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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01412
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/29/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01412
System ID: UF00028308:01412
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Traditional values
Commentator Glenn Beck,
Sarah Palin issue appeal.


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PO BOX 117007IDA
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GAINESVILLE FL 32611-194


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Moving on
Tigers serve up revenge
in kickoff classic.
Sports, I B


5 years later
Millions came to help
after Hurricane Katrina.
Nation, 6A


SReporter


Sunday, August 29,2010 4


ityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. 190 $ $1.00


IT'S A HIT!

Local hunters kill 11-foot 'gator

07N ftS '0, 1 '0


COURTESY PHOTO
An alligator hunting team of Dale Townsend (from left), Ricky Jordan, Glenwood King and
boat driver Rhett Smithey show off an 11-foot alligator taken from the Suwannee River in the
Branford area near the site of Suwannee Cove Restaurant. Jordan, who received one of;two
alligator permits for Suwannee County, said the hunters shined the monsterat about 2 a.m.
Wednesday and his killshot went through the eye. Jordan estimated the meat from the tail
weighed 50 pounds. He plans to take the head to taxidermist Mike McCauley for mounting.


Local Kiwanis fights

childhood hunger

by holding food drive


Canned goods
collected through
September.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
More than 1,80(pound-s
of food items were col-
lected at the kickoff of
the Kiwanis Club of Lake
City's inaugural End
Child Hunger food drive
Saturday at the Publix
Shopping Center.
The club is collecting
canned goods throughout
the month of September
for distribution to the Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley
and Catholic Charities,
said Kyle Keen, Kiwanis
Club president-elect.
Projects through the
Kiv7anis Club focus on
benefiting children, said
Koby Adams, president.
Some statistics of concern
about childhood hunger
in Columbia County were
recently shared with the
club by Suzanne Edwards;
Catholic Charities execu-
tive director. .
The club was told that
one-in-three children eat
only one meal a day and
go hungry every night,
Keen said.
"It breaks my heart
that kids in the commu-
nity go hungry," he said.
"We have the means to
help, and there is really
no reason a child' should
be hungry in Columbia
County."
In just a few weeks, the
club assembled the food
drive and the community
is responding. The local
Social Security office
donated 602 pounds of
food at Saturday's event.-
"We're elated with the
new collaboration and
lifelong commitment of
Kiwanis," cEdwards said.
KIWANIS continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ILake City Reporter
Kiwanians Dayna Miller and Steve Briscoe place donations in
a collection box for the End Child Hunger food drive Saturday
at Publix Supermarket.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Danny Edwards, Catholic Charities volunteer, and Lynda
Wood, case manager, wave at passing motorists to give them
fliers about the Kiwanis Club of Lake City's End Child Hunger
food drive Saturday at the entrance to the Publix Shopping
Center. The food drive runs throughout September.


Job hunt tougher for some Lake City residents


No GED, no
problem; but
felony record?
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

hasn't been easy
for 18-year-old
Casey Larrison
of Lake City.
Like myriad others, he's
been job hunting for about
six months with no luck.
"No jobs are really
open," he said. "I'm look-
ing for any job I can get."
Larrison is one of more
than 1,055,000 jobless out
of a labor force of 9,214,000
in the state, according to
the State of Florida Agency
for Workforce Innovation.
Florida's unemploy-
ment rate in July was 11.5
percent, compared to 11.4


percent in June. Columbia
County's unemployment
rate was 10.8 percent in
July and 10.6 percent in
June.
By the numbers, that
means Columbia County's
labor force is 31,685, and
28,253 people are now
employed, according to the
agency.
But the search for a job
is not the same for every-
one.
What makes the job
hunt harder for Larrison is
not having a GED, he said.
"Most jobs .want some
sort of education to qualify,
even for a low-paying job,"
he said.
Having a felony is lim-
iting the job search for
Darren Ross of Lake City,
he said. He has been look-
ing for a job since April.
JOB continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter
Lake City resident Cheryl Shick stands outside of the Columbia County Public
Library Main Branch where patrons can use computers to search for jobs and work
on their resumes. She said that she has been unemployed since 2006. '1 haven't
been able to recover. A lot of that goes with life events,' she said.


CALL US: 90 70 Opor 4A
(386) 752-1293 90 70Busness I.C
SUBSCRIBETO T-Storms Ad ce ... 3D
THE REPORTER: Puzzles 2B
Voice: 755-5445A .' Lfe D
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 8A Life. ID


RESOURCES

Several local resources are
available for job seekers in
Columbia County.
B .Florida Crown helps direct the
workforce to resources and services
available in the region. A one-stop
office is located in Lake City in the
Lake City Profesisonal Plaza, located
at 1389 US Hwy. 90 W. Call (386) 755-
9026.
SThe Greater Lake City Community
Development Corporation provides
computer services and GED assis-
tance for the unemployed.The office is
located at 363 NW Bascom Norris Dr.
Call (386) 752-9785.
The Columbia County Public
Library also provides computer
services and information resources
for job seekers. The main branch is
located at 308 NW Columbia AveI Call
(386) 758-2101.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


(4$fl1LORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
2-4-9-19 15 1-2-9-10-33 Afternoon: 4-3-1 Afternoon: 1-1-6-0 7-9-11-34-40-47 16-17-29-31-36-23
Evening: 3-0-6 Evening: 0-8-7-1


AROUND FLORIDA


Danielle may bring dangerous rip currents


MIAMI
H hurricane
Danielle
remained far
out over the
Atlantic on
Saturday, but the Category
2 storm is still expected
to bring dangerous rip
currents to the U.S. East
Coast
Danielle's maximum
sustained winds were
near 110 mph. It is about
320 miles southeast of
Bermuda and is forecast
to pass east of the island
Saturday.
The U.S. National
Hurricane Center in
Miami said the storm is
expected to remain about
the same strength for the
next day but gradually
begin weakening today.
It said large waves and
dangerous surf conditions
are expected in Bermuda,
where a tropical storm
watch has been issued.
Farther out in the
Atlantic, Tropical Storm
Earl has maximum sus-
tained winds of 60 mph.
It could strengthen into a
hurricane. A tropical storm
watch was in effect for
several islands in the east-
ern Caribbean, including
St Maarten,'Antigua and
Montserrat
In the Pacific, Tropical
Storm Frank is rapidly los-
ing strength off Mexico's
coast.

Judge shortens
Nowak probation
ORLANDO -A judge
in Orlando has ended


L:t Officer, neighbors
spar over display


ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Cangialosi, Hurricane Specialist, studies the movement of Hurricane Danielle and other
tropical weather patterns at the National Hurricane Center in Miami on Friday. The hurricane
was about 320 miles southeast of Bermuda on Saturday.


former astronaut Lisa
Nowak's probation three,
months early.
Nowak had been sen-
tenced in November to
a year of probation after
pleading guilty to burglary
charges. Orange County
Circuit Court Judge Marc
Lubet on Monday granted
her request to end her
sentence early.
The former astronaut
drove 1,000 miles from
Houston to Orlando in
2007 to mount a bizarre
attack on roinantic rival
Colleen Shipman.
Nowak's attorney
Donald Lykkebak said


Saturday that Liubet
granted Nowak's request
because she had fulfilled
all her obligations, includ-
ing writing an apology let-
ter to Shipman.
Last week, a Navy panel
reviewing Nowak's case
recommended downgrad-
ing her from captain to
commander and giving her
a discharge of "other than
honorable."

Marching band's
founder dies
TALLAHASSEE The
founder and longtime


director of the Florida
A&M "Marching 100"-, '
band has died. William P.
Foster was 91:
University officials say
Foster died early Saturday
in Tallahassee. -
Foster served as the
marching band's direc-
tor from 1946 to 1998. He
created more than 200
halftime pageants for the
marching band at the his-
torically black university.
He is credited with
innovating marching band
. techniques, including a
high stepping style imitat-
ed by bands nationwide.


CORAL SPRINGS
- A South Florida police
official is fighting his
homeowner association's
request that he remove a
patriotic display from his
garage door.
Joe Milenkovic is the
assistant police chief in
Delray Beach. Four-inch
magnetic letters spell
out "God Bless America"
across the top half of the
45-year-old's garage door
in Coral Springs.
The homeowners asso-
ciation says that violates
a rule prohibiting signs
displayed without written
permission. The property
manager has proposed
Milenkovic put up a flag
instead.
Milenkovic argues
his display is not a sign
because it consists of indi-
vidual magnets.
Neighbors say they
support the homeowners
association's enforcing its
rules.

Injured whale.
spotted again
POMPANO BEACH
An injured sperm whale,
calf has been spotted again
off South Florida's coast
Officials say a private
boater spotted the whale
Friday morning about a
mile off Pompano Beach.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission responded
with an aerial search but
failed to find the marine


mammal.
The whale was first seen
Tuesday at a Miami Beach
marina with injuries to its
head, back and tail flukes.
A veterinarian planned to
euthanize it and admin-
istered some sedatives
before losing the whale in
a strong current
The whale surfaced
in the Hillsboro Inlet on
Thursday before witnesses
saw it head out to open
waters.

State seeks more
funding for trains
MIAMI Florida's
Department of
Transportation is seeking
more federal funding to
boost high-speed rail and
regular passenger train
service.
In January, President
Barack Obama announced
that Florida would receive
$1.25 billion for high-speed
rail between Tampa and
Orlando. That was half of
what the state wanted.
Florida Rail Enterprise's
executive director says
the state now is asking for
$1.1 billion more for the
Tampa-Orlando project,
8.8 million to extend that
service from Orlando to
Miami and $250 million to
- resume passenger train
service from Miami to
Jacksonville.
In an Aug. 5 letter to
federal transportation
officials, Gov. Charlie Crist
said the $1.1 billion would
help Florida complete the
Tampa-Orlando service by
2015.
Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Paris Hilton arrested on cocaine charge


LAS VEGAS, Paris Hilton was
arrested late Friday after a police
motorcycle officer smelled marijuana
smoke wafting from a black Cadillac
Escalade driven by her boyfriend
on the Las Vegas Strip, then found
cocaine in her purse, authorities
said.
A crowd quickly gathered when
Hilton and Las Vegas nightclub
mogul Cy Waits were stopped about
11:30 p.m. Friday in the vehicle near
the Wynn Las Vegas resort on LasI
Vegas Boulevard, police said. The 29-
year-old celebrity socialite asked to
go into the hotel for privacy because
of the number people gathering, said
Officer Marcus Martin.
Police later found a substance in
Hilton's purse that tests showed to
be cocaine, Martin said. He said it
was "a small amount" of the drug, a
package of the size usually associ-
ated with personal use.
Hilton was arrested on suspicion
of felony cocaine possession.
Waits, 34, was arrested on misde-
meanor suspicion of driving under
the influence of alcohol or drugs.
Both were booked into the Clark
County jail, where Martin said Hilton
was released without bail about 2:45
a.m. Saturday. Sgt John Sheahan
said Hilton received no special treat-
ment during her brief time at the -
jail, and that release without bail was
common in such cases.


-All
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Paris Hilton and Cy Waits; shown in this recent file photo, attend the Paris Hilton
fragrance launch 'Tease' at MyStudio in Hollywood, Calif. Hilton and Waits were
arrested on the Las Vegas Strip late Friday. Police said they found that Hilton had
a substance that tests later showed to be cocaine.


to present awards from the Lennon
Ono Grant for Peace, created to
honor the former Beatle's peace
activism.
Lennon was fatally shot outside
the couple's Manhattan apartment
building on Dec. 8, 1980.


and Recreation" co-stars Adam Scott
and Aubrey Plaza held court on the
patio.
Seth MacFarlane, nominated for
original music and lyrics for "Family
Gury," and Seth Green, nominated in
the voice-over category for "Robot
Chicken," kept each other in stitches
near the bar. Inside, invitees filled
golden goodies bags with free
makeup. Other attendees included
Craig Robinson. from "The Office"
and Jason Ritter from the upcoming
"The Event"

Taylor Swift debuts
music video in Maine
KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine
- Country music star Taylor Swift
has returned to Maine for a half-hour
television special to introduce her
latest music video.
The 20-year-old Grammy win-
ner premiered "Mine" on Friday in
Kennebunkport, where the video
was shot last month.
* Associated Press


NEW YORK Yoko Ono is plan-
ning a series of events in Iceland to
mark what would have been John
Lennon's 70th birthday.
The artist and
peace campaigner
will light the Imagine
Peace Tower illu-
minated memo-
rial, located on the
island of Vioey near
Icelandic capital
Lennon Reykjavik on Oct. 9.
A special perfor-
mance by the Yoko Ono Plastic Ono
Band will follow the ceremony.
Lennon's widow is also expected


WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif.
- The champagne is popped and
the hors d'oeuvres are served as the
television world begins partying in
preparation for tonight's 62nd annual
Primetime Emmy Awards, going live
to all U.S. time zones for the first
time in recent memory. Here are the
latest happenings from Hollywood:
Celebrities roaming the
Entertainment Weekly and Women
in Film pre-Emmy party late Friday
night seemed to stay in packs.
Fellow comedians Kathy Griffin
and Bill Maher chatted outside the
restaurant at the luxurious Sunset
Marquis hotel, while adroit "Parks


* Actor-director Lord
Richard Attenborough is 87.
* Sen. John McCain
(R-Ariz.) is 74.
* TV personality Robin
Leach is 69.
* Actor G.W. Bailey is 66..
* Actor Ray Wise is 63.
* Actress Deborah Van
Valkerqburgh is 58.



Daily Scripture


* Actress Carla Gugino
is 39. :
* Rock musician Kyle
Cook (Matchbox Twenty)
is 35.
* Actor John Hensley is 33.
* Rapper A+ is 28.
* Actress Jennifer Landon
is 27.
* Actor Jeffrey Licon is 25.


"Jesus answered, 'The work
of God is this: to believe. in the
one he has sent.'"
John 6:29


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Ono to mark Lennon's Nominees party
70th birthday in Iceland at pre-Emmy soirees


Lake City Reporter
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Sally Morgan of Lake City prepares to roll a strike during the Breast Friends Forever
Bowl-A-Thon Saturday at Lake City Bowl. More than 90 bowlers participated.


Bowl-A-Thon gathers funds

to strike out breast cancer


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Family, friends and
the community gathered
to bowl in support of the
Breast Friends Forever
Bowl-A-Thon Saturday at
Lake City Bowl.
More than 90 people
attended the 'event, said
Carmen Crane, organizer.
"It was a wonderful turn-
out, beyond what I expect-
ed today," she said.
The Breast Friends
Forever is a team of women
wrho will walk 60 miles in
the Susan G. Komen 3-
Day For The Cure, Oct.
29-31 in Tampa Bay. The
team includes Crane of
Lake City, Diana Armstead
and Jan Literski, Eileen
Heidenman and Sandra
Goff all of Hernando.
Walkers must raise


$2,300 each, which goes
toward breast cancer
research. Team members
have been hosting various
fundraisers to help pay for
the event.
Each bowler paid $10 for
the game and raised a min-
imum of $25 in pledges to
go toward the walk. There
was also a silent auction
and 50/50 drawing to raise
additional money.
Crane and Armstead
work together at
the Department of
Transportation and had
talked about participating
in the "3-Day," Crane said.
Armstead knew the other
team members and the two
decided to join with them.
In the past, Crane has
participated in breast can-
cer races of about three
miles. The "3-Day" will be a
new challenge.


"If people can go through
cancer and all of the treat-
ment, I can walk 60 miles,"
she said.
Breast cancer is a cause
Sally Morgan of Lake City
supports because it hits
close to home, she said.
Her sister went though a
bout with the disease and
has been in remission for a
couple of years.
"It's touched many lives,"
Morgan said.
Star Ayers of Lake City
and her team, the Boo
Bees, came to support
the bowl-a-thon and "help
people stomp out breast
cancer," she said.
The community .was
overall very receptive to
the bowl-a-thon, Crane
said.
"We look forward to
having this kind of turn-
out next year," she said.


Niblack principal cites


reasons for grade drop


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
Niblack Elementary
School's recent Florida
School Grade drop from an
"A" to a "D" can be chalked
up to a decrease in writing
test scores, learning gains
and efforts to track improve-
ment correctly, officials said
Friday.
"Writing scores plus
learning gains," said William
Murphy, NiblackElementary
principal. "With that combi-
nation of things, our grade
dropped."
Murphy took full respon-
sibility for the less-than-satis-
factory status, which is based
on Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test scores, and
vowed to improve.
"I'm responsible because
I'm the principal and I'm
responsible for the school,"
Murphy said. "If something's
not working correctly, then
ifs my job to correct it"
Reports show the school
dropped from 97 percentage
points in the 2008 to 2009
school year to 78 percentage
points in the 2009 to 2010
school year in its percentage
of students meeting high
standards in writing.
Murphy said the decrease
was a result ofthe 2010 FCAT
exam testing the students
on only one style of writing,
instead of giving a Upix of the
two they are taught narra-
tive and expository.
'This past year we only
had one choice and so some
of the students were not as
strong because some kids
are better at just one," he


JOB: Even the well-educated encounter hurdles
Continued From Page 1A


Employers are not really
hiring anyone new, espe-
cially people who have
felonies, he said.
The job search can be
difficult for people with
a feloriy, but it is equally
challenging for those with
higher education creden-
tials, said Edward Turner
of Lake City.
"Now people with
degrees and who have been
to school can't even get a
job," he said.
In June of 2009, Turner
lost his job, and he has been
looking for one since then,
he said. The overall econo-
my has greatly impacted the
job market
"Any other time you
would be able to find a job
with no problem," he said.
Some prospective
employers seek a certain
level of experience, but it's
hard to meet that criteria
without first having a job,
Turner said.
Ross said he is hoping
that when the economy
.turns around, more job
opportunities will be avail-
able.
"The jobs they have are
just so limited," he said.
"It's on a first-come, first-
served basis."
To aid his job hunt,
Larrison has been going to
Florida Crown, he said.
"You can use them as


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Ann and Lester McKellum of the Greater Lake City Community Development Corporation look
at online job search sites. Computer services are provided by CDC to job seekers.


a reference," he said.
"They'll look at your appli-
cations. I come here and,
there are a lot of good pro-
grams to help you."
Ross also uses the
Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corporation as a resource,
he said. The organization
provides a list of business-
es that hire ex-felons.


Potential job openings
are also found in classi-
fied sections or shared
by ear from other unem-
ployed people, Turner
said.
There are so many
unemployed in
Columbia County and a
limited number of jobs
available, but job seek-
ers must remain hope-


ful, he said.
"Be patient and keep
searching and keep
looking," Turner said.
Ross said his motiva-
tion to keep searching
for work is his child.
"Don't give up," he
said. "There might be
an opening somewhere.
You've just got to keep
driving."


KIWANIS: Collection bins at 20 local businesses
Continued From Page 1A


"Childhood hunger is a
silent epidemic nationwide
and right in our commu-
nity. How can you expect
children to learn if they are
hungry?"
Suggested food items for
the donation drive includ-
ed peanut butter and jelly,


canned foods, dry beans,
bagged rice, powdered mild,
baby formula, cereal and
breakfast bars. Monetary
donations are also accepted.
All donations benefit fami-
lies in the local area, Keen
said.
Collection bins for the


food drive will be placed at
more than 20 local business-
es around Columbia County.
A list of the businesses is
available at www.mykiwanis.
erg and at www.catholicchari-
tieslakecity.org.
The club is already plan-
ning to make next year's
I


drive bigger and better,
Adams said. Using the
change found in a car's ash-
tray or behind the sofa can
help purchase an item for
the drive and give part of a
meal to a child.
"We can actually eradicate
child hunger," he said.


a..'
ii


said.
"They were taught both
and tested on only one,"
Murphy said.
To try to increase writing
scores for the 2011 .FCAT,
Murphy said all teachers will
go through writing training
and learn how to help chil-
dren improve their writing.
Students will participate in
writing simulations to pre-
pare for the FCATs writing
test and the school's teacher
most experienced in writing
will help to train both the
students and the teachers in
a collective environment
Niblack Elementary's
learning gains also suf-
fered in the 2009 to 2010
school year because school
administration, faculty and
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FCAT style through CIM
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in the information regularly
to be tracked.
"That way, I can check
* to see which students need
to be remediated, which
need to have intervention
and which ones need enrich-
ment," Murphy said. "A lot
of kids do well and need to
be enriched so they don't
drop and that will keep our
learning gains up."
Other strategies to keep
both students and teach-
ers up to pace on improve-
ments include teacher-to-
student and administration-
to-teacher data meetings, a
new discipline plan, close
progress monitoring and a
common intervention time
that the entire school will
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OPINION


Sunday, August 29, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OU
OPIN


R
ION


Vote is for

honest, fair

elections at

all levels

As sacred as the
right to life, liberty
and the pursuit of
happiness of every
American is the
right to free and honest elec-
tions. One-person, one-vote has
been the bedrock of not only
state, but city, town and county
legislatures since our nation's
highest court evoked our
nation's 1868 14th Amendment
to make it so.
But when those one-person
votes are held in question as
is the case now with almost two
dozen absentee ballots cast in
Lake City's Aug. 24 primary
- elections officials have no
choice but to minutely examine
the returns for any instance of
impropriety.
On Thursday, two days after
the election and when accusa-
tions and complaints were
aired, the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office was right to
solicit the investigative aid of
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement There would be
an inherent conflict of interest
in investigating our own elec-
toral process, especially by an
elective body.
' But there are those people
who suggest that a formal, and
potentially expensive inquiry
into such a few number of votes
- too few, law enforcement
and elections officials confirm,
to alter the outcome of the race
- is unwarranted.
They are wrong.
We should and do welcome
the scrutiny this investigative
process will engender. Not only
will it bring to light and to jus-
tice any instance of wrongdo-
ing, it will reinforce the founda-
tion of the political system upon
which our nation is built.
Repairing damage now to any
chips in that foundation is vital
to solidifying the cornerstone of
our political integrity.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Aug. 29,
the 241st day of 2010. There
are 124 days left in the year.
On Aug. 29, 2005,
Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf
Coast near Buras, La.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


What would GOP do if it ruled?


