGARRY
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated September
24, 2010 and entered in Case NO 12-
2010-CA000022 of the Circuit Court
of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, Florida
wherein JAMES B. NUTTER AND
COMPANY, is the Plaintiff and LIL-
LIAN M. MCGARRY; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA ON BE-
HALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
* HOUSING AND URBAN DEVEL-
OPMENT MIDDLE, are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
A.M., on the 20th day of October,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
SECTION 4; A PART OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTH
WEST 1/4 SECTION 4, TOWN-
* SHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE 'PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF SAID SECTION 4, AND
RUN THENCE NORTH 02 DE-
GREES 03 MINUTES 53 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST
LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4
OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 4, 847.56 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 51
MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST,
50.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING THENCE CONTIN-
UE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 51 MI-
NUTES 30 SECONDS WEST,
171.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02
DEGREES 03 MINUTES 53 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 199.41 FEET
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 51
MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST,
171.67 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02
DEGREES 03 MINUTES 53 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 199.41 FEET TO
THE POINT OF THE BEGINNING
A/K/A 282 SW MAGICAL TER-
RACE, LAKE CITY, FL 32024
Any person claiming an interest from
the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within six-
ty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this court on September 27, 2010
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scfieduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09125664 NUTTER--FHA--abiv-
en

05524074
October 7, 14,2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD
DEAN ANDERSON, deceased
File No. 09-281-CP Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
RICHARD DEAN ANDERSON,
deceased, whose date of death was
January 11, 2009, and whose social
security number is is
pending in the Circuit Court for CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Ave, Lake City Flori-
da 32055. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is October 7, 2010
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., Attorney
FBN798797


905 SW Baya Drive, Lake City, FL
32025
386-961-9959 (phone) 386-961-9956
(fax)
Personal Representative:
JOYCE M. ANDERSON
Personal Representative


Legal

161 SW Milkweed Court
Lake City, FL 32024

05524097
October 14, 21, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD
DEAN ANDERSON, deceased
File No. 09-281-CP Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
RICHARD DEAN ANDERSON,
deceased, whose date of death was
January 11, 2009, and whose social
security number is is
pending in the Circuit Court for CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Ave, Lake City Flori-
da 32055. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is October 7, 2010
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., Attorney
FBN798797
905 SW Baya Drive, Lake City, FL
32025
386-961-9959 (phone) 386-961-9956
(fax)
Personal Representative:
JOYCE M. ANDERSON
Personal Representative
161 SW Milkweed Court
Lake City, FL 32024

05524097
October 7, 14, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 10-164-CP
IN -RE: ESTATE OF JESSIE EARL
BOLER
a/k/a JESSE E. BOLER,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:,
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of JESSIE
EARL BOLER a/k/a JESSE E. BO-
LER, deceased, File No. 10-164-CP,
by the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 135 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055;
that the total cash value of the estate
is $0 and that the names and address-
es of those to whom it has been as-
signed by such order are:
NAME Donna M. Boler
ADDRESS: 4520 NW Noegel Rd,
Wellborn, FL 32094
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons,' having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of
the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of'
this notice is October 14, 2010
Attorney for person giving notice:
/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No 052454
Person giving notice:
/s/ Donna M. Boler
Donna M. Boler
4520 NW Noegel Rd
Wellborn, FL 32094
05524128
October 14, 21, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-367-CA
DIVISION:
Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance,
Inc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
David P. Hall, III, Theresa J. Hall
IF LIVING, AND IF DECEASED,
THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THEM; Washington Mu-
tual Finance, LLC Notami Hospitals
of Florida, Inc. d/b/a Lake City Med-


