<%BANNER%>






The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01416
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/03/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01416
System ID: UF00028308:01416
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Seminoles Roll
Thomas runs for 122 vard
000017 120110 ****3-DIGIT ]'!
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 3261li1943



Lalie



Sunday, October 3, 2010



Lw



rter.com



SEC Clash
No. 7 Florida challenges
No. I Alabama in Tuscaloosa.
Sports, I B





porter




Vol. 136, No. 220 V $1.00



Lake CityPD names two captains



Blanchard, Smith Robert Smith, director
appointed from of Safety and Security at
the Children's Hospital in
11 candidates. Alabama, were selected to
become the new captains,
From staff reports according to information
released from the Lake
The Lake City Police City Police Department.
Department has filled its Oct.. 11 is scheduled to
two captain positions. be the first day Blanchard
Interim Patrol Lt. John and Smith will begin their
Blanchard of the Lake City duties as department cap-
Police Department and trains.



The police department from the community and
captain's selection process executive law enforcement
consisted personnel.
of two I; 2 ~~ I ~B~El~I Thesec-
interview L .-4 I ond inter-
bo yards. view board
One of the consisted
boards was of a cross
made up section of
of a cross c supervi-
s e c t i o n Blanchard Smith sors and
of Lake City community employees from the police
leaders, executive leaders department and other city



departments. Both boards
reportedly gave each of the
selected candidates high-
ranking recommendations.
Of the 11 candidates, four
candidates made the short
list and were interviewed
by Lake City Police Chief
Argatha Gilmore and Lake
City city manager Wendell
Johnson.
"I was very pleased with
the recommendations of



both interview boards and
they were very consistent
in their recommendations
of these two candidates,"
Gilmore said, noting that
she is looking forward to
working with this team to
reach the goals and objec-
tives she has setfor the Lake
City Police Department.
Blanchard has been
CAPTAINS continued on 3A



Florida law makes it painful for clinics

to distribute prescription medication



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Amy Williams, a pharmacy technician at Baya Pharmacy, checks medication before submitting it to the Take Away
Environmental Return System, where expired and unwanted medicine is taken to Houston, Texas, to be incinerated. The
program keeps people from flushing their pills down the toilet.



By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com

s a new Florida law
the right prescrip-
tion for America's
growing pill
problem? Several
medical professionals and
others say the answer is,
"yes."
As of Oct. 1, new leg-
islation makes it harder
for unqualified doctors in
Florida pain clinics to dis-
tribute prescription drugs.
The law was put into effect
with the intent to curb pre-
scription drug trafficking
and to fight prescription
drug abuse, problems that
some studies say rank
above illegal drug use.
Senate Bill 2272 is one
way to fight the growing
problem of addiction to
prescription medication, a
problem that has become
an issue nationally, state-



JASON MATTHEW WALKERIILake City Reporter
Linda Jones, 65, sorts through some pill bottles in her bath-
room for any unwanted medicine. Jones recalls the day when
her 3-year-old niece climbed a bathroom cabinet and swal-
lowed a number of adult Tylenol pills. 'They kept her in over-
night and made sure she didn't have liver damage,' she said.



wide and locally, profession-
als say.
"Basically, addiction is
just self-medicating because
there's something you don't
have the tools to deal with,"
said Dr. Danine Fruge,
associate medical director
of Pritikin Longevity Center
& Spa in Miami, a lifestyle



education center and vaca-
tion spa with a medical
program.
"I think a lot of times our
culture encourages taking a
pill rather than dealing with
an issue and changing your
lifestyle," she said. "It's an
easier mentality to think,
'Let's just take a pill and feel



better."'
According to the 2008
National Survey on Drug
Use and Health, more
Americans abuse prescrip-
tion medication than the
number of those abusing
hallucinogens like heroine
or cocaine combined.
Jeff Scott, president of
Cheek and Scott Pharmacy
and Medical Equipment,
said four of the top five
drugs abused in the U.S.
today are prescription
drugs.
He said Florida is also
the No. 1 prescribing state
of controlled substances in
the U.S. The state's second
leading cause of accidental
death is prescription drugs,
he said.
Overdoses of the drugs
kill seven people a day in
Florida, Fruge said, which
is four times higher than
illegal drug overdoses.
PILL continued on 3A



Commissioners

setting focus on

tax abatement



Workshop set to
discuss guidelines
on incentives.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com
Setting appropriate
guidelines for tax abate-
ment processes are on the
horizon for the county.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners and the
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority,
along with special counsel,
will meet for a workshop
Tuesday to discuss estab-
lishing guidelines for tax
abatement projects.
In addition to the two
entity's staffs and boards,
Richard Powell, CPA;
Doyle Crews, Columbia
County property appraiser
and Greg Stewart, attor-
ney for Nabors, Giblin and
Nickerson, will attend the
meeting.
Dale Williams, county



manager, said questions
have been posed to spe-
cial counsel on the specifics
of the economic incentive,
which will be discussed and
reviewed at the meeting.
'"The chair will review
those questions and
answers and make sure
everybody understands
how the process of tax abate-
ment works,. when it can be
used, when
it cannot be
used, what
all of those
particulars
are," he
said.
Staff rec-
Williams ommenda-
tions on
how the tax abatement pro-
cess -will work in the future
will also be presented, such
as the minimum number of
jobs a business has to pro-
vide to receive the incen-
tive.
Discussion from previous
county meetings spurred
ABATEMENT continued on 3A



County officials

prepare to close

election books



Voters can file
paperwork until
5 p.m. Monday.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local voters will be sum-
moned to the election polls
in early November, but in
order to legally cast bal-
lots they must have their
appropriate paperwork
completed to take part in
the process.
The books for voters to
participate in the November
2 general election close
Monday, Oct. 4. Early vot-
ing begins Oct. 18.
"We'll stay open until 5
p.m. Monday, but anything
delivered to the drop box
or into our office before
midnight will be counted,"
said Liz P. Home, Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections.
Florida is a closed prima-
ry state and voters have to
be registered in the politi-



cal party of their choice to
participate in election.
Horne said the informa-
'W*. '.- tion is also
used to give
the state a
cr count from
the voter
registra-
tion totals.
Home Jean
J e a n
Lear, Columbia County
assistant supervisor of
elections, said information
from the book closing is
also used for more accurate
voter counts.
"For the primary, the
book closing would have
mattered because voters
have to change their party
before then," Lear said,
of voters who wanted to
change parties. "But for the
general election, the infor-
mation is useful for elec-
tions officials so we'll know
how many ballots we'll have
to order and how many reg-
ELECTION continued on 3A



1 .... 1 8



CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400



84
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 8A



Opinion ............... 4A
Business ............... I C
Obituaries .............. 6A
Advice & Comics ......... 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B



TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Bus moves local
business traffic.



COMING
TUESDAY
Get updated on
community events.



AA



BITTER



Pill



f.
















^ ';M 3.ezp latech(A$H 3 'ID

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
9-25-26-39 17 3-8-19-21-35 Afternoon: 4-9-5 Afternoon: 1-0-4-4 4-17-18-19-45-47 13-44-51-52-55.-30
Evening: 1-0-0 Evening: 6-8-8-4


AROUND FLORIDA



Dirty Joke Guy: Always in search of right thing to do



By MANDY MILES
Key West Citizen

EY WEST
Before he
became The
Dirty Joke
Guy on Duval
Street, Dennis Walsh was
a world traveler, a college
student, a sailor and a
commercial fisherman.
He was supposed to be
a lawyer, but now tells jokes
about them for a buck or
two.
Walsh is one of Key
West's street performers
who makes his living on
the city's main commercial
thoroughfare. He typically
sits in the 200 or 400 block
of Duval Street with his dog
and'a sign that reads, "Dirty
Jokes $1."
Then he waits for the
inevitably curious passers-
by, who approach cautious-
ly, taking stock and making
quick judgments about the
rough-looking man in the
jester hat ,
"People come up to me. I
don't shout at them. I don't
flag them down," he said. "I
ask my customers whether
any topics are off-limits, and
I always ask a guy's permis-
sion before telling a dirty
joke to his lady."
Walsh has more than 400
jokes in his mental arsenal,
ranging from mildly sugges-
tive to wildly raunchy.
"But I've gotten really
good at reading people, and
knowing how far to take .
it," said Walsh, who has
been telling and selling
- jokes on Duval Street for
about four years.



ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a July 27 photo, Dennis Walsh tells a dirty joke to a couple on Duval Street in Key West.
Walsh, who was supposed to be a lawyer, now tells jokes about them. He has more than 400
jokes in his mental arsenal, ranging from the mildly suggestive to wildly raunchy.



He holds a city permit
as a street performer, and
recently has spearheaded
efforts to organize his col-
leagues in response to a
proposal by city officials
to increase the restrictions
governing the artists and
performers. He wants those
officials to know that the
mimes, artists, jugglers and
drummers on Duval Street
are members of the commu-
nity, who add.to the island's
colorful reputation.
"Just because you're a
dirty joke guy or an artist,
or whatever, we all have
something to bring to the
table," Walsh said. "We're
not all scumbags."
He's also the first to
admit he's no saint
Breaking and entering to



retrieve money owed to you
is not the best way to collect
on a debt, he admits, recall-
ing his five-year stint as a
Virginia inmate.
"Any bad choices I've
made are my own responsi-
bility," Walsh said, acknowl-
edging lessons that he's
learned over the years.
"But now I'm playing by
the rules, and if someone
refuses to pay me what they
owe, I11 do the right thing
and call the police."
Walsh did not grow up
dreaming of a career as
The Dirty Joke Guy in Key
West He was "supposed" to
be a lawyer, according to his
family's wishes. He scored
a 1,470 on his SATs in high
school, and spent two years
at Catholic University in



Washington, D.C., he said.
He was engaged to be
married after college, and
was spending a week-
end whale watching in
Provincetown, Mass., with
his fiancee when he saw the
historic Schooner Hindu
and learned the captain
needed a crew.
"I left school two weeks
before finals that year and
never went back," he said
Walsh left his family and
fiancee behind and crewed
on the schooner for five
years, spending summers in
New England and winters in
Port Canaveral.
"If I didn't work on boats,
then I worked in restau-
rants, and I've interned with
three chefs who graduated
from the Culinary Institute



of America," he said. "I just
get bored really easily."
During his days off from
the Hindu, Walsh learned
to pull lobster traps and
long-line fish for grouper
and slark. He later become
a deckhand on tugboats,
working with people with
names like Crowbar.
He arrived in the Florida
Keys in 2004, and got a job
as a boat builder's appren-
tice in Key Largro.
After another fight over
money owed to him, and
an eight-month stint in the
Monroe County Detention
Center for trespassing and
petty theft, Walsh stayed in
Key West He lived on the
streets, and slept on the
porches of generous people.
"I was in a real dark place
back then," he said, recall-
ing how his mother died of
cancer a few years before
his Keys arrival. "I was
drinking constantly."
A severe cut on his toe
eventually led him to the
Metropolitan Community
Church, where he knew
he would receive food,
but also hoped for some
medical treatment City
Commissioner Clayton
Lopez happened to be in the
church when Walsh limped
inside.
"He took one look at my
toe and called an ambu-
lance, insisting that I go
to the hospital and telling
me that if anyone refused
to help me at the hospital,
then I was to call him on
his cell phone and he would
come out there to straight-
en things out;" Walsh said.
He spent two months in
the hospital and ultimately



lost his toe to an infection,
but he said he gained much
more in terms of perspec-
tive. The night before his
surgery, when nurses asked
about his power of attorney
and who to call in case
things went south, Walsh
realized how alone he felt in
the world.
"I started crying that
night, and just asked God
to help me do the next right
thing, one step at a time,"
he said, tears in his eyes.
Walsh recovered for two
months in the hospital.
When he got out and recov-
ered sufficiently, he moved
onto a sailboat that is
anchored off Key West and
rescued a black Labrador
he named Huckleberry
Dude. And he has been
making people laugh ever
since. The man who was
supposed to be a lawyer
now tells jokes about them.
He made an Iraqi war
vet with no legs laugh
- just before getting him
into the Red Garter strip
club for free. He would
not accept money from the
soldier or from a man who
was dying of pancreatic
cancer.
"I'd rather have a million
people give me one dollar
than one person give me
$10,000," Walsh said, esti-
mating he tells about 200
jokes per day. He makes
about $150 a night, and is
paying off some debts.
He catches lobster off
his sailboat and feeds his
friends who are hungry.
"I'm doing OK," he said.
"And I still.just look for the
next right thing to do f.r
" someone else."



Stamos wants to be
heard at court hearing
MARQUETTE, Mich. -Actor
John Stamos can't make it to federal
court in Michigan's Upper Peninsula
next week, but he still wants to be
heard.
Federal prosecutors are asking a
judge to allow them to read a state-
ment from Stamos when two people
are sentenced on Friday for trying to
extort $680,000 from him.
In July, Allison Coss and Scott
Sippola were found guilty of con-
spiracy and using e-mail to threaten
a person's reputation. They were
accused of demanding money from
Stamos in exchange for turning over
embarrassing photos of him.

Singer Mars facing
felony cocaine charge
LAS VEGAS Bruno Mars,
singer of the hit R&B song "Just the
Way You Are," faces a felony cocaine
charge stemming from his arrest
after a performance at a Las Vegas
nightclub last month.
The Clark County district attor-
ney's office filed a criminal complaint
Friday alleging the rising singer-
songwriter had 2.6 grams of cocaine
when he was arrested Sept. 19 after
being detained by a hotel security
guard.
Mars, whose real name is Peter
Hernandez, is due in court Nov. 18
on the possession of a controlled
substance charge. If convicted, he
faces up to four years in prison and a
$5,000 fine.
"Just the Way You Are" is No. 1 on
the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Katherine Heigl: 'I don't
believe my own press'
NEW YORK Former "Grey's
Anatomy" star Katherine Heigl says
she's happy to make headlines, but
stories about her in the media are
often exaggerated.
Heigl's comments in the past have'
been known to make waves in the
entertainment world. She called
the 2007 comedy "Knocked Up," in
which she starred, "a little sexist."



ASSOCIATED PRESS

Breast cancer awareness campaign rocks
In this image released by Hard Rock International, Melissa Etheridge performs at
the Hard Rock Cafe Hollywood on Hollywood Blvd. on Friday to launch its 2010
PINKTOBER breast cancer awareness campaign.



Later, she refused to seek an Emmy
nomination after saying "Grey's"
writers didn't give her enough
award-worthy material.
Heigl says she doesn't have "any
major problem" with what's written
about her.
But she adds that she tries to
keep her perspective so she doesn't
believe her own press.
The actress was speaking in New
York at the world premiere of her
latest dramedy, "Life as We Know It,"
which opens nationwide next week.

R&B singer charged
with assaulting mother
BALTIMORE R&B singer and
former "Dancing with the Stars"
contestant Mario has been charged
with assaulting his mother at their
Baltimore home.
Officers were called to an apart-



ment building in the Fells Point
neighborhood early Friday, where
police say Shawntia Hardaway told
officers her 24-year-old son, Mario
Barrett, had pushed her.
According to charging docu-
ments, Hardaway said her head
still hurt after Barrett pushed her
into in a wall in a separate instance
on Monday and she feared for her
life. Officers found broken glass
and a hole in a door in their apart-
ment.
Barrett's attorney, William
"Hassan" Murphy III, calls it "an
unfortunate incident" between a
loving son and a mother who has
had drug problems. Barrett, who
appeared in an MTV special in
which he staged an intervention for
his mother, was charged with sec-
ond-degree assault and released on
$50,000 bond.
* Associated Press



* Author Gore Vidal is 85.
*.Singer Lindsey
Buckingham is 61.
* Former astronaut Kathryn
Sullivan is 59.
* Baseball Hall of Famer
Dave Winfield is 59.
* Civil rights activist Rev. Al
Sharpton is 56.
* Rock musician Tommy Lee
is 48.
* Actor Clive Owen is 46.



Daily Scripture



* Actress Neve Campbell
is 37.
* Actress Alanna Ubach is
35.
* Actress Shannyn
Sossamon is 32.
* Actor Erik Von Detten is
28.
* Rock musician Mark'King
(Hinder) is 28.
* Actress-singer Ashlee
Simpson-Wentz is 26.



"Fear of man will prove to be a
snare, but whoever trusts in the
LORD is kept safe."
Proverbs 29:25



Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number .....;........752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U:S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)



Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
52 Weeks .................. $83.46
Rates include 7%o sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks .................. $82.80
52 Weeks .................$179.40



CORRECTION



The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.



i



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Celebrity Birthdays



----.. ....-.-... .



LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



2A












Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010 3A



ABATEMENT:

Rebates

might be

discussed

From Page 1A

the workshop.
At a Sept. 2 meeting,
Jim Poole, IDA executive
director, asked the board
to schedule the workshop
because tax abatement
will be on the upcoming
November ballot for voters.
At the Sept. 16 meeting,
the county discussed estab-
lishing guidelines for exist-
ing businesses because
Nettles Sausage, an estab-
lished business, filed an
application for the incentive
due to its upcoming expan-
sion.
*Williams said the recent
issue of the IDA overpaying
$60,000 in rebates to local
companies could come up at
the workshop, but is not the
purpose of the meeting.
Tax abatement has been
an economic incentive tool
for the county since it was
first voter-approved in 1990.
"We're asking them (the
voters) for approval to con-
tinue and I think to do that it
doesn't hurt to sit down and
have a discussion of what
procedures well follow in the
next 10 years," Poole said.
. The workshop will be held
at 6 p.m. at the Columbia
County School Board
Administrative Complex, 372
W. Duval St



PILL: Out-of-state customers buy OxyContin in Lake City



Continued From Page 1A

Also, eight out of 10 drug-
related deaths in Florida in
2009 involved prescription
drugs, she said.
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office pub-
lic information officer, said
the abuse is "behind closed
doors" and the drugs are
legally obtained, making
the problem hard to track.
Sgt. John Blanchard,
Lake City Police
Department public
information officer and
Florida Narcotics Officer
Association vice president,
said "a good number" of
local arrests are made
for prescription fraud and
possession of prescribed
drugs without a prescrip-
tion. When such arrests are
investigated, LCPD finds
the perpetrator invariably
suffers from addiction to
the drugs, he said.
The issue has been
ongoing for more than
10 years, Blanchard said,
and includes the abuse of
sedatives or painkillers like
OxyContin.
Trafficking and sell-
ing the medication on the
street also plays into the
abuse.
"You can find some of the
crack dealers selling some
of these different prescrip-
tion pills," Blanchard said.
South Florida's pain
clinics and the intersec-
tion of interstates 75 and
10 draw prescription drug
traffickers from out of
state to the Lake City area,
Seifert and Blanchard



CAPTAINS: Senior ranks



Continued From Page 1A

employed with the Lake City
Police Department' since
1989. During his career
with the local depart-
ment, Blanchard has been
assigned to uniform patrol,
the spe-
cial crimes
un i t,
Columbia
HH CCounty
Multi-
jurisdic-
tional Task
Gilmore
F o r c e,
criminal investigations divi-
sion, Office of Professional
Standards and Training,
K-9 officer and instructor.
Blanchard was assigned
as the Interim -Patrol
Commander on June 25.
Smith was employed by
the Portsmouth Virginia
Police Department in
Portsmouth, Va., a city
with a population of about
100,000.
He *was employed at
the Portsmouth Police
Department from Jan. 27,
1987 until he retired from
the department at the
rank of lieutenant on Nov.
1, 2006.
Smith has more than
20 years of experience in
law enforcement and has
worked as an undercover
street-level narcotic inves-
tigator, uniform patrol
sergeant, records man-
agement unit supervisor
and crime analyst super-
visor. He supervised the



ELECTION
From Page 1A
istered voters we have."
Residents who need to
register to vote or make
a party change should go
to the Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections
office, 971 W. Duval St.,
and complete a registration
form. People may mail, hand
deliver or use the drop box at
971 West Duval Street, or at
the Fort White office.
Horne also emphasized
that people who have
changedtheiraddress,name
or who need to update their
signature should make the
necessary changes before
the books close Oct. 4.
"Residents need to bring
a valid drivers license with
a photo identification or
Florida identification card
with their photograph and
signature to make the
changes," she said.



robbery unit and was the
uniform patrol shift com-
mander.
He will leave his employ-
ment at the Children's
Hospital of Alabama as
director of Safety and
Security where he has
been employed since
Sept. 2007.



said.
Not only are pain clinics
a large problem in Florida
for trafficking or drug
abuse, Blanchard said, but
doctor-shopping is too a
scheme in which a person
obtains multiple prescrip-
tions from different doctors
and fills them at different
pharmacies either for per-
sonal use or to sell.
Scott said in his com-
pany, which has Lake
City and live Oak loca-
tions, three prescriptions
are filled every hour for
out-of-state customers
for a "smart drug" like
OxyContin.
Both Blanchard and
Scott noted that people feel
like prescription medication
is safe.
"A lot of people have the
perception that these drugs
can't hurt them because
the doctor prescribes
them when they're sick,"
Blanchard said. But abuse
of the drugs affects all age
ranges, from juveniles to
adults, he said.
Scott said 2,500 teenag-
ers a day try prescription
drugs for the first time,
and he has seen middle-to-
upper-class business people
ages 20 to 35 become



addicted.
'The middle and the
clean class that would never
smoke crack, they're addict-
ed," he said. "It doesn't seem
dirty like some of the illegal
drugs do."
Local doctors will
unfortunately help local
people who are addicted,
Scott said. His company
fills about 10,000 tablets
a month for children in
Columbia and Suwannee
Counties with Attention
Deficit Disorder or similar
disorders, he said. The
drugs help hyperactive
children slow and focus,
but it is an amphetamine
to an adult and is com-
monly abused in the sports
arena or in college because
it causes adults to have
heightened clarity and ath-
letic ability, Scott said.
'We're talking about
drugs children are taking
that are in the classification
of a CII narcotic, the most
addictive class of drugs we
can legally dispense in a
pharmacy," he said.
Young people are abus-
ing the drugs through "pill
parties," Scott said, where
the prescription pills are
dumped in a bowl and par-
ticipants experiment with



WHEN YOU CAN'T LIVE ALONE



AND A NURSING HOME IS NOT THE ANSWER...




e_ Ite,: L.- ": tor


ar tb 4''; "

i.,^ AhI j *

Sill



.C'-..' .
UNRIS]
HOME COMPANION SE.RVICE



Seniors helpers and caregivers are fully insured,
bonded and licensed, highly trained and
qualified to sene all your needs!
Free Home Consultation
386-963-5256
E www.sunrisecompanions.com
es License 299418
Serving seniors in Suwannee nd Columbia counties since 1996



Se a1 ..e a BELK.COM


S e l o r.a y O ct. 5
d^niUInr 0



. L. *" I
t 1 G 4h e c u
i '. i0t ,

O 9'



1 .
"V



0



- 6 -
n[*]IIIOK@]IUSISX"A
0. 0
S .0



I
t



new markdowns
just taken to




500ff
transitional fall
merchandise



U



free gift ESTEE LAUD
with any Estee Lauder purchase(
of 29.50 or more.
Worth over 8000
Choose Your Lip and Eye Shad
Warm or Cool
Event ends October 24 Offer good while supplies
One gift to a customer, please



Sign up for mobile updates
text JOIN to BELKI (23551)
Learn more at belk.com/communlty



IER
e

es,
last



F Uind us on Facebook
I ;, facebook.com/belk



1i1



Make your gift even bigger
Add New Pure Color Gloss in "
4 shades.Both gifts free with any
Estee Lauder purchase of 55.00
or more. Both gifts together worth
over 125.00
Upgloss offer available In store only.



Follow US on Twitter nr
re, lOH r .'.'.m.Elli iFsa r,.'.-ArS:-



different-colored pills.
Fruge said adults will
abuse the drugs after a
tough week at work.
'Times are hard and peo-
ple possibly use the drugs
to escape reality," she said.
The presence of pre-
scription medication in the
home can fuel addiction
or start new addictions for
those in the household,
Seifert said. It also opens
access to children in the
home, Scott said.
To help prevent
addiction, the U.S.
Drug Enforcement
Administration enacts
National Take-Back Day to
give people an opportunity
to safely discard unwanted,
expired or unused phar-
maceutical substances and
medications anonymously.
Both the CCSO and the
LCPD take part in the
annual event and Scott said
his company is partnered
with local law enforcement
to take drugs back quarter-
ly for the DEA to destroy.
Recognizing the dan-
gers of prescription drugs
before taking them and tak-



ing them only as the doctor
recommends can combat
addiction, Scott said.
"But realize there's still a
potential for addiction," he
said. "The communication
with the doctor up front
is key. The doctor under-
stands in depth about these
medications, and if you
say, 'Hey doc, does it have
potential for abuse or addic-
tion?' they can let you know
that and then you can be on
guard."
The problem of prescrip-
tion medication addiction
has been under-recognized
until recently, Blanchard
said, but it is gaining more
exposure from law enforce-
ment and public focus.
Scott described it as "qui-
etly exploding."
"It has the potential to be
a problem for everyone,"
Blanchard said. "I think it
has become more popular
to use, there's been an
upswing. Over the past 10
years, we have been find-
ing out that this has been
a widespread problem,
people just haven't talked
about it"



OB/ YN '
DA NA GREENE, MD
WOMEN S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH
..~~~~~~~~



SPECIALIZING IN:
* Non-Invasive Laparoscopic
Gynecological Surgery
* Adolescent Gynetology
* High and Low Rislk Obstelrnc
* Contraception
*.Deliverlng at Shonds Lake Shore



, YOUR OLD

COUNTY FA



New Patients Welcome
Call today for a
personal appointment:
386-755-0500
.49 SE Bayo Or,'e
Lake Citl) Florida 32025
www.dainagreenemd.com
.,, ,..;'..:..; ,. '



ITE

COLUMBIIA

LIR PHOTOS

The Lake City Reporter
will be publishing the
56th Annual Columbia
County Fair Magazine.

| We are looking for old fair
photos from our readers.
If you have interesting, fun
fair photos let us know!
Digital photos can
be submitted via
e-mail to Josh at
jblaclhon @ lakecityreportecom
PleaI inadde yr name, address, phone,
date of photo and photo description.
Or stop by the Lake City
Reporter to have us
scan your photos.
Monday-Friday
8am-Spm



49thAnimal

Joseph Dicks Family Reunion

Hopeful Baptist Church
in the Life Center

New Slide Show

October 10, 2010 at 12:30 PM

Friends & Family Welcome
Bring a Covered Dish C-
k("-O-'^I-y o ~---""oc:~ ---~'"~-?l



Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055



_IF.71rM1II I



-- --- --`------



I~



LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUN'DAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0



3A



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



r~~~ HIMM I IF-2pm.1 a~:+ l~:gRni



I



...,,_,



I _



Am-
,.-I f&W-F, I.ID
I...... .-
-N.I.I.