The most important
issue in American
politics now is
figuring out what
concrete actions
Republicans would take if they
return to power.
Sarah Palin's prescription for
"restoring honor" to America
is different from that of many
other Republican politicians.
House GOP leader John
Boehner's recipe is vague.
We're not sure what John
MdCain will stand for, now that
he's defeated radio talk show-
man J.D. Hayworth. Senate
GOP leader Mitch McConnell
refuses to be pinned down. Alan
Simpson, GOP co-chair of a
bipartisan commission seeking
economic solutions, wants to
change Social Security.
I'm not talking about GOP
rhetoric. I'm not interested in
how much GOP candidates
can't stand President Obama. I
don't care about GOP claims of
a monopoly on patriotism.
I'm interested in what
Republicans would do differ-
ently now, not last year when we
realized how serious the eco-
nomic turmoil is.
Boehner, who wants to be
speaker of the House, calls
for firing Obama's economic
team, which 1) he can't do and
2) doesn't make sense unless
Obama leaves office. Boehner
wants to make former President
Gedrge W. Bush's tax cuts per-
manent, adding another trillion
dollars to the debt that is so
worrisome. He does not have a
way to pay for them no lead-
ing Republican does. (Since the
cuts expire in January unless
Congress acts, Obama proposes


LETTERS TO


Racist labels easily
misapplied
To the Editor:
I was very surprised that the
Lake City Reporter printed the
letter, "Obama's opponents act
like terrorists" (Aug. 18), given
the perceived falsity of its claims
and the hatred it was spewing.
To call Glenn Beck and Rush"
Limbaugh racists and terrorists
because their message doesn't
suit a political agenda is outra-
geous and immoral. They are
also referred to as cynics in a
pejorative manner.
It is a wise and caring per-
son who is cynical of what our
government and politicians
have become. A study of the
words cynic and cynical lead
me to conclude that the letter's
intended insult is actually a
compliment.
A person is hard-pressed to
name anyone who cares more
passionately about the future
and welfare of our government
and all of our children than
Beck. You can only consider
Beck a terrorist if the intentions
of you and your organization are
evil and anti-American.
When Glenn Beck is labeled
racist, myself and millions of
others are labeled racist. The
dilemma now is to explain
why a racist like me finan-
cially supported and voted for
Ambassador Alan Keyes in
the 2000 presidential election
and wanted Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice on the presi-


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com
to keep them only for those
earning less than $250,000 but
Boehner wants to keep them for
everyone.)
Although we're still in a deep
recession, Boehner wants to cut
non-defense federal spending to
2008 levels before the economic
stimulus. True, the stimulus
did not keep unemployment
from rising (now 9.5 percent:)
But economists say it kept the
recession from being worse. It's
also improving our crumbling
infrastructure, which must hap-
pen if the economy is to grow.
The real issue is that trashing
the stimulus is popular but does
not create jobs or address what
is wrong with the economy.
Sarah Palin wants to cut
capital gains taxes and get rid
of the estate tax on the wealthi-
est Americans. She also wants
to cut payroll taxes that finance
Social Security benefits. And
she wants to "get federal spend-
ing under control" (no specifics)
and have the government "step
aside" and watch the economy
"roar back to life." She also
wants to drill for more oil and
beef up the military.:
But discretionary spending is
a small part of a budget bloated
by entitlements and defense.
And we saw what happens when
government doesn't regulate -


THE EDITOR

dential ticket in 2008.
Robert C. Long
Lake City

Glenn Beck's heroes
build on lies
To the Editor:
Is Glenn Beck a terrorist?
Are he and many of the other
spokespersons on the far right
along with their followers rac-
ists? Follow the evidence.
Beck has a link on his website
to an article titled, "Document
Forensics Expert Obama Birth
Certificate a Horrible Forgery."
Even the man all of the tea bag
nation wanted as their president
disclaimed this red herring, yet
the radicals persist.,
Beck also has asked his fol-
lowers to read four books on his
recommended reading list, by
W. Cleon Skousen. This man so
invoked terror into the hearts
of fellow Mormons in 1965 that
the National Guard had to be
called into readiness because of
the ensuing panic. He claimed
the NAACP was sending 2,000
black Muslims to destroy one
of their tabernacles. After this
lie, his publication continued its
racist remarks by saying blacks
were "savages" and civil rights
leaders were "animals." This is
one of Beck's heroes. He asks
his followers to read and follow
this man's thinking.
Are other right-wing pun-
dits racist? Michael Savage
fantasized out loud about kill-


BP polluted the Gulf of Mexico
and contaminated eggs made
people sick.
GOP candidates want to
stop illegal immigration. Who
doesn't? But beefing up border
control costs money, which
comes from taxes. Actually,,
fewer people are entering ille-
gally, because of better enforce-
ment and fewer jobs. The
problem is what to do with the
12 million already here, working
and paying taxes. Sen. Lindsey
Graham (R-S.C.) quit working
on immigration reform and now
wants to deny U.S. citizenship
to children of undocumented
people.
The likeliest GOP 2012 presi-
dential candidates, from Palin to
Mitt Romney to Newt Gingrich,
have opposed building an
Islamic Center two blocks from
the site of the 9/11 attacks in
Manhattan (although a massage
parlor and gambling den are
that close). What does their pan-
dering to mosque opponents say
about their belief in religious
freedom and their view of U.S.
interactions in an increasingly
Muslim world?
The GOP candidates who are.
winning primary battles are the
angriest at the idea of compro-
mise with Democrats and shout
the loudest against Obama.
If they take over the House,
political dialogue will be even
more acrimonious. Nothing will
get done unless they have
a secret, workable plan they'll
reveal after the election.

N Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


ing civil rights people. Neil
Boortz blamed poor blacks for
Katrina calling them "worthless
parasites." Pat Buchanan also
expressed a desire to go back
to pre-civil rights days when
"they" had their own schools,
movie houses, restaurants, etc.
Rush Limbaugh said Obama is
more African in his roots than
American, and that he believed
he was acting like a colonial
despot. On the other hand, he
applauds Strom Thurmond by
saying, "If you want to know
what America used to be like
and what a lot of people wish it
still were then you would listen
to Strom Thurmond."
With all this coaching, is it
any wonder their followers act
like racists?
In the face of this evidence
the far right still claims they are
not racist. At best that is laugh-
able, just like the warning given
by a tea bag nation group in
Maine to fellow members who
followed Beck to Washington
on Saturday, Aug. 28, for his
rally to take back the civil rights
movement They warned them
not to take certain subway lines,
especially at night, that would
take them into black sections
of DC. I guess taking back the
movement means staying as
far away from blacks as they
can. Funny stuff if it weren't
so offensive to many, many
Americans.
Carol Crown
Wellborn


Todd Wilson
twilson@Jakecityreportercom


Making the

grade with a

9-year-old


As usual, it was the
toughest week of
the year for me. My
daughter turned 9
and school started, which as
I've described before, always
marks the turn of the calendar
in our household. That speed-
of-life reality knocks me down
every time.
Watching Lauren grow into
9 during the past year has
been a unique experience. Her
mental approach to everything
has really gained depth. The
usual things, more analysis
and more intrigue, have crept
into our daily discussions. Her
questions range about every-
thing from how the Spanish
lifted all those heavy cannons
to the top of their forts in St.
Augustine to concern of how
will Stubby, one of the squir-
rels in our yard with the unfor-
tunate luck of losing all but
about an inch of his tail, ever
make it in this world.
There seems to be deep
thought applied to everything.
My job, more and more
every day now, is to be a better
listener. This shortcoming has
been brought to my attention
regularly by both women who.
live in my house. Girls of all
ages need an ear more times
than they, need advice. I am
out-voted and I know my place.
So I zip it, or at least try on
occasion, and I focus more on
hearing the details and offer-
ing support where needed.
Of course, I realize this is my
future, unfolding slowly, as I
exist outnumbered in a house
of women. My opinion will be
needed less from here on out
The tradition with my
daughter is to conduct an.
interview with her around
birthday time each year, just
to get the "official" update as
to where things stand, find out
exactly what she's thinking.
She is crazy about school.
Unless she's the next Taylor
Swift, she's planning to be
a teacher, modeling herself
after the terrific ones we've
been blessed to know in the
Columbia County School
District. So when I approach
with questions, I am disrupting
her teaching session. At least
a dozen baby dolls of all sizes
and ages are lined up in class-
room order in her room, a few
sitting in tea party chairs in the
front row, two are buckled in a
stroller and one is sitting in a
child's shopping cart. Others
are propped on pillows in rows
on her bed, but all sitting at
attention facing the teacher
and the dry-erase board. There
are a couple of math problems
and several spelling words in
play and she is lecturing her
dolls like the FCAT is looming
tomorrow.
"They're not dolls, dad,"
she tells me with a correc-
tive glare. "They're my little
friends."
I start with the standard
question I have asked for
years: "What do you know for
sure?"
"I need a grade book," she
says. "A real one. You know,
one of those big ones like the
teachers use."
A dumb question from me
to continue breaking the ice:
"What for?"
'To give out grades.... To
my students and to you."
"What kind of grades will I
get?" I ask.
"If you say any bad words
the rest of the year, you're get-
ting an 'F.' Other than that, I'll
probably pass you," she says.
So there it is, from ancient
Spanish military questions to
baby dolls and grading my
behavior. Time flies as your
kids grow up.
Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A


I _













Afghan militants in US uniforms storm NATO bases


By ROBERT H. REID
Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan
- U.S. and Afghan troops
repelled attackers wear-
ing American uniforms
and suicide vests in a pair
of simultaneous assaults
before dawn Saturday
on NATO bases near the
Pakistani border, includ-
ing one where seven CIA
employees died in a suicide
attack last year.
The raids appear part
of an insurgent strategy
to step up attacks in wide-
ly scattered parts of the
country as the U.S. focuses
its resources on the bat-
tle around the Taliban's
southern birthplace of
Kandahar.
Also Saturday, three
more American service
members were killed two
in a bombing in the south
and the third in fighting
in eastern Afghanistan, the,
U.S. command said. That
brought to 38 the number
of U.S. troops killed this
month well below last
month's figure of 66.
The militant assault in
the border province of
Khost began about 4 a.m.
when dozens of insur-
gents stormed Forward
Operating Base Salerno
and nearby Camp Chapman
with mortars, rocket-pro-
pelled grenades and auto-
matic weapons, accord-


S. .ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Army soldiers take cover behind a low mud wall during a joint patrol with the.Afghan Army in Kandahar province, south-
ern Afghanistan on Wednesday. The district is the birthplace of the Taliban movement and holds many well-armed insurgents.


ing to NATO and Afghan
police.
Two attackers managed
to breach the wire protect-
ing Salerno but were killed
before they could advance
far onto the base, NATO
said. Twenty-one attackers
were killed 15 at Salerno
and six at Chapman and
five were captured, it said.


Three more insurgents,
including a commander,
were killed in an airstrike
as they fled the area, NATO
said.
The Afghan Defense
Ministry said two Afghan
soldiers were killed and
three wounded in the fight-
ing. Four U.S. troops were
wounded, NATO officials


said.
U.S. and Afghan offi-
cials blamed the attack
on the Haqqani network,
a Pakistan-based faction of
the Taliban with close ties
to al-Qaida. Camp Chapman
was the scene of the Dec.
30 suicide attack that killed
the seven CIA employees.
Afghan police said about


50 insurgents took .part
in the twin assaults. After
being driven away from
the bases, the insurgents
approached .the nearby
offices of the governor and
provincial police headquar-
ters but were also -scat-
tered, said Khost provincial
police Chief Abdul Hakim
Ishaqzai.


"Given the size of the
enemy's force, this could
have been a major catastro-
phe for Khost. Luckily we
prevented it," he said.
Small-arms fire contin-
ued through the morning,
while NATO helicopters
patrolled overhead. The
dead were wearing U.S.
Army uniforms, which
can be easily purchased in
shops in Kabul and other
cities, possibly pilfered
from military warehouses.
The twin attacks appeared
to be part of a growing pat-
tern of insurgent assaults
far from the southern
battlefields of Kandahar
and Helmand provinces,
which have been the main
focus of the U.S. military
campaign. Last December,
President Barack Obama
ordered 30,000 reinforce-
ments to Afghanistan,
most to the Kandahar area
where the Islamist move-
ment was organized in the
mid-1990s.
On Saturday, a candidate
running for a seat in parlia-
mentfrom Heratprovince in
northwestern Afghanistan
was. shot and killed on his
way to a mosque, said Lal
Mohammaa Omarzai, dep-
uty governor, of Shindand
district He said two men
on a motorbike opened fire
on Abdul Manan, a ca di-
date in the Septenmer bal-
loting. He later died of his
wounds.


BRIEFS


Obamas wrap up
10-day vacation
EDGARTOWN, Mass.
- President Barack
Obama wrapped up a 10-
day vacation Saturday that
was blissfully free of the
news emergencies that
have interrupted some of
his past getaways.
Grim economic reports
cast an inescapable
shadow over the first
family's stay in Martha's
Vineyard, and tough tasks
on Iraq and the Middle
East await the president
in Washington after a stop
in New Orleans Sunday
on the fifth anniversary of
Hurricane Katrina.
But during his time.
on this lovely island, the
president never once had
to shed his leisure wear to
step in front of the podi-
um and address a national


emergency or matter of
state.

NY man dies
on AirTran flight
DENVER-A man
from New York died of
an apparent heart attack
on an AirTran Airways
flight from Las Vegas to
Milwaukee early Saturday,
-forcing the plane to make
an emergency landing
at Denver International
Airport
DIA airport spokeswom-
an Laura Coale says flight
776 was diverted to Denver
and was met at the gate by
an ambulance at about 2:50
a.m.
The Denver Medical
Examiner's office says 64-
year-old Stephen Enves, of
Elmhurst, N.Y., was travel-
ing with his wife when he
died.


Americans urged
to avoid NKorea
WASHINGTON -The
State Department on
Friday urged Americans to
respect its warning against
traveling to North Korea,
saying in a cheeky Twitter
message that there are
not too many former U.S.
presidents left available
for rescue missions. In a
Tweet posted shortly after
former President Jimmy
Carter arrived in Boston
from North Korea with
American Aijalon Gomes
who had been detained in
-the communist country
for seven months, State
Department spokes-
man PJ. Cr6wley said:
"Americans should heed
our travel warning and
avoid North Korea. We
only have a handful of
former presidents."
* Associated Press


Signs of life at'ground zero'


Associated Press
NEW YORK After
nearly nine years, life is
returning to ground zero
in a tangible way.
Crews Saturday began
planting 16 swamp white
oaks at the World Trade
Center site. They are the
first of nearly 400 trees
to be planted around the
eight-acre memorial to
the nearly 2,800 people
were killed when terrorists
attacked the twin towers


on Sept. 11, 2001.
The trees will dot a cob-
blestone plaza surrounding
two huge pools built on the
footprints of the destroyed
towers.
Joe Daniels, president
of the 9/11 Memorial
Foundation, was on hand
at the site to help with the
planting. He said designers
of the memorial envisioned
a lush and quiet green
space that would bring sol-
ace to visitors.


'When people come up
to the pools and see the
names and be under this
canopy, this forest, it will
be a very peaceful environ-
ment," Daniels said.
Cultivated for four years
at a nursery in Millstone,
N.J., the 16 trees were
loaded onto eight tractor-
trailers at midnight Friday
for the 35-mile trip to
Manhattan. Several were
planted overnight and into
Saturday morning.


-"9. -v..1
J~Lv


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lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


r .r* *-,


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010









LAKE CITY REPORTER


HURRICANE KATRINA 5 YEARS LATER SUNDAY,AUGUST 29,2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Destroyed buildings are seen'
along Highway 90 in Pass
Christian, Miss., Wednesday,
Dec. 28, 2005, four months
after Hurricane Katrina.


TIMELINE


. . . .... .... I,
. ;- *-: \ .o ,. ,.;; .^ ; ; :. '
"' " "J "i~ i t 2-' ". .-"** *', ~ ; . : * ^ w

..-.: .
.- .. .
-- ................................. ..,. .. '-..... .. ..'..... .......................-. _. ,I. ,.::


-By The Associated Press
A day-by-day look at how
Katrina unfolded in 2005:
Aug. 23 Tropical
Depression 12 forms over
the Bahamas.
Aug. 24 Depression
upgraded to Tropical Storm
Katrina.
Aug. 25 Katrina
becomes a Category 1 hur-
ricane, makes landfall in
Florida between Hallandale
Beach and Aventura.
Aug. 27 Katrina
moves west into the Gulf
of Mexico, strengthens to
Category 3 hurricane.
Aug. 28 -'Katrina
becomes a Category 5
hurricane, reaching peak
winds of 175 mph. New
Orleans Mayor C. Ray
Nagin orders city's first
mandatory evacuations.
Aug. 29 Katrina
makes landfall at Buras
southeast of New Orleans
as Category 3 hurricane,
causing massive flooding
in greater New Orleans
and widespread destruc-
tion along Mississippi coast
from its later landfall near
the Louisiana-Mississippi
line.
Aug. 30 Katrina dis-
sipates.
Sept. 12 FEMA
Director Michael Brown
resigns in wake of criticism
over agency response to
storm.


Corps:


Levee

more

reliable

By CAIN BUREAU
Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tents of migrant workers sit in the parking lot of an abandoned strip mall on Highway 90, Dec. 28, 2005, four months after Hurricane Katrina.



Officials: Millions came to help after Katrina


By MARY FOSTER and
SHELIA BYRD
Associated Press Writers
NEW ORLEANS
- They came by the hun-
dreds, then by the thou-
sands and by the millions.
State officials and relief
organizations estimate '
more than 2 million people
- from celebrities to
everyday people poured
into Louisiana and
Mississippi after Hurricane
Katrina.
They rebuilt houses, fed
families, provided medi-
cal care, hauled debris,
restored parks and created
playgrounds.
And they helped give
a region smashed by the
Aug. 29, 2005, hurricane
a fighting chance to
rebound.
"It is just astounding to
me," said Aleis Tusa, com-
munication director for
New Orleans Habitat for
Humanity, which estimates
more than 120,000 volun-
teers have worked in its
home construction efforts
since Katrina. About 200
a day are still at work in
neighborhoods still in
need of rebuilding, she
said. "And these are peo-
ple that come on their own
nickel, pay for transporta-
tion and a place to stay."
Habitat for Humanity
has built 315 houses in
New Orleans alone since
the storm. Many others
have been built along the
Gulf Coast, with 15 cur-
rently under construction.
Among its projects were
houses in the Musicians'
Village, designed to give
performers a post-storm
refuge. The area now has
77 houses.
Sandra Sheffield, a
retired probation officer
from San Diego, was back
in New Orleans for a sec-
ond volunteer effort with
Habitat for Humanity ear-
lier this week.
"I did five days two
years ago and just loved
-the city and the people,"
said Sheffield, 60. "So I
treated my granddaughter
and her friend to a trip to'
New Orleans if they would
volunteer a day. I'm just
sorry it's not more."
The Mississippi
Commission for Volunteer
Service said more than


954,000 volunteers have
been a part of rebuilding
Mississippi, contributing
almost 10 million hours
since Katrina.
The hurricane crashed
ashore the morning of
Aug. 29 at Buras, La., then
cartwheeled to the north
making landfall again near
the Louisiana-Mississippi
state line. Its storm surge
broke levees, flooding 80
percent of New Orleans,
and swept far inland on the
Mississippi coast
"We had tons of federal
assistance, but people's
personal lives could not
have been accommodated
without the volunteers,"
said Les Fillingame, mayor
of Bay St. Louis, Miss.
"They were just invaluable.
That's something you can
never thank them enough
for. It's overwhelming that
people from all over the
iountr raver fu their time


and leisure time and gave I-:., NEW ORLEANS Five
their blood and sweat." years after Hurricane
Bay St. Louis bore the ASSOCIATED PRESS Katrina flooded more than
brunt of the storm in In this photograph taken by AP Images for Rebuilding Together, Chris Chase and Nell 80 percent of this city, the
Mississippi. In Louisiana, Alexander take time off from their jobs at Sears in Chicago to volunteer with Rebuilding Army Corps of Engineers
at least 1.15 million volun- Together's Fifty for Five, to help rebuild 50 homes in five days in the Gentilly neighborhood says billions of dollars of
teers showed up to work, of New Orleans, Thursday. Rebuilding Together, a national non-profit, created Fifty for Five to work has made the city
according to Janet Pace commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and has rebuilt more than 750 homes much safer and many of its
with the Louisiana Service in the Gulf Coast since 2005. defenses could withstand
Commission. a storm as strong as the
deadly 2005 hurricane.
[ -.Surprisingly, many locals
S- even the vocal critics
,-of the Army Corps say
its assessment of work
done on the levee system
01 is not far off the mark.
Since Katrina flooded New
Orleans on Aug. 29, 2005,
and killed more than 1,800
people, New Orleans has
become a round-the-clock
construction site and
Congress gave the Army
Corps more than $14 bil-
lion to fix and upgrade the
-".levees and other defenses.
"Numerous breaches in
-..the hurricane protection
system led to the flooding
that devastated the New
1Orleans area. The corps
ALsays about half of the work
is complete, and the rest
should be finished by next
-summer.
"'The good news is that
the Corps of Engineers
has done an about-face in
its sense of urgency," said
Sandy Rosenthal, the exec-
S, .utive director of Levees.
Org, a citizens group
ASSOCIATED PRESS formed after Katrina that's
In this photograph taken by AP Images for Rebuilding Together, Ruby Wright, a volunteer from Houma, La., paints the finish- waged numerous battles
ing touches on a home in the Gentilly neighborhood of New Orleans as part of Rebuilding Together's Fifty for Five. with the corps.











BRIEFS


EPA OKs lead in
ammunition
WASHINGTON The
Environmental Protection
Agency on Friday denied
a petition by five environ-
mental groups to ban lead
in hunting ammunition,
saying the issue is not
within the agency's juris-
diction.
The EPA said it did not
have the authority to enact
the ban, aimed at protect-
ing wildlife, under the
Toxic Substances Control
Act, as the groups had
requested.
But the agency said ifs
still reviewing another part
of the petition, to ban lead
fishing sinkers.
The EPA informed one
of the groups, American
Bird Conservancy, of the
decision in a letter.