Legal

ical Center; AND ANY OTHER
PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY
WHOSE NAMES ARE UNCER-
TAIN,
Defendant,
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to an order or a final judgment of
foreclosure entered in the above-cap-
tioned action, I will sell the property
situated in COLUMBIA County,
Florida, described as:
Lot 17, SOUTH WIND, a subdivi-
sion according to the plat thereof, re-
corded in Plat Book 6, Page 179, of
the Public Records of (OLUMBIA
County, Florida.
INCLUDING the following Manu-
factured Home: 1998 Destiny, Serial
Numbers H812566GL &
H812566GR
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the COLUMBIA
County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Her-
nando Avenue, courtroom 1 on the
3rd Floor, Lake City, Florida 32055
at 11:00 a.m., on November 3,2010.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED this 29 day of September,
2010.'
P. DeWitt Cason
CLERK OF THE COURT
BY: B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
SCHYULER-STEWART-SMITH
Schyuler Smith, Esq.
118 West Adams St. #800
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 353-5884
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT (ADA) NOTICE
Individuals with disabilities needing
a reasonable accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Court administrator's of-
fice, as soon as possible. If hearing
impaired, 1-800-995-8771 (TI'D); or
1-800-955-8770 (V) via Florida Re-
lay Service.

05524090
October 7,14, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-111-CP
PROBATE DIVISION
In re the Estate of:
ROBERT FILER BURNS,
Decedent.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of
ROBERT FILER BURNS, deceased,
File Number 2010-111-CP, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against Decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, on whom a copy
of this Notice is served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is: October 14, 2010.
/s/; ROBERT T. MAGILL,
ESQUIRE
Florida Bar. No. 064371
Fishback, Dominick, Bennett, Step-
ter, Ardaman, Ahlers & Langley,
LLP
1947 Lee Road
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone No. (407) 425-2786
Facsimile No. (407) 425-2863
rmagill@fishbacklaw.com
Register Agent
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
/s/STACY LANIER
Personal Representative
107 Anderson Place
Ocoee, Florida 34761

04541936
October 14, 21, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:2006-445-CA
DIVISION:
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY FKA BANK-
ERS TRUST COMPANY OF CALI-
FORNIA, N.A. NOT IN ITS INDI-
VIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT SOLE-
LY AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF
VENDEE MORTGAGE TRUST
1994-3,,
Plaintiff,
vS,
DORA J.JOHNSON, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated September
28, 2010 and entered in Case NO
2006-445-CA of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, Florida
wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NA-
TIONAL TRUST COMPANY FKA
BANKERS TRUST COMPANY OF
CALIFORNIA, N.A. NOT IN ITS
INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT
SOLELY AS TRUSTEE ON BE-
HALF OF VENDEE MORTGAGE
TRUST 1994-3, is the Plaintiff and
DORA J.JOHNSON; DISCOVERY


MARKETING AND DISTRIBUT-
ING, INC. are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 A.M., on the 27th
day of October, 2010, the following


Legal

described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SE 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, AND
RUN EASTERLY ALONG SEC-
TION LINE TO THE WEST EDGE
OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF,. STATE
ROAD NO. 247; THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY PARALLEL
TO AND 50 FEET ON A PERPEN-
DICULAR FROM THE CENTER-
LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO.
247, 2054.73 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 48 DEGREES 30 MI-
NUTES WEST 18.99 FEET TO
THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 247, AS NOW LOCAT-
ED AND TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 48 DEGREES 30 MI-
NUTES WEST 378.47 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 151.90 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 397.46 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 247; THENCE SOUTH
49 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02
SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 153.08
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. BEING A PART OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST. A/K/A
1222 SOUTHWEST STATE ROAD
247, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis- -.
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear- "
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Any person claiming an interest from
the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within six-
ty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this court on September 29, 2010
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F06017711 -NMNC-CONV

05524087
October 7, 14,2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000841
WELLS FARGO BANK N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs,
JOON HO PARK; LAUREL
LAKES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC.; WACHOVIA BANK,
NA; JACQUELINE D. PARK
A/K/A JACQUELINE DENISE.
JACKSON, A/K/A JACQUELINE
DENISE PARK; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JOON HO PARK; UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPER-
TY,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 28th day of Septem-
ber, 2010, and entered in Case
No.12-2009-CA-000841, of thie Cir-
cuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and
JOON HO PARK; LAUREL
LAKES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC.; WACHOVIA BANK,
NA; JACQUELINE D. PARK
A/K/A JACQUELINE DENISE.
JACKSON, A/K/A JACQUELINE
DENISE PARK; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JOON HO PARK; UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPER-
TY, are defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
the COURTHOUSE at the Columbia
County Courthouse in Lake City
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th-
day of November, 2010, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 19, LAUREL LAKE SUBDI-
VISION, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 7, PAGES 9 AND 10 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE" DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hemando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386)758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 29th day of September,
2010
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY:/s/B. Scippio
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Louderdale, Florida 33309


Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
09-78010

05524089
October 7, 14, 2010


Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


I -


II











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000247CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALLEN L. PRIDGEN et. al.
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated September 30, 2010, and
entered in Case No. 10000247CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein SUN-
TRUST MORTGAGE, INC, is a
Plaintiff and ALLEN L. PRIDGEN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALLEN
L. PRIDGEN; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2
are the Defendants. P. DeWITT CA-
SON as The Clerk of the Circuit
Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at 173 NE HER-
NANDO AVENUE, COURT
ROOM 1, LAKE CITY, FL 32055,
at 3rd on November 2010 at 11:00
a.m., the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Final Judgment,
to wit:
EXHIBIT A
Section 10, Township 4 South Range
16 East:
Commence at the Northwest corner
of the NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said
Section; thence S 1 45' 54" E along
the West line of said NW 1/4 of SW
1/4, a distance of 442.74 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence N 87 59'
09" E and parallel to the North line
of said NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, a distance
of 1026.23 feet to the West line of a
50.00 foot street, said street being
know as Asena Avenue; thence S 1
42' 30" E along said West street line
and parallel to the East line of said
NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, a distance of
442.72 feet; thence S 87 59' 09" W
and parallel to said North line, 1025.
79 feet to the West line of the NW
1/4 of SW 1/4; thence N 10 45' 54"
W along said West line, 442.72 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The
above tract of land being Lots 7 and
8 of an unrecorded subdivision in the
NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section.
TOGETHER WITH A 2007 FLEET-
WOOD DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME, I.D. #GAFL634A/B80069-
SH21
Any person 'claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale; if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 1st day of October, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 1 day of October, 2010.
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 771)-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
C4541921
October 14, 21, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 10-215-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TRAVIS DWAYNE SUGGS,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
TRAVIS DWAYNE SUGGS, de-
ceased, whose date of death was July
12, 2010; File Number 10-215-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this 'notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF.
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: October 7, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Verdies Kay Hires
VERDIES KAY HIRES
199 SW Shellcracker Drive
Fort White, Florida 32038
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, A'ITTOR-
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Mark E. Feagle
Mark E. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0576905
153 NE Madison Street


Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
04541869
October 7, 14, 2010


020 Lost & Found

EXOTIC
PIGEON
Call
386-752-4966

FOUND
Female, puppy, approx 13 weeks
old, found on Monday, Oct 11 at
US90 & Eadie St 386-754-2229


020 Lost & Found

Lost boat key near Hwy 242 & 47,
white float attached, near BP gas
station, would appreciate call
small reward 386-466-3641
100 Job
V100 Opportunities

04541945
Senior Teller Position
Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing, cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace

04541946
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch-at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA, SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056

05524169
Caretenders Homecare,needs
Office Assistant,clerical posi-
tion, billing, payroll, HR duties
FT position, Fax resume to
386-758-3313

Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care
Pre-school & Daycare.
Optical Assistant needed,F/T
exp a plus, we will train,
Send resume 763 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025
Security Officers
needed Live Oak Area, must have
current D Sec Lic., Clr back-
ground, Drs Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecuritv.com MB 1000084

120 Medical
120 Employment

05524078
SENIOR REGISTERED
NURSE SUPERVISOR

The Florida Department of Vet-
erans' Affairs Jenkins Domi-
ciliary is seeking a supervisory
level R.N. to fill the position of
Senior Registered Nurse Super-
visor. All applicants must hold a
Florida R.N. license and be cer-
tified in C.P.R. Requirements
for all candidates, include a
strong clinical background, good
communication abilities, and ex-
cellent computer skills. Ideal
candidates will have nursing
management or supervisory ex-
perience. Apply on-line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.co
m/logon.htm
Or call Amelia Tompkins for
more information at
386-758-0600 x3116
Req #50000426
Closing Date 10/15/2010
EEO/AAE

