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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01411
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/28/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01411
System ID: UF00028308:01411
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Removing oil cap
Engineers will soon start delicate
work at BP's blown-out well.


Nation. 5A
000015 120110 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


326


aie V


Tigers win
Columbia avenges last
year's loss, 23-13.
Sports, I B






reporter


Saturday, August 28, 2010


www.


ityreporter.com '


Vol. 136, No. 189 M 75 cents


FDLE probes 'questionable' ballots


[ Wandeenits

Today
Bowlathon for breast
cancer research
Fundraiser for Breast
Friends Forever to raise
money for Susan G. Komen
3-Day Walk for the Cure.
Event to raise sponsor
funding for the-walk is
1:30 p.m. today at Lake
City Bowl, 1995 Brandford
'Highway, $10 per person
for two games. Silent auc-
tion and door prizes and
50/50 drawing. Contact
(386) 365-4488.
Driver safety course
An AARP driver safety
class sponsored by Pine
Grove Baptist Church will
be held at 9 a.m. today. Call
A. George at 752-9061.
End child hunger project
Kiwanis' is hosting its
End Child Hunger Project
from 8 a.m. until noon
today at the Publix park-
ing lot. The canned food
drive benefits Food Bank
of Suwannee Valley and
Catholic Charities.'
Hair cut-a-thon
Ms. Wezzie's Haircuts
will host its annual cut-
a-thon from 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. today at 9206 W. US
Highway 90. All proceeds
will go to Haven Hospice to
support the families. Call
755-4102 or 758-7700.
Jazz rendezvous night
Lake City Medical
Center Hospital is sponsor-
ing Jazz Rendezvous Night
with Wayne Levy and The
Organics from 8 p.m. to 12
a.m. today at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Tickets
are $20. Call Janet at 752-
0235.
Kickoff program
FA.C.E Kickoff is from
1 to 3 p.m. today at the
Wellborn Community
Association Building.
Special guests include
Brenda Dickinson, home
school lobbyist Home
Education Foundation;
Vicki Leist, Florida Parent
Teacher Association dis-
trict representative and
Florida Virtual School rep-
resentative; Linda Williams,
Florida Gateway College
dual enrollment adviser.

Sept. 11
Civil War Expo
The Department
of Environmental
Protection's Olustee
Battlefield Historic State
Park is hosting a Civil
War Expo from 10 to 3
p.m. Sept. 11 in celebra-
tion of Patriots Day. The
expo will feature authentic
military drills, music and
storytelling. Call (386)
397-4478 or visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/
olustee or BattleOfOlustee.
org.


Sheriff meets
District 10
candidates.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement is
investigating allegations


of ballot improprieties.
The Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections
office has sent several
absentee ballots from
Tuesday's elections to the
state's division of elections
office after the ballots were
found to have questionable
signatures.
"We have informed
the (Florida) Division of


TOP


Elections that there is a tions. "The division of elec-
small amount of absentee tions will review and refer,
ballot sig- any ques-
natures in tionable
question absentee
for the ballot sig-
Aug. 24 natures to
primary," the proper
said Liz authori-
P. Horne, ties. This
Home Columbia Hunter in no way
County supervisor of elec- will affect the outcome of


COLLEGE


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
FGC library staff celebrate Friday afternoon as they get word of the college's unexpected ranking. Pictured are
coordinator of library research Christine Boatright (from left), library technicians Lynnda White and Karen Thomas and
executive director of library and community services Jim Morris. 'We are very excited, but not surprised,' Morris said.


FGC joins list of nation's


best community colleges
By LFANNF TYO dent-faculty interaction,


Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

Florida Gateway
College has
not only met
the mark for
its efforts in
2010, but surpassed it,
receiving both state and
national recognition.
The college, listed by
its former name, Lake
City Community College,
was recently ranked as
No. 26 in Washington
Monthly magazine's 2010
listing of America's best
community colleges. The
school is also listed by
the magazine as the top
community college in the
state.
The magazine's study
included more than 650
community colleges
nationwide and its results
appear in the September/
October 2010 issue.
'To be selected by
Washington Monthly is a
real honor," said Charles
Hall, FGC president.
"We're excited. Not only
were we noticed and con-


JASON MATIHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida Gateway College President Charles Hall said he
felt proud when he found out that Lake City Community
College was listed No. 26 out of the top 50 community
colleges nationwide in Washington Monthly magazine.


sidered ... to be selected
in the top 50 is a signifi-
cant honor and its a title
we're pleased to wear."
. Hall said the college is
also excited to be ranked
the top in the state by an
unconnected, indepen-
dent third party.
"We just feel very


honored that we were
selected by this impartial
group because we have
no connections," he said.
The study's rankings
were determined by
various criteria, including
active and collaborative
learning, student effort,
academic challenge, stu-


support for learning and
four-year graduation rate.
According to the
Washington Monthly
website, the study was
based on the Community
College Survey of
Student Engagement,
housed at the University
of Austin at Texas,
and on graduation
rates published by the
U.S. Department of
Education.
The college is proud
of its community involve-
ment and partnerships
as well as its economic
development programs,
reasons that could have
brought the ranking
home, Hall said.
SHe also said the stu-
dents who attend the col-
lege have a good experi-
ence and leave as quality
people ready to get jobs
or go on to higher educa-
tion.
"I think we have a
really good product that's
coming out," Hall said,
"and also, the students
seem satisfied."


any race that was on the
ballot" .
Mark Hunter, Columbia
County sheriff, said
his office has called the
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement to con-
duct an investigation into
the allegations.
Hunter said he was con-
FDLE continued on 3A


Suspect

in triple

murder

arrested

Authorities issue
warrants for two
more suspects.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
McALPIN Suwannee
County authorities have
arrested one suspect and
have signed arrest warrants
for two other suspects in
a triple homicide case that
left three Suwannee County
residents dead Thursday.
Keith Allen Hughes, no
age or address provided,
has been charged with con-
spiracy and robbery in con-
nection with the case. He is
being held at the Suwannee
County Jail.
Tony Cameron, SuWan-
nee County Sheriff, did not
say when or where Hughes
was arrested.
Arrest warrants have
also been signed for James
Lindsey Howze, 38, and
Lonnie Robert Munn, 47,
both of Suwannee County.
On Thursday morn-
ing, Suwannee County
authorities were called to a
McAlpin farm where three
adults were found shot to
death execution style.
SUSPECT continued on 3A


Crash

injures

truck

driver

Reports'say semi
tractor tried to
avoid car on I-10.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Mississippi truck driv-
er was seriously injured in a
single-vehicle crash Friday
morning when he swerved
to avoid a car that pulled in,
front of him.
Lavernes Tornes, 45, of
Jackson, Miss., was taken
to Lake City Medical Center
with injuries he suffered in

DRIVER continued on 3A


.i . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. t._..Cr ,*-L,' trfui.abi.


CALLUS: a
(386) 752-1293 90
SUBSCRIBE TO T-Storm Chance
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445 W ATHER, 2A
1 L'I 846 0001 Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER,2A


Opinion ........ .
Obituaries ......
Advice & Comics
Puzzles ..........
Faith &Values...


4A
..4B -
6A


DAILY
BRIEFING
'hrtptcOn, Pall,
.:t ii::n -t I ILK", Islon


COMING
SUNDAY
F _-'oC dea- n .':',
pe.:,ple of Kie.


-










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010


Friday:
Afternoon: 0-9-5
Evening:9-0-8


Friday:
. Afternoon: 8-5-1-4
Evening: 1-9-2-5


wrA-
ezimatchz.
Thursday:
S 3-12-14-34-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Sharpton: Rally against MLK's vision


WASHINGTON


Broadcaster Glenn Beck
and tea party activists
have a right to rally in
the nation's capital but
not to distort Martin
Luther King Jr.'s vision, the Rev. Al
Sharpton said Friday.
Sharpton described the demon-
stration planned for today by Beck
and his supporters as an anti-govern-
ment rally advocating states' rights.
And he said that goes against the
message in King's famous "I Have
a Dream" speech, in which the civil
rights leader appealed to the federal
government to ensure equality.
Beck's "Restoring Honor" rally
will be held at the Lincoln Memorial,
where King delivered his speech
exactly 47 years earlier. Beck and
other organizers say the aim is to
pay tribute to America's military
personnel and others "who embody
our nation's founding principles
of,'integrity, truth and honor." The
broadcaster toured the site Friday as
supporters cheered.
Sharpton wasn't the only one upset
with circumstance surrounding the
event
Leaders in the nation's capital said
they were offended by a tea party
blogger's warning to those attending
to avoid two of Washington's subway
lines because they go through certain
neighborhoods. Many parts of the city
are safe, he wrote, "but why chance it
if you don't know where you are?"
' D.C. Council Chairman Vinmcent
Gray, who is running for mayor,
invited visitors into the city's neighbor-
hoods and said Friday he would urge
any tea partiers he meets to ride the
subway.
"Frankly, we need to put an end to
that venom," he said at a news confer-
ence. "This is a city of 600,000 people
- people who enjoy living here,
people who pay their taxes."
"Lets not let them get away with
portraying the District of Columbia as


1~


7.
a-I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
'Thank you, Glenn!'shouts Brenda Herr of Grant-Valkaria as Glenn Beck leaves a
visit to the site of the Restoring Honor rally by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington
on Friday. The rally will take place today.


some kind of frontier city," Gray said.
"We live in peace."

Levi Johnston makes 6th
CBS morning show visit
NEW YORK Levi Johnston
chose one of his favorite television
venues, CBS' '"The Early Show," to
declare on Friday that he lied when
he previously said he had lied about
Sarah Palin.
It was the sixth
time that Johnston,
the father of the
former Alaska
governor's grandson,
has appeared on the,
show over the past Johnston
two years. He spoke Johnston
with correspondent Betty Nguyen
about his second broken engagement
with Palin's daughter Bristol and plans
to run for mayor of Wasilla, Alaska,
and film a reality TV show.
The morning show's interest in


Johnston amounts to an "obsession,"'
according to a conservative media
critic, who said he wondered whether
CBS was out to embarrass Palin and
her family.

Judge grants restraining
order sought by DiCaprio
LOS ANGELES Leonardo
DiCaprio has been granted a tempo-
rary restraining against a woman he
said claims to be his wife and carry-
ing his baby.
Court records show Superior
Court Judge Carol Boas Goodson
granted the order Wednesday
against Livia Bistriceanu, 41, of
Chicago. DiCaprio's request includ-
ed statements from the actor and his
security team claiming Bistriceanu
had traveled from Chicago to Los
Angeles at least twice to try to meet
DiCaprio at his home and business
office.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Country singer Billy
Grammer is 85.
* Former Defense Secretary
William S. Cohen is 70.
* MLB manager Lou Piniella
is 67.
* Actress Debra Mooney
is 63.
* Olympic gold medal figure
skater Scott' Hamilton is 52.



Daily Scripture


"You will keep in
him whose mind


M Actor John Allen Nelson
is 51.
* Actress Emma Samms *
is 50.
* Actress Jennifer Coolidge
is 49.
* Country singer Shania
Twain is 45.
* Country singer LeAnn
Rimes is 28.


perfect peace
is steadfast,


because he trusts in you."


.- Isaiah 26:3


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number........ (386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Fax number .............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and am. on Sunday.
The Associated Press.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
All material herein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers should
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake City, Fla. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ...............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295.. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ............... :.. $26.32
EditorTom Maler .........754-0428 24 Weeks.... ... ....... $48.79
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com) 52 Weeks...... .... $83.46
ADVERTISING Rates include 7% sales tax.
ADVERTISING aMail rates
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418 12 Weeks ..................$41.40
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) 24 Weeks............... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Boy dies after
being left in SUV
MIAMI A 3-year-old
boy died after being left J
in a sport utility vehicle
for more than an hour in
South Florida.
Miami-Dade police
report that the boy was .
found Friday in a Ford
Expedition parked outside
his family's home. Rescue
workers took the child to
a nearby hospital in criti-
cal condition, but he later
died.
Police were reportedly
called to the home after a
young man was pounding Trying
oh the outside of a trailer,
yelling at a woman inside. Homeowner
Palm Beac
their homes
McCollum seeks Assistance
help on BP claims whirlwind s
TALLAHASSEE homes of s
Florida Attorney General.
Bill McCollum says he's Cook tried
worried that independent on charge
claims administrator to commit
Kenneth Feinberg is mak- threatening
ing it harder for business- destructive,
es and individuals to get A witness
compensated for damages Atos Cook
from the Gulf bf Mexico torseCook,
oil spill. to "breakl
McCollum on Friday the 1999 C
sent letters to U.S. and 2007 V
Attorney General Eric shooting r
Holder and BP asking Cook to
for help in persuading was only jo
Feinberg to back off from mother ca
policies he says will put tions ridici
greater burdens on victims ber rifle w
and prevent some from Cook's roo
being "made whole." mother sa
old family
Teen accused of taken wer
arrow and
planning shooting about fire
TAMPA A 17-year-old
Tampa student has been Crist re
arrested for allegedly try- 2 comic
ing to organize an attack
to surpass the country's CORAL
worst cases of school vio- Gov. Charl
lence. stated two
Austin James Cook was commission
arrested this week just charged w
before classes began at state's ope
Leto High. law in Mar
He's being held without The gov
bail, and investigators want announced


ASSOCIATED PRESS

to save homeowners
ers line up in the rain before dawn outside the
h County Convention Center in hopes of saying
s Friday in West Palm Beach. The Neighborhood
Corporation of America is making its second
top in West Palm Beach to try and save the


struggling borrowers.

d as an adult
s of solicitation
murder and
g to discharge a
e device.
sstold investiga-
said he wanted
the record" of
Columbine, Colo.,
Virginia Tech
ampages.
ld deputies he
king, and his
lls the allega-
ulous. A .22-cali-
as seized from
,m, but the boy's
ys it's a rusted
heirloom. Also
e a bow and
several books
trms.

einstates
missioners
SPRINGS -
lie Crist has rein-
Coral Springs
)ners who were
ith violating the
n government
*ch.
ernor's office
1 the reinstate-


ment of Commissioners
Vincent Boccard and Tom
Powers Friday. A judge
had dismissed the charges
against the officials last
week, saying there wasn't
enough evidence.