FDA to inspect
large egg farms
WASHINGTON
- The Food and Drug
Administration is planning
to inspect the country's
largest egg farms before
the end of next year follow-
ing the massive recall that
has sickened as many as
1,500 people.
Inspectors will visit
about 600 large egg farms
that produce 80 percent
of the nation's eggs. Most
of those farms have gone
largely uninspected for
decades.
The FDA's plan for
heightened inspections
came after more than half
a billion eggs linked to
cases of salmonella poison-
ing were recalled from two
Iowa farms this month.
* ASSOCIATED PRESS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Teresa Hines of Dayton, Ohio (right) raises her arm in prayer during the 'Restoring Honor' rally, organized by Glenn Beck, at
the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Saturday. ,


Beck: Restore traditional values


By PHIUP ELLIOTT and
NAFEESA SYEED
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Conservative commentator
Glenn Beck and tea party
champion Sarah Palin
appealed Saturday to a
vast, predominantly white
crowd on the National Mall
to help restore traditional
American values and honor
Martin Luther King's mes-
sage. Civil rights leaders
who accused the group
of hijacking King's legacy
held their own rally and
march.
While Beck billed his
event as Qonpolitical, activ-
ists from around the nation
said their show of strength
was a clear sign..that they
can make a difference in
the country's future and
that they want a govern-
ment that will listen and
unite.
Palin told the tens of
thousands who stretched
from the marble steps of
the Lincoln Memorial to the
grass of the Washington
Monument that calls
to transform the coun-
try weren't enough. "We
must restore America and
restore her honor," said the
former Alaska governor,
echoing the name of the
rally, "Restoring Honor."
Palin, the GOP vice presi-
dential nominee in 2008 and
a potential White House
contender in 2012, and
Beck repeatedly cited King
and made references to the
Founding Fathers. Beck
put a heavy religious cast
on nearly all his remarks,
sounding at times like an
evangelical preacher.
"Something beyond
imagination is happening,"
he said. "America today


Fed: Secrets

leaked by

contractor
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Obama administration
accused
an ana-
lyst who
worked at
the State
Depart-
ment of
leaking
top secret
Kim informa-
tion about
North Korea to a reporter.
Steven Kim, who worked
at State as an employee of
a contractor, maintains his
innocence.
Kim was indicted on
Friday and charged with
illegally disclosing national
defense information.


begins to turn back to
God."
Beck exhorted the crowd
to "recognize your place to
the creator. Realize that he
is our king. He is the one
who guides and directs our
life and protects -us." He
asked his audience to pray
more. "I ask, not only if you
would pray on your knees,
but pray on your knees but
with your door open for
your children to see," he
said.
A group of civil rights
activists organized by the
Rev. Al Sharpton held
a counter rally at a high
school, then embarked on
a three-mile march to the
site of a planned monu-


ment honoring King. The
site, bordering the Tidal
Basin, was notifar from the
Lincoln Memorial where
Beck and the others spoke
about two hours earlier.
Sharpton and the several
thousand 'marching with
him crossed paths with
some of the crowds leaving
Beck's rally. People wearing
"Restoring Honor" and tea
party T-shirts looked on as
Sharpton's group chanted
"reclaim the dream" and
"MLK, MLK." Both sides
were .generally restrained,
although there was some
mutual taunting.
One woman from the
Beck rally shouted to the
Sharpton marchers: "Go to


church. Restore America
with peace." Some civil
rights marchers chanted
"don't drink the tea" to peo-
ple leaving Beck's rally.
Sharpton told his rally
it was important to keep
King's dream alive and
that despite progress more
needs to be done. "Don't
mistake progress for arriv-
al," he said.
-.He poked fun at the
Beck-organized rally, say-
ing some participants were
the same ones who used
to, call civil rights leaders
troublemakers. 'The folks
who used to criticize us
for marching are trying to
have a march themselves,"
he said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The crowd attending the 'Restoring Honor' rally, organized by Glenn Beck, is seen from
the top of the Washington Monument in Washington on Saturday. In the foreground is the
National World War II Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial is at the top.




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GFB A5 Great Thursdays
6LC at First Baptist Church of Lake City
Thursday, Sept 2: Rev. Stephen Ahrens, performing the Biblical Drama "Peter,
The Rock"; Lois Jane, Country Gospel Artist and Dove Award Nominee
Thursday, Sdpt 9: Dr. Ed Johnson, Florida Baptist Convention's Cooperative
Program Director; "Father & Sons Quartet" featuring Florida State Rep.
Dennis Baxley and his 3 sons.
Thursday, Sept 16: Christian Comedian Lanny Moody, "The Funniest Man Ever
to Live in Georgia"; Robin Noel, Contemporary Christian Artist and Dove
Award Nominee
Thursday, Sept. 23: Dr. Willie L. Reid, Pastor of Fellowship Bible Baptist Church;
"The Chancel Choir" of the First Presbyterian Church of Lake City
Thursday, Sept. 30: Dr. Thomas Kinchen, President of the Baptist College of
Florida; The Praise & Worship Team of.the Baptist College of Florida

182 N.E. Justice St. Lake City
For more info 386-752-5422


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


VHTfffN r
Vmg


[Ww.& odtveioid~c-


I ..-!


l irrife M. '











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY. AUGUST 29, 2010


THE WEATHER



CHANCE i- ISOLATED ISOLATED ISOLATED
-STORMS TT.STO RMS T-SORMS T-STORMS



HI89LO HI91LO HI91LO H92LO0


NATIONAL FORECAST: A broad ridge of high pressure will continue to provide abundant sun-
shine and warm temperatures for the Northeast today. More active weather will be seen from
the Lower Mississippi Valley to the Gulf Coast with thunderstorms and locally heavy rainfall.
Meanwhile, an upper-level trough will promote cool conditions from the West Coast states to
Montana.


. ISOLATED
' T-STORMS



HI92LO


- *"'


desta
89/70

Tallahassee LakeCity.
39 71 89 70
Gainesville
Panama City 9 70
86, 74 Ocala
89'71


Tampa *
91.77


I
Ft Myer
92, 75


City
* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
8 72 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
,7 Gainesville
0 0 Jacksonville
Odando Cape Canaveral Key West
91 75 3878 LakeCity
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
89'76 Orlando
0 FL Lauderdale Panama City
rs 90' 79 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
93.,' 77 Miami Tampa
o1 7o Valdnosta


Key West W. Palm Beach
9 0. ..1


Monday
S9 ;5- in
90c 75' pc
59 82 1
93' 75



91 70 pc
90 1 I
94 76 I
91 72, pc:
93 75 PC
86 73 l
86 72 I
91 ;2 pc
94 76 1
69 71 Dp
89 81 I


Tuesday
90 75. p..
;.9 76 pc
91 82 pL
*4 15 p,:
91 72 pI'
9 72 p..:
91: l l
91 71 pC
91 1l p.uC
95 76 p: .
91 73 pC:
94 75 p,:
90 75 pc
90 75 p.
93 71 p.:
93 76 pc
91 71 p,?
90 60 pc
7+


----1 *







Cold Front

Warm Front


Frontr
ocean
ColdFon
Warm .. Frnl :


a. ?- - F1 '-a*~F-~ -'o;tyv'*( 4 v 'S 0. .I n~~.T -a r. ..., " r.-.-~ .%.x. r- 14. . .-. -.


YESTERDAYS NATIONAL EXTREMES

Saturday Today


High: 1060, Camden. S.C. Low: 32, Meacham, Ore.

Saturday Today Saturday Today


SUN .,


86 Sunrise today 7:06 a.m.
74 Sunset today 7:57 p.m. -
89 Sunrise tom. 7:06 a.m. EXIIB .. ,
70 Sunset tom. 7:55 p.m. 10 Itisislbum ; I i
98 in 1954 Today's
64 in 1984 MOON ura-volet :
Moonrise today 10:24 p.m.' radiation rson i
Moonset today 11:24 a.m. for re ara on
0.00" Moonrise torn. 11:03 p.m. ta scale r 1 nm U
4.90" Moonset tom. 12:21 p.m. .
37.07" .e+',
36.07" weather corn
6.04" 1 '
36.17"
Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. v. Forecasts, data and graph-
1 8 15 23 Ics 201,0 Weather Central
Last New First Full ,. i LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com

a. '.f ,..' f 1 'r *. --. -,, -
/"++4 ...........- "' .. ++ v iY+
now%*.. ....


Onj l lms date Irn
S1984, the rign rem.
perature in Torpekb.
I. an reacned 110
degrees for only the
j second trne since
the Dust Bowl ere of
She 1930s.


Get Connectei
00 oed


Q*.^:a


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffato
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
80/49/0 89/60/s Des M
79/67/0 84/64/pc Detro
56/54/.03 59/49/c El Pa
84/71/0 82/68/pc Falrba
82/62/0 92/66/s Green
69/51/0 69/49/t Hartf
88/73/0 85/69/t Honol
76/62/0 92/58/pc Houst
68/51/0 65/42/t Indlan
77/61/0 89/71/s Jacks
79/55/0 87/62/s Jacks
89/74/0 87/72/s Kansa
87/58/0 90/62/s Las Ve
88/68/0 89/63/s Uttle
84/59/0 88/53/pc Los A
83/65/0 91/70/s Memp
87/51/0 91/67/s Miam
82/55/0 87/63/s Minne
91/73/0 90/66/s Mobil
92/69/0 96/79/s New0
86/76/0 85/77/t NewY
89/62/0 91/61/pc Oklah


lolnes
It

inks
nsboro
ord
ulu
don
lapolls
on MS
onvllle
is City
egas
Rock
ngeles
phls
I s
lapolls
e
Orieans
York
oma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
87/62/0
82/58/0
85/73/0
54/50/.43
89/68/0
82/53/0
83/76/0
95/73/0
89/61/0
88/73/0
86/75/0
89/65/0
95/79/0
90/68/0
69/63/0
91/73/0
92/81/0
88/67/0
79/74/.10
80/75/.25
83/62/0
90/60/0


HI/Lo/W CITY


88/66/pc
88/67/s
89/71/t
61/39/c
89/65/s
93/62/s
88/73/s
93/78/t
92/68/s
84/73/t
88/72/t
91/72/s
89/66/s
86/72/t
64/59/pc
86/73/t
91/79/t
89/73/s
86/74/t
87/77/t
92/71/s
92/72/s


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W


Omaha 87/63/0
Orlando 91/76/0
Philadelphia 83/62/0
Phoenix 95/80/0
Pittsburgh 82/51/0
Po#tland ME 82/52/0
Portland OR 64/53/0
Raleigh 89/70/0
Rapid City 78/60/0
Reno 69/58/0
Richmoid 87/65/0
Sacramento 71/57/0
St. Louis 89/62/0
Salt Lake City 87/66/0
San Antonio 93/66/0
San Diego 64/61/0
San Francisco 65/57/0
Seattle 60/52/0
Spokane 60/48/0
Tampa 90/74/0
Tucson 88/70/0
Washington 87/68/0


89/71/pc
91/75/t
91/71/s
96/77/pc
88/58/s
87/61/s
71/53/pc
91/64/s
95/59/pc
64/44/t
91/63/s
75/55/pc
90/71/pc'
77/54/pc
95/77/pc
70/61/pc
64/53/pc
65/52/pc
69/48/pc
91/77/t
94/72/pc
92/68/s


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today '
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Acapuico 86/77/0 91/77/pc La Paz 61/30/0 59/33/sh Rio 77/70/0 86/68/pc
Amsterdam 63/50/.03 61/55/sh Lima 64/59/0 64/57/pc Rome 84/70/0 88/67/s
Athens 95/78/0 96/76/s London 68/50/0 65/50/pc St. Thomas VI 89/80/0 89/82/t
Auckland 64/50/0 59/50/sh Madrid 93/66/0 92/61/s San Juan PR 90/80/0 88/83/t
BelJIng 90/64/0 89/69/pc Mexico City 75/52/0 75/53/pc, Santiago 63/48/0 66/33/pc
Berlin 64/52/0 62/50/sh Montreal 77/61/0 88/66/s Seoul 82/77/0 '83/75/t
Buenos Aires 72/48/0 55/44/pc Moscow 61/48/0 56/47/sh Singapore 90/79/0 86/76/t
Cairo 100/77/0 96/77/s Nairobi 72/61/0 73/57/sh Sydney 59/48/0 64/48/pc
Geneva 68/55/.03 67/49/s Nassau 93/81/1.53 92/77/t Tel Aviv 91/79/0 93/75/s
Havana 91/73/0 89/75/pc New Delhi 95/82/0 92/77/t Tokyo 91/81/0 92/78/pc
Helsinki 61/45/0 62/55/pc Oslo 52/48/.31 54/44/sh Toronto 82/59/0 88/66/s
Hong Kong 90/81/.38 89/81/t Panama 84/77/.55 86/75/t Vienna 66/59/.40 63/52/s
Kingston 88/81/0 91/77/t Paris 70/55/0 68/51/pc Warsaw 64/55/0 64/48/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


+- "["-" .,",,, .


"r .. .* ... -' "' +
YEAR




5 1 -






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Pensacoa
86:75


..1


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


%Ir~~*rml 0 mom -IU ~b.l C~-.---


IMAPi r r- r^,


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


I


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4000,F"


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Sunday,August 29, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fall registration
ends today
Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has final
registration for its fall
league from 1-5 p.m.
today at Brian's Sports.
Ages are 4-17 for T-ball,
machine pitch and
fastpitch leagues. Cost is
$45 or $65 for two
players from the same
family. A birth certificate
is required to register.
For details, e-mail
information@girlssoft
ballassociation. org.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Players needed
for travel team
A 12-under travel
baseball team is looking
for experienced players
for local tournaments.
Practices and tryouts
are 5:30 p.m. Sunday
at Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Chris
Williams at 344-5976.

ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
.Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.

SEMINOLES
Kickoff Tailgate
Party Thursday
The Lake City
Seminole Club is hosting
a Kickoff Tailgate Party
from 6-9 p.m. Thursday
at the Lake City Elks
Club on Lake DeSoto.
Fans are invited to bring
their favorite tailgate food
to kick off the new era in
Seminole football.
For details, call Steve
Gordon at 365-5413.

GATORS
Kickoff social
on Thursday
The North Florida
Gator Club is hosting a
kickoff social at 6 p.m.
Thursday at the home- of
John and Betty Norris at
1671 SE Inglewood Ave.
Hank Astengo of TV-20
Sports is guest speaker.
Dinner will be provided
by the club. Bring lawn
chairs.
For details, call Ron at
(386) 397-3378.

N From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
U Fort White High
volleyball at Branford
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Tuesday
Fort White High
volleyball at Williston
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball at Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Suwannee
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Ed White
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Brooks
County High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Madison


County High, 7:30 p.m.


Columbia High s Rakeem Battle 122) is tackled from behind by Colton Jones (17) after breaking free on a 64-yard kicoff return
against Fort White High on Friday in Fort White.


Tigers serve up revenge in classic


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn

It wasn't the kind of offensive per-
formance that the Columbia High
Tigers were use to after last season,
but it was a win. Columbia's defense
was the strong point in the 23-13 win
over county rival Fort White High in
the kickoff classic on Friday in Fort
White.
There .were flaws in the Columbia
offense, but that's half of the reason
for the kickoff classic games. The
Tigers' offense did put up 144 yards
on the ground with a combination of
different players touching the ball.
One of the most unique statistics
to come out of the game were the
53 rushing yards to come out of the
game from senior defensive tackle
Timmny Jernigan, who can now be
called a two-way starter.
Columbia High coach Craig Howard
said it was a plan that the Tigers were


planning on using all summer, and
his load could increase as the season
continues. :
He's a 280-pound halfback, and
that's a weapon back there," Howard
said. "The key is how many snaps can
he take. He's going to have to be in
tip-top shape. He could wear himself
down out there carrying eight or nine
defenders down the field."
Jernigan admitted that he's going
to have to improve his game-shape
to be dominant on both sides of the
ball, but also noted that he's in good
enough shape to take every snap on
defense.
The Tigers also received 53 yards
from Barnabus Madison and 30 yards
from quarterback Nigel Atkinson.
Atkinson scored twice.
Throwing the ball he was less suc-
cessful.
* Atkinson completed two passes
on the first drive, but finished the
game 2-of-12 in the category. Howard


believes it's a unit problem and he will -
improve as the season goes on.
"I'm sure he's disappointed," he
said. "That was his first time under
center. He's got room for improve-
ment and can do better. He's got to
get help from the protection and the
players running the right routes. We
won't win too many games with him
going 2-of-12 passing. I'm just glad it
happened early and not next week."
Columbia wasn't the only team
with offensive struggles, as the Tiger
defense held Fort White to only 14
yards of offense. Punter Colton Jones
minus 38 yards on punting misad-
ventures helped the Indians' ground
game'account for minus 5 yards.
"That's the best defense 'I've seen
us play in my three years here,"
Howard said. "Both defenses played
really well. They did a really good
job too. We have a great defense. Our
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER la- I., Fm-,:-,


Sin the Tigers 23-13 win


Columbia 7 6 0 10 23
FortWhite 0 13 0 0 13
First Quarter
C-Jernigan I run ( Lunde kick), 3:08
Second Quarter
FW-Faulkner 8 return' of blocked
punt (Jones kick), 10:40
FW-Faulkner 79 return of blocked
FG (kick failed), 2:53
C-Atkinson 13 run (kick failed), 1:42
Fourth Quarter
C-Atkinson 18 run (Lunde kick),
10:38
C-Lunde 38 FG, 6:02
Columbia FortWhite
First downs 8 2
Rushes-yards 43-144 32-(-5)
Passing 36 19
Comp-Att-Int 2-12-0 5-15-0
Punts-Avg. 2-35 4-27.5
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 14-90 I 1-90
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Columbia, Madison 18-
59, Jernigan 8-53, Atkinson 12-30, Battle
2-2. Fort White, Dixon 16-41, Baker 5-2,
Calloway 1-0, Snider 2-(-4), Blake 5-(-6).
Jones 3-(-38).
PASSING-Columbia, Atkinson 2-12-
36-0. Fort White, Snider 3-10-14-0, Baker
2-5-5-0.
RECEIVING-Columbia, Barber 1-19,
Barona I -17. Fort White, Blake 3-9, Legree
2-10.


Howard meets


future of CHS


Tigers hold camp
at Memorial
Stadium Saturday.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn

It is often said that high
school football programs
are built over generations.
That's what Columbia High
coach Craig Howard envi-
sions with the Tigers and
was one of the reasons for
the Future Tiger football
camp at Memorial Stadium
on Saturday in Lake City.
To have a tradition in high
school football, there has
to be an enthusiasm from
young players. Howard
believes that it starts with
the program of today, and
brought that to more than
120 future players following


Friday's kickoff classic win.
"I think it's important for
myself and the coaches to
be down there working with
them," Howard said. "It's a
special part of my job."
Howard gave most of the
players the morning off after
a 23-13 win against Fort
White High in the kickoff
classic, but he asked a few
of the senior leaders to be
involved with the event.
"We had about 10 or 11 of
the ],l_'. ,-rs out there talk-
ing to the future Tigers,"
Howard said. "Ben Bell just
gave a great talk about the
important of academics."
Academics was just
one of the points stressed
at the camp to go along
with basic football skills.
Howard wanted to drive
FUTURE continued on 2B


U '.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High coach Craig Howard talks with a group of more than 120 'future Tiger' players
during a camp at Memorial S.ijurr, on Saturday in Lake City.


V









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. AUGUST 29, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Grand Prix of
Belgium, at Francorchamps, Belgium
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, NAPA Auto Parts 200, at
Montreal
3 p.m.
SPEED -American Le Mans Series, at
Bowmanville, Ontario
BASKETBALL
9:30 a.m.
ESPN2 FIBA,World Championship,
preliminary round, U.S. vs. Slovenia, at
Istanbul,Turkey
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johnnie
-Walker Championship, final round, at
Perthshire, Scotland
Noon
TGC PGA Tour, The Barclays, final
round, at Paramus, N.J.
2 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Barclays, final
round, at Paramus, N.J.
TGC LPGA, Canadian Women's
Open, final round, at Winnipeg, Manitoba
4 p.m.
NBC USGA, U.S. Amateur
Championship, championship match, at
University Place,Wash.
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Boeing
Classic, final round, at Snoqualmie,Wash.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
II a.m.
ESPN World Series, third place
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
3 p.m.
ABC World Series, championship
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati
2 p.m.
TBS N.Y.Yankees at Chicago White
Sox
S8 p.m.
ESPN Boston at Tampa Bay
MOTORSPORTS
6 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, Indianapolis Grand Prix
(same-day tape)
7 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, at
Indianapolis (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
FOX Preseason, Pittsburgh at
Denver
PREP FOOTBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN Good Counsel (Md.) vs. St.
Xavier (Ohio)
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Bass Pro Shops
Shootout, at Ontario, Calif. (same-day
Scape)l
SOCCER
10 p.m.
ESPN2 D.C. United at CD Chivas
USA
WNBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, conference semifi-
nals, game 3, teams TBD (if necessary)

Monday
BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
ESPN -*FIBA, World Championship,
preliminary round, Brazil vs. U.S., at
Istanbul,Turkey
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN N.Y. Mets at Atlanta
WGN Chicago White i Sox at
Cleveland
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, first round, at
NewYork
7 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, first round, at
New-York


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 78 50 .609 -
Tampa Bay 78 50 .609 -
UBoston 74 55 .5744 1/2
'Toronto 68 61 .527101/2
Baltimore 46 83 .357321/2
S Central Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 75 55 .577 -
Chicago 70 58 ,.547 4
Detroit 64 66 .492 II
Kansas City 54 74 .422 20
Cleveland 52 76 .406 22
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 73 55 .570 -
Oakland 63 64 .4969 1/2
Los Angeles 63 66 .488101/2
Seattle 50 79 .388231/2
Friday's Games
Cleveland 15, Kansas City 4
Toronto 3, Detroit 2, II innings
Boston 3,Tampa Bay I
Texas 7, Oakland 3
Chicago White Sox 9, N.Y.Yankees 4
Baltimore 3. L.A.Angels I
Minnesota 6, Seattle 3
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Detroit 4
Minnesota I, Seattle 0.
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Chicago White Sox (n)
Boston at Tampa Bay (n)
Oakland at Texas (n)
Baltimore at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games '


Kansas City (Chen 8-7) at Cleveland
(Carmona 11-12), 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 6-1 I) at Toronto
(Rzepczynski 1-2), 1:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 0-0) at Chicago
White Sox (Floyd 9-10), 2:05 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 11-8) at Texas
(C.Lewis 9-10), 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 7-13) at L.A.
Angels (Jer.Weaver 11-9), 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 15-9) at Seattle
(French 2-4), 4:10 p.m.