I.,
LI



I



I



I



IW-















OPINION



Sunday, October 3, 2010



www.lakecityreporter.com



OUR
OPINION

County, IDA

owe voters

incentive to

cast 'yes' vote
uesday's scheduled
workshop with
county commission-
ers, the Columbia
County Industrial
Development Authority board
and staff members, special
counsel and other key county
officials will be the first con-
crete step the county has taken
to avert possible future mis-
management and irresponsibil-
ity associated with the county's
property tax abatement and
rebate programs that are in
place as an incentive for indus-
trial job growth and creation.
It's about time.
It has been more than four
months since an outside audit
revealed that the system of
rebates and exemptions used to
attract industries into Columbia
County was being conducted
against the Florida Constitution
and minus checks and bal-
ances.
This lack of oversight result-
ed in $60,000 in overpayment
of property tax rebates to con-
tracted industries and an addi-
tional $31,000 in unassessed
penalties against a local indus-
try that failed to meet contrac-
tual job creation obligations.
Additionally, the county's
IDA must claim at least some
culpability for a $1.7 million
economic incentive mistake,
and correction, on the part of
Lake City.
For these miscues, responsi-
bility has been accepted by IDA
and other officials, and county
leaders have vowed corrective
lenses for the myopic vision
that led to taxpayers footing the
bills for the mistakes.
But the time for rhetoric is
over. Tuesday's meeting needs
to make clear through calculat-
ed actions and plans that while
economic incentive packages
are critical to the future of our
county, we are not willing to
give away the store, or worse,
to allow the till to remain open
with no one minding it
The sum financial acumen
of Tuesday's players is impres-
sive. The IDA board of direc-
tors is comprised of some of
Columbia County's smartest
business leaders and several
county commissioners have
been on board the economic
incentive train since voters first
approved it Additionally, hav-
ing dedicated attorneys and the
county's tax appraiser in atten-
dance sets the stage for the
successful completion of rules
and guidelines to govern future
incentive packages.
But note well: Those rules
and guidelines must include
the adoption of the recom-
mendations of June's audit, and
especially those advisements,
which will bring the county into
compliance with the Florida
Constitution. To do otherwise
would be counterproductive
and reckless..
Costly mistakes have been
made, but if county officials
are wise enough to learn from
them, and are able to craft fair
and equitable incentive docu-
ments that contain stringent
mandates that include over-
sight, voters should again grant
them this vital economic tool
when the question is presented
on Nov. 2.



The death and burial of 'ain't'



etty Stoltze says
she hasn't used the
word "ain't" in more
than 50 years. That's
when her third grade
teacher went on the warpath
against'ain't' and dramatically
killed it off.
Here's how the teacher did it
She had each student write the
forbidden word on a scrap of
paper, then drop the paper into
a miniature casket Then the
teacher led the whole class out-
side where she dug a shallow
grave and put the little casket in
the grave and proclaimed "ain't"
dead and buried and never to be
used again.
So, obedient Betty stopped
using the dead word and has
never used it since'
Sometimes readers of this
column, like Betty, send me
good-natured e-mails pertaining
to language usage, always in
good humor.
Here are some examples:
Mary said a church friend
uses the word "just" in every
sentence when she prays aloud.
"Dear Lord, we are just so
thankful to be in Your house
today. We just thank You for
your many blessings. We just
ask that You will be with the
sick and homebound today."
Mary is not upset with that at
all. She knows the prayer would
mean the same if you left out
the "justs" but she rather likes
the poetry and rhythm the word
brings to the prayer.
Continuing in religion,
Juanita asks, "Is 'forever and
ever' longer than just 'forever'?"
And Danielle contends that
a "near miss"'is not a miss at all
but actually a hit.
Retired teacher Jonathan
said education doublespeak
drove him nutty. "Nothing gets
done, it gets 'finalized.' Nothing
gets 'used,' it gets 'utilized."'
Some school districts have even
called school busses "mobile
modular classrooms."
He also recalled he had



Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williams_h2firn.edu
372 W Duval St
Lake City, FL 32055

heard about a Texas school
system's announcement that,
"Our school's cross-graded,
individualized learning program
is designed to enhance the
concept of an open-ended learn-
ing structure with emphasis on
a continuum of academically
enriched learning using the
identified intellectually gifted
child as the agent of his own
learning."
This sounded to him, and
maybe to you, like gobbledy-
gook.
Elizabeth, a substitute
teacher, said she had heard kids
explain they were late to school
because they got "bus left' or
"Daddy couldn't get the truck
crunk."
Jeanette wrote that an
English teacher once told her
that she used poor grammar but
that her English was still "com-
municable." Say what?
Edward e-mailed, "My
English teacher used to go bal-
listic when I ended a sentence
with a preposition. Then one
day I quoted Winston Churchill
who, when corrected about
the same mistake, said That is
the kind of nonsense up with
which I will not put.' I thought
it was clever, my teacher, not so
much."
On the same subject,
Jacqueline offered this: One
day a visitor was walking
across the campus at Harvard
University and stopped a
professor and asked, "Sir,
can you please.tell me where



the library is at?" The pro-
fessor answered, "Yes I can
but we don't end sentences
with prepositions at Harvard
University."
The .visitor replied, "Excuse
me, sir, I intended no offense.
Can you please tell me where
the library is at, you jerk."
Back to the word 'ain't',
somebody must have resur-
rected it because lots of us still
use it every day.

Authors' book fair
Katrina Evans, our ever-active
assistant public library director,
has announced a local-authors'
Book Fair to be held at the
downtown library from 2 to 4
p.m. on Sunday, Oct 24. For
nlore information, call Katrina
at (386) 758-1018.

Museum thanks
School Museum thanks to
Betty Laxton for a variety of
older photos dating back to
1922, taken by Lake City pho-
tographer L. B. Blackmon, and
also photos of former CHS
principal W. B. Feagle. To
Tracy Brannon and Mike Null
for donating much needed
loose-leaf notebooks for use as
storage. To Freddie Johnson
for a picture of long time CHS
music teacher Ann Wilby, and
to the CHS Class of 1973 for
earlier donating a 1935 CHS
football helmet encased in a
beautiful presentation-type tro-
phy case. ,

Stay sharp
The ballet teacher gave her
students regular pop quizzes
because, she said, she wanted
to keep them on their toes!

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.



an has been star-
ing at the heav-
ens ever since
there was man,
but it wasn't
until 1992 when astronomers
discovered something that had
heretofore eluded them the
first planet outside our solar
system.
Now, more than 500 extra-
solar planets later, they have
discovered another heretofore-
*elusive heavenly body a
"Goldilocks planet."
That's a planet that is not too
hot, not too cold, not too dense,
but dense enough to support an
atmosphere and just the right
distance from its star to be in
the "'habitable zone," meaning it
could contain liquid water and
thus support life.



The planet is called Gliese
581g really, as we get closer
to discovering another Earth,
we've got to come up with bet-
ter names and it is 20 light-
years away, roughly 120 trillion
miles, in the constellation Libra.
That distance is daunting, but
still close enough that our sun
would be visible.
581g is one of six known
planets orbiting the dwarf
star Gliese 581,.a system, one
astronomer said, that,"haunting-
ly reminds us of our own solar
system." The planet is slightly
larger than Earth and has three
times the mass.
The planet is a lot closer to its
star than Earth is to the sun -
14 million miles versus 93 mil-
lion miles but being a dwarf,
Gliese emits far less heat. 581g's



orbital year is 37 days. The
planet keeps one side constantly
facing its star, meaning that
between its 160-degree day side
and 25-below-zero night side
there may be a temperate zone
hospitable to life.
If there is indeed liquid water
on 581g, scientist Steven Vogt,
cautioning that he's an astrono-
mer, not a biologist, personally
believes "the chances of life on
this planet are almost 100 per-
cent."
If 581g turns out to be life-
less, there are an estimated
40 billion other planets in the
Milky Way alone with the poten-
tial for supporting life. One of
these days it's going to happen.
We are almost certainly not
alone.
* Scripps Howard News Service



Flushing

dental

mercury a

problem


D entists across the
country pry nearly
4 tons of mercury
from Americans'
mouths each year,
and the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency intends to
make dentists stop flushing the
stuff into wastewater systems.
The mercury waste results
when old amalgam fillings are
replaced with'new ones made of.
other material, according to the,
EPA. The mercury from the old
fillings now is dumped down
dental-office drains and eventu-
ally makes its way to rivers and
lakes, where a toxic form can
become part of the food chain.
The EPA says it will propose
a rule next year that will ask all
dental offices to use existing
technology to separate the mer-
cury, which then can be recy-
cled and reused. Twelve states
already require that dentists
use the "amalgam separators."
Their use would become
mandatory in 2012.

Army Sikhs
With little fanfare and almost
no notice, the Army has taken
a historic step toward reopen-
ing its ranks to male followers
of the Sikh religion, who had
long been barred from serving
because their faith requires
them to wear turbans and
beards, which conflict with
Army rules.
A handful of Sikhs had
served over the years until the
Army, after the Vietnam War,
cracked down on nonconfor-
mity in the ranks. But some
determined young Sikhs, noting
the proud military history of
their culture and their desire to
serve their country, in recent
years have pressed the Army to
allow them in. America counts
about 500,000 Sikhs in its popu-
lation.
After years of trying, two
Sikhs were able to persuade
the Army to let them enlist
last year. A third recruit was
approved Aug. 30. And while
the Army says it has not for-
mally changed its policy, a Sikh- -
rights advocacy group says the
loosening portends just that

Pistachio wars
The latest slap on Iran's wrist-
is good news at least for now
- for America's pistachio grow-
ers, who have long been in a
neck-and-neck battle with Iran
for dominance of the $700 mil-
lion U.S. market
A ban on the import of Iran's
famed pistachios consid-
ered by many to be the best in
the world -took effect this
past Wednesday, putting into
effect the latest trade 'sanc-
tions imposed to.pressure Iran
to open its nuclear facilities to
international inspection. Persian
carpets also now are verboten.
But an unintended conse-
quence of the new ban may
short-circuit the celebration
by the more than 400 pistachio
growers in California, Arizona
and New Mexico.
Recently, they have had their
eyes on the potentially boom-
ing market for U.S. pistachios
in China and other countries
as their long-term future. But,
so has Iran. And the 1 million
or so nuts Iran used to ship
to the U.S. each year now can
be directed to the rest of the
world, potentially giving them
a leg up on cornering the new
market, ag-industry analysts
say.
* Lisa Hoffman writes Washington
Calling for Scripps Howard News
Service.



4A



OTHER OPINION

Have we found 'Goldilocks planet'?



Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



III



A I
:1I

I7 .r`










LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Nicole Woodward and Christopher Kline were named the 2010 'Jeanie' and 'Stephen' at the
60th Annual Stephen Foster/Jeanie Auditions Saturday at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park.


Woodward, Kline awarded

scholarships after auditions



By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
WHITE SPRINGS -
Two young vocalists are
the newest "Jeanie" and
"Stephen" in Florida.
Nicole Woodward of
Quincy and Christopher
Kline of Lakeland were
named "Jeanie" and
"Stephen" at the 60th
Annual Stephen Foster/
Jeanie Auditions Saturday
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
The auditions were
sponsored by the Florida
Federation of Music
Clubs and the Stephen
Foster Citizen Support
Organization as a state
competition to award schol-
arships to male and female
vocalists.
The event is named for a



song Stephen Foster wrote
for his wife, "Jeanie, with
the Light Brown Hair."
Contestants performed
one song composed by
Foster and two songs of
their choice written by
American composers dur-
ing a judged concert. Each
singer wore 1854-style for-
mal attire.
"It was wonderful. The
voices were wonderful,"
said Ann Stockton, FFMC
Stephen Foster Memorial
Department chairwoman.
"The judges had a hard
time because the quality
was superior."
Being named Stephen
was great, said Kline, a
sophomore vocal perfor-
mance major at Florida
Southern College. He is
very proud of the accom-
plishment.



"There was a lot of gopd
competition represented,"
he said.
Woodward, a senior
vocal performance major
at Florida State University,
liked the historical aspect
of the competition, she
said. Winning was a won-
derful feeling.
"I have no words," she
said.
Kline received a $1,000
scholarship and his run-
ner-up, Christopher Longo,
received a $500 scholarship.
Woodward received a
$1,500 scholarship. The
two runner-ups, "Jeanie
Maids" were Brittany Wood
and Danielle Good. They
received $750 scholarships
each.
"I'm proud of our
60th Jeanie and Stephen
Auditions," Stockton said.



Dems, GOP recalibrate strategies



By LIZ SIDOTI
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Democrats have all but writ-
ten off at least three Senate
seats in North Dakota,
Indiana and Arkansas -
and at least six House seats
in Tennessee, Louisiana,
New York and elsewhere
as they embark on a final-
weeks advertising push to
minimize congressional
election losses.
Emboldened by their
prospects, Republicans are
throwing at least $3 million
into West Virginia in hopes
of winning a Senate seat
that was long thought out
of reach. With polls show-
ing a close race, the GOP
decided late last week to
boost its initial investment
in the state the party's
latest move to expand a
playing field already heav-
ily tilting its way.



In the one-month dash to
Election Day, both parties
are zeroing in on races they
have the best chances of
winning, recalibrating strat-
egies and shifting advertis-
ing money by the day. The
state of play could change
repeatedly between now
and Nov. 2.
Democrats are especially
worried about House dis-
tricts in the economically
troubled Midwest, and
their chances of picking
up GOP-held Senate seats
have dwindled.
In the final stretch, the
Democratic Congressional
Campaign Committee has
reserved at least $52 mil-
lion to run TV ads in more
than 60 districts, nearly all
held by their own party.
The National Republican
Campaign Committee
has set aside $35 million
in airtime in 55 races, and
officials say more is on



"r
V.r

3. 6' I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. ;
F~~~~~~~"



P-RIMA RY, --. : -
E ARE INE
AEDICINE 3e-



Special Interests Include:
Preventive Care/ Physicals
Geriatric Care
Women's Health
Diabetes Management
Most appointments in 24 hours
Most insurances accepted



the way. Democrats con-
sistently have had a cash
advantage, but GOP-allied
groups have weighed in
and advertised in crucial
contests for weeks.



Vehicle goes airborne


after hitting railroad



From staff reports

A Live Oak man suf-
fered injures when he was
ejected from his vehicle
following a crash at a high
rate of speed in Suwannee
County early Saturday.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
William W. Edwards, 48,
no address provided other
than city of residence, was
driving a 2007 Chevrolet



truck north on Goldkist
Boulevard at about 3 a.m.
and at a high rate of speed
when the vehicle traveled
through the intersection of
80th Terrace and left, the
roadway.
Edwards' truck traveled
about 25 feet and struck a
railroad track, causing one
rail to break in half and
dislodging five railroad ties.
At this point, the vehicle
became airborne and trav-



eled about 50 feet and then
struck a large tree.
After striking the tree,
the vehicle went to the right
and spun completely about,
reports indicate. The vehi-
cle then traveled about 20
feet and came to rest
Edwards was ejected from
the truck. He was not wear-
ing a seat belt, reports indi-
cate. The extent of Edwards'
injuries was unknown at
presstime.



2nd Candidates' Forum


goes live on Channel 8



By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. cor
Viewers have the
opportunity hear what
candidates in the upcom-
ing November election
have to say during a live
forum broadcast.
The second Candidates'
Forumis at7p.m.Tuesday
and will air on the Florida
Gateway College chan-
nel, Comcast Channel 8.
It will also air simultane-
ously on 106.5 FM.
The forum is hosted
by the college, the Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
and the Lake City
Reporter
Mike McKee, FGC exec-
utive director of media
and public information,
and Todd Wilson, Lake
City Reporter publisher,
are the forum's modera-
tors.
"This is one more
option for the public to
see the candidates in a
formal setting, answer-
ing questions about per-
tinent issues," Wilson
said. "It's live TV. You
never know how the
candidates will respond
or what they will say."
Candidates from four
different local and state
races have been invited
to appear on the pro-
gram, including:
* Florida State Senate



District 14: Perry McGriff
(Democrat) and Steve
Oelrich (Republican)
* Florida State
Representative District
10: Leonard Bembry
(Democrat) and David
Feigin (Republican)
* Florida State
Representative District
11: Debbie Boyd
(Democrat), John
Ferentinos (Tea Party)
and Elizabeth Porter
(Republican)
* Columbia County
Commission District
2: Rusty DePratter and
Marc Kazmierski.'
The chamber has
hosted political forums
for a number of years to
make sure its members
as well as the commu-



nity are informed on all
the issues, said Dennille
Folsom, director.
"It's a quick two-hour
program where you can
find out where the peo-
ple running for office
stand on. everything,"
she said.
The community is
encouraged to watch the
forum to become better
informed, McKee said.
"You're hearing candi-
dates respond to similar
questions," he said.
The broadcast will
also be replayed after its
initial run.
"If you miss it on
Tuesday there will be
ample opportunities to
see and hear it after the
fact," McKee said.



