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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01415
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 10/02/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01415
System ID: UF00028308:01415
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






















______ --- --! --------------1.-: ------ .- ,, J' 1 : L- 'J' ._i'm
Vol. 136, No. 219 75 cents
X I .



County fire, rescue join forces



Columbia fire,
EMS kick off first
day as one unit.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
Friday served as a day
of new beginnings for the
Columbia County Fire/
Rescue department.
Employees began
working under the newly



formed department's fiscal
year after several months
of finalizing the merger
of the Columbia County
Fire Department and the
Columbia County EMS
Department.
Rusty Noah was the
Columbia County EMS
Service director, but as part
of the merger, he could get
a new title. That decision is
in flux, Noah said.
"We're working to



increase levels of service
delivery and it's an ongoing
process to do this entire
_^^^ ~~project," he
said of the
merger.
^ "This is an
ongoing
process
that started
in April
Atkinson 2009."
There are 25 full-time
positions in the EMS depart-



ment that were included in
the merger.
Some of the EMS employ-
ees have been cross-trained
and they are now state-cer-
tified firefighters. Noah
said some firefighters are
continuing their paramedic
training.
"This is a long-term vision
in the process of improve-
ment and an approach to
COUNTY continued on 3A



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ILake City Reporter
Columbia County Fire/Rescue firefighter/EMT Wayne Aylor (left)
and paramedic/firefighter Kim Perry prepare to jump out of the
back of an ambulance. Friday marked the first day of the com-
bined departments.



DREA



S



BUILT



After 3 decades, Southside Recreation

unveils softball concessions, building



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City resident James Montgomery delivers a speech during a ribbon-cutting dedication ceremony for the Southside
Recreation Complex Adult Softball Concessions and restroom building Friday morning.



By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityrepor ter.com
t ~T fihe efforts of
three decades
worth of
dreaming and
planning were
recognized Friday when
local officials held a rib-
bon cutting and dedication
service for the Southside
Recreation Complex Adult
Softball Concessions and
restroom building.
About 50 people attend-
ed the ceremony. Among
them were local officials
who gave a brief history
of the plans to build the
recreation complex and
thanked local businesses
who contributed time,
labor and materials for
constructing new conces-
sions, restrooms and the
scorer's building. A plaque



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ILake City Reporter
About 50 people attended the unveiling ceremony at the
Southside Recreation Complex Friday. Pictured are Columbia
County Tourist Development Council Executive Director Harvey
Campbell (from left), County Commissioner Scarlet Frisina,
general contractor Kent Harriss and James Montgomery.



was also unveiled listing
several of the building's
supporters.
Many of the speak-
ers during the program
described the building as
one of the most unique in
the county. They noted the



building's pentagon shape.
The two-storied, five-
sided concrete building is
made of poured concrete,
not laid block.
"It was intended to be
a little bit grand and a
little bit big." said Dale



Williams, Columbia
County manager, who
served as the program's
master of ceremonies.
He said officials wanted
the building'to serve as
a focal point for guests to
the area.
The building has
around 1,500 square feet
of space on the first and
second floors.
"The second story is a
score tower for people to
keep score for the games,
tournaments or what-
ever is going on in the
fields," said Clint Pittman,
Columbia County land-
scapes and parks depart-
ment director. "It will also
serve as a meeting area
for coaches and umpires
during the tournaments
and games. The space
can also be utilized for
SOUTHSIDE continued on 3A



Realtors say it's


time to buy, buy,

buy local homes



InAugust figures:
4 houses sold for
$7Kto $12K each.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Median sales prices for
August 2010 single-family,
existing home sales in Lake
City and Live Oak were cut
in half compared to August
2009's numbers, but not
without reason.
According to the August
2010 Florida Sales Report
distributed by the Lake
City Board of Realtors, the
median sales prices fell
from almost $149,000 in
August 2009 to $70,000 in
August 2010 with 27 homes
sold.
The drop resulted from
four of the 27 sales being
bank-owned and sold from
$7,000 to $12,000, said Dan
Gherna, Lake City Board
of Realtors executive vice
president. He noted that 14
sales out of the 27 were
$70,000 and less, which
accounted for 52 percent of
the sales.
'That's it right there,



"This is the
greatest buyer's
market that I've
witnessed in my
17 years of real
estate."

Dan Gherna
Lake City Board of Realtors
executive vice president

those four houses alone,"
he said. "You've got to look
at the small sample size.
When you're dealing with
27 sales in the Lake City
and Live Oak area, that's
such a small sample size
that it could take only a
couple of sales that could
skew those totals."
The totals in the report
are numbers from the North
Florida Multiple Listing
Service and are compared
to numbers from Statewide
& Metropolitan Statistical
Areas. .They are from sin-
gle-family, residential site-
built homes, Gherna said,
and do not include manu-
REALTORS continued on 3A



400 FFA officers

hone leadership

skills in Lake City



FGC plays host to
participants from
several counties.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
FFA officers came to
Columbia County for train-
ing and left with the knowl-
edge of how to be better
leaders.
The fourth Florida FFA
Association Chapter Officer
Leadership Training
Conference was Frilay at
Florida Gateway College.
The 400 middle and high
school FFA chapter officers
and advisors came from
several counties, includ-
ing Columbia, Alachua and
Putnam.
The event, which fea-



tured training from state
officers, was designed to
improve the skills of young
people interested in agri-
cultural industry careers.
"Leadership is what FFA
is known for nationwide,"
said Ronnie Simmons,
Florida FFA Assbciation
executive director.
The conference focused
on four training modules:
communications, advocacy,
goal setting and diversity.
Students were also able to
attend a career fair.
Learning how to effec-
tively communicate with
everyone was one of the
concepts he learned at the
conference, said Shaun
Mayo, Columbia High
School FFA president.
FFA continued on 3A



CALL US:
(386) 752-1293



84



SUBSCRIBETO Partly Cloud
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A



Opinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Faith &Values ........... 6A



I
a'.w-



DAILY
BRIEFING
Could Har-y
Potter return?



COMING
SUNDAY
Prescription drug
addictions.



1 I.1.1., .11,



"j ij











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010



Friday:
Afternoon: 1-4-1
Evening: 8-4-6



Friday:
Afternoon: 2-6-5-3
Evening: 2-6-5-4



Thursday:
14-15-22-31-35



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Could Harry Potter return?



CHICAGO
would Harry Potter return
to work more magic?
J.K Rowling is leaving
open the possibility. She
told Oprah Winfrey in a
taped interview airing Friday that
she may someday.write another
novel in the popular series.
Rowling says the characters are
still in her head and she "could
definitely" write several new books
about them. She says: "I'm not
going to say I won't" For now, she
feels she's moved on to a new phase
of her writing.
More than 400 million copies of
the books about the boy wizard
have been sold. Rowling says fame
brought extreme pressures, includ-
ing paparazzi and reporters search-
ing her trash..
She says it was "like being a
Beatle" and there was a time she
"was barely hanging by a thread."
Forbes magazine ranks Rowling as
one of Britain's richest women.

Ben Stiller and Falco
to team up on Broadway
NEW YORK Ben Stiller and
Edie Falco are teaming up for
a revival of "The House of Blue
Leaves" on Broadway this spring.
Producers say the actors will
appear as a married couple in John
Guare's black comedy at the Walter
Kerr Theatre. No other details were
announced Thursday.
The play will be familiar for
Stiller: He made his Broadway
debut in a 1986 Broadway revival
of it, playing the son of a zookeeper
who longs to be a songwriter. This
time, the "Zoolander" star will play
the zookeeper.
Falco has several Broadway
credits, including "Frankie and
Johnny in the Clair de Lune" and
"'night, Mother." The "Sopranos"



ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Aug. 30 and provided by Harpo Productions, Inc., talk-show
host Oprah Winfrey (right) is seen with 'Harry Potter' author J. K. Rowling during
a taping in Edinburgh, Scotland for an episode of 'The Oprah Winfrey Show.'



star currently can be seen in "Nurse
Jackie."



included 'The Simple Life" and "My
New BFF."



For real? Hilton's life Heidi Montag, Pratt
airing anew on Oxygen divorce is dismissed



NEW YORK Oxygen is put-
ting Paris Hilton back on the air in
another reality series documenting
her life.
The network said this week that
the series is so far
-a .^ untitled and will be
an all-encompassing
look at the hotel
heiress' friends,
_family and relation-
ships.
The series has
Hilton not yet begun pro-
duction. No premiere date has been
set.
Her previous TV series have



SANTA MONICA, Calif. Court
records show divorce proceedings
between Heidi Montag and Spencer
Pratt have been dismissed.
Montag requested the action
Wednesday without prejudice,
meaning she could refile it later if
necessary.
The reality show couple appeared
on 'The Hills," which filmed their
relationship and wedding.
Montag filed for divorce in July,
but the couple spent time recently
in Costa Rica. The dismissal was
first reported Thursday by celebrity
website TMZ.

* Associated Press



Celebrity Birthdays



* Retired MLB All-Star Maury
Wills is 78.
* Movie critic Rex Reed is 72.
* Singer-songwriter Don
McLean is 65.
* Actor Avery Brooks is 62.
* Fashion designer Donna
Karan is 62.
* Photographer Annie
Leibovitz is 61.
* Singer-actor Sting is 59.



* Actress Lorraine Bracco
is 56.
* Country musician Greg
Jennings (Restless Heart)
is 56.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Freddie Jackson is 52.
* Singer-producer Robbie
Nevil is 52.
* Actress-talk show host
Kelly Ripa is 40.



Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake.City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press. -
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
if you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)



Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
-vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ............... .. $26.32
24 Weeks ..................$48.79
52 Weeks ..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................. $41.40
24 Weeks ..................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40



CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.



Greer asks judge
to drop charges
ORLANDO Ousted
Florida GOP chairman Jim
Greer is asking a judge
to throw out most of the
criminal charges filed
against him earlier this
year by Florida's statewide
prosecutor.
Greer filed a motion
Thursday to dismiss five
of the six charges he is
facing.
Greer was indicted in
June on six felonies includ-
ing theft, organized fraud
and money laundering.
Records released by the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement and Office
of Statewide Prosecution
accuse Greer of funneling
$125,000 from the state
party into his personal
bank accounts.
Greer has denied the
charges.

2 teen suspects
plead guilty
BARTOW Two teen-
agers charged with mur-
der after a companion was
fatally shot while breaking
into a house likely are
headed for a juvenile facil-
ity for at least a year.
The 15-year-old and
17-year-old pleaded guilty
Friday to second-degree
murder and burglary. They
will be sentenced Oct. 15.
Prosecutors said they
were outside when two
other teens broke into a
Davenport home Sept.
22. The homeowner fired
at them, and 15-year-old
Otilio Rubio later died
from a head wound.
A 16-year-old boy who
was with Rubio is expected
to be charged as an adult.

Armored truck
guard shot dead
MIRAMAR-
Authorities are searching
for at least two armed



THE WEATHER



PARTLY MSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
CLOUDYNNY SU NNY SUNNY SUNNY1


s 79. H 80 57
H1 84 ID56 H183ID52 HI 79 L0 52 H1i79LO56 HI 80 LO 57
I 1 (d[,;L' Ii0;1:.t- i? F al '7~fA --'r



ASSOCIATED PRESS

Raising awareness of COPD
In this photograph taken by AP Images for www.
DRIVE4COPD.com, Grammy Award winner Patty Loveless,
left, signs an autograph for Frances Quesada at the AARP's
Orlando@50+ DRIVE4COPD event in Orlando Thursday.
DRIVE4COPD is a public health initiative to raise aware-
ness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and
encourage people to get screened for their risk.



suspects who fled after the
fatal shooting of a Brinks
armored truck secu-
rity guard outside a South
Florida bank.
The Friday shooting
occurred outside a Bank
of America in Miramar.
The FBI confirmed that
an armored truck secu-
rity guard was fatally shot
by suspects who were
thought to be armed and
dangerous. Miramar police
say one man is in custody
and they are searching for
at least two more people.

Man gets death
for-killing 5 men
MIAMI A man con-
victed of executing five
men during a drug theft
at a South Florida apart-
ment has been sentenced
to death.
A Miami-Dade judge
sentenced 32-year-old
Tavares Calloway on
Friday. A jury found him
guilty last year of five
counts of first-degree mur-
der and one count each
of robbery with a firearm,
kidnapping and burglary of
an occupied dwelling. That



same jury later recom-
mended the death penalty.
In January 1997, pros-
ecutors say Calloway and
another man stormed a
Liberty City apartment,
hogtied five men, taped
their mouths shut and
removed their pants.
Calloway shot each man in
the head.

Man guilty of
tourist robbery
MIAMI -A South
Florida man has been con-
victed of fatally shooting an
Illinois tourist who stopped
to ask directions in Coconut
Grove.
A Miami-Dade jury found
26-year-old Brandon Antron
Rolle guilty Thursday night
of first-degree murder and
robbery with a firearm. The
same jury will reconvene
Dec. 6 to recommend either
life in prison or the death
penalty.
Authorities say Ronald
Gentile had pulled over to
ask for directions in 2006
when a man dressed in
black approached the car,
robbed and shot him.

* Associated Press



I
?I



'Pensacola
84/59



Valdosta
83/53 j
Tallahassee Lake Cy,
85/52. 84/56
* @ -, Gainesville
Panama Cit \83/59
85/59 1', Ocala
aSi66in



Jacksonille
'82/59

Daytona Beach
8469
0



Orlando Cap Canaveral Key West
86/67 82/69 Lake City
. 15a*a \ Naples
0 West Palm Beach Ocala
86/72 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers, 87/73 Pensacola
89/69 Naples Tallahassee
88/71 Miami Tampa
87/73 Valdosta
/ey West W. Palm Beach
86/77



TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low



PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date



84
62
84
64
95 in 1904
40 in 1920


0.00"
0.00"
38.42"
0.10"
41.23"



SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrse tom.
Sunset tom.



7:25 a.m.
7:15 p.m.
7:25 a.m.
7:13 p.m.