Boston (Lackey 12-7) at Tampa Bay
(J.Shields 12-1 1). 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland,
7:05 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 7: 10p.m.
Texas at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 73 55
Philadelphia 72 57
Florida 65 62
New York 64 64
Washington 54 75
Central Division


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago
Pittsburgh


San Diego


W L
74 54
69 57
60 68
58 70
54 75
43 85
West Division
W L
76 52


San Francisco 71 58
Colorado 66 61
Los Angeles 67 62
Arizona 51 78
Friday's Games
St. Louis 4,Washington 2


Pct GB
.570 -
.5581 1/2
.5127 1/2
.500 9
.419191/2

Pct GB
.578 -
.548 4
.469 14
.453 16
.419201/2
.336 31

Pct GB
.594 -
.5505 1/2
.5209 1/2
.5199 1/2
.395251/2


Cincinnati 7, Chicago Cubs I
N.Y. Mets 2, Houston I
Florida 7,Atlanta I
Milwaukee 7, Pittsburgh 2
LA. Dodgers 6, Colorado 2
Philadelphia 3, San Diego 2, 12 innings
Arizona 6, San Francisco 0
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 3, San Diego I
St. Louis at Washington (n)
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati (n)
Florida at Atlanta'(n)
Houston at N.Y. Mets (n)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
LA. Dodgers at Colorado (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Coleman 1-1) at
Cincinnati (Volquez 3-2), 1:10 p.m.
Houston (Norris 6-7) at N.Y. Mets
(Dickey 8-5), 1:10 p.m.
Florida (o.Johnson 11-5) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 11-12), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 17-8) at
Washington (Lannan 5-6), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Burres 2-3) at Milwaukee
(Bush 6-1 1),2:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Lilly 8-8) at Colorado
(Hammel 8-7), 3:10 p.m.
Arizona (R.Lopez 5-12) at San
Francisco (M,Cain 10-10), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 7-10) at San
Diego (Richard 12-5), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p:m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers,
10:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

Little League

WORLD SERIES
Saturday
International Championship: Tokyo 3,
Kaohsiung,Taiwan 2,7 innings
U.S. Championship: Waipahu, Hawaii
10, Pearland, Texas 0, 5 innings, 10-run
rule
Today
At Lamade Stadium
Third Place
Kaohsiung, Taiwan vs. Pearland, Texas,
II a.m.
World Championship
Japan vs.Waipahu, Hawaii, 3 p.m.


FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
St. Louis 36, New England 35
Green Bay 59, Indianapolis 24
Friday's Games
Atlanta 16, Miami 6
Washington 16, N.Y. Jets II
New Orleans 36, San Diego 21
Philadelphia 20, Kansas City 17
Saturday's Games
Cleveland at.Detroit (n)
Cincinnati at Buffalo (n)
N.Y. Giants at Baltimore (n)
Jacksonville at Tampa Bay (n)
Dallas at Houston (n)
Tennessee at Carolina (n)
Seattle at Minnesota (n)
Arizona at Chicago (n)
San Francisco at Oakland (n)
Today's Game
Pittsburgh at Denver, 8 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 2
Buffalo at Detroit, 6:30 p.m..
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

TUBIL 7


New England at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Baltimore at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston. 8 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 10 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR NATIONWIDE
NAPA Auto Parts 200
Site: Montreal.
Schedule:Today, race, 2:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
2-6 p.m.).
Track: Circuit Gilles Villeneuve (road
course, 2.709 miles).
Race distance: 200.466 miles, 74 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Belgian Grand Prix
Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30-10 a.m.).
Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road
course, 4.35 miles).
Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES: Grand
Prix of Mosport, Today (Speed, 4-7 p.m.),
Bowmanville, Ontario. ,


BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Washington vs.Atlanta
Friday
Atlanta 101, Washington 77, Atlanta
wins series 2-0
NewYork vs. Indiana "
New York 85, Indiana 73
Today
New York at Indiana. 8 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Seattle vs. Los Angeles
Seattle 79, Los Angeles 66
Saturday
Seattle at Los Angeles (n)
Phoenix vs. San Antonio
Phoenix 106, San Antonio 93
Saturday
Phoenix at San Antonio
Monday
San Antonio at Phoenix, 10 p.m., if
necessary

TENNIS

U.S. Open

A look at the U.S. Open:
Surface: Hard courts.
Site: USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Stadium in NewYork.
Schedule: Play begins. Monday. The
women's singles final is Sept. I1; the men's
singles final is Sept. 12.
No. I-Seeded Man: Rafael Nadal of
Spain.
No. I-Seeded Woman: Caroline
Wozniacki of Denmark.
2009 Men's Singles Champion'. Juan
Martin del Potro of Argentina, who will
not defend his title in 2010 after having
wrist surgery in May.
2009 Women's Singles Champion: Kim
Clijsters of Belgium, the first mother to
win a Grand Slam title since 1980.
Last Year: Because of rain, both singles
finals were pushed back a day, with the
women finishing on Sunday, and the men
on Monday. Del Potro came back to
beat five-time reigning champion Roger
Federer 6f Switzerland 3-6, 7-6 (5), 4-6,
7-6 (4), 6-2 for his first Grand Slam title.
It's the only time Federer has lost to
someone other than Rafael Nadal in a
major final. Clijsters won her second U.S.
Open championship by beating Wozniacki
7-5, 6-3. It was Clijsters' first Grand Slam
tournament after taking 2 1/2 years off to
start a family.
Missing in 2010:Three-time women's
champion SerenaWilliams withdrew from
the tournament, saying she is not recov-
ered fully after surgery for cuts on her
right foot in July. Williams is the first No.
I woman to miss the U.S. Open since
the women's rankings began in 1975.
Two-time champion Justine Henin is out
for the season after injuring her elbow, at
Wimbledon.
Noteworthy: Nadal is trying to com-
plete a career Grand Slam by winning
the U.S. Open for the first time. He has
won the past two major tournaments, the
French Open andWimbledon, to raise his
total to eight Grand Slam championships.
Nadal never has made it past the semifi-
nals at Flushing Meadows.
TV: ESPN2,Tennis Channel, CBS.
Online: www.usopen.org

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME.
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the-above cartoon.


Ans: AND AND
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: BRAWL ADAGE ENTITY SAFARI
Answer: What spring does after a long, cold winter -
BRINGS "RE-LEAF"


ANTONIIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Boaz Simmons, 11, receives a Columbia T-shirt from Virgil Scippio during the Future Tiger
camp at Memorial Stadium on Saturday in Lake City.



FUTURE: Howard wants to build
!


Continued From Page 11


across the point that no
player however skilled can
play Tiger football without
the right dedication in the
classroom. .
The camp served as not
only a lesson for the youth
of Columbia County, but
also as a starting block in
building the Tiger program
for the future.
"I' think it's the most
important piece. of the
puzzle," Howard said. 'We
have to get the community
involved and behind the
team. It's such art impor-
tant key 1o any program.
You look at the great area,


state and national teams,
and that's how they do it."
Howard gave an
example of a team on the
Tigers' schedule this sea-
son as one that he believes
Columbia should learn
from.
"A good example is
Madison County," he said.
"They have six-year olds
running the same plays as
the varsity team. They don't
need to rebuild. They just
reload. Everyone's doing
the same thing no matter if
they're six or 16."
Beside 'working the
camp, the Tigers are also


incorporating the local
middle school coaches
into the framework. Both
Richardson and Lake City
middle school coaches
were on the sidelines for
Friday's game.
"Each year we're getting
a little better at working
with the youth," Howard
said. "We had Al Nelson
from Richardson and Billy
Jennings from Lake City
on the sidelines last night
coaching in Tiger gear."
Howard hopes that it will
translate into the future of
Columbia being one step
ahead of the game.


04
.



.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Darrin Brock, 12, leads the pack during the fastest future Tiger competition at the Future
Tiger Football camp at Memorial Stadium on Saturday in Lake City.


ACROSS

1 Gill
alternative
5 Caesar's man
8 Gleeful cry
11 Between ports
12 "Orinoco Flow"
singer
14 Trail behind
15 Pond sight (2
wds.)
17 Large antelope
18 Sediment
19 Music category
(2 wds.)
21 Put onboard
23 Bruce and
Peggy
24 Accumulate
27 Director Kazan
29 Rover's
greeting
30 Honey farms
S34 Made a rude
sound
37 kwon do
38 Frank
39 Pedro's mom


41 Raucous
laughs
43 Roof
problem
45 Made thick
soup
.47 Diarist Nin
50 Joule
fraction
51 Hush-hush
(hyph.)
54 Rural addr.
55 Cuff
56 Not out
57 -
Enterprise
58 NFL events
59 Tennyson
heroine

DOWN


Chem room
Second-hand
Close by
Judges' props
Vice '
Gary's st.
Meg of films


Answer to Previous Puzzle



BALSAM SOIREE
UR BANA LAMENT
DIAL NYE G.AI
MOHA WKS
SSA WOK ESPY
THRILL DETOUR

DOG GIE NSULT


RHYMERS
OMS EUR MUFF

RETURN STEREO


ALDEN URAL


8 Seaweed
9 Puts up
pictures
10 Shivery feeling
13 First name in
flying


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

12 13 14 5 16 17 @ 8 9 110


16 Id companions
20 Fray
22 Rely
24 Contented
sigh
25 Hi-tech scan
26 Pro Bowl let-
ters
28 Lash holder
30 Tarzan
companion
31 take
forever!
32 Listener's
need
33 Drop in'on ,
35 Soft drink
36 Unexpected
victories
39 Not yours
40 Geronimo was
one
41 Mongol tents
42 Encourages
strongly
44 Coarse files
45 Machu Picchu
locale
46 Simpleton
48 Tailor's need
49 18-wheeler
52 Tablet
53 A Kennedy


8-30 2010 by UFS, Inc.


' Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SHOIMD




REDUNE

L -1 )







Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SUNDAY. AUGUST 29, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 22 file photo, Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre (center) signals in the huddle in the first quarter of an
NFL preseason football game against the San- Francisco 49ers in San Francisco.


Favre going where few have gone


By JON KRAWCZYNSKI
Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- The aches and pains
simply never go away for
Brett Favre anymore.
Nineteen NFL seasons
have taken their toll, and
when he gets out of bed
in the morning he feels
every one of the hits he's
taken. His ankle barks at
him as soon as his foot hits
the floor, his knees creak
as he stands up and his
back groans as he stretch-
es to get loosened up for
anQther day as a 40-year-
old quarterback.
"There's nothing on me
100 percent," Favre. said.
"There wasn't anything on
me 100 percent last year or


the year before. The sur-
geries, I think, have made
me a little better, but I've
played 309 straight games,
I can't complain."
He can't quit, either.
As he prepares to enter
his 20th season in the
league, Favre is going
where few quarterbacks
have gone before him.
And he's looking to lead
the Minnesota Vikings to
a place even fewer QBs
have taken this tortured
franchise to the Super
Bowl.
According .to STATS
LLC, 17 quarterbacks in.
NFL history have started
a season in which they
turned 40 by Nov. 1. The.
vast majority of those play-
ers spent the waning days


of their careers watching
from the sidelines. George
Blanda played until he was
48 as a kicker and backup
quarterback who did com-
plete 119 passes after turn-
ing 40.,
Favre is the only 40-year-
old quarterback to; win a
playoff game and one of
only three to start more
than six games in his 40s.
He joins Warren Moon and
Vinny Testaverde, who
each made 25 starts in
their 40s.
How does he do it? And
what makes him want
to leave a cushy life on
his 465-acre spread in
Hattiesburg, Miss., where
he has more money than
he could spend in two. life-
times, to endure another


season of punishment?
"I look at him and he's a
competitor," former quarter-
back Len Dawson told The
Associated Press in a tele-
phone interview.. "He loves
the game. He loves the com-
petition. He probably gets
bored. What's he going to
do when he's down on that
farm in Mississippi? Run
around on that tractor? That
would get old real quick."
If anyone can speak
to, the mentality of a 40-
year-old quarterback, it's
Dawson. The Hall of Famer
and Super Bowl winner is
.one of the select group to
play the position at that
age, when he started five
games for the Kansas City
Chiefs in his final season
in 1975.


Haynesworth's


nice act is win

gfor Washington


By JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON For
the- Washington Redskins,
the absolutely, positively
best moment concerning
their 'preseason win over
the New York Jets came
when Albert Haynesworth
opened his mouth and
didn't say anything to stir
up trouble.
Haynesworth even
cracked a joke after the 16-
11 victory Friday night, say-
ing he was heading to coach
Mike Shanahan's house for
dinner and a cigar.
"What I said last week is
behind me," Haynesworth
said. "I don't even remem-
ber what I said."
Haynesworth had used
the first twQ exhibition
games to express his dis-
pleasure with Shanahan,
adding fuel to the tit-for-
tat that has overshadowed
the Redskins for months.
It's safe to say that coach
and player aren't anywhere
close to being best friends,
but at least there will be no
new fires to put. out when
practice resumes Sunday.
Instead, the Redskins for
the first time have a tangible
feel for how Haynesworth
will probably be used in the
regular season. After being.
relegated to backup nose
tackle duty in the first two
games, he was out there


with the starters for much
of the time Friday night,
playing quite a bit at defen-
sive end as well as the nose
in a 3-4 alignment that he
-had been previously reluc-
tant to embrace.
"I'm just trying to get
down the end, and the
3-4 defense, to where
I can be dominant in it"
Haynesworth said. "My
body feels great, as far as
the wind and the power. ...
I can definitely improve a
whole lot"
Haynesworth's play was
one of the few interesting
highlights in a game that
didn't reveal much about
the Redskins' prospects
heading into the regular
season. The offense didn't
start its projected starting
backfield because quarter-
back Donovan McNabb is
nursing a sprained ankle,
fullback Mike Sellers has
a sprained knee and run-
ning back Clinton Portis
was given limited work so
the coaches could see what
Willie Parker could do.
One possible concern
is that Portis sprained an
ankle in the game.
"I don't think it is seri-
ous," Shanahan said. "I
don't know how bad it is,
but that's just guessing."
The offensive line still
looks like a mixed bag
better at pass protection
than run blocking.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Waipahu, Hawaii's Ezra Heleski (left) scores the game-winning run on a wild pitch as
Pearland, Texas pitcher Jaron Roblyer tags with an empty glove in the fifth inning of the
United States Championship baseball game at the Little League World Series Saturday in
South Williamsport, Pa. Hawaii won 10-0.


Hawaii goes for Little League title


By GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press

SOUTH WILLIAM-
SPORT, Pa., Hawaii's
offensive punch followed
Japan's stirring win in extra
innings to create some
high drama at the Little
League World Series.
Now, the two teams will
meet Sunday to decide who
flies home with a World
Series title.
Ryo Motegi's RBI
grounder through the
infield with two outs gave
Tokyo, Japan, a 3-2 win
over Kaoshiung, Taiwan,
to claim the internation-
al title Saturday, before
Noah Shackles' two-run
homer to center capped a
four-run first for the boys
from Waipahu, Hawaii, in
a 10-0 win over Pearland,
Texas, in the U.S.
championship.
Shackles finished 2 for
2 with three runs, and
lefty Ezra Heleski allowed
just two hits for the local
Waipio Little League from
Waipahu trying to win its
second tournament crown
in three years. The game
ended with one out in
the fifth because of Little
League's 10-run rule.
"USA! USA!," chanted
the Hawaii fans afterward.
Many held mini-state flags


and tea leaves they have
been waving in the stands
all week for good luck.
After avoiding elimina-
tion four straight days,
Hawaii has one more big
game to go. Their blowout
victory on a picture-perfect
summer afternoon was in
sharp contrast to Japan's
tight win.
"I wanted to connect, and
I was aiming for center,"
the 13-year-old Motegi said
through interpreter Brian
Thompson.
And that's about where
the ball ended up after just
slipping past shortstop
Chen-Wei Chen into left
center, allowing pinch-run-
ner Ryusuke Ikeda to score
the winning run.
Japan exchanged
high-fives at the plate,
shook hands with the
saddened Taiwan play-
ers, then posed with the
international champion-
ship banner at the mound.
"Very happy," Motegi
simply said about the post-
game celebration.
Taiwan came within
two outs of doing the cel-
ebrating with reliever
Shao-Fei Huang cruising
on the mound into the
sixth.
Leadoff hitter Koutaro
Kamikura's one-hopper
handcuffed the third base-


man and slipped into left
before Huang got a strike-
out, Kamikura advanced
to second on a throwing
error off a pickoff attempt
before Ryota Norimatsu's
solid single up the middle
tied the game at 2-2.
"The staff, especially the
kids, they believed in them-
selves, so they didn't feel
the pressure too much,"
manager Shingo Ariyasu
said.
Japan beat one of the
tournament's most, fear-
some teams at the plate,
after Taiwan had out-
scored opponents 46-1
over its first three games.
Taiwan took a 2-1 lead in
the second after Shang-
Yu Wu hit a fluke double
that deflected off of Japan
starter Natsuki Mizumachi
into left, then later scored
on a wild pitch.
Instead, it will be a Japan
team playing for the title
for the first time since 2007
to try to snap the United
States' five-year run as
Little League champs.
"It was a 50-50 game,"
Taiwan manager Tung-Yo
Ho said through inter-
preter Ming-Huang Yeh.
"Good defense and making
contact was going to win
this game and Japan did
that a little better than
us."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Braxton Stockton tries to hang onto the football while losing his footing
against Fort White High in the kickoff classic on Friday in Fort White.

CHS: Look to improve despite win


Continued From Page 1B

experience is there. I said
earlier that they would have
to carry us early in the sea-
son and I hope they can
carry us late too."
Both of Fort White's
scores came from former
Tiger Josh Faulkner, who
was injured late in the
game and had to be taken
away in an ambulance.
Early word is that it was
precautionary. Howard
was happy for Faulkner's
play on the field with two
special-team touchdowns.
"It was a pretty neat night
for him with the two touch-
downs," Howard said. "I
hope he's alright, because
it must have been thrilling
for him early. It really was
kind of neat."
Howard hopes that the


week between the classic
and the first game of the
regular season will be time
for improvement for the
Tigers.
"My standard quote is
that the biggest improve-
ment of .a football team
comes between week one
and week two," Howard
said. "What happens is that
players begin to understand
the no-huddle. They begin
to understand what it's like
to work with the officials.
They understand what
the speed is like when the
lights come on. It's tough to
get ready for that intensity
in practice."
Howard wants that speed
to get turned up each
week.
"It's a work in progress,"


he said. "We want to play
the game as fast as it can be
played. It's hard to keep up
with that. Most teams run
40 plays. We want to run 70
or 80 plays."
Still, Howard was glad
to erase memories of last
year's classic, but doesn't
want to think ahead to a
potential rematch next year.
"It just makes you think
of how good this team
could be if there was only
one team in Columbia
county like there use to
be," he said. "We want
to wish them the best of
luck the rest of the sea-
son, and we hope they go
undefeated. We just hope
next year that we play them
in the spring instead of the
fall."





Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS S..L AY AUGUST 29. 2010


Scenes


from


classics


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia High linebacker Austin Reiter (right) lunges to .grab Fort White High punter Colton Jones in the Tigers' 23-13 win against the Indians in the kickoff classic Friday in Fort White.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High senior Kaycee Baker (4) spikes a ball past Union County High defenders
during the Pre-Season Classic Thursday night. Fort White defeated Union County in three
sets 22-25, 25-14 and 15-7.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Dalton O'Dell scrambles to pick up a loose ball during the kickoff classic on
Friday in Fort White.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School seniors Haley Dicks (14) and Taylor Messer (17) position themselves
for a block against Fort White High in the Pre-Season Classic. Columbia beat Fert White
25-17, 25-20. Both teams open :rer seasons on the road Tuesday. Columbia travels to Union
County High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday. The Lady Indians open with a district game at Williston
High at 6:30 p.m. in '.Villiston


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Nigel Atkinson (12) prepares to hand the ball to Barnabus Madison (25)
during the kickoff classic on Friday in Fort White.








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
" - :"- om


BUSINESS


Sunday, August 29, 20 10


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS







Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcost.net


Profit

centers

increase

profits


One of the most
basic tools
available to
entrepreneurs
is a profit cen-
ter. A concept originated
in the 1940s by the great
management guru, Peter
Druker, profit centers
divide a company into
smaller entities allowing
entrepreneurs to measure
results more easily. These
results can be. used to hold
each unit accountable for
desired profit levels or
simply to ensure that they
are generating sufficient
profits.
Though not prudent for
organizations with sales of
less than 10 percent, busi-
nesses that sell more than
one product should use
the profit center model.
Without profit centers,
managers have a very dif-
ficult time figuring out their
goals and objectives.
Profit centers are simple
to set up. Accounting soft-
ware such as QuickBooks
allows entrepreneurs to
easily evaluate unique
profit centers by assign-
ing different categories of
accounts for both revenues
and expenses.
When using profit cen-
ters, costs and revenues
should be allocated to each
center. While revenues
are easy to allocate, costs
are a tad bit harder. It is*
important to realize that
the bottom line profit for
the center may not be 100
percent accurate due to the
process of allocating fixed
costs. However, as long as
the reporting process is
identical each month, the
measurement will be valid.
Most businesses have no
problem allocating variable
costs to a profit center. For
example, we were work-
ing with a lawyer whose
practice covered many
areas, but he was unsure
of where to spend his time.
Profit centers allowed this
lawyer to clearly measure
and manage how much
time he and his staff spent
with each client every
month. For a retail opera-
tion, the direct costs Would
be the cost of products
sold, which again, is easily
measured.
The process gets more
difficult when it comes to
allocating fixed costs. The
allocation of fixed costs
can be handled a number
of ways. One option is to
apply the overhead as a
function of sales for each
profit center. A second
alternative is to allocate
the costs as a function of
how much floor space they
utilize. And the list goes on.
Whatever the chosen allo-
cation method, as long as it
is consistently applied, the
measurement will be fine.
Now go out and make
sure you have a profit cen-
ter set up for each element
of your business. If you are
having difficulty setting up
profit centers, your accoun-
tant can provide assistance.
You can do this!
* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida


State University's College of
Business.


