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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01418
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/06/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01418
System ID: UF00028308:01418
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Double Disaster
Fort White loses star
seniors Blake, Poteat.
ID
000017 120110 ****3 DIGIT 326
LIE OF FLORIDA HISTORy
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



Lake i,


Wednesday, October 6, 2010


Lady Tigers Roar
Columbia defeats
Lady Wolfpack.
Sports, IB






noorter


ter.com Vol. 136, No. 222 0 75 cents


County: Tax abatement 'all about jobs'


Guidelines include
minimum 10 jobs,
$250K investment.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
The county is poised to
begin conducting its tax
abatement processes sepa-
rately from other economic
development agreements,


a move that is new for the
county.
The. Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners came to a
consensus on the decision
and all other staff recom-
mendations on how to pro-
vide tax abatement in'the
future at a joint workshop
with the Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority Tuesday.


The staff recommenda-
tions will be officially pre-


Williams


sented to
the county
c,o m mi s-
sion for
adoption at
its regular
meeting
Oct. 21.
In addi-


tion to the county's and
IDA's staff and boards,


Richard Powell, CPA;
Doyle Crews, Columbia
County property appraiser
and Greg Stewart, attor-
ney for Nabors, Giblin and
Nickerson, were in atten-
dance.
If the staff recommen-
dations are adopted, the
county will conduct tax
abatement under Florida
statute in an agreement
separate from other eco-


nomic development incen-
tives to standardize the
abatement process.
"That's really the big
thing," said Dale Williams,
county manager. "Instead
of having one agreement
that covers 100 percent of
all the agreements made
with a prospective compa-
ny, we're going to carve tax
abatement out and we're
going to do it separately


under Statute 196 and then
leave everything else under
Statute 125."
Staff recommended that
companies seeking tax
abatement will submit an
application to the' county,
which will be reviewed by
Crews. If the board decides
to grant abatement, it will
be adopted by ordinance
COUNTY continued on 3A


JOBS WAITING



Sitel hosts fair to fill 150 positions


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
James Bailey, operations manager apprentice at Sitel, fields questions from Kimberly Guffey on Tuesday at a job fair at the
Holiday Inn & Suites in Lake City. 'It's harder than I expected,' Guffey, who is unemployed, said. 'I need to have a job. I'm
pursuing any opportunity to have a job. If that's Sitel, then great.'


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
huck Home of
Live Oak cur-
rently has a
job, but, every
now and then,
he's been looking for a
better one.
Mine stinks, he said.
Home joined other
interested job seekers at
the Sitel job fair Tuesday
at Lake City Holiday Inn.
Sitel is a global busi-
ness process outsourcing
provider and is expand-
ing its customer care call
center by 150 positions,
said Manuel Garcia, site
director. The company has
been in Lake City for 10
years.
"It's great to be able
to build more jobs in the
community," he said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERIILake City Reporter
Lannie Patterson (right) fills out an application for one of the
150 customer-service representative positions offered by Sitel.


Positions are entry
level in customer service
and range from full-time,
part-time to temporary, he
said.


Applications were filled
out onsite'at the job fair,
Garcia said. Some people
also submitted applica-
tions online and at Sitel


directly.
The process at the job
fair included signing in
with contact information,
filling out applications and
going to hear an orienta-
tion on the company.
The orientation offered
an opportunity for people
to ask questions about
Sitel, Garcia said.
Some of the people
don't know what Sitel
does, said Linda Dow,
human resources director.
It was busy during the
job fair, Home said.
"You have people to
talk to you," he said. "You
don't just sit here and
wait."
He has a good feeling
about getting a job with
Sitel, Horne said.
"I'm going to claim it
SITEL continued on 3A


Police: Gunman

had lengthy

criminal record


Fami friends
ask what triggered
shooting rampage.
By TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE-
Friends and family knew
Clifford Miller Jr. had a his-
tory of mental illness, yet
they tieer imagiicdd.. tba
quiet 24-year-old would kill'
his father, go on a 13-min-


ute shooting spree around
his sleepy north Florida
neighborhood, then take
his own life while parked in
a friend's driveway.
"I don't know what trig-
gered it. And then to want
to take his life. What's so
bad?" said Woodrow Jones,
a neighbor, shaking his
head while standing near
Miller's home Tuesday.
SMillc: hl.cd his 52-year-
GUNMAN continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Candidates for Columbia County Commission District 2 Marc
Kazmierski (left) and Rusty DePratter answer questions dur-
ing a live broadcast of the Candidates' Forum Tuesday night
held at Florida Gateway College.


College hosts

televised forum

for candidates


Program will be
replayed on local
cable channel.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.conm
Candidates in several
upcoming state and local
elections participated in a
live broadcast of the second
Candidates' Forum Tuesday
night on the Florida Gateway
College channel, Comcast
Channel 8.
FGC along with the Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
and the Lake City Reporter
hosted the event.
Candidates were:
N Florida State Senate
District 14: Perry McGriff


(Democrat) and Steve
Oelrich (Republican)
Florida State
Representative District
10: Leonard Bembry
(Democrat) *
Florida State
Representative District 11:
Debbie Boyd (Democrat)
and Elizabeth Porter
(Republican)
Columbia County
Commission District 2:
Rusty DePratter and Marc
Kazmierski.
The forum will be
replayed on several dates:
8 p.m. Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27;
noon and 9 p.m. Oct. 7, 14
and 21; 2 p.m. Oct. 8, 15,
22 and 29; 3 p.m. Oct. 9, 16,
23 and 30; 7 p.m. Oct. 10,
17, 24 and 31; 8 p.m. Oct.
11, 18, 25 and Nov. 1; and 1
p.m. Oct. 12, 19 and 26.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
?6 ooo"I 1 Fax: 752-9400


78
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................
Around Florida...........


DAILY
BRIEFING
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COMING
THURSDAY
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 5-5-9
Evening: 5-6-8


3. 4 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 7-8-9-4
Evening: 4-2-6-2


Monday:
6-18-20-21-23


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Yoko reflects on Lennon's 70th


LOS ANGELES
f John Lennon had lived to be
70, Yoko Ono thinks he would
have been more relaxed
about the milestone than he
was about his 40th birthday.
Ono recalls the ex-Beatle fretting
about reaching that number: "I can't
believe I'm going to be 40!" she said
he told her.
"I said, 'John, John 40's not so
bad, you know?"'
Sadly, it would be his last year.
Lennon was shot to death on Dec.
8, 1980, almost three months after
turning 40.
But in the three decades since,
Ono has worked to keep his legacy
vibrant, and continues to do so with
the approach ,of his 70th birthday on
Saturday.
Eight of Lennon's albums have
been remastered and are being rer-
eleased this week as single albums
as well as two boxed sets. There is
also a remixed version of Ono and
Lennon's 1980 "Double Fantasy"
album.
Other projects include a "Box of
Vision" commemorative set featur-
ing artwork and music; all-star con-
certs; a film about a young Lennon,
"Nowhere Boy," out this week; and
a screening of the documentary
"LennonNYC" in Central Park on
his birthday.
Ono will spend what would have
been Lennon's birthday in Iceland,
celebrating with a concert by her
Plastic Ono Band and the lighting
of the Imagine Peace Tower in his
honor.

Ul Wayne goes solo
in NY solitary jail
NEW YORK il Wayne is fac-
ing the music after being accused of
breaking jail rules by having gear for


Yoko Ono (right) performs alongside her son Sean Lennon during the 'Yoko
Ono: We Are Plastic Ono Band' concert at the Orpheum Theater in Los Angeles
on Friday.


listening to tunes: He. can expect to
go solo for the rest of his time behind
bars in a gun case.
The Grammy Award-winning rap-
per was moved Monday into what
city jail officials call "punitive segrega-
tion" for a month, until his expected
November release date, Correction
Department spokesman Stephen
Morello said. It's his punishment for
stashing a charger and headphones
for a digital music player in his cell
earlier this year, officials said.
Lil Wayne generally will now be
confined to his new cell 23 hours a
day, with such exceptions as visits
and showers, instead of being allowed
to mingle with other inmates most of
the day.
The 28-year-old rapper, one of the
genre's biggest stars; has been held
since March in the Rikers Island
jail complex. He pleaded guilty in
October 2009 to attempted criminal
possession of a weapon, admitting he
had a loaded semiautomatic gun on


his bus in 2007.

Prosecutor: Smith was
surrounded by enablers
LOS ANGELES Anna Nicole
Smith was surrounded by a circle of
enablers including her boyfriend
and two doctors who supplied her
with drugs for years despite her obvi-
ous addiction, a prosecutor told jurors
Tuesday.
Deputy District Attorney Renee
Rose continued the prosecution's clos-
ing argument in the drug conspiracy
trial of Smith's lawyer-boyfriend
Howard K Stern and two physicians.
Stern took no action to help Smith
withdraw from opiates and seda-
tives, while Drs. Sandeep Kapoor and
Khristine Eroshevich continued to
prescribe painkillers for the former
Playboy model despite signs she was
addicted, the prosecutor said.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


i Broadcaster and writer
Melvyn Bragg is 71.
* Actress Britt Ekland is 68.
* Singer Millie Small is 64.
* Singer-musician Thomas
McClary is 61.
* Rock singer Kevin Cronin
(REO Speedwagon) is 59.
* R6ck singer-musician
David Hidalgo (Los Lobos)
is 56.
* Former NFL player and
coach Tony Dungy is 55.


* Actress Elisabeth Shue is
47.
* Country singer Tim
Rushlow is 44.
* Rock musician Tommy
Stinson is 44.
* Actress Amy Jo Johnson
is 40.
* Actress Emily Mortimer is 39.
* Actor Lamman Rucker is 39.
* Actor Jeremy Sisto is 36.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Melinda Doolittle is 33.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............. 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherToddWilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
-To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed -by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks. .. ............... $82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


SBody of missing
teen found buried
IAKELAND A16-
year-old boy from central
Florida reported missing
six months ago is a murder
'victim.
Polk County Sheriff
Grady Judd announced
Tuesday that another 16-
year-old boy is suspected
of shooting and stabbing
Marco Martinez and bury-
ing his body in the woods in
Lakeland.
Martinez was reported
missing by his family in
April. Detectives found the
remains of the Kathleen
High School student last,
week. Judd said the other
teen, described as a good
friend of the victim, has
confessed to the slaying.
Prosecutors are planning to
charge him.
Detectives believe
Martinez was killed after
the two teens went into
the woods together April
5. They say the suspect
returned the next day to
bury the body.

Two teens dead
after car crash
MIRAMAR Two teen-
agers are dead after the car
they were driving crashed
into a'South Florida house.
The Miramar Police
Department says the 18-
year-old men were driving
early Tuesday when their
vehicle veered out of the
lane they were traveling in
and catapulted into some
shrubbery.
Police say the vehicle
then rolled over and struck
the back of a home.
Miramar police spokes-
woman Tania Rues says
Kevin Anthony O'Connell
of Pembroke Pines died at
the scene and Ian Michael
Guckian of Weston was pro-
nounced dead at a hospital.
It was unclear which teen
was driving. No one in the
residence was injured.


SUNNY SUNNY MOSTLY MOSTLY i MOSTLY
"' SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


HI 78 LO48 HI82 L 51 HI 86 LO 55 HI 86 LO 55 HI 84 1 58
y 5L .


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Turning up the heat on cancer
Miami Heat's Dwyane Wade, with St. Jude patients Cameron
and Kaelyn, makes his debut in the Thanks and Giving cam-
paign, a holiday program that supports the research and treat-
ment being done at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital to
help children fighting cancer and other catastrophic diseases.
The campaign kicks off Thanksgiving week and runs through the
end of the year.


Masked men hold
family hostage
ST. PETERSBURG A
couple and their two young
children told St Petersburg
Police that masked and
armed men held them hos-
tage for about five hours.
Police said the Monday
morning incident began
when the woman who lives
in the home was confronted
by three masked men.
They forced her back inside
the home at gunpoint and
woke up everyone else.
The ordeal ended when
the father dived through a
window in a bid to escape
their captors. The men
opened fire on him, striking
,him once in the upper torso.
Police said he did not suffer
life-threatening injuries.

Police ID dead
SeaWorld tourist
ORLANDO -
Authorities say the tourist
who died after being found
unresponsive in a pool at
SeaWorld's Aquatica water


park appears to have died
from natural causes.
The Orange County
Sheriff's Office says 68-
year-old Ivan Henson
had been visiting-from
England. Lifeguards pulled
Henson from the water
Monday and attempted to
revive him. He was taken
to Dr. Phillips Hospital
where he was later pro-
nounced dead.

Man guilty in '08
fatal shooting
MELBOURNE A
Titusville man has been
convicted in a teen's 2008
death in Brevard County.
A jury found 24-year-old
Winston Anderson guilty
Monday of second-degree
murder and attempted
second-degree murder. He
could face life in prison at
his November sentencing.
Authorities say
Anderson shot 16-year-old
Kevin Freeman in the head
over a feud between a
group of young men.


Tallahassee
80/44
Pensacola
80/53 Pafaina City
80/53


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total'
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SVildesta
77/46 ....
Lake City.
78/48
Gainesville .
.80/48
Ocala


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesvllle
Jacksonville '


,80/48 Key West
Orando Cape Canaveral Key West
81/59 77/62 Miami
Tampa Naples
82/60 West Palm Beach Ocala
82/68 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers, 83/71 Pensacola
83/60 *Naples Tallahassee
84/64 Miami Tampa
84/70 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


On this date in
1998, a squall Iin
moved across Lo
Michigan, produce
tornadoes, down-
bursts and some
flooding. A tornac
struck Ferris Stat
University in Big
Rapids, injuring
seven students.


. Forecasts, data and graph-
S cs 2010 Weather Central
.-', I LLC, Madison, Wls.
www.weatherpubllsher.com



.-r


GetConnectedI


<- i

Iff~ljfl^^^^B^^^^


* Associated Press


4$H3.


Daily Scripture


"Seek the Lord while he may
be found; call on him while he is
near."
Isaiah 55:6


77/50e
"77/50


Daytona Beach
7'58


Thursday
79/-71/s
80/58/s
83/71/s
84/63/s
81/51/s
80/53/s
81/74/pc
82/51/s
82/70/s
83/64/s
S82/51/s
82/58/s
84/64/s
83/58/s
84/51/s
82/61/s
82/51/s
83/68/s


Friday
81/67/pc
83/63/s
85/71/s
86/64/s
85/56/s
84/58/pc
82/76/s
86/55/pc
85/71/s
85/66/s
86/56/s
85/62/s
82/66/s
85/60/s
85/56/s
85/66/s
84/53/s
84/68/s


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise to .
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


80
55
84
63
96 in 1911
47 in 1987

0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
0.50"
41.63"


7:27 a.m.
7:10 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
7:09 p.m.

6:06 a.m.
6:13 p.m.
7:15 a.m.
6:52 p.m.


7

15niuts to bn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Wfaii:,
Channel.



weather.com


Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.
7 14 22 30
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Page Edtr oiTlae,7402 AECT EOTR L C L WDEDY COE ,21


GUNMAN! Police unclear what sparked shooting
Continued From Page 1A


old father, Clifford Miller
Sr., before he went on
a rampage Monday and
wounded five .men. He
fired multiple rounds from
a .38 caliber revolver at
each spot, Gainesville
police Cpl. Tscharna Senn
said. In most of the shoot-
ings, police said, he fired
the gun while sitting in his
truck.
"He did have a relation-
ship with the remaining
victims," Senn said. "Right
now, we do not have a
motive."
After killing his father
and shooting five oth-
ers, Miller drove his red
pickup truck and stopped
in a friend's driveway.
Frederick Wilson, who
was once married to
Miller's aunt, lives in the
home and heard a gun-
shot He emerged to find
Miller dead, the gun in
his lap.
'There's blood right
there," Wilson said, point-
ing to a patch of red in
the dirt driveway. "There's
blood and brain matter in
my yard. That ain't right."
Miller, who previously
worked as a dishwasher
at a Mexican restaurant in
Gainesville, had a lengthy
criminal history, court
records showed.
When Miller was. 19,
he was found guilty of
cocaine possession and
violated probation. When
he was about to return to
court, he wrote the judge
a letter.
"My family and friends
are so prowed (sic) of me
because I have been work-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Frederick Wilson stands in the driveway of his horie in
Gainesville, where a man identified as Clifford L. Miller
Jr., 24, shot himself to death after killing his father and
wounding five others Monday.


ing for a year," he wrote in
2006. "I beg of you to drop
the case so I can finish
being successful in life."
Every year since,
Miller was charged with
either a traffic offense or
other crimes. In 2006, he
grabbed and spit in the
face of an ex-girlfriend and
was charged with simple
battery. She refused to
press charges. In 2007, he
was found guilty of break-
ing into an ex-girlfriend's
house and roughing her
up.
In 2009, he assaulted
another woman, a friend,
but she refused to press


charges.
Also in 2009, he was
charged with reckless
driving, driving while
under the influence of
drugs or alcohol and
refusing to sign or accept
a traffic citation. In that
case, an Alachua County
judge ,declared him
incompetent.
As some of the condi-
tions of his release from
jail, Miller was required
to take medication and
undergo psychiatric treat-
ment.
It was unclear what
touched off Monday's
shooting spree.


The first 911 call was
at 4:03 p.m., followed by
several others. The last
call was to the Alachua
County Sheriff's Office at
4:16 p.m. That turned out
to be the gunman.
The wounded
were being treated at
Gainesville area hospi-
tals, Senn said.
Among the victims:
Cedric Joiner, 36, Lloyd
Dunn, 67, Paul Anthony
Sr., 43, and Vincent Sailer,
43. They are all listed in
critical condition. Anthony
Mitchell, 44, is in fair con-
dition.
Gainesville, in the north-
central part of the state, is
home to the Univ6rsity of
Florida. There was no link
between the school and
the shooting, police said.
Ronald Sercey's home
was likely the second stop
on Miller's deadly spree.
Sercey said that he arrived
home to find a disbrient-
ed-looking Miller driving
away, and several fearful
people in the yard.
Mitchell, Sercey's uncle,
was shot in the arm and
Joiner, a friend, was shot
in the face. Sercey said
Miller had been to his
house over the weekend
to watch football.
While many in the neigh-
borhood knew Miller had a
mental illness,i they never
thought he was capable of
murder.
"He fell through the
cracks," said Sercey. "He
was just a young man
with a mental illness that
snapped. And we'll never
know why."


I,
JASON MATTHEW WALKERIflake City Reporter
Recruiting specialist Peggy Robison answers questions asked by
a group of eager prospective employees.


SITEL: Open jobs
Continued From Page 1A


first," he said.
Redj Gaylord of Lake
City already applied to
Sitel, but came to the job
fair to learn more about
the company, she said.
She has been looking
for a job for two months
since moving to the area,
but also feels optimistic


about a position at Sitel,
Gaylord said.
Sitel is looking to fill
thevacant positions
immediately, Garcia said.
Applicants will be called
back for interviews.
Dow said she was
encouraged by the people
she saw at the job fair.


COUNTY: Officials vow to consider tax abatement on 'case-by-case' basis


Continued From Page 1A
in accordance with Florida
statute. All other negoti-
ated economic develop-
ment agreements for new
or expanding businesses
will be formalized in a sep-
arate contract.
For a tax abatement
application to be consid-
ered, a minimum of 10
new jobs must be created
by the company and it
must provide a .$250,000
minimum capital invest-
ment.
Carlton Jones, IDA
board member, said
$250,000 was a small
amount to create 10 jobs.
Williams said the major


purpose of abatement is
job creation and the mini-
mum dollar investment
was reasonable because
the county could sacrifice
$20,000 the amount of
tax that would be abated
in the minimum situation
- to create those 10 jobs.
Commissioner Jody
DuPree agreed.
"It's all about jobs, it's
not about capital improve-
ment," he said.
Other recommenda-
tions included :approv-
ing abatement for a base
number of 5 years and
considering granting the
incentive based on how


many local jobs will be
created. The county's goal
is to have all created jobs
filled locally, a goal that is
not always realistic based
on the circumstance.
Williams said certain
situations will have to be
considered on case-by-
case- basis and the type
of business applying will
have to meet statutory
requirements.
The board discussed
questions and answers
previously presented to
its special counsel, such
as how land value is
determined for an abate-
ment project.


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Many type 2 diabetics and hypertensive
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Jim Foole, IDA exec-
utive director, also
announced for the
board's consideration
that a company was seek-
ing to locate in the area
based on the tax incre-


ment financing the
difference between the
base tax rate of an estab-
lished zone and the tax
increase induced by the
business' improvements
to the zone it could


receive front the county.
Stewart said TIF is a
valuable tool for local
governments' use if the
company's infrastructure
will enhance the local
economy as a whole.


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Natosha Michelle Stacey Earl
Murrell Stafford
DOB: 3/24/89 DOB: 11/11/77
Height: 5' 7" Height: 6'4
Weight: 120 Ibs. Weight: 285 Ibs.
Hair: Brown Hair Brown
Eyes: Brown Eyes: Blue
Wanted for: Dealing in Stolen Wanted For VOP Ct 1-Obtaining
.Property: Trafficking Controlled Substance By Fraud, Ct
2-Uttering A Forgery
WANTED AS OF 10/4/10
ANYONE WITH- INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
ICOLUMBIA CU y www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General



MATTRESS OUTLET


W;W'. Same Da Delver AvailaDle m N1

BED BE1S BEDS


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


w


I














OPINION


Wednesday, October 6, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


'Milk Party'

spotlights

kids' issues

in Florida

n Sept. 29, some
1,700 people
braved a power-
ful rainstorm in
Miami to attend
a "Milk Party" rally in sup-
port of the recently formed
Children's Movement of Florida,
which aims to bring attention to
the plight of the youngest and
most neglected residents of this
state. Forget the bitter political
environment this is a noble
cause that everyone in Florida,
regardless of party or political
inclination, can support because,
heaven knows, the children of
Florida need help.
By practically every significant
measure of children's needs, this
state consistently ranks among
the lowest in the union, often
close to last
Almost 800,000 children,
nearly one out of five, does not
have health insurance, double
the national average. Florida
ranks 49th in the nation in the
percentage of uninsured chil-
dren.
When uninsured children in
this state are finally able to enter
a hospital, they are 1.5 times
more likely to die than insured
children.
Florida ranks 47th in the
percentage of women receiving
prenatal care in the first trimes-
ter.
Florida has a high rate of
child abuse 29.6 cases per
thousand children, more than
double the national rate.
SThe depressing list goes on.
The state's pre-kindergarten pro-
gram, which ranks 34th among
38 states in per-pupil funding,
fails to meet most of the national
standards. The organizers of the
"Milk Party," a takeoff on the tea
party, are betting that the people
of Florida are fed up and ready to
do something about it
SItfs not merely a matter of
helping children, but of creat-
ing a better future for Florida.
Improved care for children
results in increased school
achievement and graduation
rates, reduced crime (and less
money spent for incarceration),
and fewer costs to the public for
hospitalization, insurance and
other needs.
Its the best news and the
best hope Florida's children
have had in a long time.
i-The Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished'and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work. '
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Legislature's shame-
less purge of the
Public Service
Commission is com-
plete. Now it is time to reform
the process for selecting these
important regulators.
Just nine months after the
PSC's historic pro-consumer
rejection of record rate hike
requests by Florida's two
largest power companies, four
of the PSC's five members
have been unceremoniously
replaced.
Gov. Charlie Crist recently
appointed West Palm Beach
Assistant City Manger
Eduardo Balbis, an engi-
neer by training, and Tampa
business law attorney Julie
Brown to the five-member
PSC. They are set to assume
their $130,036-a-year jobs in
January.
Balbis and Brown join
Jacksonville City Councilman
Art Graham, who is president
of an environmental con-
sulting firm, and state Rep.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Cop 'arrests' stepdaughter's sex partner


response to national
news reports this
week that a San
Jose, Calif., police
officer staged a false arrest of
a 15-year-old boy for having
consensual sex with the man's
14-year-old stepdaughter.
Yes, Dad did it in full police
regalia, and clearly scared
the heck out of the boy, as a
smart-phone video of the five-
minute "arrest" shows.
The officer is now on admin-
istrative leave pending an
investigation.
The boy's parents who wit-
nessed the "arrest" are furious
at the dad and have hired a
lawyer. The boy, who later had
misdemeanor charges brought
against him related to under-
age sex, as did the daughter,
reportedly also wants to see
the officer himself behind
bars.
I'll leave all that for the
authorities to sort out.
But back to the stepfather. I
love where this guy is coming
from.
Now I can offer endless
caveats here that, yes, the
officer was abusing his author-
ity, he would have been better
served "policing" his step-
daughter to begin with, and on
it goes.
However, if more daugh-
ters had fathers much less
stepfathers like this, how
much better off young women
- and, for that matter, young
men would be.
For some reason I can't
quite fathom, it drives certain


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com
people crazy when I point out
that girls do not typically have
anywhere near the voracious
sexual appetites that boys do.
But, duh, I think it's safe to
say that a 14-year-old girl's
romantic fantasies revolve
around being loved and adored
and, well, romanced not giv-
ing oral sex or experiencing
full sexual intercourse.
Yet, strangely, our culture
today insists that girls be as
sexually aggressive as boys.
And, in fact, many parents of
high-school and even junior-
high boys will tell you that
girls are, increasingly, socially
and even sexually aggressive
toward their sons.
But I'm convinced that this
isn't what girls want at all.
So it should be no surprise
thatcollege women routinely
bemoan to researchers and
sociologists the loss of dating
and romance on campus, and
that it's been replaced with
a demeaning, sexual-hookup
culture.
Meanwhile, most of our
discussions about sex and
younger teens revolve around
"of course they are going to
do it" and ignore the fact that
girls and boys are built so dif-
ferently. And that most girls


are not as eager to have sex
as most boys, so why aren't
we better protecting girls from
what they typically don't want
anyway?
Apparently this girl told her
stepfather that she had had
sex with the boy.
Isn't it quite possible she
wanted to be protected by hid-
ing behind her stepfather?
It's a great lesson for any
boy to see a man protecting
a woman. And it's a great
lesson for a girl to know that
that's what she should expect
from a good man.
In any event, it shouldn't
take a badge and a gun for a
father to protect a daughter.
Treating her well, lov-
ing her and talking to her
over time about how a boy
should respect her and how
she should respect herself
will probably offer the best
protection against the sexual
advances of a young man.
(What fathers should be
teaching their sons about
respecting a woman would
make a full column itself.)
The fact that so many
families today aren't being
protected by a husband and
father is a tragedy, true
enough.
But when a dad is in the
home, letting even the best
of young men know that he is
willing to appropriately step
in and protect his daughter
as needed? Priceless.

M Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes. a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


Ronald Brise of North Miami,
a pastor who also heads a
consulting firm and a tele-
communications company, as
new members of the PSC.
Regardless of whether the
new PSC foursome are good,
qualified appointments has
been lost in a pall of brazen
politics that enveloped the
selection process.
Panama City accountant
Steve Stevens and former
newspaper editor David
Klement were rejected dur-
ing confirmation hearings
just weeks after the FPL
and Progress Energy votes,
and Nancy Argenziano and
Nathan Skop were candid
early on that they knew their
days were numbered because
they had dared to cross the
big utilities which for, well,
ever had gotten whatever
they asked for from the PSC.
Argenziano and Skop also
had led a vocal and visible
campaign to bring obviously
needed ethics reforms to
an agency where regulators


were openly cozy with the
regulated.
The Legislature not only
frowned upon their ethic
reform efforts, it rejected all
legislative proposals for any
changes at the PSC.
Throughout this whole
sorry episode, it has become
powerfully clear that our law-
makers care more about the
interests of the big utilities
than the interests of Florida
consumers.
The Legislature refused to
enact reforms at the PSC in
the face of blatant unethical
practices by commissioners
and staffers alike.
So it is doubtful we can
expect them to do the right
thing and reform the PSC
nominating process in a man-
ner that removes all doubt
about the objectivity and pur-
pose of those recommending
PSC appointees.
Yet, that is exactly what
should be done during the
next session.
N Ocala Star-Banner


4A


Dan K.Thomasson



Internet


could be


a deadly


weapon

WASHINGTON
-- Sometimes
man is too
smart for his
own good.
That's when the things he
invents lead to abuse and results
that are unbearable and utterly
avoidable and often seem to out-
weigh the benefits of his genius.
Take the Internet, for
instance, and the technology
that permits the uncontrolled
ability to devastate one's fellow
man or woman by invading
their privacy and embarrassing
them before the entire world.
If you' believe I am referring
to the recent tragic events that
led to the suicide of a Rutgers
University student, you are cor-
rect
As most everyone knows,
two of his fellow students clan-
destinely recorded his private
encounter with another man
and streamed it online. So com-
pletely devastated was he that
he jumped from New York's
George Washington Bridge.
This horrible prank now has
ruined the lives of not only the
boy's family but also the two
students who triggered the
incident Even if they are acquit-
ted of the invasion of privacy
charges filed against them,
which seems unlikely, they will
suffer their whole lives knowing
they caused a death.
But that was just the latest
in a series of these unfortunate
incidents brought on by those
who find it entertaining to bully
or expose with ease in the new
age of electronic communica-
tion. Putting these gadgets
in the hands of some is like
providing a loaded revolver to a
six-year-old and telling him to go
play with his friends. Pranks and
bullying once thought of as part
of growing up have taken on an
extreme dimension. In reality
they weren't funny then and
they are horrific now.
A beautiful young lady hangs
herself after a mother posing as
a teen-age boy on the Internet
ridicules her. Another does the
same when she is bullied by fel-
low students. In the latter case,
the moronic students who drove
her to this are facing years in
prison for their maliciousness
- a tragedy in itself.
These are extreme cases, but
there are plenty more that while
they do not lead to such dire
consequences result in life shat-
tering events.
Where is all this going,
one must ask? The resound-
ing answer, of course, is who
knows? There seems absolutely
no way to contain the evil inten-
tions on this communications
highway. The Internet is so
vast the government and the
courts can deal with only
the most egregious abuses.
Exhibitionism seems far more
rampant because the ability to
practice it has never been so
great Now there are tattoo par-
lors everywhere and young men
and women seem determined to
emulate the antics of Angelina
Jolie, apparently the Hollywood
queen of body art Back in the
day, youngsters pretty much
quit drawing on themselves
when they left kindergarten.
But that example of the new
world pales in comparison to the
death of a brilliant young man
victimized by technology unre-
strained by judgment or accept-
able morals.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION


Time to reform the PSC process










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL &.STATE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


Nobel Prize honors super-strong carbon


By MALCOLM RITTER and
KARL RITTER
Associated Press

NEW YORK It is the
thinnest and strongest
material known to mankind
no thicker than a single
atom and 100 times tough-
er than steel. Could gra-
phene be the next plastic?
Maybe so, says one of two
scientists who won a Nobel
Prize on Tuesday for isolat-
ing and studying it.
Faster computers, light-
er airplanes, transparent
touch screens the list
of potential uses runs on.
Some scientists say we
can't even imagine what
kinds of products might
be possible with the sub-
stance, which hides in ordi-
nary pencil lead and first
was extracted using a piece
of Scotch tape.
Two Russian-born
researchers shared the
physics Nobel for their
ground-breaking experi-
ments with graphene,
which is a sheet of carbon
atoms joined together in
a pattern that resembles
chicken wire.
Andre Geim and
Konstantin Novoselov of the
University of Manchester in
England used Scotch tape
to rip off flakes of graphene
from a chunk of graphite,
the stuff of pencil leads.
That achievement, reported
just six years ago, opened


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Professor Andre Geim (left) and Dr. Konstantin Novoselov, who have have been awarded
the Nobel Prize for Physics, pose for pictures outside Manchester University, Manchester,
England, Tuesday. The scientists shared the $1.5 million Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday
for 'ground-breaking experiments' with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind as
carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens.


the door to studying what
scientists say should be
a versatile building block
for electronics and strong
materials.
"It has all the potential
to change your life in the
same way that plastics did,"
Geim, 51, a Dutch citizen,
told The Associated Press.
"It is really exciting."
Michael Strano, a chem-
ist at MIT, said trying to
predict its uses would be
"folly ... We can't even imag-
ine the uses we're going to


find."
But he and others have
some ideas. Graphene's
electrical properties mean it
might make for faster tran-
sistors, key components of
electronic circuits, and so
lead to better computers,
the Nobel committee says.
As a single layer of carbon
atoms it's tiny, which could
pay off in more powerful
cell phones, several scien-
tists said.
And since it's practically
transparent, it could lead to


see-through touch screens
and maybe solar cells, the
committee says.
Novoselov, 36, is the
youngest Nobel winner
since 1973 of a prize that
normally goes to scientists
with decades of experience.
He holds both British and
Russian citizenship. The
2010 Nobel Prize announce-
ments began Monday
with the medicine aw-rd
going to British researcher
Robert Edwards, 85, for in
vitro fertilization.


LOCAL STOCKS


YTD
Name Ex DIv YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.68 5.7 13 29.36 +.50 +4.7
AmExp NY .72 1.9 14 38.28 -.77 -5.5
AutoZone NY ...... 15 233.33 +2.70 +47.6
BkofAm NY .04 .3 90 13.56 +.41 -10.0
BobEvans Nasd .80 2.8 13 28.87 +.81 -.3
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 4.8 13 13.65 +.27 -14.6
CSX NY 1.04 1.9 17 56.06 +1.61 +15.6
Chevron NY 2.88 3.5 10 83.39 +2.08 +8.3
Cisc Nasd ...... 17 21.99 +.23 -8.2
Ciigrp NY ......... 4.13 +.10 +24.8
CocaCI NY 1.76 3.0 19 59.66 +.78 +4.7
Delhaize NY 2.02 2.8 ... 71.90 +1.20 -6.3
DirFnBear NY ......... 12.47 -.82 -35.8'
DrFBulls NY ... ...... 22.75 +1.31 -7.9
FamilyDIr NY .62 1.4 17 45.34 +.97 +62.9
FordM NY ...... 7 13.01 +.17 +30.1
GenElec NY .48 2.9 17 16.51 +.41 +9.1
HomeDp NY .95 3.0 18 31.74 +.07 +9.7
iShEMkts NY .59 1.3 ...46.11 +.82 +11.1
iShR2K NY .79 1.1 ...68.84 +1.90 +10.2
Intel Nasd .63 3.3 12 19.15 +.28 -6.1
Level3 Nasd ......... .94 -.02 -38.5


Name Ex Dlv
Lowes NY .44
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd ..
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ..
OcciPet NY 1.62
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShsCQQQNasd .33
PrUShS&P NY
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P5OOETFNY 2.31
SearsHldgs Nasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd ..
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SPDR Fncl NY .16
TimeWam NY .85
WalMarl NY 1.21


YTD
YId PE Last Chg%Chg
1.9 17 22.67 +43 -3.1
3.2 17 75.82 +.87 +21.4
5 6.93 -.06 -34.4
2.6 7 24.35 +.44 -20.1
7 7.86 +.11 -36.4
3.7 14 54.40 +.41 +3.0
9.40 ... -10.0
'1.8 16 82.46 +1.87 +1:4
2.8 23 29.02 +1.45 +9.1
2.8 18 67.76 +.89 +11.4
4.2 9 17.23 +.33 -5.3
.3 31 143.01 -1.04 +31.8
.7 ... 49.66 +1.18 +8.5
... ... 28.57 -1.20 -18.5
2.5 32 43.30 +1.43 +5.2
2.0 .. 116.04 +2.29 +4.1
... 29 72.08 +3.14 -13.6
... 1.28 +.01+113.3
4.8 15 37.79 +.38 +13.4
1.1 ... 14.73 +.33 +2.3
2.8 14 30.60 +.44 +5.0
2.2 14 54.00 +.43 +1.0


COURTESY PHOTO

In appreciation of thrifty gift
The Fort White Community Thrift Shop receives a certificate
of appreciation from the Diabetes Foundation for a $4,000
donation given by the shop. Volunteers Ruth Young and Betty
Bush join chairman Douglas Moseley and shop manager
Shirely Kinser in accepting the certificate.


DEA drug take-back nets 121 tons


By ALICIA A. CALDWELL
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
daylong, nationwide effort
to get people to turn in old
or unwanted prescription
drugs has collected more


Lucy N. Webb
Mrs. Lucy N. Webb, 91 resi-
dent of Lake City, died at Su-
wannee Valley Care Center
Saturday, October 2, 2010
after an extended illness.
She was a native of Milton,
Florida, daughter of the late
Ernest C. and Beulah Griffith
Hart and widow of the late Jo-
seph T. Webb, Sr. She had made
her home in Lake City, FI since
1947 where she was a self em-
ployed sales person for Avon
Cosmetics for some twenty five
years until she retired. She en-
joyed watching birds, playing
scrabble, working crossword


than 121 tons of unused
medicine.
DEA officials said
Tuesday that 242,000
pounds of pills have been
collected at more than
4,000 prescription drug
"take-back" sites across the


puzzles, was devoted to her fam-
ily and was a member of South-
side Baptist Church in Lake City.
Survivors; Three sons, Joe Webb
(Janice), West Palm Beach, Fl.,
Steve Webb (Kay), Lake City,
Fl. and Roger Webb (Kim),
Lake City, Fl. One daughter,
Jeanette Steedley (Henry), Lake
City, Fl. Eight Grandchildren,
fifteen great grandchildren and
one on the way also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11 A.M. Wednesday,
Oct. 6, 2010 at Southside Bap-
tist Church, Lake City, FL. with
Dr. Ralph Rodriquez officiating.
Visitation with the family will be
from 10 A.M. Wednesday, Oct.


country.
The DEA held the nation-
al prescription drug round-!
up Saturday in hopes that
people would take advan-
tage of a free and legal
way to get rid of dangerous
prescription drugs.


S6, 2010 from 10 A.M. until 11
A.M. Interment will follow in
Memorial Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be made
to Haven Hospice, 6037 West
US Highway 90, Lake City, FI
32055. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 S. US Highway 441, Lake
City, Fl 32025, (386-752-1954)
is in charge of all arrangements.
Please sign the guest book
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's .classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


According tothe American Cancer Soclety, the chance of a woman having
invasive breast cancer some time during her life is about 1 in 8.

4th Annual

Tough Enough to Wear Pink

Breast Cancer Forum Luncheon

Thursday, October 14th

12 noon
Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet Hall
Speaker: Dr. Cherylle Hayes,
The Cancer Center at Lake City

Raffle including 50 FREE mammograms & other doorprizesl
15 minute Zumba demonstration by Anytime Fitness

i T THE CANCER CI-NTI.R
Tough Enough To a AKE CITY FAT LAKETCITY
v Wear Pink MM CENTER

S isl mitdCl&05 -2&or e u s a


October is National Breast

Cancer Awareness Month.

^ In the Lake City Reporter we'd ike to take
C) a moment to salute the strength and courage of
breast cancer survivors and to remember those
whose brave battle has ended.

Publishes Sunday, October 24, 2010


S Sample Ad Actual Size


*r *


SAnne Ratliff
Breast cancer survivor
for 9 years!
K: The Greatest Mother
& Grandmother!
It e all love rou. O
Big Richard. Ric hard.
Robert c R'and t-


Get your i2' (3.458inx2in) Wi

photo and special message for only $35!

For more information call Bridget or Mary at (386) 754-5440
Or stop by the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Lake City Reporter


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010,


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Habitat for Humanity
needs help
Construction volun-
teers are needed from 8
a.m to noon today and on
Thursday and Saturday at
971 NE Dyson Terrace.
E-mail jterry@hfhlakecity.
org or call (386) 590-0766.
Regular meetings are 7
p.m. the first Tuesday of
each month at the Lake
City Medical Center.

Friendship Luncheon
The October Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomer's is at 11:30
a.m. Oct. 6 at Ivey House,
14603 Main St., Alachua.
Call 438-8100 or 754-7227.

Antioch revival
Revival services are at 7
p.m. today until Thursday
at Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church in Fort
White. The guest speaker
is the Rev. Rex Anderson
and First Lady Trudy
Anderson of New Jacob's
Chapel Missionary Baptist
Church in Clermont. Call
Marilyn Frazier at (352)
318-3441.

Thursday
Juicing Workshop
A juicing workshop is 10
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Oct 7 at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State Park.
The fee is $20. A workshop
notebook and recipes are
included in the workshop.
Call (386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.org.

108th anniversary
The Rev. Alvin Baker,
New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church pastor, is


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter

Old-fashioned baptism renews the soul of those who believe
Members of the media take photographs of Johnny Gaston (far left), an associate pastor with the Broken Lance Native
American Church, and pastor Ken Miller as they help Dakota O'Berry, 14, after baptizing him in the Ichetucknee Springs on
Sunday.


speaking at 7 p.m. Oct. 7 at
Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church. The weekly wor-
ship service is in honor
of the church's 108th
anniversary. Call Ronald
V. Walter, pastor at (386)
752-1990.

Harvest Time Camp
Meeting
Lake City Church of
God is having a four-day
camp meeting. The meet-
ings are 7 p.m. Oct. 7 and
10:30 a.m.,Oct. 10. There


is a different speaker each
night: Thursday, the Rev.
Kevin Wallace; Friday, Dr.
TL. Lowery; Saturday,
the Rev. Tommy Combs;
and Sunday, Lowery. The
church is located at 173
SE Ermine Ave., corner
SE Duval Street (Highway
90).

Women of the Word
'Without Measure'
Miracle Tabernacle
Church is having-a-faj.
explosion 7:30 p.m. Ocf'


7-8. Dr. Jacquelyn Gilbert-
Grant, Sanctuary of Praise
Christian Assembly pas-
tor in Savannah, Ga., is
the speaker. The church
is located on 1190 SW
Sisters Welcome Road.
Contact Elder Kecia
Robinson at 697-1704.

Friday
National Denim Day
The City will celebrate
Lee National Denim Day.
at 9 a:m: 'Friday in the


City Hall Atrium area.
There will be a special
observance honoring
survivors and those "In
Memory." Mayor Stephen
Witt will read a proclama-
tion. The community is
invited to attend. Call Alice
Childress, Denise Koon,
or Audre' Washington for
details (386) 719-5762.

Ministering in Song and
Harp
Hineni Messianic
Fellowship is hav-


I ~--ur- ._. .. -. r.~iL-


POLICE
REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.
Monday, Oct. 4
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Timothy James
SStearns, 38, homeless,
warrant: Violation of
probation on original
charges of driving while
license suspended/
revoked and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Jeremy W Dunkin,
38, 11346 Brantley Road,
O'Brien, criminal mischief,
burglary while armed,
third-degree grand theft,
failure to appear for viola-
tion of probation charges
of burglary of a dwelling,
third-degree grand theft
and grand theft auto.
Eva Marie Harger, 30,
3112 Pueblo Trail, Lake
Worth, Texas, warrant:
Third-degree grand theft.
Earl Cliffard Wooley,
27, 13380 76th Terrace,
ive Oak, warrant DUI
with serious bodily injury.

From staff reports


Times Square bomber gets life in jail


By TOM HAYS
and LARRY NEUMEISTER
Associated Press Writers

NEW YORK The
Pakistani immigrant who
tried to detonate a car
bomb on a busy Saturday
night in Times Square
accepted a life sentence
with a smirk Tuesday and
warned that Americans can
expect more bloodshed at
the hands of Muslims.
"Brace yourselves,
because the war with
Muslims has just begun,"
31-year-old Faisal Shahzad
told a federal judge.
"Consider me the first
droplet of the blood that
will follow."
His punishment for
building the propane-and-
gasoline bomb and driving
it into the heart of the city
in an SUV last May was a
foregone conclusion, since
the charges to which he
pleaded guilty carried a
mandatory life sentence,
which under federal rules
will keep him behind bars
until he dies.
But the former budget
analyst from Connecticut
used the courtroom appear-
ance to rail against the U.S.,
saying the country will con-
tinue to pay for occupying
Muslim countries.


f. . ... ...
LOVE,1






Kris, Shan KatyBKr7ineiidKi*Telm


"Brace yourselves, because the war
with Muslims has just begun."

Faisal Shahzad


"We are only Muslims
trying to defend our reli-
gion, people, homes and
land, but if you call us ter-
rorists, then we are proud
terrorists and we will keep
on terrorizing you until
you leave our lands and
people at peace," he told
U.S. District Judge Miriam
Goldman Cedarbaum.
Shahzad brought into
the courtroom in handcuffs,
and wearing a long beard
and white skullcap had
instructed his attorney not
to speak, and Cedarbaum
told prosecutors she didn't
need to hear from them.
That left the two free to
spar over his reasoning for
giving up his comfortable
life in America to train in
Pakistan and carry out an
attack authorities say could


have killed an untold num-
ber of pedestrians.
"You appear to be some-
one who was capable of edu-
cation and I do hope you
will spend some of the time
in prison thinking carefully
about whether the Quran
wants you to kill lots of peo-
ple," Cedarbaum said.
Shahzad responded that
the "Quran gives us the
right to defend. And that's
all I'm doing."
The judge cut him off at
one point to ask if he had
sworn allegiance to the U.S.
when he became a citizen
last year.
"I did swear, but I did not
mean it," Shahzad said.
In his address to the
court, he said Osama bin
Laden "will be known as no
less than Saladin of the 21st-


century crusade" a refer-
ence to the Muslim hero of
the Crusades. He also said:
"If I'm given 1,000 lives, I will
sacrifice them all."
Shahzad smirked when
the judge imposed the sen-
tence. Asked if he had any
final words, he said, "I'm
happy with the deal that God
has given me."
Afterward, the head of
the FBI's New York office,
Janice K Fedarcyk, cited


evidence that Shahzad
hoped to strike more than
once.
"Shahzad built a mobile
weapon of mass destruc-
tion and hoped and intend-,
ed that it would kill large
numbers of innocent people
and planned to do it again
two weeks later," Fedarcyk
said in a statement. "The
sentence imposed today
means Shahzad will never
pose that threat again."


e arc

7 *Kazmierski


SFor0 County Commissioner

.l District 2


OB/7YN

DANNA GREENE MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH






; I






*Meet with a provider the day you come in
eSame day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr.- Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


ing Claren and Nancy
Mcqueen perform music
and lead worship at
7:30 p.m. Oct. 8 in St.
Augustine. Call (904) 827-
9731.

Answers to important
teen problems
Lake City Adventist
Church is hosting show-
ings of "Most Important
Questions" at 7 p.m. Oct.
8 through Oct. 16 on chan-
nel 3ABN. The 10-part TV
series will tackle the big-
gest problems teens are
facing today. Call 755-2382
or 344-4142.

Flu vaccine and shots
The Columbia County
Health Department now
has flu vaccine and is offer-
ing flu shots by appointment
Monday through Friday,
$25 and Medicare Part B is
accepted. Pneumonia vacci-
nations are also available for
those eligible at $40.

Saturday
Cowboy Action
Shootout
Fort White Gun
Club hosts 10th Annual
"Shootout on the Santa Fe."
The once-a-year Cowboy
Action Shoot is going to
happen this Saturday at the
Fort White Gun Club, 18808
SR 47, Fort White (about
1/2 mile south of US 27 on
SR 47).
Lots of action all
shooters dressed in period
costume and armed with
firearms common in the
1800s. It is truly a unique
spectacle.The competition
is sanctioned by the Single
Action Shooting Society
(SASS). Contact event
director Dan Sharp at (352)
332-6212.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, October 6, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

JUNIOR GOLF
Membership open
for foundation
Membership to the
North Florida Junior
Golf Foundation is open.
The NFJG is the only
non-profit junior golf
tour (ages 8-18) in North
Florida. It is sponsored
and endorsed by the
PGA Tour and the North
Florida Section Northern
Chapter of the PGA.
Membership fee is $100
for October through
August.
For details, call (904)
928-0571 or visit
www.nfjg.org.

GATORS
Packages for
football games
"Journey to the
Swamp" is a Columbia
County Tourist
Development Council
initiative with Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites and
Fabulous Coach Lines
to provide packages and
transportation from Lake
City to the Florida games
against LSU, Mississippi
State and South Carolina.
Holiday Inn is offering a
two-night package, and
Fabulous Coach Lines
will provide motor coach
transportation. Local fans
can take advantage of the
transportation.
For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or
call the Holiday Inn
at 754-1411.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Open meeting
planned Tuesday
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has its annual open
meeting set for 7 p.m.
Tuesday in the pavilion
near the practice fields at
the Southside Recreation
Complex. Two officers
and five board members
for the 2011-12 baseball
season will be elected.
For details, call
president Tad Cervantes
at 365-4810.

Travel team
tryout Oct. 16
The North Florida
Blaze 10-under travel
team has a tryout
planned for 10 a.m.
Oct. 16 at the Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call
Tim Williamson at
(386) 234-0423.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High, Fort
White High bowling at
Suwannee High, 4 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Bartram Trail High
at St. Johns Golf and
Country Club, 4:15 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Newberry
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High JV
football at Branford High,
7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Ridgeview
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Florida High,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
cross country at FSU
Invitational, 7:45 a.m.


Columbia High
swimming vs. Buchholz
High, 9:30 a.m.


Lady Tigers whoop Wolfson


Columbia defeats
LadyWolfpack in
three straight sets.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com .
Make it four in a row
for Columbia High as the
Lady Tigers volleyball team
handled Wolfson High on
Tuesday in Lake City.
Columbia bounced
Wolfson from the gym in
three-consecutive games
25-7; 25-16 and 25-14,
The win improved the
Lady Tigers to 11-6 (3-3,
district) heading into a


break for homecoming:
Beth Williams led the
Lady Tigers with 14 assists
in the match.
Taylor Messer led with
13 service points and added
five kills. Leading in kills
was Arden Sibbernson with
six. She also had 10 service
points.,
Taylor Owens led the
team in blocks with five and
added three kills.
"I thought we played
well," Coach Casie
McCallister said. "Taylor
Owens played very well at
the net. She played very
aggressive and dominant.
As a team, we played well


last night and tonight. With
homecoming I'm glad to
see the focus."
The Lady Tigers have
three games when they
return to the court on
Tuesday.
Columbia opens the
week at Robert E. Lee
High in a district game
on Oct. 12 before visit-
ing'Gainesville High in a
second district match on
Oct. 14.
The week will end with
a county match against
Fort White High during
football's bye week
at 6:30. p.m.. on
Oct. 15.


Double


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Alexis Blake makes a cut against North Florida Christian on Friday in Fort
White. Blake tore his ACL in the game and will miss the remainder of the season.


I.p


* j1b.
;'f.


., ,Of f -.V


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Katherine Mathis participates in the Tigers' swim meet at Columbia Aquatic
Complex on Saturday in Lake City.






^ F i
*
',' " ,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Haley Dicks goes up for a kill against Fort
White High on Sept. 29 in Fort White.


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE They
were the heart and soul, in
either order, for Fort White
High football.
Seniors Alexis Blake
arid Kevin Poteat both suf-
fered ACL tears in Friday's
game against North Florida
Christian School and are
lost for the season.
"It is not good," Fort
White head coach Demetric
Jackson said when asked
about the report from the
doctors. "We suspected it
on Saturday and confirmed
it Monday afternoon and
(Tuesday) morning."
Blake was a two-way
starter for the Indians, and
was the primary threat on
offense. In the four games
following the opening day
shutout, Blake had aver-
aged 117 yards per game
rushing and scored 10
touchdowns. He was tied
for the team lead in recep-
tions with six.
"Lett was always a threat,"
Jackson said. "We have to
change up our philosophy
on offense. I don't think it
is hitting Alexis yet. I talked
to him on the phone and
he is either not understand-
ing the injury or taking it
extremely well."
Poteat was leading the
team in tackles going into


the North Florida Christian
game. He has 24 solo tackles
and 19 assists with one sack.
"Kevin is taking it a little
hard," Jackson said. "He
went through it last year."
Poteat was hurt in the
fourth game of the season
his junior year.
"He is a hard-nosed line-
backer and was really start-
ing to come into his own,"
defensive coordinator Ken
Snider said. "He was out
most of last year with an
ACL in the other leg. I hate it
for someone who worked so
hard to rehabilitate the other
knee. He lived for football."
With Blake starting at
running back and safety,
and Poteat shoring up the
new 3-4 defense, Jackson
said the loss also would
hurt the Indians' depth.
"These are guys who
invested the most," Jackson
said. "They were there
every day for workouts and
they were the kids who
practiced the hardest. It
was an unfortunate kind of
accident because there was
no contact. Their leg buck-
led on both of them."
Jackson said the school
would discuss how to pro-
ceed with the families.
"We will continue to be
there for them," Jackson
said. "Our prayers are with
them and we wish them the
best."


Tigers host



first meet


Cross country
competes at
Bartram Trail.
From staff reports

Columbia High swim-
ming hosted Yulee and
Fernandina Beach high
schools on Saturday for the
team's first home meet of
the season.
Buchholz High will visit
the Columbia Aquatic
Complex for a 9:30 p.m.
meet on Saturday.
Columbia results follow
by event:
200 freestyle Lauren
Lee, first; Jordyn Smith,
second; Sara Woodfield,
fourth; Tammy Roberts,
sixth; Joseph Piccioni,
first; Jacob Finley, second;
Jackson Nettles, fourth;
200 IM Katherine
Mathis, second; Aleena


Fields, fourth; Meghan
Collins, fifth; Kaicie
Chasteen, sixth; David
Morse, third; Cody Smith,
fourth;
50 freestyle Lindsay
Lee, second; Woodfield,
fourth; Cyntaria Anderson,
sixth; Alexis Angstadt,
ninth; Levi Harkey, third;
Jonathan Smith, fourth;
Justin Tompkins, fifth; Cale
Shaw, sixth;
100 butterfly Mathis,
first; Kayla Williuns, third;
Vicki Duncan, fifth; Fields,
seventh; Jonathan Smith,
second; Piccioni, fourth;
100 freestyle-Heather
Burns, second; Cheyenne
Brown, fourth; Joana Mata,
sixth, Collins, seventh; Alan
Henry, first; Harkey, third,
Noillh -, sixth, Carlos Diaz,
eighth;
500 freestyle Lauren
* PREP continued on 3B


disaster


*Fort White loses star

seniors Blake, Poteat.


- I


'. "'














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN UAB at UCF
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, American League
Division Series, game I, Texas at Tampa
Bay
5 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, National League
Division Series, game I. Cincinnati at
Philadelphia
8:30 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, American League
Division. Series, game I, New York at
Minnesota
SOCCER
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Women's national teams,
exhibition, U.S. vs. China, at Chester, Pa.

BASEBALL

AL leaders final


JHamilton Tex
MiCabrera Det
Mauer Min
ABeltre Bos
Cano NYY
Buter KC
ISuzuki Sea
Konerko CWS
CrawfordTB
VMartinez Bos


G AB
133 518
150 548
137510
154 589
160 626
158 595
162 680
149 548
154600
127493


R H Pct
95 186.359
III 180,328
88 167.327
84 189.321
103 200.319
77 189.318
74 214.315
89 171 .312
110 184.307
64 149.302


RUNS-Teixeira, New York, 113;
MiCabrera, Detroit, I11 ;Jeter, New York,
I II; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 110; JBautista,
Toronto, 109; Cano, New York. 103;
AJackson, Detroit, 103.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit. 126;
ARodriguez, New York. 125; JBautista,
Toronto, 124; Guerrero, Texas, 115;
DelmYoung, Minnesota, 112; Konerko,
Chicago, 11I; Cano, New York, 109.
HITS-ISuzuki,Seattle,214;Cano, New
York, 200; ABeltre, Boston, 189; Butler.
Kansas City, 189; Markakis, Baltimore, 187;
JHamilton,Texas, 186; MYoung,Texas, 186.
DOUBLES-ABeltre, Boston, 49;
Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46; DelmYoung,
Minnesota, 46; Butler, Kansas Cty, 45;
MiCabrera, Detroit, 45; Markakis,
Baltimore, 45;VWells,Toronto, 44.
TRIPLES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 13;
AJacksonl Detroit, 10; Span, Minnesota,
10; Pennington, Oakland, 8; Gardner, New
York, 7; Granderson, New York, 7; Maler,
Kansas City, 6; Podsednik, Kansas City, 6.
HOME RUNS-JBautista, Toronto, 54;
Konerko, Chicago, 39; MiCabrera, Detroit,
38; Teixeira, New York, 33; JHamllton,
Texas, 32; DOrtiz. Boston. 32; VWells,
Toronto, 31.
STOLEN BASES-Pierre, Chicago, 68;
RDavis, Oakland, 50; Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 47; Gardner, New York, 47; Figgins,
Seattle, 42; ISuzuki, Seattle, 42; BUpton,
Tampa Bay, 42.
PITCHING-Sabathia, New York, 21-
7; Price, Tampa Bay, 19-6; Lester, Boston,
19-9; PHughes, New York, 18-8; Cahill,
Oakland, 18-8; Verlander, Detroit, 18-9;
CBuchholz, Boston, 17-7; ESantana, Los
Angeles, 17-10; Pavano, Minnesota, 17-11.
STRIKEOUTS-JerWeaver, Los
AAgeles, 233; FHemandez, Seattle, 232;
Lester, Boston, 225; Wrlander, Detroit,
119; Uriano, Minnesota, 201; Sabathia,
New York, 197; CLewis,Texas, 196.
SAVES-RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 45;
Soria, Kansas City, 43; NFeliz, Texas, 40;
Gregg, Toronto, 37; Papelbon, Boston, 37;
MaRivera, NewYork, 33;Aardsma, Seattle,
31.

AL Division Series

Tampa Bay vs.Texas
Today
Texas (Lee 12-9) at Tampa Bay (Price
19-6), 1:37 p.m.
Thursday
Texas (Wilson 15-8) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 13-15), 2:37 p.m.
Saturday
Tampa Bay (Garza 15-10) at Texas
(Lewis 12-13), 5:07 p.m.

Minnesota vs. NewYork
Today
NewYork (Sabathia 21-7) at Minnesota
(Uriano 14-10), 8:37 p.m.
Thursday
NewYork (Pettitte 11-3) at Minnesota
(Pavano 17-1I), 6:07 p.m.-
Saturday
Minnesota (Duensing 10-3) at New.
York (Hughes 18-8), 8:37 p.m.

NL leaders final


G AB
CGonzalez Col 145 587
Votto Cin 150547
OlnfanteAtl 134471
Tulowitzki Col 122470
Holliday StL 158 596
Pujols StL 159 587
PradoAti 140599
Zimmerman Was 142 525
Braun.Mil 157619
HRamirez Fla 142 543


H Pct.
197.336
177.324
151 .321
148.315
186.312
183.312
184.307
161 .307
188.304
163 .300


RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 115; Weeks,
Milwaukee, I 12;CGonzalez,Colorado, II I;
Votto, Cincinnati, 106;Werth, Philadelphia,
106; Braun, Milwaukee, 101; AHuff, San
Francisco, 100; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 100;
Prado,Atlanta, 100; Uggla, Florida, 100.
RBI-Pujols, St. Louis, 118; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 117; Votto, Cincinnati, 113;
Howard, Philadelphia. 108; Uggla, Florida,
105; McGehee, Milwaukee, 104; Braun,
Milwaukee, 103;ADunn, Washington, 103;
Holliday, St. Louis, 103; DWright, New
York, 103. -
HITS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 197;
Braun, Milwaukee, 188; Holliday, St. Louis,
186; Prado, Atlanta, 184; Pujols, St. Louis,
183; Votto, Cincinnati, 177; AdGonzalez,
San Diego, 176.
DOUBLES-Werth, Philadelphia. 46;
Braun, Milwaukee, 45; Holliday, St. Louis,
45;ATorres. San Francisco, 43; Loney, Los
Angeles, 41; Prado, Atlanta, 40; ASorlano,
Chicago, 40.
TRIPLES-Fowler, Colorado, 14;
SDrew, Arizona, 12; AEscobar, Milwaukee,
10; JosReyes, New York. 10; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 10; CGonzalez, Colorado, 9i
ATorres, San Francisco, 8.
HOME RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 42;


ADunn,Washington, 38;Votto, Cincinnati,
37; CGonzalez, Colorado, 34; Uggla,
Florida, 33; Fielder, Milwaukee, 32;
MarReynolds,Arizona, 32.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston,
52; Pagan, New York, 37; Morgan,
Washington, 34;Victorino, Philadelphia, 34;
AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 33; HRamirez,
Florida, 32;JosReyes, NewYork, 30; Stubbs,
Cincinnati, 30.
PITCHING-Halladay,Philadelphia,21-
10; Wainwright, St. Louis, 20-1 I; Jimenez,
Colorado, 19-8; THudson, Atlanta, 17-9;
Arroyo, Cincinnati, 17-10; CCarpenter, St.
Louis, 16-9; incecum, San Francisco, 16-
10; DLowe,Atlanta, 16-12.
STRIKEOUTS-Lincecum, San
Francisco, 231; Halladay, Philadelphia, 219;
Jimenez, Colorado, 214; Wainwright, St.
Louis, 213; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 212;
Hamels, Philadelphia, 211; Dempster,
Chicago, 208.:
SAVES-BrWilson, San Francisco, 48;
HBell, San Diego, 47; FCordero, Cincinnati,
40; Marmol, Chicago, 38; Wagner, Atlanta,
37; LNunez, Florida, 30; Franklin, St. Louis,
27; Udge, Philadelphia, 27.

NL Division Series

Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati
Today
Cincinnati (Volquez 4-3) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 21-10). 5:07 p.m.
Friday
Cincinnati (Arroyo 17-10) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 6:07 p.m.
Sunday
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at
Cincinnati (Cueto 12-7); 7:07 p.m. or
807 p.m.

San Francisco vs.Atlanta
Thursday
Atlanta (Lowe 16-12) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 16-10), 9:37 p.m.
Friday
Atlanta (Hanson 10-11) at San
Francisco (Cain 13-1 ), 9:37 p.m.
Sunday
San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at
Atlanta (Hudson 17-9), 4:37 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


N.Y.Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo


Houston
Jacksonville
Indianapolis
Tennessee


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnr i
Cleveland


Kansas City
San Diego
Denver
Oakland


East
W L TPct
3 I 0.750
3 I 0.750
2 2 0.500
0 4 0.000
South
W L TPct
3 1 0.750
2 2 0.500
2 2 0.500
2 2 0.500
North'
W L TPct
3 I 0.750
3 1 0.750
2 2 0.500
I 3 0.250
West
W L TPct
3 0 01.00(
2 2 0.500
2 2 0.500
1 3 0.250


PF PA
106 61
131 96
66 92
61 125

PF PA
108 102
71 III
117 92
98 68


PF PA
168 38
113 71
87 85
76 107


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Washington
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Dallas


Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Arizona
St. Louis
Seattle
San Francisco


East
W L
2 2
2 2
2 2
1 2
South
W L
3 1
3 1
2 1
0 4
North
W L
3 1
3 1
1 2
0 4
West
W L
2 2
2 2
2 2
0 4


TPct PF PA
0.750 69 68
0.750 106 73
0.333 43 38
0.000 82 106


PF PA
58 118
77 52
75 77
52 103


Sunday's Games
Denver 26,Tennessee 20
Green Bay 28, Detroit 26
N.Y.Jets 38, Buffalo 14
St. Louis 20, Seattle 3
Atlanta 16, San Francisco 14
Baltimore 17, Pittsburgh 14
New Orleans 16, Carolina 14
Cleveland 23, Cincinnati 20
Houston 31, Oakland 24
Jacksonville 31, Indianapolis 28
San Diego 41,Arizona 10
Washington 17, Philadelphia 14
N.Y. Giants 17, Chicago 3
Monday's Game
New England 41,Miami 14
Open: Kansas City, Dallas, Minnesota,
Tampa Bay
Sunday, Oct. 10
St. Louis at Detroit, I p.m.
Denver at Baltimore, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Houston, I.p.m.
Green Bay atWashington, I p.m.
Chicago at Carolina, I p.m.
Atlanta at Cleveland, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Buffalo, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Kansas City at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. I
Minnesota at N.Y Jets, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Miami, New England, Pittsburgh,
Seattle

College games

Today
UAB (1-3) at UCF (2-2), 8 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Thursday's Game
No. 7 Nebraska at Kansas State,
7:30 p.m.
Friday's Game
No. 22 Oklahoma State at Louisiana-
Lafayette, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games


No. I Alabama at No. 19 South
Carolina, 3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Indiana, Noon.
No. 3 Oregon at Washington State,
5 p.m.
No. 4 Boise State vs.Toledo, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Texas Christian vs. Wyoming,
3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Auburn at Kentucky, 7:30 p.m.
No. 9 Arizona Oregon State, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Utah at Iowa State, 8 p.m.
No. 11 Arkansas vs. Texas A&M at
Arlington,Texas, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 LSU at No. 14 Florida,
7:30 p.m.
No. 13 Miami vs. No. 23 Florida
State, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Stanford vs. Southern Cal.
8 p.m.
No. 17 Michigan State at No. 18
Michigan. 3:30 p.m.
No. 20 Wisconsin vs. Minnesota,
Noon.
No. 21 Nevada vs. San Jose State,
10:30 p.m.
No. 24 Missouri vs. Colorado, 7 p.m.
No. 25 Air Force vs. Colorado State,
2 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Alfred Dunhill Links Championship
Site: St. Andrews and Carnoustie.
Scotland. I
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Courses: St. Andrews, Old Course
(7,279 yards, par 72), Carnoustie,
Championship Course (7,412 yards, par
72) and Kingsbarns Golf Links (7,160
yards, par 72).
Purse: $4.8 million. Winner's share:
$800,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Saturday, 8:30 a.m.-noon; Sunday,
7:30 a.m:-12:30.a.m.) '
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
LPGATOUR
Navistar LPGA Classic
Site: Prattville,Ala.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail,
Capitol Hill, The Senator (6,607 yards,
par 72).
Purse: $1.3 million. Winner's share:
$195,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday-Sunday, 2-4 a.m.,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Monday, 2-4 a.m.).
Online: http:lwww.lpgo.com
PGATOUR
McGladrey Classic
Site: Sea Island, Ga.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sea Island Resort, Seaside
Course (7,055 yards, par 70).
Purse: $4 million. Winner's share:
$720,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.).
Online: http:ll//www.pgatour.com
CHAMPIONSTOUR
Constellation Energy Senior Players
Championship
Site: Potomac, Md.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course:TPC Potomac at Avenel Farm
(7,139 yards, par 70).
Purse: $2.7 million. Winner's share:
$405,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday.
1-3 p.m.; Friday, midnight-2 a.m., 1-3 p.m.;
Saturday-Sunday, midnight-2 a.m., 12:30-
3 p.m.; Monday, midnight-2 a.m.).
NATIONWIDETOUR
Chattanooga Classic
Site: Chattanooga,Tenn.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Black Creek Club (7,149
yards, par 72).
Purse: $500,000. Winner's share:
$90,000.
Television: None.
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
Men
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: USGA
Senior Amateur, through Thursday, Lake
Nona Golf & Country Club, Orlando.
Online: http:llwww.usgo.org
Women
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: USGA
Senior Women's Am, Saturday-Oct. 14,
Fiddlesticks Country Club, Fort Myers.
Online: http://www.usgo.org

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Tuesday's Games
Charlotte at Cleveland (n)
New Jersey vs.,Philadelphia (n)
Detroit at Miami (n)
Chicago at Milwaukee (n)
Washington at Dallas (n)
Orlando vs. Houston (n)
L.A. Clippers at Portland (n)
Phoenix at Sacramento (n)
Today's Games
New York vs. Minnesota at Paris,
France, 2 p.m..
Oklahoma City vs. Charlotte at
Fayettevllle, NC, 7 p.m.
'Philadelphia vs. Boston at Manchester,
NH, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Toronto vs. Phoenix at Vancouver,
British Columbia, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Memphis at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule


Thursday's Games
Carblina vs. Minnesota at Helsinki,
Finland, Noon
Montreal at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Minnesota at Carolina, 12 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 3 p.m.
Dallas at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit. 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.


GOLF REPORTS


Herring, Ayers are 2010


Quail Shoot champions


Joe Herring and Jackie
Ayers are the 2010 Quail
Shoot champions.
The twosome qualified
for the six-team shootout by
winning the Third Flight.
One team is eliminated on
each hole.'
Herring and Ayers
advanced to the final
shootout hole, Dunes No.
7, to face First Flight win-
ners Chris Cox and Dean
Soucinek, and won it with
outstanding trap play.
Other shootout qualify-
ing teams were: Garrett
Odom and Josh Dubberly,
second in First Flight; Todd
Carter and Chris McRae,
first in Second Flight; Dave
Taylor and Bill Ryan, sec-


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey


ond in Second flight; Peter
Francie and Kelly Francis,
second in Third Flight.
The 2010 Quail Shoot
Kicked off Friday with the
pairings party and putting
contest.
There was a four-way tie
for first place with Todd
Carter, Chet Carter, Keith
Hudson and Steve Long all
scoring 17. Steve Nail quali-
fied to putt for a $10,000
prize, but his attempt fell a
little short.
Saturday's first round
of the tournament was fol-


lowed by the sponsor shoot-
out, dinner, music and lots
of door prizes.
On Sunday, Randy
Heavrin had a million-
dollar shot on Ponds No.
9, but failed to hole out as
required.
Thanks to all sponsors
and participants for mak-
ing the 2010 Quail Shoot a
success.
Wednesday Blitz winners
from Sept 29:
A Division Frank
Soucinek; B Division -
Tom Harl; C Division -
Pete Skantzos; D Division.
- Terry Shay.
Ralph Beekman won the
Top of the Hill on Sept. 27.
Jack Tuggle was second.


Roberson team wins Florida


Sheriffs Boys Ranch tourney


-Title sponsor First
Federal and 84 golfers
gathered in perfect weath-
er to show their support for
the annual Florida Sheriffs
Boys Ranch tournament.
Team winners were:
Gross Division: First
place Shack Roberson,
Henry Roberson, Sam
Roberson and Jerry Taylor;
second Mike Norfleet,
Billy Hart, John Harris,
John Haire and David
Bellenger; third Mike
Connolly, Derek Harless,
Craig Cargill and Mike
Petersen.
Net Division: First place
- Thomas Carlisle, Glen
Wood and Rick Stiles;
second Terry Hunter,
Bill Frye, Dwight Lord
and Albert Williams; third
- Mike Gregory, Brad
Gregory, Len Klaskow and
Jason Furry.
Dwight Rhodes and Keith
Shaw, both at +8, barely
escaped Travis Timmons
at +7 to share most of the
spoils in the Wednesday
Blitz.
Shaw and Rhodes fat-
tened their take with two


1
61
12 N
14G
15 I
I1
16

17
18
19 1
21 F
23
26 F

27 (
a


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


winners apiece in the skins
game. Ed Higgs and Mike
McCranie had the other
skins.
Jonathan Allen (+ 7)
closed fast with three bird-
ies on the back nine in the
Saturday Blitz, but fell a
shot shy of chasing down
front-running Don Howard
,(+8).
Allen took a measure of
revenge with two winners
in the skins; game. Terry
Hunter, Donnie Thomas,
Randy Van Vleck, Scott
Kishton and Steve Patterson
each pocketed one skin.
Mark Risk, Jim Bell,
Tom Elmore and Doyle
Worthington garnered 8
points to take match one in
Good Old Boys play, over
Ed Snow, Stan Woolbert,
Merle Hibbard and Tom
Kennedy who finished with
5 points. Match two wasn't
close. Jerry West, Eli Witt,
Joe Persons andJim Stevens
had the best of it, 7-2, over


ACROSS 38 Hazing target,
once
Young mare 39 Magazine
More fertile execs
Not imagined 40 UK country
Get there 41 Coast Guard
n an insolent off.
manner 42 Furtive
Disturbing 43 Lime cooler
sounds 44 Speaker pro -
Mil. rank 46 Hosp. staffer
Quaint hotel 48 Starchy food
Heifer's hello 51 Envoy
Really big tees 55 Relieving
)utch carrier 56 Folk singer
Puffed cereal Pete -
brand 57 Wrestling
Grass-skirt venues
accessory 58 Car tag


28 Pen name
30 Ben & Jerry
rival
31 Bob Hope
sponsor
32 Spandex fiber
33 Degas or Cayce
35 Touch of frost
37 Uncles and
nephews


DOWN


Remote
"ER" setting
Corporate abbr.
Hasta -!
Sturdy lock
Hindu noble-
women


Monty Montgomery, Mike
Spencer, Howard Whitaker
and Dan Stephens.
In another good week of
individual scoring, Ed Siow
39-36-75 and Mark Risk 37-
38-75 tied for top honors.
Stan Woolbert 37-40-77,
Howard Whitaker 3840-78,
Merle Hibbard 37-42-79 and
Monty Montgdmery 41-38-
79 also had good rounds.
Eli Witt was the lone nine-
hole winner with 38 on the
back side.
The LGA played a com-
plex format that rewarded
certain shots and penalized
others. The format didn't
confuse Caroline Stevens
who -took the win. Natalie
Bryant and Sally Rivers
were in second and third
place, respectively. No chip-
ins were scored.
The Moon Golf tourna-
ment is Oct. 15, with a four-
person, nine-hole scramble
format. Night balls and
accessories will be avail-
able for purchase. The res-
taurant will open -at 5 p.m.
and tee off is 7:30 p.m. The
field is limited to the first
24 teams to sign up.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

AK C BARK SW|AIG
MER OVEN TONE
ABE LEGO ORAL
HAMMER TRIM
BEAR ACHE


T01R0 MIA FCLE
I NITI N EVLEST
ATVPINATIA
SUICH RCM P
LIAID Y H 1 KERS
HEED MAL L LEO


7 Club for Woods
8 Like crepe
paper
9 Man's pronoun
10 Curie daughter
11 Home tel.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
at QuillDriverBooks.com


12 3 143 54
112 1 I 1I 1I 1113 4J 8


books


13 Bobcats
19 Waistline
20 Astronaut's
supply
22 A Barrymore
24 Trounced
25 Kind of biolo-
gy
26 Salt away
27 Decoy
28 Yodeler's
place
29 Did the vocals
34 Skip voting
36 Flirtations
42 Emission
problems
43 Brat's oppo-
site
45 Sicily erupter
47 Baby chick
sound
48 Pod vegetable
49 Trireme mover
50 Mao -tung
52 Khan of note
53 New Year in
Hanoi
54 Before, poeti-
cally


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


rBrantley fine after rib injury


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Florida offensive coordi-
nator Steve Addazio says
quarterback John Brantley
is "doing great" after leav-
ing the team's loss at
Alabama with a rib injury.
Brantley returned on
the next series. He said


Monday he expected to
play Saturday when the
14th-ranked Gators host
No. 12 LSU.
Brantley says, "I'm a
little sore like any other
game, but nothing major,
nothing that's going to stop
me from doing anything."
Oddsmakers aren't so
sure. Several removed the
betting line on the game,


calling the Florida quarter-
back questionable.
Left tackle Marcus
Gilbert fueled speculation
about Brantley's health
Tuesday by saying he
missed practice Sunday
night. "We kept him out a
little bit," Gilbert said. "He
was limited, but I think
he'll be good to go this
week."


PREP: Boys place 22nd on Saturday


Continued From Page 11
Lee, second; Chasteen,
fourth; Duncan, sixth;
Mata, seventh; Henry,
second; Cody Smith, fifth;
Finley, sixth;
100 backstroke -
Lindsay Lee, first; Smith,
third; Williams, fifth,
Roberts, seventh; Cale
Shaw, first;
100 breaststroke
- Burns, first; Sydney
Morse, third; Brown,
fourth; Anderson, seventh;
Morse, first; Tompkins,
fourth; Diaz, sixth.

Columbia cross country
Columbia High's cross
country teams compet-


ed in the Bale, 'n' Trail
Cross Country Original
at Bartram Trail High on
Saturday.
Columbia's boys placed
22nd in the 32-team field.
Pensacola's Washington
High won the team com-
petition.
Eduardo Garcia of
Mandarin High was the
top individual with a time
of 15:44.37.
CHS runners with place
and time: Seth Peterson,
59th-17:44.96; Austin
Cunningham, 135th-
19:25.89; Octavious Buiey,
140th-19:33.23; Bobby
Hosier, 160th-20:06.10;
Taylor Viens, 191st-


21:38.68; ZacharyPeterson,
196th-22:08.44; Gary Alvin
Key, 197th-22:09.48.
Columbia's girls
placed 17th in a field of
29. Individual winner Lily
Williams (17:54.55) led.
Chiles High to first place
in the team competition.
Lady Tiger runners:
Abby Williams, 58th-
21:39.22; Michaelle
Charlotin, 112th-23:03.13;
Haley Lewis, 115th-.
23:07.90; Ashlyn Martin,
124th-23:33.69; Alyssa
Barwick, 134th-24:07.67.
The Tigers compete
in the FSU Invitational in
Tallahassee at 7:45 a.m.
Saturday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami's Demarcus Van Dyke (left) forces a fumble against Clemson's DeAndre Hopkins
during the fourth quarter of the NCAA college football game in Clemson, S.C., Saturday.

Canes find takeaways in bunches


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES
Miami coach Randy
Shannon has been telling
his defense the same thing
for years. Once a team gets
a knack for -creating turn-
overs, they tend to come in
bunches.
Such was the case against
Clemson.
And the Hurricanes
wouldn't mind seeing it hap-
pen this weekend against
No. 23 Florida State.
The 13th-ranked
Hurricanes (3-1, 1-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) had six
takeaways last weekend
in their league-opener at
Clemson, the most turn-
overs a Miami team forced
since 2005 and, maybe
most amazingly, two more
than it had in the first three
games of this year com-
bined. It's a point of empha-
sis again this week, with
good reason.
Since 2000, when turning
Sthe ball over four or more
times, Florida State is 6-
13. With three turnovers or
Less, the 'Noles are 83-32.
"A lot of it's luck,"
Shannon acknowledged
Tuesday. "But once you
get it going, it becomes a
frenzy. It becomes second
Nature. When you watch
the Clemson game, we had
some fumbles because of
hard hits, three or four
guys to the ball, making a
Tackle and then another guy
'throws himself on the ball.
We've had interceptions
late in games. These guys
believe it in now."
Only one major college
team has forced more turn-
overs in a game this sea-
son than Miami did against
Clemson: Oregon had seven



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
1^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^" ^^nE


takeaways against Arizona
State on Sept. 25.
Against Clemson, the
six takeaways had six dif-
ferent responsible parties.
Marcus Forston, Ray-Ray
Armstrong and Ryan Hill
had interceptions. Sean
Spence, DeMarcus Van
Dyke and Andrew Smith
forced fumbles.
Van Dyke's might have
been the biggest play of his
Miami career.
Beaten for a 20-yard gain
by Clemson's DeAndre
Hopkins, Van Dyke stayed
with the play and knocked
the ball loose, then picked
it up for a huge momentum
swing and one of the big-
gest plays of what became a
30-21 Miami win, Shannon
said.
"He got beat inside,
then did everything right:
Secure, strip, pull the ball
out," Shannon said. "We
needed that one in the
worst way."
Florida State (4-1, 2-0)
has been consistent, though
not necessarily spectacu-
lar, in the turnover-taking
department.
The Seminoles have
forced eight so far this sea-
son, two in each of their last
three games. Of the eight
takeaways, five have come
off interceptions.
"That's the name of the
game on defense ... affect
the quarterback," Seminoles
coach Jimbo Fisher said.
Chances are, there will
be a defensive* touchdown
on Saturday night: Miami
and Florida State have com-
bined for nine non-offen-
sive TDs in their last 10
meetings, seven of which
have been won by the
Hurricanes.
Either way, the takeaway
battle will likely be more

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHY THE COACH
P LAYEEP THE ROOKIE
CANUPH CFlVF R
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer: HE I"I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: VOCAL LEAVE SCHOOL JOSTLE
IAnswer: What the reckless driver gave the barber -
A CLOSE SHAVE


vital than usual, Miami
defensive lineman Allen
Bailey said.
"It motivates the offense
to score, because we're giv-
ing them opportunities,"
Bailey said. "I guess people
are really putting it into
affect now, using it, using
the coaching."
Just as Shannon predict-
ed, in other words.
Once the turnover snow-
ball starts rolling, Shannon
insists it's tough to stop.
"It's a point that coach ws-
Shannon and (defensive
coordinator John Lovett)
emphasized so highly over
spring football and over fall
camp," cornerback Brandon
Harris said. "We were get-
ting punished severely
for not coming up with
turnovers in practice. To
have that game with an
explosion of turnovers, six
in one game, it was amaz-
ing."
The punishment?
'We ran," Harris said.
Now they're all just run- Levy Performing A
ning to the ball on defense
instead. FLORIDA GATEWAY
"That's the special part Ticketholders must be senate
of this defense," Harris Uriclaimed seats will be n
said: "It's not just one or non-ticketholders at6:
two guys you can depend
on."




,qVNALLOW33N HT

COM5TUM CONT3YT

There will be three prizes awarded in three categories
*- Funny, Unique and Overall Cutest
V% _________ All photos will be published in the !
October 20th edition of the Lake
r(City Reporter and the 3 winners
sIk will be published on October 31st
S$25 entry fee
S* Deadline for entries is
^*^ 1 Friday, October 15th
TO ENTER:
Bring in, Mail or e-mail
~ Lake City Reporter
a 180E.DuvalStreet,
v Lake City, FL 32055
E-mail: ads@lakecityreporter.com
sk J"MH -------- 2
ILI4
I 'PET COSTUME CONTEST ENTRY FORM !*I
I Pet'sName: I
SOwner's Name:_
Address:
SPhone:
SPlease include a self addressed stamp envelope to have your I
Spent's photo returned to you. All entries must be prepaid.

LLale City Reporter d

L r(g) ^


AI&NTEDB

YOUR OLD COLUMBIA

COUNTY tAIR PHOTOS


The Lake City Reporter
will be publishing the
56th Annual Columbia
County Fair Magazine.

We are looking for old fair
photos from our readers.
SI If you have interesting, fun
fair photos let ns know!
Digital photos can
be submitted via
Se-mail to Josh at
jblackon@lakecityreporter.com '
'Please dJI ude yoer name, address, phone
date of photo and photo decriptib
Or stop by the Lake City
Reporter to have us
S scan your photos.
io Monday-Friday
8am-Spm
Ilake City Reporter
S180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055


B j4 ui


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


3 Bedroom
2 Bath

ONLY


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Alexis Blake (1) makes a tackle on North Florida Christian School receiver
Travis Blanks during Friday night's game.


Return to district play


ort White High
has several
scores to settle
Friday when the
Indians travel to
Florida High for a
7:30 p.m. kickoff.
Florida High, which
is officially Florida State
University High School, is
the defending champion
in Fort White's District
2-2B. One of the ways the
Seminoles got there last
year was by spoiling
homecoming for the
Indians, 16-14.
This is the second
playing date for the district


and Florida High (2-3) is
looking up at Fort White
(3-2). The Indians beat
Union County High, 31-12,
in its district opener,
while the Seminoles were
beaten by East Gadsden
High, 13-8.
Fort White had reeled
off three wins in a row
before losing to Class 1A
powerhouse North Florida
Christian School (4-1) last
week. The Indians' other
loss came at the hands of
Madison County High, still
perfect at 5-0, in the
opening game of the
season.


Kitchen Whirlpool appliances, 18 cubic ft
refrigerator, 30" free standing range, Marble
windows seals throughout, porcelain lavatories,
wired & braced for ceiling fans
NA I~- IrI


495r ""=m I''


Price Includes /C Monday-Friday 8:30am-6pm Saturday 8:30am-5pm Sunday 12pm-5pm
setup, skirting and steps 3973 HWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY 386-752-7751 or 1-800-355-9385

indian


S of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High cheerleaders shake their pom-poms and get the audience reed up for
another Indian kickoff.


'JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High Unity dance team members join the mascot cheering the Indians at the
start of the game against North Florida Christian School on Friday night.

2010 Indians Football Schedule


Fort White has an open
date on Oct. 15, then
will host district foe East
Gadsden High for
homecoming on Oct. 22.
In other district action
this week, East Gadsden
travels to Taylor County
High and Union County
Higli plays Bradford High
in Slarke.
Fort White's junior
varsity plays at Branford
High at 7 p.m. Thursday.
The next home game for
the .V is Oct. 14 against
Taylor County. The middle
school hosts Branford
High at 7 p.m. Oct. 12.


Madison Co. 31, Fort White 0

Fort White 14, Newberry 13

Fort White 52, Suwannee 22

Fort White 31 Union County 12

N.F. Christian 42, Fort White 28

Wk 6 Florida High A 7:30 p.m.

Wk 7 East Gadsden H 7:30 p.m.

Wk 8 Taylor County A 7:30 p.m.


Wk 9 Bradford H 7:30 p.m.

Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


BUY
" 'tcZ I LF', Miwl lnr IDrtl k


oinl 12 54
ia & .1it,.


590 SW Arlington Blvd
Phone (386)
lic. # '


I!. ..i* ,T 'l~ .`, 1 1I *! i


S.; i.


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ley *' "j ,,."m l

d. #113 Lake City, FL
)752-0580
Funeral Services Cremation Services Prearrmugement Pluining
458 S. Marion Ave, Lake City
752-1234 ww~-'.parrishf;unilIyfuerdlhome.com


LL.. l I- I I


L IEat More, Pay Less! Fresh
ster S.. Baked
D[ J SALADS COMBO Cookies

A'': '. t i. 'D.'S; :M0 R-. .
m' '"..." ... ,. " '. ,o, a".
'^^i?^________'*v--^~~~ r t.) ^ -. _______*^^


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olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake Ciy (and


Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010 ',


Christian Service Center: A friend to those in need


Since its begin-
ning, Christian
Service Center
has worked to
help the com-
munity.
The nonprofit organiza-
tion was formed in 1982 by
a group of pastors to help
people in need. It is sup-
ported by donations from
churches, individuals and
businesses.
It currently provides
several services including
clothing, utility and spiri-
tual assistance and more.
And soon the center will
offer its newest service:
the CSC Lighthouse
Disaster Recovery
Warehouse.
"It's been a long time
coming," said CSC Shirley
McManus, executive direc-
tor.
CSC will host an open
house for the warehouse
from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday.
Construction began
March 31 on the 6,000-
square-foot warehouse,
which offers a drive-
through. It will supply
furniture, appliances and
household items to people
that have been affected
by a disaster in Columbia,
Suwannee and Hamilton
counties.
"We're looking to
be able to provide the
essentials that they have
lost to rebuild their life,"
McManus said.
Within the last five
years, there have been
hurricanes and tornadoes
in the area.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Christian Service Center Executive Director Shirley McManus and her assistant, Charlie Suydam, stand inside the center's
clothing room where shirts, pants, costumes, coats and jackets fill the racks and shelves. 'The numbers of people here have
increased dramatically,' McManus said. 'There were 3,024 last month for services. That is more like a Christmas month, and
even that beat the Christmas month.'


"I think I really realized
there was a need when a
tornado came right down
the street there and went
around the building and
didn't destroy it," she
said. "I knew we had to
do something to provide


for people that have lost
everything."
There is nothing sadder
than seeing the eyes of
a family that has nothing
left, McManus said. The
center wanted to be able
to help start the rebuilding


process.
The building is totally
paid for, which is a real
blessing, she said.
'The Lord is in it,
because he provided,"
McManus said. 'The
money didn't come out of


funds for clients. It was
separate, donated funds."
The open house will also
serve as a kickoff for.the
CSC matching funds drive,
she said. Sponsors match
donations during the drive.
McManus wants to


have the warehouse fully
stocked with appliances
and furniture in good con-
dition and not in need of
repairs, she said. CSC will
work with other agencies
in the area, such as the
American Red Cross, to
find people in need.
Eventually a separate
fund will be set up to help
families through the ware-
house, McManus said.
Money for the regular ser-
vices of the CSC will not
go toward the warehouse.
Instead it will be self-sus-
taining.
McManus also wants
to open a gift shop in the
warehouse to bring in
additional funding.
Receiving publicity in
.the Lake City Reporter
brings awareness about
the needs of the CSC and
its matching funds drive,
she said. The money for
the drive brings in funds to
help sustain the organiza-
tion throughout the year.
, Publicity also directs
people to a resource, she
said.
"It amazes me when
people say, 'I have never
heard of you,"' McManus
said. "We've been here 28
years. You've never heard
of us because you never
needed us."
Christian Service
Center is located at 441
NW Washington St. The
warehouse is next to
the center of Hilton and
Washington streets. Call
(386) 755-1770.


$25 Prize Weekly Winner
<'Coni< rules aid ,'iii fl eiry M.m, in "ll.v' p.ip,.'r.


Iatkc City Reportcr


H ~t~^>\/^ "w e>f ,, -- ---- "" i 1

i 1 0.1 ADrafts

^^..v[Me^. W.cQ^



^M^&"" a


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!


1) ld WIa
' {y^ U;~C*-WU ISBHMK~EIwi*1


au










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
o10 q s..


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
AfA'AR! You ~/oUJLONt /A4VIIE YELLE "'BO/4,


SNUFFY SMITH


SORRY, SMIF, BUT I'LL TAKE HAMILTON'S
WORD OVER ABE'S ENNY DAY !!


;n
f1
. 9,

-go


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Woman wants her boyfriend

to hang up his party line


DEAR ABBY: My
boyfriend, "Ronnie," and
I have a very active and
"different" sex life. I'm
happy I have found some-
one who is so compatible,
but it has also presented
a problem for me when
we're out with friends.
Our bedroom activi-
ties occasionally include
a third party a female.
I'm perfectly happy with
this arrangement because
I am the one who initiated
it. However, I have a prob-
lem with Ronnie's recruit-
ing practices. He seems to
think that because I have
one friend who has joined
us, all of them are fair
game. Most of my friends
are not aware of our activi-
ties. They're mainstream,
and it's embarrassing
when he propositions
them. I try to blame it on
booze, but they get of-
fended. I have lost one
good friend over it.
I have tried repeatedly
to explain to Ronnie that
there's a time and a place
for everything. He just
doesn't get it. He says not
to worry about what oth-
ers think. I don't want to
end what we have, but I
need him to understand
that our sex life is not open


--

Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
for discussion among our
tight-knit group of friends.
Any suggestions? EM-
BARRASSED IN JER-
SEY
DEAR EMBAR-
RASSED: Because you
have explained to Ronnie
that what he's doing is
making you uncomfort-
able, that not all of your
friends are into three-
somes and it has already
cost you one friend then
face it. He doesn't WANT
to "get it." Or, this may be
his way of letting you know
that he wants to do some
recruiting of his own.
Before any more of
your private business is
broadcast, you will have to
decide if Ronnie's ability in
the bedroom makes up for
the fact that he's embar-
rassing in other important
social situations. Only you
can decide that one.
DEAR ABBY: You
probably have heard
things like this before,


rl t5I


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't limit what
you can do or let anyone
else prohibit you from mov-
ing forward with your plans.
A little aggression will be
needed regarding a part-
nership but, when dealing
with peers and colleagues,
approach whomever you
disagree with cautiously.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't let the
changes going on around
you create uncertainty or
fear. If you become too fo-
cused on what might hap-
pen, you are apt to make
mistakes. Concentrate on
doing the best job possible
and getting along with ev-
eryone. ***
GEMINI (May21-June
20): Attend functions that
can help you connect with
people in your industry or
who are working in an area
you'd like to get into. Op-
portunities are available
but you do have to go after
what you want. Children or
older relatives will play an
important role. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't let ques-
tions unnerve you. You
have to do whatever it takes
to relieve personal stress.
Taking refuge in familiar
territory may comfort you
but it won't solve the prob-
lem. Stop hiding. **


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't let someone
else's uncertainty cause
you to question what you
are doing. You have the an-
swers, so stick to your game
plan. A problem at home
may confuse you. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Partners, finances, le-
galities and contracts must
all be dealt with carefully.
Unexpected changes are
likely to surface and may
leave you in a vulnerable
position. Your practicality
and good sense will help
you make the right choice.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll be affected by
changes over which you
have no control. Take a
practical position and don't
allow anyone to push you
in a direction you don't feel
is in your best interest An
older, more experienced
individual may be able to
shed some light on your
situation. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You'll be tempt-
ed to let your heart rule
your head. You can be as
passionate as you like as
long as it doesn't lead to a
financial loss or debt. Gam-
bling and taking a risk are
off-limits. ****


SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Set your
sights on the things you
can accomplish and ignore
any temptation to follow
what someone else is do-
ing. Emotional upset due
to unexpected changes will
cause,you to make a mis-
take. Rethink your strategy.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Originality
will count when it comes to
impressing others, so don't
be afraid to be different
Getting closer to someone
with whom 'ou have a lot
in common will help you
move in the right direction
personally and profession-
ally. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Stick to your
game plan and offer what
you feel is fair. Handling
legal or financial matters
will bring good results.
Contracts, agreements, ne-
gotiations and legal settle-
ments can all be resolved
as long as you stick to the
truth. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Home, family,
love, marriage, contracts
and fixing up your home
should all be part of your
plans. The more at ease
you feel about where you
live and the less stress you
have hanging over your
head, the better. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals B
"BAYRDBP DF LAIN VJLDIVMCN YRVB
YRN TAIYDYWJN KDYR KRDOR
L D C C D AB V D I N F Y A C N I V Y N YRN
JDFVJHVBYVPNF AT YRNDI KNVCYR."
I N S F Y A W Y
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It was his humanity... that truly defined the greatness
of his work." TV producer Susan Zirinsky, on correspondent Harold Dow
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-6


CLASSIC PEANUTS


-- r 1
i$:-I'':-
y W.".^^liifc \1


YOU WERE ) IF YOU EVER NEED
RIGHT, SOMETHING WITH A
HER3... IT \LITTLE MORSE KICK /
WORK/ TO IT, I'VEOT
SHE'S BUDDIES AT THE
VERTICAL FIIRE DEPARTMENT!





0-6V .


Page Editor: Emogene Grahamx, 754-0415


but I don't know where to
turn.
I have been dating "Jeff"
for five years and we have
a lot of fun together. Last
week Jeff proposed mar-
riage and I choked! Now
I'm having doubts about
everything, and he's get-
ting impatient with me be-
cause I haven't given him
an answer.
Things are not going
the way I had hoped, Abby.
Everything is falling apart.
Does this happen often?
How do I know if he's the
right one? PANICKED
IN PITTSBURGH
DEAR PANICKED:
It doesn't happen "often,"
but panicking at making
a lifetime commitment
certainly isn't unheard of.
You need to relax, calm
down, and .realize that
you have spent five enjoy-
able years with Jeff or the
relationship would have
ended. Then ask yourself
how you would feel about
a lifetime of similar experi-
ences', and you'll have the
answer you're looking for.
I hope you'll be very hap-
py together.
a Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


II',i piI r ?T!j7


4 D N.~I I O
r~'* I"V.r
r j~ *,,,


S 1- Nettles Sausage, Inc. store nous:
l 90swcR240 Monday- Saturday
S36-752-2510


Sugar Cured
Smoked
Hams

s1.69 lb.


Bone-In
Pork Loins
Whole or Half

,1.99 lb.


Lean Pork
Steaks


s1.69 Ib.


Sliced Smoked
Bacon
2.5 pound pack

s6.99


i -tU A'
K.^-^^p~lt


10Th ANNIVERSARY


N,
.-



i -1445 SW IdAli BELVED
LAKr CITY, FL

7+; i 7 -5 2 O20


r A.

-r-V
Exam and Necessar\ X-ravs I



S $136 -
I I e

i'l Re $ SS ING S OF $1U7
* I I l\pires October 31, 2010
- t I a % i1,101 t'
www.aspenlakecily.com


/ --r Meeting allyour sewing needs!
Fabric, qjuil & Over 2.000 Bolts of Fabric
custom embroidery store noon. zi s
Itabric. notions. zippcr~s
216 SW M.ai:t Blvd. Lake City Simplicitypattcrns
(Neje tco W.ndy s) *C.)uii
754.- 3 741 Au.horiz d S1ale & Service for-
wW.a zygene s .c Sot1:Singcr Sec'wing Machinc1
18HusvanaVIIN


-TOYO"Al
.... Rotate &
Balance
Tires
S, *Most cars & trucks
Plus t;x & supplies
SNot vld with ;iny other offer
txIrhos 10/31/10


Full Synthetic
Oil Change
,;, A s...-
-* ,9. a .
Includes up to 5 quarts
of Oil and Filter


Most cars & trucks
expires 10/31/10


..


TASTE BUDS DON
In the 2010 National Taste Test Os.".'- ;


"P Cheese
Pepperoni
Sliced Italian Sausage
Italian Sausage
Green Peppers
Black Olives
Pineapple
Mushrooms
Premium Chicken


Salami
Philly Steak
Jalapeno Peppers
Banana Peppers
Spinach
Roasted Red Peppers
Cheddar Cheese
Shredded
Provolone Cheese


Shredded Parmesan
Diced Tomatoes l
Sliced Provolone
Feta Cheese
Onions ,
Beef
Ham
Bacon I
ir.^


Order Online www.do irlo ......

CALL NOW! 386-758-3130 2372 S Hwy 90
iA,:,:,$S. FiL,.m La3PP CitvMal11


p,-;


4 ^

;'I *Cr


r __~4 W C

'19~6


*r ..
~:~',~:1~~i~I~$ir~,t~F~' ".:


77,', -.-N ,"YM L"


"--~* ';;;- '- ~'


- ------ ------ ----~~~--------~------


- -~-------~;~rx


SI .T. i" I


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. fs











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage
A~vanta


I-I





4 lines *6 days line ".25
Rate applies to private Individual selling
peon merchandise totaling S100 or les.
Each item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad iO.
4 lines 6 days tionl
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling or les.
Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.,




One Item per ad c 16a
4 lines 6 days Each addition
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,00 or less.
Each tem mustnude a price
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,00 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Eah" additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4, or less.
Each item must include a )rice.
This is a o refundable rate.




One Item per ad l-^V7 |
4 lines 6 days tlined"". 6
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 6000 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.

-e

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com


-3


Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 900 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 am Mon., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed., 10:00am. Wed., 9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:00 a.m
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without nolce




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www. Illtcecityreportcr.ico


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,
Case No. 10-114-CA
vs.
JEROME CARTER, JR., if alive and
if deceased; the Estate of JEROME
CARTER, JR., the decedent's un-
known spouses, heirs, devises,
grantees, creditors and all other par-
ties claiming by, through, under or
against him; the unknown spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees and cred-
itors of deceased persons, and all
other parties claiming by, through,
under or against them; and all un-
known natural persons if alive, and if
dead or not known to be dead or
alive, their several and respective un-
known spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees and creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through or under
those unknown natural persons; and
the several and respective unknown
assigns, successors in interest, trust-
ees or any other person claiming by;
through, under or against any corpo-
ration or other legal entity named as
defendant; and all claimants, per-
sons, or parties, natural or corporate,
or whose exact legal status is un-
known, claiming under any of the
above-named or described defend-
ants or parties claiming to have any
right, title or interest in and to the
lands and property hereinafter descri-
bed,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JEROME CARTER, JR., if
alive and if deceased; the Estate of
JEROME CARTER, JR., the dece-
dent's unknown spouses, heirs, devi-
sees, grantees, creditors and all other
parties claiming by, through, under
or against him; the unknown spous-
es, heirs, devisees, grantees and cred-
itors -of deceased persons, and all
other parties claiming by, through,
under or against them; and all un-
known natural persons if alive, and if
dead or not known to be dead or
alive, their several and respective un-
known spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees and creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through or under
those unknown natural persons; and
the several and respective unknown
assigns, successors in interest, trust-
ees or any other person claiming by,
through, under or against any corpo-
ration or other legal entity named as
defendant; and all claimants, per-
sons, or parties, natural or corporate,
or whose exact legal status is un-
known, claiming under any of the
above-named or described defend-
ants or parties claiming to have any
right, title or interest in and to the
lands and property hereinafter descri-
bed.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Complaint to Foreclose Mort-
gage has been filed by the Plaintiff,
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Florida, regarding
the following described real proper-
ty:
Lot Twelve (12), Block B, OA-
KHAVEN, a subdivision
According to the plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 5,
Pages 54-54A, public records of Co-
lumbia County, FL.
You are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, on the
Plaintiff's attomey, PAUL V.
SMITH, ESQ., whose address is P.O.
Box 2029, 4705 West U.S. Hwy. 90,
Lake City, Florida 32056, and file
the original with the Clerk of the
above-named Court on or before the
25 day of October, 2010.
IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO, judgment
by default will be taken against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
WITNESS my hand and official seal,
this 22 of September, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: Deputy Clerk
04541705
September 29, 2010
October 6, 2010


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.,
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
s*3en)ess**i<*)*ee**********


Land Services

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lie.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219

Construction

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


020 Lost & Found
BULLDOG
SLost,bulldog, white,w/brindle
spots,female
call 386-697-1197
LOST White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches
lost off of CR 242, pls call,
Children miss dog! 386-697-1197


080 Travel

Day Trip to Savannah,GA,
October 11 (Mon), lunch at Paula
Deen's and Historic Tour,
Call Nathan @ 904-259-4410

100 Job
1 Opportunities
(45- 1599
The Mobile Mechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolavemplovment.com


04541724
The City of Lake City is
now hiring for:
School Crossing Guard PT
Police Officer (2 positions)
Water Treatment Plant
Operator "C" or Pre-Certified
Trainee
Please call (386) 719-5804 or
Come to City Hall, 1st floor,
Receptionist,
205 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City, FL or go to our
website at www.lcfla.com


05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA, SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056

05524086
Full Time Office
Clerk/Auditor.,available benefits
include: vacation, sick leave,
credit union, profit sharing,
dental, health and life
insurance.Drug Free Workplace
EOE Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colburn Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025

Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care
Pre-school & Daycare.
Computer Store Sales & Techni-
cian help needed immediately.
F/T & P/T Send resume to
Star Tech, bdj@startech.cc
Legal Secretary/Paralegal, Salary
Neg., Must have exp., Fax resume
to 386-752-3185 or email to
rdzlaw@ymail.com
Manager/housekeeper/mainte-
nance person/couple for 14 unit
Mom & Pop Motel in Live Oak,
Manager Apt plus small
salary,back ground check,
computer exp, refs, exp pref,
email susanellery888@yahoo.com
with resume
Optical Assistant needed,F/T
exp a plus, we will train,
Send resume 763 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025
Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to
northfloridajobs@ gmail.com
Team Driver wanted,
must have Class A CDL
or learner's permit, $600
wk to start 828-342-0380

120 Medical
012 Employment
041541824
RN/LPN
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for RN and LPN positions.
Day and Evening PRN
positions available.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon Health-
care and Rehabilitation Center.
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE


Need English/ Spanish Medical
Assistant for a Dermatology office
in Lake City. Florida. Experience
is required, but not necessary. We
will train. Call 386-758-1965
or Fax to: 386-758-6923


04541892
F/T Administrative Assistant
wanted for busy health care
company. Strong computer
skills, knowledgeable in excel
and word. Must have good
interpersonal skills .
Send reply to Box 04106, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

05524099
SLEEP center is hiring a sleep
technician trainee; requirements
include high school diploma and
at least 6 months of direct patient
care experience; 2-4 night shifts;
please e-mail resume to
viducan1065@yahoo.com

05524101
SHANDS LIVE OAK
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER
has the following immediate
openings:
Registered Nurses
Emergency Room (PRN)
C.N.A.
Emergency Room (Full-Time)
CT Tech (Full Time)

Admissions Clerk
(Full Time)

Switchboard Operator
(Full Time)

Patient Financial Rep.-
Shands Medical Group

Competitive salary and
benefit package.

Resumes WITH cover letter
may be faxed to (386)292-8295
or email to
angeta .altman@hma.com
EOE, M/F/V/D,
Drug Free Workplace.

CNA/caregiver needed. Exp nec-
essary. Must be available Mon-Fri.
Maybe some nights & weekends.
Call 386-755-1233 for more info.


130 Part Time

Piihist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580


190 Mortgage Money

STOP FORECLOSURE,
go to:
www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.coim


310 Pets & Supplies

FEMALE AKC Registered
Yorkshire Terrier. 4 yrs.-
Full Coat. $500. FIRM
(386)867-0035

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
S Supplies"

Chicken house equipment. Tin,
rafters, feed tanks, troughs,
waterers, motors and fans.
386-431-1737 or 353-353-5008

Single Lane Farms
(1)-2 years old black Limosene
bull. (1) 2.5 yr old angus bull.
Dwane Hingson. 386-776-1090


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver. Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
Sexp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

E-MACHINE
$65.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

E-MACHINE
$80.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

5' OAK full Entertainment
Center with
32" RCA color TV. $250.
386-867-0035

BEDROOM SUITE
Solid wood. Captains Bed. dresser,
mirror, night stand & desk/desk
chair. $450. 386-752-5784
KING SUITE Mattress andt box,
headboard, rails, dresser, high
chest & 2 night stands. $600.
Full size bunkbed set. Like new.
$400. Call Charlie 386-984-7226


410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Weedeater,
like new,
$50
386-344-1783


Machinery &
411 Tools

SHeavy Duty Auto Jack Stands
(2), $10 each,
New
call 386-963-4560

4 19 TV-Radio &
4197 Recording
Galvanized Remote Control
Antenna, 36 Ft High, Tri pod,
$100
Call 386-963-4560


420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430. Garage Sales

Moving sale, everything must go.
Tractors, lawnmowers, tools,
household; To much to list. Will
be able to see all day Oct 9th, 10th,
11th, other days by appt. 2879
193rd Rd Live Oak. 386-208-1050


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

New Interior Lights (6),
Valued at $60,
Will sell for $30
386-344-1783

630 Mobile Homes
63 0 for Rent

14X80. 3br/2ba. Total electric,
country living. Pets ok. Garbage,
water sewer inc. 1st, last, dep.
w/lease. $600. mo. 386-752-8978
2/1 S/W, front kitchen, CH/A
$375. mo. plus
$200.dep
386-752-2254
2/2 (full baths). S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep. $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3Br/lbath. Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet. A/C &
paint,fenced yard. nice cond, $575
month. Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
Mobile Homes for rent in
While Springs. Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm. Five Points.
NO PETS. also 3 bd home
739 Monroe st.. I mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

Very nice 3/2 Skyline DW on 3.3
ac. fenced yard, dead end street,
nice trees. Financing available.
$75,000 386-303-1258 / 365-1406


705 Rooms for Rent

Newly Renovated ROOMS W/
FREE Utilities, Cable. WiFi. Local
& Long Distance Calls, Maid
Service. Microwave & frige in ea.
room. lprs $165, 2ppl $175
Jasmine Garden Inn. Clean &
Under New Mgmt! 386-755-4308

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1 bath, I car garage, W/D
hook up, $550 month, no pets
1 month sec,
386-961-8075 Realtor
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/IBA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922


Georgeous Lakeview. Nice &
clean 2br Apt. In town. Close to
shopping. $485. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972

Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652

Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208

LARGE IBR Apt
over looking lake. Screened pool.
CH/A, washer/dryer, full kitchen,
$650 mo. 386-344-3261

Move in specials available,
I & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423

Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit.,-l/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.

The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292


SUpdated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

NEAT AS a Whistle lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-6198

Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

3/2 in Branford area, fireplace,
appliances, security & $800 mon.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

3bedroom/2bath
in city. $450. mo.
plus deposit No Pets!
386-758-0057

Beautiful 3br/2ba. Spacious home
w/lg. fenced yard. Callaway S/D
$1200. per mo. plus deposit.
386-984-5987 -

In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225

Nice 3/2, brick home, good neigh-
borhood, $875 rent, $675 security
deposit;appplication required,
call 386-963-4974

Rural beauty and privacy near
1-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br.
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553. Lv. message.

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals

1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales

SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & 1-10
813-286-2323


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?



Comfortable
I ,'or,
eni .t N our %kill%

po sili e flilude

Opportunl lies.. "
i | ion
J.* A^ ..*- i,


Apply Online or In Personl


SiTEL


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


I3SELL4
FIND


rj~iiii^







Classified Department: 755-5440
805 Lots for Sale


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
810 Home for Sale
Lease 3/2 Block on 55ac.,
$700 mo, 1st, month & last.
386-754-0800 or
386-755-9333
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
820 Farms &
SAcreage


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


-E EwL .


IJf: j


Let Us Write Ad

ClBassitled Acd


Se arn


for

nevJ


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancina.com


4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
-NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
Carriage LS 36 ft, fifth wheel,
$27K obo, can see by appt. only
(will sell w/F350 package)
serious offers only 386-755-0653
Sun Light Slide-In Truck .
Camper, Fits long wheel base,self
contained, A/C, new fridge, $4000
used very little, 404-358-1358
952 Vans-& Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd,
V-8, 4-whl dr. All factory opts,
cold air, orig sticker, Will bring
car to you! $4500. 386-658-2380
I L~


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445

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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010


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RS & STRIPES


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Nigel Atkinson (12) looks for tight end Jayce Barber in a game
played earlier this season in Lake City.

Homecoming week for CHS


olumbia High
may have lost
its first game of


1 the Tigers still
have an undefeated record
in the district.
Columbia, 4-1 overall and


1-0 in District 4-4A, will
host Ridgeview High at
7:30 p.m. on Friday in
the 2010 homecoming
game for CHS.
Not only will it serve
as homecoming, but a
chance for the Tigers to


move closer to repeating
as district champions.
Last season, the Tigers
made their way through
the district undefeated. The
Panthers are one of three
district teams remaining
on this year's schedule.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High football defensive coordinator Dennis Dotson speaks with the defense as the
Tigers take a time out earlier this season.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
The Columbia High special teams unit prepares for an extra point against Buchholz High


earlier this season.

2010 Tiger Football Schedule

CHS 38, Brooks County 13 Wk

CHS 30, South Lafourche 19 Wk

CHS 22, Buchholz 14

CHS 23, Robert E. Lee 20

Madison County 19, CHS 0

Wk 6 Ridgeview H 7:30 p.m.

Wk 7 Godby A 7:30 p.m.

Wk 8 Ed White A 7:30 p.m.


9 Wolfson H 7:30 p.m.

10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.


Get Connected




"-..-


I


L *" I L" 1 a. a I
The Predator 'I."

*48,900
4BR/1iA, 180laqft
(386)754-8844


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Call And Check Our Prices On
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