MOON
Moonrise today 1:35 a.m.
Moonset today 3:38 p.m.
Moonrse tom. 2:42 a.m.
Moonset tom. 4:19 p.m.

*003
Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.
7 14 22 30
New First Full Last



_ -.



SaturdayP



=7 [ |faOn this date in
7p Sunday a 1981, a lightning
bolt that worked its
way into buildings
via a water main
damaged a city
~ '. I~ l~ street in Prospect,
Conn., resulting in
numerous water
| leaks.



8

15nmitest bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation rsk
for the area on
a scale from O
to 10+.



Sunday
83, i p,;
84/68/s
87/73/pc
89/69/pc
82/55/pc
82/55/s
86/77/s
83/52/s
87/73/pc
88/70/pc
83/57/pc
85/67/s
82/56/s
83/55/s
83/49/s
88/67/s
82/50/s
86/71/pc



Monday
8'.), i 1, .
82/66/pc
86/75/pc
88/68/pc
79/54/pc
77/55/pc
87/78/pc
79/52/pc
86/75/pc
88/69/pc
80/56/pc
84/65/pc
78/58/s
81/54/s
79/50/s
86/66/pc
79/50/s
85/74/pc



An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com



-- <. Forecasts, data and graph-
E .' Ics 2010 Weather Central
v .:' LLC, Madison, Wls.
*J') i"' www.weatherpubllsher.com



GetConnecte


IQ2-d
i- ,
^^ ~~~~~~~



I



Daily Scripture

"Blessed are you when people
insult you, persecute you and
falsely say all kinds of evil against
you because of me. Rejoice and
be glad, because great is your
reward in heaven, for in the same
way they persecuted the prophets
who were before you."
Matthew 5:1 1-12



AROUND FLORIDA



City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesville
Jacksonville



c~~~~~~~~~~~~~~J1~~~~~~~~~~~~~



IIF



I



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



2A



11INI)WI



WTIVAIN
m I



--_-- -



1. INN"
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010 3A



JASON MATTHEW WALKER//Lake City Reporter
Columbia County School Board member Glenn Hunter (left) introduces Jack Muenchen, one of the
many people who made the 30-year dream a reality.


SOUTHSIDE: Built by community



Continued From Page 1A

meeting rooms for other
events."
The downstairs area of
the building has ADA male
and female restroom facili-
ties. There is a mechanical
space/work area between
the restrooms and conces-
sion area for storage.
The front side of the
building has two serving
windows for customers.
'This is the largest con-
cession stand we have,"
Pittman said. 'This is
made to be the focal point
of the complex so'when
people come in they have
a grand entry view of
the facility. The complex
has the potential to host
large tournaments so we



needed a bigger facility
in order to accommodate
that."
Glenn Hunter,
Columbia School Board
member, also addressed
the crowd and gave a
brief history of complex,
noting that the original
effort began 35 years
.ago with commissioners
James Montgomery, the
late Ludie Ship and other
local leaders who bought
the five pieces of property
for the complex.
"This is more than
just a concession stand,
it's a community coming
together," Hunter said.
"It's a lot of moms com-
ing together selling hot



dogs and cup cakes."
Montgomery, who con-
tributed funding for the
building, addressed the
crowd.
"It's hard to believe
this building has finally
been completed, but it is
fantastic," he said. "This
thing started out as a
dream, as most things,
but to me the thing that
impacts this building so
much is the fact there
was so much coopera-
tion from the community.
The whole community of
Lake City and Columbia
County ought to be proud
of this building because
everyone got on board
with it."



FFA: Students share common focus
Continued From Page 1A



"We learned a lot," he
said.
The conference was also
"really fun" said Carson
Palmer CHS FFA treasur-
er.
There were a lot of activ-
ities for the students, they
met a lot of new people
and learned new things



to help each officer make
their chapter successful.
'You are a leader when
you are an officer," Palmer
said.
FGC provided a great
experience for the confer-
ence, said Valerie McKee,
state secretary. The
event included interac-



* tion among students who
shared a common focus
on FFA.
"It's been wonderful,"
she said.
The officers will be able
to use the training from
the conference even after
they graduate from the
program, Simmons said.



JASON MATTHEW WALKER//Lake City Reporter
Students from the Suwannee Middle School chapter of the FFA review a booklet during the
Florida FFAAssociation Chapter Officer Leadership Training Conference hosted at Florida
Gateway College on Friday.



JASON MATTHEW WALKER//Lake City Reporter
About 400 middle and high school FFA chapter officers and advisers attended a career fair to
leam about future opportunities available to them. Pictured are agricultural economics instructor
Dustin Bass (from left), of Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Sage Moss, 13, Lilly Perez, 13,
and McKenzie Smith, 12.



COUNTY: Officials say merger going smoothly
Continued From Page 1A



improvement," he said.
"Its good for the commu-
nity and for the service."
Noah said designs on
the ambulances have not
been completed and offi-
cials .are also continuing
to work on the standard-
ized uniforms for the
department's employees.
Tres Atkinson will be
the department's Fire/
Rescue chief, subject to
commission approval.
'There are several title
changes to be approved,
mine, Rusty Noah's and
David Boozer's," Atkinson
said. "It's just the first step
in a line of many we'll
have to take."
An organizational chart
has to be approved by
the county and that chart
gives "walking orders" on
how the new department
will be set up.
The. changes to the
administrative code for
the new department were
adopted at last month's
county commission meet-
ing.
"Everybody is affected
by the merger and we
graduated 10 firefighters
from paramedic school
this week," Atkinson said.



"They now have to go
through a clearing pro-
cess through our medical
director to be able to work
in our county as paramed-
ics."
Atkinson said the merg-
er is going smoothly.
"There are several
changes and it's going to
take time," he said. "We'll
run into some bumps in
the road, but we'll work
through those and we will
have a good quality ser-
vice to serve citizens."



A total of 57 employees
make up the new Columbia



County Fire/Rescue
Department.



Sewing Machines


Starting 4500
Starting at:.lk



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'^"*f iB y' 4'. j '-^r

]6"
.' "Swet i6' s our' little girl gJrowng
to become our -special pearl
. ', Love Dad, Morn & Robbie



REALTORS:
From Page 1A

factured or mobile homes.
The current real estate
market is still one that
favors the buyer, Gherna
said.
"This is the greatest buy-
er's market that I've wit-
nessed in my 17 years of
real estate," he said. "I've
not seen a buyer's market
like this and there are still
really, really low mortgage
rates."
"People sitting on the
fence really need to inves-
tigate the market and take
a look at what's out there,"
Gherna said. 'This is a great
time for bargain-hunters."



.

... ,
I



Call in bl,
plat a uprise
ad foiir rhii,
gridmkil, Gid
chill mr anoxiI

Mxlliil exfra gl
thiriplcialdjui



Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
been 8r. A Apn

e Deadline:
M t Nr l 1Xa1 f Sd b 4sb c Ih dlw st
It qab'En* fin 1 LiN i CU i ti a



*M Just this side of heaven is a F";
place called Rainbow Bridge "
When a pet dies they go to Rainbow Bridge. There they have-
plenty offood and water. There is plenty of hills to run and
a pond to swim in. Those that were ill are restored to health.
Those who were hurt were made hole again, just as we
remember. They are all content, exceptfor one thing; they each
miss someone vety special to them, who had to be left behind.

The day comes while playing that she will stop and look into
the distance. Her eyes bright, overcome by joy she suddenly-
begins to runflying over the hills.

You've been spotted, and when you and your specialfriend
meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to begvarted
again. The happy kisses coveringyour face as you caress..
her beloved head, and you look
once more into her trusting eyes,
sd long gonefirom your life but'
a '1 ,/ < ; Snever absentfrom your heart.
L i' Tl Then yon cross Rainbow
.A. i*.lf Bridge together-..
You are in my heart &
ItR -" thoughts ever day.

We miss and love
O Aiefiie you so much.



3A



Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424



LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 201 0














OPINION



Saturday, October 2, 2010



www.lakecityreporter.com



OTHER
OPINION


Florida, the

home of the

purple state

of politics

F"_'"') lorida can be a toss-
up when it comes to
statewide elections,
but its legislative
and congressional
races are almost never competi-
tive. The simple reason: The
Legislature draws the districts
to favor specific political par-
ties and protect incumbents.
Now two constitutional amend-
ments on the Nov. 2 ballot give
Floridians a historic opportu-
nity to level the playing field by
rewriting the rules for drawing
political districts.
Drawing political districts to
protect political power is noth-
ing new. Before Republicans
took control of the Legislature
in 1996, Democrats were just
as guilty. But mapping software
and demographic databases
over the years made it possible
to know block-by-block whether
a district will lean Republican
or Democratic. Legislative lead-
ers have exploited that to draw
more safe Republican districts
during the once-a-decade redis-
tricting for the Legislature and
Congress.
The result. Though Barack
Obama carried Florida in 2008,
not a single Republican incum-
bent lost in the Legislature that
year. Republicans hold more
than 60 percent of legislative
seats but have only 36 percent
of state voter registration, com-
pared to 41 percent Democratic
and 19 percent nonaffiliated.
If 60 percent of voters
approve Amendments 5 and 6,
dubbed "Fair Districts," legisla-
tors would be prohibited from
gerrymandering districts to
favor themselves, friends or
their political parties during the
2012 reapportionment process.
The lack of competitive elec-
tions has led to hyper-partisan-
ship from both Republicans and
Democrats, because few incum-
bents fear being held account-
able by the voters.
Florida is a purple state, not
red or blue. Its elected law-
makers in the Legislature and
Congress should mirror that
diversity and work together for
a state and a nation that are nei-
ther far left nor far right.

* St. Petersburg Times



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POLICY
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typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
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and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com



Compromise need not be a dirty word



~~As anybody who has
a spouse or other
annoying compan-
ion understands, the
art of compromise
is one of the essential ingredi-
ents of a successful relationship.
Without compromise, it is dif-
ficult to achieve anything.
It is possible this principle
is being illustrated as you read
this. Perhaps that familiar-
looking man/woman staring
at you over breakfast with the
disgusted expression wants the
section of the paper you are
now reading. .
If you are in a good mood,
you may promise to hand it over
as soon as you read this column
- and what a wonderful person
you are for having such good
taste.
But if you are chronically
peevish, you will refuse on a
matter of high principle i.e.,
it is rude to interrupt someone
under the influence of bagels,
and he/she can darn well wait
until the cows come home and
moo to you, buddy.
That is where we are now
with the most dysfunctional
marriage in the land, that of
the two parties in Congress.
You can guess who I think is
behaving like the spoiled brats,
angrily stamping their feet to
get their partisan way. (Hint:
Not the Democrats, because
stamping feet would require
them to stand up, not cower
under the furniture.) Still; it
must be acknowledged that no
party has a monopoly on virtue.
In fact, when it comes to virtue,
Miss Trixie's House of Fun and
Frolic has a better claim. My
main concern is not who are
the bigger jerks, but what is
to become of the fading art of
compromise.
The Irish-born, British orator
and statesman Edmund Burke,
who sympathized with the
American revolution, had wise
words in the 18th century that



Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com



should resonate with Americans
at this irritable hour: "All
government indeed, every
human benefit and enjoyment,
every virtue and every prudent
act is founded on compro-
mise and barter."
Ah yes, compromise. It is the
little retreat necessary to help
secure life's bigger victories. It
is the fluid in civilization's gears.
It is the very soul and definition
of politics.
Or was. Unfortunately, com-
promise is now in chronically
short supply. Where once it
was common in the halls of
Congress and on friendly roosts
at other levels of government,
compromise has been hunted
to near extinction by the cynics
and power-mongers.
If you need chapter and verse
on this phenomenon, the health
care overhaul effort would be a
good place to start, but it seems
there's almost nothing the two
parties can agree on. If these
guys died and went to heaven
-an unlikely event, I grant you
- they would argue with each
other eternally about dividing
up the halos and who should
play the harp.
Apparently, a sizable number
of the American people approve
of this uncompromising attitude.
Since Barack Obama became .
president, the Republican Party
has become known as the Party
of No. That "No" isn't a tribute
to compromise.
Yet here's the odd thing.
While its members have been
doing an excellent job of not
compromising, the party has



still been purged of anyone
who has ever given the slight-
est indication they may have
compromised even if it was
in grade school or has that
shifty compromiser look. If the
Republicans do as well as they
expect in the midterm elections,
the effect will be that the Party
of No will rule Congress as the
Party of Never.
Do Nothing Congress, here
we come.
Now, I know some of you
would heartily approve of the
Obama administration doing
nothing for the next two years,
and that would be a fine plan if
the United States had no chal-
lenges and problems and the
world were to stand still.
But as for problems, we have
more of them than Capitol Hill
has lobbyists, more of them
than my kitchen has stinkbugs.
(By the way, the difference
between lobbyists and stink-
bugs is that when a congress-
man squeezes a lobbyist, the
scent of money fills his nostrils.)
Call me old-fashioned, but I
think congressmen should do
something to earn their salaries,
even if it requires the dreaded
"c" word compromise.
Don't tell me that certain
ideological purists can't compro-
mise because they have their
principles. We all have our prin-
ciples, I have my principles (no
warm beer), Principles are very
important.
There's always a time and
place for the famous cry of
Patrick Henry (no relation):
"Give me liberty or give me
death!" But most of us are look-
ing for something workable in
the middle range. We are hop-
ing that sensible compromise,
the agent of every human ben-
efit and enjoyment, every virtue
and every prudent act, will still
be there to make our country
great.
* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.



he U.S. Court
of Appeals in
Washington acted
appropriately in rul-
ing that the National
Institutes of Health could con-
tinue funding human embryonic
stem cell research pending
legal arguments over whether a
temporary ban on funding the
research imposed by a district
judge should be made perma-
nent
The Obama administration
argued that abruptly pulling the
plug on the ongoing research
would derail promising prog-
ress toward treatment of heart



disease, spinal-cord injuries and
Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Lou
Gehrig's and other devastating
diseases.
As it is, NIH can go ahead
with $54 million to underwrite
private research and $9.5 mil-
lion to fund its own research.
Meanwhile, it can restart the
review process for 20 new grant
applications.
The appeals court thought it
important enough to act quickly,
ruling a day after it heard argu-
ments in the case. The panel
also promised to expedite its
hearings on the district judge's
finding that funding the grants



violated a 1996 law that prohib-
its federal money from being
used in the destruction of
embryos. The administration
argues that federally funded
research is legal if the cells
have been privately obtained.
In 2001, President George
W. Bush allowed government
funding for research into cell
lines that had existed before
the ban, but researchers said
they were inadequate. Congress
twice overturned the ban, but
Bush successfully vetoed it both
times.