Risk, reward: Investors want safer bet


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
With con-
cerns
about the
economy
on the
minds of some investors,
many are choosing to
leave the stock market,
financial experts say.
The market is content-
ing to go up and down,
said John Kuykendall,
president of Gulf Coast
Financial Services. A lot of
negativity is surrounding
the market, he said.
"Uncertainty-and inves-
tor confidence is taking its
toll," he said.
People are nervous and
fearing a double-dip reces-
sion a recession fol-
lowed by a short recovery
and then another reces-
sion, said Steve Jones,
Edward Jones financial
adviser.
According to the
Investment Company
Institute, $33.1 billion was
withdrawn from domestic
stock market funds in the
first seven months of the
year.
' "There are large,
amounts of money coming
out of mutual-funds," Jones
said.
Large amounts of
money previously came
out of stock mutual fund-
ing in 1988 and 2001, both
of which were right before
a bull market, he said,
referring to the market
when stock prices show an
upward trend.
The stock market was


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
John Kuykendall, GulfCoast Financial Services Inc. president, compares the ebb and flow of today's stock market with those
of the recent past. 'The stock market is reflecting consumer confidence,' he said. 'People are having to take money out of
their investments for living expenses. They are afraid they're going to lose. I know the market is going to come back. That is
what this country is based on risk and reward'.'


down by 50 percent in
2008, but up by 20 last
year, Kuykendall said.
The majority of money
vacating the market was
within the last three
months.
"People tend to get in
when the market is going


up and out when the mar-
ket is going down," he
said.
But, historically, the
stock market has given the
greatest return on money
over a long period of time,
Jones said.
Money leaving stocks


Recession may.

have pushed US


births to new low


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer
The U.S. birth rate has
dropped for the second
year in a row, and experts
think the wrenching reces-
sion led many people to
put off having children.
The 2009 birth rate also
set a record: lowest in a
century.
Births fell 2.7 percent
last year even as the
population grew, numbers
released Friday by the
National Center for Health
Statistics show.
"It's a good-sized decline
for one year. Every month
is showing a decline from
the year before," said
Stephanie Ventura, the
demographer who oversaw
the report.
The birth rate, which
takes into account changes
in the population, fell to
13.5 births for every 1,000
people last year. That's
down from 14.3 in 2007
and way down from 30 in
1909, when it was com-
mon for people to have big
families.
"It doesn't matter how
you look at it fertility
has declined," Ventura
said.
The situation is a strik-
ing turnabout from 2007,
when more babies were
born in the United States
than any other year in
the nation's history. The
recession began that fall,
dragging stocks, jobs and
births down.
"When the economy is
bad and people are uncom-
fortable about their finan-
cial future, they tend to
postpone having children.
We saw that in the Great


Depression the 1930s and
we're seeing that in the
Great Recession today,"
said Andrew Cherlin, a'
sociology professor at
Johns Hopkins University.
"It could take a few
years to turn this around,"
he added, noting that
the birth rate stayed low
throughout the 1930s.
Another possible factor
in the drop: a decline in
immigration to the United
States.
The downward trend
invites worrisome compari-
sons to Japan and its lost
decade of choked growth
in the 1990s and very low
birth rates. Births in Japan
fell 2 percent in 2009 after
a slight rise in 2008, its
government has said.
Not so in Britain, where
the population took its big-
gest jump in almost half
a century last year and
the fertility rate is at its
highest level since 1973.
France's birth rate also has
been rising; Germany's
birth rate is lower but ris-
ing as well.
"Our birth rate is still
higher than the birth rate
in many wealthy countries
and we also have many
immigrants entering the
country. So we do not need
to be worried yet about a
birth dearth" that would
crimp the nation's ability
to take care of its growing
elderly population, Cherlin
said.
The new U.S. report is a
rough count of births from
states. It estimates there
were 4,136,000 births in
2009, down from 4,251,095
in 2008 and more than 4.3

FERTIUTY continued on 2C


is now being invested in
bonds, he said. In the past
two and a half years, net
inflows of $538 billion have
gone into bonds.
"Bonds yield a little
lower returns, but are less
risk than stocks," he said.
A few of Jones clients


have moved some stocks
into bonds because their
tolerance for risk changed,
he said.
Kuykendall said the
majority of his clients have
moved out of the market

MARKEF continued on 2C


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


Brand Behemoths
Q What are the world's biggest
brands? JL., Allentown, Pa.
A The folks at Interbrand
tack and list the most
valuable brands in the world each
year. Here are the top 10 brands
for the year 2009, along with what
they estimate to be the market
value of each, in billions of dollars:
(1) Coca-Cola, $69; (2) IBM, $60;
(3) Microsoft, $57; (4) General
Electric, $48; (5) Nokia, $35; (6)
McDonald's, $32; (7) Google, $32;
(8) Toyota, $31; (9) Intel, $31;
(10) Disney, $28..
Keeping up with changes
in brand rankings from year to
year can offer clues about how
aggressively various companies
are growing. Google. for example,
was ranked 24th m 2006. while
Kodak fell from 70th in 2006 to
out of the top 100 in 2009. Over
the past year, Amazon.com jumped
from 58th to 43rd, while Starbucks
slipped from 85th to 90th and
Harley-Davidson slowed from
50th to 73rd.


Q As I invest in the stock market
for the long haul what kind of
return should I expect? TS.. Detnvit
A There's no guaranteed return
with stocks. But over many
decades, the stock market has
averaged roughly a 10 percent
return annually. Over just a few
decades, though, it can offer less.
Over the past 20 years, the
S&P 500 has averaged 6 percent:
over the past 30, it's closer to 8
percent. (For the "'real" return.
subtract the rate of inflation,
which has averaged 3 percent
over the long run.)
Those returns reflect
investments in the overall stock
market, not in various individual
stocks. Particular companies can
end up trouncing or lagging the
market. You can aim to beat the
market's average return by care-
fully selecting indi dual stocks
or mutual funds.

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The oil spill in the Gulf took a
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sharply. BP lost half its value in
just a few weeks. Fannie Mae and
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percent of their value in
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some 50 percent as it lost ground to
its biggest competitor, Amazon.com.
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People are increasingly buying
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Bloomberg's BusinessWeek, in
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will equal $25.2 billion, and by
S2015, $129 billion.
Consumers are using iPhone and
Android software to buy everything
from clothing to art to even cars.
EBay has taken advantage of the
situation, offering more than a dozen
mobile apps that allow users to buy,
sell and search for great deals. This
can be a.real growth driver for eBay,
if it can keep offering new and
improved apps and if it stays one step
ahead of Amazon. Mobile is
still a very small portion of
eBay's $9 billion in revenue,
but the potential is enormous.
Though eBay's marketplace
revenue dropped in its second quar-


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Bernanke: Fed will take action if necessary


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer
JACKSON, Wyo. -
Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke said that
the Fed will consider mak-
ing another large-scale
purchase of securities if
the slowing economy were
to deteriorate significantly
and signs of deflation were


to flare..
Bernanke acknowledged
that the recent pace of
growth is "less vigorous
than we expected." He
described the outlook as
uncertain and said the
economy "remains vulner-
able to unexpected devel-
opments."
At the same time, he
said growth is likely to


pick up next year. He
downplayed the odds of
another recession, even
after a series of dismal
reports on housing and
manufacturing this week
stoked fears that the econ-
omy may be on the verge
of another downturn.
His remarks came
Friday 90 minutes after
the government said the


economic growth slowed
sharply in the second
, quarter to a 1.6 percent
pace. Bernanke stopped
short of committing to
any specific action. But
he raised the prospect of
another Fed purchase of
securities, most likely gov-
ernment debt or mortgage'
securities, to drive down
rates on mortgages.


FERTILITY: On decline in the United States
Continued From Page 1C


million in 2007.
The report does not give
details on trends in differ-
ent age groups. That will
come next spring and will
give a clearer picture who
is and is not having chil-
dren, Veritura said.
Last spring's report, on
births in 2008, showed an
overall drop but a surpris-
ing rise in births to women
over 40, who may have
felt they were running out
of time to have children
and didn't want to delay


despite the bad economy.
Women postponing
having children because
of careers also may find
they have trouble conceiv-
ing, said Mark Mather of
the Population Reference
Bureau, a Washington-
based demographic
research group.
"For some of those
women, they're going to
find themselves in their
mid-40s where it's going to
be hard to have the num-
ber of children they want,"


he said.
Heather Atherton is
nearing that mark. The
Sacramento, Calif., mom,
who turns 36 next month,
started a home-based
public relations business
after having a baby girl in
2003. She and her husband
upgraded to a larger home
in 2005 and planned on
having a second child not
long afterward. Then the
recession hit, drying up
her husband's sales com-
missions and leaving them


owing more on their home
-than it is worth. A second
child seemed too risky
financially.
."However, we just
,recently decided that it's
time to stop waiting and
just go for it early next
year and let the chips fall
where they may," she said.
"We can't allow the reces-
sion to dictate the size of
our family."
"We just need to move
forward with oiur lives,"
Atherton said.


MARKET: Volatility doesn't portend crash


Continued From Page .1

and into bonds, since
April.
"It's certainly something
a lot of people go into," he
said.
The stock market
dropped in 2007 and 2008,
and that is still fresh in
some peoples' minds,
Jones said. There is a fear
and uncertainty associated
with such investing.
The key for individual
investors is to stay bal-
anced with a portfolio and.
risk tolerance tailored to
their needs, Jones said.


"It's bad to buy when you
feel good and sell when you
feel bad," he said.
Now, investors have to
be selective in where they
put their money, Jones said.
There are good buying
opportunities available in
the stock market, even now.
"It is certainly a time to
review your portfolio with
a financial advisor and see
the changes that need to be
made, he said.
Kuykendall said inves-
tors should buy something
they know and want By


example, he has an iPhone
and keeps track of Apple.
"You don't need to be
investing all your money all
the time," he said. "Buy a
little at a time."
Things are going to
improve with the market
in the future, Jones said.
There is a lot of money on
the sidelines.
"When investors get
a little good news, the
money will flow back into
the stock market," he said.
The world is not com-
ing to an end and the


market is not going to
crash with the number
of investors leaving,
Kuykendall said\
"It would have crashed
in 2008 when it was down
50 percent," he said.
Despite the concerns
with negativity in the
market, all that will
change, Kuykendall said.
"We've been through
this before during the
Jimmy Carter era in the
80s," he said.
"We survived that and
we'll survive this."


Pronoun violation
nets $30K fine
MEDFORD, Ore. A
three-letter word may cost
one of the nation's oldest
air ambulance operators a
$30,000 fine.
The word is "pur" a
possessive personal pro-
noun meaning it belongs
to us. *
But the U.S. Department
of Transportation said that
was the wrong word for
Mercy Flights of Oregon
to use to describe a heli-
copter technically owned
by another company.
The Mail Tribune
reported that the heli-
copter was purchased for
Mercy Flights' exclusive
use, but a separate com-
pany was formed for the
deal, and it has ownership
on paper. The DOT said
Mercy Flights broke laws
prohibiting unfair and
deceptive practices in the
sales of air transportation
by saying it is "our helicop-
ter."
The nonprofit was fined
$30,000 but it will only
have to pay half if it avoids
other pronoun violations
for a year.

Comedian sues
couple over home
CHICAGO Attorneys
for Chicago radio personal-
ity and comedian George
Willborn have filed a
$100 million discrimina-
tion lawsuit stemming
from his failed attempt to
buy a house in the city's
Bridgeport neighborhood
for $1.7 million.
Willborn and his wife,
Peyten, who are black,
contend that they were
discriminated against when
the home's owners, Daniel


and Adrienne Sabbia,
backed out of a verbal
agreement to sell it
The lawsuit is against
the Sabbias, real estate
agent Jeffrey Lowe
and Prudential Rubloff
Properties. Attorneys for
the defendants were not
immediately available for
comment.
Earlier this week,
the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban
Development filed a fed-
eral housing discrimina-
tion complaint against the
defendants.

Judge: Tribal rules
not followed
PHILADELPHIA, Miss.
- A judge has ruled tribal
members did not follow
tribal rules in attempting
to force an election on
the Mississippi Band of
Choctaw Indians casino
project in the Bogue
Homa community in Jones
County.
Tribal Judge Jeffrey
Webb issued the decision
Friday.
At a hearing earlier this
week, the attorney for the
tribal members argued
the office of tribal chief
Beasley Denson and the
Election Committee were
using technicalities to deny
the referendum.
The Election Committee
said it had followed the,
laws of the Tribe, which
address a referendum, and
the petition was deficient
and untimely filed.
About 500 to 700 slot
machines and a snack
shop are planned for the
27,000-square-foot casino.
It is scheduled to open in
mid-December with about
250 workers.
* Associated Press


The Motley Fool'

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


1


BRIEFS


I Ask the


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


illu l -.l.,,- .











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER STOCKS SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


Y NYSE
6,794.91 -18.24


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
3Par 32.46 +14.42 +79.9
FtBcppfD 5.25 +1.50 +40.0
FtBcp pfC 5.15 +1.35 +35.5
FtBcp pfE 5.15 +1.28 +33.1
FtBcp pfB 5.30 +1.30 +32.5
FtBcp pfA 5.10 +1.24 +32.0
Netezza 19.87 +4.48 +29.1
Acomlnft 4.05 +.81 +25.0
Competlent 17.17 +3.22 +23.1
GtAPc39 16.85 +3.13 +22.8

LoserS ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GabUlil 6.04 -1.55 -20.4
StuLnCp 19.04 -4.47 -19.0
IDTCpC 11.63 -2.57 -18.1
KronosWd 29.52 -5.83 -16.5
CallonP h 3.87 -.74 -16.1
Raythn wt 7.62 -1.38 -15.3
Guess 33.50 -5.81 -14.8
IDT Corp 14.55 -2.53 -14.8
BrownShoe 10.95 -1.89 -14.7
UnivTravel 5.05 -.87 -14.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citgrp 20728514 3.76 +.01
S&P500ETF10741283106.86-.67
BkofAm 7047468 12.64 -.23
SPDR Fnd3640713 13.73 -.10
iShEMkts 3308685 40.49 -.53
GenElec 3240031 14.71 -.32
FordM 3233172 11.56 -.21
iShR2K 3150304 61.65 +.50
Pfizer 2352228 16.09 +.17
SprintNex 2340491 4.00 -.19

Diary
Advanced 1,679
Declined 1,461
New Highs 332
New Lows 245
Total issues 3,208
Unchanged 68
Volume 20,137,086,022


Amex
1,893.74 +29.14


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChiMetRur 2.46 +.79 +47.2
Geokinetics 5.35 +1.50 +39.0
RareEle g 3.77 +.97 +34.6
ContMatls 15.00 +3.16 +26.7
PemixTh 3.65 +.70 +23.7
AlexcoR g 4.13 +.70 +20.4
Augustag 2.40 +.37 +18.5
VistaGold 2.25 +.30 +15.4
VimetX 7.32 +.94 +14.7
NwGold g 6.48 +.76 +13.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SearchM un 2.58 -1.55 -37.5
CAMACn 2.33 -.72 -23.6
BioTimewt 2.44 -.74 -23.3
LGLGrp 14.25 -3.75 -20.8
Kemet 2.68 -.49 -15.5
SagaComm 16.89 -2.97 -15.0
Suprmlnd .2.18 -.37 -14.5
OrienPapn 4.34 -.65 -13.0
EngySvcs 3.50 -.50 -12.5
ConmedH 2.85 -.40 -12.3

Most Active (s( or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
VantageDrl 250780 1.34 +.05
GoldStrg 173637 4.76 +.16
NwGold g 102374 6.48 +.76
KodiakO g 92139 2.66 -.05
GrtBasGg 86137 2.15 +.11
BootsCoots 80777 2.98
NovaGldg 78799 7.11 +.32
AmO&G 73272 7.01 +.01
UberlyAcq 71911 10.01 -.11
Taseko 69997 4.39 ...

Diary
Advanced 246
Declined 292
New Highs 40
New Lows 46
Total issues 561
Unchanged 23
Volume 385,542,901


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Y Nasdaq Name Ex Div

2,153.63 -26.13 T&T A IncNY 68.
,.p'aMat Nas 28
Gainers ($2 or more) KofAme NY 04
Name Last Chg %Chg -',; NY
Nasd 80
ArcSight 39.66+12.42 +456 .tl,, Nsd 6
Ambaslntrs 2.75 +.75 +3705 N :- Na 6
ColdwtrCrk 4.69 +1.12 +31.4 NY .96
DiamMgmt 12.50 +2.96 +310 isco Nasd ..
ArQule 5.27 +1.24 +30.8 Nsco Ns
Daktronics 9.85 +2.15 +27.9 : NY 7
DollrFn 19.78 +4.11 +262 D: NY 1 76
AVEO Phn 8.21 +1.70 +26.1 De Ihaze NY 2.02
WestwdO n 8.27 +1.63 +24.5 ell Inc Nasd
MMTripn 34.81 +6.76 +24.1 DrSCBe rsNY
DirFnBear NY
DrxFBullsNY .15
Losers (S2 or more) FamilyDlr NY .62
Name .Last Chg %Chg FordM NY
Constar 4.75 -4.25 -47.2 GenElec NY .48
ImunoGn 5.16 -3.55 -40.8 Hewe8P NY 32
OIScCTripf2.37 -1.24 -34.3 Homep NY 95
DynaVoxn 9.76 -4.54 -31.7 iShEMks NY .59
NwLead rs 4.55 -1.94 -29.9 iShR2K NY 7
VocalT rs 27.20 -10.80 -28.4 Intel Nasd .63
FstChester 5.70 -1.84 -24.4 JPMorgCh NY .20
ZoomTchs 3.83 -1.20 -23.8 LVSands NY
kLPDrt I n A 0n 1_ 1 _0 Q -


MidPenn 6.15 -1.70 -21.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ421224544.07 -.85
Intel 4111401 18.37 -.54
Microsoft 2727537 23.93 -.30
Cisco 2488294 20.81 -1.42
MicronT 1478765 6.83 -.29
ApldMatl 1430181 10.69 -.34
Dell Inc 1294397 11.89 -.18
MarvellT 1096447 16.57 +.41
Comcast 1070178 17.25 -.56
Orade 1000027 22.51 -.51

Diary


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


1,307
1,506
71
377
2,881
68
9,854,443,326


Last


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg
+.49 +1.9 -3.9
-.17 -2.7 -37.2
-.34 -3.0-23.4
+1.58 +0.7 +35.8
-23 -1.8 -161
-134 -5.9 -36.9
+.17 +0.7 -10.5
+.64 +5.2 -19.3
+.24 +0.5 +2.7
-.12 -0.2 -2.7
-1.42 -6.4 -13.1
+.01 +0.3 +13.6
+.86 +1.6 -1.5
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-.18 -1.5 -17.2
-1.28 -3.4-27.1
+.17 +1.1 -16.8
-.35 -1.8 -24.6
+.51 +1.2 +55.7
-.21 -1.8 +15.6
-.32 -2.1 -2.8
-1.85 -4.6 -26.2
+.57 +2.0 -.7
-.53 -1.3 -2.4
+.50 +0.8 -1.3
-.54 -2.9 -10.0
-.54 -1.5 -12.1
-.33 -1.1 +96.1


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


Lowes NY .44
McDnlds NY 2.20,
MicronT Nasd ..
Microsoft Nasd .52
NY Times NY
NextEraEnNY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd
OcciPet NY 152
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .401
PwShs 00QQQNasd .26
PrUShS&PNY
QwestCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.68
S&P500ETFNY 2.22
SearsHldgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclNY .17
TimeWam NY .85
Tycolntl NY .84
US NGsFd NY
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
YRC Wwd h Nasd ...