120 sea turtle
eggs in backpack
JUNO BEACH -
Authorities are reburying
about 120 sea turtle eggs
after they were found in a
backpack in South Florida.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission said Friday
the backpack belonged to
Kenneth Coleman, who
was arrested on charges
of resisting arrest and
obstruction of justice after
he fled on a bicycle when
stopped by an officer. He
also faces federal charges,
including one count of
violating the endangered
species act.
The eggs are being
reburied in the hopes that
they will hatch.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


I>SHOWERS, SHOWERS, CHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS


HI90 LO71 HI 901070 HI 91LO 71


* s.R


SValdosta
. 89/72 ,


Tallahassee *
89/72
Pensacola '*
85/76 .Panama City
87/75


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Lake
90


86
75
90
70
98 in 1959
61 in 1930

0.05"
4.81"
36.98"
5.84"
35.97"


0*


lacksonville
218/79


:rCit


-I'-l


City Sunday
Cape Canaveral 88/79/sh


.x \ 'w. Daytona Beach
)/71 Ft. Lauderdale
ainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
0772 8 76 Fort Myers
0/72, ', Gainesyille
Ocala Jacksonville
90/72 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral LaKey est
91/76 87/79 Lake City
SMiami
Tampa Naples
91/77 West Palm Beach Ocala
89/78 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 89/81 0 Pensacola
92/76 Naples Tallahassee
a4/77 Miami Tampa
Kvey West 92/80 Valdosta
91/83 W. Palm Beach
91/83 '


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:05 a.m.'
7:58 p.m.
7:06 a.m.
7:57 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 9:49 p.m.
Moonset today 10:29 a.m.
Moonrise torpk 10:24 p.m.
Moonset tom. 11:24 a.m.


Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
1 8 15 23
Last New First Full


10mi0esbum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI92LO71
^siM~ewtwwtia 1


Monday
89/75/sh
90/75/pc
89/82/pc
92/75/pc
91/71/pc
90/73/pc
91/80/t
91/71/pc
91/80/pc
95/77/pc
90/72/pc
93/75/pc
85/76/pc
86/75/t
88/71/pc
91/77/pc
90/69/pc
88/80/pc


90/77/t
90/82/t
92/75/t
89/72/pc
88/73/t
90/8b/t
90/70/pc
91/80/t
93/76/t
90/72/pc
92/77/t
86/75/t
86/73/t
89/71/t
91/78/t
89/71/pc
89/79/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


., Forecasts, data and graph-
'-' Ics 2010 Weather Central
S w:--'] LLC, Madison, Wis.
' ~ www.weatherpubllsher.com


CAH3.


AROUND FLORIDA


I


-------- ---------- --- --------------


ok Wll -,"Invomm


H BH.lakecitirold,, c)


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010


-.Rainshower drops extra


thrill for Finally Friday


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Gabrielle Griffis, 9', dances as he brother Sawyer, 3, slaps his feet in a puddle during Finally
Friday.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

The August edition of
Finally Friday went on
despite a rainy start Friday
in Olustee Park.
"Everybody here was
having a good time," said
Dennille Folsom of the
Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.
Finally Friday is orga-
nized by the chamber, and
Party Down 4 Less was the
event sponsor.
"It was a way to give back
to the community and for
the kids to have something
to do on a Friday after a
long hard week of school,"
said Makeba Murphy, co-
owner.
Starlight Rhythm Section
performed classic music
and Lake City Dance
Studio had a clogger per-
formance.
Two bounce houses
were available for children
and the Columbia. County
Sheriff's Office had a finger
printing and identification
station.
"Hannah Montana: The
Movie" was shown to the
audience.
Natalie Manna, 10, of
Branford was excited to see
the movie, she said.
She came to Finally
Friday to support her father,
Carl, who is the drummer in
Starlight Rhythm Section.
"It was amazing because
of all the great music and


JPASUN MAI IIltEW WALKRiKLaKe uiy Reporter
Megan Merritt, 5, laughs as she bounces in a bounce house
at the Finally Friday event held at Olustee Park on Friday.
Food, music and 'Hannah Montana: The Movie' were a few of
the attractions geared to reward children after the first week
of school.


fun (bounce houses),"
Manna said.
John Oliver of Lake City
brought his children to the
event
Finally Friday provides
a family-oriented event, he
said.
"It's something you can
do without spending lots of
money," Oliver said. "They
need to do more stuff like
this. It's nice."
A lot of people came out
even in the rain, Murphy
said.
"The kids definitely had


fun," she said. "The rain
made the bounce houses
even more fun for them."
Finally Friday will be
held, quarterly and the next
one is scheduled for Oct 29
and will feature the annual
Trunk or Treat.
Overall, the Chamber's
first Finally Friday was a
fantastic event, Folsom
said.
"Everybody here sat out
in the rain but their spirits
were high and they were
entertained and they.appre-
ciated the event," she said.


DRIVER: Serious injuries


Continued From Page 1A

the incident. The wreck
occurred around 5:15 a.m.
Friday on Interstate 10 west
of the Interstate 75 inter-
change.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Tomes was driving a 2005
Freightliner semi tractor trail-
er east on the outside lane of
Interstate 10.As he was travel-


ing near the 1-75 interchange
a small vehicle, which was
parked on the south shoul-
der of the roadway traveled
into the his truck's lane of
travel, causing Tomes to take
evasive action.
Tornes told authorities
the small vehicle entered
his lane of travel and was
swerving from the outside


and inside lanes. Tornes
reportedly reacted by apply-
ing his brakes and pulling
the steering wheel to the
right as he attempted to
avoid a collision with the
other vehicle.
The small vehicle left the
scene and authorities have
not been able to identify the
vehicle.


SUSPECT: Officials identify victims


Continued From Page 1A

The victims were iden-
tified as Joseph Militello,
53, Nancy Militello, 68,
and Angelo Rosales. The
Militellos were married and
Rosales was their nephew.
"They were shot execu-
tion-style in the head,"
Cameron said.
Authorities believe that
the "homicides occurred


Wednesday night, late in
the evening.
The bodies were found
Thursday morning by an
employee who worked at
the farm. Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office officials
say they received a call
around 7:36 a.m. Thursday
notifying them about the
bodies.


Authorities believe rob-
bery was the primary
motive behind the deadly
shootings.
Although the victims
lived on a farm,.Cameron
said they had severalbusi-
nesses beside farming,
including scrap metal,
used car sales and rental
properties.


FDLE: Initial review shows ballots in question would not alter results
Continued From Page 1A


tacted Thursday morning
by the Columbia County
Canvassing Board chair-
man in reference to ques-
tionable ballots.
"I contacted FDLE and
requested that they send
somebody over to follow up
on this," Hunter said. "I felt
it was appropriate to have
someone from outside do
this investigation."
He also said the Florida
Division of Elections has
been made aware of the
allegations and they are
looking into the incident
and that some information
about their findings should
be made public soon.
"The preliminary inves-
tigation has revealed that
what was done will not
affect the outcome of the
election. That's were we are
right now," Hunter said.
Hunter also confirmed
that he and the candidates
in the City of Lake City
District 10 race had a meet-
ing Thursday morning with
Horne.
"Yesterday (Thursday)
we did not know what we
had and I met with the can-
didates that brought forth
the complaint," he said.
"When I met with them I
told them we would look
into it and I got someone to
do that through FDkE."
Horne said the question-
able signatures were sig-
natures that did not match


with what was on file at the
elections office. She said 20
signatures are in the batch
that is called questionable.
' "This is a routine thing
for us. We do this all the
time," Horne said. "This
is just what we would do
after every election. We are
not doing anything that we
would not do after every
election."
Home said there will be
no recounts or need for
another election.
Hunter said FDLE agents
were at the supervisor
of elections office Friday
where they met with Home
and did a follow-up to his
request for an inquiry.
"The initial review shows
that the ballots that were in
question would not affect
the status of the current
election (results), but we'll
follow up on some possible
improprieties with the elec-
tion ballots," he said, noting
the investigation is ongoing
and he doesn't know when
it will be completed. "The
other candidates felt there
was some improprieties
with the ballots, it's being
looked at and that's where
we are going from there."
Adee Farmer, a losing
District 10 candidate, noted
he was part of the meeting
with Horne and Hunter.
Farmer said he had
many calls from District
10 constituents and friends


who said there is "no way
there should have been
that large of a gap between
the winners and losers."
The winner of the race,
Eugene Jefferson, claimed
69.6 percent of votes cast
Farmer claimed the next
largest block of votes with
13 percent of votes cast
Those votes include absen-
tee ballots, a number of
which Framer believes are
in question.
"I think the investigation
is definitely needed into
how the ballots came in,"
he said.



OBITU

Steven Robert Madsen
Steven Robert Madsen, 63, of
'Branford, Florida entered into
eternal rest Wednesday, August
25, 2010 at Lake City Medical
Center. He was born December
15, 1946 in. Fort Wayne, Indiana
and raised as an only child by
Robert and Wanda (Gross) Mad-
sen, who preceded him in death.
He had many talents and careers
in his life, including working as
an autobody mechanic and lastly
at Walmart in Lake City Florida.
He will be missed as a loving
husband, father, and grandfa-
ther who was eternally patient
in temperament and quick with
a joke and a smile. His easygo-
ing manner made it easy for
him to make friends and always
keep those around him happy.
He is survived by his wife of 31


The biggest thing that
came to my mind is how a
candidate can get so many
absentee ballots, Farmer
said.
"I didn't have an expla-
nation for them," Farmer
said. "The ballots have been
cast, and the race is over,
but I've had calls every day
about ballots in the race.
That's the poison in ithe
back of my mind. So many
people are asking about
the absentee ballots and
how they were collected. I
don't have'any control over
how the absentee ballots


DIARIES


years Diane Madsen of Branford,
sons Jon Robinson of London
Ohio, Edward (Phyllis) Robin-
son with grandchildren Jonny
and Jacob Robinson of Branford.
A memorial service will be held
Monday, August 30, 2010, 9:00
AM at Daniels Funeral Home
in Branford, Florida, Pastor
O.E. Boals presiding. A fel-
lowship gathering at Riverside
Baptist Church on Gilchrist
CR 138 will be held afterward.
DANIELS. FUNERAL
HOMES & CREMATORY,
INC., of Live Oak and Branford,
FL in charge of arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


were collected. I just know
there are voting statutes
on absentee ballots on how
they are supposed to be
collected. There are laws
and statutes on collecting
absentee ballots the wrong
way. I'm about doing things
the fair way and about the
law."
Jefferson said he was
unaware of the investiga-
tion into the ballots with
questionable signatures
and the first he had heard
anything about it was when
he was contacted Friday by
a reporter from Lake City


Reporter.
However, Jefferson
said he was aware there
was some problems
where voters who were
not supposed to .be vot-
ing in the District 10 race
were wrongly issued the
District 10 ballots at their
polling sites.
Tammy Perry Harris,
also a District 10 candi-
date, declined to comment
on the investigation and
the remaining candidate,
Clarence Tucker Jr., did
not return phone calls by
press time.


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OPINION


Saturday, August 28, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


O
0 P


OTHER
INION


Cuba's

'charm

offensive'


a kinder, gentler
face on the Castro
brothers' hard-
line government
is beginning to look more and
more like a flop. The regime
would have the world believe
that it has a generous side,
allowing some 26 political
prisoners to go free in recent
weeks as a gesture of mag-
nanimity. More releases are
promised.
This is all good and well, but
meanwhile, in the shadows,
the thugs who do the regime's
dirty work conduct business as
usual. Every whisper of protest
is stifled by state-sanctioned
repression.
The latest display of intoler-
ance occurred recently when
five Cuban dissidents were
arrested for demanding free-
dom while standing on the
steps in front of the University
of Havana. As Fidel Castro well
knows, the university was not.
only a symbol of intellectual
independence in the old days,
but also enjoyed autonomy
from police intervention and
nurtured anti-government dis-
sent.
Castro's revolution put an
end to that No autonomy, no
intellectual freedom and cer-
tainly no cries for liberty, not
in a place fraught with such
historic significance and once
identified with freedom of
thought.
More troubling is the govern-
ment's shameful harassment of
Reina Luisa Tamayo, the outspo-
ken mother of Orlando Zapata
Tamayo, a prisoner of conscience
who died in February after a pro-
longed hunger strike in prison.....
"Reina Luisa Tamayo is sim-
ply paying tribute to hef son who
died in tragic circumstances, and
that must be respected by the
authorities," Kerrie Howard of
Amnesty International told The
Associated Press.
Others have noticed, too. The
Inter-American Commission on
Human Rights has asked the
government to guarantee the
woman's safety. So far, the gov-
ernment has not replied.
Some charm offensive this is.
* The Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter:
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Dumb? We all might be stupid


The recent Pew
Research Center
poll that found
almost one in five
Americans believe
President Barack Obama is a
Muslim raises a delicate ques-
tion.
It is an especially hard ques-
tion for me, who was born
somewhere else but since has
come to love this brilliant,
sprawling, cantankerous, bub-
bling stew pot of liberty and
excess.
But the question implicit
in the Pew poll affects us all
and does not allow any dainty
construction. It just needs to
be blurted out. Are Americans
becoming more stupid? Have
a sizable number of people
in this nation that put a man
on the moon and gave us any
number of technological mar-
vels become as dumb as posts?
Is this group dumber than
rocks? Dirt? The cast of "Jersey
Shore"? Are they one brick
shy of a load? One cauliflower
short of a garden? Do ideas roll
around their heads like stones
in an empty garbage can? Admit
it: In the political arena, if you
are of the right you think the
left is stupid. If you are of the
left, you think this of the right.
If you are of the middle, you
may think this of everyone.
Maybe everybody is correct.
As the Pew poll makes clear,
beliefs about Obama's religion
"are closely linked to political
judgments about him." While 18
percent of Americans think the
president is a Muslim, a third
of conservative Republicans
believe this.
In other words, the same
group that so fiercely objected
to Obama being a member of
the Christian church run by the
Rev. Jeremiah Wright has not
stopped to ask what a Muslim
was doing in that church for so


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
long rather than in a mosque.
Add to that the belief among
many that Obama was foreign-
born another stupid idea.
equal parts prejudice and wish-
ful thinking plus all the other
Internet lies, inanities and exag-
gerations regularly peddled and
believed about the president,
and what we have here is a
Golden Age of Dumbness.
From my own perspective,
I see stupidity blighting both
liberals and conservatives no
argument but the current age
of knuckle dragging is mostly
on the right. Sorry, but the
liberals had the '60s and '70s in
which to be really dumb.
Oh, sure, Nancy Pelosi will
say something dumb from time
to time as she did recently
in her call for an investigation
of the critics of the New York
mosque but give credit
where credit.is due. The right
has whole teams of talk-show
hosts devoted to the task of
making chimps seem more
intelligent than people.
With that, it is only fair to
say something nice about our
conservative friends. I apologize
for painting you too often with a
broad brush, which I trust you
will understand is an occupa-
tional hazard of my trade, that
being a professional heaver of
cats into flocks of pigeons.
If you are courteous, conser-
vative and sensible, you are not
the problem. Having read my
e-mails, in which I am regularly
called an idiot and a pinhead