13 Oh Noil
i d, SAY ITrr
.; ISNT i
SO NOT'
* .;. THE BIG .

5-0!
~~~~~~~~l~~~~~~



UAIPPY BIRTUDAY

,S 'ISSY,,
[ ] (WA A)Log F.BJ)
|| Youi Loving Family Ul



I



FACTORY SALE!
...A



Save $50-$250
OFF Woodstoves, Gas Stoves4
and many Fireplaces.
E DO MAJE--5TIC C



im
Contemporary
Gas Fireplaces



"U' 1 *'".11



i ie t:
Wood Fireplaes
Wood Fireplaces



F;
_



L



Wood Stoves



A| C .o TAX CREDIT Program
ALSO- Savings up to $1500



611 N. Main
Gainesvll



THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
OPEN Toll Free 1-800-524-2675
St. M-F 9:30-5:30 C = =r
le SAT. 9:30-4:00



',.ii


Remember
: each day
so special
,v and sweet,
much more
4 inour future
ifyou will

Marry A
'*i- W k *^'1''"' '''1



Do You Need to

POP THE

QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
4 X .Bridget
y, TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!
'755-5440or
755-5441
I between 8:00am & 5:00pm
re v


ie nd ^^
/uriyt-^



] A m 01 *I i14 I i y!ill 4'lWrwfl^i



fLUSet Marc

' 7 'Kazmiers ki

For County Commissioner

District 2
L l ...b.~~~~p



The Columbia County
Industrial Development Authority
Board of Directors will meet on
the following dates during the
2010 2011 fiscal year.
October 6,2010 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
November 10, 2010 8:30 a.m.
at CHS Career Center
December 1, 2010 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
January 5, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
February 2, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
March 2,2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
April 6, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
May 4, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
June 1, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
July 6, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
August 3, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
September 7, 2011 8:30 a.m.
at Lake Shore Hospital Authority
The address for the Lake Shore Hospital Authority is
259 NE Franklin Street, Lake City
The address for CHS is
469 SE Fighting Tiger Drive, Lake City
Please check www.ccflorida.com for up-to-date information.



I
a .._ z
k,

I.liz.lct h "K. hy"
Ncwm.ll, AlNI'



Mincsh Palecl MD



I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~



I



11



5A



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



LAKE CITY REPORTER



II%



11. 'r]440Alrt"~ afd
.41: 1.1". u;L r cwc~L -LL,-ik3.



)
A



c~~~~~~bti~~~~~~~



Wm-F.J 411-11-ij 11-11u. 1111 j b lj 11, I U.
i--. :.. r, -1
..- -Z -., -.-- -- r












6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



COMMUNITY CALENDAR



* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter. com.



Monday
Class ring orders
The Herff Jones repre-
sentative will be at Fort
White High School dur-
ing all lunches Monday
and Tuesday to take
orders and deposits for
class rings. All juniors are
encouraged to order at this
time. Seniors who have not
ordered a ring yet are also
encouraged to order. Rings
ordered on these dates
will be in by the Christmas
break. If you did not get a
ring order packet go to the
school's front office and
pick one up.

Wheel throwing
workshop
A beginning wheel
throwing workshop is
6:30 to 9 p.m. on Monday
and on Oct. 11 and 25 at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State Park.
The fee is $85. Students
will learn wedging, pulling
up and more. Students are



asked to wear old clothes,
bring apron, an old hand
towel and small plastic
bowl. Call (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.

Tuesday
Pottery workshop
A beginning hand build-
ing pottery workshop is
6:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday
and on Oct. 12 and 26 at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State Park.
The fee is $85. Students
will learn wedging, how to
hand build a pinch pot and
more. Call (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.

Wednesday
October Friendship
Luncheon
The October Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomer's is at 11:30
a.m. Wednesday at Ivey
House, 14603 Main St.,



Alachua. Call 438-8100 or
754-7227.

Thursday
Juicing Workshop
A juicing workshop
is 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Thursday at the Stephen
Foster Folk Cultural
Center State Park. The
fee is $20. Students will
learn how juicing fruits
and vegetables can bet-
ter their health, increase
energy, vitality and over
all well being. A workshop
notebook and recipes are
included in the workshop.
Call (386) 397-1920 or visit
www. stephenfosterCSO.org.

Friday
Birthday Bash
Columbia High School
Class of 1978 Birthday
Bash is Friday through
Saturday. The cost is
$50 for singles and $100
for couples. Call Terri
Millikin 755-4098 at home



or 755-4033 at work.

Saturday
Planting Workshop
A planting and propa-
gating workshop is 9
a.m. to noon Saturday at
ithe Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State
Park. The cost is $25.
Participants will learn
about sowing seeds, trans-
planting bare root plants, -
transplanting plugs, work-
ing with cuttings, and see
a demonstration of layer-
ing and dividing plants.



Watercolor Workshop
A beginning watercolor
workshop is 1 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Stephen Foster
Folk Cultural Center State
Park. The fee is $35. It
will cover all aspects of
the medium including;
supplies, techniques and
painting. Each person
will complete at least one
painting matted and ready



to frame.

Pine Needle Workshop
A pine needle workshop
is 10 am. to 2 p.m. Saturday
at the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State Park.
The fee is $35. Students will
learn the traditional Florida
art of transforming long leaf
pine needles into baskets
by coiling and stitching with
raffia. A small basket will
be finished in class and the
.techniques of shaping, start-
ing, and finishing a coiled
basket will be mastered.

Richardson Alumni
Meeting
Richardson is having an
alumni meeting 12 p.m.
Saturday in the school's
gym. For more informa-
tion call 752-0815.

Oct. 10
Rollers home bout
The Alachua County
Rollers are holding their



second home bout at 6
p.m. Oct. 10 at the Skating
Palace, located at 357 N.W.
Hall of Fame Drive. Doors
open at 5:15 p.m. The
ACR Hunnies are taking on
Fort Pierce's South Florida
Roller Girls. Bout tickets
are $5 in advance at Skate
Palace. Tickets are $7 at the
door and children under
12 are free to attend. Visit
www.acrderby.org.

Annual family reunion
Hopeful Baptist Church
is having a family reunion
Oct. 10 at 12:30 p.m. in the
Life Center. Bring a cov-
ered dish.

Christian Service
The Christian Service
Center is having an
open for the Lighthouse
Disaster Recovery
Warehouse 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. Oct. 10. The center
is located on Hilton and
Washington St. There
will be refreshments and
music. Call 755-1770.



OBITUARIES



Elizabeth (Beth) Kinyon
Elizabeth (Beth) Kinyon, age
81 of Asheville, NC and Lake
City, FL, died on Sept 25,
2010 at the Solace Center Care
Partners in Asheville, NC.
Mrs. Kinyon was born on March
24, 1929, in Seneca Falls New
York. She attended Mynderse
Academy, Seneca Falls, NY,
Keuka College, Keuka Park,
NY and later the University
of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
She is survived by her daughter,
Dr. Kathryn Kinyon-Munch,
her granddaughter, Keisha Kin-
yon who attends Douglas An-
derson School of the Arts and
son-in-law Bryan Munch, all of
Jacksonville, FL and son, David
Brownell of Ft. Lauderdale, FL.
She is also survived by her sister,
Carol Barone, of Lake City, FL.
In lieu offlowers, donations to the
Douglas Anderson School of the
ArtS-Instrumental Department,
2445 San Diego Rd, Jackson-
ville, FL 32207, would be greatly
appreciated. Douglas Anderson
is a public high school devoted
to supporting music education.
A celebration of Beth's life
will be held at a later date.
Algenia T. Vajda
Mrs. Algenia T. Vajda, 88, of
Cheyenne, Wyoming died July
28, 2010 at her home in Chey-
enne. She was born on Decem-
ber 16, 1921 in Mulberry, Flori-
da a daughter of the late Lonnie
George & Inez Esther Cox Crews.
Mrs Vajda married Steven Vajda
on January 28, 1943, in New
Brunswick, New Jersey. She
lived in Lake City until moving
to Cheyenne in 1982. Mrs. Vajda
was a former member of the St.
James Episcopal Church and
was currently a member of St.
Christopher's Episcopal Church
in Cheyenne. She enjoyed read-
ing, cooking, sewing and fishing.
She is survived by two daugh-
ters, Algenia T. Davis (Robin) of
Cheyenne, Wyoming; and Janice
Foglesong (Gary) of Mitchell,
Nebraska; a son, Steven Vajda,
Jr. (Edna) of Cheyenne, Wyo-
ming; a sister, Inabelle Ciluffo of
Highland Park, New Jersey and
six grandchildren, Toni Dover,
Michelle Olson, Joshua Davis,
Kristin Schmidt, Craig Vera-
cruyse and Veronica Vajda. Eight
great-grandchildren also survive.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, her parents and
two infant brothers, Arthur
Lawrence and Robert George.
Memorial services for Mrs. Vajda
will be conducted at 10:00 A.M.,
Wednesday, October 6, 2010
in the chapel of the Dees-Par-
rish Family Funeral Home with
Mother Michael Armstrong offi-
ciating. Interment will follow in
Bethel United Methodist Church
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the
family requests that memorial
donations be made to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234. Please sign
the on-line family guestbook at
parrishfam ilyfuneralhome. cor
Edgar Ray "E.R." Sprad-
ley
Mr. Edgar Ray "E.R." Spradley,
79, a lifelong resident of Co-
lumbia County died Wednes-
day, September 29, 2010 at his
residence. He was the son of
the late Pete Spradley and Retha
Mae Bullard Milton. Mr. Sprad-
ley retired in March of 1991
fiom the Florida Department of
Transportation after thirty-six
years of service in the mainte-
nance division. Mr. Spradley
was an avid hunter and enjoyed
fishing and watching sports. He



was a member of the North Lake
City Church of God. Mr. Sprad-
ley was preceded in death by a
grandson, Doyle Spradley, Jr..
Mr. Spradley is survived by
his wife of fifty-seven years,
Katherine Bryan Spradley; his
five sons; Sephus Spradley
(Sheryl); Doyle Spradley Sr.;
Delano Spradley (Teresa); Larry
"Tony" Spradley (Tarren) and
Edgar "Darrell" Spradley (Patty)
all of Lake City; six brothers,
Quincy Milton, Shep Spradley,
Shelton Spradley, Joe Spradley,
Ralph Spradley and Sheffield
Spradley all of Lake City; and
six sisters, June Law. Gerline
Feagle, Mary Ann Raulerson,



Debbie Hughes, Shirley Riley
all of Lake City and Linda Gail
Williams of Live Oak, Florida.
Nine grandchildren and eighteen
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Sprad-
ley will be conducted at 2:00
P.M. on Saturday, October 2,
2010 in the North Lake City
Church of God with Rev. Bar-
ney Hurst officiating. Interment
will follow in the Salem Primi-
tive Baptist Church Cemetery
(located on Lake Jeffery Road ).
The family will receive friends
from Noon until 2:00 P.M. Sat-
urday at the church prior to the
service. Arrangements are under
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY



pAu. MAI I OWlN Ptf



FUNERALHOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025
. (386)752-1234 Please sign
the on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. cor
Lois Watson Bradford
Lois Watson Bradford, 75, of
Wellborn, formerly of Nash-
ville, Ga. died Friday, Oct. 1 in



the Haven Hospice in Lake City.
She was a homemaker and the
widow of Harry Bradford who
died in 1997. She is survived by
three daughters, Wanda Cotton
of Wellborn; Deborah Hunter of
Lake City; and Sheila Randazzo
of Port Saint Lucie; two sons;
Gerald Skinner of Port Saint
Lucie; and Michael Skinner of
Livp Oak; nine grandchildren
arf 11 great-grandchildren.



* C05TUM3 CONT35T i

. % There will be three prizes awarded in three categories
* 0 JFunny, Unique and Overall Cutest
r So P,. All photos will be published in the e .;
H i~. t^ ~October 20th edition of the Lake .
.,4 | Vf lI. City Reporter and the 3 winners
1I.Y t will be published on October 31st 4^
o 'I I $25 entry fee 4
T' 4 .. | Deadline for entries is -'
Pf O '' t Friday, October 15'
fix Ar U f TO ENTER:
fRf ti j~ l Bring in, Mail or e-mail
,[. t .lake City Reporter
't .*& .z- i* *I 180 E. Duval Street,
: X B Lake City, FL 32055
E-mail: ads ,lakecityreporter.com


I *PET COSTUME CONTEST ENTRY FORMWI
I Pet's Name: I
I Owner's Name: I
I I
Address:
I Phone: I
I Please include a self addressed stamp envelope to have your I



Graveside funeral services will
be held at 11 a.m. Oct. 4 in the
Westview Cemetery in Nash-
ville, Ga. Visitation is Monday
morning two hours prior to the
service. Lovein Funeral Home,
Nashville, Ga. (229) 686-2007.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.



S

_. _
remelt] 4 iC 4'dWe'd;l



I pet's photo returned to you. All entries must be prepaid. I
. --.-------------
'h Lake City Reporter

. 4 -.



WORKSHOP MEETING
CITY OF LAKE CITY-CITY COUNCIL

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council for the City of Lake
City, Florida will hold a workshop meeting on Monday, October 4, 2010.
The meeting is scheduled for 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, 205 North Marion Street,
Lake City, Florida. The purpose of the workshop is:

Presentation relating to BCBS (Blue Cross and Blue Shield)
Health Insurance

All interested persons are invited to attend. No official action will be taken
during this meeting.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as
addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Manager's
Office at (386) 719-5768.

City of Lake City, Florida
AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk



St4LLO.EEN (LOftINN



Ete r orv Yo. chace to ~Ji, tickets to



LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



6A



1~~~~~~~~
W... I,



-&a MUAo











Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010 7A



Multi-faith baptisms held

today at Ichetucknee Springs



By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
Christian churches of dif-
ferent denominations will
gather for the annual tradi-
tion'of a springs baptism.
Baptism Sunday is 2'
p.m. today at Ichetucknee
Springs.
The event started five
years ago when three
churches Christian
Heritage Church, Wesley
Memorial Methodist
Church and First
Presbyterian Church of
Lake City decided to
restart baptisms at the
springs, said John Wheeler,
event organizer.
"Ichetucknee Springs is
the place of the first bap-
tisms in Florida which
occurred during Spanish
occupation times," he said.
'There was a Spanish mis-
sion at the lchetucknee



Springs."
The springs were a tradi-
tional place where churches
went for baptism through
the years, but for some rea-
son it stopped occurring
when it became a state park
in the 70s, Wheeler said.
"It just kind of fell out of
favor," he said.
Baptism Sunday's pur-
pose is to promote believ-
er's baptism, build fellow-
ship among churches in
Columbia County and dem-
onstrate good stewardship
of the springs, Wheeler
said. The event will begin
with singing of old time
gospel songs.
Pastors from Christian
Heritage Church, Broken
Lance Native American
Church, Mt. Tabor A.M.E.
Church, Ichetucknee
Springs Baptist Church and
Poole Memorial Church of
God will baptize members



brought with them, he said.
Other churches may also
show up.
Each church will baptize
according to their own tra-
dition, he said.
There is an open call for
members of the public not
affiliated with churches
to come up for baptism.
People already baptized
can also participate in a
rededication 'responsive
reading to reaffirm their
baptism vows.
The event will end with a
dessert social.
Baptism is a special time
in a person's life symboliz-
ing rebirth, Wheeler said:
"Where better to do
that than one of the most
beautiful places on earth
in the springs?," he said.
"Everyone is invited. Bring
a dessert and bring a lawn
chair."



ANTONIA ROBINSONI Lake City Reporter
Ford driven to help raise funds for CHS
George H. Hudson Jr., Rountree Moore Ford master certified sales and fleet manager, talks
to Terry Hunter before he test drives a Mustang GT Saturday at Rountree-Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury. For every test drive that day, Ford Motor Company donated $20 to Columbia High
School as part of the 'Drive one 4 UR school' fundraiser. The goal was 300 test drivers for
$6,000.



Some water mains to
be closed on Tuesday
From staff reports
Water mains will be shut
down at 9 a.m. Tuesday
for two hours in the SE St.
Johns Street and SE Church
Avenue area.
Crews are changing out a 6
inch valve that has a broken
stem.
Residents may experience
cloudy water after the
repairs are completed due
to aeration and flushing.



.. Ads
^JE. jJp ,, 5p Ads VIA-- -REPR TEo



October is "Breast
1K. vCancer Awareness"
save te'
Wta-as' s Ae TEE-S
~.; ,.; ,It-
'20 hi-
_PIR^11^ '-Muzzle Loading Accessories
_f ~HL- ^^ 19W~C'J New Reef Flip Flops
,G p^--= ''f AC JUST ARRIVED



Three Rivers Medical



Now Accepting New Patients
Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS and
Most other Insurances Accepted


Where the healthcare providers are accessible,
patient, and practice modern and holistic medicine.
Heavy Metal Detoxification Now Available

THREE RIVERS MEDICAL-
in Branford, FL at
208 NW Suwannee Ave.
(across from the Capital City Bank)
More information and appointment



Rodney Scyphers ARNP -C





Ira Lee-ARNP-C



0SGBE kf [A Wki



O M PT IFI A
fT The -:erious solution for wei
What makes OPTIFA'



unique?

Optifast treats the whole you not just your
weight: By combining comprehensive lifestyle
education and. medical monitoring with a
great-tasting meal replacement diet, the
Optifast Program can help enhance your
health, vitality and enjoyment of life.



Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,FAC.O.I
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Board Certified Critical Care
Allison B. Baris, A.RN.P



Many type 2 diabetics and hypertensive
patients can reduce or eliminate their medicine.


SOUTHERN
INTERNAL MEDICINE



____.3G_
__



Symptoms of Depression
may include:
* Change in appetite
* Loss of energy or loss of
interest in activities
* Feeling nervous, tense
or stressed out



Sarkis Clinical is currently conducting a clinical

research study of an investigational medication for

depression. You may qualify to participate if you

are between the ages of 18-80 and are suffering

with depression.

Qualified participants may receive:

study-related medication

study-related examinations

compensation for time and travel


\xxww.SarkisClinicalTrials.com

To find out if you qualify Sarkis Clinical Trials
or to receive more 611 NW 60th Street
information, please Suite C
contact: Gainesville, FL 32607

T: (352)333-0094



S



Tra



eight loss"
ST Program



CITY OF LAKE CITY
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Lake City shall hold a public
meeting at 7:00 PM or as soon after, on Monday, October 4, 2010 in, the City
Council Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.

The purpose of this public hearing is to consider and establish the ranking of
those firms who submitted their qualifications to City in response to the City's
Request for Qualifications 017-2010 pursuant to the provisions of the
"Consultant Competitive Negotiations Act" (Florida Statutes 287.055) to
provide engineering services for upgrades and improvements to the City's St.
Margaret Street Wastewater Treatment Plant, and to select in order of
preference no fewer than three (3) of those firms deemed'to be the most
highly qualified to perform the required services for the upgrades and
improvement to the City's St. Margaret Street wastewater treatment facilities;
and negotiate a contract with the most qualified firm for the required services
in accordance with the criteria and provisions of Section 287.055(5), Florida
Statutes."

All interested persons are invited to attend.

,SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as
addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Manager's
Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk



I -mm mlo



LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0



7A



Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-04218



M &ttS~~~..X Aor IV1-1:-., :
J;I '-s* ;W .." -.



!



I














8A L





THE WEATHER




> MOSTLY, S SUNNY SUNNY
S SUNNY;;



HI84 L0 H' HI78 LO : HI 79 LO



Valdosta
83/49 Jack

Tallahassee ake City 8'
83/47 84/49
* Pensacoa Gainesville o Day
78/49 Panama City 83/51
Pn/rA f~~~~l4IIO



ucaa -
84/52
Orlan
86/6



OU/o



Tampa 0
86/64



0
Ft Myers
87/65



TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low



PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date



85
63
84
64
96 in 1911
46 in 2001



0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
0.20"
41.33"



sonviile
A /pn



AKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



NATIONAL FORECAST: Scattered showers and thunderstorms will bubble up over much of
the Southwest and Intermountain West today. Meanwhile, expect numerous showers over
the eastern Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic states. Dry but chilly conditions are in store for the
Midwest, but look for windy and much warmer weather throughout the Great Plains.



SUNNY





HI 80 LO






'City Monday
Cape Canaveral 81/71/pc



54/ "! Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ytona Beach Fort Myers
83j61 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
do Cape Canaveral Key West
;0 82/65
60 82/65 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
85/72 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
87/74 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
87/67 Miami Tampa



87/75 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach



SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.



MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


' ; .
Oct. Oct.
7 14
New First



7:25 a.m.
7:13 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
7:12 p.m.



2:42 a.m.
4:19 p.m.
3:49 a.m.
4:58 p.m.

.
Oct. Oct.
22 30
Full Last



81/66/s
86/75/pc
86/67/s
79/54/s
79/59/s
87/78/s
78/45/s
85/75/pc
86/71/s
80/55/s
83/60/s
79/58/s
76/54/s
78/46/s
83/66/s
78/45/s
84/76/pc



8
VERI HIt
1 15 Lues t bim
T,:.ja,
ul[r t-. [.-l
.r 3li.,:r r11-
. Ior Tn:- re of,
-. :31e hl''n', ('
'I l l:,+.



'Jeat'.



Forecasts, data a
'-. ; ics O 2010 Weat
:-. -" LLC, Madison, Wi
www.weatherpub



SUNNY



Hi83 LO






Tuesday
?:' ,11 p,;
;O & lr:. p,'
,r ;'7 :r,

.;61 r,-
r. -


6 7F:,
71.,,:
81/58/pc !i
81/64/pc
78/59/s i
79/56/s
77/47/s
85/64/pc j
77/51/pc i
84/74/sh



0



I ,, ..s...



YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES



Saturday Today



CITY
Albany NY
- Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
', Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
.Cr.com Columbia SC
Dallas
and graph- DDytona Beach
thr. Cntr.al Denver



Is.
llsher.com



HI/Lo/Pcp.
63/45/0
80/60/0
51/46/0
76/55/0
69/46/0
68/44/0
81/50/0
56/27/0
85/58/0
66/54/0
56/40/0
77/61/0
70/43/0
73/49/0
52/39/0
55/48/.10
70/41/0
54/46/.06
77/58/0
81/57/0
84/66/0
69/42/0



HI/Lo/W
59/43/pc
76/53/pc
49/35/r
70/44/s
66/51/sh
85/52/s
67/45/s
71/43/s
83/51/pc
59/47/pc
53/41/sh
76/56/pc
55/44/sh
71/47/sh
77/45/s
57/41/s
58/42/pc.
55/45/sh
76/50/pc
74/47/s
83/61/pc
82/50/pc



544i- uuier 'I

aha 1 .- 665', T.SloI r

SI Lods PL ._4 W glor, I R
62/3_ .'


I &Abanla
'nfl'.

.--- 70S. 70/44"'*-r
70


G'oodrS, Azll.nLo 27 CaormFronnl
'" *>.86,60
-j;'ii M ., l s. a rm[
I Hijm, F..'J. 101Jt4,.-- ,
H h1. i. 75i. r
OClu,3a0
Frur.lf



Hlgh: 100, Goodyear, Ariz. Low: 27. Cook, Minn.



Saturday Today



CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Des Molnes 60/48/0
Detroit 55/50/.27
El Paso 86/59/0
Fairbanks 46/37/0
Greensboro 70/49/0
Hartford 67/52/0
Honolulu 81/72/0
Houston 84/58/0
Indianapolis 57/47/.28
Jackson MS 83/50/0
Jacksonville 79/63/0
Kansas City 61/50/0
Las Vegas 92/78/0
Uttle Rock 81/52/0
Los Angeles 77/66/0
Memphis 78/53/0
Mlami 88/72/0
Mlnneapolls 53/41/0
Mobile 81/54/0
New Orleans 82/66/0
New York 66/52/0
Oklahoma City 76/52/0



HI/Lo/W CITY



58/39/s
54/41/pc
87/59/pc
46/29/pc
65/48/sh
62/44/c
86/74/pc
84/52/s
60/38/pc
73/43/s
84/59/s
60/39/s
93/72/pc
70/43/s
68/58/pc
67/44/s
87/75/pc
59/38/s
79/50/s
75/60/s
66/51/c
66/44/s



Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington



Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
60/46/0 61/38/s
87/68/0 86/60/s
68/51/0 66/52/sh
97/81/0 101/74/pc
64/40/0 54/43/sh
64/52/0 59/44/pc
62/60/0 65/53/sh
73/50/0 65/51/sh
60/36/0 79/49/s
80/58/0 76/45/t
'71/50/0 66/52/sh
79/57/0 78/53/c
62/53/.01 62/38/s
84/54/0 83/60/pc
83/61/0 85/55/s
79/71/0 70/63/pc
68/59/0 62/54/pc
61/57/0 61/52/sh
69/51/0 75/51/pc
86/69/0 86/64/s
94/70/0 97/69/t
70/52/0 65/50/sh



.. -.. ~.- 1 V, 1. ;I ,, ,i, ; *, ,, '-


a.i lp 7p la 63':
Sunday Monday r .- re-an
^ t ne r i rewnnrpfpi
Itr,,n, Ir,e Pli, r,. G
mr,;-,,-r, r: l,l,,rr,,.. ..l w

"I I r '- ,
* ra ,:,n ; rr,rr ,r,
-It~' t-,! r.n',ler.rrure or 1:'., ,



r Forecauied temperature -- Feels like' leperatule ; ~,
r_ ,. ____ ^-^_ ___ _-_- -i._r r-=rav .. .v' ,* , ; ,- .



I
4I



Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today ;
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Acapulco 84/75/0 87/76/pc La Paz 55/37/.02 56/32/sh Rio 82/75/0 75/6,6/sh
Amsterdam 66/54/.14 67/52/pc Uma 64/57/0 64/56/pc Rome 75/54/0 76/55/pc
Athens na/na/.04 75/61/pc London 61/48/.18 64/56/r St. Thomas VI 87/80/.01 86/79/t
Auckland 61/52/0 63/46/s Madrid 79/50/0 82/49/s San Juan PR 88/77/.37 86/78/t
BelJing 70/55/.11 68/46/pc Mexico City 72/43/0 72/49/pc Santiago 77/39/0 67/38/s
Berln '55/39/0 64/53/c Montreal 54/41/.02 54/37/pc Seoul 68/52/0 71/52/sh
Buenos Aires 66/37/0 69/49/s Moscow 48/39/.03 45/32/s Singapore 90/81/0 90/77/t
Cairo 99/77/0 100/76/s Nalrobi 81/57/0 78/59/t Sydney 68/59/0 66/55/sh
Geneva 75/48/0 71/51/pc Nassau 93/79/0 90/80/t Tel Aviv 100/73/0 92/75/s
Havana 86/64/0 88/69/pc New Delhi 94/na/0 92/71/s Tokyo 73/66/0 78/69/t
Helsinkl 55/28/0 55/38/s Oslo 46/41/0 54/49/r Toronto 52/46/0 53/40/sh
Hong Kong 93/81/0 88/79/pc Panama 82/79/0 84/76/t Vienna 55/48/0 65/48/pc
Kingston 82/73/1.20 86/76/t. Paris 68/57/.46 71/54/pc Warsaw 54/43/0 ,5638/s.
KEYTO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drzzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
h'-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.



i



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



v











Story ideas?



Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom



Lake City Reporter





SPORTS



Sunday, October 3, 2010



www.lakecityreporter.com



Section B



BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Open meeting
planned Oct. 12
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has its annual open
meeting set for 7 p.m.
Oct. 12 at the Southside
Sports Complex. Two
officers and five board
members for the 2011-12
season will be elected.
For details, call
president Tad Cervantes
at 365-4810.

Travel team
tryout Oct. 16
The North Florida
Blaze 10-under travel
team has a tryout
planned for 10 a.m.
Oct. 16 at the Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at
(386) 234-0423.

Travel team 9U
tryout Oct. 30
An open tryout for a
9-under travel baseball
team players is 10 a.m.
Oct 30 at the Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call
manager Todd Gustavson
at 365-2133.
GATORS
Packages for
football games
"Journey to the
Swamp" is a TDC
initiative with Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites and
Fabulous Coach Lines
to provide packages and
transportation from Lake
City to the Florida games
against LSU, Mississippi
State and South Carolina.
Holiday Inn is offering a
two-night package, and
Fabulous Coach Lines
will provide motor coach
transportation. Local fans
can take advantage of the
transportation.
For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or call
the Holiday Inn.
* From staff reports

GAMES



Monday
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Suwannee
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Tuesday