+2.2 -9.8
+1.2 +18.5
-4.1 -35.3
-1.2 -21.5
-2.7 -39.2
+2.1 +2.0
-0.2 -8.8
+0.5 -7.3
-4.7 -24.1
-1.0 +5.5
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-1.3 +36.2
-1.9 -3.7
+1.1 -1.8
-0.2 +34.0
-0.3 -4.8
-0.6 -4.1
+1.4' -25,1
+1.7 +65.0
+3.3 +11.0
-4.5 +9.3
-0.7 -4.7
+6.8 +4.0
-0.5 +7.9
-10.2 -38.1
+1.6 -4.6
-2.4 -11.1
-5.3 -68.2


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks,. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s ='Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. v = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed wi =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee eoveing market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a disthibution dung the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hurndeds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Currencies
Last Pvs Day


Australia 1.1125 1.1292
Britain 1.5511 1.5526
Canada 1.0525 1.0581
Euro .7855 .7872
Japan 85.37 84.38


Mexico


II


I I


SwitzerInd 1.0294 1.0247
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials -39.21 -133.96 19.61 -74.25 164.84
Close: 10,150.65 ,) -IT 1,
1 -week change: -62.97 (-0.6%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
11,500




11 ,000





9,5060 M A M J J A



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetlls Cl
Vanguard TotStldx LB
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Dodge & Cox lnlStk FV
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA
ArrienTar FurndI If'ePerqpA m WS
Ami-n.:an Fund. F.'lI,'A m LB
Vangruar ToiSllAdrri LB
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard Welltn MA
Vanguard 500AdmI LB
PIMCO TotRetA m Cl
American Funds BondA m Cl
Fidelity DivrlntI d FB
Vanguard Totint d FB
Fidelitv GrowCo LG


137,039
63,566
61,323
.55,373
53,952
51,442
48,436
46,968
46,671
45,460
39,482
36,776
36,687
36,140
33,800
31,232
30,154
29,724
29,636
. 29,359
28,516
28,336
28,027
27,718
26,227
26,161
25,891


+11.8/B
+6.1/B
+3.4/D
+6.5/C
+10.2/A
+3.1/D
+10.6/A
+5.21/B
+5.4/B
+3.0/D
+2.2/D
+3.0/B
+2.7/A
+7.4/A
+11.5/B1
+14.2/A
+5.1/C
+6.1/B
+6.3/A
+7.8/B
+6.7/C
+5.41/B
+11.3/C
+11.2/C
-0.8/C
+2.3/B
+11.2/A


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
'5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
4.25 t000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 100,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 100,000
3.75 1,000
3.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
NL 2,500


CA-ConservativeAlcaion, Cl-Internnediate-Tenn Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -ForeignLargeGrowth, FV-Foreir
Large Value, IH -World Alocaton, LB large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Lae Value, MA -Moderate Allocaton, MB .Mic-Cap Blend, MV
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specially-heath, WS -World Stock Total Return: Ch in NAV with didends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs
others with sameobjective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Minm Invt Minimum $ needed to investing fund. Source: Momuigstar


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ... ... 11
AFLAC 1.20 2.5 12
A( Steel .20 1.6 13
AMR ... ... ...
AT&T Inc 1.68 6.2 12
AbtLab 1.76 3.5 13
AberFtrc .70 1.9 27
Accenture .75 2.0 16
AMD ... ... 4
Aeropostl s ... ... 9
Aetna .04 .1 8
Agilent ... ... 18
AlcatelLuc ... ... ...
Alcoa .12 1.2 ...
Allstate .80 2.9 15
Altria 1.52 6.7 13
AmbacFh .. 1
Ameren 1.54 5.4 11
AMovilL 1.31 2.8 ...
AEagleOut .44 3.3 16
AEP 1.68 4.7 14
AmExp .72 1.8 15
Ameridt ... ... 15
Anadarko .36 .8 44
AnalogDev .88 3.0 15
Annaly 2.61 15.2 9
Apache .60 .7 12
ArcelorMit .75 2.6 22
ArchCoal .40 1.8 40
ArchDan .60 2.0 10
ATMOS 1.34 4.6 13
BB&TCp .60 2.6 21
BHP BilILt 1.66 2.5 ...
BakrHu .60 1.5 36
BcoBrades .51 2.9 ...
BcoSantand.81 6.8 ...
BcSBrasil n .33 2.7 ...
BkofAm .04 .3 84
BkNYMel .36 1.5 ...
BarVixShT ... ... ...
BarrickG .48 1.0 ...
Baxter 1.16 2.7 12
BerkHBs ... ... 14
BestBuy .60 1.9 10
BlockHR .60 4.4 10
Boeing 1.68 2.7 .49
BostonSci ... ... ...
BrMySq 1.28 4.9 13
CB REIlis ... ... 34
CBSB .20 1.4 38
CMS Eng .84 4.7 18
CSX .96 1.9 15
CVSCare .35 1.3 11
CdnNRsgs .30 ...
CapOne .20 .5 8
CardnlHIts .78 2.5 17
Carnival .40 1.3 15
Caterpillar 1.76 2.7 27'
Cemex .43 ... ...
CenterPnt .78 5.2 13
CntryUnk 2.90 8.0 10
ChesEng .30 1.4 15
Chevron 2.88 3.8 9
Chicos .16 1.8 15
Chimera .63 15.9 6.
Chubb 1.48 2.7 8
Citigrp ... ... ...
CliffsNRs .56 .9 15
Coach .60 1.6 16
CocaCE .36 1.3 17
CocaCl 1.76 3.1 18
ConAgra .80 3.7 14
ConocPhil 2.20 4.1 10
ConsolEngy .40 1.2 16
ConEd 2.38 5.0 14
ConstellEn .96 3.2 1
CtlAir B ... 25
Coming .20 1.3 8
Covidien .72 2.0 24


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+.15 +1.0
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-1.29 -24.0'
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-.39 -.9
-.56 -12.8
-.60 -36.1
-1.48 +1.7
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.... -11.9
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' -.32 -4.4
-.33 -.7
-2.96 +15.6
-.49 -30.3
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-.12 -2.7
-.07 -37.4
+.08 +2.1
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-.39 +1.1
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+.29 -5.7
-.47 +4.6
-1.33 -34.2
+1.18 +5.4
+.91 -15.2
+.06 +21.7
-.07 -17.2
-1.36 -23.3


Name Div
Cummins 1.05
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.20
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .08
DevonE .64
DrSCBeaurs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBulls .15
DirxSCBull 4.83
DirxLCBear ...
DirxLCBull 8.17
DirxEnBull 5.17
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
Dynegy rs ...
EMC Cp ...
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGId g .05
EmersonEl 1.34
EnCana g s .80
EnergySol .10
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FidNatinfo .20
FstBcpPR ...
FstHorizon .75
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .60
FordM
FMCG 1.20
FrontierCm .75
GameStop,,...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenMillss 1.12
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ..
GrtAtlPac ...
Guess .64
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt .
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP '.32
HomeDp .95
Honwillntl 1.21
HostHolls .04
Huntsmn .40
iSAstla .81
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn .16
iShMex .75
iShSing .38
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20 T 3.73
iS Eafe 1.38
iShR2K .77
iShREst 1.81
ITW 1.36
IBM 2.60
IntlGame .24


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Cha %Cha Last


20 -3.32
... +.20
14 +1.22
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9 -.33.
17 -.50
... -.07
19 +.27
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-.89
-.12
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32 +.36
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7 -8.49
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-19.0 15.21


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg
IntPap .50 2.5 44 -.83 -23.9
Interpublic ... ... 32 +.12 +17.8
ItauUnibH .59 2.8 ... -.27 -7.4
JCrew ... ... 12 -3.37 -30.6
JPMorgCh .20 .5 11 -.54 -12.1
Jabil .28 2.6 20 -.35 -37.7
JanusCap .04 .4 16 -.49 -29.3
JohnJn 2.16 3.8 13 -.60 -10.6
JohnsnCtI .52 1.9 14 -.79
JnprNtwk ... ... 51 ... +2.1
KB Home .25 2.4 ... +.36 -22.8
Keycorp .04 .5 ... -.05 +36.6
Kimco .64 4.3 47 +.57 +10.5
KingPhrm ... ... 53 -.21 -26.4
Kinrossg .10 .6 34 +1.04 -10.5
Kohis ... 13 +.89 -12.5
Kraft 1.16 3.9 11 +.90 +10.4
LDK Solar ... ... ... -.01 -.1
LSI Corp ... ... 13 -.24 -30.4
LVSands ... ... ... -.33 +96.1
LennarA .16 1.2 79 +.70 +5.5
LillyEli 1.96 5.7 9 +.03 -4.2
Limited .60 2.4 .15 -.45 +29.7
LincNat .04 .2 13 +2.40 -4.6
MBIA ... ... ... +.34 +136.2
MEMC ... ... ... +.19 -21.7
MFA Fncl .76 10.3 8 +.13 +.7
MGIC ... ... ... +.12 +29.8
MGM Rsts ... ... ... -.52 +3.1
Macys .20 1.0 14 -1.37 +16.9
Manpwl .74 1.7 ... -.53 -18.7
Manulife g .52 ... ... -.34 -37.7.


Name piv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
MarathonO 1.O00 3.2 12 -.58 -.9 30.94
MktVGold .:11 ....... +2.06 +15.4 53.34
MarlntA .16 -.5 34 -.87 +20.0 32.70
MarshM .80 3.3 18 +.82 +8.5 23.96
Marshlls .04 .6 +.23 +20.9 6.59
Masco .30 2.8 ... +.12 -22.7 10.68
MasseyEn .24 .8 .. -3.11 -31.1 28.95
McDrmlnts ... ... 7 +.27 +4.9 12.99
McMoRn .. ...... +2.30 +73.7 13.93
McAfee ... ... 27 +.07 +16.1 47.10
MedcoHlth ... ... 16 +.08 -29.1 45.34
Medtrnic .90 2.8 10 -2.25 -26.1 32.52
Merck 1.52 4.3 13 +.56 -4.2 35.00
MetLife .74 2.0 11 +.54 +7.0 37.82
MetroPCS ... ... 16 +.06 +18.5 9.04
Monsanto 1.12 2.0 23 -1.17 -30.8 56.56
MonstrWw ... ... ... +.14 -36.4 11.06
MorgStan .20 .8 8 -.89 -15.4 25.03
Mosaic .20 .3 31 +1.63 -2.4 58.27
Motorola ... ... 45 +.20 -1.0 7.68
NCR Corp ... ... 14 +.48 +17.6 13.09
Nabors ... ... ... -.26 -25.8 16.25
NatGrid 7.17 6.8 ... +1.38 -12.2 42.89
NOilVarco .40 1.1 11 -.26 -13.9 37.97
NatSemi .40 3.1 15 -.36 -15.4 13.00
NaviosAcwt.,. ... ... -.02+118.3 1.31
Netezza ... ... ... +4.48 +104.8 19.87
NY CmtyB 1.00 6.3 12 -.16 +9.5 15.89
NewellRub .20 1.3 13 +.11 +2.6 15.40
NewmtM .60 1:0 16 +1.93 +26.7 59.95
NextEraEn 2.00 3.7 14 +1.10 +2.0 53.89
NiSource .92 5.3 16 +.97 +13.6 17.47


NobleCorp .20 .6
NokiaCp .56 6.5
Nordstrm .80 2.6
NorflkSo 1.44 2.6
Novartis 1.99 3.8
Nucor 1.44 3.9
OcciPet 1.52 2.0
OfficeDpt ....
OilSvHT- 2.60 2.0
PG&ECp 1.82 3.8
PMI Grp ...
PNC .40 '.8
PPLCorp 1:40 5.1
Pactiv
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .28 .6
Penney .80 4.0
PepcoHold 1.08 6.0
PepsiCo 1.92 3.0
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.18 3.9
Petrobras 1.18 3.5
Pfizer .72 4.5
PhilipMor 2.32 4.5
PlainsEx ...
Potash .40 .3
PS USDBull...
PrinFncl .50 2.2
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ... ...
PrUIShDow. ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ ... ...
ProUltSP .40 1.2
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSRE rs...
ProUShtFn ..
ProURn rs .17
ProUSR2K ...
ProUltR2K .02
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp .16 .8
ProLogis .60 5.5
Prudentl .70 1.4
PSEG 1.37 4.3
PulteGrp
QwestCm .32 5.7
RRI Engy
RadianGrp .01 .2
RangeRs .16 .5
Raytheon 1.50 3.4
RedHat ...
RegionsFn -.04 .6
RiteAid
SLMCp
SpdrDJIA 2.53 2.5
SpdrGold
SP Mid 1.65 1.2
S&P500ETF2.22 2.1
SpdrHome .12 .8
SpdrKbw RB.32 1.5
SpdrRetl .56 1.5
SpdrOGEx .23 .6
SpdrMetM .35 .7
Safeway .48 2.5
Saks ... ...
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .44 3.0
Schlmbrg .84 1.5
Schwab .24 1.8
SemiHTr .52 2.1
SiderNac s .58 3.7
SilvWhtn g ... ...
Smithlntl .48 1.2
SouthnCo 1.82 4.9
SwstAirl .02 .2
SwstnEngy ...


5 +.35 -21.7
... -.43 -32.6
13 -1.29 -19.4
16 +.11 +4.1
13 +1.24 -4.5
79 -1.12 -20.2
15 +.36 -7.3
... -.43 -44.5
...+1.02 -15.7
14 +1.77 +6.7
... +.07 +25.0
10 -.76 -1.6
21 +.84 -15.2
16 -.06 +33.8
18 -.94 -32.1
21 -1.74 -4.5
16 -.99 -24.1
27 +.21 +7.2
17 -.68 +5.5
19 -.38 -37.6
.. -.45 -28.9
-.63 -29.1
9 +.17 -11.5
14 -.54 +6.7
18 +1.97 -11.6
32 -1.94 +36.2
... -.06 +4.3
11 +.82 -3.5
... +.28 +.2
... +.37 -1.8
... +.27 -5.2
... -2.05 -10.1
... +.64 -3.1
... -.47 -10.2
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... -.78 -36.3
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-.57 -121
... -.49 -14.3
... +.46. -6.2
... +.54 -6.0
+.40 -26.5
12 +.45 +10.6
... +.85 -20.4
8 -1.01 +3.4
10 +.34 -3.5
... +.13 -18.3
21 -.01 +34.0
... -.02 -39.3
-.25 -9.2
... +.39 -32.1
9 +.48 -14.1
75 +2.62 +13.8
-.22 +24.8
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7 -.19 -.2
... -.56 -2.4
... +1.04 +12.8
... -.45 +1.3
... -.67 -4.1
... +.20 -3.7
... -.08 '-2.4
... -.46 +3.8
... +.01 -5.1
... -1.35 -6.1
... -.56 -8.6
... -.76 +5.8
..-1.27 +51.1
-.29 -57.6
23 -.05 +21.1
22 -.70 -14.3
22 -.91 -29.8
... -.63 -9.3
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41 +1.77 +51.8
65 -.40 +43.0
15 +1.19 +11.0
93 -.13 -2.6
20 -.36 -30.8


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SpectraEn 1.00
SprintNex ...
SP Matls .52
SP HIthC .55
SP CnSt .75
SP Consume .42
SP Engy 1.00
SPDR Fncl .17
SP Minds .59
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.26
StarwdHtl .20
StateSir .04
Stryker .60
Suncor gs .40
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX .60
TaiwSemi .47
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .40
TenetHIth
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texinst .48
Textron .08
ThermoRs ...
3M Co 2.10
3Par
Tiffany 1.00
TimeWam .85
TollBros ...
Transocn ...'
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSol s ..
TycoElec .64
Tycolntl .84
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Airwy ..
UnilevNV 1.22
UnionPac 1.32"
UPSB 1.88
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
US OilFd
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
UnumGrp .37
Vale SA .52'
Vale SA pf .52
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.90
ViacomB .60
Visa .50
Walgm .70
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint' ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20
WmsCos .50
WmsSon .60
Wyndham .48
XLGrp .40
XcelEngy 1.01
Xerox .17
Yamana g .08
YumBmds .84


15
... -.19
... -.11
... -.10
... -.04
-.21
... -.09
... -.10
... -.43
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+.67
38 +.30
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74 -.03
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30 +.24-
19


20.98
4.00
31.38
28.57
26.69
30.69
52.10
13.73
28.74
21.04
31.14
47.45
35.85
44.00
31.10
22.67
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41.13
9.65
51.74
33.43
4.11
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24.15
17.86
43.18
81.00
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40.71
30.32
17.35
52.03
49.87
25.50
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38.50
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16.76
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73.69
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29.84
31.82
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27.32
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50.87
24.00
4.03
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16.03
15.78
18.51
26.70
23.88
18.17
22.57
8.64
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42.32


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASMLHId
ATP O&G
AVI Bio
ActivsBliz
AdobeSy
Affymetrix
AkamaiT
AllscriptH
AlteraCp If
Amazon
AmCapLtd
Amgen
AmkorT If
ApolloGrp
Apple Inc
ApidMatl
ArenaPhm
ArmHId
ArubaNet
Atheros
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData I
BMC Sft
BSD Med
Baidu s
BedBath
BrigExp
Broadcom
BrcdeCm
CA Inc
Cadence
Caseys
Celgene
CentAl
ChkPoint
CienaCorp
Cirrus


...-2.17
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39 +.06
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58 -.60
37 -.15
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53 -1.12
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-6.9 51.84
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Name Div YId
Cisco ...
CitrixSys ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38 2.2
Comc spcl .38 2.3
CorinthC ...
Costco .82 1.5
Cree Inc
Ctdp.coms ...
CypSemi
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DiamMgmt .36 2.9
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DonlleyRR 1.04 6.8
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts
EricsnTel .28 2.8
Expedia .28 1.2
ExpScrip s ...
FLIR Sys ...
RfthThird .04 .4
Finisar rs
FstNiagara .56 4.7
Rextm ... ...
FosterWhl ...
FresKabirt ... ...
GenBiotch ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC s...
HanmiFncl...
Hologic
HudsCity .60 5.2


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last


16 -1.42
47 -.53
30 -1.02
13 -.56
12 -.50
3 +.31
20 +1.15
39 -1.40
... -.77
62 +.16
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10 -.12
20 -3.19
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-13.1 20.81
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Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


HumGen
Intel .63
Intersil .48
Intuit
JA Solar
iDS Uniph
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
LamResrch ...
LeapWirlss ...
Level3
LibtyMIntA ...
LihirGold .60
LinearTch .92
MarvellT ...
Mattel .75
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .52
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OmniVisn ..
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
PDL Bio 1.00
PMC Sra
Paccar .36
PacCapB ...
Pa1tUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
PoDular ...


+2.18 -3.9 29.38
-.54 -10.0 18.37
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-1.66 +39.7 42.94
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-.70 +3.3 24.11
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-.02 -27.3 6.41
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-.13 -8.9 .88
+.55 -3.8 14.77
-.01 -17.2 25.37
-.45 -23.4 12.79
+.02 +14.2 2.58


Name Div
Power-One...
PwShs 000.26
PriceTR 1.08
Qualcom .76
RFMicD ..
ReprosTh h ...
RschMotn
STEC
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Somaxon ...
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StiDynam .30
SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr ...
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .72
TibcoSft
TrQuint
UAL
UrbanOut
Veecolnst ...
Verisign
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.32
WarnerChil8.50
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1.00
Xilinx .64
YRC Wwd h...
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg- %Chg Last
... ... +.27+138.4 10.37
.6 ... -.85 -3.7 44.07
2.4 '20 -.85 -15.0 45.24
2.0 19 -.08 -16.5 38.64
... 15 +.34 +5.0 5.01
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10 -2.73 -31.9 45.99
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GrtBasGg ...
Hemisphrx...
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Kemet


AMEX Most Active


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KodiakOg ...
LadThalFn ...
LibertyAcq ...
LibAcq wt ...
MagHRes ...
Metalico ...
NIVS IntT ...
Nevsung ...
NDragon
NwGoldg ..
NAPallg ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtM g ...
NovaGld ...
Oilsands g ...
OnenPapn
Palatin
ParaG&S ..
PionDrill ..
Protalix
RadientPh
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Rentech
Rubicon g ..
SamsO&G ..
SeabGldg ...
SulphCo
TanzRyg ..
Taseko
TimberlnR
TmsatlPtn ...
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Uluru
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl...
VimetX .50
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YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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+.00 -50.9
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+.30 -8.2


2.66
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10.01
1.23
4.10
3.31
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4.56
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6.48
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2.98
7.11
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1.34
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3.77
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4.27
1.21
30.35
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5.53
4.39
1.10
2.78
5.10
.11
2.64
1.34
7.32
2.25


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.14 9.14
6-month 0.19 0.19
5-year 1.49 1.44
10-year 2.65 2.61
30-year 3.70 3.66


IF


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


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IELL T


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Rate applies to private individuals selling
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Each Item must Include a price.

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personal merchandise totalling $2000 ess.
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One Item per ad I$23d 0
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Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 1,000or less.
Each Item must include a price






Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2500 orless.
Each Item moot Inctude a price.
This is a non-refundablea rate.





4lin da s Each additionl
lines line $1.55
Rate applies to private idiida selling s.
personal merchandise totalling 000000 on
Each Item most include a price..
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one te n per ad rfc j
4 inems i daysEach additional
lnes on Y "as [ ine $1.65
SEach Item must Include a price.
gf^ This Is a non-refunclable rate. ,ir^


4 lines 50
3 days 1 I
Includes 2 sIgn E Ett onil l tidlei165



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
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$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
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only the charge for the ad space
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tion and billing adjustments.
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for that portion of the advertisement
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Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION *
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000304
DIVISION:
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL-
LON FKA THE BANK OF NEW
YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
BENEFIT OF THE ASSET-
BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES
2007-2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THERON E. WATERS, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated August 17,
2010 and entered in Case NO. 12-
2009-CA-000304 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein THE BANK OF
NEW YORK MELLON FJCA THE
BANK OF NEW YORK AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2007-2, is the
Plaintiff and THERON E. WA-
TERS; CHANDRA D. WATERS;
MARVYNE A. WATERS .A/K/A
MARVYNE C. WATERS; TEN-
ANT #1 N/K/A LANITRA SAPP;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
.'11:00 AM, on the 15th day of Sep-
tember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 2 AND THE WEST 1/2 OF
LOT 3, BLOCK D, NORTHSIDE
ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION, AS
PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 18,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 822 NW SPRINGDALE
GLENN, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an, interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 18, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you are a person with a disa-
bility who needs any accommodation
in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance. Persons with a disability
who need any accommodation to
participate should call Court Admin-
istration, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida.
30255, 386-719-7428, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing impaired
call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice
impaired call (800) 955-8770.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09030607-COUNTRY-CONV B/C
04541354
August 22, 29, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVILACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000731
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,.
Plaintiff,
vs.
DONALD D. JONES, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE -
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated August 12,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12
2009 CA 000731 of the Circuit Court
of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, Florida
wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff and DONALD D.
JONES; LINDA L. JONES; are the
Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 15 day of September,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
LOT 3 AND THE NORTH 1/2 OF


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

Cleaning Ddne Your Way!
Do YOU need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.

Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200
Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lie.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219


Legal

LOT 4 OF BLOCK 5, LAKE-
WOOD, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 6-C, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A. 1519 SE LOQUAT WAY,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 16, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you are a person with a disa-
bility who needs any accommodation
in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain as-,
sistance. Persons with a disability
who need any accommodation to
participate should call Court Admin-
istration, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, 386-719-7428, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing impaired
call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice
impaired call (800) 955-8770.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09107653 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-
R-ejayska

04541350
August 22, 29, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000839
DIVISION
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MYLES D. SAPP, et al,
,Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated August 12,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000839 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein CHASE HOME FI-
NANCE LLC, is the Plaintiff and
MYLES'D. SAPP; KELLY SAPP;
are the Defendants, I will sell sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 15th day of Sep-
tember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTH
1/2 OF LOT 3, BLOCK 1, MEL-
ROSE FARMS, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 34,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/K/A 1337 SE LANVALE ST.,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 16, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should call Court
Administration, 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Flor-
ida 32055, 386-719-7428, within two
(2) working days of ygur.receipt of
this notice, if you are hearing im-
paired call (800) 955-8771; if you
are voice impaired call (800) 955-
.8770.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09122877 CHASEDIRECT-
CONV-abiven

04541346
August 22, 29, 2010


Notice to Lake City Drinking Water
Customers
The city of Lake City Water Facili-
ties Department will be temporarily
converting its disinfectant process
from chloramines to free chlorine re-
sidual beginning September 01, 2010
and ending on September 30, 2010.
This is a routine measure that is
common' for water utilities using
chloramines as its primary disinfec-
tant.
Anyone who uses a kidney dialysis
machine at home should contact his
or her equipment supplier so the
proper filtering equipment may be
installed.
Tropical fish or aquatic animal own-
ers should contact a local tropical
fish store for appropriate pretreat-
ment of water before adding water to
tanks.
Customers may notice a temporary
change in the taste, odor and color of
the water, which is not harmful.
Again, this is a routine precautionary
measure to ensure our customers of
clean, safe potable water.
Please feel free to contact our office
during regular business hours at
(386) 466-3350 if you should have
any questions.

04541274
August 29, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-171-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILBUR L. PURDY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Wilbur L. Purdy, deceased, whose
date of death was July 10, 2010, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida. Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 135
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate eon whom
a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OFF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is August 22, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Henry Grafton Purdy
8488 127th Drive
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Attorney for Personal Representa-
ive:
/s/Tom W. Brown
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
Florida Bar No. 0091332
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A. .
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386) 752-3213
Fax: (386) 755-4524

04541352
August 22, 29, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF'THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 12-2009-CA-000596
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
4 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-4
Plaintiff
vs.
KIM B. FITZHUGH, et al.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
or Order dated August 12, 2010, en-
tered in Civil Case Number 12-2009-
CA-000596, in the Circuit Court for
COLUMBIA County, Florida,
wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION
ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2005-4 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-4 is the
Plaintiff, and KIM B. FITZHUGH,
et 'al., are the defendants, I will sell
the property situated in COLUMBIA
County, Florida, described as:
Parcel 18: Township 5 south Range
16 East
Section 1: Commence at a concrete
monument which is the Northeast
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5
South, Range 16 East, thence S 89
degrees 06' 22" W, along the North
line of said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, 443.36 feet to point of
beginning; run thence S 0 degrees
15' 31" E, 320 feet to the North line
of a 60 foot graded road; thence N 89
degrees P6' 22" E, along said North
line, 147.79 feet; thence N 0 degrees
15' 31" W, 320 feet; thence S 89 de-
grees 06' 22" W, 147.79 feet to point
of beginning.
Parcel 19: Township 5 South Range
16 East
Section 1: Commence at a concrete
monument which is the Northeast
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5
South, Range 16 East, thence S 89
degrees 06' 22" W, along the North
line of said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, 295.57 feet to point of
beginning; thence S 0 degrees 15'
31" E, 320 feet to the North line of a
60 foot graded road; thence N 89 de-
grees 06' 22" E, along said North
line, 147.79 feet; thence N 0 degrees
15' 31" W, 320 feet; thence S 89 de-
grees 06' 22" W, 147.79 feet to point
of beginning.
Parcel 20: Township 5 South Range
16 East
Section 1: Commence at a concrete
monument which is the Northeast
corner of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5
South, Range 16 East, Columbia
County, Florida, and also the point of
beginning; thence S 89 degrees 06'
22" W along the North line of said S
1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4,
147.78 feet; thence S 0 degrees 15'
31" E, 320 feet to the North line of a
60 foot graded road; thence N 89 de-
grees 06' 22" E, 147.78 feet to the
East line of said NW 1/4 of the NW
1/4; run thence N 0 degrees 15' 31"
W, along said East line 320 feet to
point of beginning.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055, at
11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of Sep-
tember, 2010. Any person claiming


an interest in the surplus fro the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated: August 16, 2010


Legal

Dewitt Cason
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: B. Scippio
"In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons in
need of a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding shall,
within seven (7) days prior to any
proceeding, contact the Administra-
tive Office of the Court, Columbia
County Courthouse, P.O. Box 2069,
Lake City, FL 32056-2069, tele-
phone 386-758-1342, TDD 1-800-
955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via
Florida Relay Service".
Florida Foreclosure Attorneys, PLLC
601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690
Clearwater, Florida 33755
Telephone: (727) 446-4826

04541347
August 22, 29, 2010

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRON-
MENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE
PERMIT
The Department of Environmental
Protection gives notice of its intent to
issue an Environmental
Resource/mitigation bank permit
(#0288852-001) to the Bayfield Miti-
gation, LLC to establish the Bayfield
Mitigation Bank (SMB) on a
+1994.64 acre parcel. The project
includes the preservation of the site
and the restoration or enhancement
of a mosaic of upland and wetland
communities described as longleaf
pine/xeric oak, mesic pine flatwoods,
hydric pine flatwoods, ecotone, cy-
press dominated or mixed wetland
forest depressions, and mixed slough*
and stream swamp. Credits generat-
ed may be used as mitigation for fu-
ture unavoidable wetlands impacts to
these natural or disturbed communi-
ties within the service area.' Restora-
tion and enhancement will be accom-
plished by installing ditch blocks and
low water crossings, removing -1/2
- ac. of fill road and associated ditch-
es, thinning and removal of planted
pine, reducing woody shrub density,
decreasing bedding impacts, planting
longleaf pine and perennial ground-
cover species, supplemental planting
of cypress, hardwood and mixed
wetland forest vegetation in appro-
priate habitats, and implementing a
long-term management program in-
cluding frequent prescribed burns.
The mitigation was assessed by the
Uniform Mitigation Assessment
Method (UMAM; Chapter 62-345,
F.A.C.) as having a potential of
280.77 freshwater credits (108.10
Hydric Flatwoods/Wet Prairie Cred-
its (38.50%) and 172.67 Forested
Wetland Credits (61.50%)).
BMB is located in Columbia County,
north of Lake City, and east of White
Springs just east of Hwy 441. BMB
site is specifically located in Sections
28-30, 32, and 33, Township 0IN,
Range 17E. It lies within the Upper
Suwannee River Basin Hydrologic
Unit Code (HUC) with a small por-
tion draining west directly to Suwan-
nee River but most of the site drain-
ing south and east to Little Creek (a
tributary of the Suwannee), Class III
waters. It has a mitigation service
area incorporating portions of Baker,
Columbia, Suwannee, and Hamilton
Counties.
The application and draft permit is
available for public inspection during
normal business hours at the Depart-
ment,A6s Office of Submerged
Lands and Environmental Resources,
Bob Martinez Building, 2600 Blair
Stone Road, MS 2500, Tallahassee,
FL, 32399-2400.
A person whose substantial interests
are affected by the Department,A6s
proposed permitting decision may
petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) in accordance with
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statutes. The petition must contain
the information set forth below and
must be filed (received) in the Office
of General Counsel of the Depart-
ment at 3900 Commonwealth Boule-
Ivard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399
3000, within 21 days of publication
of this notice. Petitioner shall mail a
copy of the petition to the applicant
at the address indicated above at the
time of filing. Failure to file a peti-
tion within this time period shall
constitute a waiver of any right such
person may have to request an ad-
ministrative determination (hearing)
under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes.
The Petition shall contain the follow-
ing information: (a) The name, ad-
dress, and telephone number of each
petitioner, the applicant's name and
address, the Department Permit File
Number and the county in which the
project is located; (b) A statement of
how and when each petitioner re-
ceived notice of the Department's ac-
tion; (c) A statement of how each pe-
titioner's substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's action
(changes to the conditions placed on
this permit); (d) A statement of the
material facts disputed by Petitioner,
if any; (e) A statement of facts which
petitioner contends warrant reversal
'or modification of the Department's
action (changes to the conditions
placed on this permit); (f) A state-
ment of which rules or statutes peti-
tioner contends require reversal or
modification of the Department's ac-


A


RE YOU OUR



Comfortable ,
work





Opportunities




Apply Online or In Person!


SiTEL


Legal

tion (changes to the conditions
placed on this permit); and (g) A
statement of the relief sought by peti-
tioner, stating precisely the action
petitioner wants the Department to
take with respect to the Department's
action.
Persons whose substantial interests
will be affected by the permit have
the right to petition to become a par-
ty to the proceeding. The petition
must conform to the requirements
specified above and be filed (re-
ceived) within 21 days of publication
of this notice in the Office of Gener-
al Counsel at the above address of
the Department. Failure to petition
within the allowed time frame con-
stitutes a waiver of any right such
person has to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS.,
and to participate as a party to this
proceeding. Any subsequent inter-
vention will only be at the approval
of the presiding officer upon motion
filed pursuant to Rule 28 5.207.
FA.C.
Mediation is not available.
04541452
August 29, 2010


100 Job
10 Opportunities

04541382
The MobileMechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolavemplovment.com


04541389
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position open for a PT
(20 hours per week)
Switchboard Operator.
Front desk receptionist and
miscellaneous clerical duties as
assigned. Applicants must have
excellent interpersonal and
organizational skills.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
and forwarded to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City, FL 32056 or
email Turbeville.J(iffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

05523669
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;.
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.

05523685
Professional and Courteous
Class A CDL Driver needed

United States Cold Storage
Lake City
Immediate openings due to
fleet expansion
Florida region deliveries

Qualified Class A
CDL Drivers must:

*Have a valid Class A CDL
with an acceptable driving
safety record
*Be 23 years of age
*Have 2 years verifiable
tractor trailer experience

We offer our Class A
CDL Drivers
*Bi-weekly pay
*Benefits

Apply in person or
send resume to
USCS
211 NE McCloskey Ave
Lake City, FL 32055


MISSING PIECE?


I t our skills
and
f posirie attitude


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


- ADvantage


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


100 'iOpbportunities
04541206
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
No CDL, No Problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CHILD CARE/NURSERY
WORKER Needed, Sundays
10 am. to 1 pm., Wednesdays
6 pm to 8 pm, Call 386-752-9119
CLASS A CDL LONG HAUL
Driver needed Must have frame-
less dump exp. Must pass drug
test. Requires out of town travel.
386-719-9482 between 9a & 5p
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Delivery driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring St, Lake City
Energetic, motivated,
Sales Person, retail & computer
exp. a plus Apply in person@
Smitty's Western between 9-11 am
F/T Cashier in Service Dept,
pd vacation, eligible for ins, 40 hr
wk, see Brenda T @ Roundtree
Moore Ford service dept
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record, 386-963-
5026, Drug Test.
Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have-an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Lve Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746
Seeking experienced
Satellite Installer with tools
and truck ready to go
407-460-9225
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
Sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
Please fax resume to
386-758-4523


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
Want to make a difference
in someone's life?
Residential Training Specialist
positions available, one yr exp. di-
ploma or GED, current FL DL.
CPR/lst Aid/ HIV Training req'd.
Apply in person at CARC
512 SWSisters Welcome Road.
Lake City

120 Medical
U Employment

04541385
Medical Receptionist
Experience in a medical office
required. Send resume to PO
Box 3009, Lake City, FL 32056,
or fax to 386-758-5987

04541386
Medical Billing Manager
Experience in coding, billing,
collections req'd. Excellent
salary based on experience.
Send resume in confidence to:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com
or Fax # 386-758-5987
04541397
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
Full-Time Positions
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
Will be over ER, OR and Med
Surge Floor, Current RN
License, Ward or Hospital
Management Helpful.
Teaching and/or Supervisory
Exp. Preferred.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT
High School Graduate,
AA Degree in Acct. Preferred.
2 yrs Exp. in all aspects of Acct.
General Ledger, Accts Payable
and Payroll. Accounting Skills,-
Computer Skills, knowledge of
Word, Excel Software &
10 key Punch
PRN Position
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
Current Florida PT/ST/OT
license. Evaluate, Assess, Plan
and Implement Treatments.
Hand Therapy Preferred.
ARNP/PA,
To staff Emergency Room
Small Acute Care Critical
Access hospital. Exp. Required,
FT/PT/PRN
Great benefits and salary.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free'Workplace
04541443
Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation is hiring
for the following positions.
LPN, 3-11 shift, Full-time
Dietary Aide, Part-time
Dietary Cook, Part-time
Please apply 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, Fl or fax
resume to 386-752-7337
EOE/DFWP
Busy Medical Practice with multi-
ple doctors is seeking responsible
individual for Receptionist and
Scheduling. Medical experience a
must. Fax resume to 386-758-5628
F/T LPN (IV cert. req'd) needed,
for medical office.
Computer skills a plus.
Fax resume to 386-754-1712.


and t sake So ca
Make scashc


ADVERTISE YOUR


GARAGE SALE

WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER

Only



17 50

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!



(386) 755-5440


Classified Department: 755-5440


1 Medical
120U Employment
52" 36',2



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
C.N.A. in PRN Pool
Evening & Midnight
Shifts
PRN RN
Lake City
Adult Case Manager
Live Oak
CO IV
Discharge Planner
Lake City
www.mbhci.ore
to see our current
needs and online
applications
EOE, DFWP

P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

1.AKF CITY REPORTER


240 Schools &
240V Education
0441226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-09/13/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Boxer/Sheppard mix puppy, ready
for good home on 9/10/10,
Special needs dog 90% blind,
free/call for details 386-438-5385
Jack Russell puppies, with health
certificates, 8 weeks, asking $300
for females, $250 for males
386-935-1722
Jack Russell Puppies. $350. obo
DOB 7-17-10. super cute, friendly.
POP. Raised w/kids Jenn 352-260-
7019 or jenn@gatewayfarms.net
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
REGISTERED
English Setter puppies.
Great Bird Dogs. $200. ea.
386-961-1855 or 755-6874


330 Livestock &
33 Supplies
Grandma,
I want a Pony...
Call for details
386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware.
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Hotpoint side-by-side.
Refrigerator/Freezer, 25 cu ft.
white, like new $395
Call Don 3974889
Microwave Oven
good shape, works well, revolving
plate, welcome to see $30
386-755-3682

407 Computers
IBM Computer,
Many extras
$80.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


2/2 Large MH, small park. near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, I acre.
big front porch $650 mo,
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900 -




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Sunglasses


555-5555


B I G V N


Lake City

Reporter's

popular weekly

word search is

a great way to

get attention

with a fun new

puzzle every

week at a price

any business

can afford.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat/Sun, 8AM -. woodwork
tools, lawn mower, boat trailer. -
lots of other tools
249 SW Bedrock St (47)

440 Miscellaneous
Full Sized School Chalkboards
$25 each
386-344-5706 or
386-344-1783
Hospital Bed, electric wheelchair.
lift chair. recliner, vacuum cleaner
TV stand, kitchefi table w/4 chairs
call for prices 386-752-6051
450 Good Things
45 to Eat:
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434
630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
1,2 & 3 BR 1 BTH
MH's & House
Close to town 1st & Deposit.
386-755-5488
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2br/lba CH/A, screen porch. Lg
yard. fishing pond. Clean. quiet.
No Pets. References. Long term
rentals $475 mo. $475 sec. Smoke
free environment. 386-965-3003.
3BR /2BA DWMH. 10 miles from
Lake CIty off Hwy 247.
$650. mo plus 1st. last and $500
securtiy deposit. 386-935-6699
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/l ba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824


70 Unfurnished
70 Home For Rent
2BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo Ist and last NO pets
Country setting on Nash Road
386-752-1677
3bd/2ba's
Multiple Locations
Call for details
386-755-3649.
4/2/2 2800 sqft. 2nd fairway
Southern Oaks CC. 174
NW Harris Lake Dr. $1350. mo.
plus security. (941)545-6731
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,000
mo. $1.100. dep. 386-758-3166
Clean lBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/867-
1833.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Large 4 br/2ba, Family Rm, Living
Rm, Recreation Rm, large yard,
Old Country Club Road; No pets;
$800/mo + sec dep. 623-2642
Like new House for Rent.
1500 sqft. 3/2 w/garage. Available
now. $1000. mo. plus deposit.
386-623-0237
Mayfair Subdivision, 3/2,
fenced back yard, $1200 month
w/$800 security deposit
386-466-2254
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


71 Unfurnished Apt. 70Business &
710 For Rent I7U Office Rentals


055233(M
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
.2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security."
Call Michelle
386-752-9626
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in-town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $500. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-1002
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,.
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


Convenient Stbre
with gas
for lease,
813-286-2323
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children inder the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ble,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St **Sold**
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
MUST SEE! New 3500 foot
spec home. Reduced to $299,000
5% interest. 0% down or trade.
386-752-1364
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Bmfrd, Irg shed, sm down, $725
mo 386-590-0642/386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Saturn Lane 4/2 block,
5 acres, half cleared,2 sheds,
reduced from $140K to $120K
LCFR 386-754-0800


820 Farms &
O U Acreage
4 Ac..Fr. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles
1995 HONDA Shadow 600cc
Motorcycle. Mileage 19,500.
New battery. $2,500.
386-752-8157 or 397-6717

940 Trucks
1997 FORD F-250 Diesel
Extra cab. 5 sp., good AC.,
dependable. 7.3 turbo. $4,500.
(352)339-5158
1999 CHEVROLET 1500,
4 wheel drive, Z-71. Extended cab
w/3rd door. 1 owner. $7500.
Call after 8pm. 386-963-4788

951 Recreational
55i Vehicles
MOTORHOME 1995 Ford F350
29ft long, 29,011 miles slight
water damage on top.bed of truck
cab, $10,000.00 call 935 1270

952 Vans & Sport
SUtil. Vehicles
1999 CHEVY Suburban 4 door,
leather (no cracks). Dual AC.,
Like new condition. $4,500
386-454-5120


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1993 Harley
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67,000 miles.
$9,500
Call
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200635 Ft. Denali In Print, Online
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many extras, like new with
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I I











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Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
rrmnerolec^/fepoje r~trl


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, August 29, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Demorest


The

sudden

death

of oak

Office receives
many ques-
tions about
dead or dying
oaks, especially during
the months of July and-
August. According to Dr.
Barnard, a pathologist with
the Florida Division of
Forestry, there are many
reasons for "sudden" death
of oak.
Don't panic, however,
because Florida oaks have
not yet succumbed to the
disease called "Sudden Oak
Death" which is so destruc-
tive in the western coastal
states.
It appears that a combi-
nation of root disease fungi
and environmental condi-
tions are usually to blame.
The fungi can grow inside
the roots, decaying them
and keeping them from
taking up enough water.
Pathogens get in when
roots are damaged during
construction, or when they
grow among old decaying
stumps and roots. Roots
are more readily infected if
they are already suffering
from drought, insects, or
soggy soil.
Death of a tree may
occur slowly over months
or years. You may see a
progressive dieback of
branches and slow thinning
of the top crown. Usually
the 'sudden' death occurs
in the hottest part of the
summer when the tree is
full of leaves. Lots of water
is lost from the leaves into'
the atmosphere. The infect-
ed tree roots simply cannot
supply the water needed by
the tree for survival.
Drought can make the
problem worse, but too
much water can cause
problems, too. Water-
logged soil reduces the
amount of oxygen available
to the tree. Carbon dioxide
and other chemicals can
build up and reach toxic
levels. It is important that
soils do not become com-
pacted and soggy.
One pathogen,
Phytophthora cinnamomi,
causes "bleeding" cankers
to appear on the tree trunk.
These cankers ooze a clear
or dark liquid that runs
down the tree bark. The
damage inside the tree
prevents water from reach-
ing the leaves. A seemingly
healthy laurel oak can turn
completely brown within
a two-week period. In tree
terms, that is sudden.
There isn't any help for
a tree that has reached
this stage. Fungicides may
help prevent infections,
but they won't restore
health. A healthy tree is
the best defense against
these deadly root destroy-
ers. Remember that tree
roots reach out twice as far
as the tree canopy, so limit
any soil disturbing activi-
ties that could damage
those roots.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Brian Dopson, the dean of Arts and Sciences at Florida Gateway College, spent 10 days on a mission trip to Kiev, the capital of Ukraine. Dopson was one
of 15 people from First Baptist Church of Macclenny who helped build four Sunday school classrooms in Ukraine.They also helped out with a children's
Vacation Bible School in Kiev.










College dean does construction work


to serve the people of Kiev in Ukraine


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
F or Brian
Dopson, vaca-
tion time from
work was the
perfect oppor-
tunity to travel internation-
ally but not on vacation.
Instead, the Florida
Gateway College admin-
istrator decided to wield
a hammer, haul a mud
bucket and keep on work-
ing on his own dime.
Dopson, dean of Arts
and Sciences at FGC,
recently spent his time off
doing construction work
on a 10-day mission trip
serving the people of Kiev,
Ukraine.
A team of 15 people
from Dopson's church,
First Baptist Church of
Macclenny, traveled to
the country's capital city
to construct four Sunday
school classrooms in
one of its missionary
churches, and help with a
children's Vacation Bible
School.
Dopson said he has
been serving off-and-on
through different mis-
sion trips for the past 20
years, but this was his first
mission endeavor to the
Ukraine.
Construction work
in helping to build the
Sunday school class-
rooms was Dopson's
assignment during the
trip, work in which he
has had some experience
in from remodeling and
renting houses out in the
States.
"There were certainly
people a lot more expert
than I on that trip," he
said. "But I can do grunt-


COURTESY PHOTO
The group of missionaries gather for a group photograph as they arrive in Kiev, which is not
only the country's capital but its largest city.


work on about anything."
First Baptist Church
of Macclenny paid for all
the construction project
materials, while individ-
ual team members paid
approximately $2,500
each to take the service
trip.
The international expe-
rience and adjusting to
cultural differences pre-
sented some challenges
for the team, Dopson
said.
Scarcity of running
water for drinking or
brushing teeth, the
lack of air conditioning
anywhere in the coun-
try during record-high
100-degree weather and a
poor Ukranian economy
were issues the team was
confronted with, he said.
Such issues made
Dopson appreciate his


job at FGC, since the col-
lege has been developing
a water quality program
that will help people
without water in both the
United States and other
countries.
'Those are things I
think on a practical side
that really make me thank-
ful first to work here
because I think we've got
some programs that are
going to meet the needs
of people in places like
Ukraine," Dopson said.
The service experience
also taught Dopson to
respect the blessings of
living an American life.
"Also, it just makes
you thankful to be an
American and have the
blessings that we have,"
he said. "God's blessed us
so much in our country
with things that we just


take for granted."
Working alongside the
Ukranian people and con-
necting with them despite


the language barrier were
ways to show love to
them and give them hope,
Dopson said.
"I think obviously
it's rooted in taking the
love of Christ to people
and letting them know,
.'God loves you,'" he said.
"There's something about
it when you pay money,
you travel, you take your
vacation, you go over and
work hard and show them
that you're a brother or
sister, that you're related
to them, that you care
about them, they really
take that seriously."
Ultimately, Dopson's
faith and beliefs were rea-
sons to take an opportu-
nity to serve.
"Jesus gave the com-
mand to go and tell all
the world, go and preach
the gospel to all nations,"
Dopson said. '"We felt like
we wanted to help our
Ukranian brothers and sis-
ters to be encouraged."