SENIOR LICENSED PRAC-
TICAL NURSE

The Florida Department of Vet-
erans' Affairs Jenkins Domi-
ciliary is seeking a Senior
L.P.N; for the 3:30 PM to 12
midnight shift. All applicants
must hold a Florida L.P.N. li-
cense and be currently certified
in C.P.R. Requirements for all
candidates, include at least one
year's experience as a working
L.P.N., good communication
abilities, and excellent computer
skills. A strong clinical back-
ground is preferred. Call Amelia
Tompkins at 386-758-0600
x3116 for more information or
apply online at


www.myflorida.peoplefirst.com/
logon.htm
Req #50000022
Closing Date 10/15/2010
EEO/AAE

05524099
SLEEP center is hiring a sleep
technician trainee; requirements
include high school diploma and
at least 6 months of direct patient
care experience; 2-4 night shifts;
please e-mail resume to
viducanl065@yahoo.com

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Medical
120 Employment
Busy Family Practice Office in
need of Nursing Assistant for
full-time position. Must have
expe-
rience in patient care/triage and in-
jections. Fax resume to
386-719-9494
HEALTHCORE Physical
Therapy has an immediate opening
for an energetic,team player li-
censed, Physical Therapy Assistant
for our outpatient clinics. $25 hrly.
Fax resume to: 386-961-9170
or email to:
healthcoreinfo@bellsouth.net.
All resumes kept confidential


190 Mortgage Money

FORECLOSURE HELP
Free consultation, Contact us
today! 1-800-395-4047 x 4702
or visit us on web www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

0 Schools &
240 Education

04541904
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-10/26/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTENS
To Good Home
Leave Message
Call 386-867-3373

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
3 Supplies
Free Pot Belly Pig
to good home, male,
6 months old,
386-754-6779


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fumrn., China, Silver, Glassware,







$150
386-752-8978
GE Washer/Dryer Set,
$250
less than two years old
386-752-8978
WHIRLPOOL DRYER,
Older model but works good,
large capacity, $75
Call 386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
White, Small Upright Freezer,
Runs great
$85
386-292-3927 or 386-948-0387


408 Furniture

5' OAK full Entertainment
Center with
32" RCA color TV. $200.
386-867-0035
Nightstand
Brown wood, 2 drawers
$10
386-752-8978
OVAL TABLE with 4 chairs,
Butcher block top, nice,
$145
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Student Desk
by "Woods" 3 drawers
Light Blue $20
386-752-8978
Wooden Desk w/Hutch,
Call for info
$25
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
20" Craftsman Push Mower
4.5 HP, Runs great, like new,
$80
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
38" YARDMAN RIDE-ON LAWN
MOWER, 3 years old, in great
condition, $500 (386) 752-3464 or
(386) 466-7550 to leave message.
Craftsman Rider
42" cut, runs good,
$385
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Sears Seed & Fertilize


Push Spreader
works great! $45
386-752-8978
Weedeater,
like new,
$50
386-344-1783


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

05524160
"Jack's Gone" Estate Sale
Fishing, hunting, guns, coins,
tools, antiques, household,
furniture, office
715 Miracle Ct (off Pinemount)
386-752-6947

10/15 & 10/16, 7-?, 175 SW Cot-
tage Gin., 90 W to252-B on left.
household goods, kitchen stuff.
clothes, stove, refrig., lots of misc.
5 Family, Fri & Sat, 7a-lp, house-
hold, clothes, antiques, appliances,
X-mas Deco, off Lake Jeffrey,
597 NW Spring Hollow Blvd
Dollhouse Lady!,
Sat yard sale/(2)items left,
please call
386-752-9047
Fri only, 8-?, golf bag carrier,
printers, clothes (boys) 14 husky,
(girls) 3T, lamps, Dewalt Drill
7719 NW Lake Jeffery Rd,
FRI. 10/15 & SAT. 10/16th, 8-3,
800 N.W. Emerald Lakes Drive in
Emerald Lakes Subd., tools, hutch,
fum., dishes, lawn equip., misc.
Large Moving Sale, Sat only,
8a-?, fum, clothing, games,
etc."Cr,eek Side Subdivision",
off Sisters Welcome, follow signs
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat,Oct 16, 8am-? Annual Deer
Creek Subdivision, Many yards!
252-B,(signs),Guns, antiques (car-
nival glass),Handmade X-mas
deco, fast built computer, tow bar,
(Rain Date Oct 23)
Saturday only, 8a-4p,
household, clothes, party dresses,
near Cannon Creek Airport
2077 SW Sisters Welcome Rd