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Suwannee High
at Quail Heights Country
Club, 4 p.m.
* Fort White High
volleyball at Santa Fe
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Wolfson
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Wednesday
Columbia High, Fort
White High bowling at
Suwannee High, 4 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Bartram Trail High
at St. Johns Golf and
Country Club, 4:15 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Newberry
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High JV
football at Branford High,
7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Ridgeview
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Florida High,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
cross country at FSU
Invitational, 7:45 a.m.
Columbia High
swimming vs. Buchholz
High, 9:30 a.m.



High-octane


Indians fall



North Florida
Christian tops
FortWhite, 42-28.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High matched the
firepower of North Florida
Christian with a methodi-
cal offensive attack and
stayed even with the Eagles
through three quarters.
With the scored tied at
21-all, North Florida
Christian quarterback Matt
Dobson hit a streaking



Branton Lee on the first
play of the' fourth quar-
ter and Lee could not be
caught. The scoring play
covered 84 yards.
The Eagles would add
two more touchdowns and
go on to a 42-28 win in Fort
White on Friday.
The Indians got a break-
out game from running
back JR Dixon, which took
on more importance when
Alexis Blake went down
with a knee injury. Dixon
rushed for 144 yards on
27 carries and scored two Fort White High's Dariu
quarterback Matt Dobs(
INDIANS continued on 4B running for the Eagles.



Tide keep



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
s Pollard (4) attempts to bring down North Florida Christian School
on (7) in Friday's game. Dobson totaled 283 yards passing and



rolling



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama's Mark Ingram (22) carries on a first-quarter touchdown as Florida's Jeremy Brown (8) defends in an NCAA
college football game at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Saturday.

Alabama cruises over seventh-ranked Florida



By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. Mark
Ingram scored two touchdowns, C.J.
Mosley returned an interception 35
yards for a score and the top-ranked
Crimson Tide overwhelmed No. 7
Florida 31-6 on Saturday night.
Round 2 between the last two



national champions could come in
Atlanta in early December at the
SEC title game. Alabama (5-0, 2-0)
certainly looked like a team on its
way to another championship sea-
son.
In front of a 101,821 at a blaring
Bryant-Denny Stadium, coach Nick
Saban's Tide rolled to a 24-0 lead in
the second quarter behind Ingram's



two shortTD runs and a defense that
.was buzzing around the-ball.
After the Gators (4-1, 2-1) chipped
it down to 24-6 in the middle of
the third quarter, Mosley picked
off a short pass by a hurried John
Brantley into the middle of the field,
and raced to the end zone for a score
that all but wrapped up Alabama's
19th straight victory.



Miami

edges

Clemson

Harris leads
Hurricanes with
four TD passes.
By PETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press
CLEMSON, S.C. -
Jacory Harris tied a career
best with four touchdown
passes three to Leonard
Hankerson and No. 16
Miami opened Atlantic
Coast Conference play
with a 30-21 victory over
Clemson on Saturday.
Harris had all four of his
scoring throws in the open-
ing half as the Hurricanes
(3-1, 1-0 ACC) took a 27-14
lead. Then they called on
the ACC's top-rated defense
to hang on.
Ahead 27-21, cornerback
Brandon Harris stopped
Andre Ellington on 4th-and-
1 from Miami's 20 with 8:20
to go, ending the Tigers
comeback.
The Hurricanes followed
with a mistake-free, 68-yard
drive that finished with
Matt Bosher's clinching 29-
yard field goal.
Clemson (2-2, 0-1) came
into the game with the
ACC's fewest turnovers
- just two its first three
games. But Miami forced
the Tigers into three fum-
bles and three intercep-
tions.



CANES continued on 2B



Seminoles roll

Cavaliers, 34-14



Thomas runs for
122 yards, two
scores in victory.
By HANK KURZ Jr.
Associated Press
CHARLOTTESVILLE,
Va. Jermaine Thomas
ran for 112 yards and two
touchdowns in the first half
and Florida State pounded
Virginia 34-14 on Saturday.
The Seminoles (4-1, 2-0
Atlantic Coast Conference)
led 27-0 at halftime after
outgaining Virginia 294-42.
Thomas, who finished with
122 yards on 16 carries,
scored on runs of 70 and 10
yards, and Christian Ponder
hit Willie Haulstead with a
15-yard touchdown pass.
The Seminoles also
sacked Marc Verica three
times before halftime, and
he missed several open
receivers. He was 4 for 15
in the first half, and all four



completions were to run-
ning backs.
Virginia (2-2, 0-1), which
had beaten FCS schools
Richmond and VMI and
played well in a 17-14 loss
at Southern Cal, viewed the
game as a chance to see
where it stands four games
into the Mike London era,
and many of the Cavaliers
fans left after seeing the
answer.
Meanwhile, the
Seminoles were out to show
that their 47-17 thrash-
ing at the hands of No. 8
Oklahoma three weeks
ago was an aberration, and
they may have made some
believers.
Virginia gave its fans
some hope in the third
quarter when the defense
forced Florida State to punt
and Verica hit Kris Burd
for a 76-yard touchdown.
The defense again held
FSU continued on 2B



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State running back Jermaine Thomas (38) and wide receiver Willie Haulstead (82)
celebrate Thomas' touchdown during the first half of an NCAA college football game against
Virginia at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday.



A



'L r



I














2B LAECT EOTR S O T UDY COE ,21 aeEio:BadnFne,7402



SCOREBOAF



TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup Series,
Price Chopper 400, at Kansas City, Kan.
EQUESTRIAN
I p.m.
NBC --World Equestrian Games, at
Louisville. Ky. (live and same-day tape)
GOLF
4 am.
NBC Ryder Cup, final round, at
Newport,Wales
2 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Ensure
Classic; final round, at Conover, N.C.
4 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Soboba
Classic, final round, at San Jacinto, Calif.
8 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour,Viking Classic, final
round, at Madison, Miss. (same-day ppe)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
WGN Cleveland at Chicago White
Sox
1:30 p.m.
TBS N.YYankees at Boston
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, at Motegi,
Japan (same-day tape)
4 p.m,
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
Magny-Cours, France (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage'
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC Chicago at N.Y. Giants
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Mohegan Sun
Invitational, at Uncasville, Conn. (same-
day tape)
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Primera Division, Real
Madrid vs. La Coruna, at Madrid, Spain
8 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Los Angeles vs. CD
Chivas USA at Carson, Calif.

Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN New England at Miami


BASEBALL

AL standings



z-New Yor
z-Tampa B
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore


x-Minnesc
Chicago
Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas Ci



East Division
W L
rk 95 65
Bay 95 66
87 73
84. 77
66 95
Central Division
W L
ota 94 67
,87 74
80 81
69 92
ty 67 94
West Division



Pct GB
.594 -
.590 '
.544 8
.522 1 I
.410 29'A



Pct
.584
.540
.497
.429
.416



GB

7
14
25
27



W .L Pct GB
x-Texas 89 71 .556 -
Los Angeles 79 ,81 .494 .'10
Oakland 79 81 .494 10
Seattle 61 99 .381 28
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
Friday's Games
Baltimore 10, Detroit 6, Ist game
Baltimore 2, Detroit 1, 2nd game
L.A.Angels 5,Texas 4,11 I innings
Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 3
Kansas City 7,Tampa Bay 0
Toronto 6, Minnesota 3
Oakland 9, Seattle 0
N.Y.Yankees at Boston, ppd., rain
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 5,Toronto 4
N.Y.Yankees 6, Boston 5, 10 innings,
Ist game
Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 2,
6 innings
Baltimore 2, Detroit I
Tampa Bay 4, Kansas City 0
L.A.Angels atTexas (n)
N.YYankees at Boston, 2nd game (n)
Oakland at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Detroit (Undecided) at Baltimore
(Bergesen.8-11), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Undecided) at Boston
(Lackey 13-1 Ij, 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Undecided) at' Chicago
White Sox (E.Jackson 3-2), 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 12-10) at Kansas
City (O'Sullivan 4-6), 2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Rzepczynski 3-4) at
Minnesota (Blackburn 10-1 I), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 4-4) at Texas
(C.Lewis 12-13),3:05 p.m.
Oakland (Braden 10-14) at Seattle
(Rowland-Smith I-10), 4:10 p.m.

NL standings



East Division
W L
x-Philadelphia 97 64
Atlanta 90 71
Florida 79 82
New York 79 82
Washington 68 93
Central Division
W L
x-Cincinnati 90 71
St. Louis 85 76
Milwaukee 77 84
Chicago 75 86
Houston 75 86
Pittsburgh 57 104
West Division
W L
San Francisco 91 70
San Diego 90 71
Colorado 83 78
Los Angeles 78 82
*Arizona 65 95



Pct
.602
.559
.491
.491
.422

Pct
.559
.528
.478
.466
.466
.354

Pct
.565
.559
.516
.488
.406



GB

7
18
18
29

GB

5
13
15
15
33

GB


8
12L'
25'h



x-clinched division
Friday's Games
Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 3, 1 Innings
Pittsburgh 5, Florida I
N.Y. Mets 2,Washington 1, 10 innings



Philadelphia I I,Atlanta 5
Chicago Cubs 2, Houston 0
St Louis 3, Colorado 0
Arizona 7, LA. Dodgers 5
San Diego 6, San Francisco 4
Saturday's Games
St. Louis I, Colorado 0, I innings
Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 4
N.Y. Mets 7,Washington 2
Philadelphia 7,Atlanta 0
San Diego 4, San Francisco 2
Chicago Cubs 8, Houston 3
Florida 2, Pittsburgh 0
Arizona at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Ra.Wolf 13-1 I) at
Cincinnati (Volquez 4-3), 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Burres 4-4) at Florida (Ani.
Sanchez 12-12), 1:10 p.m.
Washington (Li.Hernandez 10-12) at
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 15-9). 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-1 I) atAtlanta
(T.Hudson 16-9), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 15-1 I) at
Houston (W.Rodriguez I1-12), 2:05 p.m.
Colorado (E.Rogers 2-2) at St Louis
(Suppan 2-8), 2:15 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 14-9) at San
Francisco (J.Sanchez 12-9),4:05 p.m.
Arizona (R.Lopez 7-15) at L.A.
Dodgers (Lilly 9-12), 4:10 p.m.



FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE.



East
W L
N.Y. Jets 2 I
Miami 2 I
New England 2 I
Buffalo 0 3
South
W L
Houston 2 I
Indianapolis 2 I
Tennessee 2 I
Jacksonville I 2
North
W L
Pittsburgh 3 0
Cincinnati 2 I
Baltimore 2 I
Cleveland 0 3
West
WL T
Kansas City 3 0
San Diego I 2
Denver I 2
Oakland I 2



T Pct
0.667
0.667
0.667
0.000



PF PA
68 47
52. S5
90 82
47 87



TPct PF
0.667 77
0.667 89
0.667 78
0.333 40

TPct PF
01.000 72
0.667 59
0.667 44
0.000 45



PA
78
61
42
83

PA
33
55
41
57



Pct PF PA
01.00068 38
0.333 72 61
0.333 61 65
0.333 52 76



NATIONAL CONFERENCE



Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas
N.Y. Giants


Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis
San Francisco



East
W L
2 1
1 2
1 2
1 2
South
W L
2 1
2 1
2 1
0 3
North
W L
3 0
2 1
1 2
0 3
West
W L
2 1
2 1
1 2
0 3



TPct PF
0.667 83
0.333 56
0.333 54
0.333 55

TPct PF
0.667 77
0.667 63
0.667 50
0.000 32

TPct PF
01.00066
0.667 78
0.333 43
0.000 56



TPct
0.667
0.667
0.333
0.000



PF
72
48
57
38



PA
62
67
53
85

PA
46
58
59
71

PA
51
47
38
78



PA
57
77
49
87



Today's Games
Denver atTennessee, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Buffalo, I p.ni.
Seattle at St. Louis, I p.m.
San Francisco atAtlanta, I p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, I p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
New England at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 10
St. Louis at Detroit, I p.m.
Denver at Baltimore, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay atWashington, I p.m.
Chicago at Carolina, I p.m.
Atlanta at Cleveland, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Buffalo, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Kansas City at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans atArizona, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. II
Minnesota at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.


GOLF

Ryder Cup

At Celtic Manor Resort
Newport,Wales
Saturday
Foursomes
United States 3'A, Europe 2'
Zach Johnson and Hunter Mahan,
United States, def. Edoardo Molinari and
Francesco Molinari, Europe, 2 up.
Rickie Fowler and Jim Furyk, United
States, halved with Lee Westwood and
Martin Kaymer, Europe.
Padraig Harrington and Ross Fisher,
Europe, def. Phil Mickelson and Dustin
Johnson, United States, 3 and 2.
Tiger Woods and Steve Stricker,
United States, def. Miguel Angel Jimenez
and Peter Hanson, Europe, 4 and 3.
lan Poulter and Luke Donald, Europe,
def. Bubba Watson and Jeff Overton,
United States, 2 and I.
Stewart Cink and Matt Kuchar, United
States, def. Graeme McDowell and Rory
Mcllioy, Europe, I up.
United States 2A, Europe I '
Fourballs
Lee Westwood and Martin Kaymer,
Europe, def. Phil Mickelson and Dustin
Johnson, United States, 3 and 2.
Stewart Cink and Matt Kuchar, United
States, halved with Graeme McDowell
and Rory Mcllroy, Europe.
Tiger Woods and Steve Stricker,
United States, def. lan Poulter and Ross
Fisher, Europe, 2 up.
Bubba Watson and Jeff Overton,



ZD


United States, def. Luke Donald and
Padraig Harrington, Europe, 3 and 2.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Price Chopper 400
Site: Kansas City, Kan.
Schedule: Today, race I p.m. (ESPN2,
noon-I p.m.; ESPN, 1-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Kansas Speedway (oval, 1.5
miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 266 laps.

Price Chopper lineup

At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 174.644.
2. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 174.469.
3. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 174.43.
4. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 174.312.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.255.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
174.149.
7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
173.952.
8. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 173.902.
9. (2) Kurt Busch; Dodge, 173.874.
10. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 173.768.
I I. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 173.751.
12. ( I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 173.7.
13. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
173.622.
14. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
173.416.
15. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 173.377.
16. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
173.349.
17. (09) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
173.321.
18. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
173.227.
19.(18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 173.177.
20. (88) Date Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
173.077.
211 (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
173.038.
22. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
173.033.
23. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
173.021.
24. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
172.961.
25. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
172.933.
26. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
172.883.
27. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
172.789.
28. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
172.706.
29. (46) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet,
172.612.
30. (43) A J. Allmendinger, Ford,
172.557.
31. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 172.529.
32. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
172.408.
33. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 172.046.
34. (83) Reed Sorenson, Toyota,
172.024.
35. (64) Landon Cassill, Toyota,
171.985.
36. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford,
171.734.
37. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 171.723.
38. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 171.51.
39. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 171.396.
40. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 170.719.
41. (7) Kevin Conway.Toyota, Owner
Points.
42. (71) Tony Raines, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
43. (38) Dave Blaney, Ford, 171.265.
Failed to Qualify
.44. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
171.255.
45. (55) Mike Bliss,Toyota, 170.557.
46. (66) Jason Leffler,Toyota, 169.465.


BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Today
New York at Armani Jeans Milano
(Italy), 12:30 p.m.
Maccabi Haifa (Israel) at New Jersey,
7 p.m.
Monday
LA. Lakers vs. Minnesota at London,
3 p.m.
Tuesday
Charlotte at Cleveland; 7 p.m.
NewJersey vs. Philadelphia at Roanoke,
Va., 7 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando vs. Houston at Hidalgo,Texas,
8:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Portland, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

FIBA Worlds

MEDAL ROUND
Semifinals
Saturday
Czech Republic 81, Belarus 77, OT
United States 106, Spain 70
Finals
Today
Bronze Medal
Semifinal losers, 1 1:30 a.m.
Gold Medal
Semifinal winners, 2 p.m.

Classification (5-8)
Saturday
Australia 78, Russia 73
France 61, South Korea 46
Today
Seventh Place: South Korea vs. Russia,



6 a.m.
Fifth Place: France vs. Australia,
8:45 a.m.
Classification (9-12)
Saturday
I Ith Place: Greece 71, Canada 55
Ninth Place: Brazil 84, Japan 79


HOCKEY

NHL preseason

Today's Games
Nashville at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Buffalo, 6 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 7 p.m.



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami's Marcus Robinson puts pressure on Clemson's Kyle Parker as her tries to throw
during the second quarter of an NCAA college football game in Clemson, S.C., Saturday.



CANES: Harris sets personal high

Continued From Page 1B



Jacory Harris finished 13
of 33 for 205 yards and two
interceptions. His touch-
down throws matched his
personal high set against
Duke in 2008.
Hankerson 'had seven
catches for a career high
147 yards.
The past three games
these teams played all went
to overtime, highly enter-
tainiing back-and-forth affairs
people didn't want to leave.
Harris and the
Hurricanes, though,
looked like they had put
this one away by halftime
after Hankerson's 7-yard -
TD catch with 10 seconds
left before the break put
Miami ahead 27414.
But then Harris showed
why he can both amaze and
frustrate fans of 'The U."
He was called for inten-
tional grounding near his
goal line, forcing Miami to
punt from the end zone.
Clemson took advantage



of the good field position
that followed with the last
of Ellington's three touch-
downs to cut the lead to
27-21.
Harris then escaped a
game-changing mistake
when Hurricanes lineman
Seantrel Henderson, a 6-
foot-8, 355-pound freshman
making his first start, cov-
ered up the quarterback's
fumble.
' Clemson's last serious
threat ended on its drive to
the Miami 20. That's when
Brandon Harris made his
big stop, flipping Ellington
out of bounds short of the
first down.
Quarterback Kyle Parker
ended the Tigers final two
drives with a fumble and an
interception.
Jacory Harris showed off
his skills in the first half.
When Clemson moved
in front 14-7 on Ellington's
second TD run, Harris
answered back three plays



later with a textbook throw
to Hankerson for a 65-yard
score to tie the game.
In the second quarter,
Harris followed a badly
overthrow interception a
series later with a perfect
lob to Mike James for an
18-yard touchdown.
Harris made a second
awful error when, on third-
and-goal, Marcus Gilchrist
intercepted his throw into
the end zone. But Harris
made up for it right before
halftime with two nifty
passes to Hankerson, the'
second for his 7-yard TD.
Clemson looked like
it had figured a way
through Miami's defense
as Ellington dashed off
two TD runs, the first a
71-yarder in the first quar-
ter that was the Tigers lon-
gest in three seasons.
Ellington rushed for 107
yards. Parker was just 14
of 33 for 149 yards. He was
sacked three times.



ASSOCIATED PRESS



Florida State quarterback Christian Ponder (7) gets ties up by Virginia safety
Corey Mosley (7) and defensive tackle John-Kevin Dolce (59) during the first half of an
NCAA college football game at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday.


FSU: Ponder efficient in blowout

Continued From Page 1B



and Virginia drove to the
Seminoles' 30, but Greg
Reid intercepted Verica in
the end zone.
Vericathrewanotherinter-
ception deep in Seminoles
territory and finished 14
for 30 for 211 yards. He
was sacked four times and
replaced by Ross Metheny
in the final quarter.
The Seminoles came in
leading the nation with 19
sacks and got six more.
Florida State, unranked



for just the second time in
16 meetings with Virginia,
looked every bit like one
of those top teams of years
past in the first half.
After Ponder was hit and
fumbled on the opening
play, with Thomas recover-
ing, Ponder drove his team
to the Virginia 19, where
Dustin Hopkins' 37-yard
field goal made it 3-0.
The Seminoles' next
three possessions ended in
touchdowns, often because



Ponder made plays to
keep the drives going. He
hit Beau Reliford for 16
yards on a third-and-4, and
Haulstead for the TD on a
third-and-8. He also ran 12
yards on third-and-ll in a
later drive.
Ponder finished 17 for 29
for 172 yards, and ran 10
times for 17 yards.
Metheny hit Colter
Phillips with an 11-yard TD
with 1:39 left for the final
points.



Page Editor: Brandon Finley,- 754-0420



2B



.I.



J



LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0













Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010 3B



Europe eyes Ryder Cup comeback



By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

NEWPORT, Wales -
Europe had its blue num-
bers all over the scoreboard
Saturday evening as throaty
cheers rang out from every
corner of Celtic Manor. All
the Americans had in their
favor was a darkening sky
- and for now, the lead.
A typical day of momen-
tum swings in a most
unusual Ryder Cup ended
with the Americans ahead
6-4 and Europe feeling
like a winner. It led all six
matches on the golf course,
which included a beatdown
of Tiger Woods and Steve
Stricker.
"I'd say it wasn't a bad
thing that it got dark," U.S.
captain Corey Pavin said.
There has never been a
day at the Ryder Cup quite
like this one.
Sixteen players from both
sides competed in parts of
three matches. The open-
ing fourballs session ended



before lunch, followed by
six alternate-shot matches,
and play finally was stopped
with six matches of both
formats still going on. On
two occasions, a fourballs
match allowed an alter-
nate-shot match to play
through.
"I'm not sure what day it
is," Zach Johnson said.
These matches are far
from over. Heavy rain was
in the forecast for Sunday,
with 12 singles matches
still to play after the third
session is completed. Any
stoppage in play would
result in the first Monday
finish in Ryder Cup his-
tory
About the only thing that
resembled a typical Ryder
Cup was 11 hours of golf at
its highest level.
Woods and Stricker won
their second straight match
convincingly, Stewart Cink
delivered a clutch putt and
21-year-old Rickie Fowler
atoned for a bizarre blun-
der by making a birdie



on the 18th hole for an
unlikely half-point Padraig
Harrington won his first
match for Europe in six
years and Lee Westwood
looked like a player on the
verge of going to No. 1 in
the world.
But the final two hours
changed everything.
Europe came roaring
back behind Westwood,
Luke Donald and a host
of others, taking the lead
in every match and pulling
sbme 40,000 fans who stood
in the muck back into the
game.
"Although none of these
games finished, obvious-
ly we are in a very, very
strong position," European
captain Colin Montgomerie
said. "It was a very impor-
tant two hours of play, and
we came through it with
flying colors."
Europe had lost only four
holes of the 39 that were
played in the third session.
'"We're just going to have
to go back tonight, rest up



and fire at them tomorrow,"
Pavin said. "We're down
in all six matches. I have
not seen points given for
matches that are through
four, five, six or seven
holes. So we are going to
go out and try to turn those
around, and try to turn the
momentum back in our
favor."
Westwood and Donald,
who have emerged as the
European stars at Celtic
Manor, might make that
difficult:
They won the first two
holes Stricker missed
the first green with a
9-iron in hand and
Westwood holed a birdie
putt on No. 2 then let the
Americans self-destruct.
Woods couldn't make a putt
as they fell further behind,
and the only positive note
came on the ninth and final
hole when Stricker made a
12-foot putt.
Europe still was 4 up with
nine holes to play in its four-
somes match.



r/il



'--_ ._.'.


. ..
-^ 'j



i. L. *,.
v...
.~WL .
:
' '.. -'
y'^-'
r -



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stewart Cink of the U.S. celebrates after he holed a putt on
the 17th green on the second day of the 2010 Ryder Cup golf
tournament at the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, Wales,
Saturday.



Sooners

take back

Red River

Rivalry



I



Associated Press

DALLAS Landry Jones
threw for 236 yards and
two touchdowns, DeMarco
Murray ran for two scores
on hurry-up plays and
No. 8 Oklahoma survived
another fourth-quarter
swoon Saturday to hand No.
21 Texas its second straight
loss, 28-20 in the Red River
Rivalry.
The Sooners (5-0, 1-
0 Big 12) jumped out to
a two-touchdown lead in
the first quarter, then got
bailed out by a muffed punt
late for a second straight
week.
The Longhorns had
scored 10 straight points
and were set to get the ball
back in the final 62 sec-
onds when Aaron Williams
dropped the punt and James
Winchester recovered it to
let Oklahoma run out the
clock.

ACROSS 39 RV
40 He
1 Klutz's cry 41 Ra
5 Take to the 44 Se;
slopes 47 Hu
8 Encompass 49 Ou
12 Gentle slope 51 Cu
13 Taxi 52 Sem



14 Cleveland's
lake
15 Mr. Alda
16 Planting
guides
18 Even-tempered
20 Grating noise
21 Modicum
22 Strive to win
23 Helicopter
blade
26 Periodic count
29 Kojak's lack
30 Bronze disk
31 Quip
33 Electrical unit
34 Dogpatch verb
35 Nave neighbor
36 Still good
38 Torch's mis-
deed



Bedlam in Baton Rouge
Associated Press penalty for too many play-
ers on the field gave them
BATON ROUGE, La. a second shot at victory.
The Tigers remained Stevan Ridley punched
unbeaten with a 16-14 vic- in a 1-yard touchdown
tory over Tennessee on for the wild win. Ridley
Saturday after aVolunteers finished with 123 yards.

rlirX/T ? Tt^ r THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Oh, my! You
one letter to each square, This is have had that
to form four ordinary words. Es \ /embarrassing third glass
[ TIGAN I /



Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.



Answer here: I X I I X l
^ haK yK /v yl v y\_ m,^



Saturday's Jumwes:
I Answer:



haven
althy
nk
ance holder
ng around
building
zco builder
minoles'



sch.
53 Frat-party attire
54 Reproving
clucks
55 Skip stones
56 Food fish

DOWN

1 Mouths, in
zoology
2 Lubricates
3 Exam for HS
juniors
4 Dole,fmey
5 Heat to boiling
6 Curly-leafed
veggie
7 PC maker
8 Mystery and
sci-fi



(Answers tomorrow)
BILGE CRAFT FROTHY ECZEMA
What the lawyer said when he gave his client
the bill FREE OF "CHARGE"


Answer to Previous Puzzle



Q U A Y *Z MO O M B RIA
U NTO-E R I EIEA R
I S AKpT QlL 2 AN T
T E R EISTA *TIEDDY
*R I L |L **L S |U**