- and that is just from the folks
who want to flatter me I have
come to believe that the really
stupid behavior on the right is
not committed by people who
are conservative, even though
they think they are. The yahoos
are the problem.
Actually, I am not sure what
to call them these profoundly
un-conservative conservatives
with their radical social resent-
ments and their commitment
to be unthinking jerks. As the
polar opposites of illiberal liber-
als, these angry right-wingers
are a scowling crowd seriously
at odds with the traditional con-
servative respect for intellectual
striving and achievement.
Mindless populism is their
game. How else to explain the
popularity of Sarah Palin, Rush
Limbaugh and Glenn Beck as
leaders of the conservative
movement? Now, you respect-
able conservatives, don't go
denying it it's true, as much
as it rightly embarrasses you.
It is at this point in the col-
umn that I am called an elitist.
How I love that. If only
the old crowd back in Eagle
Junction, where I grew up a
barefoot boy, knew that I rose
to be an elitist! I wish this elit-
ist gig paid a little better, how-
ever, so that I didn't have to
drive around in a little car with
100,000 miles on the clock.
Stupid is as stupid does
- and you don't have to be an
elitist to say something about it.
But if elitism has now been,
dumbed down to thinking rea-
sonably, in a way independent
of the messages twitched down
the strings by political puppe-
teers, then we should all be so
elitist.
Resentful dummies should
not have the last word. Now
there's a cat among the pigeons.
N Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


Even as many Central
Florida students
trudge back to
school after summer
break, district offi-
cials must be looking ahead.
First to October. The state's
official student count could
mean painful funding cuts for
public schools that exceed the
strict student caps on core aca-
demic classes now imposed by
Florida's class-size amendment.
And then to November: That's
when voters could deliver cash-
strapped schools and taxpay-
ers much-needed relief by
wisely embracing Amendment
8. The ballot measure would
cap the maximum number
of students in public school
classrooms at the more flexible
school-average level.
Eight years ago, supporters
had great expectations for stu-
dents often struggling to learn
the three R's in overcrowded


classrooms when they passed
the Class Size Reduction
Amendment But a withering
economy. has rendered the ulti-
mate goal unrealistic.
Wilting tax revenues and state
support left schools scrambling
to plug budget holes. Over
the past two years, Orange,
for instance, has weathered an
$87.5 million drop in state fund-
ing; Seminole has lost about $40
million.
Now, schools must implement
the amendment's final phase
- classroom level caps. That
means, all core classes math,
reading, science and social stud-
ies can assign no more than
18 students in grades K-3, 22 in
grades 4-8, and 25 iM grades 9-
12. Period.
All with no new state money
to defray the cost.
Amendment 8 would estab-
lish school-wide averages, but
with safeguards against abuse:


K-3 classes could exceed caps
by only three students, while
grades 4-12 could top the cap by
five students.
The Florida Education
Association has filed suit to pull
Amendment 8 off the ballot. The
teachers' union calls it a sneaky
ploy to gut state funding for
public schools.
The opposite is true. A July
report from Florida TaxWatch
estimates the class-by-class caps
could cost Florida $4 billion a
year over the next decade. But
Amendment 8 could reduce the
annual tab by $350 million to
$1 billion. The savings could
defray the cost of better technol-
ogy, higher teacher salaries and
improved curriculum.
Florida's legislators already
have stirred to action. Come
November, voters too must heed
the call and give schools and
taxpayers' wallets a break.

* Orlando Sentinel


Cliff May


Violent

muslims

get media

free pass


Washington
Post has identi-
fied "rabble-
rousing outsid-
ers!" I haven't heard language
like that since southern seg-
regationists complained about
civil rights activists descending
on Mississippi. So who are
these interlopers stirring up the
unwashed masses? Ifs anyone
who dares criticize plans for
an Islamic center near Ground
Zero in Manhattan. According
to reporter Jason Horowitz, New
Yorkers take a "dim view" of,
them.
Horowitz informs us that
the planned Islamic center has
become "the prime target of
national conservatives who, after
years of disparaging New York
as a hotbed of liberal-activity,
are defending New York against
a mosque that will rise two city
blocks from Ground Zero." The
hypocrisy! ,Have they no shame?
Horowitz interviews Ali
Mohammed who sells "falafel
over rice" in the besieged neigh-
borhood. Opponents of the proj-
ect, he says, "got nothing to do
with New York and they don't
care about New York."
Horowitz also interviews
Oz Sultan, a spokesman for
the project, who sings from
the same hymnal: "The people
behind this (Islamic center) are
New Yorkers. These are local
yokels." How does that square
with Sultan's refusal to rule out
the possibility that funds for
this $100 .million project may be .
raised in Saudi Arabia and Iran?
Horowitz does not even ask.
A Washington Post interview
with Daisy Khan, the wife of
Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, key
organizer of the project, is
headlined: "When Will Muslims
Be Accepted?" The veteran
journalist Sally Quinn asks Khan
nothing about the project's fund-
ing, nothing about the Imam's
past statements regarding 9/11
(American policies were an
"accessory"), Osama bin Laden
("made in America'), Hamas
(the Imam would prefer not to
characterize the group), terror-
ism ("complex").
A Time magazine cover
story titled "Is America
Islamophobic?" asserts that
"many opponents" of the Islamic
center "are motivated by deep-
seated Islamophobia." The evi-
dence? A poll that finds 46 per-
cent of Americans believe Islam
is more likely than other faiths
to encourage violence against
nonbelievers.
Why would anyone think
that? CoUld it have something
to do with the fact that there
have been thousands of terrorist
attacks carried out in the name
of Islam since 9/11/01? Just last
month, Time had on its cover
the photograph of an 18-year-old
Afghan girl whose nose and ears
were sliced off by members of
the Taliban because she had
violated Islamic religious law
by "running away from her
husband's house." The word
"Taliban" means "the students."
Of what? Of Islam.
Lefs say it one more time
loudly for the media moguls in
the cheap seats: Most Muslims
are not terrorists. But in the
21st century, most of those
slaughtering women and chil-
dren in the name of religion are
Muslims. This is a problem. It
ought to be seen by Muslims as
very much their problem a
pathology within their commu-
nity, within the "Muslim world."
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Keeping class sizes manageable


_










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & WORLD


SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010


COURTESY PHOTO

Lake City cloggers collect wins in Dublin, Ga.
Southern Rhythm Cloggers, a Lake City clogging team under the direction of Dalita Diaz de Arqe and based out of Lake
City Dance Arts, is shown here at the 11th Annual Georgia State Clogging competition. The team represented Lake City
in the Georgia State Clogging Competition in Dublin, Ga., on Aug. 21. They returned with four third-place wins, three sec-
ond-place wins and two first-place wins for the group. In addition, they had one second-place solo, one first-place solo,
and one second-place duet. The team will be competing in a national competition in October in Maggie Valley, N.C. The
team performs regularly in Lake City, including at Finally Friday events downtown. Pictured are (from back left) Savannah
Hoffman, Allie Robinson, Brooklyn Crews, Stephanie Harris and Brianna Butcher; (second row, from left) Amber Yates, '
Masi Williams, Tara Thomas, Amanda Moore, Tobie Williams, Kallie Horton, Brooke Russell; and (from front left) Cecily
Griffis, Chloe Potter, Eliana Durate, Kristen Louder and Katelyn Horton.




Engineers to remove temporary


cap from blown-out Gulf oil well


By HARRY R. WEBER
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS
- Engineers will soon
start the delicate work of
detaching the temporary
cap that stopped oil from
gushing from BP's blown-
out Gulf of Mexico well'
and the hulking device
that failed to prevent the
leak all while trying to
avoid more damage to the
environment.
Retired Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen, the
government's point man
for the spill response, told
reporters Friday that engi-
neers will remove the cap
starting Monday so they
can raise the failed blow-
out preventer. The blowout
preventer is considered a
key piece of evidence in
determining what caused
the April rig explosion that
unleashed the gushing oil.
The leak was first con-
tained when engineers
were able to place a cap
atop BP's well. Workers
then pumped mud and
cement in through the top
in a so-called "static kill"
operation that significantly
reduced pressure inside
the well. Officials don't
expect oil to leak into the
sea again when the cap
is removed, but Allen has
ordered BP to be ready to
collect any leaking crude
just in case.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
BP subsea engineer Merrick Kelley (right) and his attorney Edward Castaing Jr. look over
documents during testimony at the Deepwater Horizon joint investigation hearings on
Friday by the U.S. Coast Guard and the.Department of Ocean Management Regulation
and Enforcement in Houston.


The Department of
Justice and other federal
investigators are oversee-
ing the work to remove the
blowout preventer, Allen
said. The 50-foot, 600,000-
pound device which was
designed to prevent such
a catastrophe will be
taken out of the water with
the well pipe still inside
to ensure the pipe doesn't
break apart any more than
it already has.
Keeping the blowoutpre-


venter intact is important
because it's considered
an essential piece of evi-
dence in determining what
caused the blast aboard
the Deepwater Horizon on
April 20. After the explo-
sion, 206 million gallons
of oil spilled into the
Gulf of Mexico until the
temporary cap stopped
the flow. The explosion
on the rig which was
owned by Transocean
Ltd. and being operated


by BP PLC killed 11
workers.
Work to lift the blow-
out preventer is extreme-
ly difficult and delicate
- all happening a pnile
underwater. Engineers
must take care not to
raise the central casing
of the well and a casing
seal.
They also may have to
carefully free the blowout
preventer from any hang-
ing drill pipe.


Video shows trapped miners' refuge


By PETER PRENGAMAN
Associated Press

COPIAPO, Chile The
first video released of the
33 men .trapped deep in a
Chilean copper mine shows
the men stripped to the
waist and appearing slim
but healthy, arm-in-arm,
singing the national anthem
and yelling "long live Chile,
and long live the miners!"
Only about five minutes
of what is reportedly a 45-
minute video was released
late Thursday by Television
Nacional de Chile via the
Chilean government
The men made the video
with a small camera sent
down to them through a
small emergency shaft
drilled to their emergency
shelter deep in the San Jose
mine.
The grainy, night-vision


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An image made from a video released by Television
Nacional de Chile via the Chilean government Thursday
shows one of the trapped miners in the underground
chamber waving at the camera.


images show some men
standing, others lying down
and apparently just wak-
ing up. One man proudly
displays the way they have
organized the living room-
sized shelter where they


took refuge after a landslide
trapped them Aug. 5. They
also showed off areas out-
side the shelter where they
can walk around.
An animated miner gives
a guided tour through the


ample space where the
men have plenty of room
to stand and lie down. He
shows where the men meet
and pray daily and points
out the "little cup to brush
our teeth."
"We have everything
organized," he says.
The few items they have
are carefully laid out a first
aid cabinet, shelves holding
unidentified bottles, mats in
a corner for rest.
As the camera shows a
table with dominoes laid
out, the tour guide says that
"this is where we entertain
ourselves, where we play
cards."
"We meet here every-
day," he adds. "We plan,
we have assemblies here
everyday so that all the
decisions we make are
based on the thoughts of
all 33."


LOCAL STOCKS

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YTD
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Cisco
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Delhaize
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FamilyDIr
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HomeDp
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NY 1.68 6.2 12 26.94 +.24 .-3.9
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NY .04 .3 84 12.684 +.17 -16.1
Nasd .80 3.1 12 25.93 +.51 -10.5
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NY .96 1.9 15 49,79 +1.57 +2,7
NY 2.88 3.8 9 74.93 +1.60 -2.7
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NY 1.76 3.1 18 56,16 +100 -1,5
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NY .15 .8 ... 18.64 +1.07 -24.6
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NY 6 11.56 +.39 +45.6
NY .48 3.3 15 14,71 +.21 -2.8
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NY .59 1.5 ... 40.49 +.87 -2.4
NY .77 12 .. 61,65 +1.57 -1.3
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NY .44 2.1 16 21.10 +,45 -9.8


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PrUShS&P NY ....
QweslCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.08
'S&P500ETFNY 2.22
SearsHIdgs Nasd ..
SidusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SPDR Fnd NY .17
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY 20


YTD
Chg%Chg


17 73.99 +.83 +18.5
5 6.83 +.05 -35.3
6 23.93 +.11 -21.5
7 751 -.10 -39.2
14 53.89 +.84 +2.0
... 9.54 ... -8.8
15 75,42 +3.19 -7.3
16 20.19 -.13 -24.1
17 64.12 -,01 +5.5
32 147.73 +2.91 +36.2
. 44.07 +.53 -3.7
.. 34.43 -1.12 -1.8
21 5.64 +.01 +34.0
29 39.20 +1.15 -4.8
... 106.88 +1.63 -4.1
25 62.47 -.69 -25.1
... .99 +.03 +65.0
15 36.97 +.83 +11.0
... 13.73 +.29 -4.7
14 30.32 +.63 +4.0
13 51.00 +.03 -4.6
10 24:00 +.51 -11.1


BRIEFS

Stocks gain after ization by another inmate.
Bernanke speech Democrat quips:


NEW YORK Stocks
posted big gains after
Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke said the
central bank was ready to
step in if the U.S. economy
showed further signs of
weakening.
Traders were also
encouraged by a down-
ward revision in second-
quarter economic growth
Friday that wasn't as bad

mists had
expected.
f 1 The Dow
Jones
industrial
average
"^ -and other
Bernanke indexes
all gained
more'than 1 percent -
Bernanke said in a
speech at the Fed's annual
conference that while
the economic recovery
remains-tentative, the cen-
tral bank remains ready to
take extra steps to stimu-
late the economy if neces-
sary, such as buying more
debt securities in order
to keep interest rates low.
He said he still expects
the economy to grow next
year.
"It could have been
worse, and because it
wasn't, that was good
news," said Alan Gayle,
senior investment strat-
egist for RidgeWorth
Investments, based in
Richmond, Va.