* Scripps Howard News Service



Cliff May
Cliff May



United

States still

home of

the free?

M ~~ rolly Norris
M I /I is not as well
known as Imam
Feisal Abdul
t v r aRauf or Pastor
Terry Jones. But you should
know who she is even
though she is no more. It will
take just a moment for me to
explain.
In response to threats from
militant Islamists, such cus-
todians of Western culture,
as Comedy Central, Yale
University Press and the
Deutsche Oper have resorted
to self-censorship. Norris, -
a cartoonist for the Seattle
Weekly, was troubled by what
she saw correctly, I think
-as the slow-motion surren-
der of freedom of expression, a
fundamental right
. So she came up with an idea:
"Everybody Draw Muhammad
Day." This may not have been
a great idea few ideas are
- but the point she wanted
to make was simple enough:
Freedom implies the right to
criticize and caricature. This
freedom is now in jeopardy
because a minority of Muslims
believes the majority of non-
Muslims can be intimidated.
If we all stand up for freedom,
Norris thought, surely free-
dom's enemies will back down.
What happened next Anwar
al-Awlaki, the American-born
cleric who became an al-Qaeda
commander issued a fatwa call-
ing for Norris to be murdered
by any Muslim willing and
able. She quickly retracted
her proposal for a day of mass
Mohammad-sketching but it
was too late. As the Seattle
Weekly cheerily informed its
readers:
"You may have noticed that
Molly Norris' comic is not in
the paper this week. That's
because there is no more
Molly.
'The gifted artist is alive
and well, thankfully. But on
the insistence of top security
specialists at the FBI, she is,
as they put it, 'going ghost':
moving, changing her name,
.and essentially wiping away
her identity. She will no longer
be publishing cartoons in our
paper or in City Arts magazine,
where she has been a regular
contributor. She is, in effect,
being put into a witness-protec-
tion program except, as she
notes, without the government
picking up the tab."
Norris views the situation
with her customary sense of
the world's complexity, and
absurdity. When FBI agents,
on a recent visit, instructed her
to always keep watch for any-
one following her, she joked,
"Well, at least it'll keep me
from being so self-involved!"
We wish her the best.
Where does this leave us?
Significantly less free than we
used to be. One may satirize,
criticize and even demonize
Christians and Jews. Such
speech remains protected by
America's Constitution. But
when it comes to Islam and
the sensibilities of overly sensi-
tive Muslims, Constitutional
protections are no longer to
be taken seriously. To even
discuss these matters, as I am
now doing, risks being casti-
gated as an Islamophobe.
But the alternative is to
watch Molly Norris "go ghost"
and pretend that no historic
changes are occurring. It is
not just Molly but America
and the West that are moving,
changing, "essentially wiping
away" our identity as the home
of the free and the brave.
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.



4A



Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is'pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
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This mission will be accomplished
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Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



OTHER OPINION

Stem-cell research gets government reprieve



II I



I















US balloonists plunged at 50 mph, likely dead



By PAOLO LUCARIELLO and
NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
BARI, Italy Two
missing American balloon-
ists plunged toward the
Adriatic Sea at 50 mph and
likely didn't survive, race
organizers said Friday.
Flight director Don
Cameron said that high
rate of descent, if con-
firmed, leads him to be
"very pessimistic" about
the fate of veteran pilots'
Richard Abruzzo and Carol
Rymer Davis.
Abruzzo and Davis
were participating in the
54th Gordon Bennett Gas-
Balloon Race when contact
was lost Wednesday morn-
ing in rough weather over
the Adriatic Sea.
Race organizers said the
balloon "appears to have
suffered a sudden and
unexpected failure."
"It's very bad news,"
Cameron said.
Cameron said he received
information Friday from
Zagreb's air traffic control
indicating the balloon was
at 5,300 feet and descended
slowly at first but then at
a rate of 50 mph until 600
feet.
"At this rate of descent to



the surface, survival would
be unlikely," the race orga-
nizers said in a statement.
Cameron stressed that
the Croatian readings were
from the outer limits of its
radar zone, though, and
said he hoped they were
incorrect.
"It's the only shred of
hope," he said, adding that
he expects to confirm the
data with Italian air traf-
fic controllers in Brindisi,
on the other side of the
Adriatic, on Saturday.
The Italian coast guard,
the U.S. Navy and Croatian
coastal aircraft crews
have been scouring the
area around Croatia's dis-
tant, uninhabited islet of
Palagruza.
The Abruzzo name is
synonymous with balloon-
ing. Abruzzo is the son
of famed balloonist Ben
Abruzzo, who was in 1981
part of the first team to
cross the Pacific Ocean by
balloon, and who was killed
in a small airplane crash in
1985.
The younger Abruzzo
and Davis won the 2004
edition of the Gordon
Bennett race and the 2003
America's Challenge gas
race one .of Abruzzo's
five victories in that race.



Elena Kagan takes

place on high court



By Associated Press

WASHINGTON-Justice
Elena Kagan took her seat
at the Supreme Court for
the first time Friday in front
of a packed courtroom that
included President Barack
Obama.
The court session was
merely ceremonial. Kagan
and the rest of the court
will return Monday for the
start of the new term.
In August, the 50-year-
old New Yorker became the
third woman on the current
court, and its fourth ever.
She replaced Justice John
Paul Stevens.
Kagan took the oath
again Friday in a ceremony
by which the court formally
welcomes its newest mem-
ber. She wore a black robe
she received as a gift from
her former colleagues at
the University of Chicago
and Harvard Law School,
where she served as dean,
and a white scarf.
"We wish you a long and



Rahm's

gone: New

tone for

Obama

By BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent

WASHINGTON -
Reshaping the tone and
tenor of the White House,
President Barack Obama on
Friday replaced the colorful
and caustic Rahm Emanuel
with the private Pete Rouse
as his chief of staff, shifting
.to a new phase of his presi-
dency with a drastically dif-
ferent aide as trusted gate-
keeper.
Emanuel's decision to
quit the White House and
run for Chicago mayor had
been so well known that
even Obama mocked the
lack of suspense. But it still
felt like the most important
transition to date for the
Obama operation, which
has been fueled for nearly
two years by Emanuel's
demands, drive and disci-
pline.
At an emotional farewell,
Obama said, "We are all
very excited for Rahm, but
we're also losing an incom-
parable leader of our staff."
Emanuel choked up as he
said his goodbye.
Into the breech steps
Rouse, an Obama senior
adviser known around the
White House as a problem-
fixing, media-shy strategist
and organizer.



ASSOCIATED PRESS
This handout photo provided
by the Supreme Court shows
Chief Justice John Roberts
and Justice Elena Kagan
in the Justices' Conference
Room prior to Kagan's
Investiture Ceremony, Friday.

happy career in our com-
mon calling," Chief Justice
John Roberts said after
administering the oath.



ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 3, 2009, photo, pilot Richard Abruzzo (right) and co-pilot, former Gov. Gary
Johnson, make some adjustments, to their balloon before the America's Challenge Gas
Balloon Race in Albuquerque, N.M. Abruzzo and co-pilot Carol Rymer Davis were participat-
ing in the 54th Gordon Bennett Gas Balloon Race when contact was lost Sept.' 29 over the
Adriatic Sea.



Abruzzo's wife; Nancy,
was in Bari at coast guard
headquarters on Friday
monitoring the search
effort. She said her hus-
band had made a final radio



transmission saying that he
was preparing to ditch in
the sea.
"We have every reason
to believe that with his
final transmission to air



TiRED of ALL THE PENALTiES?



I_ _I












S.- S 3. S



Lv9(M^W



October is National Breast

Cancer Awareness Month.
->^ ~ In the Lake City Reporter we'd like to take
) a moment to salute the strength and courage of
breast cancer survivors and to remember those
whose brave battle has ended. To honor or remember
a loved one on the page, please use the order form below.

Publishes Sunday, October 24, 2010

Sample Ad Actual Size



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Breast cancer sirliivor
Jor 9 years!
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adequate amount of time
to prepare for an emergen-
cy sea landing which, you
know, they are very pre-
pared for," she said.
She said she had been
ballooning with her hus-
band for 17 years.
"It's in his blood. It's who
he is. This is what he loves.
This is his passion,", said
Abruzzo, who spoke to the
AP via cell phone before
word about her husband
had cqme through.
The Italian coast guard
was unaware of any final
radio transmission, said
spokesman Lt. Massimo
Maccheroni. He said
the coast guard merely
received information about
the last automatic signal
the balloon communicated
to the air traffic control
center in Bridinsi before
losing contact.
Kevin Knapp, a pilot and
co-director of Americas
Challenge race sched-
'uled to begin Tuesday in
Albuquerque, New Mexico
said the ballooning com-
munity was still focused on
the search effort.



YOUR OLD COLUMBIA

COUNTY FAIR PHOTOS



The Lake City Reporter
will be publishing the
56th Annual Columbia
County Fair Magazine.

I We are looking for old fair
phQtos from our readers.



If you have interesting, fan
fair photos let as know!
Digital photos can
be submitted via
e-mail to Josh at
iblackmon@lakecityieporter.com
PIseP midcde your name addre, dd hone,
dare of photo and phgto desciptioa
Or stop bv the Lake City



Reporer to have us
Reporter. to. have us



bet your 2x2 (3.458inx2in) ad with scan your photos.
I .-|~ ~ | *~~ ~~~| |y ~~~~~~~, , ',*M"1-''"I" "'.,t ,]; Monday-Friday
photo and special message for only $35! 8am-5pul

For more information call Bridget or Mary at (386) 754-5440 _.<-v L.ke City Report
Or stop by the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055 .' gF.' 180 E. DCval Street
Lake City, FL32055



DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Lake City Reporter



i_ I I



UNI)TEDSTATE5 Statement of Ownership, Managemeni, and Circulation
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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 201 0



5A



Page Editor: Ibm Mayer, 754-0428



i j.

;1 k -



I



__ __ V T w















FAITH


Saturday, October 2, 2010 v



&



VALUES



vww.lakecityreporter.com



HEART MATTERS

IIIC. -P



Angie Land
angieland3@windstreom.net


Dealing


with a


'bitter'


person


"'Don't call me Naomi,'
she told them. 'Call me
Mara, because the Almighty
has made my life very bit-
ter I went away full, but the
Lord has brought me back
empty. Why call me Naomi?
The Lord has afflicted me;
the Almighty has brought
misfortune upon me.'"
"So Naomi returned
from Moab accompanied
by Ruth the Moabitess, her
daughter-in-law, arriving in
Bethlehem as the barley har-
vest was beginning."
Ruth 1:20-22

before we let
Ruth and
Naomi unpack
in Bethlehem,
let's get one
last lesson from the details
we find at the end of chap-
ter one. Last column, we
compiled a checklist from
Naomi's example in order
to identify any bitterness
that might be present in our
own lives. On the other side
of that coin, let's consider
what it might be like to be in
Ruth's shoes. What if life has
called us to live with, work
with, or walk along side of
someone who could rightly
be called "bitter?"
While bitterness can
be difficult to recognize in
ourselves, it will usually be
obvious in someone else.
But we may not know how
to respond in a healthy way.
Letls learn a few things from
Ruth and Naomi:
Expect a bitter person to
push you away. (vs. 11, 15)
Remember that bitterness
causes us to believe that we
have it worse than anyone
else. And a bitter person
will often push you away
because they are convinced
that you don't understand
their right to be bitter.
Notice that Ruth was firm,
but kind with Naomi in her
response. "Do not urge me
to leave you or to turn back
from you. Where you go, I
will go." (vs. 16)
Expose yourself to plenty
of other people. (vs. 16)
"Your people will be my peo-
ple." When dealing with "bit-
ter" in a close relationship,.
make sure that you never
isolate yourself with them.
We need to expose our-
selves to other healthy rela-
tionships in order to keep
bitterness from infecting us.
It is quite contagious. What
better reason to become
bitter than having to deal
with someone who is bit-
ter? After some time apart,
you will have much more to
give, and a better attitude in
which to give it!
Let God be God. (vs 16)
"Your God will be my God."
The absolute worse thing
that we can do for a bitter
person is to decide that we
can fix them. We can't be
nice enough, do enough,
or say enough. Only God
can heal bitterness. Period.
* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.