P A N P A I Ri" R E
O N U SaT R EflM A E
D A N|a H|A s|T|EB*B*l
* **U|TE **OIDI E
_- E- AX*XE= D G- MI A
PIEIIC EM EI I IGIMIA
U NNEjR|V E D CLL I P
M O TM E T E =fO T S
A W E S|E|E|N B SO S O



9 Latin hymn word
10 Costa-
11 Office workplace
17 Breezing
through
19 Exclude



22 Chimney
23 Sorority letter
24 Waikiki's
island
25 Holt and
Considine
26 Ice-cream
holder
27 Game officials
28. Mediocre
(hyph.)
30 Large lizard
32 Decimal base
34 Dwelling
35 Easel buyers
37 Japanese
pooches
38 Facilitate
40 Disgusted (2
wds.)
41 Dart about
42 Time beyond
measure
43 Check mark
44 Butte
45 Oy vey!
(hyph.)
46 Part of MHz
48 P.O. service
50 Homer, to Bart



O 2010 by UFS, Inc.



"If you are a small business trying to
make it in today economy, then the
Lake City Reporter is by far the best way
to educate the community on what it is
you have to offer. JeffPressley and the
Lake City Reporter has been a huge part
of our success as a small business. And to
those customers that make that call, we
thankyou! If it weren't foryou calling,
we wouldn't have the opportunity to
serve you."



FOR AMERICAN DREAMS MOBILE



Find out ways to tell your story
by calling 752-1293.



Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine



Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com



RV SERVICE



... e I



I



LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0



3B



Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420



. .



II
E



10-4



PRUABT










LAKE CITY REPORTER HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420



SCENES FROM COLUMBIA'S SWIM MEET



A.



JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's David Morse comes up for air while competing in the Tigers' meet on
Saturday at the Columbia Aquatic Complex.



I 4
JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Spedal to the Reporter;
Columbia High's Jonathan Smith competes in the butterflies on Saturday at the Columbia
Aquatic Complex. '



INDIANS
Continued From Page 1B
touchdowns.
"Coming in the coaches
told me 'it will be on you
this week' and it felt pretty
good," Dixon said. "I'm sure
there were some things I
could have done better, but
I have got to thank God for
it."
With 'nine touchdowns
and 416 yards in the last
three weeks, Blake figured
to draw the attention of any
defense. He still rushed
for 51 yards and scored a
touchdowns, but had to be
helped off the field when
he slipped while trying
to make the turn on the
right side late in the third
quarter.
"I heard something pop,"
Blake said.
He joined Kevin Poteat,
also nursing a knee, on
the sidelines and coach
Demetric Jackson said both
would visit the doctor on
Monday. Dalton O'Dell suf-
fered a sprained ankle and
Kellen Snider hurt his ribs,
as the game took a toll on
the Indians.
* "When Lett (Blake) went
down, he told me I need
another one from you,"
Dixon said.
The. teams returned to
the field after the 'injury
and Dixon immediately
responded; crashing the
left side for 16 yards and
the touchdown that briefly
tied the game after Colton
Jones' PAT
"JR ran real hard,"
Jackson said. "You have got
to be proud of him. Our
offense played good."
The Indians rolled up
close to 300 yards on offense.
They had 21 first downs
to 16 for North Florida
Christian (4-1) and ran 18
more plays. Fort White had
scoring drives of 80 yards in
16 plays and 77 yards in 11
plays. Three turnovers by
the Indians (NFC had none)
proved too much.
Dobson had an outstand-
ing game. He ran for 107
yards, averaging 10 yards
per carry, and completed
11-of-13 passes for 176 yards
and two touchdowns.
Fort White (3-2, 1-0)
returns to District 2-2B
play this week with a trip to
Florida High in Tallahassee.
The Seminoles are defending
champions in the district
g



N.F Christian 14 7 0 21
FortWhite7 7 7 7



42
28



First Quarter
NFC-Hart 3 run (Rolfe kick), 8:52
FW-Dixon 3 run (ones kick),4:21
NFC-Blanks 24 pass from Dobson
(Rolfe kick), 1:35
Second Quarter
FW-Blake 6 run (Jones kick), 5:31
NFC-Vickers 10 run (Rolfe kick),
3:50
Third Quarter
FW-Dixon 16 run (Jones kick), 3:33
Fourth Quarter
NFC-Lee 84 pass from Dobson (kick
failed), 11:47
NFC-Hart 3 run (Dobson run), 6:03
NFC-Vickers 9 run (Rolfe kick), 3:17
FW-Legree 8 pass from Baker (Jones
kick), :32
NFC FortWhite
First downs 16 21
Rushes-yards34-26448-218
Passing 176 77
Comp-Att-lntI 1-13-010-17-1
Punts-Avg. 1-37 2-34.5
Fumbles-Lost0-0 2-2
Penalties-Yards6-50 0-0
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING--NFC, Dobson 10-107,
Hart 16-97,Vickers 5-29, Railey 2-19, Klees
1-12. Fort White, Dixon 27-144, Blake
13-5 I, Baker 7-18, Cormier I-5.
* PASSING-NFC, Dobson 11-13-176-
0. Fort White, Baker 10-17-77-1.
RECEIVING-NFC,Blanks4-53,
Adkins 2-21, Hart 2-16, Lee 1-84, Rodney
1-2, Seymour 1-0. Fort White, Blake 2-20,
Legree 2-19, Phillips 2-18, D. Sanders 2-12,
Faulkner I-4, Dixon 1-4.



Save



here.



Let's face it. Right now, we're all looking to save. And


you probably don't expect to save in the same place


where you find great quality and get treated nicely. But



actually, at Publix you'll find thousands of items on sale


every day-clearly marked, easy to find, with savings


highlighted on the shelf and again on your receipt. You'll


notice Publix brand products, priced lower than national


brands without compromising quality. And along the


way, you'll get helpful service you can't quite put a price


on. So, even when you're shopping on a budget, you


don't have to give up the experience you deserve.


























a~~i ~,,,



Love to shop here; Love to save here.





Publix.



I



17 .... M



4B



Ni ;; ",
:\( ( ) ) c












Story ideas?



Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@iakecityreportercom



Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS



Sunday, October 3, 2010



www.lakecityreporter.com



Section C



Chamber Corner



Bus ride moves business traffic



Dennille Folsom
(386) 752-3690
www.lakeatychambercom



Chamber

promotes

educated

elections

ur goal at the
Lake City-
Columbia
County
Chamber of
Commerce is for our mem-
bers to be informed voters,
not only on the candidates
running for office, but
also the amendments that
could shape the future of
our state. Your Chamber
realizes that, although
most people intend to do
their due diligence, it is
not always easy to find
the time to thoroughly
research the candidates or
the issues. To counter this,
the Chamber is hosting two
programs that will provide
you with all of the neces-
sary information needed to
help you make an informed
decision on Election Day.
The first event, which is
in conjunction with Florida
Gateway College and the
Lake City Reporter, is the
Candidate Forum 2010.
This program will allow
voters the opportunity to
see and hear from the can-
didates running for public
office. It also provides vot-
ers with a chance to get a
better idea of where the
candidates stand on today's
critical issues.
Invited to participate in
the Candidate Forum are
those running for the fol-
lowing seats: Florida State
Senate District 14, State
Representative District
10, State Representative
VOTE continued on 2C



By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
he initial
"Journey to the
Swamp" bus
trip was suc-
cessful and can
only get better, according
to organizers.
More than 30 passen-
gers rode from Holiday
Inn to Gainesville for the
Florida versus Kentucky
game Sept. 25.
"I'm enthused. It
was our first time out
and I thought we had
a good response," said
Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council.
The bus trip is a col-
laboration between
the TDC, Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites and
Fabulous Coach Lines to
provide transportation to
University of Florida foot-
ball games.
On the first trip, pas-
sengers included Florida
and Kentucky fans, said
Rod Butler, Holiday Inn
general manager. They
were a mix of hotel
guests as well as local
residents.
A two-night package
for $149, which includes
the room, a full made-to-
order breakfast for two
in the Atlantis Cafe each
morning and round-trip
transportation for two to
the game, is available for
visiting fans.
Local fans can ride on
the bus for $20 per per-
son.
The hotel opened up
its bar and lounge at
noon and offered drink
and food specials until
the bus left at 5 p.m.
Judging by their
faces, the riders were
impressed with the quali-
ty of the bus, Butler said.
For a first-time ven-
ture Butler said he was
thrilled with the turnout.
The passengers who rode
the bus this time will
spread the word to their



t -



LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Sandi Jackson (right), 66, of LaBelle receives a wristband from Vivian Robinson of Fabulous Coach Lines as she boards the
'Journey to the Swamp' bus Sept. 25 at the Lake City Holiday Inn & Suites for a round-trip travel to the University of Florida



home football game.
friends.
"It can only get bet-
ter as the word gets out,"
Butler said. "We foresee
increased participation."
The bus service is a
means of moving business
from Gainesville to Lake
City hotels.
'We're optimistic that
our ridership will grow
and that visitors coming
into the area for Gator
football events will con-
sider Lake City as a viable
option as opposed to
Gainesville," he said.
Some of the passengers
told the driver 'We'll see
you next time," said Laura
M. Fowler, Fabulous
Coach Lines director of
business development.
The next bus will be
offered for the Saturday
game against Louisiana
State University.
Other games include
Mississippi State on Oct.
16 and South Carolina on



k'e~eu e4 ce'

October is National Breast

;, Cancer Awareness Month.

In the Lake City Reporter we'd like to take



K ... a moment to salute the strength and courage
breast cancer survivors and to remember tho
whose brave battle has ended

Publishes Sunday, October 24, 2010

Sample Ad Actual Size

Anne Ratliff



of
ose
ed.



Bre'at c(tilcer survivor
for l ye'ars!
The Greatesl Mother
& Grandmother!
II e_ all /o'Ri ll ou,
Bi' Ril h.lt' l RIL .li/i'".
R, I!'c, I t R.,.t'v



/



Get your 2x2 (3.458inx2in) ad with

photo and special message for only $35!

For more information call Bridget or Mary at (386) 754-5440
Or stop by the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Lake City Reporter



Nov. 13.
'We expect a lot of LSU
fans coming in from 1-10
to stop and stay in Lake
City," Fowler said.
Tickets are available
at the Holiday Inn or by
purchasing them online
at www.fabulouscoach.
com and clicking on
"Navigator."
"It's safe and it's com-
fortable, and the fans
don't have to worry about
fighting traffic," Fowler
said. "It's extremely con-
venient."



i A.=..-..',-. :, -, I
LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Trey Buie (from left), 20, and father Al Buie, 60, of Lake City
talk with Terry McMillian, 54, and son Trent McMillian, 13, of
Knoxville, Tenn. before boarding the 'Journey to the Swamp'
bus.



I HOME OF THE WEEK



ONLY $29,900 for this completely
remodeled 3BR/2BA mfg home on over
1 acre off Lake Jeffery; new HVAC will
be given at closing along w/new stove;
possible owner financing available
#73552



CYPRESS LANDING! Very nice
3BR/2BA home built in 2009
w/split floor plan, 1, 286 SqFt,
large gathering room, open
kitchen great for entertaining;
sliding glass doors off great
room opens to patio; 3BR/2BA
ONLY $109,500 #74356



CUTE HOME in great location
is MOVE IN ready! 3BR/2BA
w/1,225 SqFt on corner lot of
quiet subdivision; 12x16 wk-
shop w/elec; several upgrades
thru-out for only $75,000
#75824



GEM OF A HOME! 3BR/2BA on
80'x125' lot has 1,200 SqFt,
kitchen & bath totally reno-
vated; metal roof, large fenced
back yard S close to all ameni-
ties ONLY $79,900 #74493



ACREAGE



ROCK BOTTOM PRICE! 20.45 75 ACRES on US-441 in 474+ ACRES in GILCHRIST CO
acres on Old Wire Road only southern part of Columbia with appx 150 acres under
minutes from Lake City; prop- County; 18-yr-old pines; most game fence; property has
erty has been cut-over would of property high & dry; only some scattered pines & hard-
make beautiful homesite small portion in flood zone wood bottoms; will consider
w/lots of privacy $75,000 "A" REDUCED TO $367,500 selling property on east side
#52486 #74982 of road separate $1,390/Acre
#74302



1--.,--- -- __I -I
GREAT OPPORTUNITY! 1,280 LEASE this newly renovated BRICK DUPLEX close to VA
SqFt income-producing ofc beautiful Victorian perfect for & shopping areas! 2 bldgs
bldg w/great visibility on Baya; office; close to downtown Lake consist of duplex with (2)
centrally located & conve- City! 2,972 SqFt bldg w/major 2BR/1BA and separate bldg
nient to downtown Lake City; renovations on large highly vis- with 1BR/1BA all on 1/3 acre
owner financing available ONLY ible street-to-street corner lot ONLY $154,900 #75282
$139,900 #74689 $2,500/Month #54256



DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
...,.. k j ;i-..* -i'.:. ...I ... .
2806 West US Highway 90, Suite 101
Lake City, Florida, 32055
$mS (386) 755-5110 www.danielcrapps.com t



4



--



"I



l



.



i; 1



.,



I



0~~~~~~












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



Funds vs. Stocks

QMy portfolio is diversified
across several mutual funds. I'd
like to invest in individual stocks,
too. Is there added value in that? -
B.M., Hartford. Conn.
It's good to be diversified,
but many mutual funds are
more diversified than necessary,
often invested in several hundred
different securities. (And many
mutual funds are very similar to
each other, offering more duplica-
tion than diversification.)
An advantage to putting a
chunk of your money into individ-
ual stocks is that if a stock appreci-
ates in value, it will make a signifi-
cant difference in your portfolio.
For example, if you park 5 percent
of your moolah in Fingernail-on-
Blackboard Car Alarm Co. (ticker:
AIEEEE) and it doubles, your
portfolio's value will increase by
5 percent. If you instead own the.
stock through a mutual fund, where
it represents a fraction of a percent
of the fund's value, its advance will
be less perceptible.
Of course, when selecting your
own stocks, you need to know what
you're doing. If you don't, it's smart
to opt for funds managed by effec-
tive pros or index funds that auto-
matically mirror the stock market's
performance. Lear more at
www.fool.com/how-to-invest and
www.morningstar.com.
***
Where can my teens learn
Q about money and invest-
ing? S.E., Topeka, Kan.
A They can learn a lot from you.
if you discuss your financial
beliefs and experiences with them.
Have them read "The Motley
Fool Investment Guide for Teens"
by David and Tom Gardner with
Selena Maranjian (Fireside, $15).
Younger kids can read "Growing
Money" by Gall Karlitz (Price
Ster Sloan, $9), while you
tackle "Raising Money Smart
Kids" by Janet Bodnar (Kaplan
Business, $18) and "Raising
Financially Fit Kids" by Joline
Godfrey (Ten Speed Press, $20).
...................................... -. ........................... .
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
- see Write to Us



VOTE
From Page 1C

District 11 and Columbia
County Commission
District 2. The program
will air live from 7-9 p.m.
on Oct. 5 on the Florida
Gateway College channel
which is Comcast channel
8 and will continue to be
replayed until the elections
on Nov. 2.
The next event is spon-
sored by Brannon, Brown,
Haley and Bullock, P.A and
is titled "Understanding
the Amendments: A
Discussion of the Ballot
Initiatives to Change
Florida's Constitution."
The event will be held at
Florida Gateway College
Gym Conference Center
at 11:30 a.m. on Oct. 19.
Tickets are $12. and include
lunch. In addition to cover-
ing the amendments, we
will also have Jim Poole,
executive director of the
Industrial Development
Authority, speaking on tax
abatement and why it is a
necessary tool in attracting
new industry in our county.
This event is open to mem-
bers and non-members.
If you are interested in
attending, please RSVP to
the Chamber no later than
Oct. 15.
The Chamber also
strives to make our com-
munity a stronger place
to live ind work. We are
pleased to be hosting our
first 'Trunk or Treat" at
6:30 p.m. on Oct. 29 at
Olustee Park. We will have
a costume contest, food
vendors, music by Starlight
Rhythm Section, "Scooby-
Doo" the movie and lots of
candy! If you would like to
volunteer to decorate your
car as one of the "trunks"
and pass out candy, give
me a call. We will provide
all of the treats!
* Dennille Folsom is the
executive director of Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.



T The Motley Foolr

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich



I_=NI ml



The Good, Bad
and Ugly
At The Motley Fool, we don't
like most annuities. Their typically
high fees and low returns mean
that the folks selling them, not the
customers they supposedly serve,
end up making a lot of money.
An annuity is a contract between
you and (usually) an insurance
company. In exchange for a big
chunk of cash today, the insurance
company agrees to pay you an
income for a specified period,
which can be a certain number of
years or the rest of your life.
Here are three broad categories
of annuities:
The ugly: equity indexed
annuities. These are notorious
salesman-enrichers. Promising a
"guaranteed" rate of return based
on the performance of an index, the
fine print reveals that your return
will be several percentage points
lower than the index's. Worse, the
return is often capped.
When the S&P 500 has a big
year like 2009, in which it gained
26 percent, you might be looking at
no more than a 10 percent return.



And that's before ridiculous fees. A
well-built portfolio of stocks should
easily trounce this tax-disadvan-
taged boondoggle of a product.
The bad: variable annuities.
These generally sport high fees,
iffy returns and brutal "surrender
charges" if you need your money
back. There some tax advantages,
but they rarely compensate for the
.downsides.
The sometimes-good: lifetime
income annuities. These are
basic, classic annuities you
hand over a lump sum and get a
specified income for the rest of
your life. The best ones offer cost-
effective insurance against outliv-
ing your money. They're worth
serious consideration if you're
near retirement and your nest egg
isn't as big as you'd like.
Even if you think your nest egg
is big enough, if you're concerned
about managing an investment
portfolio while you're retired and
don't want to be dependent on an
adviser, a lifetime income annuity
can make some sense.
There are trade-offs, but they may
be worth the peace of mind. If
you're considering this option, seek
low-fee offerings backed by highly
rated insurers.
We'll offer more details next week.'



Name That Company
!^ > Based in Hartford, Conn., I'm a global
/ conglomerate serving the aerospace
and commercial building industries. My
businesses include Carrier heating and

IL air conditioning, Hamilton Sundstrand
_ i 1. __1:1.1 _ I __J .



aerospace systems ana industrial products,
Otis elevators and escalators, Pratt & Whit-
ney aircraft engines and Sikorsky helicopters,
along with fuel cells and fire and security sys-
/tems. I employ more than 200,000 people and
am one of America's 50 largest companies and
nnp of its ton 20 manufacturers. I'vP hbpn navinn



J1



Conviction Ignored
My dumbest moves have always
been selling companies I strongly
believed in and keeping the less
successful ones. I bought shares of
Amazon.com around $38 at the end
of 2004 and sold them at $40 two
years later, on the advice"of
an investment consultant
who thought the company '1
was too risky. Impressed by '
his credentials and conscious of my
own ignorance, I ignored my inner
conviction. I bought in again in
2008 at $75 but sold half my
shares a year later. That was a stu-
pid move, as I could have sold
many others instead.
If you believe in a company that
has sound finaricials and a business
you understand well, ignore the
advice of pseudo experts and trust
yourself. L.D., online
The Fool Responds: Good thing
you hung onto some of your shares!
Amazon, a "Motley Fool Stock
Advisor" recommendation, has
recently been trading above $140.
Some people like to sell part of
their stake in a company after they
make a certain profit, such as earn-
ing back their initial investment.
They then view the remaining
shares as gravy.
Do you have an embarrassing
lesson learned the hard way?
.j\y Boil it down to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
printyours, you'll win a Fools cap!



What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember 'As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you 'II laugh all
the way to the bank



Is Activision Blizzard's
Growth Sustainable?
Growth stocks are exciting, but
before you jump into one, look for
real, numerically relevant signs of
sustainability. Consider Activision
Blizzard (Nasdaq: ATVI), maker of
popular console games such as
"Guitar Hero" and "Call of Duty,"
and owner of "World of Warcraft.'"
It's been a great business for years.
So good, in fact, that it has more
than tripled in value since Fool
co-founder David Gardner recom-
mended it in our "Motley Fool
Stock Advisor" newsletter.
Activision Blizzard is a cyclical
business that earns much of its cash
from new releases. Therefore,
studying revenue and net income
isn't likely to tell us much, since
those are based in the past.
On the plus side, though, manage-
ment has used the company's gener-
ous cash flows wisely, buying back
shares and instituting a dividend that
was recently yielding 1.3 percent.
A glance at industry numbers
reveals slowing revenue growth,
suggesting that video games are
a more mature business than we
might like to think. But should
we really be surprised? There are
people in their 40s now who grew
up playing video games.
With a forward price-to-earnings
(P/E) ratio of 14, the stock seems
reasonably priced, while the divi-
dend adds a layer of protection
against sustained losses. This may
no longer be a growth story, but it's
still a good story.



: 0 0 0 0 LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER 000000 0 0 0 0
LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
My name reflects my founder and the location of my first store. I was born
in 1956, launching my first bridal registry in 1958 and my first catalog in 1972. :
Today, headquartered in San Francisco, I'm a top retailer of home furnishings
and kitchenware in North America. My brands include my own name, along
with Pottery Barn, Pottery Barn Kids, PBteen and West Elm. I used to operate :
the Gardeners Eden catalog and Hold Everything stores. My three-prong



7R-. " Va t '' ... F. 1I. .. K.."I I ...' distribution approach features 610 stores, seven direct mail catalogs and six
dividends on my stock since 1936, and I rake in more e-commerce websites. Who am I? (Answer: Williams-Sonoma)
,~,/ '' than $50 billion annually, more than $9 billion from
F~/- hthe U.S. government. Who am I? Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
...._r'.' '.....................,Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
fn i.'vii ilic .aniert'' Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you 'I be to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
eni' r, al ,a'.bl gfor a nifty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individualfinancial advice.
................... 20.0T.o......Y..S.....S...S...01 F0x)0D0lsUr.BYUl\RSl .. (t 0I5 'S2 9010. MY IS Y UN RSI (R I .30/2010)
2010 TIti MOn11Y FnuiIDjsr. cv DYUs~IX UC11( (lIR mi IiA~i 9/30/2010) ~



US auto sales remain sluggish



Associated Press

DETROIT New car
models and Labor Day pro-
motions drewAmericans to
showrooms in'September,
but not enough to put
much fire back into overall
auto sales.
Sales at Chrysler Group
LLC and Ford Motor Co.
rose slightly from August.
They fell at General Motors
Co. and were flat at Toyota
Motor Corp. Car compa-
nies say a recovery is pro-
gressing, but it's not as
strong as they had hoped
following a terrible 2009.
September had the
uneven sales that have
plagued the industry all
year.
The month started
strong thanks to Labor
Day promotions, but sales
tapered off until the final
weekend, when new mod-
els and clearance sales on
2010 models again piqued
buyers' interest.
Among the winners:
Redesigned crossovers,
which are SUVs on car



ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 11 file photo, general sales manager Carlos Rodriguez demonstrates how to
open the 'CommandView' panoramic sunroof in a 2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4x4
at the Planet Dodge Chrysler Jeep dealership in Doral. A year after getting billions of dol-
lars in federal aid to stay in business, Chrysler now brags each month about growing sales,
insisting it is rolling down the road to recovery.



frames, saw big jumps
across the industry. Sales
of the new 2011 Ford Edge,
Jeep Grand Cherokee and
Toyota RAV4 doubled,



while General Motors'
GMC Terrain surged.
Ford's new Fiesta subcom-
pact also did well.
Sales rose significantly



from last September, but
that was expected. .
The government's Cash
for Clunkers rebate pro-
gram, which ran during the



summer of 2009, drew buy-
ers who otherwise would
have waited until later in
the year.
Of more concern were
sales compared with
August, which was one of
the weakest on record.
Ford, whose sales rose
'2 percent from August
and 46 percent from
last September, says it's
expecting the industry to
see modest sales increases
for the remainder of the
year.
Others in the industry
echoed that prediction.
'We're not going to bust
loose as you sometimes see
after a downturn, but we'll
see steady growth," said
Don Johnson, GM's vice
president of U.S. sales.
Chrysler, which has
struggled all year, saw
September sales rise
slightly from August
and 61 percent from last
September. GM'S sales
fell about 6 percent from
August.
Sales rose 10.5 percent
over last September.



One large trader led to May 6 market plunge



By MARCY GORDON
and DANIEL WAGNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
trading firm's use of a com-
puter sell order triggered
the May 6 market plunge,
which sent the Dow Jones
industrial average dropping
nearly 1,000 points in less
than a half-hour.
A report issued Friday
by the Securities and
Exchange Commission and
the Commodity Futures
Trading Commissioq deter-
mined the so-called "flash



crash" was caused when
the trading firm executed
a computerized selling pro-
gram in an already stressed
market
The firm's trade, worth
$4.1 billion, led market
players to swiftly pull their
money from the stock mar-
ket
The report does not
name the trading firm. But
a person with direct luowl-
edge of the investigation
said the firm is Waddell &
Reed, based in Shawnee
Mission, Kan. The person
spoke on condition of ano-



nymity because he was not
authorized to identify the
firm.
The free fall highlighted
the growing complexity and
diversity of the fast-evolving
securities markets. Sleek
electronic trading platforms
now compete with the tra-
ditional exchanges, with
stocks now traded on some
50 exchanges beyond the
New York Stock Exchange
and the Nasdaq Stock
Market. Powerful comput-
ers give so-called "high
frequency" traders a split-
second edge in buying or



selling stocks based on
mathematical formulas.
The risk looms that elec-
tronic errors at high speeds
could ripple through mar-
kets and disrupt them.
The stock market was
already stressed even before
the plunge that day. Anxiety
was mounting over a debt
crisis in Europe. The Dow
Jones was down about 2.5
percent at 2:30 p.m. when
the trader placed an enor-
mous sell order on a futures
index of the S&Ps index.
The trade on the E-Mini
S&P 500 was automated by



a computer algorithm that
was trying to hedge its risk
from price declines.
In that one trade, 75,000
contracts were sold in a
span of 20 minutes. It was
the largest single trade of
that investment since the
start of the year. The firm's
previous transaction of that
size took more than five
hours, the report notes.
The trade triggered
aggressive selling of the
futures contracts and that
sent the index down about
3 percent in four min-
utes.



WIT1,54



- ---- .-- -



.



2C



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