New Orleans levee
nearly ready
NEW ORLEANS Five
years after Hurricane
Katrina flooded more than
80 percent of this city, the
Army Corps of Engineers
says billions of dollars of
work has made the city
much safer and many of its
defenses could withstand
a storm as strong as the
deadly 2005 hurricane.
Surprisingly, many locals
- even the vocal critics of
the Army Corps say its
assessment of work done
on the levee system is not
far off the mark.
Since Katrina flooded
New Orleans on Aug. 29,
2005, and killed more than
1,800 people, New Orleans
has become a round-the-
clock construction site and
Congress gave the Army
Corps more than $14 bil-
lion to fix and upgrade the
levees and other defenses.


Pelosi might die


WASHINGTON
A conservative Alabama
Democrat often criticized
for backing Nancy Peloti
as House speaker dodged
a question about support-
ing hef again next year by
saying she might get sick
and die before he has to
decide,
Rep. Bobby Bright,
among the most con-
servative Democrats in
Congress, was speaJdng at
a Chamber of Commerce
event in Montgoniery
Wednesday when he was
asked about his decision
to support Pelosi as parLy
leader after his 2008 elec-
tion.
Bright deflected the
question as hypothetical.
"Never cross a bridge
until you come to it,"
Bright said in comments
confirmed by his office. *
"She may get beat (for
re-election), she may step
away, she may get sick and
die."

Two free-market
reforms in Cuba
HAVANA Cuba has
.issued a pair of surpris-
ing free-market decrees,
allowing foreign investors
to lease government land
for up to 99 years poten-
tially touching off a golf-
course building boom
- and loosening state
controls on commerce to
let islanders grow and sell
their own fruit and veg-
etables..
The moves, published
into law in the Official
Gazette on Thursday and
Friday and effective imme-
diately, are significant
steps as President Raul
Castro promises to scale
back the communist state's
control of the economy
while attempting to gener-
ate new
revenue for
a govern-
ment short
on cash.
These
are part of
the open-
Castro ing that
the gov-
ernment wants to make
given the country's situa-
tion," said Oscar Espinosa
Chepe, a state-trained
economist who is now an
anti-communist dissident


Ex-Army analyst
90,000 inmates
90,000 inmates arrested at airport
CDY illv victimized


WASHINGTON The
government reported
Thursday that 4.4 percent
of inmates in prison and
3.1 percent of inmates in
jail report being victimized
sexually by another inmate
or staff member.
Those percentages trans-
late to the sexual victim-
ization of 88,500 inmates
behind bars nationwide in
the previous 12 months,
according to a study by
the Justice Department's
Bureau of Justice Statistics
in 2008-2009.
The study also found
that female inmates were
more than twice as likely
as male inmates to report
experiencing sexual victim-


ST. PAUL, Minn. -A
former U.S. Army analyst
whose security clearance
was recently revoked
has been arrested in
Minneapolis while trying
to board a one-way flight to
China.
The U.S. Attorney's
office says 26-year-old
Liangtian Yang, also known
as Alfred Yang, of Lawto-.,
Okla., allegedly had mul-
tiple data storage devices
when he was arrested
Thursday. One alleg-
edly contained a restricted
Army field manual. Yang
was charged in Oklahoma
Thursday with one count
of theft of government
property.

* Associated Press













FAITH


Saturday,August 28, 2010


&


VALUES


nww.lakecityreporter.com


BIBLICAL MEDITATION


Carlton McPeak
carlton_mc@msn.com


God's

voice has

authority

e speaks and
things hap-
pen. It is
understood
that when God
speaks, someone in author-
ity has spoken. From the
very beginning of time the
voice of God has spoken
with authority.
Consider the creation of
the world. By the voice of
God there was light, there
was the expanse between
the waters, there was dry
ground, animals, trees, veg-
etation and even mankind
(Genesis' 1:3). Everything
that God made He spoke
into existence. What
authority! What power!
From the top of Mount
Sinai, God spoke to the
children of Israel. His
voice was so powerful and
so authoritative that the
people became very fear-
ful. They told Moses to go
Upon top of the mountain,
get the word of God, bring
it to them and they would
obey it (Exodus 20:19).
One day during the
ministry of Jesus, He took
Peter, James and John
upon a mountain. While
there Moses and Elijah
appeared with Jesus. From
heaven a voice spoke and
said, "This is My beloved
Son, with whom I am well-
pleased, listen to Him!"
(Matthew 17:5). Later in
Peter's life he says this
event was not some "clev-
erly devised tales."
In writing to his read-
ers, Peter says "the pres-
ent heavens and earth
by [God's] word are
being preserved for fire,
kept for the day of judg-
ment and destruction of
ungodly men" (2 Peter 3:7).
Previously, in this chapter,
Peter had said that when
men think there is not
going to be any judgment
that they have forgotten
what God can do simply
by speaking. According
to Peter these men were
following their own lusts
when they were mocking
Peter and those who spoke
of the judgment (2 Peter
3:3).
All of the things which
God has said are impor-
tant. All of the commands
which He has spoken ate
to be followed. However,
in my thinking, probably
the most important words,
which God will speak to
me, is when He announces
His decision of where I will
spend eternity.
There are only two
options: "depart from Me"
or "enter in."
When God speaks these
words they will be with
authority. They will be final.
There will be no appeals.
At that time I will do what
God has said.
Today we need to be
listening to the voice of
God, which can be heard
by reading from the pages
of the Bible. Let us not be
like Israel and harden our
hearts to God's voice but
rather let us listen to Him
(Hebrews 7:4).
* Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working with the
Lakeview Church of Christ in
Lake City. All Scriptural
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this recent photo, Rev. Richard Mahan, lead pastor at St. Timothy Lutheran Church in
Charleston, W.V., stands outside the church where Lutheran pastors are preparing for the
formation of the new North American Lutheran Church in Hilliard, Ohio.


Lutherans split over gay


pastors and Bible beliefs


By A. WELSH-HUGGINS
Associated Press

GROVE CITY, Ohio
- Critics of the country's
largest Lutheran denomi-
nation and its more open
stance toward gay clergy
have formed a new group
at a meeting in Ohio of
a conservative activist
group.
Members of Lutheran


CORE voted overwhelm-
ingly to approve the
creation of the North
American Lutheran
Church on Friday in
Grove City in suburban
Columbus.
The new denomina-
tion will consist largely of
congregations leaving the
Chicago-headquartered
Evangelical Lutheran
Church in America over
issues of adhering to scrip-


tural authority.
Paull Spring, the new
bishop of the North
American Lutheran
Church, said the ELCA's
acceptance of openly gay
pastors was a tipping point
for many.
Spring and others
attending the meeting.said
they were also concerned
about the ELCA's use of
language limiting mascu-
line references to God.


2nd sex-abuse


complaint filed


against diocese


By JULIANA BARBASSA
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO A.
man who claimed he was
sexually abused as a child
by an Irish priest filed a
lawsuit Thursday against
the Roman Catholic
Diocese of Santa Rosa -
the second such suit alleg-
ing the church knew the
priest faced abuse charges
in Ireland, but failed to
warn the parish.
The law-
suit, filed "Bishoi
in Sonoma walked
C o unty tc
Superior diocese
C o u r t was mI
alleged that probl
Rev. Patrick
McCabe past sc
abused
the plain- Deirdre I
tiff almost Spoke,
weekly dur-
ing most of
1983, when McCabe was
assigned to St. Bernard's
church as associate pas-
tor. The alleged victim,
who was 11 at the time,
attended the school
attached to the church in
Eureka, Calif.
McCabe's attor-
ney didn't return calls
Thursday from The
Associated Press.
Santa Rosa Bishop
Daniel Walsh hasn't
reviewed the lawsuit yet,
but since he took over
the diocese, he has tried
to make sure past abuse
would not be repeat-
ed, said spokeswoman
Deirdre Frontczak.
Walsh's efforts have
included educating fami-
lies in the diocese on rec-
ognizing signs of abuse,
and making the process of
selecting priests is more
stringent, said Frontczak.
"Bishop Walsh walked
into a diocese that was
mired in problems of past
scandals," she said. "His
focus has been on deter-
mining what he can do,


p

ii
e
a2


what is in his control to
ensure these things never
happen again."
A 2009 report by Irish
officials showed accusa-
tions of abuse first sur-
faced against McCabe in
1982, and refer to inci-
dents dating back to the
1970s. It recounted how
Dublin officials dealt with
the allegations by sending
McCabe to a treatment
facility for sexual offend-
ers in New Mexico, then
securing a
Walsh position for
into a him in the
Santa Rosa
e that diocese.
red in T h e
ms of Archbishop
1,, in Dublin


s,. knew Mark
Hurley, who
rontczak was then
woman Bishop of
Santa Rosa,
and in a letter
cited in the Irish report,
asked Hurley, for help
dealing with a problematic
,priest. Hurley then placed
McCabe in St. Bernard's.
"Hurley's placing
McCabe there as a known
pedophile certainly upset
him," said attorney Joseph
George of his client, who
declined to be identified.
By 1985, McCabe was
pulled from the Eureka
church after allegations of
child abuse emerged there
as well. He had a brief
assignment in Guerneville
before Hurley refused to
rehire him.
Hurley destroyed per-
sonnel files before he
left the diocese, said
Frontczak.
Too many years have
passed for criminal charg-
es to be brought against
McCabe. Instead, George
brought a civil lawsuit
against the diocese for
negligence and fraud
for allegedly misrepre-
senting to the congrega-
tion McCabe's fitness to
work around children.


Attacks raise concerns in Northern Ireland


By DANICA KIRKA
Associated Press
LURGAN, Northern
Ireland Bursts of laugh-
ter. Young men playing ping
pong. Battles of the bands.
In a Northern Ireland
determined to put conflict
behind it, the Links teen
center bridges the divide


between Catholic and
Protestant teens in this
struggling town, giving them
something to do, an.alterna-
tive to streets that offer a
toxic mix of drugs and vio-
lence. It's working, but like
the peace process itself, it is
under strain amid looming
budget cuts.
'"We're just keeping our


heads above water," said
Martin Larkham, 52, a youth
work manager. "Everybody
is."
Tough times are hit-
ting promising initiatives
like Links and causing
unease about the very fate
of Northern Ireland's peace
deal. As the troubled ter-
ritory slogs through the


worst economic downturn
in decades, dissident Irish
nationalist militias are get-
ting increasingly restless -
carrying out a string of vio-
lent acts including a recent
bombing that injured three
children.
Deep-rooted poverty and
continued religious segrega-
tion of Irish nationalists and


British loyalists are combin-
ing with steep budget cuts
in London that lead many
to fear that the hard work
building bridges between
Catholics and Protestants
could suffer. Though their
numbers are small, the
ability of the dissidents to
cause problems has, been
improving.


CHURCH NOTES


Sunday
Worship service
Union AME Church
is having its Women
Missionary Society
Worship Service at 11 a.m.
Aug. 29. The guest speak-
er is William Murphy,
Niblack Elementary
principal. Contact (386)
755-0858

Homecoming
Fort White Church
of God is celebrating its
Homecoming 11 a.m.
Aug. 29. The featured
speaker is the Rev. John V.
Morgan. A covered dish
lunch follows in the fellow-
ship hall. The church is
located at 339 SW Bryant
Avenue in Fort White.

Building Fund Rally
The Good Shepherd
Tabernacle Church is
celebrating its Building
Fund Rally at 4 p.m. today.


The Rev. David Jordan of
Word in Power Outreach
Ministry will be the guest
speaker. The church is
located at 504 Dixie St.

Monday
Revival services
Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church is hav-
ing a revival starting at
7:30 p.m. nightly Aug.
30- Sept. 3. The speaker
is Dr. Michael D. Warren,
Pleasant View Missionary
Baptist Church in Apopka.
The church is located at
1015 SW Birley Ave.

Sept. 2
Biblical drama
The first of Five Great
Thursday is at 7 p.m.
Sept. 2 at First Baptist
Church of Lake City. The
Rev. Stephen Ahrens
will be performing the
Biblical drama "Peter, The


Rock. Lois Jane, country
gospel artist and Dove
Award nominee will also
perform. Homemade
refreshments will be
served. The church is '
located at 182 NE Justice
Street. Call (386) 752-
5422.

Sept. 5
Homecoming Celebration
Fellowship
Missionary Baptist
Church is having a
homecoming celebra-
tion at 11 a.m. Sept.
5. The speaker is Rev.
Wyndell Wallace, pastor.
The church is located at
1015 SW Birley Ave.

Sept. 11
Women's Conference
The Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
its annual women's con-


ference prayer breakfast
at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 11. The
speaker is Helen Davis.
Call Conda Green at 719-
3852.

Sept. 12
Women's Conference
The Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
its annual women's con-
ference worship service
at 3 p.m. Sept. 12. Janice
Stockton is the speaker.
Call Conda Green at
719-3852.

Every Tuesday
Support group
Greater Visions
Support Group hosts a
faith-based addictions
support group at 7 p.m.
every Tuesday in the
fellowship hall of Christ
Central Ministries, 217
SW Duval Ave. The


group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 755-2525.

Biblical counseling
Free Biblical coun-
seling is available at
Hopeful Baptist Church.
Many are struggling with
problems including mari-
tal, financial, communica-
tion, emotional, spiritual
and addiction. To make
an appointment, call
(386) 752-4135 between
8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes
in writing no later than
5 p.m. Tuesday to Tom
Mayer at tmayer@lake-
cityreporter.c.om, (386)
754-0428, fax to (386)
752-9400 or visit 180
E. Duval St., Lake City.
Call (386) 754-0428 with
questions.


6A'


F
s









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010
--l -II Ir


- -


Labor Day is a holiday to honor our occupations.

Some toil for pay, some for nothing; our work force

is all around us, giving of strength and intellect,

compassion and courage. Reward yourselves on Labor

Day for the work you do. Likewise, remember to give

thanks to God as you worship Him on His day, for He

has blessed us with our talents. "1 can do all things

through Him who strengthens me." (Phil 4:14)



Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Hebrews Hebrews Hebrews Genesis Genesis Genesis Genesis
11.20-40 12.1-11 12.12-29 40.1-23 41.1-16 41.17-36 41.37-57

Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights











:3 nB -7!.J~-,, a- an .