US judge asks Vatican to serve



court papers to Pope Benedict

I i--n- -. - .;- I--- zs N----E.-X- ..,



By DINESH RAMDE |I gi_ 1. '



Associated Press



MILWAUKEE -A fed-
eral U.S. judge is asking
the Vatican to cooperate
in serving the pope and
two other top officials with
court papers that stem
from decades-old allega-
tions of sexual abuse by a
priest in Wisconsin.
The request is an incre-
mental step in a lawsuit
that accuses the officials
of conspiring to keep
the' allegations against
the Milwaukee priest
quiet. The Vatican is not
obliged tq comply with the
request.
When faced with simi-
lar requests the Vatican
has made service diffi-
cult, time-consuming and
expensive by insisting, for
example, that documen-
tation be translated into
Latin, one of the Vatican's
official languages.
Mike Finnegan, the
attorney representing
the Chicago-based plain-
tiff, said Friday he's not
holding out hope that the
Vatican reverses course
and begins to cooperate
now.
"Based on what they've
done in other cases, I don't
expect them to do the right
thing," he said. "I expect
more delay and obstruc-
tion."
Jeffrey Lena, the
Vatican's U.S.-based attor-
ney, said he hadn't seen the
court request and couldn't
comment on whether the
Vatican would comply with
it.
The lawsuit, filed in
April in U.S. federal court,
names as' defendants
Joseph Ratzinger, who is
now Pope Benedict XVI;
Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone,



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Benedict XVI blesses two women as he conducts Mass in Westminster Cathedral
in London in this Sept. 18 file photo. Pope Benedict XVI said he was ashamed of the
'unspeakable' sexual abuse of children by priests, telling the British faithful during Mass in
Westminster Cathedral that he was deeply sorry and hoped the church's humiliation would
help victims heal.



the Vatican secretary of
state, and his predecessor,
Cardinal Angelo Sodano.
It claims the three
men knew about allega-
tions of sexual abuse at
a Milwaukee-area school
for the deaf, and called off
internal punishment of the
accused priest. The Rev.
Lawrence- Murphy, who
died in' 1998, was accused
of sexually abusing some



200 boys at the school
from 1950 to 1974.
Lena has called the law-
suit a publicity stunt and
said it rehashes theories
already rejected by U.S.
courts.
'This is a minor proce-
dural step by plaintiff's
lawyers in a meritless law-
suit," he said. He added
that it refers to abuse that
occurred in the 1970s,



which he said was more
than 20 years before the
Holy See first learned of
the priests actions.
The Vatican has argued
that it isn't liable for clerical
sex-abuse cases because
according to canon law
and the structure of the
Catholic Church, bishops
- not Rome are respon-
sible for disciplining pedo-
phile priests.



Milwaukee Archbishop
Rembert Weakland
had complained about
Murphy in a 1996 letter
to the Congregation of the
Doctrine of the Faith, the
powerful Vatican office
then-Cardinal Ratzinger
led from 1981 to his elec-
tion as pope in 2005.
That office told the
archbishop to move for-
ward with a canonical trial
against Murphy in 1997..
But after the office received
a letter from Murphy it
urged a different course,
citing Murphy's advanced
age, failing health and a
lack of further allegations.
The Wisconsin bishops
ordered the proceedings
halted. In the end, Murphy
died while still a defen-
dant in a canonical trial,
which could have led to
him being removed from
the clerical state.
The court order request-
ing the Vatican's cooperation
in the lawsuit was signed
Sept 24 by U.S. District
Judge Rudolph Randa.
It was released Friday by
the Survivors Network of
those Abused by Priests, or
SNAP
'The court requests the
assistance described herein
as necessary in the interests
of justice," Randa wrote.
Plaintiffs in two other
U.S. cases have also sued
the Vatican under simi-
lar arguments. The three
plaintiffs in the Kentucky
case dismissed their case
last month, and a case in
Oregon is ongoing.
SNAP spokesman
Arthur Budzinski called
the Wisconsin court order
a "hopeful sign." He said he
hoped it would lead to the
pope testifying under oath
about what he knew about
Murphy's actions,



Group wants IRS probe into Oklahoma pastor



Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY-
The head of a religious
liberty watchdog group
is asking the Internal
Revenue Service to investi-
gate' an Edmond pastor for
political comments made
from the pulpit.
The Rev. Barry Lynn
said the Rev. Paul Blair vio-
lated a federal law prohibit-
ing tax-exempt churches
from endorsing or oppos-
ing candidates for public
office. Lynn, of Americans
United for Separation of



Church and State, told The
Oklahoman he has written
to the IRS about the situ-
ation.
"When churches
become cogs in any can-
didate's political machine,
they ought to lose their
tax exemption," he said. "I
urge the IRS to investigate
this matter and apply the
law."
Blair announced Sunday
from the pulpit of Fairview
Baptist Church that he
plans to vote for Republican
Mary Fallin for governor.
Fallin faces Democrat



Jari Askins in the
November election.
Lynn filed a similar com-
plaint in 2008 after Blair
said he would vote for GOP
presidential nominee John
McCain, also during a ser-
mon at Fairview Baptist.
Blair said he isn't too
worried about the latest
complaint. He said he sent
a copy of his McCain ser-
mon to the IRS to let the
agency know he was exer-
cising his FirstAmendment
rights.
"In two years, we haven't
heard anything from them,"



he said. "Obviously, if we
were doing something ille-
gal we would have heard
from them. We haven't. We
have got the constitutional
right to do exactly what
we've done."
IRS spokeswoman
Karen Connelly told The
Associated Press the agen-
cy does not comment on
ongoing cases.
Lynn said the IRS has
been tied up the past two
years because the agency
has been reviewing que-
ries into similar matters
and whether they were



handled properly.
Blair said Sunday's ser-
mon was part of "Pulpit
Freedom Sunday," in
which about 100 pastors
across the country talked
about races in the Nov. 2
general election.
He said he wasn't tell-
ing his approximately 400
congregation members
how to vote and didn't
know how many would
follow his advice if he
aid.
"I can't get half of them
to come back to church on
Sunday night," he said.



CHURCH NOTES



Today
Health Fair and
Clothing Giveaway
A Community Health
Fair and Clothing
Giveaway is 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. today at the Fort
White Community Center.
The event is hosted by
Anointed Vessels In Arms
Reach Ministries and will
include free health screen-
ings, food, and more. Call
Gloria Jackson at (352)
538-0352 or Ora Enman at
(352) 317-1835

Know your status
campaign
The Tri-County.
Community Coalition
presents a HIV/AIDS
prevention event at 9 a.m.
today at Union A.M.E.
Church. There will be free
HIV/AIDS testing, guest
speakers and incentives.
Call Sandra Price at (386)
344-3776.



Yard sale
Wellborn Church of
God is having a yard sale
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. today.
For more information
call W.C. Cobb, Pastor
at (386)963-4988 or the
church at (386) 752-8479.

Blessing of the Pets
Spirit of Christ Church
of Lake City, located at
the corner of US 90 West
and Sweetbreeze Drive,
is hosting a Blessing of
the Pets ceremony at 11
a.m. today in front of the
church. A donation of a
can or bag of pet food
would be appreciated.
Pet food collected will
be given to the Animal
Shelter.

Pre-anniversary
The 28th pre-anniver-
sary celebration of The
Miracles of Jacksonville
is 2 p.m. today at the
Church of Faith and



Deliverance Through
Christ..Featured guest are
the Sacred Soul Gospel
Singers of Gainesville;
Elder Robert Jackson
and the New Spirit
Travelers of Jacksonville;
Little Sheldon and Spirit
Travelers 3rd Generation
of Jacksonville; The
Gospel Harmoneers of
Lake City; and many
more. The church is locat-
ed at 379 NW Long Street.
Contact Pastor Minnie
Gomes at (386) 758-1886.

Sunday
Baptism Sunday
The annual Baptism
Sunday at Ichetucknee
Springs is 2 p.m. Oct. 3.
The purpose of this event
is to promote believer's
baptism, build fellow-
ship among churches in
Columbia County and
demonstrate good stew-
ardship of the springs. All
churches and denomina-



tions are welcome. Just
arrive at the park's north
entrance with your favor-
ite dessert. Contact John
Wheeler at 752-8660.

Lulu homecoming
celebration
Lulu Advent Christian
Church is having its
homecoming celebration
at 11 a.m. Oct. 3. The
Rev. Ray Penney is the
speaker. Dinner is on the
grounds following morn-
ing service.

Full Gospel homecoming
celebration
First Full Gospel
Church is celebrating
their homecoming Oct. 3
at 11 a.m. Service will be
rendered by Rev. Byron
Griffis. Afternoon sing-
ing will be performed by
the Stephen Jones Band.
Dinner will be held at the
church with Call Cagney
Tanner at 386-984-0310.



Revival service
Watertown
Congregational
Methodist Church is hold-
ing a revival service at 6
p.m. Oct 3 and 7 p.m. Oct
4-6. Evangelist Lee Crist,
Cornerstone Community
Church pastor in St
Petersburg, is the speaker.
For more information, call
752-1329 or 9654706.

Blood drive and
Pancakes
A blood drive for
Elyse Hancock, who has
Leukemia is 8 a.m. Oct 3
at Old Providence Baptist
Church in Lake Butler. Call
(386) 755-1648 or (386) 697-
6226.
Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes in
writing no later than 5 p.m.
Tuesday to Tom Mayer at
tmayer@ldkecityreporter.
com, (386) 754-0428, fax to



6A



I _













LAKECITYREPOTER DVERISEENISTRDIOTOER2 210I



Books Are Noble



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ooks have the power to change lives; without them our

knowledge of the world is limited; One immortal hook

offers beauty, hope and inspiration more than any other.

It is the story of both what has been and what will be. This

book is God's Word, the Bible. In Job 12:13 we read, "To

God belong wisdom and power; counsel and understanding

are his." Read this book, it will change your life!
B~~~~~~~~~~~~v
knowledge of the world ~s limi~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,te.' n imralbo
offers beautyhope and inspration morethan any othe.w
It ~~~~~~is h tr bt hths enadwa ilb.Ti
book~~~~~~~ isGdsWrteBbe. n b1:3w ed T
God elon wisom ad poer; ounsl:an udrtandin
are his~~~~~." Rat hsbo, itwl cag ou ie



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Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society .
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com



8North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights



| 1 Verowm lm?'e Q tltty snd jtrBt Iy |
wrYt~nf ^^5i-ty



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
Chen Chevron Oil
i Jobber




Hollylectic, Inc.
"Quality /Mork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944



RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or .FP
386-867-2035 i_
after hours 4 -I

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



FnistAdvent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9 45AML
Sunday Service 11 00rM
Wednesday Service: 7:00FM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake letlery Road
j38-752-0620
Sunday Woprship 10 30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7 0oJPM
"A church where IESUS s Real".

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755 090(
SundaySchool, 9:30AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Paslor: Larry E. Sweat



EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship I iAM& 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mig/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G Win
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Srud 9 15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6.00PM
Wed 6.tH)PM Prayer Service &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OLIVEu MISSIONARY BAPIST CHURCH
541 NE Davis Street
(386) 752-1990,
RonaldV Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Mnmoing Worhip 11 :00AM
Wed Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
'In Gnd'sWoid, Will Way"

PARII EW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Liae lelerv Rd., 752-1-081
Like City. Flornda 32055
wwv.pbclc con
Sunday School 8:30, 9:45 & II AM
Sunday Worship y45 & 11 M & 6PM
AWANA 5:30 PM
EveninigWorship 6:00PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation) 5PM
Children Ministry 6PM
YouthWorship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule St 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
SundayWorship 11AM &6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson



SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10 30AM
Pasior Elder Herman Griffin
75.l4198
OUTrHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S E Baya Dnve 755 5553
Sunday.



Bible Study
Moming Worship
Evening \Worhip
Wedneda;
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study



J.15AM
In:30AM
b.15PM
;615'PM
6:15 PM



TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Mon rose Ave. *752 4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun Morn Worship II AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman



THE VINEYARD
A Southern Bapnsi Church
2091 SWMain Blvd. 623-0026
Sunday Worship l0 r00I,
Where lesus is Ferdled
and rlein are approipnaie
Pasil. Bo Hammock

EPIPHAN' CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Coun 752 44 0'
Sanuday hgdl Ma,s 5 00 PM
SundayMass 8:15AM. 1030 AM,
1 ili PM iSparlsh/Englishj
Sunday SchooliRrligious Educatinn
q uO AM I 15. I

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
SundayService ]. 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM



LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Iw4y 247 5 75.- i6



Sunday Sclh:ol
Sun Mon Wurship
Wed. Prayer Meetlng



9:30 AM
10 31 AM
7 PM



NEWHORIZON
church of Christ
Directions &Times 755-1320
'Jack ExumJr., Minister
M R1I lawII] 11 M
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School' 9:45AM
Sun.Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OP GOD
370 SWMdnitotGlen o 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SundayWorship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"ShockYouth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
BibleStudy
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy



OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 12 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Serice, 9:30AM
iNtluery Providedl
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 1045.A1
Pastor Rev. Bruce uAkre



SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hvy 90, 15 mides est of 1-5 72 .18t07
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail
Wed Pol Luck 6PM Worship rPM
Vicar lohn David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 IUS 441 South
Sunday Wor.hip Services.
Traditional Services 8'30 & 1 1-UAM
386-755-1353
rrychnstlsearthlinLnet
First United Methodisl Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worshup
Cconemporary Sertice 1tH:iAM
iddinrinal Serce ll :Olutl
Progrdam opporrunlire available in ll
areas for all ages
For a complete schedule
coniac church office at
7524488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacenl to Summers Schooll
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 8 (HI & 10:00AM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
AWANA siarls 9115Wed 500PM
Pastor: The Rev 1. Louie Mabrey
wv-w.wesleymernm om



WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CIwRCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez rient to Quahln
Ind.i right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9.45 AM
Sun. Worship I IAM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service PM
Pastor,RandyOgbum


LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday b 30PM
Aduli, Youth Mtmlry. Children's Mnistry
Paitou: Craig Henderson
Nursery Proided
SW SR 47 and Adlea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Bava Drive 1752-0670
Sunday Contemporary 9:00AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
Traditional Service I:00AM
NIIRSERY PROi'DED
Pastor Dr Roy k Mamn
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE lores Wa & s NE ahington SL
Sunday School 10 0 AM'
Murmng Worship 11 00 AM
Elangelisn c ServlCe 6vi F'M
Youth Servces Wdnesday 7:0UPM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7 1( PM
Fr mtuif cal 5 j30f- Eerione WlWel:otri
Pastor Rev. Stan Ells
I II II



CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9-00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Senice 7'0jPM
21? Dal Ave, hom Hwy 90 lake
Sisters Welcome Rd. g 5 miles, South,
church on leh. 755-2525
Lead Pasior Lonnie lohns
'A Church on the Muve'
CHIRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR 47&HudsonCircle
Sunday Celebrltion lIJ:10 AM
I'asti Chns lone 752-9119
PALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road ; 'i5 0580
First and Third Sundays 9 10 A M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel



To List





Your





Church





on the





Church



Call



752-1293



I



.