440 Miscellaneous

Grill (charcoal)
used a couple of times
$10
386-752-8978
New Interior Lights (6),
Valued at $60,
Will sell for $30
386-344-1783
Well kept items for sale,
Eliptical $80, computer desk $20
and Nascar collectibles, negotiable
321-388-1832

630 Mobile Homes
6V 0 for Rent
1 bd/l bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
386-752-1941 or 386-965-0932
14 x 76, 3 BR/2 BA, private lot,
South of town,
References & Lease required,
Call 386-752-4348
2/2 (full baths), SW, I acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3 bdrm/2bath MH, N of town,
$575 monthly ,
plus sec dep
386-965-1173
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $575
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st., 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $500 mo.,
386-867-1833 ,386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


0 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Very nice 2006 S/W 3/2 on fenced
2.5 acres in Olustee, close to
Ocean Pond,$750 month, dep &
ref's req'd,904-349-5192

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
1998, 2BR/2 BA, on 10 Acres,
SW of Lake City, Good Condition,
Asking $80,000 or OBO
Call 407-666-3553

7 0 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
5523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apt. In town
Georgeous Lakeview. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
LARGE lBR Apt
over looking lake. Screened pool.
CH/A, washer/dryer, full kitchen,
$650 mo. 386-344-3261
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
New Ownership/Management
Upgraded "Live in Lake City"
Apartments, 1, 2 or 3 Bedrooms
Starting @ $385, 386-719-8813
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
7/2 For Rent

Neat as a Whistle! Ibr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

2/1 w/den; on west side, 1 wooded
acre, W/D hook up. water and
trash included, $650 month +
security 386-719-9702
2br plus bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 deposit,. no water/sewage-
cost call 386-752-8553.
3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
3BR/1BA HOUSE. CH/A,
All appliances, $725. mo. 1st, last &
sec. 141 NE Montrose Ave.
(386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666
4/1, S on 47, close to town, $750
month, 1st & sec needed,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
Beautiful 3br/2ba. Spacious home
w/lg, fenced yard. Callaway S/D.
$1200. per mo. plus deposit.
386-984-5987
Furnished Farm House. 3/2, re-
modeled, wrap around porch on
160 ac, 5 miles to 1-75, 2 miles to
1-10, $1200 month 386-362-8708
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Near Newberry, 10405 SR 45, 4/2,
2000 sq ft, 6 acres, place, CH/A,
Irg yard in rural area, $1100 mo,
$1100 dep, call 386-365-8543
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


730 ~Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

75O Business &
5 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995


OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales
SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & I-10
813-286-2323


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale

5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not, knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at-1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

FSBO, Owner Fin. 2/1, $49,900
Updated-Elec, plumb, CH/A, roof,
floors. $5,000. dn. $433/mo.
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $900 mo
3-8-867-1833/386-590-0642
www,suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&
2 Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard.BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


950 Cars for Sale

2004 NISSAN SENTRY, SE R
4 dr. auto, tinted, yellow ext., sport
int., elect. windows/doors, $3,500
****SOLD****


"Awesome Deals At Prestige Homes"

Our lot models are priced to sell. It's a MUST SEE TO BELIEVE. Many of
our models are reduced as much as s6,000. Take our "Scott" model,
it's a nice 3BR/2BA with an office space. Spacious Kitchen, built in
entertainment center and large master bath.

Was $57,995,


Now reduced to 53,995.
A savings of s4,000. Come See!


DON'T BE FOOLED BY FALSE PROMISES!
All of our prices include: Delivery and Set-up,
Now Air Conditioning, New Skirting, and New steps

PRESTIGE 3973 HWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY
HOME CENTERS 386-752-7751 or 1-800-355-9385