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
.Jobber


Ho ctnc, Inc.
Quality ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944_


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do .aull nigs lhroiugi ehris s Iil] strcnglhe ncl, me"
'hieppla s 4 1

To Advertise in
this Directory
Ca llMary
755-5440


RICK'S (RANE SERVICE
Located at 25A ,-
(Old Valdosta Hwy) ,
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service:, 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
S 386-752-0620
Sunday Worship t10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Famn. Bible Study 7 00PM
"A church where IESlU is Real'


BEREABAPTIST CHURCH
SR47S-7557-0900
Sunday School 9:3
SundayWobrship 10:45AM &
Wednesday'Eve. Service
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat'


IOAM'
6PM
7PM


EASTISIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196SE lamesAve.' 386-752-2860
Sun Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship AM & 6PM
Wed. Praye Mig/Bible Study 6PM
Rev Brandun G Win

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Wurship 10:30AM & 6 JOPM
Wed 6.0uPM Prayer Serice, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev Stephen Ahrens, Pasrir
OUVETMISSIONARYBAPIST CHURCH
541 N.E.Davis Street
(386) 752-1990 -
Ronald V:Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MomingWorship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God'sWord, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. 752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
SundayWorship i 45 & I AM & 6PM I
AWANA 5:30 PM
EveningWorship 6:00 PM
SWed. Eve. Schedule
Fairiily Supper IRe-rtvaniornl 5PM
Children's Mmistry' 6PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8/21108
Pahivew Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

SPINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
SundayWorship 1 AM & 6PM'
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Serices 10300AM
Pasior Elder Herman Griffin
752 .4198
SOUTHSDE BAPTISTCHURCH
388 SE Baya Dnve' 755-5553
.Bible Study 9:15AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Witship 6:15PM
AMA.A 5:45PM'.
Prayr! & Bible Study 6:15 PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(independent Baptist)
144 SE MontroseAve. 752-4274
SundaySchool IOAM
Sun MoNrn.Worship I11 AM
Sunday Eve, 6PM,
Wed. Prayer Meeting 730 PM
Pastor: Mike Normah
THEVINEYARD -
A Southem Baptsi Church
2091 SW Main Blvd.s 623-0t126
Sunday Worship 10.00AM
Where lesu is Preached
and lemns are appropnaie.
FPastot, Bo Hammorrck

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-1470
Saruiday Vigil Mass 500 PM
SundayMass 8:15AM, 10:30AM,
5-00 PM lSpanishlEnglishi
Sunday School/Religious Educanon
900 AM 10-15AM1

CHRISTIANSCIENCESOCETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy. 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom., Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7PM

NEW HORIZON
church of Christ
Directions & Times 755-1320
SJack E\um.ir. Minister
CHIURCHl i IO
LAKE CITY CHURCHlOF GOD
167 Ermine St. *752-5965
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7.PM
'Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"ShockYouth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouthnet
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: TheRev. immieHunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


I Can Po Al Thngs


,1~


S t.



S -


I T o a v ri ei h sC u c ir-et r al75 -40.


lay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


i:.


Ai


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 /2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
SHwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South -
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
trychrist@earthlink.net
First United Methodist Church
973 S, Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday Schoul 9:45AM
Sunday Morning W\,irship
Coniempora. Service 8:30AM
Tiddinonal Servae I I:ItLuAM'
Program opporruniues available in .ill
areas for all age,
For a complete schedule
rcnidCtachurth offie at
524Hi88
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNTIED
1L7 SW McFalane 75..j'j0
lAdjdcerii to Sunurier Scthorol
Sunday SchIol 9Uilt \
Worship I IJA
Nursery prouded
Young Adult group resumes Sepi
AWANA resume. Wed 9 1'.
Padsio Louie Mabrey
ewww weslemlem (rim

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
IJ S. 90 E turn on Corezi nex It iQualty
Ind.j right on Okmiawa
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, RandyOgburn

LAKECITYCHURCH OFTHENAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAlNCIURCH -
629 SW Baya Drive* 752:0670
Sunday School 9;OOAM
Sunday Sservice 10:00AM '
NURS PROVIDED
Pastor. Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director ofMusf: Bill Pdplin

S/ FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
'NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
southh Services Wednesday 7.00PlPM
Mid aeek Seruce Wednesda 7 IJUJ F'M
For info call ;5".A 4i0' Eerne Welriome
Pasiur Rev Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
SundayMoming . 1:00AM .
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Abe., foran Hw v 9tliakct
Sisiets Welcome Rd go 5 niles. South,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnielohns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 EP.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R, Pingel .
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 1:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday' 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church- EveryoneWelcomed
(386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
SDir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

GENTIVA"
great healthctiare has come home-
*Nursing *Orthopedic Rehab ProgramnB balance Dsuncuon
Program *Physical & Occupational Therapy
*MSW *Home leadhh Aide Services
Medicare/Medicaid Certified/JCAlO Accredited
HI11A206340963 & |ItIA299991379
Lake City 386-748-3490 Live Oak 386-364-4593




Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon'-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register .-
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


A, ^ Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

PLOn. 752-2308 sf -

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




t= 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & ConlliierciAl
755-6142

..,,. ._ I '.





To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


GW


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To List





Your











on the





Church





Directory





Call





752-1293!






Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx


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SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday. August 28. 20 10


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE
I OW NW7.


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com


Senior


impact


13-12 loss left
a bitter taste
in Columbia
High senior
Timmy Jernigan's mouth
all season. On Friday,
Jernigan tasted victory.
The star calls every
game the most important
one he's going to play, and
Jernigan played like it in a
23-13 win over Fort White
High in the kickoff classic.
It was easy to see that
both teams were ironing
out the wrinkles on offense
(Fort White alternated two
freshman quarterbacks),
but Jernigan continually
plowed through double
teams to squash any
thoughts the Indians'
offense had of scoring.
"I told myself that I'll
refuse to lose," he said. "I
have heard it all (over the
last year). I felt, of all the
Tigers, why would they
want to talk about me, but
that's fine. People talked
about Jesus Christ. I just
told myself I wasn't going
to reply, and let my play on
the field show." -. - ~
Jernigan's play translated
to the offensive side of the
ball as well, entering the
game at running back on
the Tigers' first offensive
drive. On his first drive, he
produced 43 yards rushing.
On his second drive, he
reached the end zone.
The star wasn't satisfied
with his offensive
performance, however,
saying that he has room for,
improvement on offense.
"I'm in game-shape to
play a full game on the
defense, but I want to be
in good enough shape to
be out there every play,"
Jernigan said.
His play did leave an
impression on Fort White
High coach Demetric
Jackson.
'We don't have to
play too many Timmy
Jernigans," Jackson said.
"He's one of the premiere
players in the area for a
reason, and he showed
why tonight."
Josh Faulkner played
for Columbia last season,
and the Tigers may-have
wished he was playing for
them this year after they
witnessed the Indian score
two touchdowns during the
game.
Faulkner broke through
in the second quarter with
a blocked punt return for
a touchdown from eight
yards out. Later in the
quarter, Faulkner returned
a blocked field goal attempt
79 yards to give the Indians
a 13-7 lead.
The senior was injured
late in the game, but
Jackson said that he should
be fine.
"Faulkner appears to be
fine," he told the Indian
crowd after the game. "The
big thing is he didn't want
to leave his teammates,
but with precautions and
everything, they had to
take him out."
His impact on the game
was missed for the Indians.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


ssic


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Nigel Atkinson (right) tries to round the corner as Fort White High's Xavier Wyche makes the tackle during the second quarter of
the kickoff classic on Friday in Fort White.


Tigers avenge last year's loss, 23-13


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE -
Columbia High unveiled
a secret weapon and over-
came a pair of special team
shocks to beat host Fort
White High, 23-13, in a kick-
off classic game on Friday.
Columbia received the
opening kickoff after Fort
White deferred and' the
Tigers lined up with Timmy
Jernigan in the backfield.
Jernigan, one. of the most
highly recruited defense
lineman in the country,
showed he could carry the
ball.
He broke off runs of 14
and 25 yards on Columbia's
first two plays, as the Tigers
moved to the Fort White
12 before losing a fumble.
Soron Williams recovered
for the Indians.
When the Tigers got
the ball back, they drove
73 yards for a touchdown.
Jernigan plowed over the
final five yards on two car-
ries. Hayden Lunde kicked
Columbia to a 7-0 lead at
3:08 of the first quarter.
Quarterback Nigel
Atkinson had completions
of 17 yards to Alex Barona
and 19 yards to Jayce
Barber during the drive.
"It felt good," Jernigan
said. "It's been a couple
of years (since he scored
on offense). I played
running back in the eighth
and ninth grade, but then
I blew up and knew I
would make my living on
defense."
The second quarter
belonged to Fort White's
Josh Faulkner, who experi-
enced the highs and lows of
football during the game.
Faulkner, who has two
sisters who are Columbia
cheerleaders, torched
his old team for two
touchdowns.
Early in the second quar-
ter, Alexis Blake blocked
a CHS punt, and Faulkner
grabbed the ball on a bounce
and went eight yards for
a touchdown. Colton Jones
tied the game at 7-all with
his point-after kick.


Later in the quarter,
Columbia lined up for a
field goal try and Williams
blocked the kick. Faulkner
was on the spot a second
time and returned the ball
79 yards to give Fort White
a 13-7 lead with 2:53 left in
the half. *
Faulkner was injured late
in the game and taken off
the field on a stretcher.
Columbia responded to
Faulkner's second score
with its own big play.
Raheem Battle returned
the kickoff 64 yards to the
Indians 18.
After Jernigan pounded
the middle twice, Atkinson
faked to him and went
around the left side for 13
yards and a touchdown.
Both teams missed the
second PAT tries and the
game was tied, 13-13, at
halftime.
Neither team generated
much offense in the scored
half, as they combined for
three first downs.
Columbia missed a field
goal and Fort White con-
tinued to have the punting
problems it experienced in
the first half.
After a partially blocked
punt, Columbia had a first
down at the Indians 30 late
in the third quarter. Sacks
by Adonis Simmons and
Jonathan Dupree pushed
the Tigers back past
midfield and forced a punt.
On fourth-and-6 from
the Fort White 14, coach
Demetric Jackson tried
a fake punt that came up
short.
Atkinson scored from
18 yards out on a keeper
on the next play. Lunde
kicked the PAT and added a
38-yard field goal with 6:02
left in the game for the final
margin. Barnabas Madison
had runs of 30 and 13 yards
in the final scoring drive.
"We did some good
things, but we did some
things that hurt us,"Jackson
said. "I thought the defense
played phenomenal, but the
offense must get better."
Sports Writer Brandon
Finley contributed to this
report.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan (8) bursts through the offensive line into thq backfield with
help from Justin. Kennedy (64) to make a tackle on Fort White High's J.R. Dixon.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jayce Barber left) holds for Hayden Lunde (right) as he connects with a
38-yard field goal.


I


'Li a~l








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010 ,


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
Grand Prix of Belgium, at Francorchamps,
Belgium
11:30 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR. Nationwide
Series, final practice for NAPA Auto Parts
200, at Montreal
2 p.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
at Montreal
5 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for NAPA Auto
SParts 200, at Montreal
7 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, Peak Antifreeze and
Motor Oil Indy 300, at Joliet, III.
BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN CLASSIC FIBA, World
Championship, preliminary round, Croatia
vs. U.S., at Istanbul
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Lightweights, Omri
Lowther (14-1-0) vs. Hank Lundy
(18-I-1), at Montreal
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European, PGA Tour, Johnnie
Walker Championship, third round, at
Perthshire, Scotland
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour,The Barclays, third
round, at Paramus, N.J.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Barclays, third
round, at Paramus, N.J.
TGC LPGA, Canadian Women's
Open, third round, at Winnipeg, Manitoba
4 p.m.
NBC USGA, U.S. Amateur
Championship, semifinal matches, at
,University Place.Wash.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Boeing
Classic, second round, at Snoqualmie,
Wash.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.-
ABC World Series, International
championship game, Japan vs. Taiwan, at
South Williamsport, Pa.
4 p.m.
ABC -World Series, U.S. champion-
ship game, Pearland, Texas vs. Waipahu,
Hawaii, at South Williamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX--Regional coverage,Philadelphia
at San Diego, Minnesota at Seattle, or
Florida at Atlanta
7 p.m.
WGN N.Y. Yankees at Chicago
White Sox
MOTORSPORTS
8 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, qualifying for Indianapolis
Grand Prix (same-day tape)
9 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 450, at
Southwick, Mass. (same-day tape)
10 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 250, at
Southwick, Mass. (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
CBS Preseason, Dallas at Houston
PREP FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Hoover (Ala.) vs. Byrnes
(S.C), at Rock Hill, S.C.
7 p.m.
ESPN Steele (Texas) at Madison
(Texas)
RODEO
10 p.m. -
VERSUS PBR, Bass Pro Shops
Shootout, at Ontario, Calif. (same-day
tape)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League match
TENNIS
I p.m.
CBS WTA Tour, Pilot Pen,
women's championship match, at New
Haven, Conn.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP, Pilot Pdn, men's
championship .match, at New Haven,
Conn.
WNBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, conference semi-
finals, game 2, Phoenix at San Antonio
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, conference semi-
finals, game 2, Seattle at Los Angeles

BASEBALL

AL standings


New York
Tampa Ba)
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore


Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit.
Kansas Cit
Cleveland


Texas
Oakland
Los Angele
Seattle


East Division
W L
78 49
S 78 49
73 '55
66 61
45 83
Central Division
W L
73 55
69 58
64 64
ty 54 73
51 76
West Division
W L
72 55
63 63
es 63 65
50 77


Pct GB


.614 -
.614 -
.570 5'h
.520 12
.352, 33'h

Pct GB
.570 -
.543 .3'
.500 9
.425 18'h
.402 21'h

Pct GB
.5S7 -
.500 8'h
.492 9h'
.394 22


Thursday's Games
Cleveland 3, Oakland 2
Detroit 7,Toronto I
Minnesota 6,Texas 4
Chicago White Sox 8, Baltimore 0
Friday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
Detroit at Toronto (n)
Boston at Tampa Bay (n)
Oakland at Texas (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Chicgo White Sox (n)
Baltimore at LAAAgels (n)
Minnesota at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Detroit (Bonderman 7-9) at Toronto
(Morrow 9-6), 1:07 p.m.


Minnesota (Blackburn 7-8) at Seattle
(Fister 4-9), 4:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Greinke 8-11) at
Cleveland (j.Gomez 3-2), 7:05 p.m.
NY.Yankees (Sabathia 17-5) at Chicago
White Sox (Danks 12-8),7:05 p.m.
Boston (C.Buchholz 15-5) at Tampa
Bay (Garza 13-7), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Braden 8-9) at Texas
(Harden 5-4), 8:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Millwood 2-14) at L.A.
Angels (Kazmir 8-11), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox,
2:05 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore at L.A.Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 8:05 p.m.


NL standings

East Division
W L
Atlanta 73 54
Philadelphia 70 57
Florida 64 62
New York 63 64
Washington 54 74
Central Division


Cincinnati
St. Louis'
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago
Pittsburgh


San Diego


W L
73 54
68 57
59 68
58 69
54 74
43 84
West Division
"W L
76 50


Pct GB
.575 -
.551 3
.508 8/,
.496 10
.422 19'h

Pct GB
.575 -
.544 4
.465 14
.457 15
.422 19'h
.339 30


San Francisco 71. 57 .555 6
Colorado 66 60 .524 10
Los Angeles 66 62 .516 II
Arizona 50 78 .391 .27
Thursday's Games
Houston 5.Philadelphia I
L.A. Dodgers 7, Milwaukee I
Arizona I I, San Diego 5
Washington I 1, St. Louis 10, 13 innings
Florida 1I, N.Y. Mets 4
Friday's Games
St. Louis at Washington (n)
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati (n)
Houston at N.Y. Mets (n)
Florida at Atlanta (n)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
LA. Dodgers at Colorado (n)
Philadelphia at San Diego (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Blanton 5-6) at San
Diego (Garland 13-8),4:10 p.m.
St. Louis. (Lohse 2-5) at Washington
(LHernandez 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 5-12) at
Cincinnati (Arroyo 14-7), 7:10 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 14-8) at Atlanta
(T.Hudson 14-5), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Myers 9-7) at N.Y. Mets
(J.Santana 10-8), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Duke 6-12) at Milwaukee
(Capuano 2-2), 7:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Billingsley 10-7) at
Colorado (O.Chacin 6-9), 8:10 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 3-1) at San
Francisco (Zito 8-9), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Houston at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis atWashington, 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m..
LA. Dodgers at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.

Youngest to 400 HRs

The youngest players to reach 400
career home runs in the najor leagues:


I. x-Alex Rodriguez
2.Ken GriffeyJr.
3. x-Albert Pujols
4.Jimmie Foxx
5. Mickey Mantle
6. Eddie Mathews
7. Frank Robinson
x-active


Yrs Days
29 316
30 141
30 222
30 '248
30 325
31 185
32 9


Little League.

WORLD SERIES
At South Williamsport, Pa.
Thursday
Pearland,Texas 7,Auburn,Wash. 5
Waipahu, Hawaii 7, Columbus, Ga. 4
Friday
Waipahu. Hawaii 12, Columbus, Ga. 5
Today
International Championship: Japan vs.
Taiwan, I p.rh.
U.S. Championship: Pearland, Texas vs.
Waipahu, Hawaii, following International
championship
Sunday
At Lamade Stadium
Third Place
International runner-up vs. U.S.
runner-up, II a.m.
World Championship
International champion vs. U.S.
champion, 3 p.m.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. i

I WARBL I


FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
St. Louis 36, New England 35
Green Bay 59, Indianapolis 24
Friday's Games
Atlanta at Miami (n)
Washington at N.Y.Jets (n)
San Diego at New Orleans (n)
Philadelphia at Kansas City (n)
Today's Games
Cleveland at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 6:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Arizona at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
San Francisco at Oakland, 9 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Pittsburgh at Denver, 8 p.m.

NFL calendar

Tuesday Roster cutdown to
maximum of 75 players.
Sept. 4 Roster cutdown to
maximum of 53 players.
Sept. 9 Opening game of regular
season.

AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
PEAK Antifreeze Indy 300
Site: Joliet, IllI.
Schedule:Today, race, 7:50 p.m. (Versus,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: Chicagoland Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
NASCAR
NATIONWIDE
NAPA Auto Parts 200
Site: Montreal.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
11:30 a.m.-I p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,
5-7 p.m.); Sunday, race, 2:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
2-6 p.m.).
Track: Circuit Gilles Villeneuve (road
course, 2.709 miles).
Race distance:,200.466 miles, 74 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Belgian Grand Prix
Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
Schedule: Sunday, race, 8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30-10 a.m.). /
Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road
course, 4.35 miles).
Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES: Grand
Prix of Mosport, Sunday (Speed, 4-7 p.m.),
Bowmanville, Ontario.
GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS CAR
SERIES: Montreal 200, Today (Speed,
2-4:30 p.m.), Circuit Gilles Villeneuve,
Montreal.

BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Washington vs.Atlanta
Atlanta 95,Washington 90
Friday
Washington at Atlanta (n)
Sunday
Atlanta at Washington, 4:00 p.m., if
necessary
New York vs. Indiana
Thursday
New York 85, Indiaha 73
Sunday
New York at Indiana, 8 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Seattle vs. Los Angeles
Seattle 79, Los Angeles 66
Today
Seattle at Los Angeles, 3 p.m.
Tuesday
Los Angeles at Seattle, 10 p.m., if
necessary
Phoenix vs. San Antonio
Thursday
Phoenix 106. San Antonio 93
Today
Phoenix at San Antonio, I p.m.
Monday
San Antonio at Phoenix, 10 p.m., if
necessary

NBA calendar

Today-Sept. 12 FIBA world
championships,Turkey.
Sept. 24 Training camp opens for
teams playing in European exhibition
games.
Sept. 27 Training camp opens for
all other teams.
Oct. 22 Preseason ends.
Oct. 25 Rosters set for opening
day.
Oct. 26 Regular season opens.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


/ (I I j Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:

(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CLOVE WHEEL DEFACE SECEDE
I Answer: When the con man pulled the wool over their
eyes, the couple was FLEECED


CHS SWIMMING

Fundraiser car

wash today

Columbia High's swim
team is washing cars from
8 a.m. to noon today at
First Federal.
Donations will help with
program expenses.

YOUTH FOOTBALL

Little League final

sign-up today

Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
has youth football
registration from 8 a.m..
to 5 p.m? today at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Ages are 8-13, and two
leagues are offered. Cost
is $40. The Future Tiger
Football Camp, sponsored '
by the Lake City Parks and
-Recreation Department
and Columbia Youth
Football Association is
9-11 a.m. today at
Memorial Stadium. Boys
and girls ages 7-14 are
eligible for the free camp.
Participants can register
the day of the camp,
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.


Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball has
fall season sign-up from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at
Southside Sports Complex.
Fee of $50 includes jersey,
hat, socks and insurance.
Ages for the five leagues
range from 5-6 coach
pitch to 13-15. A parent
or guardian must come to
registration and provide a
birth certificate.
Fordetails, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810 or
Kevin Stalters at 623-9497.


Players needed
for travel team

A 12-under travel
baseball team is looking
for experienced players
for local tournaments.
Practices and tryouts
are 5:30 p.m. Sunday at
Southside Sports Complex.

ACROSS 45 NA
46 Glc


1 Fall mo.
5 In an unrea-
soning manner
10 Fragrant fir
12 Evening gala
13 Home of the
Illini
14 Mournful poem
15 Radio part
16 PBS "Science
Guy"
18 Moo goo-
pan
19 Punk hairdos
23 FICA funds it
26 Stir-fry need
27 Glimpse
30 Excite
32 Long way
around
34 Pooch
35 Slur
36 Romances
37 Day before
38 Fairway gizmo
39 Pdets
42 Mantra chants


SCOREBOARD


The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team is
seeking players, qualified
coaches and sponsors.
Conditioning and practice
is under way at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and
Saturday at Richardson
Community Center gym
and field,
For details, call Elaine
Ortiz Harden at 292-3039
or (386) 438-5728, or Luis
Santiago at 292-4138.

CHEERLEADING

Columbia Cheer

registration today
Columbia Cheer has
registration for little
league cheerleaders (girls
ages 4-12) from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. today and Sept. 4
at Southside Recreation
Center. Registration in
Fort White is 10 a.m. to


TO turf
Dve alterna-


tive
Tax form
Hi-fi
Brings about
Sketcher's
need
Colonial suitor
Mountain's or
river

DOWN

Graceful wrap
Isle of exile
Choir selection
Camel's-hair
color
Extinct bird
Objective .
Remnant
Actress Olin
Big Foot
cousin
Frost victim
Sewer opening
Vast number
Gab


Overly solemn
Not'as dull
Former JFK
arrivals'
Norm, briefly
Public exhibi-


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


BRIEFS

For details, call Chris
Williams at 344-5976.

YOUTH SOFTBALL

Fall registration

through Sunday

Girls'Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration
for its fall league through
Sunday at Brian's Sports.
Ages are 4-17 for T-ball,
machine pitch and fast-
pitch leagues. Cost is $45
or $65 for two players from
the same family. A birth
certificate is required at
registration.
For details on coaching,
scholarships, evaluations
or registration, e-mail
information@girlssoftball
association.org.


Fort White fall

registration today

Fort White Babe Ruth
Softball has registration
for the fall season from
10 a.m. to .1 p.m. today.
Registration is at the South
Cblumbia Sports Complex.
Cost is $40 per child.
For details, call Lynn
Harvey at 365-5688.


tion
25 Jason's vessel
28 Mope
29 Festive log
31 Composer
Stravinsky
32 Many and dif-
ferent
33 AAA sugges-
tion
37 Trendy meat
40 Longings
41 Blur, as ink
42 Killer whale
43 Brunch or *
lunch
44 Wall upright
47 Bear constel-
lation
.48 Perceive by
touch
49 On behalf of
51 Put into ser-
vice
52 Toon
Chihuahua
54 Capote, on
Broadway


828 2010 by UFS, Inc.


2 p.m. today. Cost of $90
includes uniform, T-shirt,
insurance, trophy,
end-of-year party and
homecoming parade.
Columbia Cheer is looking
for coaches.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at 292-4668.

AAU CROSS COUNTRY

Eye of the Tiger

meeting Thursday

The AAU Eye of the
Tiger cross country team
for sixth- through
eighth-grade girls and
boys has a fall season
information meeting for
parents and runners at
5:15 p.m. Thursday at
Alligator Park. Practices
will be at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday
during September. The
AAU National Cross
Country Meet is D&c. 4 at
Disney's Wide World of
Sports.
For details, contact
coach April Morse
eanbz@bellsouth.net.

GATORS

Kickoff social

planned Thursday

The North Florida Gator
Club is hosting a kickoff
social at 6 p.m. Thursday
at the home of John and
Betty Norris at 1671 SE
Inglewood Ave. Hank
Astengo of TV-20 Sports is
guest speaker. Dinner will
be provided by the club..
Bring lawn chairs.
For details, call Ron at
(386) 397-3378, Angela at
(386) 961-1766 or Bob at
752-3333.

SEMINOLES

Kickoff Tailgate

Party Thursday

The Lake City Seminole
Club is hosting a Kickoff
Tailgate Party from
6-9 p.m. Thursday at the
Lake City Elks Club on
Lake DeSoto. Fans are
invited to bring a tailgate
dish to kick off the new
* era in Seminole.football.
For details, call Steve
Gordon at 365-5413.

From staff reports


YOUTH BASEBALL SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Fall league final Practice open for

registration today Lake. City Falcons.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LO NS V IJEWS
ONIONS SITTER
GERMAN CREEDS
SW


ERE RAM
PEC LABEL MEIW
ANY SKEW ROUE
STRAUSS PEARL
TRAMP TRUSTED
EENY GEAR EKE
LEO BUDGE DAD
PIE LBS
ISLETS ARABIC
QUARTS NE BULA
SMOKE DUCKY


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421












Strasburg to have Tommy John surgery?


By JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Stephen Strasburg has a
torn elbow ligament and
will likely have Tommy
John surgery, bringing the
pitcher's promising rookie
season to an abrupt end.
Washington Nationals
general manager Mike
Rizzo said Friday an MRI
exam on the right elbow
revealed a "significant
tear." Strasburg will ,trav-
el to the West Coast for a
second opinion, but Rizzo
anticipates the 22-year-old
right-hander will need the
ligament replacement oper-
ation that requires 12 to 18
months of rehabilitation.
"As you can imagine, he
was initially upset," Rizzo
said. "But he has really
turned himself from being
upset to being focused on
his rehabilitation. He's
determined to get the sur-
gery done and begin the
process of rehabilitation:"
Strasburg was pulled
from Saturday's game at
Philadelphia when he gri-
maced while grabbing and
shaking his wrist after
throwing a changeup to
Domonic Brown. The
Nationals initially called the
injury a strained flexor ten-
don in the forearm, but an
MRI exam taken Sunday
raised enough questions for
the Nationals to order an
extensive exam in which
dye is injected into the
arm.
The No. 1 overall pick in
the 2009 draft, Strasburg
signed a record $15.1 mil-
lion contract a year ago.
He struck out 14 batters


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington Nationals' starting pitcher Stephen Strasburg throws against the Philadelphia
Phillies in the second inning of a baseball game on Aug. 21 in Philadelphia.


in a sensational major
league debut in June and
was quickly drawing huge
crowds everywhere, draw-
ing gasps with his 100 mph
fastballs, bending curves
and wicked batter-freezing
changeups.
He went 5-3 with a 2.91
ERA and 92 strikeouts in 68


innings with the Nationals,
who have kept him on strict
pitch counts and planned
to shut him down once he
reached about 105 innings.
Strasburg has had medi-
cal setbacks despite the
team's best efforts to be
as cautious as possible. He
was placed on the disabled


list a month ago because of
inflammation in the back of
his right shoulder, and he
was making his third start
since returning from the
DL when he had to leave the
game against Philadelphia.
"The. player was devel-
oped and cared for in the
correct way, and things like


this happen," Rizzo said.
"Pitchers break down, pitch-
ers get hurt and we certain-
ly are not second-guessing
ourselves. ... Frustrated?
Yes. But second-guessing
ourselves? No."'
Rizzo said doctors believe
Strasburg hurt himself on a
particular pitch, as opposed
to a gradual buildup. When
Strasburg grimaced in the
game at Philadelphia, he
told the team he had felt
something similar at San
Diego State and had con-
tinued to pitch through it.
Doctors have decided that
what happened in college
was unrelated to the liga-
ment tear.
Even so, Strasburg has
been saying this week he is
strong enough to pitch.
"Stephen felt pretty good
and still feels OK," Nationals
president Stan Kasten said.
"And that's why this has
been so confounding."
Strasburg is an intense,
competitive pitcher. He
wasn't thrilled with having
to start the season in the
minors or with the restric-
tions the Nationals placed
on him. Now he faces the
realistic prospect of not
pitching again until 2012.
The injury is the last thing
the woebegone Nationals
needed. The franchise is on
pace for its fifth last-place
finish in six years since
relocating from Montreal,
and Strasburg was seen
as the centerpiece of the
rebuilding. Attendance
has been disappointing
at Nationals Park since it
opened in 2008, while the
young .pitcher generated
rare sellouts in his first few
home starts.


Strasburg was informed
of the diagnosis Thursday
night, but the Nationals
chose not to announce the
news because it would have
upstaged the introductory
news conference for No. 1
draft pick Bryce Harper.
C o i n c i d e n tal y,
Thursday's game marked
the return of Jordan
Zimmermann, another
young Washington pitching
prospect who had Tommy
John surgery a year ago.
His counterpart, Chris
Carpenter of the St. Louis
Cardinals, has also had the
operation.
"I look at the bright
side," Rizzo said. 'Tommy
John surgery is a surgery
that we've had great suc-
cess at The success rate
for guys coming back from
Tommy John and retain-
ing their stuff is very good.
We saw two examples of it
on the mound yesterday at
Nationals Park."
Indeed, dozens of major
leaguers have had the sur-
gery since Dr. Frank Jobe
performed the first one on
Los Angeles Dodgers pitch-
er Tommy John in 1974.
"Thafsthemodernmiracle
of what doctors can do to put
people back together," Twins
manager Ron Gardenhire
said recently after a game
that featured Tommy John
returnees Francisco Liriano
and Tim Hudson.
"We all know the arm
takes beatingg" Gardenhire
said. "Goodness gracious,
we saw two guys who were
both throwing the ball
90-plus mph with sliders
and stuff. That's because
some doctors did some
really good jobs."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In front of a huge gallery, Tiger Woods hits a shot on the 16th tee during the second round of The Barclays golf tournament
Friday in Paramus N.J.

Woods struggles during second round


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

PARAMUS, N.J. -Tiger
Woods was poised to take
control at the Barclays on
Friday. Instead, he went
the other way.
Woods missed a 20-inch
putt for one of his four
bogeys over the last eight
holes and shot a 2-over 73.
The difference from the
rest of the year is this only
cost him the lead, not a
chance of winning.
Jason Day, the 22-year-
old Australian who won his
first PGA Tour event ear-
lier this year, made three
straight birdies late in his
round and finished with a
good par for a 4-under 67
that gave him a one-shot
lead.
Day was at 8-under 134,
one shot ahead of Kevin
Streelman (63) and Vaughn
Taylor (70).
Woods was four shots
behind going into the
weekend, and not the least
bit concerned with wheth-
er he could make up the
deficit
"You play around here
and post good numbers,
you'll move up the board,"
he said. "The guys aren't
going to be tearing this


place apart"
Streelman sure did.
Two years after nar-
rowly missing a playoff at
Ridgewood Country Club,
Streelman ran off six bird-
ies in a seven-hole stretch
for a 63 that will put him in
the final group Saturday.
Clearly, this is no
ordinary place for him.
Streelman's grandparents
are buried in a cemetery
beyond the seventh hole.
His parents live in the area.
These are his roots.
"It's like a special home
for me, a special place,"
he said.
Stewart Cink raised his
Ryder Cup hopes with a 69
that put him in a group at
136, while the pack another
shot behind included Adam
Scott (71) and three-time
major 'champion Padraig
Harrington, who had a 68.
Europe's Ryder Cup team
will be decided Sunday
evening, and Harrington
can only hope to be one of
three captain's picks.
"The last thing I want-
ed was to come here and
miss the cut, or play poorly
here," Harrington said.
Paul Casey, also hope-
ful of a Ryder Cup pick,
shot 69 and was in the
group with Woods that also


included Zach Johnson.
Woods at least will keep
his No. 1 ranking for anoth-
er week. Phil Mickelson
missed the cut, then left
The Barclays through a
side door without speaking
to reporters.
Woods wants to play on
the U.S. Ryder Cup team
as a captain's pick the
American selections won't
be announced until Sept
7 and the desire alone
makes him a worthy candi-
date. His game is starting
to show plenty of promise,
too.
Woods went to 8-under
par when he hit his
approach to 5 feet for birdie
on the 18th. Heading to the
front nine, the easier of the
two nines at Ridgewood,
he had only 93 yards to
the hole and a wedge in
his hand. Woods went 40
feet long, left his first putt
6 feet short and made that
to escape with par.
That set the tone for the
rest of his round.
Posing over his tee shot
on the par-3 second, it
sailed over the green and
left Woods a tough chip.
As he started his swing,
a photographer took a
series of pictures. "Not in
my swing," Woods said as


he made contact, sending
it 25 feet long for his first
bogey.
The real damage came
on No. 5, the 291-yard hole
where Woods hit driver
to 15 feet in the opening
round. With the pin close
to the front, he would have
had to take something off a
driver, so he opted to lay up.
The plan worked fine until
Woods putted to just inside
2 feet from the fringe, then
missed the par putt.
"Ball was sitting in a
hole," Woods said. "I could
see it I was trying to hit
up on it and hook it like I
normally do. I didn't do it."
He made bogey on the
next hole with one of his
few poor iron shots that
came up short then missed
his only fairway of the day
on the ninth hole and made
one last bogey.
Throughout the day,
the problem was putting.
On three straight holes on
the front nine, he ran putts
some 4 feet beyond the
hole and had to work for
his pars.
"I didn't have the speed
at all on the greens," he
said. "I was leaving it way
short or blowing it by the
hole. And it caught up with
me."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Oct. 10, 2009 file photo shows South Carolina's Steve
Spurrier (right) talking to running back Kenny Miles (31)
during the second half of an NCAA college football game
against Kentucky at Williams Brice Stadium in Columbia, S.C.


Spurrier keeps


competitive edge


By PETE IACOBELU
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C.
- When Steve Spurrier
took over South Carolina
football after 2004, he
spoke excitedly of winning
Southeastern Conference
championships.
Spurrier is still chasing
the title-winning legacy he
established at Florida.
After five seasons at South
Carolina, the drought has
led to questions of just how
long the 65-year-old coach
who cherishes winning can
bear SEC mediocrity. But
his son, Steve Jr., warns not
to mistake the sideline gri-
maces, thrown game notes
and disgusted comments
for surrender.
'The day he's not frustrat-
ed is the day he's lost some
of his competitive edge,"
said Spurrier Jr., South
Carolina's receivers coach.
'Steve Spurrier has already
achieved several milestones
at South Carolina.
He has led the Gamecocks
to an unprecedented four
bowl trips his first five sea-
sons. His 35 victories are
sixth all-time among South
Carolina coaches and he
could rise to third by sea-
son's end with eight wins.
But school records aren't
why Spurrier came back to
college.
"We need to win big at


South Carolina," Spurrier
said.
So far, that hasn't hap-
pened quickly enough
to suit Spurrier. He con-
sidered packing it in after
South Carolina was blast-
ed by Iowa 31-10 at the
Outback Bowl two seasons
ago. "Who wouldn't have?"
he joked.
He was just as ticked
off this past January when
the Gamecocks again fell
flat in the Papajohns.com
Bowl with a 20-7 loss 'to
Connecticut "Don't tell us
to forget because we're not
going to forget it. We're
going to try our best to not
ever have a performance
like that again," he said.
Spurrier seems to have
channeled his anger into.
preseason preparations.
At practice, quarterbacks
coach G.A. Mangus felt
Spurrier had a "youthful
enthusiasm that's really
neat to be around."
"He knows," Mangus
continued, "that some of
the pieces are getting in
place."
Spurrier attracted top
talent recently that hadn't
always looked South
Carolina's way. Two years
ago, the Gamecocks landed
the Palmetto State's "Mr.
Football" in Stephon Gihnore,
who passed up Alabama,
Florida and Tennessee to
sign with Spurrier.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420







ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


H-APPY MEDIUM
I


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Teen gets silent treatment

from her dad's new wife


DEAR ABBY: I am a 14-
year-old girl living with my
grandmother. My mom died
when I was 7 and my father
is now remarried. He and
my stepmom have two chil-
dren together.
My problem is my step-
mother and I don't get along.
I try to be friendly, but she
hardly speaks to me or my
grandmother. I understand
that some people are quiet
by nature and I am one of
them, but my grandmother
and I agree that her behavior
is rude especially because
we have done nothing to pro-
voke it.
I sometimes get the feel-
ing my stepmother doesn't.
want me to see my father. Ev-
ery time he comes to visit at
my grandmother's she calls,
and then he has to leave.
My grandmother and I
love their two children and
they have come to recognize
us. However, we don't get to
see them very often. I be-
lieve my stepmother may be
the reason for this as well.
What can we do to im-
prove the situation? My*
grandmother has spoken
to Dad, but things haven't
gotten any better. I'm afraid
to say anything because
.1 know things 'could be
worse. What's your advice?
- SILENT TEEN IN
NORTH CAROLINA
DEAR SILENT TEEN:
If your grandmother has al-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
ready spoken to your dad,
there is nothing you can do
to improve the situation. The
ball is in your father's court.
The problem isn't you or
anything you have or haven't
done. Your father married a
woman who appears to be
possessive, insecure and
unable to empathize with
anyone she can't control.
You are a reminder that your
father had a wife and a life
before she came into it, and
she views that as a threat.
Your father could straighten
her out but it appears she
holds the power in their re-
lationship.
It's time you spoke to him
about your feelings directly.
Hearing it from you may
have more impact than what
your grandmother is able to
convey. If that doesn't work,
you have my sympathy.
DEARABBY: My daugh-
ter, "Cassie," who is 23,
moved out to live with her fi-
ance. My house is now truly
empty. I have two sons who
have been on their own for a
while. Cassie was the last to
fly the coop.


I am so sad. I can't bear
to even go into her room. It
is so quiet. We didn't exactly
have the closest relation-
ship. I tried, but she wanted
her independence. It hurt,
but isn't that what a parent
has to do with her kids?
Now that Cassie's gone,
she won't answer calls or
messages nothing. I saw
her ht her place of work the
other day and she barely ac-
knowledged me. She claims
she is "happy now" and real-
ly doesn't miss me. She says
hurtful things and makes fun
of me because I am so sappy
and emotional.
How do parents handle
these situations? I don't work
because I'm not able to. I
know I should go out and do
volunteer work. I do go to the
gym, but I'm much younger
than the crowd there. I don't
have many close friends.
What do empty-nester moms
do? I know Cassie is insensi-
tive, but talking it out with
her won't help. She is who
she is. HURTING IN
PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR HURTING: OK,
you say you don't have many
close friends and can't work
- but you are well enough
that you can go to a gym and
volunteer. Now it's time for
YOU to "fly the coop."
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Problems with
the way things are pre-
sented to you will arise in
both your personal and
professional dealings. You
can advance but only if you
cover all the material that is
expected of you. Research
and preparation will pay off.

TAURUS (4 1 20-
May 20): Plan to have
fun. Dwelllng on what you
didn't get done will not help
matters. You need to look
for ward, not bak. You ll
learn1 t something valbl
from Somteone you encoun-
ter through a friend. ***-
GEucl-it (May21nt e-J
20): Look for alternative
ways to entertain someone_
you love. Your spontaneity
will capt ure attention an
eprtss espoia eone who cant
offr ayou favors. You'll be
emotional, 3o stay busy.
A A A)und k
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Refrain from
reacting to something too
quickly it may not be eas-
ily reversed. Not everyone
will have your best interests
at heart, especially when it
pertains to love, children
or an older family member.
Don't let anyone push you
around. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Listen to what oth-
ers are telling you and you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

can make a wise decision.
Friends, neighbors and
relatives will play an im-
. portant role in your life. In-
clude the people you love in,
your plans. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let someone
from your past cost you.
Try to collect or pay old
debts so you can start with
a clean slate. Don't get an-
gry over an emotional mat-
ter that cannot be altered..
Walk away from any situ-
ation not likely to be good
for you. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll have mixed
emotions regarding a per-
sonal relationship. Try not
to be too hard on the per-
son you are dealing with,
but don't act as a doormat
either. It's important that
you keep the peace until
you decide what's best for
you. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take a good idea
you have and work it until it
amounts to something. A
change will do you good,
so don't hesitate to make
a move or relocate for the
weekend. An opportunity
you come across will help
you make a decision. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov;
22-Dec. 21): Count your
blessings and work long
and hard to complete what
needs to be done. You have
plenty to gain by putting'in
extra time. Your own small
business will show some po-
tential and that will encour-
age you to diversify what
you have to offer. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't push
your luck when dealing
with others. Travel will be
riddled with delays, detours
and frustration. It's best to
stay put. There is money
heading your way. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Spend time with
an old friend. Looking back
and sharing memories will
remind you of ideas and
goals you can still put into
play. With a little streamlin-
ing and updating, you could
turn something you once
enjoyed doing into a lucra-
tive endeavor. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): It's best to
listen to the arguments be-
ing made to help you get a
better view of what's going
on. You can avoid a terrible
mistake when it comes to
both personal and profes-
sional partnerships. Don't
lead someone on. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: B equals G
" MDG JVR HVEL V RLU PXWLRS, CGZ
MDG JVR'Z HVE L VR DKS DRL."
"...VRS U L' KK KLVOL ZYL KWBYZ DR
PDX MDG." ZDH CDSLZZ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "They say that marriages are made in heaven. But so
is thunder and lightning." Clint Eastwood
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-28


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


W;HEN qCU6ET
R6,DOYOUWQANT
TO 6E SOMEBODY
\6(REAT?


THAT'S AN IN\SU


A c-oiRDIAL PsycHMI


. I;


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of il,
Reporter Classifieds'.

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pe ThIs Is a non revtndahie rate. s

r" 7 .