COURTESY PHOTO
Brian Dopson prepares to paint one of the completed
Sunday school classrooms while enduring temperatures
that scaled as high as 100 degrees and embracing the
uncertainty of consistent running water.


Nichelle


I --








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


Why people keep their elbows off the table


MMabel,
Mabel,
if you're
able,
keep your
elbows off the table." Your
mom probably taught you
that little rhyme.
But this rule of etiquette
dates back to the 17th
century in Europe. Then,
people ate out of a com-
mon pot at a table (and
even drank out of a com-
mon glass) and you kept
your elbows out of the way
to provide more room for
others.
People either reached
into the common pot
with their fingers or their
pointed knives (weapon)
to capture their food.
Eventually in 1669, King
Louis XIV of France was
determined to prevent vio-
lence and he ordered all-
the points of knives to be
ground off, leaving them
rounded, which is the
table knife we use today.
Another story is that
Cardinal Richelieu of


France ordered all points
to be rounded off so his
guests couldn't pick their
teeth with their knives
after the meal. This
"no tooth-picking" rule
remains today a genteel
person never uses a tooth-
pick in public.
Why is dining etiquette
important?
In some cases, you may
be taken to lunch as part
of an interview process.
Your manners will be
observed because you
will be involved with busi-
ness lunches and clients.
Knowing basic business
etiquette or manners is not
a luxury it is a necessi-
ty for career advancement.
If you were lucky, you
learned correct table man-
ners from your family. If
you're not sure your man-
ners are appropriate, put
a stand-up mirror on the
dinner table and actually
watch yourself as you eat.
These are common errors
,to avoid:
No tucking your napkin


Sheri Carder
sheri. carderi@fgc.edu


into your neck line (like
a bib) or into your waist-
band. Lay it over your lap..
It is for blotting your lips
and cleaning your fingers
- no nose blowing.
No taking an additional
bite of food while you're
still chewing the first bite.
Seeing chewed-up food in
someone's mouth is nau-
seating.
No talking with food in
your mouth. If you're car-
rying on a conversation,
take very small bites so
that you can respond in
just a few seconds.
No hunching over your
plate like you're guarding
it from an attack from a
hungry, wild caveman. Sit


up straight and lean slight-
ly forward over your plate
as you take a bite.
No eating anything
that's simply too messy to
eat or involves eating with
your fingers when dining
out formally.
This would include spa-
ghetti, lobster or crab legs,
peel 'em shrimp, tacos,
pizza, or fried chicken.
Use your knife and fork on
everything; no fingers.
. No salting or seasoning
food before you have even
tasted it. J.C. Penney actu-
ally refused to hire man-
agers who salted before
tasting! he felt it indicated
they were too set in their
ways.
No cutting up your meat
all at one time. Just cut
only one bite at a time.
You're not a baby any-
more.
No taking a bite out'"
of whole roll or piece of :
bread. Pinch one bite off
at a time, butter one bite
at a time, and then eat that
bite.


No scraping food off
your plate onto someone
else's. If you're sharing
food, ask the waiter to
divide it in the kitchen
for you. No scraping food
off and stacking dishes
at the end of a meal in a
restaurant or even when
the guests are still seated
around your table at home.
No texting or cell phone
talking during a meal.
None. Do not even put
your telephone on the
table.
Give your associates
your undivided attention.
And don't ruin the eve-
ning for the other patrons
around you with your
incessant phone talk.
No "pushers." Don't use
a piece of bread or your
knife or, for goodness'
sake, your thumb to
push food up on your fork.
You are not suffering from
starvation and it's okay
to leave some food on
the plate. Never use your
bread to sop-up the left--
overs or juices.


If you're in Generation
"Y" (born after 1980), you
may think these etiquette
rules are out of fashion.
The casual behavior that
is acceptable to your
peers will probably not be
acceptable to your boss,
clients, or co-workers.
Remember, it's the older
generation the Baby
Boomers who have the
power to hire and promote
you.
I'll finish up this lesson
with a fun fact Buttons
were added to the sleeves
on men's coats to remind
them to use their napkins
- and to prevent them
from wiping their mouths
on their sleeves.
Mind your manners!
Make your mom proud.
If you're interested in
taking business courses at
Florida Gateway College,
contact Dr. Sheri Carder
at 754-4407 or e-mail sheri.
carder@fgc.edu.

* Sheri Carder is a business
professor at Florida Gateway
College.


ENGAGEMENTS


COURTESY PHOTO


Emily Ann Vaughan and Evan Blair.


Vaughan-Blair
Dan and Ann Vaughan
of Des Moines, Iowa,
announce the engagement
and approaching mar-
riage of their 'daughter,
Emily Ann Vaughan of Des
Moines, Iowa to Evan Blair
of Lake City.
He is the son of Lee and
Joanne Blair of Lake City.
The bride-elect gradu-
ated in 2007 from Central
College and is currently
working in the behavioral


and health field at Principal
Financial group.
The future groom
attended Central College
and owns his own
spray foam business
in addition to working
with his father at KK
Construction.
The wedding is
planned for 6:30 p.m.
Aug. 28 at the home of
Tom and Deb Dean, fol-
lowed .by a reception.


'Sex parties' reveal ba


By GREG BLUESTEIN
Associated Press, :,
ATLANTA- We called
it a,sex party. But it's not
what you think.
My wife, Sheryl, and I
never hesitated on whether
we wanted to find out the
sex of our baby. But we
also knew we didn't want
the news to come at our
doctor's office.
The thought of celebrat-
ing the news at a sterile
medical building made her
stomach turn. And that's
never a good thing when
you're pregnant
So she came up with an
elaborate, creative plan to
discover the news about
the baby at our own home
- surrounded by some of
our closest friends. Here's
how it worked:
We went to the doctor
for the 20-week checkup,
which is typically when
the ultrasound techni-
cian is able to determine
the baby's gender. The
techs are used to handling
requests from nervous
parents who don't want to
know the gender of the
baby, but we surprised her
a bit
After she probed myr
wife's belly, checked the
baby's vital signs and made
.sure all its toes and fingers
were accounted for, she
told us to look away. That's
when she printed a picture
of the baby's privates and


ASSOCIA
This undated photo provided by the Utah-based bal
The Sweet Tooth Fairy, shows a cake the bake sho|
for an expectant mother who wanted the gender of
baby to be revealed using cake. The mother gave a
envelope that contained a sheet of paper with-the g
of her baby written on it to the bake shop. When thE
family made the first cut of the cake they found out


were having a baby girl.
wrote the gender on it for
good measure. Then she
tucked it away in a sealed
envelope.
Almost as soon as she
handed us the envelope,
we were bpth tempted to
break the seal to see if we
were having a Little Boy
Blue or Little Girl Blue.
That night my wife gave
the envelope to one of her
best friends, Jaime, for safe.
keeping. Jaime kept if by
her side until she drove
to a local grocery store
the next day and handed
it to the baker along with
a strange request Take
a look at the picture and
bake a cake with.blue icing


inside if it's a boy a
icing inside if it's a
At first, I was a b
uncomfortable witi
whole idea. It seem
strange sharing swu
intimate moment w
closest friends, and
weirder that the ba
the Publix knew ou
gender before we d
Then we figured
had to find out the
sex, we might as w
to share it with ma
them at once. Andy
thought it would be
way to put some of
friends at ease, since
among the first in o
circle to have a bab


Lby gender
But most of all, Sheryl
reminded me that I didn't
have much of a say on this
one. After all, she's the one
,.. carrying the baby.
Our guests started com-
ing over that Saturday
night around 7, and two
shoes greeted them in
our foyer. We asked them
to write their names on a
slip of paper and tuck it
S into my giant loafer if they
think ifs a boy and Sheryl's
slender stiletto if they think
TED PRESS it's a girl. One lucky win-
ke shop ner would take home a.
p made prize a gag gift of baby
her oil brought by one of the.
i sealed guests.
ender Over the next few hours,
e about 50 friends gorged on
they a dozen pizzas and guzzled,
down some beer until it
was time for dessert Then,
nd pink we all gathered in our
girl. kitchen in front of the mas-
)it sive sheet cake, giving our
h the guests a brief reminder of
ted the import of the moment
ch an Anticipation mounted
ith our as we eyed the icing. We
even slowly cut into a cake,
ker at separating a piece.
ir baby's I looked. Sheryl looked.
lid. I wasn't quite sure. I
if we checked again. She
baby's checked again.
ell try Cheers'echoed through
ny of the house as we saw the
we also pink icing.
e a nice It's a girl!
Sour
ce we're
)ur "
by. __ 9


Sarah Michelle Ratliff and Justin Harriss Moses.


COURTESY PHOTO


Ratliff-Moses


Glenda Register
announces the engage-
ment of her daughter,
Sarah Michelle Ratliff to
Justin Harriss Moses. She
is the daughter of the late
Charles Owen Ratliff.
He is the son of Mike
and Cathy Moses and
Melinda Moses.
The bride-elect is a
2007 graduate of Lake
City Community College
and is currently employed
with Ed Fraser Memorial


Hospital in Macclenny and
Shands Homecare in Lake
City as a physical therapist
assistant.
The future groom is
a 2000 graduate of the
University of Central
Florida and is currently
employed with Momex
Foods Inc.
Both are graduates of
Columbia High School.
A private wedding in
California is planned for
November.


our bridaf

registry
China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Holly Helms
Patrick Hadlock
August 21, 2010

Tifanie Mosely
Garre Miller
September 18, 2010

Hailey Witt
Wes Douglas
September 18, 2010

Jessica Powers
Eric Johnson
October 10, 2010

Rebecca Busby
Robert Murray
October 23, 2010
We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower gift.
We update their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.
SWARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









.3D


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Deadbeat husband needs


tougher

DEAR ABBY: I am a
40-year-old woman who
feels like a single mother.
My husband is lazy, has
a negative attitude and
hasn't held a job in four
years. I provide everything
in our marriage the
money, the education for
our 8-year-old son, plus I
do all the housework, etc.
My husband graduated
from a famous university
with a bachelor's degree.
I have a master's degree
and am now studying for
my doctorate.
When my husband had
a job he would give his
money to his parents or
spend it on lottery tickets.
His parents have more
money than mine do.
To me, family is like
a bank account into
which you must deposit
your love, your money
and your responsibility.
Unfortunately, my hus-
band is always spending
- never saving.
There is no love
between us. I think about
divorce but worry that
my husband will have no
house to live in. Maybe I.
am being too kind. What
words of advice do you
have for me? --Y.L. IN
BEIJING, CHINA
DEAR Y.L.: It's time to
stop worrying about your
husband and start think-


love to gi


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.comrn
ing about the example he
is setting for your son. Do
you want him to grow up
thinking your household is
normal?
Speaking woman to
woman, since nothing
else has worked it is time
to try "tough love." Your
husband will not be home-
less he can-stay with his
parents until he decides he
wants to act like a respon-
sible spouse, finds a job
and stops gambling his
money away. If he straight-
ens up, you can reconcile.
Marriage is supposed to
be a working partnership,
and from where I sit you
have pulled the entire load
long enough.
DEAR ABBY: My
fiancee, "Mandy," and I
decided to buy a home.
(We moved in together
last August.) Mandy didn't
qualify to be on the loan,
so it is in my name. No
matter what I do, she says
she feels like the house
won't be "ours" until I put
her name on the deed.


row up
Abby, a week hasn't gone
by that we haven't argued
about this to the point of
not speaking to each other.
I want to marry Mandy,
but I would like us to
reach a point that we're
able to get along first She
says we won't be able to
do that if I don't put her
name on the deed. Am I
wrong to want to be more
comfortable in the relation-
ship before doing that?
If something happened
and we didn't get married
she'd have as much right
to the house as I do with-
out having paid any money
toward it. "IN DEED"
IN ATLANTA.
DEAR "IN DEED":
Listen to your gut, because
ifs guiding you in the right
direction. A house is one
of the biggest investments
you will ever make. Putting
Mandy's name on the deed
will not magically fix the
shaky foundation of this
relationship. You may love
her, but please continue to
think rationally. It appears
she is trying to emotion-
ally blackmail you.. Before
entering into ANY contract
with Mandy (or anyone
else, for that matter), talk
to your lawyer.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't get
caught in the middle of
someone else's argument.
You will be blamed for
meddling and might even
lose a friendship. Make
a judgment call and you
will avoid being set up or
let down by someone you
have to deal with profes-
sionally. * *
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Join a group or
take a course to learn a
new skill. The more you
can add to your resume,
the better. You will under-
stand exactly what is being
implied, enabling you to
elaborate in a positive and
productive manner.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Look inward
and you will find the
answers you are looking
for. As long as you keep
thinking that everyone
else has the answers, you
will be no closer to finding
your way. * *
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't limit what
you can do because you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
are indecisive. It's better to
at least try moving forward
instead of sitting still, let-
ting life pass you by. Make
choices conducive to sat-
isfaction, functionality and
productivity. *
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Get involved in a
new pastime or take on a
creative project. You will
be introduced to a mul-
titude of people who will -
challenge you in a positive
manner. **r *
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't-be afraid to
take a different approach.
You will surprise the peo-
ple who think they know
you and attract new friends
who can stimulate your
mind.. *. *
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't allow anyone to
push you aside when you
have the right to step into
the spotlight and share
your thoughts and inten-
tions. You cannot always
be the one trying to keep
the peace. * *
SCORPIO (Oct.. 23-


CELEBRITY CIPHER
CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptogroams or created trOaf q~oarotaos by anion people. past and present.
Each better in the cipher stands (or e manh
Today's clue: U equals B
F L P O S F A Y T F K P K I R Y F
TSG'K Y J Y G X G SB WSB KS R P Y
KW Z K KW F G E F G KW Y X F K HW Y.G
B F KW KW Y AJ R IG YIP LSTY A
H FG T M L Z I E SA F P
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "What I am proudest of? Working really hard... and
achieving as much as I could." Elena Kagan
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-24


Nov. 21): Make altera-
tions at home. An oppor-
tunity will develop if you
try something different.
What you discover will be
a hidden talent that can be
added to your-resume. *
* *
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't give
too much information away
or it will be used against
you. Your position at home
and at work will take a pos-
itive turn if you do the best
you can personally and
professionally. * *
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Not every-
one will be happy with
your plans. Be careful
while traveling and limit
the amount of information
you share with others.
You'll have trouble stick-
ing to the rules., *
**
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Get your per-
sonal paperwork in order
and make plans to change
some of the conditions
in which you have been
living. Say no to anyone
trying to talk you into a
backwards move. *
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You won't go
wrong if you are true to
your beliefs and you are
practical in the way you
apply what you know. A
relationship can develop
between you and someone
you have worked with in
the past ** *


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


FILM NO-R By Patrick Berry f Edited by Will Shortz rrrwr |2 j 4 |1e ||7 |l |


Ac ros
1 "Come O ___!
Of wrast, in a
L.tin hymn
0 -'VhrowA in
13 *L..a
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c r r rpos
19 FaIm Iabo it a
corrfda
r., -at -i r..' a
1" pdi.sr'lir'
21 MNount ___
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Mordeor)
22 Too
23 ... i candy-
confeder erat
2 Lk rie rie :y
Cleveliand
2 F A.. hb.il f c
W,.,';La have i
2 m VivacityI
28 ... a smal-
mnuded lady?
J "Cisino" actor
Jone
4T TV prondckesr
M .. t arlinfi:
34 [E42 H.Iafrv
Jame, h ii"
311 fiowlir"'
atc ijnmew
F::; in mseait

,. The iMythical tree
4 i.,:(j ; I I for
uns
.40 F-inback whale
41 Museunim piect
4.5 Cil o:,If
44 ... 3B
emharrfiS~f-n8Jy
smei-,Edad r.,enli.

Par Ui', :hrc ;w.rtisww

1.49 eich, minute. -,
wah a crMdit card I-...:'-
H 14- M.t4


48 David &aTnofft
aompiany
5 Political theorist
Hannaaa
33 "b it'" narrator
54 The AceII.1'
rL. i .
S5 Some solos
57I Oae who keeps
Ihir.n' from
39 Geometric shape
whoae perimeter
has in irtc
Iknlih
<2 T"ce Colosaeum
was comtleted
during his reign
63 ParaBetiu.m"'
prope I Itr4s
bt Paot o N.Pt. L.
Abhr.

61 .. decayazlve
ei'crnwtv being

75 Arry division
e.g. n
71 .Dam-
SActre" nhew Sx
0 uhSpotakr insie

rade



102 hullornia city
93 .. ick
iorsrc t
M9t.nHlfnuity.
49 Wethrmr3irLe
Hit... a eder of a


t-3 Pixar title
c haract-r
LI C4 Re itatiom by
:' h: h r r a i J.v
tM.4, "Time _. .- "
ti v 'uk.on, e.g.:
, Abb b
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tl2 .. drnk
.: rInls._j I.,
tlS Work like a J.'F
[17 Kirrnum or
;h.i>3c!m
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appretiale muaic
L21 ...a reedy
t24 tipaped ik
123 _1(CakestirA
I l h;:,: :,
I I!c:Ii,
1 1 intrsn c n .f
127 re nb na
12,1 H.mk- in the

stripped aitear
j29 rKiciliai



t Gentle WoBlhes
2 Turkish title
3 Con- whose music
its rasy ta
4 What intersecting
Limaes.cnrea'e
& Makr of the
koadrunne r
s up-e reoam inpute r
6 "Wtat noansenae!'
? Wing-shaped
Fhij:.l h. .
& 1969. lierart
heraine wfi sayt
'1 like (be wordas
damozel,
eglanmine,
ele gant. I )ove
'when you kimL
m)> :rnialrd
while : hnJ


10 Enselihgent

1. Pounder f an
Oahu plantation
12 'Tommy oi t-H -",
13 ?'pl: office ,
14 Ac knowledge
15 oil
i p rlrfurr.,r)
in rrdie nrI
16 Homni-r. detector?
1t NaIame in 20il)
newspapers
1A Country simSer
.'-.iar !b-, -
20 f-ellas






acrasA the pond
36 Count (2004
J29 H C r role I-.
33 Amasnon e,

Singer, saagw rite
-39 Ad _
42 -\im for wouIli-
h-. Attys.

45 Part afl TV dial
4' "Whlt he said"
41 Wliere' Excaftbur
was forged
49 Make wtteftighI
1i0 le.sts of burden
3 .l pse ate
restaurant
requreme nt,
maybe
36 '"To Catch a
Thie '" sr: .iri (
58 Shharpie tipl
60 A-athor .Mailra.u
61 -lagcd.-J vehicle.
64 St. Cla.ei home
0 ,lostumer
reports


8 ---I i vay
69 Rkeadfers etlutant
't0 -'he Sandhox"
play rig hi
?I Central potat
-72 Ho i96si teft
71, New and
I proved "
might appear ,on,
one
74 Song Isylabl.s6
79 Calisl ct'ullta's
wile in
'AI Vai ll sh1 '
NOC< Hollroas taU~,h


:01 Meni io
82 ___ votailt
44 .I 11 -i-,L n v of
food, e.g.

16 Paper stIp,?
90 1 [ r;,:'..,. quirk
94 I-.nvli'%h
chur.:hyard y tiiht
.95 P'laartf, *tlht
sindiaing herr
96 Indiin miottctrrv


.17 Sailar's sword
IM0I Hand braakes,

!i13! Conifer leaf
1,04 Unqualified
tSi i-H c i.c riang a
pulse
1117 LElectrnic game
fad of the

1119 6iivea deep
massage therapy
it Web ite for
f'IaCptbites


1l3 What totus-
eaters eijoy
1I4 "l d be g lad t.oI"
I 1fi Kussian figure
skater Kulik
1 8 Major publisher
of romance
novels
119 Helen of Ir:-'. 's
mother
12'2 ,jnrKiTig to bfe
near oeIs fans!
123 Lastl in a series


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
IG|OGO1LIM|ASH|SIANElS RTAS
A D A N 0 T R 1I 0 DIE A- R PIE A R S
MA|Y ITIEVERBESOSO IC B M S
PNINDN TEON CLASINALOS


MED ITERRANEANSI 1 OSA
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NAMABLE PUN R V TCS


B OND VINCENTE ALBUMS
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IBEAM UHF IDEE TABU
C 0 B RA D 0 NTTRE ADON MIMI
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8 5


5 67 9 4


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758 4


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9 6 9 L L 8 1 9


9 8 9 L V Z 6 L


L V 6 8 E L 9 Z 9


LEI 6 9 9 1L 8







4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY AUGUST 29, 2010


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2


Making This Right


I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have
to restore the Gulf communities for the shrimpers, fishermen,
hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach


Beaches


Claims


Cleanup

Economic Investment
Environmental
Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the
beginning of our work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup
in the Gulf and that includes keeping you'informed.

Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet.
We have been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments.and community organizations, my job is
to listen to people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have
19 community centers and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and
restaurant owners, helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have
already gone to people affected by the spill. We have committed a
$20 billion independent fund-to pay all legitimate claims, including lost
incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism
recover and bring people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams
will remain in place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific
experts on the impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support
over 10,000 jobs in the region and people here are our neighbors. We
know we haven't always been perfect, but we will be here until the oil
is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal. We will do
everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816


restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BP_America
YouTube: BP


For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP, E&P


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