LAKE CITY REPORTER



BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW



The Week in Review



Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights



A NYSE

7,335.91 +34.87


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Keithley 21.60 +9.60 +80.0
AirTran 7.34 +2.79 +61.3
Hypercom 6.45 +2.32 +56.2
ChinaNepst 4.45 +1.33 +42.6
HarvNRes 10.44 +2.51 +31.7
CallonPh 4.78 +.99 +26.1
ChNBorun nl.07 +2.28 +25.9
FtBcppfA 9.19 +1.80 +24.4
FtBcp pfE 8.92 +1.73 +24.1
Thorlnds 34.12 +6.40 +23.1

Losers ($2 or more
Name Last Chg %Chg
Satyam If 3.96 -.71 -15.2
PSCrudeDS65.43-10.71 -14.1
ChrsBnk 6.67 -1.06 -13.7
DBAgnDL 9.22 -1.39 -13.1
Monsantd 48.26 -7.12 -12.9
Compx 12.06 -1.74 -12.6
ProUShCrudel2.78-1.84 -12.6
DirLatBear 22.60 -3.04 -11.9
AVangrd 6.28 -.73 -10.4
TRC Cos 2.50 -.29 -10.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 23352543 4.09 +.19
S&P500ETF8856897114.61 -.21
BkofAm 7005284 13.30 -.30
SPDR Fncl4295638 14.50 -.11
iShR2K 2867657 67.86 +.87
iShEMkts 2665446 45.43+1.31
DirFnBear2440062 13.08 +.18
GenElec 2434999 16.36 -.30
FordM 2111273 12.26 -.30
SprntNex 2004574 4.72 +.28

Diary
Advanced 2,126
Declined 1,005
New Highs 475
New Lows 33
Total issues 3,188
Unchanged 57
Volume 20,695,009,056



Amex 3 Nasdaq

2,035.06 44.98 2,370.75 -10.47


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
TioTch 5.20 +1.70 +48.6 NighwkR 6.37 +3.12 +96.0
GoldenMin 20.00 +5.90 +41.8 USATcpf '9.45 +3.45 +57.5
ChinNEPet 6.40 +1.63 +34.2 AirMedia 6.01 +2.12 +54.5
AlmadnM 3.28 +.70 +27.1 DearbmBc 2.03 +.69 +51.5
CapGoldn 4.82 +1.02 +26.8 MedQuist 11.11 +3.43 +44.7
Gainsco 10.29 +2.08 +25.3 AVEO Ph n 13.69 +3.98 +41.0
Banro g 2.45 +.4 +24.4 FCtyBFL 2.10 +.60 +40.0
Bamwell 3.47, +.57 +19.7 CVD Eqp 6.04 +1.65 +37.6
RELM 2.14 +.35 +19.6 SeattGen 15.97 +3.81 +31.3
ChiArmM 3.77 +.59 +18.6 Exceedwt 2.99 +.71 +31.1



Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
IncOpR 4.45 -.60 -11.9
SunLnk 2.16 -.24 -10.1
NthgtMg 3.05 -.34 -10.0
SearchMed 2.38 -.21 -8.1
Minefnd g 9.79 -.84 -7.9
KeeganRg 7.62 -.63 -7.6
Aerocntry 15.53 -1.18 -7.0
CKX Lands 10.80 -.81 -7.0
Chrmcft 2.29 -.17 -6.9
GSE Sy 3.36 -.24 -6.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NthgtMg 318857 3.05 -.34
RareEleg 170668 8.75 +.91
GoldStrg 161254 5.03 +.02
LibertyAcq 158021 10.26 -.05
CapGold n 146425 4.82 +1.02
NovaGldg 121810 8.89 +.20
Taseko 114665 5.55 +.38
GrtBasGg 112263 2.47 +.07
NAPallg 105083 4.46 +.50
NwGold g 100649 6.74 +.43

Diary.
Advanced 349
Declined 185
New Highs' 59
New Lows 16
Total issues 556
Unchanged 22
Volume 519,556,159



Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DynaVoxn 5.44 -3.12 -36.4
LodgeNet 2.38 -.90 -27.4
FalconStor 3.00 -.87 -22.5
YRCWwrs 5.39 -1.36 -20.1
GreenMtC s29.57 -6.65 -18.4
QlikTechn 21.74 -4.75 -17.9
AtBcGp 2.05 -.39 -16.0
OhioLegacy 2.00 -.38 -16.0
Z7onO&Gwt 2.54 -.46 -15.3
FstCapVA 3.00 -.50 -14.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ413622149.01 -.65
YRC Ww rs3693987 5.39 -1.36
Intel 2900039 19.32 -.10
Microsoft 2656503 24.38 -.40
Cisco 2565143 21.91 -.18
SirusXM 2465463 1.24 +.06
Oracle 1888933 27.24 +.28
MicronT 1577003 7.29 +.09
Dell Inc 1321653 13.04 +.39
Comcast 1141722 17.82 -.76

Diary
Advanced 1,679
Declined 1,126
New Highs 287
New Lows 61
Total issues 2,882
Unchanged 77
Volume 10,464,648,630



STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST



Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg%Chg Name Ex Div



AT&T Inc NY 1.68 28.81
AMD NY ... 7.05
AirTran NY ... 7.34
AutoZone NY ... 228.83
BkofAm NY .04 13.30
BobEvans Nasd .80 28.41
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.78
CSX NY 1.04 55.16
Chevron NY 2.88 81.95
Cisco Nasd ...21.91
Citigrp NY ... 4.09
CocaCI NY 1.76 59.12
Delhaize NY 2.02 71.92
Dell Inc Nasd ...13.04
DirFnBear NY ...- 13.08
DrxFBull s NY ... 21.82
EMC Cp NY ...20.34
FamilyDIr NY .62 44.30
FordM NY ... 12.26
GenElec NY .48 16.36
HewlettP NY .32 40.77
HomeDp NY .95 31.82
iShEMkts NY .59 45.43
iShR2K NY ..79 67.86
Intel Nasd .63 19.32
JPMorgCh NY .20 38.81
LVSands NY ... 35.19
Level3 Nasd ... .93



+.23 +0.8 +2.8
+.21 +3.1 -27.2
+2.79 +61.3 +40.6
+3.10 +1.4 +44.8
-.30 -2.2 -11.7
-.41 -1.4 -1.9
+.01 +0.1 -13.8
-.98 -1.7 +13.8
+1.83 +2.3 +6.4
-.18 -0.8 -8.5
+.19 +4.8 +23.6
+.50 +0.9 +3.7
-1.50 -2.0 -6.3
.+.39 +3.1 -9.2
+.18 +1.4 -32.7
-.35 -1.6 -11.7
-1.30 -6.0 +16.4
+.90 +2.1 +59.2
-.30 -2.4 +22.6
-.30 -1.8 +8.1
-.21 -0.5-20.9
+.18 +0.6 +10.0
+1.31 +3.0 +9.5
+.87 +1.3 +8.7
-.10 -0.5 -5.3
-.94 -2.4 -6.8
+1.46 +4.3+135.5
-.03 -3.3 -39.0



Lowes NY .44
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NYTimes NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .56
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Petrobras NY 1.18
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShsQOQNasd .33
PrUShS&PNY
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.31
SearsHdgs Nasd ..
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprntNex NY
SPDRFnclNY. .16
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
YRC Ww rs Nasd ...



Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg



22.35 -.13 -0.6 -4.4
74.92 -.18 -0.2 +20.0
7.29 +.09 +1.3 -31.0
24.38 -.40 -1.6 -20.0
7.85 +.06 +0.8 -36.5
54.41 -.09 -0.2 +3.0
9.74 +.34 +3.6 -6.8
10.31 +.25 +2.5 -19.8
80.77 +4.47 +5.9 -.7
27.24 +.28 +1.0 +11.0
27.44 +1.89 +7.4 +3.1
67.00 +.87 +1.3 +10.2
36.46 +1.54 +4.4-23.5
17.18 -.22 -1.3 -5.6
142.64 3.36 -2.3 +31.5
49.01 -.65 -1.3 +7.
29.33 +.08 +0.3-16.3
42.51 -.75 -1.7 +3.3
114.61 -.21 -0.2 +2.8
69.72 -5.41 -7.2 -16.5
1.24 +.06 +5.1 +106.7
37.14 -.35 -0.9 +11.5
4.72 +.28 +6.3 +29.0
14.50 -.11 -0.7 +.7
30.61 -.76 -2.4 +5.0
53.36 -.72 -1.3 -.2
25.56 -.03 -0.1 -5.3
5.39 -1.36 -20.1 -74.3



Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late iling with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pI = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has spit by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed. wi =
When Issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: i = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value. a = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribulibn during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial..



Currencies
Last Pvs Day



Australia



102R R 1.0340



Britain 1.5835 1.5716'
Canada 1.0191 1.0279



Euro .7257



I733



Japan 83.37 83.40
Mexico 12.5450 12.6280
Switzerlnd .9753 .9816
British pound expressed in U.S.dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Weekly Dow Jones



Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 10,829.68
1-week change: -30.58 (-0.3%)
11,500 - -.. ........



-48.22


MON



46.10 -22.86 -47.23


TULo WED THUR



11.



10,500


10 i-n00



9,500



A M J J A S



New York Stock Exchange -



Wkl y YTD Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last



ABB Ltd .48 2.2
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.3
AK Steel .20 '1.4
AMR
AT&T nc 1.68 5.8
AU Optron ...
AbtLab 1.76 3.3
Accenture .90 2.0
AMD
Aeropostls ...
Aetna .04 ..1
Agilent
AirTran
AlbertoC n .34 .9
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.0
Aldlrish ..
Allstate .80 2.5
Altria 1.52 6.4
AEagleOut .44 2.9
AEP 1.68 4.6
AmExp .72 1.7
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
AmeriBrgn .32 1.0
Anadarko .36 .6
AnalogDev .88 2.8
Annaly 2.60 14.9
AonCorp .60 1.5
ArcelorMit .75 2.2
ArchDan .60 1.9
ATMOS 1.34 4.6
AvisBudg' ...
Avon .88 2.7
BB&TCp .60 2.5
BakrHu .60 1.4
BcoBrades .51 2.5
BcoSantand.81 6.4
BcSBrasil n .33 2.3
BkofAm .04 .3
Bklrelnd 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .36 1.4
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .48 1.0
Baxter 1.16 2.4
BerkHBs ...
BestBuy .60 1.5
Blackstone .40 3.2
BlockHR .60 4.8
Boeing 1.68 2.5
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.28 4.7
CB REllis ...
CBSB rO0 1.2
CMSEng .84 4.6-
CVSCare .35 1.1
Cameron
CdnNRsgs .30 ...
CapOne .20 .5
CareFusion ...
CarMax
Carnival .40 1.0
Caterpillar 1.76 2.3
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78 4.9
CntryLink 2.90 7.3
ChesEng .30 1.3
Chevron 2.88 3.5
Chicos .16 1.5
Chimera .69 17.4
ChiMYWd n...
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56 .8
Coach .60 1.4
CocaCE .36 1.1
CocaCI 1.76 3.0
ColgPal 2.12 2.8
ConAgra .92 4.2



.+.28
12 +.19
13 --.29
15 +.46
. -.18
12 +.23
... +71
13 +.64
19 +2.48
4 +.21
9 -.22
9 +.26
21 +1.64
39 +2.79
26 +6.39
.+.05
...+.03
.-.13
17 -.03
14 -.22
18 +.23
15 -.28
16 -1.35
... +2.39
63 -.07
14 -.50
53 +.04
16 +.52
9 -.26
16 -.17
26 +.21
11 -.35
14 +.46
29 +.58
22 -.07
23 -.14
40 +2.47
...+1.50
-.30
:..+1.25
89 -.30
...+.39
... +.21
+.41
.+.64
13 -.37
16 -.61
12 '+1.31
... +.94
9 -.48
52 +2.23
... +.32
14 -.02
37 -.68
29 +.21
18 +.16
12 +.77
22 +1.56
... +3.06
9 -.05
28 -.19
18 +.44
16 +.60
32 -1.51
.-.08
14 +.25
11 +.52
16 +1.32
10 +1.83
18 +.01
6 -.03

+.19
16 +4.00
19 +.68
19 +1.60
19 +.50
16 -1.95
14 +.35



+i2.0 21.39
-13.3 11.54
+12.6 52.06
-34.6 13.97
-19.8 6.20
+2.8 28.81
-11.8 10.57
-2.6 52.58
+6.9 44.38
-27.2 7.05
+2.1 23.18
-1.6 31.20
+8.6 33.73
+40.6 7.34
+29.3 37.87
+2.7 3.41
-24:1 12.23
-59.8 1.41
+5.1 31.57
+21.1 23.78
-11.4 15.05
+4.1 36.22
+3.1 41.78
+29.6 38.86
+19.5 51.62
+18.3 30.85
-8.6 57.06
-.6 31.39
+.6 17.46
+2.5 39.28
-26.8 33.49
+1.9 31.92
.29.40
-10.7. 11.72
+2.0 32.12
-3.9 24.37
+7.5 43.53
+15.0 20.78
-23.5 12.58
+.9 14.06
-11.7 13.30
-38.5 3.67
-5.8 26.34
-50.0 17.04
+19.4 47.01
-18.8 47.65
+25.9 82.71
+3.3 40.76
-5.2 12.44
-44.3 12.59
+23.5 66.83
-32.6 6.07
+8.0 27.28
+33.6 18.13
+16.6 16.38
+16.3 18.22
-1.3 31.78
+4.4 43.63
+.5 36.15
+2.5 39.30
-1.0 24.76
+14.6 27.79
+21.1 38.39
+37.3 78.22
-24.2, 8.62
+9.6 15.90
+9.8 39.77
-11.9 22.80
+6.4 81.95
-25.2 10.51
+2.1 3.96
.13.25
+23.6 4.09
+44.5 66.58
+18.0 43.12
+50.0 31.80
+3.7 59.12
-6.8 76.57
-4.0 22.13



Name Div
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd. 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.20
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .08
DiaOffs .50
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFfulls ...
DirxSCBull 4.77
DirxLCBear...
DirxLCBull 8.06
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
Dynegy rs ...
EMCCp
EIPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGld g .05
EmersonEl 1.34
EnCana g s .80
ExxonMbl 1.76
FamilyDIr .S2
FedExCp .48
FstBcpPR ...
FstHorizon .72
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM ...
FMCG 1.20
FrontierCm .75
Gatisas .14
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenMills s 1.12
Genworth
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrpg .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac ...
GpTelevisa .52
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewittAsc ...
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwlllntI 1.21
HostHotls .04
Huntsmn .40
Hypercom ...
lAMGldg .06
iShGold s
iSAstla .81
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn .16
iSh Kor .39
iShSing .38
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver
iShChina25 -.68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20T 3.82



Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last



3.8
1.0
4.9
3.0
1.1
2.0
1.4
4.8
.2

1.8


.7
.8



.2

i2.9
.5
1.0
4.2
2.2
5.5


.3


2.5
2.6
2.8
1.4
.6


5.7

1.3
9.2
.9
1.3
2.2
3.0

1.5'
1.0
.4
.9


2.7
1.1
.9


.7

.8
3.0
2.7
'.3
3.4



3.4
3.3
2.6
1.6
.7
2.8


1.6
1.3
3.7



11 +1.50 +13.3
19 +1.91 -23,1
14 -.46 +6.4
1 +.14 -7.8
9 +.48 -5.6
26 +1.06 -15.7
...+.16 +1.9
13 +.64 +6.6
21 -.83 +7.4
9 +.50 -42.9
18 -3.77 +26.8
...+.31 +5.5
21 +.80 +10.9
...+.27 +23.2
8 +3.84 -32.3
...-1.09 -48.0
...+.18 -32.7
.-.35 -11.7
...+1.83 +12.0
-.01 -28.3
-.01 +1.6
14 -.19 +12.7
16 -.24 +3.4
15 -.20 +13.1
17 -.04 +.9
13 -.16 +3.6
... +.17 -48.1
29 -1.30 +16.4
11 +.15 +26.4
...+.20 -14.1
50 +.20 +30.2
21 +.21 +26.0
11 +1.85 -6.6
12 +.79 -8.3
17 +.90 +59.2
20+1.41 +2.6
-.04 -87.9
...+.61 -11.5
14 +.79 -16.3
7 -.30 +22.6
12 +2.52 +11.0
12 +.11 +4.7
...+.86 +1.0
5 +.25 -15.2
11 -.32 -11.3
16 -.29 +4.4
24 -.21 +8.2
...+.27 -19.3
3 +.21 +16.5
.. -.09 +11.1
7 +.42 -12.5
16 +.03 -23.0
-.05 -66.0
+.26 -8.7
25 +.60 +10.8
8 +.73 +.7
49 +.13 +3.2
40 -1.15 -16.0
12 +3.11 +.7
18 -.56 +18.5
11 -.21 -20.9
18 +.18 +10.0
16 -.31 +12.6
.+.10 +25.5
...+.13 +3.4
40 +2.32+103.5
33 +.14 +13.0
.+.24 +20.2
..+.04 +5.0
...+4.22 +4.7
...+.36 +17.0
..+.04 +1.7
...+1.67 +14.3
...+.24 +16.8
...+.23 +5.1
...+.64 +30.9
...+.25 +2.0
...+1.31 +9.5
.+1.51 +16.4



57.86
38.31
48.33
32.42
18.23
40.36
11.08
46.48,
40.40
10.30
68.57
12.01
16.41
11.41
66.66
25.62
13.08
21.82
47.85
12.26
53.35
16.58
33.34
44.03
27.88
17.83
4.70
20.34
12.43
5.60
18.45
53.67
30.26
62.54
44.30
85:64
.28
11.51
38.89
12.26
89.13
8.18
16.34
12.59
18.51
36.95
,12.28
13.67
15.27
43.72
147.70
10.85
4.01
18.96
33.33
23.42
6.38
10.01
60.92
50.06
40.77
31.82
44.15
14.65
11.67
6.45
17.67
12.91
23.99
78.12
18.32
9.90
54.44
13.42
13.63
21.65
43.10
45.43
104.61



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last



iSEafe 1.38
JSR1KG .72
iShR2K .79
iShREst 1.88
ITW 1.36
IBM 2.60
InllGame .24
IntPap .50
Interpublic...
Invesco .44.
IronMtn .25
ItauUnibH .59
IvanhM g...
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk .
KB Home .25
KKR n .08
Keycorp .04
KimbClk 2.64
Kimco .64
KingPhrm ...
Kinrossg .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp .
LVSands .
LennarA .16
illyEli 1.96



,... +.09 +.3
-.01 +3.4
+.87 +8.7
-.40 +15.7
16 +.52 -1.5
13 +1.53 +3.6
23 +.49 -23.8
49 +.53 -16.5
38 +.08 +37.5
27 -.53 -9.0
22 +.47 -1.9
...+1.85 +7.7
+.50 +65.4
11 -.94 -6.8
18 +.73 -17.7
14 -.39 -4.1
15 +.66 +12.1
40 +.52 +13.6
63 -.77 -17.1
+.20 +6.3
+.21 +46.1
13-1.02 +2.1
49 -.70 +16.7
58 +.04 -19.9
39 -.10 +2.7
15 +.33 -2.4
11 -.45 +14.8
... +1.30 +44.8
14 +.08 -24.3
.. +1.46+135.5
29 +A4 +22.7
9 +.44 +2.3



55.47
51.55
67.86
53.14
47.26
135.64
14.31
22.36
10.15
21.37
22.32
24.58
24.17
38.81
14.30
61.75
30.54
30.30
11.34
10.84
8.11
65.03
15.79
9.83
18.90
52.64
31.21
10.15
4.55
35.19
15.67
36.54



Name Div
Limited .60
LincNat .04
MBIA
MEMC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20
Manitowoc .08
Manpwl .74
MarathonO 1.00
MarinerEri ...
MktVGold .11
Marshals .04
Masco .30'
McKesson .72
McAfee
MedcoHlth .
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCRCorp :.
Nabors
NBkGreece ...
NatGrid 7.17
NOilVarco .40
NatSemi ,40
Netezza



YId PE



2.2
.2



.9
.7
1.4
3.0


.6
2.7
1.2


2.7
4.2
1.9

2.3
.8
2.3
.8
.3




6.8,
.9
3.1



Wkly YTD Wkly
Cho %Cho Last



-.36 +39.4 26.82
-.13 -3.7 23.97
-.81 +155.8 10.18
+.17 -12.2 11.96
+.58 +23.4 11.25
+.40 +38.1 23.15
+1.61 +19.2 11.88
+2.38 -5.1 51.82
+1.60 +8.3 33.81
+.23 +110.3 24.42
+.93 +22.5 56.60
+.06 +31.2 7.15
+.18 -19.0 11.18
-1.21 -2.9 60.70
-.08 +16.4 47.24
+.80 -18.2 52.29
-.21 -23.5 33.63
-.74 +.2 36.60
-.21 +10.2 38.94
+.82 +43.3 10.93
+1.77+130.2 29.58
-7.12 -41.0 48.26
-.13 -15.5 25.02
-2.47 -.2 59.62
-.12 +10.3 8.56
-.05 +23.6 13.76
-1.16 -18.5 17.83
-.20 -56.8 2.25
+.04 -11.5 43.20
+.97 +2.5 45.18
+.09 -16.7 12.80
-.51 +177.8 26.95



Name Div Yld PE



NYCmtyB 1.00
NewmtM .60
NewpkRe ...
NextEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.08
NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .56'
Nordstrm .80
NorlkSo 1.44
Novartis 1.99
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt .
OilSvHT 2.60
PG&ECp 1.82
PMIGrp ...
PNC .40
PPLCorp 1.40
PeabdyE .28
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.18
Petrobras 1.18
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.56
PlainsEx
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
Pridelntl
PrinFncl .50
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
PrUIShDo ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ...
ProUItSP .43
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSRE rs...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUFin rs .09
ProUSR2K ...
ProUItR2K .01
ProUSSP500...
ProUItCmde...
ProgsvCp .16
ProLogis .60
Prudentl .70
PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS ...
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ...
Rackspace ...
RangeRs .16
Raytheon 1.50
RedHat
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola ...
RepubSvc..80
RiteAid
SLM Cp
SpdrDJIA 2.55
SpdrGold
SPMid 1.54
S&P500ETF2.31
SpdrHome .12
SpdrKbwBk .11
SpdrRetl .57
SpdrOGEx .20
Safeway .48
Saks
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .44
Satyam If
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .52



6.1
.9

3.7
5.2
1:3
.6
5.4
2.2
2.4
3.5
3.7
1.9

1.8
4.0

.8
5.1
.6
2.9
2.9

3.6
3.2
4.2
4.6

.3

















.8
5.0
1.3


5.0


.4
3.4

.6

2.6


2.4

1.1
2.0
.8
.5
1.4
.5
2.3



3.3

1.3
1.7
1.9



Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last



12 -.01 +12.6
17 +.28 +34.6
50 -.54+101.2
14 -.09 +3.0
16 +.24 +14.3
20 +.68 +21.5
6 -.73 -17.7
...+.25 -19.8
16 +.60 -1.3
17 -.86 +12.6
13 -.41 +5.0
83 +1.23 -16.7
16 +4.47 -.7.
.. -28.7
...+3.00 -4.3
14 +.36 +2.4
... +.17 +48.0
10 -.24 +.1
21 +.03 -15.1
25 +1.70 +12.6
22 +1.89 +3.1
17 +.87 +10.2
21 '+1.34 -31.3
...+2.17 -22.2
...+1.54 -23.5
9 '-.22 -5.6
15 -.55 +15.3
19 .-s66 -4.5
31 -3t6 +31.5
... -.32 -1.9
40 +.16 -5.7
12 +.02 +7.8
...+.06 -7.4
... +.08 -16.3
...+.10 -17.5
.-1.72 +11.2
..+.37 -22.8
-.13 +3.8
.-.96 -36.8
.+.29 -43.4
...+.14 -19.2
-.57 -1.8
-.49 -31.2
...+.84 +13.4
... +.13 -26.3
...+1.28 -16.7
13. -.48 +16.0
...+.38 -12.7
8-2.94 +6.7
... +.31 -12.7
70 +.29 -28.7
23 +.09 +50.6
...-37.9
92 +1.31 +23.6
... +1.77 -24.1
9 -.88 -13.4
92 +.01 +33.6
+.23 +35.7
...+.48 +159.5
25 +.23 +7.9
-.01 -37.7
7 -.49 +1.8
-.25 +4.1
.. +2.22 +20.1
...+1.55 +10.8
-.21 +2.8
...+.09 +4.6
.-.10 +9.4
+.13 +17.9
...+1.57 +37
+.02 -.4
-.11 +30.2
...-7.34 +51.8
.+.99 -37.5
15 -.33 +10.3
... -.71 -14.1
25 +1.79 -4.1
29 +.16 -24.9
... +.17 -.8



16.34
63.68
8.51
54.41
17.58
80.25
33.50
10.31
37.11
59.02
57.13-
38.87
80.77
4.60
113.82
45.72
3.73
52.84
27.44
50.89
27.44
67.00
16.47
32.96
36.46
17.18
55.55
26.42
142.64
22.65
30.10
25.92
48.66
29.33
24.30
66.15
14.70
39.69
31.54
21.21
19.57
55.30
17.34
32.14
26.74
10.57
20.86
11.95
53.07
8.73
2.09
6.34
3.55
25.77
37.83
44.61
41.27
7.18
12.35
30.56
.94
11.47
108.32
128.91
145.97
114.61
15.80
23.17
41.97
42.72
21,21
8.54
112.00
5.89
13.43
3.96
62.43
14.13
27.71



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chi %Chg Last



SiderNac s .58
SilvWhtng ...
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAri .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.00
SprintNex' ...
SP Matls 1;05
SP HlthC .58
SPCnSt .77
SP Consume .43
SPEngy 1.00
SPDRFncl .16
SP Inds .60
SPTech .31
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
Suncorgs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX .60
TaiwSemi. .47
Talbots
TalismE .25
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .40
TenetHth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texinst .52
Textron .08
3MCo 2.10
TimeWam .85
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
'TrinaSol s ...
Tycolntl .85
Tyson .16
UBSAG ..
US Airwy
UnilevNV 1.22
UtdContl ..
UPSB 1.88
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd ...
US OilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhthGp .50
Vale SA .52
Vale SApf .52
ValeantPh .38
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .50
Walgm .70
Weathfntl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20
WmsCos .50
XLGrp .40
XcelEngy 1.01
Xerox .17
Yamanag .08
YingliGm
YumBrnds 1.00



Name.. .3 .. 1. 1 +11. 17.76



3.3 ... +1.14
48 +.07
4.9 15 -.35
.2 ... +.66
.21 +.41
4.4 16 +.54
.. +.28
3.2 ... -.15
1.9 ... -.17
2.8 ... -.11
1.3 ... -.25
1.8 ... 1.54
1.1 ... -.1-1
1.9 ... -.13
1.3 ... -.09
4.0 ... +.09
.1 ... -.10
79 +1.91
....-.25
.2 ... +.06
3.1 7 '.04
1.6 ... -.02
3.5 14 -1,15
1.3 14 -.51
4.6 ... +.27
.35 +.87
... +1.09
1.9 15-1.58
... +3.13
..17 +.30
...12 +.05
.26 +.52
1.9 13 +.32
.4 ... +.01
2.4 16 +.66
2.8 14 -.76
7 +4.29
2.8 8 -1.00
...12 +1.78
2.3 17-1.22
1.0 60 +.61
... -.69
... ... +.30
4.1 ... +.54
' .. +1.91
2.8 23 -.83
.9 16 -.65
... -.36
... +2.23
.5 ... +.40
1.4 10 -.30
1.6 ...+1.66
1.9 ...+1.60
1.5 17-1.36
1.1 ... +.83
1.2 ...+1.30
5.9 ... +.25
1.6 12 +.42
.7 20 +.95
2.1 16 +3.32
......+.07
...5 -.58
.8 10 -.03
1.4 26 +.02
5 +.05
1.4 15 +.19
1.2 ... -.24
2.6 26 +.52
1.9 28 +.33
4.3 15 +.30
1.6 15 +.03
.7 34 +.37
... 28 +1.25
2.2 20 -.02



+11.2
+77.6
+11.5
+13.2
-30.6
+11.2
+29.0
+.7
-1.9
+5.5
+12.4
-.4
+.7
+12.7
+.4
+1.7
-12.2
-5.7
-44.4
+28.6
-10.8
+21.0
+2.3
+21.9
-10.4
+45.1
-6.2
+10.5
+21.4
-16.0
+3.4
-1.0
+4.6
+10.3
+6.0
+5.0
-22.3
+4.5
+9.2
+4.6
+32.5
+10.4
+91.9
-7.5
+91.3
+15.8
-3.6
-39.8
-9.3
-20.8
+16.2
+9.2
+12.9
+84.5
+5.4
+12.6
+6.3
+22.4
-16.2
-8.3
-3.2
-3.7
-5.3
-5.8
-36.0
-6.2
+1.6
-8.1
+17.6
+9.5
+24.1
+.6
-15.3'
+32.9



17.76
26.67
37.14
12.94
33.46
22.80
4.72
33.21
30.49
27.93
33.45
56.81
14.50
31.31
23.03
31.55
38.21
33.30
9.25
26.10
11.34
2.48.
28.58
44.54
10.25
12.93
17.49
53.47
42.47
4.53
11.10
13.41
27.25
20.75
87.62
30.61
64.35
52.12
29.46
37.33
16.26
17.12
9.29
29.91
24.70
66.44
21.71
6.07
35.63
43.63
35.43
31.70
28.02
25.75
17.65
.46.17
32.89
36.39
73.32
33.68
17.33
56.11
25.56
4.42
28.25
17.68
16.09
19.37
21.55
23.23
10.50
11.45
13.39
46.48



Nasdaq Most Active



AMEX Most Active



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last



...+1.06 -25.8 13.57
15 +.07 -2.2 10.87
29 -.61 -28.6 26.27
61 -1.55 +94.7 49.33
19 +.98 +33.0 30.09
64 -7.02 +14.3 153.71
4-1.21 +1.7 26.98
5 -.08 +139.3 5.84
11 -.81 -1.9 55.51
13 +1.40 -14.3 51.93
23 -9.80 +34.1 282.52
24 +.08 -16.0 11.71
56 -1.39 +27.3 9.51
.-.08 -56.8 1.53
-.54+124.9 19.25
17 -2.34 -25.2 25.61
... +12 +70.9 7.88
43 -.09 +25.5 31.88
17 -.82 -2.3 41.82
...+.04 +71.6 3.26
..+.97+140.3 98.80
-.05 -39.2 .30
16 -.32 +12.4 43.40
14 +.11 +5.7 56.53
62 +1.49 +42.0 19.24
29 +.85 +10.3 34.72
...+.43 -75.4 1.99
20 -.39 -23.1 5.87
15 +.10 -5.4 21.25
-.13 +26.9 7.60
14 +2.86 -45.0 15.84
.. +.11 -38.3 .79
32 -.36 +4.3 58.10
48 +.87 -16.5 13.52
20 +2.39 +8.9 36.91
...-.15 +42.5 15.45
21 +.47 +155.3 17.41
16 -.18 -8.5 21.91



Name Div
CitzRepBh ...
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire ...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
CorinhC ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi .
Dell Inc
DeltaPtr h .
Dndreon
DirecTV A .
DryShips ...
ETrade rs
eBay
ElectArts ...
EndoPhrm ...
EnlropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
EvrgrSlr h ...
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
FifthThird .04
Finisar
FstNiagara .56
Flextm
FocusMda ...
FosterWhl .
FresKabi rt ...
GT Solar ..
Genzyme ..
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC s...
Hologic
HudsCitv .60



Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last



+.09 +33.3 .92
-2.61 +63.3 67.94
+.34 +17.0 7.91
-.76 +6.3 17.82
-.72 +5.3 16.76
+.89 -47.8 7.19
+1.00 +9.9 65.05
+.97 -5.1 53.49
+.86 +129.7 13.21
+.02 +22.7 12.96
+.39 -9.2 13.04
+.11 -23.3 .80
-1.97 +54.5 40.61
-.11 +25.4 41.83
+.66 -17.9 4.78
-.38 -15.4 14.89
-.28 +4.0 24.46
-.02 -7.4 16.44
+2.35 +60.2 32.88
-.28 +214.7 9.66
+.18 +20.3 11.06
+.13 -50.7 .75
-1.93 +7.7 27.71
-.77 +13.0 48.83
-.33 +22.1 11.90
+1.24 +113.7 19.06
+.20 -15.7 11.72
+.08 -17.4 6.04
+2.51 +55.8 24.70
+.17 -17.5 24.30
+.00 -88.0 .04
+.31 +49.6 8.32
-.72 +44.6 70.88
-.79 -17.4 35.76
-1.67 -15.2 525.62
-6.65 +8.9 29.57
-.54 +11.2 16.12
-.06 -11.2 12.19



Name Div
HumGen r..
IntgDv
Intel .63
Intersil .48
Intuit
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.00
Level3
UbtyMlntA ...
UnearTch .92
MannKd .
MarvelT ...
Mattel .75
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.37
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NetLogics ...
NetApp
Nettlix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
NightwkR ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ..
Oracle .20
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PacEth h ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ .33



Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg



+.68 -4.2
15 +.22 -8.5
12 -.10 -5.3
-.24 -25.2
25 -.55 +46.1
19 +.37 +52.3
...-.09 +48.8
37 +.70 +21.8
60+1.56 -3.2
...-.03 -39.0
15 +.90 +31.1
19 -1.37 -1.7
.+.55 -24.5
21 -.22 -15.7
14 -.5 +18.2
46 +.50 -9.2
+.19 +51.5
22 +.80 +8.1
5 +.09 -31.0
7 -.40 -20.0
... +1.25 +19.5
36 -1.75 +41.6
62 -7.55 +180.7
14 -.75 -3.3
16 -.58 -4.1
... +3.12 +40.6
28 -.91 -39.2
13 +.44 -18.0
22 +.28 +11.0
17 -.22 -16.3
77 +.59 +33.1
-.06 +45.1
+.35 +10.3
20 +.03 -11.0
42 -.12 -21.9
...+.08 +26.1
...+.44 +116.3
-.65 +7.1



Wkly
Last Name



29.31
5.92
19.32
11.47
44.91
8.68
12.28
6.64
35.01
.93
14.21
30.04
6.61
17.50
23.61
18.46
5.09
31.41
7.29
24.38
27.65
48.64
154.66
13.24
15.26
6.37
11.35
7.23
27.24
7.25
48.28
1.03
16.93
27.26
13.04
2.85
9.41
49.01



Qualcom .76
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ...
Rovi Corp ...
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
SeattGen ..
SIcnware .41
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol .
Solarlun
SouthFn h ..
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StIDynam .30
SunesisPh ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr ...
Tellabs .08
TerreStar
TevaPhrm .72
TibcoSt ...
TriQuint
UrbanOut ..
Verisign
Verisk
VirgnMda h .16
Vivus
Vodafone 1.32
WarnerCh s8.50
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1.00
Xilinx .64
YRC Ww rs ...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04



Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last



1.7 22 -.29 -4.3
...18 +.28 +28.5
10 +1.34 -25.7
...56 +1.36 +57.4
8 +1.18 +27.7
4 +.07 -35.7
... +3.81 t57.2
7.6 ... +.51 -23.1
... ... +.06 +106.7
.25 -.20 +45.5
.23 +.52 +65.3
... -.01 -56.0
1.7 18 +.13 -15.7
2.0 24 -.19 +12.5
2.0 16 +.24 -17.4
-.09 -71.0
16 +.26 -13.9
15 -.06 -15.9
1.1 14 -.27 +27.8
... -.10 -60.6
1.3 19 -1.26 -4.7
.38 -.44 +86.8
.22 +.65 +62.0
.20 -3.20 -10.1
.27 +.08 +30.8
.38 -.07 -6.5
.7 ...+.61 +38.7
... -.18 -28.5
5.2 ...-.39 +9.6
...11 -1.07 +6.6
8.1 19 -.46 +12.1
1.1 ... -3.11 +49.6
2.4 15 -.19 +5.1
. ... -1.36 -74.3
.23 -.23 -15.0
.2 ... +.32'+65.3



44.26
6.13
50.21
50.17
37.03
11.69
15.97
5.39
1.24
20.65
12.61
.28
20.72
25.94
14.64
.31
15.40
16.29
7.26
.37
53.52
17.99
9.72
31.47
31.71
28.32
23.35
6.58
25.30
21.53
12.32
87.09
26.35
5.39
14.27
21.21



Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AlldNevG .
AlmadnMg ..
AmApparel...
AmO&G...
Anooraq g...
Aurzon g .
BarcUBS36.
BarcGSOil.
Brgusgrs...
CAMAC n.
CanoPet ...
CapGoldn ...
CardiumTh...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChinNEPet...
ClaudeR g...
CrSuiHiY .32
Crossh glf...
Crystallx g...
DenisnM g...
Endvrlnl
EndvSilvg ...
EntreeGold...
ExeterRgs...
Fronteerg'...
Gastar grs...
GenMoly .
GoldSr g ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
Hemisphrx...
Hyperdyn .
IndiaGC .
InovioPhm ..
KodiakOq ...



Yld PE



Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last



+.05 +12.3
-.17 +81.2
+.70 +212.4
+.16 -53.9
+.43 +99.0
+.16 +24.1
+.12 +55.3
-.32 -.7
+1.52 -9.9
+.09 -6.8
+.53 -26.6
-.21 -68.4
+1.02 +35.4
-.10 -23.5
-.09 -32.2
+.32 +22.1
+.09 +9.5
+1.63 -30:8
+.12 +33.1
+.02 -.7
+.03 +5.3
-.01 -2.6
+.12 +38.6
+.06 +20.4
+.13 +15.1
+.20 +19.3
-.06 +20.2
+.26 +87.5
-.05 -19.0
+.42 +76.9
+.02 +61.2
+.73 +35.4
+.07 +44.4
-.01 -3.6
+.31 +159.8
-.06 -16.7
+.11 +11.4
+.30 +62.2



6.98
27.33
3.28
1.43
8.36
1.08
6.99
41.95
23.32
1.64
3.43
.31
4.82
.52
.61
16.83
2.65
6.40
1.57
2.91
.20
.37
1.76
1.30
4.19
2.90
6.46
7.37
3.88
3.68
5.03
7.76
2.47
.54
2.26
1.15
1.27
3.60



Name
LibertyAcq
LibAcq wt
LongweiPI
Metalico
Minefnd g
Nevsun g
NDragon
NwGold g
NA Pall g
NthnO&G
NlhgtM g
NovaGld g
Oilsands g
ParaG&S
PlatGpMet
Protalix
PudaCoal
RadientPh
RareEle g
Rentech
Rubicon g
SamsO&G
Senesco
Talbots wt
TanzRy g
Taseko
TimberinR
TrnsatlPt n
UQM Tech
US Gold
Uranerz
UraniumEn
VantageDrl
VimetX
VistaGold
WizzardSft
YM Bio q



Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last



-.05 +6.1
-.01 +133.3
+.31 -15.2
+.44 -19.1
-.84 -5.0
+.17 +102.9
-.00 -60.8
+.43 +85.2
+.50 +27.4
+1.41 +51.8
-.34 -1.0
+.20 +45.0
-.00 -55.2
+.14 +15.9
+.03 +3.8
+.45 +34.9
+1.05 +6.3
-.12 +185.8
+.91 +125.5
+.04 -20.2
-.09 -13.4
-.09 +454.2
-.03 -12.1
+.19 -34.4
+.21 +108.6
+.38 +31.5
+.26 +19.4
+.08 -9.4
.. -61.3
-.01 +100.8
+.26 +26.9
+.31 -11.9
+.09 -4.3
+1.85 +411.9
+.33 +9.4
+.04 -32.4
+.18 +36.3



10.26
1.61
2.29
3.98
9.79
4.93
.05
6.74
4.46
17.97
3.05
8.89
.52
1.68
2.20
8.93
7.81
.69
8.75
.98