41ines 1 17 50
3 days i
includes 2 Signs r il adinmal ine t% 1 5


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....*92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2:00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


-=
You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
* copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





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These deadlines are subject to change without notice,




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Should further information be
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Advertising copy is subject to
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be checked for errors by the
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will be allowed for the first insertion
for that'portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
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omission of advertisements ordered
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In Print antd Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-284-CA ,
Judge Leandra G. Johnson
THE SHILOH RIDGE COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GARY A. WHITENECK and
BARBARA A. WHITENECK,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the third floor of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m.
on September 15, 2010, the follow-
ing property described in Exhibit
"A" attached hereto.
LOT 75
THE SW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF
THE SE 1/4, SECTIONl16, TOWN-
SHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
SAID LANDS BEING SUBJECT
TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT
FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS IN
THE NORTHEAST CORNER
THEREOF. CONTAINING 10.05
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS. OVER AND ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
PROPERTY:
60-FOOT EASEMENT FOR IN-
GRESS AND EGRESS
A STRIP OF LAND 60 FEET IN
WIDTH BEING 30 FEET EACH
SIDE OF A CENTERLINE DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COM-
MENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE
NE 1/4, SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP
7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE S 89' 03' 48"
W, 20.45 FEET TO THE WEST
LINE OF FRY ROAD AND TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE S 89 03'48"
W, 3952.99 FEET TO THE EAST
LINE OF SECTION 16, TOWN-
SHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, *
THENCE S 89' 06' 19" W, 661.99
FEET TO REFERENCE POINT
"C", THENCE CONTINUE S 89'.
06' 19" W, 1323.98 FEET TO REF-
ERENCE POINT "D" AND TO
THE POINT OF TERMINATION.
ALSO BEGIN AT REFERENCE
POINT "C" AND RUN THENCE N
00' 45' 21" W, 701.45 FEET TO
THE RADIUS POINT OF A CUL-
DE-SAC HAVING A RADIUS OF
50 FEET AND TO THE POINT OF
TERMINATION. ALSO BEGIN AT
REFERENCE POINT "C" AND
RUN THENCE S 00' 45' 01" E,
1323.20 FEET, THENCE S 00' 44'
52" E, 701.59 FEET TO THE RADI-
US POINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC
HAVING A RADIUS OF 50 FEET
AND TO THE POINT OF TERMI-
NATION. ALSO BEGIN AT REF-
ERENCE POINT "D" AND RUN
THENCE N 00' 46' 46" W, 701.37
FEET TO THE RADIUS POINT OF
A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 50 FEET AND TO THE
POINT OF TERMINATION. ALSO
BEGIN AT REFERENCE POINT
"D" AND RUN THENCE S 00' 46'
12" E, 1323.42 FEET, THENCE S
00' 46' 00" E, 701.68 FEET TO
THE RADIUS POINT OF A CUL-
DE-SAC HAVING A 50 FEET RA-
DIUS AND TO THE POINT OF
TERMINATION.
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a clam within 60 days after the
sale.
Date: August 16, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04541345
August 21, 28, 2010

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440









Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming.
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

Cleaning Done Your Way!
Do YOU need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dlzer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219


Legal

PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given pursuant to
Ordinance No. 2008-1060, of the
City of Lake City, Florida that a Pub-
lic Hearing will be conducted on the
8th day of September, 2010, by the
Board of Adjustment at a meeting
commencing at 6:30 P.M. in the City
Council Room, on the second floor
of the City Hall Building, 205 North
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
to hear the public on the following:
Petition # V-10-04, submitted by
Lake DeSoto Properties, LLC, re-
questing variance of 5 feet from the
maximum sign allowance as estab-
lished in Sections 4.2.20.9 (e) of the
Land Development Regulatiois on
property described as 273 NW Main
Blvd, Columbia County Parcel No.
12640-000, as lying within the City
of Lake City, Florida, City Limits.
A copy of said petition may be in-
spected by any member of the public
at the office of the Zoning Official
on the first floor of the City Hall
Building. At the aforementioned
meeting, all interested parties may
appear and be heard with respect to
this petition.
04541445
August 28, 2010

100 J0b
Opportunities

04541382
The Mobile Mechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolayemplovment.com


04541389
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position open for a PT
(20 hours per week)
Switchboard Operator.
Front desk receptionist and
miscellaneous clerical duties as
assigned. Applicants must have
excellent interpersonal and
organizational skills.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
and forwarded to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City, FL 32056 or
email Turbeville.Jt@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

05523669
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.

05523685
Professional and Courteous
Class A CDL Driver needed

United States Cold Storage
Lake City
Immediate openings due to
fleet expansion
Floridi region deliveries

Qualified Class A
CDL Drivers must:

*Have a valid Class A CDL
with an acceptable driving
safety record
eBe 23. years of age
*Have 2 years verifiable
tractor trailer experience
We offer our Class A
CDL Drivers
*Bi-weekly pay
*Benefits

Apply in person or
send resume to
USCS
211 NE McCloskey Ave
Lake City, FL 32055

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CLASS A CDL LONG HAUL
Driver needed Must have frame-
less dump exp. Must pass drug
test. Requires out of town travel.
386-719-9482 between 9a & 5p
Delivery driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL.apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring St, Lake City
Energetic, motivated,
Sales Person, retail & computer


exp. a plus Apply in person@
Smitty's Western between 9-11 am


F/T Cashier in Service Dept,
pd vacation, eligible for ins, 40 hr
wk, see Brenda T @ Roundtree
Moore Ford service dept


100 Job
-100 Opportunities

Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record, 386-963-
5026, Drug-Test.
Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Lve Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746
Seeking experienced
Satellite Installer with tools
and truck ready to go
407-460-9225
STelemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able to
'perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
Please fax resume to
386-758-4523
Want to make a difference'
in someone's life?
Residential Traning Specialist
,positions available, one yr exp, di-
ploma or GED, current FL DL,
CPR/lst Aid/ HIV Training req'd,
Apply in person at CARC
512 SWSisters Welcome Road,
Lake City

Medical
120 Employment

04541374
OPS DENTAL HYGIENIST
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking an OPS
Dental Hygienist, position
#64912060 to work on mobile
dental unit at Elementary
Schools for an eight week
period for 2 days a week,
Wednesday and Thursday.
Must be licensed as a Dental
Hygienist in accordance with
Florida Statute 466. Rate of pay
is $25.00'per hour. Applications
will be accepted online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com
State of Florida application may
be mailed to State of Florida,
People First, Staffing
Administration, PO Box 44058,
Jacksonville, FI 32231 or faxed
to (904)636-2627 by 08/29/10.
EEO/AA/VP Employer.

04541385
Medical Receptionist
Experience in a medical office
required. Send resume to PO
Box 3009, Lake City, FL 32056,
or fax to 386-758-5987

(14541386
Medical Billing Manager
Experience in coding, billing,
collections req'd. Excellent
salary based on experience.
'Send resume in confidence to:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com
or Fax # 386-758-5987

04541397
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
Full-Time Positions
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
Will be over ER, OR and Med
Surge Floor, Current RN
License, Ward or Hospital
Management Helpful.
Teaching and/or Supervisory
Exp. Preferred.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT
High School Graduate,
AA Degree in Acct. Preferred.
2 yrs Exp. in all aspects of Acct.
General Ledger, Accts Payable.
and Payroll. Accounting Skills,
Computer Skills, knowledge of
Word, Excel Software &
10 key Punch
PRN Position
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
Current Florida PT/ST/OT
license. Evaluate, Assess, Plan
and Implement Treatments.
Hand Therapy Preferred.

To staff Emergency Room
Small Acute Care Critical
Access hospital. Exp. Required,
FT/PT/PRN
Great benefits and salary.
For further information,
please visit our website: n
www.lakebutlerlhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity


F/T LPN (IV cert. req'd) needed,
for medical office.
Computer skills a plus.
Fax resume to 386-754-1712.


120 Medical
120 Employment

Busy Medical Practice with multi-
ple doctors is seeking responsible
individual for Receptionist and
Scheduling. Medical experience a
must. Fax resume to 386-758-5628
P/T CNA or LPN needed,
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

240 Schools &
240 Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/13/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Boxer/Sheppard mix puppy, ready
for good home on 9/10/10,
Special needs dog 90% blind,
free/call for details 386-438-5385
Jack Russell puppies, with health
certificates, 8 weeks, asking $300
for females, $250 for males
386-935-1722
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
REGISTERED
English Setter puppies.
Great Bird Dogs. $200. ea.
386-961-1855 or 755-6874

330 Livestock &
3JU Supplies
Grandma,
I want a Pony...
Call for details
386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Hotpoint side-by-side,
Refrigerator/Freezer, 25 cu ft,
white, like new $395
Call Don 397-4889
Microwave Oven
good shape, works well, revolving
plate, welcome to see $30
386-755-3682


407 Computers

IBM Computer,
Many extras
$80.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Multi Family Sat only, 7AM,-?,
lots of toys!, DVD's, furniture,
clothing, misc items
3090 NW Nash Rd
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat -9-1, Quail Heights 147 SW
Wren Crt. Baby/Toddler Clothes
/shoes, Kid toys, Fum, Fish Tanks,
Pet stuff, electronics, misc. hshold.
Sat 7-12, Moving Sale,.
Southern Oaks Country Club,
furniture, linens, lawn mower,
patio furniture, and much more!
Sat/Sun, 8AM ?. woodwork
tools, lawn mower, boat trailer,
lots of other tools
249 SW Bedrock S't (47)


440 Miscellaneous

Full Sized School Chalkboards
$25 each
386-344-5706 or
386-344-1783
Hospital Bed, electric wheelchair,
lift chair, recliner, vacuum cleaner.
TV stand, kitchen table w/4 chairs
call for prices 386-752-6051


Good Things
450 toEat

GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
1,2 & 3 BR 1 BTH
MH's & House
Close to town'. 1st & Deposit.
386-755-5488
2&3 Bedroom Mobile home,.
$425 $650. monthly.
Watei & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Large MH, small park. nco;.
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dcl
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly\
painted, near college,1 acre.
big front porch $650 mo.
386-697-1013 or 386-697-190(
L2br/lba CH/4, screen porch. Lg
yard. fishing pond. Clean, Cqulc
No Pets. References. Long ternt
rentals $475 mo. $475 sec. Smo', :
free environment. 386-965-300
3BR /2BA DWMH. 10 miles from
Lake CIty off Hwy 247.
$650. mo plus 1st, last and $500
securtiy deposit. 386-935-6691)
Clean bedroom, Large treed l;i,
on Turner Road.
Call:.386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mro
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & F.
White Contact 386-623-246?
or 386-292-0114
NICE 3BR/2BA on 1/2 ac. fenced
New workshop. Pets ok, comcast
avail., $650. mo. 1st and las;
required. 386-697-6621
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba fi n
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move in
July Special. Rent includes watcr.
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to torin.
386-623-7547 or,984-8448

f640 Mobile Homes
for Sale

5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floor'.
new metal roof. plywood, 2 por e h-
es, utility shed, concrete founo,-
tion & some furniture. $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5% udn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824

7" 1 s Unfurnished Apt.
10v For Rent
05523300
Voted Best Apartment 2010 I
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05523675
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security.
Call Micheile
386-752-9626
A Landlord You Can Love-
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Creat
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookt,-,.
386-758-9351/352-208-242:
Great location W of 1-75. spaciu.
deluxe 2BR hpts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up..+ SD.
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499. 2/1. ne, ly
renovated, in town, includes wav r
$550 per month, easy qualil\ in
386-755-2423 or 386-697-W16
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled.
kit., 1/bd, ba. LR, dining & c\ir,i
room. Ref. req. $500. mo & s.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incluh1:
utilities, Satellite TV. applian.,,.
(washer/dryer). No pets For ii!,i
call. 386-963-1002
The Lakes Apts. Studios & Il.I s
from $135/wk. Utilities & ,
incl. Full kitchen. No contrn:I.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0 ~?
Updated apartments w/tile l ,l s
& fresh paint. Excellent locatoil.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9620
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/1
country acre 8 mi to VA, off I.'
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dcp. No di ..
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.:

7 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sen.
Columbia. All furnished. llIeI,
cable, fridge, microwave. W\'sr'
or monthly rates. 1 person S$ I
2 persons $150. wceklh
386-752-58(08

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
2BR/2BA Nice & Cleain
$800. mo 1st and last NO pr.
Country setting on Nash Re,.
386-752-1677
3bd/2ba's
Multiple Locationsi
Call for details


386-755-3649.
4/2/2 2800 sqlft. 2nd fI I i .1,
Soutlhern Oaks CC. 17.1
NW Hllarris Lake Dr. $1350 ,
plus security. (941)545-( / 1


I Drug Free Workplace


_ I ---`


* ADvantage


~l^IBeEM


1


I








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 2010


7 0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,000
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-758-3166
Clean IBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-
1833.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Large 4 br/2ba, Family Rm, Living
Rm, Recreation Rm, large yard,
Old Country Club Road; No pets;
$800/mo + sec dep. 623-2642
Like new House for Rent.
1500 sqft. 3/2 w/garage. Available
now. $1000. mo. plus deposit.
386-623-0237
Mayfair Subdivision. 3/2,
fenced back yard, $1200 month
w/$800 security deposit
386-466-2254
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business&
Office Rentals
ConvenienfStore
with gas
for lease,
813-286-2323
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar'Sales 7 days 7-7

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call1
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St **Sold**
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
MUST SEE! New 3500 foot
spec home. Reduced to $299,000
5% interest. 0% down or trade.
386-752-1364
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Brnfrd, lrg shed, sm down, $725
mo 386-590-0642/386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Saturn Lane 4/2 block,
5 acres, half cleared,2 sheds,
reduced from $140K to $120K
LCFR 3.86-754-0800
82 Farms &
Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
WE FINANCE!. Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles
1995 HONDA Shadow 600cc
Motorcycle. Mileage 19,500.
New battery. $2,500.
386-752-8157 or 397-6717

940 Trucks
1997 FORD F-250 Diesel
Extra cab. 5 sp., good AC.,
dependable. 7.3 turbo. $4,500.
(352)339-5158
1999 GHEVROLET 1500,
4 wheel drive, Z-71. Extended cab
w/3rd door. 1 owner. $7500.
Call after 8pm. 386-963-4788

915 Recreational
9 Vehicles
MOTORHOME 1995 Ford F350


29ft long, 29,011 miles slight
water damage on top bed of truck
cab. $10,000.00 call 935 1270
952 Vans & Sport
S952Util. Vehicles
1999 CHEVY Suburban 4 door,
leather (no cracks). Dual AC.,
Like new condition. $4,500
386-454-5120


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ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10.days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2008 Dodge SLT
4x4 Big Ram
20" Factory rims, Hemi
full power, extra clean.
10,290 mi.
$24,900
Call
386-755-2909




2006 35 Ft. Denali
5th wheel camper tow
truck combo, 3 slides,
many extras, like new with
2002 Chevy Silverado
crew cab PU w/6.6CI turbo
diesel.
$37,900
Call
386-758-2465


1999 Chevrolet
1500 Z-71
4 Wheel drive, extended
cab with 3d door.
One owner.
$7,500
Call after 8pm
386-963-4788
i 'lh -.


IUa3 larley
Davidson FXRP
Super Glide, 23K miles,
crash bar, windshield,
good condition.
$4,900
Call
386-758-9750


1995 Honda Shadow
600cc Motorcycle
Mileage 19,500
New battery.
$2,500
Call
386-752-8157
386-397-6717


2003 Cadillac
DeVille
AM/FM/CD, leather,
heated seats.
67,000 miles..
$9,500
Call
386-965-5484


In Print, Online




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