-1 IMMEM. I



SCiay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054



Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy lJff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday



Patty Register
386-961-9100 ;5
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday



ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City



i0j HARRY'S
-ac s,, ; Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


Pu! n 752-2308 8Si-



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445



MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn &.Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
I's: et 755-7050
I z-.. .ta..O .



FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
I can do lil things through Christ shich sircngthenclh me
Philippians 4.13



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



, VI',.'~
.Ic: / =_._..ff
, I I
1- -"
-5^ "



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



BAYWAYanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Rcsidenti:d & Coinmerci: d
755-6142



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



I .. -
A I



,.I,I I
I



7A



PATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 201 0



I



LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT








LAKE CITY REPORTERADVERTISEMENTSATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010



.



N



N.



4N



U



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4



N
O/



1



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'1.~
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Now hiring for 150 Customer



Service



Agent Positions!



Come to our Job Fair on Tuesday,



2010



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between 3:00 pm and



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213 SW Commerce



Dr., in Lake City



We have Full Time,



Part Time and Temporary positions



available.



If you have customer



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possess great telephone and



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skills, we are



interested



in talking to you.



If you are unable to attend



job fair, you may apply on-line at:


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or in person at:



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(Between Sisters Welcome Road and Hwy 47)
Equal Opportunity Employer



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October 5



at the Holiday Inn,



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, 4



I- I



i -.
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.i
v"la











Story ideas?



Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@oakecityrepottercorm



Lake City Reporter





SPORTS



Saturday, October 2, 2010



www.lakecityreporter.com



Section B



FROM THE SIDELINE



L aIl
Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfin!ey@lakecityreportercom


We've


heard


it all


before
n football there
are no sure things.
College football,
in particular,
is known for
the shear number of
upsets that take place
throughout a season.
That's why I find it
hard to believe all the
'experts' out there aren't
giving the University of
Florida a shot against the
top-ranked Crimson Tide
of Alabama today.
Think back to the
last time Florida was
counted out before the
game. It was 2006 and
the Gators were going
up against the Ohio State
Buckeyes for the national
championship.
Before the game all the
'experts' were crowning
the Buckeyes as the next
national champion. What
happened?
Florida went out and
dominated the Buckeyes
that night for coach
Urban Meyer's first
national championship
and the second in school
history. Since then the
Gators haven't been
underdogs in many of
their games and Florida
has added a third
national title.
The lesson that was
learned is one that any
kid that puts on a pair
of shoulder pads learns
early in their playing
days football games
are won on the field.
Make no mistake,
Florida has a shot at
beating Alabama tonight.
While Alabama should
be considered the
favorite heading in, it's
not as lop-sided as some
'experts' believe.
Alabama comes in
averaging 244.8 yards
per game, but Florida
may match up with the
Crimson Tide better than
any team on the schedule
this season. The Gators
have given up 376 yards
through four games this
season, most of those
coming in a blowout
against South Florida.
If Florida has a chance
to win this game, it will
have to win this battle.
The Gators went into the
SEC Championship game
last season with a similar
philosophy against
the Tide and Heisman
winner Mark Ingram was
helped by quarterback
Greg McElroy's
efficiency.
When Florida was
able to contain Ingram,
McElroy was able to
find an open receiver
and convert a first down.
This year, McElroy is
even better. Completing
70 percent of his passes
this season, McElroy
has shown why he hasn't
lost a game since grade
school.
Still, there's a glimmer
of hope when it comes
PICKS continued on 3B



Sho

Fort White falls,
42-28, to NFC in
offensive struggle.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE It was
an offensive showcase
for both teams, but Fort
White High made the most
mistakes.
North Florida Christian
(4-1) beat the Indians (3-2),
42-28, in Fort White on
Friday.
The Indians showed up
well against the 1A power,
but injuries could be
crucial. Alexis Blake, Kevin
Poteat, Dalton O'Dell and
Kellen Snider all had to
helped off the field.
The two teams combined
for 380 yards in the first half,
and Fort White answered
the first two touchdowns by
the Eagles. North Florida
Christian scored a third
touchdown in the first half,
and held on for a 21-14 lead
at intermission when Fort
White was intercepted at
the Eagles 10 late in the
second quarter.
The Indians lost a fumble
on their first series of the
game and North Florida
Christian quickly scored on
a run by Warren Hart.
JR Dixon capped a
52-yard drive with a three-
yard touchdown run and
Colton Jones kicked the
first of his four extra points
to tie the game at 4:21 of the
first quarter.
The Eagles moved 80
yards for a second touch-



Columbia shut
out at Madison
County, 19-0.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
MADISON
Momentum can change a
football game on a dime
and the Columbia High
Tigers felt that in a 19-0 loss
to Madison County High at
Boot Hill on Friday.
Defensive football and
punts was the story of the
first half.
When the Cowboys
weren't punting, their six-
shooters were being fired at
their feet. Kevin Singletary
had three passes dropped
in the first half that could
have gone for touchdowns.
The story for Columbia
was penalties and lack of a



in



running game. After rush-
ing for 144 yards against
Robert E. Lee High last
week, Rakeem Battle was
held to negative yards on
the ground in the first half.
The Tigers committed six
penalties for 60 yards.
Madison (5-0) was the
closest to scoring on a
12-play drive that saw
the Cowboys reach the
Columbia yard line, but
then go backwards.
A roughing the kicker
penalty on a missed field
goal gave the Cowboys a
second chance, but the
Columbia defense was up to
the challenge once again.
After a scoreless first half,
the Cowboys struck fast
to start the third quarter.
Marty McDaniel returned
the third-quarter kickoff
78 yards to the Columbia
12. Tommie Young scored



a



shootout



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon (11) stretches out for more yards while being brought down by a host of North Florida Christian
School defenders in Fort White on Friday night.



down. Quarterback Matt
Dobson threw to Travis
Blanks who ran through the
secondary from 24'yards
out for the touchdown.
Fort White matched the
80-yard drive, running 16
plays as Alexis Blake scored
from six yards out.
North Florida Christian
again struck quickly with
Jonathan Vickers scoring



on a 10-yard run.
Fort White made a stop
on the opening series of the
second half and put togeth-
er another solid drive. This
one went 77 yards and
Dixon scored on a 16-yard
run. Jones tied the game
with 3:33 left in the third
quarter.
Finally, the teams
exchanged punts with the



Eagles setting up on their
15. On the first play of the
fourth quarter, Branton Lee
got behind the defense and
Dobson hit him in stride.
Lee outran everybody for
an 84-yard scoring play and
a 27-21 lead.
Hart and Vickers both
tacked on touchdown runs,
the first following a Fort
White punt and the second



after a fumble.
Fort White scored late on
a pass from Andrew Baker
toA.J. Legree.
"We did some good
things. on offense, but our
defense couldn't stop what
they were doing," Fort
White head coach Demetric
Jackson said. 'The guys
fought hard. You have got
to be proud of the effort."



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High wide receiver Nate Ayers (81) outruns a couple of Buchholz High defenders
while gaining yardage after catching a Nigel Atkinson pass on Sept. 17.



from the one-yard line.
"It was a heavyweight
fight and that was kind of a
knockout blow," Columbia
coach Craig Howard said.
Columbia (4-1) drove
the field on the next pos-
session, but missed on a
25-yard field goal attempt.



Eight plays later, Madison
was back in for their second
score. This time, Singletary
connected with Thomas
Weatherspoon on fourth-
and-7 for the score.
After exchanging pos-
sessions for the next por-
tion of the game, Columbia



received the ball at its 13-
yard line with 6:53 remain-
ing. Atkinson hit Battle on
a five-yard pass, but the ball
popped loose and Dantonia
Denson recovered for the
Cowboys. Singletary scored
on a 19-yard run. The PAT
was good for the 19-0 final.



Reigning powers



ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 8, 2006, file photo, Florida coach Urban Meyer (left) and Alabama coach
Nick Saban greet after Florida defeated Alabama 31-20 in the Southeastern Conference
Championship game at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. Florida and Alabama will meet again on
today in Tuscaloosa, Ala.



Florida, Alabama
meet today for
SEC supremacy.
By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
It's still comfortably warm
most days in the Deep
South, and already top-
ranked Alabama and No. 7
Florida are set to tangle in
a battle of the Southeastern
Conference's reigning pow-
ers.
The timing and scene are
different than usual, and so
is the scenario. Rub out all
the hype and anticipation,



and you're left with a huge
SEC game that won't really
settle much of anything.
The loser of Saturday
night's clash at Bryant-
Denny Stadium presumably
won't be knocked out of the
national championship pic-
ture, and the winner earns
no guarantees unlike the
past two SEC championship
games.
It's big, just not point-of-
no-return big.
'The timing of the-game
is a little bit different, but
it's still very important,"
Crimson Tide quarter-
back Greg McElroy said.
GATORS continued on 3B



4



Firing blanks


at Boot Hill



I - -I --














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010



SCOREBOARD



TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
11 am.
SPEED American Le Mans Series,
The Petit Le Mans, at Braselton, Ga.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas
City, Kan.
6 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, Cafes do Brasil Indy
300, at Homestead
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
Price Chopper 400, at Kansas City, Kan.
(same-day tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Northwestern at Minnesota
ESPN2 Miami at Clemson
FSN Kansas at Baylor
2:30 p.m.
VERSUS Navy atAir Force
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Virginia
Tech at N.C. State,Wisconsin at Michigan
St or Texas vs. Oklahoma, at Dallas
CBS -Tennessee at LSU
ESPN Split national coverage,Texas
vs. Oklahoma, at Dallas or Wisconsin at
Michigan St
7 p.m.
FSN Georgia at Colorado
8p.m.
ABC Split national coverage, Notre
Dame at Boston College or Stanford at
Oregon
CBS Florida at Alabama
ESPN Penn Stpte at Iowa
ESPN2 Washington at Southern
Cal
GOLF
3 am.
ESPN Ryder Cup, first round, at
Newport,Wales
*8 am.
NBC Ryder Cup, second round, at
Newport,Wales (same-day tape)
.2 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Ensure
Classic, second round, at Conover, N.C.
4 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Soboba
Classic, third round, at San Jacinto, Calif.
8 p.m.
TGC PGATourViking Classic,third
round, at Madison, Miss. (same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
6:30 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC NTRA, Lady's
Secret Stakes, Norfolk Stakes, and Yellow
Ribbon Stakes, at Inglewood, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, N.Y.
Yankees at Boston, Philadelphia at Atlanta
OR San Diego at San Francisco
7 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Houston
MOTORSPORTS
2 am.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, at Motegi, Japan
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Mohegan Sun
Invitational, at Uncasville, Conn. (same-
day tape)
SOCCER
9:55 am.
ESPN2- Premier League, Manchester
United at Sunderland
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
VOLLEYBALL
4:30 p.m.
FSN -Texas at Nebraska


GOLF

Ryder Cup

NEWPORT, Wales '- U.S. .is ahead
2-1, with the fourth of four better-ball
matches tied, although none had pro-
gressed beyond the 12th hole when dark-
ness forced suspension of play.


BASEBALL

AL standings



z-New Yor
z-Tampa B
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore


x-Minneso
Chicago
Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas Cit



East Division
W L
k 94 65
ay 94 66
87 72
84 76
65 95
Central Division
W L
ta 93 67
86 74
80 80
69 91
ty 67 93
West Division



Pct GB
.591 -
.588 1/2
.547 7
.525101/2.
.406291/2



Pct
.581
.538
.500
.431
.419



GB

7
13
24
26



W L Pct GB
x-Texas 89 70 .560 -
LosAngeles 78 81 .491 II
Oakland 78 81 .491 II
Seattle 61 98 .384 28
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
Thursday's Games
Detroit at Baltimore, ppd., rain
Texas 3, L.A.Angels 2
Chicago White Sox 8, Boston 2
Kansas City 3,Tampa Bay 2
Toronto 13, Minnesota 2
Oakland 8, Seattle I
Friday's Games
N.Y.Yankees at Boston, ppd., rain
Baltimore '1, Detroit 6, st game
Baltimore 2, Detroit I, 2nd game
Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 3
Kansas City 7,Tampa Bay 0
Toronto 6, Minnesota 3
LA.Angels atTexas (n)
Oakland at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Toronto (Marcum 13-8) at Minnesota
(Duensing 10-3). 1:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Pettitte 11-3) at Boston
(Wakefield 4-10), 4:10 p.m., Ist game
Cleveland (C:Carrasco 2- ) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle 12-13), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Galarraga 4-8) at Baltimore
(Matusz 9-12), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Sonnanstine 3- ) at Kansas
City (Davies 8-1 ), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 17-9) at Texas
(C.Wilson 14-8), 8:05 p.m.