4.08
1.33
.29
2.74
7.28
5.55
1.29
3.10
2.65
4.98
1.65
3.33
1.54
15.05
2.68
.23
1.84



3C



41.63


FRI



MUTUAL FUNDS



Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.15 0.14
6-month 0.19 0.19
5-year 1.14 1.34
10-year 2.52 2.61
30-year 3.72 3.79



Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pcl Min Inn
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 144,752 11.61 +1.2 +10.7/B +8.4/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStldx LB 61,740 28.54 +6.7 +14.6/A +1.2/B NL 3,000
AmericanFundsGrthAmA m LG 57,889 27.97 +6.8 +11.1/D +1.6/B 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 55,855 62.31 +7.7 +17.9/A +3.8/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA mIH 54,531 49.04 +3.7 +10.6/C +4.0/C 5.75 250
American Funds CpWIdGrlA mWS 49,365 34.33 +7.0 +9.8/D +4.8/A 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 47,650 16.07 +3.5 +14.6/A +3.5/B'. 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB 45,058 104.84 +6.3 +13.6/B +0.8/C NL 5,000,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 44,398 105.52 +6.3 +13.5/B +0.6/C NL 3,000
American Funds InvCoAmA mLB 42,852 26.14 +6.7 +11.2/D +1.3/B 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 36,729 97.58 +7.0 +10.3/C -1.4,D NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 35,626 33.71 +8.0 +11.4/A +4.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds EurPacGrA mFB 35,326 39.96 +7.9 +10.5/B +6.0/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 35,095 11.61 +1.2 +10.4/B +8.1/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds WAMutlnvA mLV 34,596 25.40 +5.5 +15.2/A +0.8/B 5.75 250
American Funds NewPerspA mWS 28,903 26.68 +7.5 +12.6/C +5.3/A 5.75 250
American Funds BalA m MA 28,597 16.96 +4.2 +13.0/B +3.0/B 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 28,457 11.61 +1.2 +10.2/B +7.9/A 3.75 1,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 28,315 28.54 +6.7 +14.7/A +1.3/B NL 100,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 28,219 33.67 +6.1 +13.4/B +3.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds BondA m Cl 28,009 12.47 +0.9 +9.7/C +3.8/E 3.75 250
Vanguard Welltn MA 27,705 29.72 +3.9 +11.5/C +4.8/A NL 10,000
Vanguard 500Adml LB 27,026 105.53 +6.3 +13.6/B +0,7/C NL 100,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 26,604 74.34 +8.0 +19.5/A +4.6/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Divrlntl d FB 26,259 28.57 +8.0 +8.1/C +2.0/C NL 2,500
Vanguard Totlnl d FB 25,240 15.08 +7.6 +10.9/B I +4.1/B ,L 3,000
Fidelity LowPrStk d MB 24,868' 34.78 +7.0 +17.5/C +3.7/A NL 2,500
CA -Conservaive Nlcataon Cl -Intenediale-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock F -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign Largerowth, FV -Fbx
Large Value, IH -World Alocation, LB -arge Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Lage Vaue, MA Moderate Aca MB -Midap Blend, MV
MidCap Value, SH -Speoaly-heatl, WS -World Stock Total Retun: Chng In NAV ith dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund peroined vs.
others wilh same objecve:A is in top 20%, E in boomn 20%. Min Ini Invt Minimum $ needed toinvest in fund. Source: Momngstar.



ATPO&G ...
AclivsBliz .15 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .24 .8
Anmazon
ACapAgy 5.60 20.8
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
ApolloGp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMall .28 2.4
AMCC
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHld .12 :6
Atheros
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36 3.3
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu s
BeaconPw ...
BedBath ...
Biogenldc ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .32 .9
Broadwind ...
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc .16 .8
Cadence ...
CdnSolar .
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CentAI
ChkPoint ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco



III



-jI 1A



AUJII_ VIIV I, IV"



. I I I



I III



I



I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



w



t Yld PE



.7330













Classified Department: 755-5440



LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage -



Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440



:-=



One .tei 2 per ad 5
4 lines 6 days aclsli'"ne S2 al
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling S100t or less.
Each Item must include a price.
aThb is a non-refundabie rate.



One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days1ine ditiona
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each tem must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad 6
4 lines 6 days ,ach additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per adS a iJ
4 lines 6 days Eachsaddtioeal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad nal
4 lines 6 days ih additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandiseaotaling $4,0e 0 or less
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



-



One item per adtJ\J
4 lines 6 days Eachs addtionas
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,0 or less.
Each Item must include a price
This s a non-re unable rate.

I --____



41ines $ 1 t50
3 days t 1
Inciles 2 Signg [E'.,t d, niiin it 6



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....592.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 .
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com



7-O
Call by:-



Ad lsto Appea
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday



Call by:
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Fr., 10:00 a.m.
Fr., 0:00 a.m.



FaxlEmail by:
Mon., 9:00 am.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00a.m.



These deadlines are subjec l to change without nice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your. call will be trans,
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and.
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print atd Online
;,< .l-w r,Z f tr itmrir''.iL'iii!!



Legal



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLOgIDA
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000737
Division No.
ROSE ACCEPTANCE, INC.
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
WANDA B. COLLIER;, et al
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated September 23, 2010, and
entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-
000737 of the Circuit Court of the
3RD Judicial Circuit in and for CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida, wherein
ROSE ACCEPTANCE, INC is the
Plaintiff and WANDA B. COLLIER
AND MCKINLEY G. COLLIER,
WIFE AND HUSBAND; UN-
KNOWN TENANT(S) are the De-
fendants, I will sell the highest and
best bidder for cash at the front steps
of the Columbia County Courthouse,
145 North Hemando Street, Lake
City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
27th day of October, 2010, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Order of Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
THE NORTH 1/3 OF THE SOUTH
2/3 OF BLOCK 52, MASON CITY
SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 31 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ALSO INCLUDING TWO (2) 1997
FLEETCRAFT CORP MOBILE
HOMES, VEHICLE IDENTIFICA-
TION NUMBER
FLFLT79A12831HE21 AND VEHI-
CLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
FLFLT79B12831H321. and com-
monly known as: 333 SW HODGES
WAY, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIM-
ING A RIGHT TO FUNDS RE-
MAINING AFTER THE SALE,
YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH
THE CLERK OF COURT NO LAT-
ER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A
CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE EN-
TITLED TO ANY REMAINING
FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY
THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MAU CLAIM THE SUR-
PLUS.
DATED at COLUMBIA County,
Florida, this 23 day of September,
2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk
COLUMBIA County, Florida
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Michelle Garcia Gilbert, Esq.
Florida Bar# 549452
Amy McGrotty, Esq.
Florida Bar # 829544
GILBERT McGROTTY GROUP
Attorney for Plaintiff(s)
3200 Henderson Blvd, Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33609
(813)443-5087
04541806
October 3, 10, 2010



020 Lost & Found

BULLDOG
Found off Mauldin,
call and provide description
386-867-0694



LOST White,-female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches lost
off of CR 242, pls call,
Children miss dog! 386-697-1197



100 JO o
Opportunities



CDL Class A Driver needed
Great miles and great home time
Call Frank At 727-916-1055
Hour To Call 1 am to 5 pm



100 Job
Opportunities



04541599
The Mobile Mechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolavemplovment.com



04541819
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace



Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.



100 Jorb
1 Opportunities



m ... .



k
p IE ', I



E tgineering

ACCOUNTING



-'uca ton
71tb li."
14-ArZ -e ~.Yr



04541848
Loan Portfolio Manager
Seeks an experienced loan
portfolio manager to monitor a
large commercial loan portfolio.
Candidates must have extensive
experience with small business
lending and commercial real
estate lending. Candidates with
formal credit training are
preferred; however, 2-3 year's
experience in finance or
accounting experience is
acceptable. Visit
www.columbiabankflorida.com
for more information or to
apply for this position.

05523988
Manager:
Manage conv. store/gas station
that sells groceries, gas, alcohol-
ic beverages, cigarettes, lottery
tickets, etc., Plan & prepare
daily schedules & assign duties;
set prices; interview, hire &
train employees. 2 yrs prior exp
in job duties req. Resumes only
to Bhavi, LLC, d/b/a Stop N Go,
5277 S US Hwy, 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 Attn: N. Patel,

05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA, SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056



05524083
Teachers FT and PT- Early
Head Start (birth to 3 yrs old)
$8.65/hr (if credentialed)-posi-
tions in Lake City & Jasper-HS
Diploma/GED, CDA (Child De-
velopment Associate) or FCCPC
(Fl Child Care Professional
Credential) and bilingual
(Span/Eng) preferred. Sick &
annual leave, holiday pay, health
insurance, retirement + add'l
benefits. Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
current ISt Aide/CPR pref.
To apply- e-mail:
'arobinson()sv4cs.org, call (386)
754-2222 or Fax 386-754-2220,
apply in person @ 236 SW
Columbia Ave, Lake City Fl or
843 SW Marymac St, Live Oak
Fl EOE



Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care
Pre-school & Daycare.



Experienced Sewing Machine
Operator, wages based on ability,
Call Hafner's
386-755-6481



Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to
northfloridajobs@ gmail.com



ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?



jYours skill

poitlve attitude
<. -j
/ AL .,



Apply Online or In Personl


SIrEL



1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE



too Job
100 Opportunities
Manager/housekeeper/mainte-
nance person/couple for 14 unit
Mom & Pop Motel in Live Oak,
Manager Apt plus small
salary,back ground check,
computer exp, refs, exp pref,
email susanellery888@yahoo.com
with resume

1 o Sales
V10 Employment
Optical Assistant needed,F/T
,exp a plus, we will train,
Send resume 763 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025

120 Medical
12V Employment



04541824
RN/LPN
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for RN and LPN positions.
Day and Evening PRN
positions available.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon Health-
care and Rehabilitation Center.
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05523875
ARNP/PA-C
Background in internal medi-
cine, orthopedics, worker's
comp and/or occupational inju-
ries pref. Must have current FL
license. Great salary and bene-
fits package offered. Visit
www.simedpl.com to apply.

05523919
Medical Practice (IM) is looking
for a part time ARNP or
PA.Send reply to Box 05055,
C/O The Lake City Reporter,
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL,
32056



05523920
Doctor's office is looking for a
part time office assistant.Send
reply to Box 05056, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box-
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056



FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
MATHEMATICS (two positions)
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics courses; work with
colleagues for the advancement of
departmental goals. Requires
Master's degree in appropriate area
related to mathematics; or Master's
degree with minimum of 18 graduate
credit hours in course work centered
on mathematics.
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
Teach Anatomy and Physiology
courses; work with colleagues for the
advancement of departmental goals.
Requires Master's degree in
appropriate area related to Anatomy
and Physiology; Medical doctorate;
or Master's degree with minimum of
18 graduate credit hours in course
work centered on human anatomy
and physiology.
164 Duty Days Tenured Track to
Commence Spring 2011
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 10126110
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr@g.c..edu
I ( i is accreileil h IIc C(, nlniqsiol .n allegeses io
the Sothcim. Assia rilioil ol (ollegs mild Scllols.
VP/AI)AI IA/EO ('llegiin I llc.tlltll lnd
........Ll__p hllpvcntI



Medical
120 Employment

CNA/caregiver needed. Exp nec-
essary. Must be available Mon-Fri.
Maybe some nights & weekends.
Call 386-755-1233 for more info.



Need English/ Spanish Medical
Assistant for a Ddrmatology office
in Lake City. Florida. Experience
is required, but not necessary. We
will train. Call 386-758-1965
or Fax to: 386-758-6923



Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 lv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
*************** *********************



Land Services

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219

Construction

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037



FLORIDA
+ GATEWAY
COLLEGE
* ***
(Formery Lake City Community College)
SENIOR STAFFASSISTANT
WATER RESOURCES
BANNER CENTER (Grant Funded)
Responsible for assisting the director
in developing and expanding
programs, maintaining appropriate
documentation for training programs,
and assisting in providing customer
services for a growing area at the
college. Other duties vary widely in
both subject matter and complexity
and require exercising considerable
initiative and independent judgment.
Minimum Qualifications: High school
graduate or equivalent plus four years
secretarial or clerical experience.
Additional education may be
substituted on a year for year basis
for required experience in related
area. Special consideration will be
given to applicants with an Associate
Degree or certificate in a related area.
Experience working with MSWord
and Excel.
Salary: $23,827 annually, plus
benefits.
Application Deadline: 10/15/10
College employment application
required. Position details and
application available at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr()fac.edu
FOC is accredited hli t oe CommLiuBti ot Colleges of
the SLothern A.sWiaation q/ Collegfs and Schoolh.
tPA.41,4/. :'EO Collee in Educailon and
Employment



We hate to brag,
but we thought our
readers should hear
the good news about
the continued success
our Help Wanted
section has had in
matching thousands
of readers with
great jobs.



Don't blow your chances. Read the Help Wanted section of the Classifieds

to hear about the latest job opportunities, and soon you'll be tooting your own horn!


S = l 0I,, 3k vA-W.'



Classifieds



Call 386-755-5445 and get the latest jobs delivered right to your door!

www.lakecityreporter.com



I



04541818
Senior Teller Position
Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing, cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace



04541544
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
No CDL, No Problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236



Lake City Reporter



1111*1 HIII ;I~~h1Ij ljilyl lI '111 il



Lake City Reporter



-



P~~~~"I" BIB J



mo-,



0



a a~I~1]



I



alft ...............



1100"w""E"'W", 9



-



-------



4C



loollalrol



slalm


181018T



I,.
I ,
0



14



-AV N Alm a












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



12A lMedical
120 Employment



05523902



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
C.N.A. in PRN Pool
Evening & Midnight
Shifts
PRN RN and LPN
Lake City
Adult Case Manager
Live Oak

Child Case Manager
Lake Butler/Starke
Therapist
Masters Level
Outpatient Svcs
Discharge Planner
www.mbhci.ore
to see our current
needs and online
applications
EOE, DFWP


05524066
Front Desk Receptionist (FT)
detail oriented individual needed
to'assist doctor's office in Lake
City & Gainesville. Must be-
lieve in making good first im-
pressions and be proficient in
positive customer service skills4
Hard worker required. Previous
medical office experience pre-
ferred. Great salary, great bene-
fits plenty of opportunities! Fill
out an application online today
at www.simedpl.com.



190 Mortgage Money



STOP FORECLOSURE,
go to:
www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com


^240'f Schools &
240' Education


04541570
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/27/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 nextlclass-10/25/10.
* Pharm Tech national, certifica-
tion $900 next class-10/26/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies



FEMALE AKC Registered
Yorkshire Terrier. 4 yrs.-
Full Coat. $500. FIRM
(386)867-0035



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.



330 Livestock &
3J V Supplies

Single Lane Farms
(1)-2 years old black Limosene
bull. (1) 2.5 yr old angus bull.
Dwane Hingson. 386-776-1090


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Heavy Duty, Maytag, Washer,
White,
$165
386-292-3927 or 984-0387



New GE Late Model
Gas Cook Top still in the box!
Costs $700, will sacrifice for $285
386-292-3927 or 984-0387



Whirlpool Dryer
works great
$50
386-935-0654


407 Computers

E-MACHINE
$80.00. v
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

5' OAK full Entertainment
Center with
32" RCA color TV. $250.
386-867-0035



BEDROOM SUITE
Solid wood. Captains Bed, dresser,
mirror: night stand & desk/desk
chair. $450. 386-752-5784 .



Sofa & Loveseat Set $200
Navy Blue & Black Velveteen
extremely comfortable, excellent
condition Call 386-935-0654

410 Lawn & Garden
4tV Equipment

22" Murray Mower
(Easy Push), 4HP,
$70
386-984-0387 or 386-292-3927

Machinery &
411 Tools

Heavy Duty Auto Jack Stands
(2), $10 each,
New
call 386-963-4560



91 n TV-Radio &
417 Recording
Galvanized Remote Control
Antenna, 36 Ft High, Tri pod,
$100
Call 386-963-4560

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.



Wanted Junk Cars. Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
Wooden White Storage Cabinet
36Wx20Dx72H
like new $60
386-935-0654



Wooden White Storage Cabinet
Like Brand New
29 1/2W20Dx72H
$50 386-935-0654

520 Boats for Sale
PROJECT BOAT 1993 SeaRay
Boat 18' Bow Rider w/trailer hull,
good condition with 150 mercury
motor. $800.obo 386-365-3773

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1 bd/l bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
386-752-1941 or 386-965-0932
14x55 MH, 2Br/lBa Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $395/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
14X80. 3br/2ba. Total electric,
country living. Pets ok. Garbage,
water sewer inc. 1st, last, dep.
w/lease. $600. mo. 386-752-8978
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, .1 acre
*secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410



2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450



3/2 DW $800/mo on 3ac. hot
tub/pool, remodeled.6/10 livestock
& pets ok. (937)938-1727, 3353
230th Terr. Lake City off SR 247



3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $575
month, Sc & 1st 954-649-1037



Clean bedroom. Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.



Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114



Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Nice clean 2 & 3 bdrm. Five
Points, NO PETS, also 2 bd home
163 NE Escambia St, 1 mon rent
& dep 386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 AMobile Homes
64V for Sale
Very nice 3/2 Skyline DW on 3.3
ac. fenced yard, dead end street,
nice trees. Financing available.
$75,000 386-303-1258 / 365-1406

705 Rooms for Rent
Newly Renovated ROOMS W/
FREE Utilities, Cable, WiFi, Local
& Long Distance Calls, Maid
Service. Microwave & frige in ea.
room. Iprs $165, 2ppl $175
Jasmine Garden Inn. Clean &
Under New Mgmt! 386-755-4308

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $550 month, no pets
1 month sec,
386-961-8075 Realtor
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apartment. In town.
Nice & clean. Close to shopping.
$485. mo plus deposit.
Call for appt. 386-344-2972
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
-2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
Large & clean. Ibr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208

LARGE 1BR Apt
over looking lake. Screened pool.
CH/A, washer/dryer, full kitchen,
$650 mo. 386-344-3261

Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423

Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.

One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568

The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292



ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifies.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.



IL



A



710 AUnfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale
710 For Rent



Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72v For Rent
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945



Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808 '

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 Bed/1 Bath,clean quiet home,
5 miles south of Lake City, $550
monthly, 386-867-1833/590-0642
suwanneevalleyproperties.corn
3bedroom/2bath
in city. $450. mo.
plus deposit No Pets!
386-758-0057
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Pleasecall after 5pm.
386-752-0017
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374



Small 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $500 month, $400 dep, no
pets!, pls leave message 386-365-
1920 or 386-454-7764 after 6pm
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553. Lv. message.

750 Business &
75V Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office spate in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales



SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,,(
N441 & I-10. .-
813-286-2323



790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633



PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com



Starke. 1.5 ac Brick 3br/2ba. 1535
sqft. washer/dryer.'gas fireplace,
walk in closet, pantry, Dishwasher.
Corian counter tops in kitchen &
bath. Double carport, week shed.
$169,000. (904)742-5028 or
(904)266-4511



O80 Farms &
o82 Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com



4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com



WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

951 Recreational
7951 Vehicles

2007 Club Car w/golf club rain
cover, windshield, ex cond., very.
low hrs, w/charger, $2200 obo,
386-288-8833 or 386-438-5592



Sun Light Slide-In Truck
Camper, Fits long wheel base,self
contained, A/C, new fridge, $4000
used very little, 404-358-1358

n^9 2 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles

1985 Chevy high top Conv Van.
88K mi. very nice.
1998 Dodge 6cyl van
Call Hafner's 386-755-6481



95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd,
V-8, 4-whl dr. All factory opts,
cold air, orig sticker, Will bring
car to you! $4500. 386-658-2380



_OM0 @_ 0



piwtibrook
DJPLEX COMMUNITY



An Adult Community



I '......... I.. h... :f,1J ,.,; ,lh
I !'. l 'dI. 1 1 ,,,I '11.....



Locatcd on Country C Il,- Rhl I i S. I indrround trrodlities Carpct/C.rx'micTilc
2 tniles south of Baya Ave on left Citv ater (-th'l
nr 2 miles north of CR 252 on right.
laforuti: / ,38-397- LStorlg cuidting oAnailbi e e
Forln formanti on: 3 b-397-Ct >1 Locally Owned and Operated



'^I^M ^w Po|(P/^ (Sju J0 ^ ^^ ^^



ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.



1993 SeaRay Boat
18' Bow Rider w/trailer
hull, good condition with
150 mercury motor.

$800 OBO
Call
386-365-3773



zuu5 liMC Sierra
1500
Single cab, 2WD, V6, AT,
power steering, cruise, AC,
trailer pkg., 80,000 miles,
6 ft. box.
$7.900 OBO
Call
386-623-6860



zuu6o 't. umngy
2 seat, 4hp, Suz, 4 stroke
motor, w/trailer, new tires.

$600
Call
386-965-3110 or
386-758-6098
Can be seen only on weekends.



In Print,

& Online

One Low

Price!



1



UU- U gS4~41



Stick With Us to Stay Posted on



News and Events Around Town



and Across the Country.



5C



I~~~~~~~~i~~~~~~~rr~~~~~~~~~~fiemnl9~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



I



1 IL L ph BI CI I, )I I r
r



Classified Department: 755-5440









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



I



~~... a. !
a I a IfiI a I I 3



10TH: AN NIVE SARY
t^rYr r" ;


cu0 % J .
i 5Ffi,,X e viii};S~gp



1445 SW Isli BLVID
LAKlr CilIY, FL
7:54-52:00



--"-WAA --XXL-WX-%-/* ''' Fabric. notions. zippers
216 SW i *t.i B Blvd,. L k-z City Simplicity patterns
CWXt r.o Wva4y's) Quilting
?74-3 74 Authorized Sales & Service for
VwwUrw. assa m Ye aa es Zcot = Singer Sewing Machines



*am^ffI S.BHH B -lI



S3'
I



'. ;,:. '-.. ,:: .-:, .- .'. .... .... ':. ; .' ... ; .' www.aspenlakeclty.com
. L, -...................... ^.....I. -



Rountree



( TOYOTA
i Rotate & Inludes up to 5 quarts
Balance l 1
Parts & Service Tires
~430I~ ~ W US Hwy 90' B~Most cars & trucks
43~10~ W US IHwy go90 Plus tax & supplies
(386) 755-0631 3 Notvalid with any other offer Mostcars & trucks
MondayFriday 7amsp expires 10/31/10 1 expires 1031/10
Monday-Friday.?am-. p m' 7a; A ?.. RV.... x..s.is..0.........1..0 T i .



TASTE BUDS DON'T LIE
In the 2010 National Taste Test Domino's Pizza came in #1!



Cheese Salami i Shredded Parmesan
Pepperoni Philly SteakDiced Tomatoes'F
cliir HItlirn eIc.na JalaDeno Penners Sliced Provolone ,f-'



Italian Sausage
Green Peppers
Black Olives



Order Online www.dormi ^Ls.comr
CALL NOW. 386-758-3130 2372 W. US Hw 90
^^^^--^ *^^^Wa ^JO\J~ I ^JQ~%) i nJU Acrocss From ILake citv mail)



'-I.,
:"', -'.',.'-' >
VISA: '



e



FF
I


i



';



I --- ------- -- r L -3LL 4 I - I L L1



- I- II-=-- I I -- I



-s I I _~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



I I_ I~~~~~~~I I IA d ITU
I~~I



1 g 1
ii Dn\r v r
L CTi- J""`'L1 Il



I



I



6C



,,.v__.. ,. NV_IILY..,. CI



~B~fBB&S~ge~Y~a~~~..~-(~, :.~b 1:.u~r:., ~~ ~Y~r~t~p~ ~*?~;~;i.:~j ~$.~~F~,dii~~Y~ ~~r,- ~~~:;r.











Lake City Reporter



Story ideas?



Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmoye@lakecityreportercom

Sunday, October 3, 2010



LIFE



www.lakecityreporter.com



GARDEN TALK
- .. MUMS.



Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu



Creative

Ways

to use

grasses

O r ornamental
grasses have
many uses in
the landscape.
They can
add soft textures or bold
statements to the planting
bed which will continually
change throughout the
seasons. They solve prob-
lems for us by growing in
places that other plants
refuse to grow. If you are
creative, try using grasses
in container gardens along
with flowering plants. But
however you end up using
ornamental grasses, the
low maintenance of these
beauties might please you
the most.
Most native Florida grass-
es, or grasslike ornamental
plants, are drought resistant
after they become estab-
lished. Pruning is usually
done in the winter months
to clean up the foliage and
ready the plant for spring
growth. If your plant is grow-
ing satisfactorily, no fertilizer
is required. Too many nutri-
ents will cause the flower
stems to become weak and