N.Y Yankees (AJ.Burnett 10-15) at
Boston (Matsuzaka 9-6), 9:05 p.m., 2nd
game
Oakland (BreAnderson 6-6) at Seattle
(Pauley 4-8), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox,
2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City; 2:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
LA.Angels atTexas, 3:05 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
End regular season

NL standings



East Division
W L
x-Philadelphia 96 64
Atlanta. 90 70
Florida 78 82
NewYork 78 82
Washington 68 92
Central Division
W L
x-Cincinnati 89 71
St. Louis 84 76.
Milwaukee 77 83
Houston 75 85
Chicago 74 86
Pittsburgh 57 103
West Division
W L,
San Francisco 91' 68
San Diego 88 71
Colorado 83 77



Pct
.600
.563
.488
.488
.425



GB

6
18
18
28



Pct GB
.556 -
.525 5
.481 12
.469- 14
.463 15
.356 32

, Pct GB
.572 -
.553 3
.5198 1/2



LosAngeles 78 81. :491 13
Arizona 64 95. .403 27
x-clinched division
Thursday's Games
San Francisco 4,Arizona I
Chicago Cubs I, San Diego 0
Cincinnati 9, Houston I
Milwaukee 9, N.Y. Mets 2
Florida I I, Pittsburgh 9
St Louis 6, Colorado I
Friday's Games
Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 3, 11 innings
Pittsburgh 5, Florida I
N.Y. Mets 2,Washington 1, 10 innings.
Philadelphia I ,Atlanta 5
Chicago Cubs 2, Houston 0
St Louis 3, Colorado 0
Arizona at LA. Dodgers (n)
San Diego at San Francisco (n)
Today' Games .
Colorado (Jimenez 19-8) at St Louis'
(Lohse 4-8), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Capuano 4-4) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 4-3), 1:10 p.m.
Washington (Maya 0-3) at N.Y Mets
(Undecided), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Undecided) at Atlanta
(Hanson 10-11), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 5-5) at San
Francisco (Zito 9-13), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 10-6) at
Houston (Happ 6-3), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 2-11) at Florida
(Sanabia 5-3), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (J.Saunders 3-6) at L.A.
Dodgers (Billingsley I -I 1), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Colorado at St Louis, 2:15 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
End regular season


FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Suriday's Games
Denver atTennessee, I p.m.
Detroitat Green Bay, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, I p.m.
Seattle at St Louis, I p.m.
San Francisco atAtlanta, I p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, I p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
'Chicago at N.Y Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
New England at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Kansas City, Dallas, Minnesota,
Tampa Bay

College scores

Friday
Utah St 31 BYU 16
Thursday
Hampton 20, Delaware St 14
Tenn.-Martin 27,Tennessee Tech 24
-Oklahoma St 38,Texas A&M 35

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. I Alabama vs. No. 7 Florida,
8 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State at Illinois, Noon
No. 3 Boise State at New Mexico



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. a

GLIEB /


Q2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

FRACT 1

I 1

YOHRFT /


z
CAMEZEz

7^T ) 7T



State, 8 p.m.
No. 4 Oregon vs. No. 9 Stanford,
11:15 p.m.
No. 5 TCU at Colorado State, 2 p.m.
No. 8 Oklahoma vs. No. 21 Texas at
Dallas, 3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Auburn vs. Louisiana-Monroe,
Noon
No. II Wisconsin at No. 24 Michigan
State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 LSU vs.Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.
No. 16 Miami at Clemson, Noon
No. 17 Iowa vs. No. 22 Penn State,
8 p.m.
No. 18 Southern Cal vs.Washington,
8 p.m.
No. 19 Michigan at Indiana, 3:30 p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina State vs.
Virginia Tech, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Nevada at UNLV, 10 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Price Chopper 400
Site: Kansas City, Kan. -
Schedule:Today, practice (ESPN2, 6:30-
7:30p.m.);Sunday,race I p.m.(ESPN2,noon-
I p.m.; ESPN, 1-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Kansas Speedway (ova!, 1.5
miles).,
Race distance: 400 miles, 266 laps.

NATIONWIDE
Kansas Lottery 300
Site: Kansas City, Kan.
Schedule:. Today, qualifying
10 am.; race, 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2, 3:30-
6:30 p.m.)
Track: Kansas Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
INDYCAR
Cafes do Brasil Indy 300
Site: Homestead
Schedule: Today, race, 7 p.m. (Versus,
6-9 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES: Petit
Le Mans,Today (Speed, I I a.m.-9:30 p.m.),
Road Atlanta, Braselton, Ga.


BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Today
New York at Armani Jeans Milano
(Italy), 12:30 p.m.
Maccabi Haifa (Israel) at New Jersey,
7 p.m.

FIBA Worlds

QUARTERFINALS
Friday
Belarus 70, Russia 53
United States 106, South Korea 44
Czech Republic 79,Australia 68
Spain 74, France 71, OT

Classification (9-12)
Friday
Japan 63, Greece 39
Brazil 64, Canada 58
Today
I Ith Place: Greece vs. Canada, 3 a.m.
Ninth Place: Japan vs. Brazil, 5 a.m.
MEDAL ROUND
Semifinals
Today
Urnited States vs. Spain, 12:30 p.m..
Czech Republic vs. Belarus, 2:45 p.m.
Finals
Sunday
Bronze Medal
Semifinal losers, 11:30 a.m.
Gold Medal
Semifinal winners, 2 p.m.

Classification (5-8) .
Today
South Korea vs. France, 7:15 am.
Australia vs. Russia, 9:30 am.


HOCKEY

NHL preseason

Today's Games
Atlanta at.Columbus, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Montreal vs. N.Y. Islanders (ss) at
Quebec; Quebec, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Florida atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at St. Louis 8 p.m.
Colorado vs. Los Angeles at Las Vegas,
Nev., 9 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Nashville atWashington, 12:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Buffalo, 6 p.m.
St Louis at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles atAnaheim, 8 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek



WHAT THE LAAWYER
5AIP WHEN HE GAVE
HIS CLIENT
THE BILL.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.



A: KOl IoF "K I )
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's IJumbles: GULLY PYLON BRIDLE PILFER
I Answer: The gymnast won the event when she did
this "FLOPPED"



I W / ;'W \W I -
COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High bowlers in the Baker scoring line-up on Wednesday are Jordan Williams
(from left), Christine Peters, Courtney Schmitt, Victoria Wise and Alyssa Phillips.



Columbia bowlers open with


win over Fort White, Suwannee



From staff reports


Columbia High's bowling
team opened its season with
a three-team match at Lake
City Bowl on Wednesday.
The Lady Tigers played
Fort White High and
Suwannee High.
Columbia swept the
match behind 2009 state
qualifiers Courtney Schmitt
and Christine Pete.'
Scores in the scratch
bowling were: CHS 474,
Suwannee 660, Fort White
416 in match one, and CHS



744, Suwannee 616, Fort
White 399 in match two.
The teams also bowled
a match under the Baker
scoring system, which is
used in district competi-
tion. Columbia had a 151
to 106 for Suwannee and 90
for Fort White.
* Schmitt rolled a pair of
190s for CHS, while Peters
bowled 183 and 141, and
Victoria Wise bowled 157
and 130.
Other top scores for
Columbia were Jordan
Williams 133, Shea Spears



126, and Alyssa Phillips and
Savannah Bowdoin both
with 124.
The teams will meet at
4 p.m. this Wednesday in
Live Oak.
The three teams, all in
District 2, will bowl each
other four more times in
preparation for the district
tournament
The other six District
2 teams are in Marion
County.
Brians Saunders is coach
for Columbia; Kenny Burt
is coach for Fort White.



BOWLING



League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lori Davis
203; 2. Maggie Battle 193; 3. Mary
Lobaugh 178. 1. Mark Davis 246; 2.
Frank Miller 235; 3. Bill Dolly 234.
High scratch series: 1. Lori Davis
553; 2. Maggie Battle 526; 3. Mary
Lobaugh 522. 1. Bill Dolly 648; 2.
Mark Davis 641; 3. Dess Fennell 611.
High handicap game: 1. Linda
Andrewvs 231; 2. Staci Greaves 229;
3. Maggie Battle 227. 1. Dave Ward
269; 2. Frank Miller 263; 3. Raleigh
Llley 259.
High handicap series: 1. Lori Davis
685; 2. Carla Nyssen 669; 3. Linda
Oliver 632. 1. Bill Dolly 720; 2. Scott
Thompson 688; 3. Mark Davis 686.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
175. 1. Mark Davis 196
(results from Sept. 21)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Lucky Strikers
(17-7); 2. Spare Us (15-9); 3. The
Sandbaggers (14-10).
High handicap game: 1. Ruth



ACROSS

1 Jetty
5 Kind of lens
9 Half a bikini
12 Golden Rule
word
13 A Great Lake
14 Corn serving
15 Ms. Dinesen
16 Open-minded
18 Avila saint
20 Cuddly toy
21 Lunar valley
22 Baton Rouge
campus
23 Venture forth
26 Slue
30 Pie container
33 Card combo
34 Dublin's land
35 Heavy burden
37 Genealogy
chart
39 Daisy -
Yokum
40 Andrews or
Wynter
41 Rapidity



Helms 237; 2. Jo Anne Carr 219; 3.
Sandy Black 213.
High handicap series: 1. Jo Anne
Carr 622; 2. Ruth Helms 606; 3.
Sandy Black 605.
(results from Sept. 28)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Shiners (15-9);
2. Wild Things (15-9); 3. Up and Down
(13-11); 4. Turkey Rollers (13-11); 5.
Golden Niners (13-11).
High handicap game: 1. Betty
Carmichael 239; 2. Joyce Hooper 234;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 230. 1. James
Burnett 252; 2. George Mulligan 247;
3. Chuck Pressler 238.
High handicap series: 1. Jane
Sommerfeld 662; 2. Betty Carmichael
650; 3. Joyce Hooper 599. 1. George
Mulligan 681; 2. James Burnett 666;
3. Chuck Pressler 665.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
152.5; 2. Betty Carmichael 150;
3. Bea Purdy 149.28. 1. Bill Dolly
184.5; 2. David Duncan 181.61; 3. Art
Joubert 176.94.
(results from Sept. 30)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(16-8, 14,324 pins); 2. Pin Droppers



43 Sporty truck,
45 Comics pooch
48 Ease of mind
51 Conundrum
53 Scared
56 Barrette
57 Witty remark
58 Dole out
59 Tricyedeiders
60 Floor
61 In full view
62 Two-star
(hyph.)

DOWN



1 Halt
2 Auto-racing
family
3 Video.game
pioneer
4 Hayseeds
5 Greek Z
6 Incan treasure
7 Shale extract
8 Is introduced
9 Form droplets
10 McNally partner
11 Pretentious



(16-8, 14,004 pins); 3. Golden Oldies
(13-11, 14,147 pins); 4. 9 Wild and
Wooley Bun (13-11, 14,045 pins); 5.
Pink Panthers (13-11, 13,982 pins); 6.
Farmers (13-11, 13,968 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Shirl Reeve
171; 2. (tie) Pat Hale, Jeanne Sireci
166. 1. Ross Meyers 211; 2. Dan
Ritter 186;,3. Art Joubert 185.
High scratch series: 1. Amy
Musselwhite .452; 2. Pat Hale 449;
3. Jeanne Sireci 442. 1. Art Joubert
509; 2. Ross Meyers 503; 3. Dan
Ritter 501.
(results from Sept. 28)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(22-2); 2. Average Joe's (17-7); 3.
Team 1 (15-9).
High scratch game: 1. Kim.
Schneiders 181; 2. Kim Schneiders
168; 3. Kim Schneiders 167. 1. Bobby
Trunnell 225; 2. (tie) Jon Cadie, Carl
McGhghy 223.
, High scratch series: 1. Kim
Schneiders 516; 2. Donna Duncan ..;,
476; 3. Cheryl Jacks 447. 1. Carl
McGhghy 628; 2. Leonard Randall
581; 3. Bobby Trunnell 567.
.(results from Sept. 26)



Answer to Previous Puzzle



CANE DUN A A AN


E *IU A EN LICHE

O JAIS OIIN *V
sGoABI STA TME DA M
E I D IOl SI H A I O L E


I E IE I C HOF A D







G PJA G T T* A F T



17 Wear hand-me-
downs
19 Bang down
22 Ancient harps
24 Woodworking
tool



Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com



25 Pre-euro coin
27 Kipling novel
28 Rollover subj.
29 Sandra or
Ruby
30 Herd of
whales
31 Santa -
winds
32 Cloister
dweller
36 Hollandaise
38 007's school
42 Decrees
44 Semesters
46 House of
snow
47 Puts forth
48 Mountain lion
49 Sufficient, in
verse
50 Kitty starter
51 TV genie por-
trayer
52 Lhasa -
54 Sweater front
55 Monsieur's
summer



10-2 2010 by UFS, Inc.



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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421



9












Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010 3B



FSU renews old rivalry



.By HANK KURZ Jr.
Associated Press

CHARLOTTESVILLE,
Va. A lot has changed
- including both head
coaches at Virginia and
Florida State in the four
years since the Cavaliers
and Seminoles last met in
football.
The Seminoles (3-1, 1-
0 ACC), under first-year
coach Jimbo Fisher, will be
unranked for just the sec-
ond time in 16 meetings
when the Atlantic Coast
Conference rivals play
Saturday.
Nonetheless, Virginia
sees the same old Seminoles,



led by a Heisman Trophy
contender in dual-threat
quarterback Christian
Ponder. Their defense leads
the nation in sacks with 19
and figures to significantly
challenge the Cavaliers.
"You want to make sure
that you don't go back-
wards," said first-year coach
Mike London London.
The Cavaliers also want
to be sure that if quarter-
back Marc Verica is being
pressured, he isn't rushed
into an interception.
Virginia (2-1) has been
something of a surprise,
beating Richmond and
VMI both of the Football
Championship Subdivision



- and losing 17-14 at
No. 18 Southern Cal.
To many, the USC result
was the biggest surprise,
but the players say other-
wise.
"Right now the confi-
dence is as high as I've
seen it since I've been here,
and I've been here for four
years," Cavaliers left tackle
Landon Bradley said this
week.
"Everybody's excited
and we can't wait to play on
Saturdays"
The Seminoles seem to
.see that, too, and probably
also are wary of taking any
opponent lightly, especially
on the road.



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State wide receiver Taiwan Easterling lunges for the end zone on Oct. 25 in Tallahassee.


Rain delay spits U.S. fine

at water-logged Ryder Cup



By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press

NEWPORT, Wales
- Boy, did that rain delay
work out just fine for the
Americans. They were
able to get dry, do some
shopping at the merchan-
dise tent and claim the
momentum on a water-
logged day at the Ryder
Cup.
The U.S. team rallied
for a narrow lead by the
end of play Friday, clear-
ly the biggest beneficiary
of the Cup's first weather
suspension since 1997.
Phil Mickelson got going,
Stewart Cink kept rolling
in long putts and the rookie
team of Bubba Watson and
Jeff Overton held its own.
The Americans were
down in three matches
and leading only one when



drenching showers halted
play at midmorning. Celtic
Manor spent more than
$1 million on a complex
drainage system, but it was
no match for showers that
turned the course into a ver-
sion of Venice, impromptu
canals popping up all over
the place.
The start was bad
enough. Even worse were
the rainsuits worn by the
Americans, a gaudy getup
that looked more suited for
basketball team warmups
- and didn't work anyway.
During the break, the PGA
of America dispatched offi-
cials to the merchandise
tent to buy up about 20
new suits in case it starts
raining again this weekend,
always a possibility in soggy
Wales.
But the clouds .finally
broke late in the day and



the U.S. team was feeling
a lot sunnier about the way
things stood: Cink and Matt
Kuchar were 2 up on Rory
Mcllroyand U.S. Open cham-
pion Graeme McDowell
through 11 holes; Watson
and Overton were 1 up on
Luke Donald and Padraig
Harrington through eight;
and Tiger Woods and Steve
Stricker were all square
with Ian Poulter and Ross
Fisher.
The only Americans trail-
ing were Mickelson and
Dustin Johnson, but even
they left the course with a
good feeling.
"It was tough day, a
tough start," American
captain Corey Pavin said.
"Obviously I'm pleased with
the way U.S. came back
and performed this after-
noon. I'm very proud of the
guys."



GATORS: Demps expected to play



Continued From Page 1b

"Obviously without a vic-
tory on Saturday; we're
going to have a harder time
getting to where we want
to be."
Well, not necessarily. The
Gators (4-0, 2-0 SEC) and
Tide (4-0, .1-0) still could
meet for the league title.
"The last severalyears, it
seems like these two teams
find ways to win games,"
Florida coach Urban Meyer
said. "We better be locked
and loaded. Everybody
has to be on point. All-in is
something we talk about.
Everybody has to be all-
in, that means everybody
has to have excellence to
have a chance to go win this
game."
If both teams were to
win their remaining games
- hardly a sure thing in
a league with five teams'
ranked in the top 15 -
that's exactly what will hap-
pen. Now, that game 'could
be for a national champion-
ship shot.
And there likely won't
be a bigger challenge in
between. These two teams
have made a habit of win-
ning big games the past few
years and accounted for the
past two national champi-
ons, though Alabama is a
nine-point favorite this time.
McElroy is practically
an old hand in this kind
of game. Florida's John
Brantley knows well the
view from the sidelines in
the big ones from when
Tim Tebow was running
the show.
Clearly the quarterback
battle has changed, too.
McElroy came into last
year's game regarded as



the offensive caretaker. His
assignment: Don't make
mistakes and get the ball
to the Tide's playmakers.
-Instead, he was.the MVP,
outshining Tebow and lead-
ing Alabama to a 32-13 win
in what he regards as per-
haps his best college game.
Alabama went on to win
the BCS national title game
over Texas with McElroy
mostly handing off to
Heisman Trophy winner
Mark Ingram and Trent
Richardson. But Florida
defenders know better than
most that the Tide's offense
starts with those runners
but doesn't stop there.
There's also McElroy and
favored target Julio Jones,
among others.
"Everyone knows that
Alabama has two of the
best running backs in the
country -and they're always
going to get a lot of atten-
tion;" Gators defensive end
Justin Trattou said. "We def-
initely don't take for granted
their quarterback, and they
have some big-time threats
at receiver that we're going
to have to focus on and pre-
pare for this week."
Shaky for a while,
.Brantley and the Gators
seemed to hit their stride
last week with a 4814 romp
over Kentucky that included
a Tebow-like performance
by freshman Trey Burton.
He accounted for a school-
record six touchdowns,
mostly as the quarterback
in the Wildcat formation.
Brantley will face a young
secondary that has been
targeted for some big plays
- and made some of their
own. The Tide's eight picks



is second in the SEC, and
sophomore safety Robert
Lester has four of them.
He swiped two of Ryan
Mallett's passes at Arkansas
last weekend.
Tide coach Nick Saban
said he thinks Brantley has
improved each week, but
also thinks Burton's Wildcat
success brings additional
challenges.
'The guy (Burton) is a
very good player," Saban
said. "It does create some
problems, but it creates
more problems when
you've got one guy who can
do it all because you have
to defend it all, all the time.
This guy is a very good
player. Brantley is a very
good passer, so the com-
bination of those two guys
does present some issues
and problems."
That's just for starters.
Speedy tailback Jeff Demps,
the Gators' leading rusher,
is expected to. play after re-
injuring a bruised left foot
against Kentucky.
He provides a contrast to
the power running of Ingram
and Richardson, who have
combined for eight touch-
downs, even though Ingram
has only played in two
games because of a knee
injury. But, like Alabama's
defense, Florida has only
allowed one rushing touch-
down. The Gators are giv-
ing up just 94 yards a game
on the ground.
"We're starting to click
as a team, I think," Brantley
said. 'We're starting to find
our identity. I think it's get-
ting back to where we were
last year when we came out
firing."



COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Abby Williams competes in Columbia High senior Seth Peterson runs in
the Ponte Vedra XC Invitational on Sept. 25. the Ponte Vedra XC Invitational on Sept. 25.



CHS cross country sweeps

Roy Benson Invitational



From starr reports



Columbia High's cross
country team competed
in the Ponte Vedra XC
Invitational on Sept. 25.
Seth Peterson led the
Tigers with a person best
time of 16:59, which was
good for seventh overall in
the field of more than 150
varsity runners.
Other top perform-
ers for Columbia were
Octavious Buiey 19:43,
Austin Cunningham 20:16,
Bobby Hosier 21:04 and
'Taylor Veins 21:41.
Coiumbia's girls also
had a good showing, led
by Abby Williams who ran



22:06 and placed 33rd out
of 144 girls.
Other top performanc-
es for the Lady Tigers
were Hayley Lewis 23:33,
Ashlyn Martin 24:13,
Alyssa Barwick 25:31 and
Candaysha Newton 33:30.
Columbia went to the
Roy Benson Invitational
in Fernandina Beach on
Tuesday. The Tigers placed
first in the seven-team field
for both girls and boys.
Peterson and Williams
won the individual races.
Michaelle Charlotin
placed second, followed
by Lewis in fourth, Martin
in seventh and Barwick in
eighth.



Cunningham was third,
with Buiey in fourth,
Hosier in fifth, Viens in
12th and Zachary Peterson
in 20th.
"This meet was an awe-
sdme showing and a great
moral booster for our
teams," coach Bill Griffin
said. "Dominating a mid-
sized meet is quite an
accomplishment for such
a young team. Overall, the
team continues to show
measurable improvements.
Last week was a very good
week, with all but one ath-
lete achieving a personal
best time. I am very proud
of the dedication of this
team."



I



COURTESY PHOTOS
Fort White High's Matt Waddington (left) and Sydni Jones won the individual competition in
the cross country run at Williston High on Tuesday.


Fort White's Waddington,

Sydni Jones win in Williston



From staff reports

Fort White High's cross
country team competed in
a six-team field at Williston
High on Tuesday.
Runners from Branford,
Cedar Key, Bradford and
Yankeetown also partici-
pated. There were no team
scores.
Fort White's Sydni
Jones (21:30) and Matt
Waddington (18:04) won
the individual competition.
Ashley Jones (22:22)
placed third, with Seaira
Fletcher (24:40) in fifth,
Carolee Marrow (27:30)



in 10th and Sitia Martinez
(27:59) in 12th.
Other LadyIndianstimes:
Taylor Douglass, 30:22;
Marissa Fletcher, 30:55;
Kaleigh Stokes, 30:56;
Hannah Champerlain,
43:41; Eva Bohling, 51:14.
Andy Hart placed 10th in
24:24. Other Indians times:
Alex Southerland, 25:24;
Wesley Blakley, 25:24;
Brandon Lam, 25:24; Paul
Glenn, 36:32; Caleb Regar,
42:20.

Fort White volleyball
Fort White's volleyball



team closed a tough week
with a victory that counts.
The Lady Indians won
a District 5-3A match
*at Suwannee High on
Thursday. Fort White
swept 25-23, 25-9, 25-21.
Alison Wrench had 19
assists and 13 service
points with four aces.
Kaycee Baker had eight
kills, four digs and one
block. Brigitte Lapuma had
seven kills, seven digs and
two aces.
FortWhite (8-10,5-1) faces
district foe Santa Fe High
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Alachua.



PICKS: Gators close, but not enough



Continued From Page 1E
to the Florida secondary.
The Gators lead the nation
in interceptions with 12 on
the season. Three of those
interceptions have been
returned for a touchdown.
For Florida to win,
the defense will have to
force a few turnovers.
Interceptions are the most
likely route.
On the other end,
Florida must protect
the ball. There can't
be exchange problems
between the (center)
Mike Pouncey and



(quarterback) John
Brantley. There can't
be dropped passes by
(wide receiver) Deonte
Thompson.
In short, Florida must
play their best game, but
the Gators are capable
of winning. It just won't
happen. ... yet.

Alabama 17, Florida 9
Others.... Miami
continues its resurgence
against Clemson....
Oklahoma gives Texas



a second-straight loss in
the Red River Rivalry.
... Oregon could be
gearing up for a national
championship run with
a close win over a very
tough Stanford Cardinal
team.... Florida State
doesn't come up inches
short (Warrick bunn
reference) against
Virginia.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.



LAKE CITY REPORTERI SPORTS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 201 0



3B



Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420



L












4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415



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DEAR ABBY


Maintaining friendship just

prolongs pain for ex-girlfriend



DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend, "Jake," dumped me
two years ago. Since then, we
have tried to remain friends.
He texts or calls to check up
on me, tells me he misses
me, calls me pet names and
recites lines from my favor-
ite movies.
Although I appreciate
Jake's efforts to stay friends,
I'm confused because he
was the one who broke off
our relationship. He has said
in the past that letting me go
is something he will always
regret, but he hasn't made
an attempt to get back to-
gether.
Abby, I feel that Jake is
stringing me along. I enjoy
our friendship, but in my
heart I'll always want more.
I can't shake the feeling that
he still loves me. At what
point should I just give up
and let go? LEFT HANG-
ING IN HOUSTON
DEAR LEFT HANG-
ING: How about right now?
But before you do, tell Jake
that this "friendship" has
prolonged the pain of your
breakup, that what you feel
for him isn't platonic and
you will always want more.
If he does still love you, it
will be his opening to de-
clare himself. However, if he
doesn't, then for your sake,
cut the cord, because you
won't be free to find some-
one else until you do.
DEAR ABBY: I was mar-
ried in Las Vegas six months
ago in a quickie wedding so



Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com



my husband could put me on
his health insurance. I used
my late grandmother's ring
for the ceremony, assuming
that "Harry" would buy one
for-me shortly. It still hasn't
happened, and he makes it
very clear he doesn't intend
to. Harry claims we don't
have any money. However,
we are buying a house, and
he constantly spends money
on his hobbies.
I am starting to regret the.
whole package not hav-
ing a real wedding, no ring,
no proposal. I am so resent-
ful I am considering ending
our marriage over it. I need
to know if there's a way to
fix this. RINGLESS IN
RICHMOND, TEXAS
DEAR RINGLESS:
When most mature couples
marry, they have gotten to
know each other well enough
to know if their values and
priorities are siinilar. Appar-
ently, you and Harry tied the
knot so quickly there wasn't
time for that to happen. A
way to "fix this" would be
through marriage counsel-
ing provided you and
Harry are willing to spend
the money that way. Please



suggest it.
DEAR ABBY: After my
wife's funeral, many of our
friends returned to the mor-
tuary to collect the flowers
they had sent. Some of them
were vety rude, insisting
that because they had sent
them, the flowers belonged
to them.
This has upset our daugh-
ter, who was in charge of
sending thank-you notes.
Now she doesn't know who
sent what because we were
too distracted to look at the
cards on the flowers. Is this
something new, or are those
people just rude? WID-
OWER IN LIVINGSTON,
MONT.
DEAR WIDOWER:
When flowers have been
sent whether for a birth-
day or for an occasion like a
funeral -they are no longer
the property of the sender.
They belong to whomever
they were sent to. What your
"many friends" did was in-
sensitive and rude.
As to what yoqr daughter
should say in her thank-you
notes, I suggest a short mes-
sage to those who signed the
memorial book at the funeral
service: "Our family thanks
you for attending Mother's
funeral, and for your. com-
passion during this sad time.
Your thoughtfulness is deep-
ly appreciated."
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.



HOROSCOPES



ARIES (March 21-
April 19): It's time to cut
your losses and start anew.
Enjoy what life has to offer
and you will meet someone
of interest who will be a
good fit for you profession-
ally or personally. Don't
limit what you can do.

TAURUS (Apiil 20-
May 20): Stop complain-
ing or nagging. Put your
trust in your ability to get
things done yourself. Make
the changes that will bring
you contentment. Oppor-
tunity is present, so don't
miss out. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Take a look
at what you have to work
'with and you will come up
with a plan that allows you
to incorporate your skills
with what you enjoy doing.
Trying something new will
allow you to meet new peo-
ple and explore different
ways to utilize your talents:

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You'll be drawn
to someone or something
from your past but, before
you decide to jump back
in, remember why you left
the situation the first time
around. Self-improvement
projects will allow you time
to consider what you truly
want. ***



THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll be ready, willing
and able to take on what-
ever challenge 'comes your
way unless, of course, it has
to do with the love of your
life or someone looking for
a fight Don't get dragged
into someone else's melo-
drama. Avoid the people
who bring out the worst in
you. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Getting involved in
events you enjoy or that
make'you feel good about
who you are and what you
can accomplish should be
at the top of your to-do list.
Love and romance look
very inviting and can high-
light your evening. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Develop a skill or tal-
ent you have, enhance the
way you look or feel and do
things that will relieve your
stress. Taking on too many
burdens and responsibili-
ties can lead to a meltdown.
Get help before you need it.
**
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Your talent and
ability to get ahead will be
at an all-time high. Travel
will lead to new opportuni-
ties and inspirational ideas.
Love and romance should



be on your agenda late in
the day. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Sort through
your personal papers if you
want to stay on top of some
of the problems you are
currently facing. Publish-
ing, records and legal mat-
ters may not weigh in your
favor if you haven't done
your homework. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll be
bogged down by responsi-
bilities. Someone is likely
to make you answer for
a mistake that was made
that caused problems in
your neighborhood or your
family. A quick response or
making a few alterations
may save the day. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Spend time and
money investing in yourself.
Restrictions that have made
your life difficult physically
will be lifted. Good fortune
is within reach and changes
that will alter your future
are falling into place. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You may need
to lean on someone you
trust to do a good job. Too
much of anything will lead
to hardship. Reorganize
and recycle. Don't let any-
one push you into some-
thing you don't care to do.
***



CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals P
"LM Y B A K V R W F RBBAIWLRWL ED DMF
RWC X L E X E W H. MY' D D M F R
T I R X LY X A O R K E G G E A W C A G G R X D.
LM R L 'D S MF MY' D X Y L E X E W H." -
KEG LAW P Y XGY
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Show me a person who has never made a mistake
and I'll show you somebody who has never achieved much." Joan Collins
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 10-2



FOR BETTER OR WORSE
RI WO,MIKE- YoURE 1 COU DOIN' lr
RAKIN'LERVES! I BERSE you HAvE
I ._-m TO ? -_



CLASSIC PEANUTS



SOON THE MEETING
TURNED UGLY
THEN WHY ARE YOU
2 SHOWING A SLIDE OF
A GIANT @-$#Gl*?
r |



ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY OCTOBER 2, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415



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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-CA-000541
PIERCE CHRISTIE as Personal
Representative of the ESTATE OF
ALICE GAYL CHRISTIE,
Plaintiff,
v.
JO ANN NICKERSON, DAVID
NICKERSON, and ANY UN-
KNOWN TENANT(S) of
106 Lauman Glen
Fort White, Florida, 32038
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of Fore-
closure entered September 23, 2010.
in Case Number 08-CA-000541, of
the Circuit of the Third Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Columbia County.
Florida, wherein PIERCE CHRIS-
TIE, as Personal Representative of
the ESTATE OF ALICE GAYL
CHRISTIE, is the Plaintiff, and JO
ANN NICKERSON, DAVID NICK-
ERSON, and ANY UNKNOWN
TENANT(S), are the Defendants,
that I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the 3rd Floor of
the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 N.E. Hemando Ave., Lake City,
FL, on Wednesday, October 27,
2010, at 11:00 A.M. the following
described property as set forth below
in said Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure, to wit:
Lot 15: Part of the South 1/2 of Sec-
tion 9, Township 6 South, Rangp 16
East, Columbia County, Florida,
more particularly described as fol-
lows: Commence at the Southwest
comer of the Northwest 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4 of said Section 9;
thence North 0037'43" West, along
the West line of said Section 9, a dis-
tance of 441.41 feet; thence North
88"39'04" East, 12.00 feet to a point
on the East right of way line of Lazy
Oak Road and the Point of Begin-
ning; thence North 00"06'34" West,
along said right of way line 441.07
feet; thence North 8840'00" East,
988.21 feet; thence South 00'24'57"
East, 440.75 feet; thence South
8839'04" West, 990.57 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
Property Address: 106 Lauman Glen,
Fort White, FL 32038
Dated this 23rd day of September,.
2010, at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida.
P. DeWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By:/s/B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Daniel M. Coton, Esquire
Trinkle, Redman, Swanson. Coton,
David & Smith. P.A.
P.O. Box TT
Plant City, FL 33564-9040
(813)752-6133/FAX (813)754-8957
Florida Bar Number: 857335
Counsel for Plaintiff

04541804.
October 2, 9, 2010


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityrepofter.com



Legal

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned. being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Oak Lane
Sheep Farm at 303 SE Rodney Dicks
Drive. Lake City, FL 32025

Contact Phone Number: 386-752-
8441 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Robert L. Cox
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Kathleen A. Riotto
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 29 day of September, A.D. 2010.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05524073
October, 2, 2010



We will sell the following units at
Community Self Storage 814 SW
State Road 247/Branford Hwy., Oc-
tober 21, 2010 at 9:00 A.M.
WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY
386-961-9926

JAMES COTHRAN C-17
Household goods

ADA MORRELL DD-8
Household goods
CASEY COAKE .F-16
Household goods
EKALWRIGHT BB-12
Household goods
REAVES COLE K-27
Household goods

REAVES COLE K-23
Household goods

WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REFUSE ALL BIDS.

04541728 -
September 25, 2010
October 2, 2010


020 Lost & Found

BULLDOG
Found off Mauldin,
call and provide description
386-867-0694



LOST White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches lost
off of CR 242, pls call.
Children miss dog! 386-697-1197

100 Jlb
0 Opportunities
CDL Class A Driver needed
Great miles and great home time
Call Frank At 727-916-1055
Hour To Call 11am to-5 pm

Restaurant Chef Family-owned
business in Lake City area seeks
an experienced chef to manage
kitchen. Send resume to
northtloridajobs( gmail.com



Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care
Pre-school & Daycare. ,



100 Jorb
1 Opportunities



04541599
The Mobile Mechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolavemplovment.com



04541819
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability. and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
uni6n/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace



. Experienced Sewing Machine
Operator, wages based on ability,
Call Hafner's
386-755-6481



p - -



n Job
100 Opportunities

05524064
MIS Assistant
Lake City Collection Company
is looking for a MIS Asst., This
is a supporting role, reporting to
the Director of IT. Responsibili-
ties include, management and
client reporting and DB mainte-
nance. Candidate must have ex-
perience with Query design in
MS Access, VBA, SQL, PHP,
My SQL, AJAX, A+.
Send Resume to Dave
PO Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056

05524083
Teachers FT and PT- Early
Head Start (birth to 3 yrs old)
$8.65/hr (if credentialed)-posi-
tions in Lake City & Jasper-HS
Diploma/GED, CDA (Child De-
velopment Associate) or FCCPC
(Fl Child Care Professional
Credential) and bilingual
(Span/Eng) preferred. Sick &
annual leave, holiday pay, health
insurance, retirement + add'l
benefits. Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
current 1StAide/CPR pref.
To apply- e-mail:
arobinson(a)sv4cs.org, call (386)
754-2222 or Fax 386-754-2220,
applyin person @ 236 SW
Columbia Ave, Lake City Fl or
843 SW Marymac St, Live Oak
Fl EOE


11 Sales
Employment
Optical Assistant needed,F/T
,exp a plus, we will train,
Send resume 763 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025

120 Medical
120 Employment



04541824
RN/LPN
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for RN and LPN positions.
Day and Evening PRN
positions available.
Competitive Salary, and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon Health-
care and Rehabilitation Center.
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05523875
ARNP/PA-C
Background in internal medi-
cine, orthopedics, worker's
comp and/or occupational inju-
ries pref. Must have current FL
license. Great salary and bene-
fits package offered. Visit
www.simedpl.com to apply.



CNA/caregiver needed. Exp nec-
essary. Must be available Mon-Fri.
Maybe some nights & weekends.
Call 386-755-1233 for more info.



1-20 Medical
120 Employment
Need English/ Spanish .Medical
Assistant for a Dermatology office
in Lake City. Florida. Experience
is required, but not necessary. We
will train. Call 386-758-1965
or Fax to: 386-758-6923

170 Business
17 v Opportunities
P/T Business. Nets $65K+
Christian Themed publication.
No exp necessary. Clients estab-
lished for you. Retiring $29,900
(941)685-8291

190 Mortgage Money

STOP FORECLOSURE,
go to:
www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com



Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lie & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 lv rnsg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
***!C************************



Land Services

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386497-3219

Construction

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions. Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386L497-3219 or 954-649-1037



Get Connected



-. Ww catroporlor.oom



Ad is to Appear:
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday



Call by:
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Thurs., 10:00a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.



FaxlEmail by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thus., 9:00 a.m.
F.,9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.



These d amare subject to change wihout notice.
__(
A_ eve___



Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be,
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call.will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit,' reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www .lai.eei tyrelportecrconl



5B



04541818
Senior Teller Position
Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing, cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace



I'lloyal~



willmooo



I
I



.1 --------



)












6B

l240 ASchools&
240 Education



310 Pets & Supplies
PET MARKET. Buy or sale. Oct
2nd from 9-5. Bradford Co Fair-
. grounds,2300 N Hwy 301 Starke,
FL. Free Adm. For Vendor info.
(352)376-9038



PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33V Supplies
Single Lane Farms
(1)-2 years old black Limosene
bull. (1) 2.5 yr old angus bull.
Dwane Hingson. 386-776-1090

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Heavy Duty, Maytag, Washer,
White,
$165
386-292 3927 or 984-0387



New GE Late Model
Gas Cook Top, still in the box!
Costs $700, will sacrifice for $285
386-292-3927 or 984-0387
Whirlpool Dryer
works great
$50
386-935-0654

407 Computers
E-MACHINE
$80.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
BEDROOM SUITE
Solid wood. Captains Bed, dresser,
mirror, night stand & desk/desk
chair. $450. 386-752-5784



Sofa & Loveseat Set $200
Navy Blue & Black Velveteen
extremely comfortable, excellent
condition Call 386-935-0654

A10 Lawn & Garden
410 Equipment
22" Murray Mower
(Easy Push), 4HP,
$70
386-984-0387 or 386-292-3927

/411 Machinery &
411 Tools
Heavy Duty Auto Jack Stands
(2), $10 each,
New
call 386-963-4560

419 TV-Radio &
Recording
Galvanized Remote Control
Antenna, 36 Ft High, Tri pod,
$100
Call 386-963-4560

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.



Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
3 FAMILIES. Russwood Estates.
Sat. 8am-2pm.
Branford Hwy to Troy Street
turn right. Look for signs.



Multi Family: Sat. Oct. 2 8-?
Hwy 100 to Price Creek to Plant
St. to Mossy Ct. Look for signs.
Fur., baby items & Much more!
PLANTATION S/D 90W Oct. 2
8-1p. 2nd house on right. Small
kitchen appliance, Bose radio, ori-
ental rugs, household, lots of misc.



PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



Sat only, 8-2pm, baby & mens
clothes, toys, big screen TV, books
and much more! (Emerald Forest)
219 SW Stanley Ct.

440 Miscellaneous
Wooden White Storage Cabinet
36Wx20px72H
like new $60
386-935-0654



LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010



520 Boats for Sale
PROJECT BOAT 1993 SeaRay
Boat 18' Bow Rider w/trailer hull,
good condition with 150 mercury
motor. $800.obo 386-365-3773

630\ Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1 bd/l bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
386-752-1941 or 386-965-0932
14x55 MH, 2Br/lBa Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $395/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
14X80. 3br/2ba. Total electric,
country living. Pets ok. Garbage,
water sewer inc. 1st, last. dep.
w/lease. $600. mo. 386-752-8978
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH. small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DW $800/mo on 3ac. hot
tub/pool, remodeled.6/10 livestock
& pets ok. (937)938-1727, 3353
230th Terr. Lake City off SR 247
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard. nice cond, $575
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2 & 3 bdrm, Five
Points, NO PETS, also 2 bd home
163 NE Escambia St, 1 mon rent
& dep 386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Very nice 3/2 Skyline DW on 3.3
ac. fenced yard, dead end street,
nice trees. Financing available.
$75,000 386-303-1258 / 365-1406

705 Rooms for Rent
Newly Renovated ROOMS W/
FREE Utilities, Cable, WiFi, Local
& Long Distance Calls, Maid
Service. Microwave & frige in ea.
room. Iprs $165, 2ppl $175
Jasmine Garden Inn. Clean &
Under New Mgmt! 386-755-4308

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05523977
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $550 month, no pets
1 month sec,
386-961-8075 Realtor
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
Ist, last & sec
386-755-6867
2br Apartment. In town.
Nice & clean. Close to shopping.
$485. mo plus deposit.
Call for appt. 386-344-2972
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
Large & clean. Ibr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
LARGE 1BRApt
over looking lake. Screened pool.
CH/A, washer/dryer, full kitchen,
$650 mo. 386-344-3261
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
One bedroom apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626



P7-a Furnished Apts.
7/2 For Rent
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73a Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 Bed/i Bath,clean quiet home,
5 miles south of Lake City, $550
monthly, 386-867-1833/590-0642
suwanneevallevproperties.com



Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3bedroom/2bath
in city. $450. mo.
plus deposit No Pets!
386-758-0057



In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225



LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017



Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635



Rural beauty and privacy near
1-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br.
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Small 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $500 month, $400 dep, no
pets!, pls leave message 386-365-
1920 or 386-454-7764 after 6pm



SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619



TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553. Lv. message.

75O Business &
75 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995



Classified Department: 755-5440



, I ,. M- IO 1r ,,a Sa ie D|tPr n ~
Is,- wI

I~~~~~~lP



ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.



1993 SeaRay Boat 2005 GMC Sierra
18' Bow Rider w/trailer 1500
hull, good condition with Single cab, 2WD, V6, AT,
150 mercury motor, power steering, cruise, AC,
trailer pkg., 80,000 miles,
$800 OBO 6 ft. box.
$7.900 OBO
Call Call
386-365-3773 386-623-6860



2006 8Ft. Dingy
2 seat, 4hp, Suz, 4 stroke
motor, w/trailer, new tires.

$600
Call
386-965-3110 or
386-758-6098
Can be seen only on weekends.
I



In Print,

& Online

One Low

Price!



OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor



OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor



Retail/Commercial/Office
1200 + sq ft only $950 month
Includes Utilities 386-752-5035 ,
7 day 7-7 A Bar Sales



SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N441 & 1-10
813-286-2323

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Starke. 1.5 ac Brick 3br/2ba. 1535
sqft. washer/dryer. gas fireplace,
walk in closet, pantry, Dishwasher.
Corian counter tops in kitchen &
bath. Double carport, week shed.
$169,000. (904)742-5028 or
(904)266-4511

o80 Farms &
o8 v Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com



4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com



n9 I Recreational
951 Vehicles

2007 Club Car w/golf club rain
cover, windshield, ex cond., very
low hrs, w/charger, $2200 obo,
386-288-8833 or 386-438-5592



Sun Light Slide-In Truck
Camper, Fits long wheel base,self
contained, A/C, new fridge, $4000
used very little, 404-358-1358



9c5 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles



95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd,
V-8, 4-whl dr. All factory opts,
cold air, orig sticker, Will bring
car to you! $4500: 386-658-2380



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