fall over.
When selecting an orna-
mental grass, keep in mind
the planting site and what
you want from the plant
There are grasses which
grow in clumps and stay
where you put them. There
are spreading grasses that
work well as a ground cover,
but they may need a bound-
ary so they don't run far
from home. Short grasses
make nice edging plants,
soft grasses are nice fillers,
and tall grasses make good
screens. These are only a
few suggestions. The uses
can be product of your own
landscape, needs, and imagi-
nation.
Mondo grass is a short
little clumping variety that
thrives in shady areas. These
make neat edging plants
along walks, under trees, or in
hard to mow spaces. Purple
lovegrass grows a little larger,
up to two feet tall and wide.
This colorful mounding grass
has reddish fallfoliage and
purple fall flowers. Lovegrass
really tweaks the "Florida"
look when used in combina-
tion with native shrubs or
mixed with wildflowers such
as gaillardia, asters, daisies
and black-eyed Susans.
Muhly grass is a very deli-
cate looking three foot plant
with fine, weeping foliage.
The feathery fall flowers
look like pink clouds above
the foliage. Pampas grass,
on the other hand, has a
bold look in the landscape.
It grows up to eight feet and
has coarse, sharp edged
leaves. Read more about the
many species of grasses for
North Florida gardens at
http://edis. ifas. ufl. edu/ep233.
Make your reservation for
"Floating Salad Hydroponic
Workshop," at 6 pm., Oct.
12, call 752-5384.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.



CO RTESY PHOTO



Bob Deckon, director of engineering technology at Florida Gateway College, explains the advantages of having a mobile lab for students who use hydraulic
and pneumatic training systems. -



College rolls out mobile classroom


for engineering technology students



By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. cor
oming to a
classroom
anywhere on
campus this
semester is the
Engineering Technology
Mobile Lab at Florida
Gateway College.
The new $400,000-
mobile classroom was
purchased through grant
funding, said Bob Deckon,
director of engineering
technology. Equipment
came in last week and
the school is finishing
inventory and installing
the pieces.
The lab is for, students
in the engineering technol-
ogy program at FGC, as
well as local businesses
that want community-
based job training, he said.
Individual pieces of the
lab can go to any class-
room on campus or in the
five-county area. The lab is
not limited to equipment
being carted out indepen-
dently.
"It can function as a
standalone classroom,"
Deckon said.
The equipment for the
lab includes two of each



COURTESY PHOTO
Bob Deckon says the mobile classroom can function 'as a standalone classroom,' and fea-
tures process-control trainers, which essentially is a miniature factory"command and control
for distribution centers.



component housed on
a 52-foot-long triple axel
trailer with air condition-
ing and electric power, he
said. It has a generator
option and complete video
system.
The hydraulic and pneu-
matic training systems
are the core of the lab,
Deckon said. The systems
demonstrate the principles



and practices of both power
transfers in varying levels
of complexity.
The process control train-
ing systems provide train-
ing for industrial processes
and automation through
experiences in setting
up, tuning, operating and
troubleshooting the actual
instrument and control sys-
tems uses in process and



power industries.
"Its the heart and soul
of a plant and distribution
center," he said. "Students
learn how to control various
systems."
The programmable logic
controls training system is
a digital computer used for
automation of electrome-
chanical processes, such as
control of amusement park



rides.
"A wide variety of course-
ware supports the system,"
Deckon said. "The PLC is
the brain of any modern
factory."
The electronic train-
ing systems teach basic
electronics on theoretical
presentations. Training
modules hangingg in a vari-
ety of subjects are available
for use and more can be
added, he said.
"The beauty of this equip-
ment is, this is just scratch-
ing the surface," Deckon
said.
Students can go to a unit
and learn various engineer-
ing components, he said.
Once the basics have been
mastered, the instructor
can devise problems for.
them to solve with the
equipment
Up to two students can
work on a piece of equip-
ment at a time, he said.
They will be very busy and
challenged.
The mobile lab will make
its first appearance at the
Columbia County Fair later
in October.
"We're just excited and
really proud of it," Deckon
said. "It's state of the art
and will last a long time."



Pass the pie: Pumpkin shortage is over



By SARAH SKIDMORE
Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. -
Pumpkin lovers can relax:
A nearly yearlong shortage
of the canned stuff is over.
That means an end to
the hoarding, rationing
and even pumpkin profi-
teering that have been
going on since heavy rain
ruined last year's harvest
and caused a shortfall. But
the country's top produc-
er says this year's crop is
healthy and cans are arriv-
ing in stores.



"I was a little panicked,"
Jamie Lothridge of Toledo,
Ohio, said about the pros-
pect of a another season
low on pumpkin. The avid
baker bought more than 25
cans last fall and was down
to her final few this month
when she called Libby's
to make sure it would be
back.
Nestle, which sells about
'85 percent of the canned
pumpkin in the U.S. under
its Libby's brand, said cus-
tomer inquiries have grown
five-fold since last fall, when
it warned it might not have



enough to get through the
holidays.
The problem was com-
poundedbypumpkin'sgrow-
ing popularity in American
kitchens. Its richness in
nutrients has given it a repu-
tation as a "super-food," and
people use it year-round in
bread, muffins and rolls.
Some even feed it to their
dogs and cats as a digestive
aid.
To most, though, it means
one thing.
'The color, smell and
taste of pumpkin equals fall,"
Lothridge said.



Normally Nestle's fall har-
vest yields enough pumpkin
to last until the next year.
But its farm in Morton, Il.
- the source of nearly all its
pumpkins received about
double the typical rainfall
last year. Tractors sat mired
in muck and much of the
crop rotted in the fields.
Canned pumpkin was
gone from the shelves as
early as Thanksgiving in
some 'places. On eBay, cans
of pumpkin went for $6 or
$7 each, several times the
normal price, as supplies
dwindled.



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bad weather led to a pump-
kin shortage last year for
Nestle, which sells nearly all
the canned pumpkin in the
U.S. under its Libby's brand.
But the company says there
should be enough to go
around this year.



Section D



- I



IV



HEELS



#I


I I



LAB











2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



ENGAGEMENTS



Davis-Crowder
Jimmy and Janice Davis
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Heather Lynette Davis
of Lake City, to Hoyle F
Crowder Jr. of Lake City.
He is the son of Hoyle
and Connie Crowder of Lake
City.
The bride-elect is a 2002
graduate of Columbia High
School. She is employed as a
pharmacy technician at Baya
Pharmacy West The future
groom is a 1995 graduate of
Columbia High School. He is
employed by the Columbia
County Property Appraiser
Office.
The wedding is planned
for 4 p.m. Oct 16 at First
Full Gospel Church in Lake
City. A reception will follow
at Deep Creek Community
Center, 441 North. All fam-
ily and friends are invited.



Downing-Dow
Mike and Susan Downing
of Madison and Glen and
Glenda Buckner of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Brandi
Lynn Downing of Lake City,
to John Franklin Dow of
Lake City.
He is the son of Billy and
Marcia Dow of Lake City.
The bride-elect graduated
in 2002 from Columbia High
School. She is employed
with Hart 2 Hart Academy
and the U.S. Post Office.
The future groom gradu-
ated in 1993 from Columbia
High School. He is self-
employed.
The wedding is at 4 p.m.
Oct 16 at Wesley United
Methodist Church' in Lake
City. A reception will follow
at Quail Heights County
Club on Hwy. 247. All family
and friends are invited.



Smith-Eddy
J.D. and Kristi Smith of
Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Victoria Kristine Smith
of Lake City, to Keith Eddy
of Lake City.
He is the son of Dan and
Kay Eddy of Lake City.
The bride-elect is a 2007
graduate of Columbia High
School and employed at
Mane Performance Hair
Salon.
The future groom is a
200,1 graduate of Columbia
High School and employed
at Ronsonet Buick-GMC.
The wedding is planned
for 5 p.m.. Oct. 9 at the
home of the bride's parents,
followed by a reception.



COURTESY PHOTO



Heather Lynette Davis and Hoyle F. Crowder.



COURTESY PHOTO



Brandi Lynn Downing and John Franklin Dow.



Victoria Kristine Smith and Keith Eddy.



COURTESY PHOTO



Autumn inspires musical


melancholy and seasonal,


short melodic fragments



T he seasons and
the inescap-
able changes
that they bring
to our lives
have long been an inspira-
tion for all types of artists.
From vibrant depictions
of spring on a painter's
canvas to icy winter imag-
ery of a poet's verse, the.
transformations brought
on by the Earth's continu-
ous revolution around the
sun have inspired count-
less works of creativity
over the past several cen-
turies.
Though not always
as immediately acces-
sible as their visual and
literary counterparts,
musical works depict-
ing the seasons have
been no less common,
dating back as early as
the Middle Ages. For
example, in the 13th
century, an anonymous
English composer
penned the still-rousing
"Sumer Is Icumen In"
("Summer is Coming
*In"). Celebrating the fer-
tility of the season's flora
and fauna through verse
and music, the song con-
cludes with a joyous ren-
dition of a cuckoo's call.
Musical depictions
of individual seasons
have continued to
remain popular from the
Renaissance through
today, with more notable
works including the
Norwegian composer
Edvard Grieg's concert
overture In Autumn, op.
11 (1865); tie English
composer Frederick
Delius's orchestral works
In a Summer Garden
(1908) and On Hearing
the First Cuckoo in
Spring (1912); and the
American composer
Samuel Barber's Summer
Music for Wind Quintet,
op. 31 (1956).
Several composers,
meanwhile,.have chosen
to focus not just on a
single season, but on the
entire seasonal cycle, in
a work.
In 1723, for instance,
the Italian composer
Antonio Vivaldi cre-
ated what is arguably
the most famous of
such works, 'The Four
Seasons" (1723). These
four programmatic vio-
lin concertos titled
"Spring," "Summer,"
"Autumn," and 'Winter"
respectively-- bril-
liantly depict the moods



Frederick Smith
Frederick.Smith@fgc.edu

and events of their sub-
ject matter and remain
extremely popular today.
Other notable works
of this type composed
during the past couple
centuries include the
Austrian composer
Joseph Haydn's ora-
torio "The Seasons"
(1801); the Russian
composer Pyotr Ilyich
Tchaikovsky's set of.
twelve short piano pieces
known as "The Seasons"
(1875-1876); the Russian
composer Alexander
Glazunov's ballet score
'The Seasons," op. 67
(1899); and the American
composer John Cage's
ballet score "The
Seasons" (1947).
But while all of these
compositions\ are clearly
examples of classical
music, they are far from
the only musical works
to depict either one or
several seasons.
Many jazz and popu-
lar songs, for instance,
have been written dur-
ing the last century in
which spring, summer,
autumn, and/or winter
take center stage. In
recent decades, many
composers have turned
to creating entire albums
dedicated to one or more
seasons.
It is in this last cate-
gory, in fact, that some of
the most popular albums
of instrumental music
have been created during
the last few decades.
Though many of these
albums are worthy of
note, creatively depicting
the season on which they
are based, those that seek
to musically represent
autumn are often the most
poignant
With this in mind, I'd
like to recommend just a
few of the recordings in
which I. think the autum-
nal season is particularly
well illustrated.
In his album, "Autumn"
(1980), the popular
American musician
George Winston created
an eclectic program of
short works for piano



focused on the color,
light, and growing mel-
ancholy of the season.
Featuring the use of
short melodic fragments
over repetitive accom-
paniments, in a style
Winston himself refers to
as :'rural folk piano," sev-
eral of the works on the
album were inspired by
"the blazing yellow cot-
tonwoods of Miles City
and Billings, Montana,"
where the artist grew up.
Also inspired by
autumn in America,
though in New England
rather than the West,
is "Flowers in October"
(1999) by American com-.
poser Tim Janis.
In part a tribute
to thel9th-century
American poet Celia
Thaxter, the album
features lush works for
keyboard and chamber
orchestra that are as
touching and nostalgic
as they are sweeping and
powerful.
According to Janis,
the work'is meant to
create "a wonderful long-
ing, but with a sense of
impermanence," like the
autumn season itself.
Less melodic than the
work of Winston and
Janis, but perhaps even
more introspective and
evocative, are the ambi-
ent electronic albums
"Autumn Continent"
(2006) by Swedish com-
poser "Between Interval
and Autumn" (2007)
by English composer
Kevin Kendle. While the
former is a broodingly
dark and atmospheric
depiction of autumn
in Northern Europe,
the latter featuring
sampled nature sounds
and instruments is
a warmer and more col-
orful approach to the
season.
These are just a few of
the many recent albums
that have been inspired
by autumn.
Like so many of the
seasonal works that
were composed before
them, they each have
the power to engage the
imagination and the emo-
tions, thereby providing
a meaningful soundtrack
for the season.
* Frederick Smith is pro-
fessor of Humanities at
Florida Gateway College.
He can be reached at (386)
754-4380.



L ~~~~



I



--



LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 -



2D













Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE-----------------------------&--CROSSWORD-----SUNDA------OCTOBER----3,--2010------



DEAR ABBY



Tragic end to one life gives


renewed life to three others



DEAR ABBY: My dad
was on the kidney transplant
list for almost four years. Last
week, he received a call that
there was a kidney for him. As
I sat in the waiting room dur-
ing his transplant surgery, I
became aware that two other
families were in the same situ-
ation. One's relative was also
getting a kidney transplant,
the other a liver. As we talked,
it became apparent that ev-
ery transplant surgery -that
evening-was from the same
donor.
I can't help but think of the
family who lost this young
man, who helped to save the
lives of three people while
grieving their loss. I would
like to extend my deepest
gratitude .to that family and
to all the families who have
donated the organs of their
loved ones.
Because of one person, my
father and two other dads got
a new lease on life. My plea is
for people to mark the back
of their driver's license to
indicate their willingness to
become an organ donor. Also
let your families know that
you want your organs donated
if, God forbid, anything were
to ever happen. It will make
the decision for them much
easier.
Thank you for allowing
me the opportunity to speak
out and perhaps save some-
one's life the way someone



-6S



Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

saved my dad, whom I love
very much. GRATEFUL
DAUGHTER IN OWENS-
BORO, KY.
DEAR DAUGHTER: Your
letter touched my heart I hope
it will remind everyone what a
precious gift each of us can give
if we wish.
Readers, I encourage all of
you to discuss the subject of
organ donation with your fami-
lies. Let them know you would
like to give the "gift of life" and
ensure that a part of you lives
on. Your generosity can make
the difference between life and
death for someone.
For more information about
organ donation, contact the
National Kidney Foundation at
Box DA, 30 E. 33rd St, New
York, NY 10016, call toll-free
(800) 622-9010 or log onto www.
kidney.org.
DEARABBY: Mygirlfriend
has asked me to be her maid of
honor, Of course I agreed, but
my husband doesn't want me
to for a couple of reasons. First,
he says I shouldn't be a maid of
honor because I am married.



Second, he's uncomfortable
about my walking down the
aisle with another man (the
best man) and being photo-
graphed with him.
I want to be there for my
friend, but I don't want to cre-
ate tension between my hus-
band and me. He has made it.
clear that if I choose to be in
this wedding he won't attend
as a guest.
The wedding is scheduled
for a year from now, and I don't
want to be stressing.about this
until next September. What
should I do? TORN BE-
TWEEN MY FRIEND AND
MY HUSBAND.
DEAR TORN: It appears
you have married a man who
is insecure and controlling. If
he had said he'd be uncom-
fortable if you were seated
with the bridal party at the
reception while he sat in "Si-
beria," I would understand.
However, his idea that a mar-
ried woman cannot be a maid
of honor is incorrect, and his
objection that there's some-
thing wrong with your walk-
ing down the aisle or being
photographed with the best
man is ridiculous. So tell your
husband (sweetly) that he'll
be missed at the wedding, and
.if he's more comfortable not
attending it's OK with you.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.



HOROSCOPES



ARIES (March 21-April
19): Have fun but play it safe
when it comes to love. Jeal-
ousy is likely to flare up if you
flirt and can lead to relation-
ship situations that can affect
your future. There is no half-
way when it comes to love.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Stick to the truth and
don't.bend the rules. As long
as you are open and honest,
you will not face opposition
but trying to get away with
something will backfire. Emo-
tional issues that concern
children or a partner can be
expected. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Love, coupled with en-
tertainment, should be on
your agenda. A little pamper-
ing will go a long way. Some
interesting changes at home
will add to your comfort, en-
joyment and ease when it
comes to getting chores done.
I-****
CANCER (June 21-July.
22): Don't count on getting
any help and you won't be dis-
appointed. There will belplenty
to talk about but conversations
will lead to disagreements.
Actions will pave the way to a



THE LAST WOF

EugeniaWor
better relationship with
one you love. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
Get out of the house ar
gage in activities that
you to explore new av
and learn new skills. T
on a disgruntled part
someone you reside wit
be a waste of time and er
. Preparation should be
goal. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
22): Someone will try t.
advantage of you. Doi
swayed by compliment
emotional tactics. If you
want to do something, s
Put your time and energy
home, family and person
provements. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23
22): Your hard work an(
ication to a cause will p
and bring you opportu
that you cannot turn
Don't let someone's jea
stop you from fully enj
what's being offered. A
you have can be turned
profitable service. ***
SCORPIO (Oct.
Nov. 21): You'll be f
pressured and anxious



CELEBRITY CIPHER



by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and pres-
Each letter in the cipher stands lor another
Today's clue: V equals W
"G E GMBOOP W X S Z Z L Y W I S R G MN
NSSY." 0 G B I M L L W SM "MSV XFB
G IN S M L, G XLOO P S H, Y S M' X
WIS R L P H CT P M M LT

PREVIOUS SOLUTION' "The company accountant is shy and retiring.' H
shy a quarter of a million dollars. That's why he's retiring." Milton Berle
(c) 2010'byNEA, Inc. 10-4



RD what's going on in your life,
personally and professionally.
rd Prepare for every possible
some- outcome so you don't leave
anything to chance. Don't ne-
22): glect someone you love. **
nd en- SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
allow 22-Dec. 21): Strive for atten-
enues tion and show everyone what
makingg you have to offer. The ease at
ler or which you present your talent
th will and deal with the people you
energy. meet will impress someone
*your who can'use your type of sav-
_Sept. vy approach. Travel may be
o take necessary. *****
n't be CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
its or Jan.. 19): You may have to
l don't work long hours. Not every-
.ay so. one will be happy with your
ry into choices and demands will be
nal im- put on you if you fall short
when it comes to the expect
3-Oct. stations of friends and family.
d ded- Travel will be riddled with de-
)ay off
inities lays, detours and restrictions.
down. ***
lousy AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
joying Feb. 18): Follow your heart
talent and you will make the right
into a decision. A problem with a
*. past lover or someone trying
23- to take advantage of what you
feeling have will arise. Don't fall for
about insincere gestures of friendli-
ness. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
-- 20): Getting together with
Am. someone who has as much to
contribute as you can result
E s T in a worthwhile investment of
both time and money. Make
sure you put everything in'
writing and that you have
discussed the division of re-
le's sponsibilities, so there are no
surprises. ***



SUNDAY CROSSWORD



LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION By Pamela Amick Klawitter / Edited by Will Shortz

NOTE: EACH SET OF CIRCLED LETTERS IS DESCRIBED BY AN ANSWER ELSEWHERE IN THE GRID.



Across
1 When repeated, a
resort near the
Black Forest
6 How things may
be remembered
11 Beginning
15 Caboose, for one
18 In ___ (unborn)
19 Homeric hero
20 Part of Q.E.D.
21 ___ Miss
22 Specification in a
salad order
.25 A lens fits in it
26 Swell
27 Certifies, in a
way
28 U.S.M.C.
barracks boss
29 XXX
31 Homeric genre
32 Address part
34 Unit in
measuring
population
density
40 As a friend, to
the French
42 Relative of Manx
43 Michael who
once headed
Disney
44 Grab bag: Abbr.
46 Some stakes
48 Dreadful feeling
49-Worker who may
create a stir?
53 Following
56 Opening
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
$1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.



57 Opening for an
aspiring leader
59 Fine and dandy,
in old slang
60 "I don't give
__ !"
62 Zing
63 Writer/critic
Trilling
65 Hit computer
game with the
original working
title Micropolis
68 First name
alphabetically in
the Baseball Hall
of Fame
70 President who
said "I'm an
idealist without
illusions"
71 Giggle
72 Suffix with
lumin-
73 Hard, boring
efforts
74 Directional
suffix
75 Diagonals
79 "Mazel ___!"
82 Fix, as a shoelace
84 Complete
85 Country singer
Griffith
87 Name on 1952
campaign
buttons
89 Romance of 1847
90 Errand runners
91 Mid 12th-century
year
93 Cool, very red
celestial body
97 Carp or flounder,
typically



99 Highly rated
security
101 Hungarian city
103 Actress Ward
1,04 Fashion inits.
105 You might wait
for it to drop
109 Three-wheeled
vehicle
114 Spanish bruin
115 Go-between
117 Rapper ___-A-
Che
118 Same: Fr.
119 Convict
120 Relative of a
canary
121 Cinch __
(Hefty garbage
bag brand)
122 "Idylls of the
King" lady
123 Falls (over)
124 Breast: Prefix

.Down
I Melville's "Billy

2 Italian bell town
3 Dead ends?
4 Formerly, once
5 Public knowledge
6 Ph.D., e.g.
7 Barge_
8 "Don't give ___
lip!"
9 Beverage that may
be foamy
10 A wishbone has
one
11 Director Vittorio
12 48th state: Abbr.
13 Begins
energetically



14 Explosive trial,
for short
15 Place for a date,
frequently
16"___ Restaurant"
17 Not likely
19 "... ___ the
queen of'
England!"
23 "And to those
thorns that___
bosom lodge":
Shak.
24 St. Patrick's land
30 One of the 12
tribes of Israel
33 Shipwreck locale
34 Ship locale
35 Last dynasty of
China
36 Links org.
37 Susan who co-
starred in "Five
Easy Pieces'
38 Actor Neeson
39 "C6mo ___?"
41 Shopping locale
45 Indulged
47 Pre-broadcast
activity
49 David Cameron,
e.g.
50 Normandy battle
town
51 More ___ enough
52 Dark time, in
verse
54 Just got (by)
55 Trust, with "on"
57 Honey badger
58 Dinner spreads
61 Engine type
64 Employed
65 "Fer ___!"



66 French noun
suffix
67 Cause of
thoughtlessness?
68 Dog of old films
69 Didn't just pass
70 Noted Bauhaus
artist
72 Dallas-to-
Memphis dir.
73 High-hats
76 Large food tunas



77 Bausch & ___
(lens maker)
78 Langston Hughes
poem
80 "The ___ Gave
My Heart To"
(1997 Aaliyah
hit)
81 Tapers, briefly
83 Peculiar: Prefix
85 Bedouins' trait
86 It's like "-like"
88 "Next ..."
90 Dimwit



91 City chiefs
92 Cinnamon tree
94 Swarmed
95 Indian tourist
city
96 Challenger
astronaut Judith
98 Chief dwelling?
100 "'mn innocent!"
102 Liechtenstein's
western border
106 Certain engine
107 "This round's



108 List-ending
abbr.
110 Notion
111 Mil. leaders
112 Came to earth
113 "There Shall
___ Night"
(Pulitzer-
winning Robert
E. Sherwood
play)
116 Elevs.



Answers to last Sunday's Crossword..

EJ UA E SlE C I E R A
O LP A L| U K EBIA BH ALE NT EIN
B I Z EmAS TAEB EIA V E R|OL D H A T
M S T A R|C E D *V E R IC E
T NI | OK O U T S|D E ET HEBAICHS
C I A Y|A N K E E _M A H
A DT C E IS CIH^ I N S P REE
R A R E F I' El S *GIA N S PIPIO
A L DR N| OMISK|| AIEO LAN
F L Y I NG O F F TIH E H A I DPI D E L
E IY E ll10 B L I A T N ITII PISI
| | N T O N AIL|L _Ss TIP A RIT Y
LT W OTRIS T WTEIA IL OIH A|E|AR
L E R R J0!l | I H EIA A MIA ETIT TIA
_ A Y D NIG O S EEIKj D E N NE||N
**0Vl I D |V IOODIO|O-E|N|T|
_ B _3ID F ATG RII G W E D D I G
A P O G E|A L E IDE R R E 0 11
E RIW N I~ G R S IASIP A T S A IR|A|UISIS
v E L V EIT I TIA CO OIT A A IGIUIAI
_ S S E S~ S W AIY E D NIA E C|H|E|X|



57 69 1


8 2 5


62 8 7


8 3 4 ,


2 3_


1 1 8 9


95 86 1 2


6 2 1 4


8 7



S L 9 6 1 1Z L 8


8 6 | L | 9 9 C L


ZI L| 9 .8 Lit b176


6 9 Z 8 L L L


8 LL V 6 9 Z


L 1 c 9 Z 8 6 L
LZ79S9Z86L





9 c 6 Z IL L 8 17


L Z 8 6 9 L 9
LZ8f769SL9i



LAKE CITY REPORTER 'ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 201 0



3D



Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415



\











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010



I



1 u a u



[TI.






i
. .



Making This Right



Beaches

Claims

Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife



I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have
to restore the Gulf communities for the shrimpers, fishermen,
hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach



No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the
beginning of our work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup
in the Gulf and that includes keeping you informed.



Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet.
We have been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments andcommunity organizations, my job is
to listen to people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have
19 community centers and teams in four states, listening and helping.



Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and
restaurant owners, helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have
already gone to people affected by the spill. We have committed a
$20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate claims, including lost
incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism
recover and bring people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams
will remain in place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific
experts on the impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support
over 10,000 jobs in the region and people here are our neighbors. We
know we haven't always been perfect, but we will be here until the oil
is gone and'the people and businesses are back to normal. We will do
everything we can to make this right.



For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816



restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BPAmerica
YouTube: BP

For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com



bp


4WZ*
00^ 14%Il



2010 BP, E&P



I
*



- t- i



If
s".



I



4D



't.ki
*. '



, .



I)



-qu~d
t





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM