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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01410
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/27/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01410
System ID: UF00028308:01410
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Bureaucratic issue
U.S. Rep. Crenshaw discusses
progress of inland port project.
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Lail% '


Friday, August 27, 2010


Split success
Lady Tigers, Lady Indians
score mixed results.
Sports, I B






Reporter


-ter.-com


Vol. 136, No; 188 0 75 cents


Body found in Lake City field


PATRICK SCOTTI Special to the Lake City Reporter
An investigator crosses the yellow police tape Thursday to
gather evidence after authorities found a body behind the
former K-Mart Plaza near U.S. Highway 90.


No signs of foul
play seen in maifs
death, officials say.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A dead man was found
near a former shopping
center plaza Thursday
morning, spurring a Lake
City Police Department


investigation.
The man has been
identified as John Russell
McLemore, 45, 189 NE
Craig St
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
around 8:34 a.m. officers
were called to Cole Road
to investigate -reports of a
dead person.
Officers reportedlyspoke
to a citizen who noticed a


bicycle in the field behind
the former K-Mart Plaza
off U.S. Highway 90 near
Branford Highway. The citi-
zen also discovered a body
near the bicycle.
Lake City Police
Department investiga-
tor Paul Kash, the State
Attorney's Office and the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement Crime Scene
Unit from Jacksonville


were called to the scene.
The scene was pro-
cessed for evidence and the
dead man was identified as
McLemore. Authorities
then notified his next of
kin.
Sgt.JohnBlanchard, Lake
City Police Department
public information officer,
said the body was taken to
BODY continued on 5A


Sheriff: Three adults, found inside

McAlpin home, bore bullet wounds


S , PATRICK SCOTT/ Special to the Lake City Reporter
Law-enforcement officials gather at the driveway of the McAlpin home where three bodies were found Thursday.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
McALPIN -Three
adults were found dead,
with a gunshot wound to
each body, at a farm in *
eastern Suwannee County
Thursday.
The bodies were found
at 12726 172nd Road in
McAlpin, an area Tony
Cameron, Suwannee
County sheriff, described
simply as a "rural area."
"It appears to be a triple
homicide," Cameron said.
Preliminary investiga-
tions led authorities to
believe that the homicides
occurred Wednesday
night, late in the evening.
"They're (victims) all
related and they're all
adults," Cameron said,
noting the identity of the
victims are not being
released at this stage in
the investigation. 'They
were shot."
The Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office received a
call at 7:36 a.m. Thursday


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


from an employee at the
farm notifying authorities
about the homicides.
"He came to work on
the farm, and when he.
arrived he found the
three of them and they
had been shot," Cameron
said.
No arrests have
been made in the case,
however the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement Crime Scene
Unit from Tallahassee, as
well as state attorney's
office and sheriff's office,
are also working on the
homicide investigation.
Cameron said authori-
ties have not yet located
witnesses in the case.
'"There is no one that
was here that we've seen,"
he said, speaking of the
next step in the investiga-
tion. "We're just canvass-
ing the area around here
talking to all the people
who live close by, talking
to the people who knew
them and those kinds of
things."


90 70
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


PATRICK SCOTT/ Special to the Lake City Reporter
Officials say a 'triple homicide' took place inside this home
in eastern Suwannee County Wednesday night.


PATRICK SCOTT/ Special to the Lake City Reporter
A sheriff deputy allows a vehicle to enter the driveway of
the home where bodies were found Thursday.


c~jy


4


ST urglar strikes

Sonic restaurant;

flees with cash


Possible inside
job; authorities
interviewworkers.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A recent burglary at the
Sonic restaurant, where a
thief broke into the store
and took an undetermined
amount of money from the
restaurant's safe, is being
investigated. as an inside
job.
Police officers were called
to the Sonic restaurant,
2395 SW Main Boulevard
on Tuesday, shortly after
it opened, by general man-
ager Steven Graham.
"He came into the Sonic
and found there was money
taken from the safe, some
things had been moved
around and he reviewed
the store's video tape," said


Sgt. John Blanchard, Lake
City Police Department
public information officer.
"According to the tape,
around 3:05 a.m. Tuesday,
it showed a subject in dark
clothing entering the store
and taking money out of the
safe and leaving. The sub-
ject's face was obscured."
Authorities are attempt-
ing to release images taken
from the restaurant's video
surveillance camera to aid
in catching the suspect.
Authorities hope someone
may recognize the clothing
the suspect was wearing
during the burglary and
contact investigators.
"It appeared the sus-
pect possibly used a key
to get into the store and
appeared to use the com-
bination to the safe to open
it up," Blanchard said. "We
are currently interviewing
some past employees."


Niblack prepares

strategy to move

up school grade


Local elementary
drops from A
grade to'D.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Niblack Elementary
School has plans in place to
recover from its "D" Florida
school grade and jump to
an "A" for the 2010 to 2011
school
year
school
officials
said
The
Columbia
County
Millikin S c h o o 1
Board,
district officials and Niblack
Elementary administration
and staff met at the school
for a State of the School
workshop, discussing the
school's grade data and
how to remedy student per-
formance and progress.
Niblack Elementary
dropped from an "A" in the
2008 to 2009 school year to
a "D" for the 2009 to 2010
school year.
The group determined


Opinion ...
Obituaries . ....
Advice & Comics......
Puzzles .......... ..
Around Florida... .. .


TODAY
IN STATIC
Do ou :.* ..".
this ,, it


"If one person
is not on board,
it is going to
tremendously
impact scores."

Linard Johnson
School board member

that the school's biggest
issue to be dealt with is
making more learning
gains.
According to its state
school-grade reports
comparing the 2009 to
2010 school year to that
of 2008 to 2009, Niblack
Elementary dropped 31
percentage points in read-
ing learning gains and 19
percentage points in math
learning gains.
It dropped 33 percent-
age points in the lowest 25
percent of students making
gains in reading, and 17 per-
centage points in the lowest
25 percent of students mak-
ing gains in math.
In attempts to raise learn-
ing gains, school adminis-
tration and teachers plan to
NIBLACK continued on 5A

COMING
E SATURDAY
P~ ,d the latleft_
.:hur,:h ie_.'.:,









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


CA$H 3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-3-4
Evening: 0-6-8


4 Thursday:
Afternoon: 9-7-8-9
Evening: 2-4-7-9


ezmtaicli-.
Wednesday
9-21-22-34-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Beck: Saturday rally not political


WASHINGTON

Glenn Beck says it's
just a coincidence his
Restoring Honor rally
on Saturday at the
Lincoln Memorial will
take place on the anniversary and at
the site of Martin Luther King Jr.'s
famous "I Have a Dream" speech.
But he's hardly apologizing for the
connection.
"This is going to be a moment that
you'll never be able to paint people
as haters, racists, none of it," he says
of the event featuring Sarah Palin'
and other conservative political and
cultural figures. "This is a moment,
quite honestly, that I think we
reclaim the civil rights movement."
Some civil rights veterans are
skeptical.
"When we heard about Glenn
Beck, it was puzzling," the Rev. Al
Sharpton said. "Because if you read
Dr. King's speech, it just doesn't gel
with what Mr. Beck or Mrs. Palin are
representing."
Beck, a popular figure, among
tea party activists and a.polarizing
Fox News Channel personality, is
headlining the event, and Palin, the
2008 Republican vice presidential
nominee and a potential 2012 presi-
dent candidate, will be a prominent
speaker. But Beck told his television
audience again on Thursday that it's
not about politics.
The event's website says the rally
is to pay tribute to America's military
personnel and others "who embody
our nation's founding principles of
integrity, truth and honor." It also is
to promote the Special Operations
Warrior Foundation, which provides
scholarships and services to family
members of military members.
The website urges citizens to
attend and "help us restore the val-
ues that. founded this great nation."
The rally, on the 47th anniversary
of King's plea for racial equality is


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ryan Palmer (right), with Elite Productions, uses a level as the stage is being
set for the Glenn Beck 'Restoring Honor' rally in front of the Lincoln Memorial
in Washington on Wednesday. Beck's rally on the anniversary and at the site of
Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous 'I Have a Dream' speech is drawing criticism,
protests and questions about his intentions. See related local story, page 5A.


drawing a-strong reaction and
several counter-rallies as the
nation looks toward November's
elections.

Producers say no
auto-tuning at 'idol'
LOS ANGELES Simon Cowell
has gone from "American Idol" judge
to a potential headache for the show.
A furor over whether Cowell's
British talent show "The X Factor"
electronically altered contestant voic-
es has prompted "American Idol" to
make a pre-emptive strike.
'We have never, nor would we
ever, use Auto-Tuning during the
'American Idol' competition," produc-
ers of the Fox show said in a state-
ment Thursday, referring to pitch-
correcting technology.
Cowell left the judge's panel on


the top-rated Fox series at the end ,
of last season and is bringing "The X
Factor," which he created in Britain
and is hugely popular there, to the
Fox network in 2011.

Judge: Chris Brown
doing 'great job'
LOS ANGELES A judge says
'Chris Brown is doing a "great job"
completing the terms of his proba-
tion after pleading guilty to assault-
ing ex-girlfriend Rihanna.
Brown appeared Thursday for a
brief hearing in Los Angeles.
Superior Court Judge Patricia
Schneggnoted Brown had received
, positive reports from domestic vio-
lence counselors and the Richmond,
V, police chief overseeing his com-
munity service work.
U'Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Cajun-country singer
Jimmy C. Newman is 83.
* Author Antonia Fraser is
78.
* Actor Tommy Sands is 73.
* Bluegrass singer-musician
J.D. Crowe is 73.
* Musician Daryl Dragon
is 68.
* Actress Tuesday Weld is 67.


* Rock singer-musician Tim
Bogert is 66.
* Actress Marianne
Sagebrecht is 65.
* Actress Barbara Bach is
63.
* Country musician Jeff
Cook is 61..
* Actor Paul Reubens is
58.


Daily Scripture


"Just as each of us has one body
with many members, and these
members do not all have the
same function, so in Christ we
who are many form one body,
and each member belongs to
all the others."
Romans 12:4-5



Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US, CLASSIFIED
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Fax number ...............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation ............... 755-5445 BUSINESS
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and a.m. on Sunday.
The Associated Press. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
All material herein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers should
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service ce ber fore dayrnt ertAs er
No. 310-880. vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake City, Fla. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295; (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
Editor Tom Mayer ..........754-0428 24 Weeks..................$48.79
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com) 52 Weeks................... $83.46
ADVERTISING Rates include 7% sales tax.
ADVERTISING Mail rates
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418 12 Weeks................ $41.40
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) 24 Weeks.............. $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City'Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man gets 10 years
for hate crime
DAYTONA BEACH
- A Port Orange man
who slammed his car into
a bicyclist then shouted
racial slurs at her has been
sentenced to 10 years in
prison after, being convict-
ed of a hate crime.
A Volusia County judge
sentenced 58-year-old
Thomas Cosby, who is
white, on Thursday. He
was convicted last month
of aggravated battery with
a deadly weapon and bat-
tery evidencing prejudice.
He had faced up to 35
years in prison. "
Authorities say Cosby
veered his car off the road
in 2008 to strike then-25-
year-old Nekedia Cato,
then yelled derogatory
names at the black woman.
Prosecutors say its rare to
pursue assault charges as
hate crimes because it's
difficult to prove the defen-
dant's motivation.
Arguing to get the sen-
tence reduced, a defense
attorney said Cosby had a
history of mental illness.

Company sues BP
well cementer
PENSACOLA The
Panhandle's largest pri-
vate landowner is suing a
Houston-based company
that was responsible for
cementing BP's failed Gulf
of Mexico oil rig.
St. Joe Co. sued M-I
SWACO on Thursday. The
lawsuit seeks unspecified
damages for a decline
in the value of St. Joe's
577,000 acres of Panhandle
property.
Since the April rig
explosion, St. Joe says the
value of its properties has
declined substantially. At
its worst point, the com-
pany lost about $1.4 billion
in market capitalization.
M-I SWACO did not
return phone messages


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Memorial recalls student deaths


In this photo released by the University of Florida News
Bureau, Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell comforts
Ann Gorren, the mother of Gainesville student murder
victim Christa Hoyt, at a memorial service on Thursday
in Gainesville recognizing the 20th anniversary of the
Gainesville student murders.


and e-mails seeking com-
ments on the lawsuit
Thursday.

Wesley Snipes
wants new trial
OCALA Actor Wesley
Snipes wants a new trial.
In a court filing, he
argues some jurors decid-
ed he was guilty before
hearing any evidence and
prosecutors hid damaging
information about a key
witness.
Snipes faces a three-year
prison sentence for tax-
related crimes if his latest
appeal is rejected. Snipes
was found guilty of will-
fully failing to file federal
tax returns.
In documents filed
Wednesday in federal
court, defense lawyers say
they received e-mails from
two jurors who claim that
three other members of
the jury had made up their
minds before the January
2008 trial began.

Man gets prison
for animal abuse
TAMPA A Pasco
County man convicted of


shooting bulls with a bow
and arrow and using a golf
club to blind a baby llama
and kill its mother is going
back to prison..
A Hillsborough County
judge revoked 27-year-
old Robert Pettyjohn's
probation Thursday.
Pettyjohn pleaded guilty
in 2002 to shooting bulls
in Hillsborough County
and attacking pet llamas
in Pinellas County. He and
another teen had been
arrested for the attacks a
year earlier.

Judge: Growth law
unconstitutional
. TALLAHASSEE A
judge has struck down'
a 2009 law that loosened *
Florida's growth manage-
ment requirements.
Chief Circuit Judge
Charles Francis, of
Tqllahassee, on Thursday
ruled the law violated a
provision in the Florida
Constitution barring the
state from requiring local
governments to spend
more money without pro-
viding those dollars or a
means to get them.


THE WEATHER



CHANCE CHANCE' CHANCE PARTLY, PARTLY,
T-STORMS STORMS T-STORMS CLOUDY CLOUDY

L I It I ., i 92LO
HI90L0 HI89 LO HI90OLO HI91LO HI92 L0:


SValdosta c
S9073 Jacksonville
STallahassee Lake City 9, 72
i. 8g 75 90. 70l F
* Pensacola ainesville Daytona Beach F
92.75 Panama City 89 70 90 75
88 6 Ocala *
85 71 0 *
Orlando Cape Canaveral L
9' 7.1 90 75
8 n


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TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high,
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


am
1'


89
75
90
70
102 in 1915
62 in 1930


0.57"
4.32"
36.49"
5.63"
35.76"


City
Cape Canaveral
)aytona Beach
t. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
acksonville
Ley West
Lake City
Mliami


npa Naples
77 West Palm Beach Ocala
90 77 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 90 S3 Pensacola
92 7a Naples Tallahassee
92, Miami Tampa
K91 80 Valdosta
Key Westi W. Palm Beach


':1 i.


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.


7:05 a.m.
7:59 p.m.
7:05 a.m.
7:58 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 9:18 p.m.
Moonset today 9:35 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 9:49 p.m.
Moonset tom. 10:29 a.m.


Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
1 8 15 23
Last New First Full


. VER
15I I
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tor,
h,*-


Saturday
89. 79 1
88 7'iI
91. 82,i1
93 ii'.,
89. 71, ir,h
88 71 1
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69 70 rn
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90 71 pr.
90 79 I


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Sunday
89,771 1
90.' 7, pc
91 1S pO
91 75 pc
89. 71 p': I
%. 72 pc
91 82 1
90'70 p'
92 S0 T
94 7S pc
90 7? p:
92 77 p.:
S7 74 i

? 7 ; p,
90 78 [,:
&S 7 1 p,
91 79 I


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
.by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


..v Forecasts, data and graph-
- Ics 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


4.


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AROUND FLORIDA


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


STATE


FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


Gulf oil cleanup both bonanza and bust


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
MIAMI The Gulf oil
spill is a bonanza for some
and a bust for others.
The worst offshore oil
spill in U.S. history has
spurred something of an
economic boom in some
communities where clean-
up operations are based,
an Associated Press analysis
has shown.
But BP's oil spill has
delivered a double wham-
my to areas too far away
from the cleanup to serve
as a staging ground for
masses of workers, but
close enough to experience
severe losses in tourism,
fishing and drilling.
Sales tax revenue in Gulf
states showed a stark dif-
ference.
In Louisiana's Plaque-
mines Parish alone, a fish-
ing and oil-and-gas mecca
that saw an influx of about
5,000 cleanup workers,
state sales tax revenue shot
up 80 percent in June over
the same month of 2009.
By contrast, Vermilion
Parish in the Cajun coun-
try of western Louisiana,
close enough to the spill to
turn off tourists but too far
to play a significant role in
the cleanup, suffered a 45
percent decrease for the
same period.
The two areas share a
common thread: Both have
been affected by the clos-
ing of Gulf fishing grounds
and the threat to oil field
jobs ,posed by a federal
moratorium on deepwater
drilling.
But if there is good news
to be found in the oil spill,
it is in front-line places
like Plaquemines, where
thousands of spill work-
ers and companies that
serve their needs, such as
caterers, have snapped up
lodges and rental housing
and have spent their pay
in local honky-tonks and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Convenience store owner Sharon Couture (right) rings up customers in Sharon's Discount Store in Yscloskey, La., Thursday.
Couture's business, which served local commercial and recreational fishermen before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, has
remained mostly intact, thanks to contract workers from nearby spill response bases. But she worries about the future, when
the spill workers pack up and the fishermen go back to their businesses, convincing consumers that their products are safe to eat.


restaurants.
"The cleanup is a whole
industry," said Brooke
Andry, whose 20 or so rental
properties in Plaquemines
are booked up with cleanup
workers and BP officials
instead of the customary
,recreational fishermen.
The AP analysis showed
that, taken together, the
39 Gulf Coast counties
and parishes in Louisiana,
Mississippi, Alabama and
Florida actually sawv a mod-
est increase in year-over-
year sales tax revenue fol-
lowing the spill. However,
this is a tale of booms can-
celing out busts, of selec-
tive prosperity, and of tem-


porary relief that has done
little to assuage anxiety
about the future.
Using year-to-year
changes in the amount of
taxes collected by retailers
or service providers when-
ever they do business is an
imperfect method of cal-
culating the impact of the
oil spill since other factors
also play a role. Yet the data
offers a glimpse into some
of the unexpected eco-
nomic distortions caused
by the BP disaster and
the lives and livelihoods it
overturned.
In Vermilion and other
areas on the fringe, tourists
have stayed away under


the false impression that
the whole coast is lathered
in oil. And a federal drill-
ing moratorium has cast a
shadow on the future of the
oil business, a linchpin of
the local economy.
"People don't want to be
in an area that has prob-
lems like this," said Betty
Bernard, owner of Betty's
RV Park in the Vermilion
community of Abbeville,
which has lost half its busi-
ness this summer from last
year. "The news media has
it that we. have oil in our
backyards, and we don't."
The economic impact of
the April 20 rig explosion
that killed 11 workers and


sent more than' 200 mil-
lion gallons of crude gush-
ing into the Gulf of Mexico
hasn't yet been fully calcu-
lated. BP already has paid
out $399 million in claims
to residents and businesses
who say they were affected
by the spill, and the $20
billion set aside by BP at
the behest of the Obama
administration to compen-
sate spill victims will cer-
tainly help ameliorate stif-
fering. Yet the feeling along
much of Gulf Coast is high
anxiety.
"A lot of the revenues
come from oil-producing
companies, so if they're
not producing, we're not


getting any revenue,"
said Ray Dugal, president
of the Greater Abbeville-
Vermilion Chamber of
Commerce. As for tourism,
"one of the perceptions ... is
that we're in 6 feet of oil,"
he said.
Given the uncertainty,,
workers and residents just
don't want to spend money,
Dugal said.
In nearby St. Mary's
Parish, state sales tax rev-
entle dropped 9.9 percent
in May and 3.2 percent in
June. At St. Mary Seafood
& Marina, sales of fish,
crabs and crawfish dropped
by a third as out-of-state
. buyers grew worried about
whether Gulf seafood was
safe to eat.
"Whenever all of the
pictures of the birds in
oil came out, that is when
the sales started to drop;"
said owner Daniel Edgar.
Of all the Gulf par-
ishes and counties, the
biggest boom has been
in Plaquemines, where
oil from the well about
50 miles offshore first
touched the U.S. mainland
April 29.
Other oil-affected
Louisiana parishes saw a
sales tax boost in June,
too: St. Bernard (15 per-
cent), St. Tammany (14
percent) and *LaFourche
(9.6 percent), according
to the AP analysis.
Sharon Couture, 60,
runs a convenience store
in Yscloskey, a tiny fish-
ing village in eastern St.
Bernard.
"They come in all the
time," she said of cleanup
workers. "They buy beer,
energy drinks, cigarettes,
that sort of thing.
"I'd say I'm about break-
ing even because of them.
The fishermen used to
come in and spend $40,
$50. These guys come in
and spend $5, $10. There's
just more of them."


August 27, 1950


"Newlyweds become


'Oldywedi, and


'Oldyweds 'are the


reason that


families work "


N '


L"&i


.04q


Cli


'""












OPINION


Friday, August 27, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER


OPINION


It's time to

come clean

on oil spill

T he Obama admin-
istration owes the
American people
plain talk about the
oil spill in the Gulf
of Mexico particularly about
how much oil remains and the
dangers to humans, wildlife and
the environment.
The White House last fully
addressed the issue in early
August. A report by govern-
ment scientists declared that
three-quarters of the 5 million
barrels spilled had disappeared
skimmed, burned, dispersed.
Top officials took to the air-
waves to celebrate the news.
This rosy narrative has
since been badly shaken.
Scientists at the University of
Georgia later said that the rate
of evaporation and biological
breakdown had been greatly
exaggerated. Another team of
scientists wrote in the journal
Science about the discovery of
a vast 22-mile underwater oil
plume the size of Manhattan.
Most alarmingly, they said they
saw little evidence that the oil
was being rapidly consumed
by the gulf's petroleum-eating
microbes, raising the possibility
of significant future damage to
the ecosystem.
No one is accepting these
studies as the last word, and
there is no evidence that the
White House is being dis-
honest. Jane Lubchenco, the
respected marine biologist who
runs the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration,
has said that plumes undoubt-
edly exist.
But the public is rightly con-
fused, and with that confusion
comes legitimate concern.
We are eager to see the
fishing industry back on its
-feet and the region rebound.
And we were reassured when,
after hearings, Representative
Edward Markey the
Massachusetts Democrat and
scourge of both BP and the
government said he believes
that the seafood now available
is largely risk-free. He also said
he thought that the responsible
agencies have been diligent in
testing fish in areas where fish-
ing is now allowed.
The administration's larger
problem is one of credibility,
which can only be fixed with
much clearer answers about
the spill. ,
* The New York Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
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get things done!"
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This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters-. must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


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2pr O WPp H -J4X6. 8-2; -WmnAiw R EtB rO n.EsEsS


Remembering, honoring Mario Obledo


A story is circulating
that Jerry Brown,
California's attorney
general, former gov-
ernor and current
gubernatorial candidate, plans
to base his pitch to Latino vot-
ers on having marched in the
1970s with Cesar Chavez.
When the Field Poll found his
GOP opponent Meg Whitman's
standing had jumped from 25
percent to 39 percent among
Latino voters, several pundits
'observed, "So who's Cesar
Chavez?" After all, Brown was
last governor 27 years ago.
Gary Taylor's book,
"Cultural Selection: Why Some
Achievements Survive the Test
of Time And Others Don't,"
explains why. The process of
remembering begins when
somebody dies and a survivor
promotes the story or accom-
plishments of the deceased so
that others don't forget. Stories
about success spread until they
become part of the culture and
survive as memory through
each retelling. That is how we
accumulate knowledge and
understanding and even wisdom
sometimes.
The survival of remember-
ing is a lot like natural selection
in evolution. Yet, most worthy
accomplishment stories die for
lack of someone to do the retell-
ing.
After Brown followed Ronald
Reagan as California gover-
nor in 1975, he pulled Mario
Obledo away from a Harvard
Law professorship by appoint-
ing him secretary of health and
welfare. Obledo had been a co-
founder in 1968 of the Mexican
American Legal Defense and
Educational Fund and had
helped set a new civil rights
platform for the nation.
He also pioneered the Albert
Armendariz defense, named for
a law student at the University


Jose De La Isla
joseisio3@yohoo.com
of Texas Law School who
brought an action in the United
States District Court that led to
student deferments during the
draft in the late 1960s. Obledo,
himself a veteran, was often
around for those who needed
representation. As counsel for
a group of drug-abuse workers,
he helped establish one of the
first national organizations to
advocate for more treatment
and less criminalization.
Obledo's open-door policy
was universally known. Many
got in to see him (especially
good, humble, salt-of-the-earth
types with reasonable beefs)
who otherwise would never
have made it past a reception-
ist intern on the first floor. If a
Spanish-speaker or foreign-lan-
guage-speaking person called,
he wanted that person respond-
ed to in his native language.
"Just in case my mother calls,"
he explained.
Then a series of stinging
accusations rocked Sacramento.
It was alleged that the new-
found access to government
was something else. Inferences
were made to connect state
support for drug-rehabilitation
programs to a prison gang, then
to organized crime and a drug-
related murder. All this was
tied to Obledo's tenure in office
because a murder victim had
made an appointment to see an
Obledo aide in Sacramento.
The Readers Digest was chief
among media enflaming the


story, along with some local
Sacramento newspapers that
passed along the sensationalis-
tic, unsubstantiated rumors and
allegations like tabloid news and
other histrionics.
The governor, the secretary
himself, the attorney general,
a regulatory commission and
several newspapers undertook
lengthy investigations. All of
them, of course, uncovered
absolutely no wrongdoing. The
intended guilt-by-association
assertions did not even leave
behind the usual cow-pie smell.
Obledo was that clean.
So why would serious profes-
sional people, who are not cir-
cus clowns, go to such absurd
lengths to construct such an
imaginary story. Taylor answers
that others compete against a
version of reality at odds with
their point of view. Heroic sto-
ries survive after the hero dies
- like those passed on by Plato,
St. Paul, and James Boswell
- because the survivors pass
along the story well enough to
make it part of the.culture.
That's why it's important to
remember Mario Obledo, who
fought the good fight and who
won for al4 of us. He was an
originating member of Jesse
Jackson's Rainbow Coalition, a
successor group of Rev. Martin
Luther King's crusades, and
Obledo served as national presi-
dent of the League of United
Latin American Citizens. He
was awarded the Presidential
Medal of Freedom in 1998 by
President Bill Clinton for his
many accomplishments. Citizen
Obledo passed away Aug. 19, at
age 78, in Sacramento.
Among his survivors, I hope,
are those who will retell his
story.
0 Jose de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link .News Service.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


A better solution for
farmer's market?
, To the Editor:
I am upset over the City
Council's comments about the
Farmers' Market, and the appar-
ent handling of the situation
("City plucks park site from
market," Aug. 18).
I feel the members of the
council may be a little out of
touch with the term "farmers'
market."
Wikipedia: "Farmers' markets
are a traditional way of selling
agricultural and home-manufac-
tured products."
I am pleased to say, I not
only buy tomatoes, cucumbers,
onions and other seasonal pro-
duce there, but also I have pur-
chased a lovely kitchen "Angel"
(homemade dishtowels); a plant
for my porch; fat wood for my
fireplace in winter; lovely hand-


made soaps, herb teas, and I
very carefully only buy one
chocolate a week.
The story says people
have been complaining to
Councilman George Ward about
parking. Who and how many? It
is an arbitrary statement at best,
at worst, unsubstantiated.
He also stated, "the market
does not have produce, but
'trinkets' purchased from else-
where." That sounds a little
condescending and not very
accurate.
When I purchase at the mar-
ket, it allows me a freedom of
choice. When I buy from my
neighbors, the money stays
local, which is good for Lake
City's economy. I thank Cliff
Neukam for all the work he has
done to bring it together for all
the citizens of Lake City.
I have to ask myself, why
were these comments made?


The answer I got from the story
was, the council does not want it
in my park.
Personally, I still want it in my
park. It is convenient for me.
Bottom line of the.story is:
The council decided the market
had to close at my park by Sept.
1, but could relocate at the old
city hall location.
My next questions are: Did
Neukam have any real input to
this decision? Did the consum-
ers have any input? Did I have
any input to this decision? Did
the venders have a chance to
state their needs? Is this truly
the best decision for Lake City?
My main reason for saying
all of this is not to personally
attack the council, but to say
isn't there another way to a find
a solution?
Donna Duncan
Lake City


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


Nonsense

to oppose

embryonic

stem cells

U.S. District Judge
Royce Lamberth's
ruling this week
'halting federally
funded stem cell
research took me back imme-
diately to a chilly era I have
not revisited in some time: the
two administrations of George
W. Bush.
During the eight years
he was in power, I felt as if I
were living under a repressive
Roman emperor or Stalin's
Secret Police. Freedom of
expression was not welcome
and toeing Bush's religiously
driven federal policy line was
de rigueur.
Stem cell research is one of
those issues whose opponents
emanate almost exclusively
from the uber-religious. I
say uber-religious because
there are plenty of religious
Americans who support
embryonic stem cell research.
But those who follow so-called
church law or church teach-
ings to a point of absurdity
comprise the vast majority of
stem cell research opponents.
These are the folks for whom
proselytizing is an acceptable,
even required daily activity.
I'm not a fan of many of
President Barack Obama's
policies. But embryonic stem
cell research is our future.
I find most social policy
positions taken by not just
Christian but all religious
extremists to be fairly nonsen-
sical. After, "Thou shalt not
Kill," (or steal or lie, etc.) I'm
not a fan. Why bother form-
ing a movement to oppose gay
marriage, for example? What a
waste of time and energy. The
same for abortion. Those who
oppose abortions are nowhere
required to have them.
But to oppose help for fully
formed human beings who are
very sick and could possibly
be cured, to "save" a frozen
embryo that will most likely
never be implanted in a womb
and therefore become fully
formed, seems like, insanity
to me and like the height of
cruelty.
My father died of multiple
myeloma four years ago. It's
cancer of the bone marrow.
It's a relatively rare form of
cancer, accounting fo& some 2
percent of all cancer deaths.
There were four drugs used to
treat it at the time of his death
and doctors would use them
sequentially until the patient's
body could no longer tolerate
the chemotherapy. When he
was on the next-to-last drug
he read about some embry-
onic stem cell research to find
an entirely different kind of
cure for multiple myeloma.
Instead of relying on drugs to
tame the cancer's progress,
this research would train the
body's own immune system to
kill off the cancer cells. It did
not arrive in time for him to
use.
So whenever I read or hear
that some devoutly religious
person opposes stem cell
research, I think of what a
cruel person he or she must
be. To deny medical care to
my father and millions of suf-
fering elderly Americans for
the sake of a frozen embryo
is beyond my ken. Even
Nancy Reagan, a heroine to
the Religious Right, does not
side with those people on this
issue.
Talk in Washington, D.C.,
is that it could require an
act of Congress to overturn
Lamberth's ruling. That would
take years. Let's hope it is
not necessary. It would be a
pity to return ,to the days of
Constantine or Stalinist Russia.
Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps


Howard News Service.


4A








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


Crenshaw discusses issues facing inland port project


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Bureaucratic red tape
presents one of the big-
ger obstacles slowing prog-
ress of Columbia County's
inland port, U.S. Rep. Ander
Crenshaw said Thursday.
Crenshaw, who was in
Lake City Thursday morn-
ing for several speaking
engagements, spoke about
economics, small business,
stimulus funding, national
health care, increasing
unemployment rates, feder-
al regulations and numer-
ous other hot topics.
He said he and his staff
are aware of the inland port
plans and the need for a
rail spur to be added on
property the U.S. Forest
Service now owns.
He also said he and other
legislators are trying to cut
through some of the red
tape needed to get the rail
spur for the project, but it
takes more work than just
making a call because of so
many regulations.
'"There is a lot of extrem-
ism going on," he said,
describing the amount of
paperwork needed to con-
tinue with negotiations.
While speaking about the
slow economy, Crenshaw
said he realizes that many
people are tired of being
unemployed and are will-
ing to take a job even if
they are over qualified.
'The job market is a
disaster," he said. "Until
you turn the economy
around, there is nothing
you can do to create more
jobs."
But that's easier said
than done, the congress-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw (second from left) listens to Glenn Hunter (far right) as he asks a question Thursday morning. Crenshaw addressed members of
the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce's Government Relations Committee hosted at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center. Pictured are Chris
Samson (from left), owner of Cms Professional Staffing Inc., attorney and committee chairman Joel Foreman and Hunter Printing owner Glenn Hunter.


man said.
Crenshaw said the way'
lending institutions and
banks give loans is driven
by national policy and the'
economy. He said if the
current trend of over-regu-
lating the lending contin-
ues, federal policy is going
to close smaller banks and
noted that the little guys are
getting squeezed by federal


regulations and policy.
"That kills the small busi-
ness and banks in general,"
he said of over-regulation.
Also Thursday, Crenshaw
responded to recent sug-
gestions by congressional
candidate Troy Stanley that
he return campaign contri-
butions directed by Paul
Magliocchetti.
Magliocchetti. was


arrested on Aug. 5 for
allegedly making illegal
political contributions. FBI
agents raided his company,
PMA Group, which primar-
ily serves defense contrac-
tors.
Magliocchetti's son,
Mark, entered a guilty plea
to making illegal corporate
campaign contributions at
the direction of his father,


on the same day of, his
father's arrest, according
to Stanley.
According to disclo-
sure documents filed with
the Federal Elections
Commission, both
Magliocchettis had contrib-
uted $1,000 to Crenshaw's
campaign committee.
Crenshaw's office
said the issue is being


resolved.
- "Previous contributions
from Paul Magliocchetti
that were deemed illegal
were donated to char-ty
prior to his indictment,"
an e-mail response from
Crenshaw's office noted.
"Personal donations
from Paul and Mark
Magliocchetti will also be
donated to charity,"


Lake City residents to attend Honor Rally in D.C.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Two Lake City residents
will be among the expect-
ed crowd at the Restoring
Honor Rally in Washington,
D.C. on Saturday.
Wilbur Corbitt and Mike
Gordon are both leaving
today to head to the rally.
Organized by media per-
sonality Glenn Beck, the
"non-political" rally was


created to pay tribute to
America's heroes, heritage
and future, according to his
website. The event is on
the steps of the Lincoln
Memorial and coincides
with the anniversary of the
"I have a dream" speech
given by Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr.
Corbitt said he is a tea-
partier and decided to
attend the rally to show his
support for its beliefs.


"It's something I believe
in," he said. "I've shown my
support locally and want to
show it there."
Gordon wanted to
attend the event to gain
inspiration from seeing
the monuments in D.C.
and encouragement from
hearing the speakers, he
said. He also wanted to be
able to bring something
back to the community.
"I'm thrilled to be going,


quite frankly;" he said.
' Speakers at the rally
will include Beck, former
Alaska. Gov. Sarah Palin
and King's niece, Dr.
Alveda King.
Corbitt is meeting his
son, Vincson, at Tampa
International Airport and
they will fly together to
D.C. Gordon is catching


a. bus
Tampa
rally.


coming up from
and riding to the


As soon as the rally was
announced, Corbitt said
he made plans to attend.
Initially, Gordon' didn't
think he was, going,
because of family obliga-
tions, he said. His wife
knew it was important
and encouraged him to
attend.
"She said, 'I want you to
go represent our family,'"
Gordon said.
Attending the event will


Carter secures release of U.S. man held in N. Korea


By JAY UNDSAY.
Associated Press


BOSTON An American
who was imprisoned in
North Korea for illegally
crossing the border has a
gentle spirit but is also a
person of conviction will-
ing to be bold about what
he believes, friends and
acquaintances said.
Aijalon Gomes had
been teaching English in
South Korea when he was
imprisoned in January for
entering North Korea from
China, U.S. officials said.
This week, former presi-
dent Jimmy Carter traveled
to the isolated nation to
try to win Gomes' release,
and end the Boston's man


harrowing and unlikely trip
from the inner city to a
North Korean jail.
"'He ran deep,' I think,
would be the phrase that
other people might use,"
said Erik Woodbury, who
attended college with
Gomes. "I was surprised
that he ended up in North
Korea, but I wasn't sur-
prised that there was some-
thing he was passionate
about."
It's unclear what prompt-
ed Gomes to enter the
repressive nation. He may
have been emulating fel-
low Christian Robert Park,
who was detained after he
crossed into North Korea a
month earlier to highlight
its human rights record,


said Jo Sung-rae, a South
Korean human rights advo-
cate who met with Gomes.
Park was expelled a few
weeks later.
Shortly before he left for
North Korea, Gomes was
photographed in Seoul,
South Korea, protesting
Park's plight.
. Gomes was sentenced in
April to eight years of hard
labor and fined $700,000 for
illegally entering the coun-
try. Gomes' relatives have
declined to say much about
him or his situation, though
they pleaded for his release
on humanitarian grounds
after North Korea's state-
run media reported last
month that he'd attempted
suicide.


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, left, shakes hands with
North Korea's No. 2 Kim Yong Nam at Mansudae Assembly
Hall in Pyongyang, North Korea on Wednesday.


NIBLACK: School, aiming for an A' grade, launches strategies


Continued From Page 1A

hold weekly meetings on
student data and teachers
will meet individually with
students to discuss the fig-
ures.
Tutoring for students will
begin earlier and progress
will be monitored more
closely through assess-
ments, the Continuous
Improvement Model and
other activities, such as
writing simulations.
Narragansett Smith,
assistant superintendent
for administration and for-
mer Niblack Elementary
principal, stressed that
intervention, remediation
and CIM are necessary.
Other issues discussed
to improve the school's


grade included implement-
ing a revised discipline pro-
cess, making sure admin-
istration is watching over
the teachers' strategies and
keeping all teachers on the
same level of professional
development training.
"If one person is not on
board, it is going to tremen-
dously impact scores," said



THE LAST EXORCISM (PG-1) 310 520 730 950
TAKERS (PG-13) (120) 400 700 940
LOTTERY TICKET (PG-13) (150) 420 720 1000
NANNY MCPHEE RETURNS(PG)
(130 PM)410PM710 PM
VAMPIRES SUCK (PG-13)110)3155257501030
THE EXPENDABLES (R) ID REQ'D
(140) 430 740 1020
THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 1010PM
il.ll[ eI QSI l< |..1 ,iljtl,, l ll~lJ[ ,


Linard Johnson, school
board member.
William Murphy, princi-
pal, said programs will be
put in place to work on
intervention, remediation
and enrichment.
"I feel the strategies we



Sa minute -/

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of tile
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning

N& Clanr


have in place will get the
job done," he said.
Mike Millikin, superin-
tendent of schools, said
the meeting was neces-
sary to have an honest.
discussion on how the
school can improve and on


what Niblack Elementary
already does well.
"We recognize that
things had to be done
differently this year," he
said.
"We're shooting for an
'A,'" Murphy said.


not only show his sup-
port but help him gain
more knowledge from the
speakers, Corbitt said.
"The ultimate objective
is to take the county back
to it's values," he said.
For Gordon, he will be
able to stand up with oth-
ers and let people know
,"it's time to restore the
honor, faith, hope and
charity" to the nation, he
said.



BODY: No

Foul play

From Page 1A


the Medical Examiner's
Office in Jacksonville for
an autopsy.
"There were no signs
of foul play," he said,
noting an update can be
expected after the autop-
sy is completed.
He said authorities are
also awaiting the results
of a toxicology report
which could take several
weeks.
Anyone having infor-
mation about the inci-
dent is can call the Lake
City Police Department
anonymously on the
department's TIP line at
719-2068..

r In Loving Memory of N
Inez Fuller Hamilton
1915-2007


Mothers are a gift from God
above sent from Heaven
with special love. We love
and miss you Mama.
Your Loving Children,
Grandchildren &
Great-Grandchildren
. . ......


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


'








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


Finally


Friday


returns


today


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Finally Friday returns
with several activities and
a showing of "Hannah
Montana: The Movie" start-
ing at 6 p.m. today at Olustee
Park after a brief hiatus.
This is the first Finally
Friday under the manage-
ment of the Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce, said Dennille
Folsom, executive direc-
tor. Previously, the now
defunct Downtown Action
Corporation hosted the
event.
Party Down 4 Less is the
event sponsor and will pro-
vide two bounce houses and
a slide.
The family-oriented
event will feature children's
games, the bounce houses
and a performance from
Lake City Dance Studio
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The
studio will also teach steps
from the movie for a dance
party.
Starlight Rhythm Section
will perform classic music
from the 60s-80s beginning
at 7:30. The movie will then
start at 9 p.m.
"We encourage people to
bring a chair or a towel to
sit on to watch the movie,"
Folsom said.
The fountain in Olustee
Park will be on throughout
Finally Friday, Folsdm said.
Several food vendors will
also sell items such as bar-
becue, nachos, hot dogs,
chips, drinks and deserts.
The chamber will have glow
necklaces for sale.
Everyone in the commu-
nity is encouraged to come
to the free event, she said.
"We pulled a lot of
resources and volunteers'
to make it a family-friendly
event," Folsom said. "Get
out there."


ARRESTS

The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent unless proven
guilty.

Thursday, Aug. 19
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Anthony James
Skinner, 18, 1*56 SW
Hudson St., warrant:
Burglary of a structure
of conveyance and third-
degree grand theft.
John Allqn Ivey, 28,
507 SW Peace Drive,
battery by strangulation
(domestic violence).

Friday, Aug. 20
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Joseph Wayne Hill
Jr., 26, 149 NW Neptune
Court, driving while license
suspended/revoked and
warrant: Violation of proba-
tion for failure to comply
with sex offender registra-
tion.
Cearra Monique
Lezama, 18, 165 NE Rifle
Court, aggravated assault
with a weapon (domestic
violence).

Saturday, Aug. 21
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Tammy Ann Bigelow,


45, 204 NE Range Road,
possession of a controlled
substance without prescrip-
tion, tampering with evi-
dence, possession of drug
paraphernalia and warrant:
Grand theft.
Lake City
Police Department
Amos Lee Hall, no age
given, 587 SE Monroe St,
battery (domestic violence)
and battery by strangula-
tion (domestic violence).
* From staff reports


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Cleaning up at the courthouse after Columbia County's political primary season
Lake City maintenance worker Harry Snyder shovels the remnants of a mock grave Thursday afternoon after someone anonymously left it outside of the
Columbia County Courthouse. The "grave," a traditional display outside of the courthouse following an election, consisted of dirt, cow manure and head-
stones, and specifically mentioned County Commissioner District 2 candidate Stew Lilker. 'It makes us do more work,' Snyder said. 'It's just politics.'



McCollum still unsure of GOP nominee Scott


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE
- Attorney General Bill
McCollum still had reser-
vations about Rick Scott's
character and honesty on
Thursday, two days after los-,
ing a bruising Republican
gubernatorial primary to
the wealthy outsider.
McCollum refused to join
most members of Florida's
GOP establishment who
have quickly thrown their
support to the former hos-
pital company CEO after


they'd overwhelmingly
backed McCollum in the
primary.
"I still have serious ques-
tions, and I have had them
throughout the time that
I've had the -very brief
acquaintanceship with Rick
Scott, about issues of his
character, his integrity, his
honesty,, things that go
back to Columbia/HCA,"
McCollum said after a
Cabinet meeting.
Columbia/HCA was
accused of committing one
of the largest Medicare and
Medicaid frauds in history


while Scott was running
the company. Scott was
forced out in the midst of
a government investigation
in 1997, but he received
a rich severance package.
The company paid the gov-
ernment a record $1.7 bil-
lion to settle criminal fraud
charges. Scott was not
charged and said he was
unaware of the wrongdo-
ing.
Scott put at least $38 mil-
lionl of his own fortune into
the primary campaign and
easily outspent McCollum.
He blanketed the state with


television ads defending his
tenuire at Columbia/HCA
and ravaging McCollum as
a. tax-raising "career politi-
cian."
. The .Scott ads also
tried to link McCollum
unfairly, Republican
officials insisted to Jim
Greer, now charged with
stealing from the Florida
GOP while serving as Gov.
Charlie Crist's hand-picked
party chairman. Crist has
since quit the party to run
for the U.S. Senate as an
independent.
McCollum said he spoke


briefly on the telephone
with Scott on Wednesday
but has never had the
chance to know him other
than shaking hands across
the table at debates.
"I await the opportuni-
ty if it occurs to get bet-
ter acquainted with him,"
McCollum said. "As other
voters will do, I will judge
him throughout this cam-
paign."
McCollum said he also
has received phone calls
from the Democratic nomi-
nee, Chief Financial Officer
Alex Sink about Scott.


Yacht mysteriously washes up on Gulf Coast


By MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press
PENSACOLA The
owner of a 48-foot Mexican
yacht that mysteriously ran
ashore in Florida with no
one onboard and its engines
running said Thursday that
he had reported it stolen
from a Cancun marina days
earlier.
Arturo Millet Reyes said
the yacht was taken from
private marina on Saturday
and that he reported, the
theft to local police. Millet,
S43, who owns a professional
soccer team in the Mexican
state of Yucatan, said the
Mexican Coast Guard had
been on the lookout for the
yacht.'
"I am was very worried
about what had happened,"
Millet told The Associated
Press in a telephone inter-
view. "My first concern was
what they were going to do
with the boat, if they were
going to traffic drugs or
something."
The yacht, named "Makin
Waves," washed ashore


Michael Bergmann
Mr. Michael Bergmann, age
51, of Neighborhood Walk,
Villa Rica, GA passed away
Wednesday, August 25, 2010.
Mr. Bergmann was born in Co-
lumbia County, FL on April
2, 1959, the son of Frances
Barfield Bergmann and the late
Harold Bergmann. He was
an Accountant and member
of The Church at Chapel Hill.
Survivors include his wife. Alisa
G. Bergmann; son, Matthew'
Mills Bergmann of Villa Rica;
stepdaughters, .lustin Michelle
Ronsonet of Villa Rica, Aimee
Ronsonet Williams of Lake City,
FL; mother, Frances B. Berg-
mann of Lake City, FL; brother,


ASSOCIATED PRES
Officials try to remove a grounded yacht at Redington Beach Thursday. The Sea Ray
Sundancer was beached around noon Wednesday. Detectives are still trying to figure out who
owns the luxurious 48 Sundancer, which sells for about $1. million new.


midmorning Wednesday
on Redding Beach, which
is west of St. Petersburg
on Florida's Gulf Coast and
about 480 miles away from


Thomas Cline Bergmann of Pon-
te Verde Beach, FL, Alan Law-
rence Bergmann of Rex, GA;
and sister, Patricia Bergmann
Melgaard of Lake City, FL.
A memorial services will be
held Saturday, August 28, 2010
at 11 am from The Church at
Chapel Hill, Douglasville, with
Rev. Larry Latimer officiating.
The family will receive
friends at their residence,
2624 Neighborhood Walk,
Villa Rica, Ga. on Friday, Au-
gust 27, 2010 from 6 to 8 pm.
Memorial contributions may
be made to The Church at Cha-
pel Hill. 5357 Chapel Hill Rd.,
Douglasville, GA 30135 Or
Koinonia ACIS 189 Sandhill
Hulett Rd. Villa Rica, GA 30180


Cancun. Resident Gene
Borg was relaxing at home
when he saw it approach-
ing the shore.
"I see boats all the time



OBITUARIES

In accordance with Mr.
Bergmann's wishes,
his body was cremated.
ALMON FUNERAL HOME
Messages of condolences
may be sent to the family at
www. almonfuneralhome. conm.

Dr. Donald N. Isaac
Dr. Donald N. Isaac, 74. died on
August 24th at this home in Lake
City, FL following a prolong ill-
ness. iHe was horn October 5,
1935 in New Kensington, PA
to the late Eissa and Ann Isaac.
Dr. Isaac was a 1954 graduate of
Arnold High School and a 1960
graduate of the University of
Pittsburgh School of Dentistry.


- it's one of the joys of
living here but this one
was coming straight in at
the beach," Borg said. "I
hollered at my wife to call


He practiced dentistry in Gale-
ton, PA for several years before
joining the US Army where he
served in Korea as a Captain
in the Dental Corps. Upon his
discharge from the military, Dr.
Isaac began a nearly 30 year ca-
reer with the US
Dept of Veter-
ans Affairs serv-
ing as the Chief, ',
Dental Service at
the VA hospitals
in Beckley. W\. VA. Detroit, MI,
Dublin. GA, Erie. PA and Lake
City, FIL. lie retired while serv-
ing as the Lake City Hospital's
Acting Chiefof Staff. In addition
to his professional career, he en-
joyed playing tennis and hunting.
Dr. Isaac is survived by his


911 and I put on my bathing
suit out of concern some-
one was having a medical
emergency."
Borg entered the water
and* found no one inside
the boat.
Investigators said they
saw no signs of violence
on the boat, which they
planned to tow away
Thursday afternoon.
Millet said officials told
him that the plasma TVs
had been removed from
the boat. He did not know
what other damage may
have been done to the
yacht, which sells for about
$1 million new. Millet said
,he has stored the yacht at
the Cancun marina since
he bought it in 2008.
Millet owns the soccer
team Merida EC., which
plays in Mexico's' second-
tier league.
The U.S. Coast Guard
searched by air and sea
Wednesday for anyone who
may have been on the aban-
doned yacht, but suspend-
ed the search Thursday.


daughters. Wendy Isaac, Laureen
Bodner and Robin Parrish all of
whom reside in the Pittsburgh,
PA area; his brother, Richard,
Dahlonega, GA; four grand-
children one great-grandchild;
and several nieces and nephews.
Professional services are
entrusted to the care of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, Lake City,
FL. Per Dr. Isaac:s request, there
will be no viewing or service.
Interment will be via cremation.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


:t~ci9


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


BRIEFS

Palin mocks
Obama, Crist
JACKSONVILLE -
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah
Palin is lumping President
Barack Obama and Florida
Gov. Charlie Crist together
while criticizing their posi-
tions on abortion.
Palin said that Obama
is the most pro-abortion
president ever and that
his health care plan will
expand access to the pro-
cedure.
She also mocked Crist,
who recently left the
Republican Party, for still
claiming to be pro-life after
he vetoed a bill that would
have required women to
get ultrasounds before hav-
ing an abortion.
She made her remarks at
a fundraiser Thursday for a
group that helps pregnant
women get support.
Crist is running for
the U.S. Senate as an
independent. He faces
Republican Marco Rubio
and Democrat Kendrick
Meek.

Man gets third life
term for murder
MELBOURNE A
convicted killer who had
previously been on death
row has been sentenced to
a third life term for a 1986
double-murder in Brevard
County.
A judge sentenced 78-
year-old George Porter
on Thursday. He was con-
victed in 1988 of two counts
of first-degree murder. He
was sentenced to death for
the murder of his former
girlfriend, Evelyn Williams,
and two life terms for her
boyfriend, Walter Burrows.
The U.S. Supreme Court
overturned Porter's death
sentence in November,
citing Porter's military
service during the Korean
War, where he won two'
Purple Hearts.

Job crisis forces
foreclosure risk
WASHINGTON The
jobs crisis is putting more
Americans at risk of losing
their homes.
One in 10 households'
has missed at least one
mortgage payment, and
more than 2 million homes
have been repossessed
since the recession began.
Few expect the outlook to
improve until companies
start to hire steadily again
and layoffs ease.
And while there was
some good news Thursday
a modest decrease in
the number of Americans
filing for jobless benefits
for the first time in a month
the figure is still too
high to bring down the
unemployment rate.
So the housing crisis
goes on, even though the
average rate on a 30-year
mortgage fell again this
week to an all-time loW of
4.36 percent.
"Ultimately, the hous-
ing story, whether it is
delinquencies, homes
sales or housing starts,
is an employment story," .
said Jay Brinkmann,
the top economist for
the Mortgage Bankers
Association.

FDA: Salmonella
found in feed
WASHINGTON- Food
and Drug Administration
officials say they have
found positive samples of
salmonella that link two "
Iowa farms to a massive
egg recall.
FDA officials said


Thursday that investigators
found salmonella in chick-
en feed at Wright County
Egg that was used by that
farm and also Hillandale
Farms. They also found
additional samples of sal-
monella in other locations
at Wright County Egg.
More than 550 million eggs
from the two farms were
recalled this month after
they were linked to salmo-
nella poisoning in several
states.
* Associated Press


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

United Way of Suwannee Valley mixes it up with community, businesses
United Way of Suwannee Valley General Campaign Chair Mike McKee (from left), Westside Elementary School fourth-grader Samuel Walker, 9, Peoples
State Bank Senior Vice President and Chief Lending Officer Christopher Dampier and United Way President Karen Mizer share a laugh at the Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber of Commerce mixer on Thursday.



CDC cuts ribbon on first home, plans next


By ANTONIA ROBINSON -
arobinsori@lakecityreporter.com'

It felt good to finally
move into her new home,
said Delores Hunter of
Lake City.
"I'm so ecstatic," she
said. "I just want to thank
everyone included in this
process."
Hunter, and her son, Ian,
are the first recipients df a
house through the Greater
Lake City Community
Development Corporation
Inc. The organization held
a ribbon-cutting for the
house Thursday.
Construction on the
house began in May and
was completed Monday,
saidLester McKellum, CDC
executive director. Bryan
Zecher was the contractor,
and Hunter began moving
into the home Tuesday.
The first home is the
hardest to build, he said.
"It feels good to finally
have the momentum to
move us forward to other
projects in the community,"
McKellum said
The CDC, a nonprofit
organization, was estab-
lished in 2002 to assist
low to moderate income
families or individuals in
becoming homeowners.
The house is 1,350-
square-feet, and includes


ANTONIA ROBINSONI Lake City Reporter
Delores Hunter (center) prepares to cut the ribbon to her new home, built through the Greater Lake City Community
Development Corporation Inc., Thursday. Members of the organization and city officials attended the event.


two bedrooms and a
garage. Financing for the
home was provided by the
USDA.
Land for Hunter's new
home was donated by the
City of Lake City to the


KIWANIS CLUB OF LAKE CITY
ir, c ,ooperariorn ith
Catholic Charities and the
Food Bank of the Suwannee Valley
will hold a FOOD DRIVE beginning
Saturday, August 28, 2010.

This project will continue through the month of
September with collection,bins being placed at
cooperating businesses throughout the
Lake City and Columbia County area.


CDC.
"Hopefully it's just a sign
of things to come," said
City Manager Wendell
Johnson.
The city wants .to work
with the CDC in a continu-


ous partnership to provide
affordable housing in the
community, he said.
The CDC is encour-
aged by completing its first
home, said Donna MacRae,
CDC board of directors


president.. It is already
looking to the future for
more homes.
"We hope to start build-
ing the next one in 90 days,"
the CDC board president
said.


MATTRESS OUTLET



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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428







LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


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& STRIPES


Reporter file photo
Columbia High's Ben Bell brings down a Gainesville High runner on Sept. 11, 2009.

Tigers look to turn the tables


Columbia High returned
to its district-winning ways
last year, taking the top
spot in 4-4A.
The Tigers won a play-
off game in coach Craig
Howard's second season
and finished with an 8-3-1
record. Howard is 12-9-1
at CHS.
The season started off
sour with a 13-12 loss to
Fort White High in the


kickoff classic game. The
Tigers will be looking for
revenge when the teams
meet Friday in Arrowhead
Stadium.
Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
Columbia features one
of the top recruited players
in the nation in defensive
lineman Timmy Jernigan.
Jernigan said he has had
more than 50 offers, from
schools such as Florida,


Florida State, Alabama and
USC.
The Tigers had to find
a new quarterback for
Howard's spread offense
and Nigel Atkinson is
getting the nod.
Columbia will have to
replace running back Tiger
Powell, one of the best
to have played the posi-
tion in the school's 99-year
history.


tig4


Reporter file photo
CHS's Anjre' Caldwell (5) and Clyde Coker (4) tackle a Lee High back on Sept. 25, 2009.


Reporter file photo
Columbia High's Curtis Washington (99) and Brach Bessant (22) combine for a tackle
against Godby High on Oct. 23, 2009,


2010 Tiger Football Schedule


Wk 9 Wolfson H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.


This Week
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High


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only 25
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12 Pack Cans
2 for 7

2?3 or


PRODUCTS
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Wk 1 Brooks Co. H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 2 S. Lafourche A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 3 Buchholz H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 4 Robert E. Lee A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 5 Madison Co. A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 6 Ridgeview H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 7 Godby A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 8 Ed White A 7:30 p.m.


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


N. "-


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1!









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Friday, August 27, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS







Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tklrby@lakecityreportercom


The big

picture

F rom the tone
of this week's
comments, the
big losers in '
today's kickoff
classic game will be the
trophy, plaque and
T-shirt makers.
Regardless who wins,
they are unlikely to get
a call.
When Fort White, in
its fourth year, and
venerable Columbia High
first met in 2003, the
Gateway Classic trophy
was ordered by CHS to
present to the winner of
the game.
Fort White wasn't
thrilled with the idea,
especially after the
mercy-rule finish of that
first meeting. When
Columbia won the next
year in Fort White, there
was no post-game trophy
presentation.
When the Indians
shocked Columbia
last year, it was Fort
White's turn to order
mementoes. There were
T-shirts passed around
with a catchy slogan and
plaques given out that
included a picture of the
scoreboard with the final.
Enjoy. To the victors
belongs the spoils.
The 2010 teams have
more in common than
differences.
The varsity rosters for
each school are in the
30s. Both teams seem
closer to rebuilding than
reloading.
The players at Fort
White and Columbia
know each other. The
three middle schools are
playing each other, so the
familiarity will grow.
Making this a blood-
and-guts game negates
the benefits of classics. If
they must win, coaches
can't experiment. They
can't get everybody in
the game, something
all players deserve after
offseason workouts and
two-a-day practices.
Fort White players
crashed the Columbia
scrimmage on Saturday,
and were sent away.
That's fun stuff like
Cassius Clay going to
where Sonny Liston was
staying before their fight
and hollering at him.
Clay won that
championship and Liston
went down early in the
rematch, against the now
Muhammad Ali. Many
think Liston took a dive.
Columbia won't do
that in this rematch, but
coach Craig Howard said
there will be no
T-shirts if the Tigers win.
The team has its sights
on repeating as district
champion.
Likewise, coach
Demetric Jackson is
looking past this game to
district foes and getting
back to the playoffs.
"We may have got the
big laugh, but they got
the last laugh," Jackson
said about last year's
victory. "They got to the
playoffs."

* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


Split success


E .- =, -i 1 .1 ,
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Taylor Owens (right) spikes a shot against
Fort White High's Kaycee Baker on Thursday in Fort White.


Lady Tigers, Lady
Indians have
mixed results.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE -
Basketball is said to be
a game of runs, but the
Columbia and Fort White
high school volleyball teams
proved that volleyball can
be streaky as well.
The Lady Tigers and
Lady Indians were back and
forth throughout the two
sets, but Columbia came
away with the win in both
games 25-17, 25-20.
Columbia started the
first set out with an 8-2 lead
and looked to be headed
to an easy win. The Lady
Indians rallied to outscore


lassie


Columbia turns
on scout team for
Fort White game.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Erasing last year's 13-12
loss to Fort White High at
home is the premium con-
cern for the Columbia High
Tigers this week. Even
though the game won't mat-
ter as far as regular season
records go, the game has
already been billed as the
Columbia County Super
Bowl.
To beat the Indians, the
Tigers have to have Fort
White well-scouted. It's a
practice that every team
uses .going into a game
week. No matter the level,
football teams look for an
edge by using scout teams
to give the offense and
defense a look at what will
be thrown their way.
"What we call our 'look
team' will try to give a look
of the opponent," Columbia
High coach Craig Howard
said. "No matter the level,
someone always has to play
the role of Peyton Manning
or Larry Fitzgerald.
Someone has to play the
role of Tim Tebow. It's time
to. get ready, for that role.
Our boys will assume the
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) is brought down by former Tiger Todd Steward (20) as
Justin Kennedy closes in on the tackle during last year's kickoff classic in Lake City.


Locals take


national stage


Kirkman makes
Rangers showing,
Barber at Amateur.
From staff reports

Lake City has been in
the sports news on national
television.
Blayne Barber is play-
ing in the U.S. Amateur
Championship, which is
being televised on the Golf
Channel.
Michael Kirkman is
pitching for the Texas
Rangers, which was the fea-
tured game on ESPN on
Wednesday.
Barber was eliminated in
the match play round of 32
by Patrick Cantley of Los


Alamitos, Calif. The match
was all square after eight
holes, but three bogeys by
Barber down the stretch
were costly.
In his second appearance
since joining the Rangers,
Kirkman led a group of five
relievers who preserved
a 4-3 lead by Texas over
Minnesota with three score-
less innings. C.J. Wilson got
the win.
Kirkman took the mound
in the top of the seventh
inning and faced four bat-
ters. He gave up a hit to
Joe Mauer, and retired the
others.
In two outings, Kirkman
has pitched 2', scoreless
innings with one hit, no
walks and three strikeouts.


Columbia 8-2 over the next
10 points, however, and the
game was tied 10-10.
Fort White took the 11-
10 lead, before Columbia
rallied to pull away in the
end, 25-17.
The second game was
more of the same with
Columbia jumping out to
a 9-1 lead before the Lady
Indians rallied for an 11-
9 lead with 10 straight
points.
Again, the Lady Tigers
were able to battle back,
and came away with the
match after a 25-20 win in
the second set.
Things didn't go as
smooth for the Lady Tigers
in the first game, however,
as Cornerstone Academy
prevailed 25-16, 25-11.
"We played to about 10
percent of our capability the


first game," Columbia coach
Casie McCallister said.
"I had to re-evaluate my
intensity against Fort White
and the girls responded
better to the positive feed-
back. I thought that Annie
Milton, Ashleigh Bridges,
Kelbie Ronsonet and Taylor
Messer all played well
tonight."
Fort White came away
win a.win against another
set of Lady Tigers after a
* 22-25, 25-14 and 15-7 win
against Union County
High.
"I think we played well as
a team," Fort White coach
Doug Wphlstein said. "CHS
played really well against
us, but they are 5A and we
don't have to beat them. I
think it's going to have us
ready to go for the regular
season."


Young Indians
prepare for visit
by Tigers tonight.
By TIM KIRBY
fTkirt.,1 kak.ecir.yr -port or.c r
FORT WHITE A new
year means a new approach
for Fort White High football
in the kickoff classic game.
Fort White hosts
Columbia High at 7:30 p.m.
today. Admission is $6, as
set by the FHSAA.
The upstart Indians beat
the stodgy Tigers, 13-12, in
the 2009 classic at Columbia
High Stadium. Fort White
scored the winning touch-
down and PAT with 28 sec-
onds left in the game.
"Last year, we had a lot
of seniors to rely on and
we threw everything at
Columbia to win the game,"
Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson said.
"This year, we are approach-
ing it a little different."
The Indians had veterans
in quarterback Alex Gilmer,
Roy Blake and Montr6 Cray
leading on offense last year.
This year, a new quarterback
had to be found and an injury
to Wesley Pitts means the
new one will be a freshman.
"On offense last year,
there were some things we
did with some three-year
INDIANS continued on 2B


Woods fires 65 to open Barclays


Tiger comes in
with his best
round of the year.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
PARAMUS, N.J. -Tiger
Woods finally looked like
the No. 1 player in the
world.
In his first tournament
since his divorce, Woods
played his best round of
the year Thursday at The
Barclays by missing only
one fairway, putting for
birdie on all but two holes
and shooting a 6-under
65 for his lowest score all
season.
"It feels good to be able
to control my ball all day
like this," Woods said.
He wound up atop the
.leaderboard with Vaughn
Taylor among the early


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods hits from a bunker on the 11th hole during
the first round of The Barclays golf tournament Thursday in
Paramus, N.J.


starters. Woods has not
led after any round since
he won the Australian
Masters last year, and he
hasn't been atop the lead-
erboard on the PGA Tour
since the second round of
the Tour Championship.


So much has changed
since then -- the car
crash after Thanksgiving
night, details of adultery,
five months away from
the game and a broken
marriage, which officially
ended Monday.


tune -up


- II I I- I I -"










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
8a.m. "
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Grand Prix of Belgium, at Francorchamps,
Belgium
4:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Enjoylllinois.com 225, at
Joliet, IIl.
5 p.m.
VERSUS IRL pole qualifying for
Peak Antifreeze and Motor Oil Indy 300,
at Joliet, Ill. (same-day tape)
7 p.m.
SPEED ARCA, Ansell Protective
Gloves I50, at Joliet III.
9 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Enjoylllinois.com 225, at Joliet, III.
GOLF
10:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johnnie
Walker Championship, second round, at
Perthshire, Scotland
I p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S. Amateur
Championship, quarterfinal matches, at
University Place.Wash.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Barclays,
second round, at Paramus, N.J.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Boeing
Classic, first round, at Snoqualmie,Wash.
12 Midnight
TGC .LPGA, Canadian Women's
Open, second round, at Winnipeg,
Manitoba (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
CBS Preseason, San Diego at New
Orleans
PREP FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Plant at Manatee
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Grant (Calif.) at Folsom
(Calif.)
TENNIS
Noon
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Pilot Pen,
semifinal, at New Haven, Conn.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Pilot Pen,
semifinal, at New Haven, Conn.

FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
St. Louis at New England (n)
Indianapolis at Green Bay (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta at Miami. 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Jets, 7 p.m.
San Diego at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Cleveland at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 6:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Arizona at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.,
San Francisco at Oakland, 9 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Pittsburgh at Denver, 8 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 78 49 .614 *-
Tampa Bay 78 49 .614 -
Boston 73 55 .570 5%'
Toronto 66 60 .524 lIA
Baltimore 45 82 .354 33
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 72 55 .567 -
Chicago 68 58 .540 3h
Detroit 63 64 .496 9
Kansas City 54 73 .425 18
Cleveland 50 76 .397 21A
West Division


W L Pct GB
Texas 72 54 .571 -
Oakland 63 62 .504 8'A
Los Angeles 63 65 .492 10
Seattle 50 77 .394 22h'
Wednesday's Games
Kansas City 4, Detroit 3, 12 innings
Boston 5, Seattle 3, Ist game
LA.Angels 12,Tampa Bay 3
Oakland 6, Cleveland I
Toronto 6, N.Y.Yankees 3
Seattle 4, Boston 2,2nd game
Texas 4, Minnesota 3
Baltimore 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Thursday's Games
Oakland at Cleveland (n)
Detroit at Toronto (n)
Minnesota atTexas (n)
Baltimore at Chicago White Sox (n)
Today's Ganes
Kansas City (Bullington 1-2) at
Cleveland (Tomlin I-3), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 14-8) at Toronto
(Marcum 11-7), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Lester 13-8) at Tampa Bay
(Price 15-5), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (BreAnderson 3-4) at Texas
(Tom.Hunter 10-2), 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (AJ.Burnett 9-11)
at Chicago White Sox (EGarcia 10-5),
8:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Bergesen '5-9) at L.A.
Angels (JerWeaver 11-9), 10:05 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 11-9) at Seattle
(U.Vargas 9-6), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Detroit atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox,
7:05 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Baltimore at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 73 54 .575 -
Philadelphia 70 57 .551 3
Florida 63 62 .504 9
NewYork 63 63 .500 9'A
Washington 53 74 ..417 20
Central Division


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago
Pittsburgh


W L
73 54
68 56
59 68
58 69
54 74'
43 84
West Division


W L Pct GB
San Diego 76 49 .608 -
San Francisco 71 57 .555 6'h
Colorado 66 60 .524 10'
LosAngeles 66 62 .516 lI'1
Arizona 49 78 .386 28
Wednesday's Games
Colorado 12,Atlanta 10
Cincinnati 12, San Francisco I I, 12
innings
Chicago Cubs 4,Washington 0
Houston 3,Phila4ielphia 2
Pittsburgh .5, St. Louis 2
Florida 5,4N.Y. Mets 4
LA. Dodgers 5, Milwaukee 4
San Diego 9,Arizona 3
Thursday's Games
Houston 5, Philadelphia I
LA. Dodgers 7, Milwaukee I.
Arizona at San Diego (n)
St. Louis at Washington (n)
Florida at N.Y. Mets (n)
Today's Games-
St. Louis (J.Garcia 11-6) at Washington
(Olsen 3-6), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Gorzelanny 7-7) at
Cincinnati (Cueto 11-4), 7:10 p.m. ,
Houston (Figueroa 3-1) at N.Y. Mets
(Pelfrey 12-7),7:10 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 7-9) at Atlanta
(Hanson 8-9), 7:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-3) at
Milwaukee (Narveson 9-7), 8: 10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 11-8) at
Colorado (jimenez 17-4), 9:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Oswalt 9-13) at San
Diego (Latos 13-5), 10:05 p.m.
Arizona (Enright 4-2) at San Francisco
(Uncecum 11 -8). 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis atWashington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
LA.Dodgers at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.


Little League
WORLD SERIES
At South Williamsport, Pa.
Wednesday
Waipahu. Hawaii 6. Hamilton, Ohio 4,
Hamilton eliminated
Kaohsiung,Taiwan 5, Chitre. Panama, I,
Chitre eliminated
Aubum.Wash. 7, Pearland,Texas 4
Thursday
Game 24 Auburn, Wash. vs.
Pearland, Texas (n)
Game 26 Columbus, Ga. vs.
Waipahu, Hawaii (n)
Today
x-Game 28 Game 26 winner vs.
Game 26 loser, 2 p.m., if necessary
Saturday
Japan vs. Taiwan, International
championship, I p.m.
U.S. championship, following
conclusion of international championship

AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
PEAK Antifreeze Indy 300
Site: Joliet, IlI.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Versus, 5-6 p.m.); Saturday, race, 7:50 p.m.
(Versus, 7-10 p.m.).
Trackde Chicagoland Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
NASCAR
NATIONWIDE
NAPA Auto Parts 200
Site: Montreal.
Schedule: Saturday, practice (ESPN2,
11:30 a.m.-I p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,
5-7 p.m.); Sunday, race, 2:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
2-6 p.m.).
Track: Circuit Gilles Villeneuve (road
course, 2.709 miles).
Race distance: 200.466 miles, 74 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Enjoylllinois.com 225
Site: Joliet, III.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(4:30-7 p.m.), race, 9 p.m. (Speed, 8:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: Chicagoland Speedway (tri-oval,.
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 225 miles, I50 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Belgian Grand Prix
Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m.).
Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road
course, 4.35 miles).
Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.
OTHER RACES
ARCA RE/MAX SERIES: Ansell
Protective Gloves 150, Today (Speed,
7-8:30 p.m.), Chicagoland Speedway
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES: Grand
Prix of Mosport, Sunday (Speed, 4-7 p.m.),
Bowmanville, Ontarip.
, GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS CAR
SERIES: Montreal 200, Saturday (Speed,
2,4:30 p.m.), Circuit Gilles Villeneuve,
Montreal.

BASKETBALL

WN BA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS -
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Washington vs.Atlanta
Wednesday
Atlanta 95,Washington 90
Today
Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.

NewYork vs. Indiana
Thursday
Indiana at New York (n)
Sunday
NewYork at Indiana, 8 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Seattle vs. Los Angeles
Wednesday
Seattle 79, Los Angeles 66
Saturday
Seattle at Los Angeles, 3 p.m.

Phoenix vs. San Antonio
Thursday
San Antonio at Phoenix (n)
Saturday
Phoenix at San Antonio, I p.m.


CHS: Scouting isn't an exact science


Continued From Page 11
role of scout players." -
-Scouting isn't an exact
science for any coach.
Howard admits that he is
yet to master the art in his
37 years of coaching.
"It's hard to get good
scout-team looks," he said.
"One week the team will be
playing a Power-I, the next
aWing-T and then a spread.
When we go against an out-
standing player, we put that
guys jersey number on the
scout team."
Howard didn't comment
on whether the Tigers
would be scouting Alexis
Blake or any of the Indians'
players.
The kickoff classic prep-
aration ended with a walk-
through on Thursday with
the Tigers putting the final
steps toward the first game.
No word has been mentioned
between the coaches as far as
how much both teams will
play their starters.
"There: has been no
coaches agreement,"
Howard said. "Sometimes
you go in saying you're only
going to play the varsity for


so long and then play the
junior varsity. We're going
to play it by ear. We don't
want to make it that big of
'a hyped-up deal."
Though the Tigers



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
VOCEL I


DECAFE |



DEECES
--- r- 7


haven't pumped the game
up to the likes of a district
title game against Ed White
High, there's no doubt that
Columbia doesn't want a
repeat of last season.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHEN THE C.ON MAN
PUL-L-E THE WOOL
OVER THEII ER EYES,
THE COUPLE WAS ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: LI IX I j
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: SKIMO HAVEN TUMULT UNWISE
I Answer: What happened when the fog'lifted at the
airport IT WASN'T "MIST"


BRIEFS


YOUTH BASEBALL
Fall league
registration today
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball has
fall season sign-up from
5-7 p.m. today, and
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
at Southside Sports
Complex. Fee of $50
includes jersey, hat, socks
and insurance. Ages range
from 5-6 coach pitch to
13-15. A parent or guard-
ian must provide a birth
certificate.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810 or
Kevin Stalters at 623-9497.

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Little League
sign-up Saturday
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
has youth football
registration from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Saturday at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Ages are 8-13. Cost is $40.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607 or
e-mail christieh@lcfla.com.


Future Tiger
Football Camp
The Future Tiger
Football Camp, sponsored
by the Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
and Columbia Youth
Football Association is
9-11 a.m. Saturday at
Memorial Stadium. Boys


and girls ages 7-14 are
eligible for the free camp.
Participants can register
the day of the camp.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fall season
registration set
Girls Softball Association
of Columbia County has
registration for its fall
league through Sunday at
Brian's Sports. Ages are
4-17 for T-ball, machine
pitch and fastpitch leagues.
Cost is $45 or $65 for two
players from the same
family. A birth certificate is
required at registration.
For details, e-mail
information@girlssoftball
association.org.


Fort White fall
registration set
Fort White Babe Ruth
Softball has registration for
the fall season from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.
Registration is at the South
Columbia Sports-Complex.
Cost is $40 per child. .
For details, call Lynn
Harvey at 365-5688.

CHEERLEADING
Columbia Cheer
registration set
Columbia Cheer has
registration for little league
cheerleaders (girls ages
4-12) from 9 a.m. to


1 p.m. Saturday and
Sept 4 at Southside
Community Center.
Registration in Fort White
is 6-8 p.m. today and
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
Cost is $90. Columbia
Cheer is looking for
coaches.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at"292-4668.

AAU CROSS COUNTRY
Eye of the Tiger

meeting Thursday
The AAU Eye of the-
Tiger cross country team
for sixth- through eighth-
grade girls and boys has a
fall season meeting for
parents and runners at
5:15 p.m. Thursday at
Alligator Park. Practices
will be at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday
during September.
For details, contact
coach April Morse
eanbz@bellsouth.net.

FOOTBALL
Team Spirit Game
Day Saturday
Southern Exposure
Boutique & Salon on South
Marion Avenue is
sponsoring its 1st Annual
Team Spirit Game Day
Tailgate Party from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday. There
will be free food and drink
and entertainment.
For details, call the store
at 752-4614.

N From staff reports


INDIANS: Installed new 3-4 defense

Continued From Page 1B


starters," Jackson said. "I
saw what Columbia was
doing and called a screen
play. We had never prac-
ticed it, but were able to
pull it off. I can't necessar-
ily do that now. They would
say, coach, we've never run
that play before."
Jackson has placed the
emphasis past the classic
game and kept it on district
play and a return to the
playoffs.
"When webeat Columbia,
a lot of guys thought we've
arrived and we didn't


ACROSS


1 Cash advances
6 Personal opin-
ions
11 Liver go-with
13 Brood hen
14 Kind of shep-
herd
1.5 Beliefs
16 Prior to
17 Rear-end
18 Delt neighbor
21 Classify
23 Pet plaint
26 day now
27 Slant
28 Rake
29 Johann or
Richard
31 Porous gem
32 Hike
33 Counted on
35 Counting-out
word
36 Duffel filler
37 Make ends
meet
38 Zodiac sign


take the (district) games
as seriously as we should
have," Jackson said. "Some
thought if we beat Columbia
and Santa Fe, we've had a
successful season. It is a lit-
tle different with coaches.
We want to beat our rivals,
of course, but we want to
win district games and play
in late November."
Fort White also is install-
ing a new 3-4 defense and
is anxious to see how it per-
forms against Columbia's
spread. The Indians
will face several spread


39 Yield slightly
40 Male
parent
41 Crusty dessert
42 Freight amts.
44 Archipelago
dots
47 Mullah's
tongue-
51 Gallon frac-
tions
52 Interstellar dust
cloud
53 Chimney plume
54 Just fine

DOWN

1 Written record
2 Cyclops eye
count
3 Tire filler
4 Gold-rush
camp, once
5 Gets tangled (2
wds.)
6 Like the flu
7 News
article


offenses during the sea-
son.
Parking: Visiting fans
are asked to park in the
baseball field area. Turn
left -off State Road 47 on
Dortch Road past Fort
White Elementary; turn left
on Stillman Road and follow
to baseball field.
There is also parking at
the front and north side of
Fort White High. Turn in
the main gate to the school.
There is a $2 donation
for parking. Free parking
is available at the South


Answer to Previous Puzzle

V 0 LBG R
EPA ROIL A Q UA
G GULLIBLE LUNG
ASTUTE UNLIT
S CASS OOPS T








AR GON DO NED
SHAM APERTURE
IOTA SOLE TIM
COEN HIED SCI


8 Riviera summer
9 Single no more
10 Almost grads
12 Skulks about
13 Propeller type
18 Soft hue


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


19 Diner's choice
20 Rostand hero
22 Outdone
23 Like
a castle
24 California
motto
25 Joined
metals
28 Home, in the
phone book
30 A Little
Woman
31 Registered
34 Roomy sleeve
36 Speculate
39 Please, to
Fritz
41 Expense
account
43 The "elephant
boy"
44 Mensa data
45 Amount
46 Thai neighbor
48 NFC gridder
49 Genre
50 Coral forma-
tion


8-27 2010 by UFS, Inc.


~


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


-









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY AUGUST 27, 2010


DILBERT
- I,-?


I GET SLEEPY IN THE
AFTERNOON. AND I'M
NOT A MORNING
PERSON.
\ tS



^^^^yC<


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


I'M AT MY BEST
FOR ABOUT AN HOUR
IN BETWEEN, WHICH
EXPLAINS LJHY I'M
AN EXCEPTIONALLY
GOOD LUNCH EATER.

i K


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Leaving college brings end

to son's parental subsidies


HOWJ'S THE
W WORKFORCE
SKILLS I LUST
ASSESSMENT SOLD ALL
GOING? OF MY
COMPANY
STOCK.
I 8 f ,
C I-' \ f
5 ^ -


at - mi A


DEAR ABBY: Our
son, "Jason," has decided
to leave college with only
two semesters left in or-
der to pursue his love of
river guiding and outdoor
programs. While he was in
school, his father and I paid
for his cell phone, health
and car insurance, and his
rent because we wanted his
focus to be on his studies.
We also paid his tuition.
Jason has a part-time job.
Now that he has decided to
leave school, our view is
that he should find another
job and assume these ex-
penses.
My husband and I dis-
agree about who should
pay for any future educa-
tion Jason wants. If fie goes
back to school, his tuition
will be paid for, says Dad. I
think we would be enabling
him if he thought we were
always standing by to foot
the bill.
We are heartsick that Ja-
son has made this decision,
but his mind is made up.
Any advice from you would-
be appreciated. UNHAP-
PY MOM IN MISSIS-
SIPPI
DEAR UNHAPPY: I
agree that Jason should
shoulder the ,responsibil-
ity for his living expenses.
However, do not make any
hard and fast decisions
about his tuition while you
are still angry at him. This


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't give in to
bullying. Redirect your en-.
ergy and apply your talents
to encompass the things
that you .enjoy and know
that you can do well. Love is
in the stars, so work on your
current relationship or find
someone new. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): There is too
much going on behind your
back to know how to react
or to make a decision. Listen
and observe until you have
a better grasp of what's real
and what's fiction. Believing
what others say will only
lead to mishaps. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): This is not the time to
argue when you should be
focusing on getting things
finished that have been left
undone. An opportunity
will arise from something
you volunteer to do. Plan
for romance late in the day.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't learn the
hard way. Anger will not
solve anything or help you
get your way. Be willing to
meet halfway to avoid ongo-
ing problems. Relationship
issues are evident if you
don't work hard to please.
**
SLEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Love and relationships


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

are highlighted and should
be your main concern. Com-
munication, travel and learn-:
ing will all lead tointeresting
interaction. A commitment
or promise should be put in
place: *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You'll face financial or
personal limitations due to
unanticipated responsibili-
ties. Overspending, overin-
dulging and overdoing will
all set you back. You may
want to have fun but there
will be a price to pay if you
aren't responsible. ***
, LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Now is the time to
question what you are do-
ing personally, profession-
ally and financially. You may
have to change the way you
do things to lessen. your
stress. Don't allow anyone to
dictate what you should and
shouldn't be doing. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Tie up whatever
loose ends you left dangling.
Getting behind schedule
can make the difference be-
tween failure and success.
Push hard to maintain the
status quo and to stay within
the deadlines that have been
set. ***
.SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You are quite


capable of drumming tup
your own business ideas and
putting them into play. Per-
sonal changes will benefit a
relationship that means a lot
to you. Make a promise to
someone yfdii'loIe 'afid'you
won't be-disappointed in the
outcome. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Protect your
cash and avoid joint ven-
tures. Love may be on the
line and it will be important
that you size up the situation
and- take appropriate action
before you end up being
taken for granted. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): live, love and
be happy. A partnership will
help you save and also make
extra cash. Don't be shy
when it comes to express-
ing the way you feel and
what you want to see hap-
pen in the future. Someone
from your past will surprise
you. ****
PISCES (Feb. 1,9-
March 20): You may have
to make some changes
in order to accommodate
someone you care for. An
opportunity may appear oit
of nowhere but, before you
decide to jump in, make
sure there is substance to
what's being offered. Dori't
make a snap decision when
time is on your side. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Camrpos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals B
"ABZD NSD ABSA.'WSEEYSIZN SEZ
WSVZ YG BZSHZG. UPA NL YN ,
AB PGVZE SGV JYIBAGYG I "
XJYGA ZSNATLLV
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "People don't understand that a wild animal is not
something that is nice to pat. It can seriously harm you." James Cameron

(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-27


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I V LEAVE, DUMB CANE,
MOCK ORAN6E CATOR EAN,
FOUR O'CCK AND LCAMEN,




J,t'l/ ,


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9EM5, BAONET kORT5,TLIP
UL65 AND MONKSWO ROOTS


ITS BEEN A LONm SINCE
THE GAN6 ANDI USD TO 5T
AftUND EATlND ONW OW f




8-27-o0


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
situation will play out. If and
when Jason decides to com-
plete his education, discuss
the matter of tuition then.
DEAR ABBY: Do you
know what a speech-gen-
erating device is? A lot of
people don't. It's a special-
ized computer that speaks
for people who are unable
to communicate verbally.
We're a group of camp-
ers from Camp Courage
who use speech-generating
devices to talk. Sometimes
people are uncomfortable
with our unique way of
communicating. We'd like
to share some ideas to help
them understand:
1. Please be patient. It
'takes us a little bit longer to
get our messages out than
it does you.
2. Feel free to ask ques-
tions. Don't pretend to un-
derstand us if you don't.
3. Do not think we are
stupid. Have you ever tried
to communicate using one
of these things?
4. If it looks like we're
having trouble, ask if we
need help.


SNUFFY SMITH


WHEN YOU'RE MY AGE,
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5. Treat us like adults
- just as you would want to
be treated.
6. If you're curious, you
can look at our devices. Ifs
OK to ask. We're not all the
same.
7. Be our friend. If you
do, you'll find we have a lot
of interesting things to say.
Abby, thanks for helping
us communicate our mes-
sage. We hope to speak to
you again! CAMILLE,
HEATHER, JOEL,
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COLE
DEAR CAMILLE,
HEATHER, JOEL,
JOHN, NAT AND NI-'
COLE: I'm pleased to help
spread the word. For peg-
ple who are vocally chal-
lenged, you have written an
eloquent letter.
Assistive technologies
have come a long way in
recent years to ensure that
people with disabilities are
more fully able to partici-
pate in business as well as
society. These advances are
constantly evolving and as
they do there must also be
an "evolution" on the part
of the larger community to-
ward acceptance of people
who are perceived as dif-
ferent.

M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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In Print and Online
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Legal

CIRCUIT COURT, 3rd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 10-161-CP
IN RE: DONALD ROBERT SUHL,
Sr.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Donald Robert Suhl, Sr., deceased,
who date of death was May 24,
2010, whose social security number
is is pending in the
Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida, probate division, the address
of which is 173 N.E. Hemando Ave-
nue, Lake City, FL 32055. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 'OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is August 20, 2010.
/s/: Sonya Suhl
Personal Representative
1059 S.E. Press Ruth Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
/s/: Stanley J. Narkier, P.A.
Florida Bar #134360
1803 S. Australian Avenue, Suite D
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
(561) 689-5208
stanley@narkier.com

04541343
August 20, 27, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT
TO THE CITY OF LAKE CITY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY
THE PLANNING. AND ZONING
BOARD OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO
AS THE LOCAL PLANNING
AGENCY OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE. IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
Section 163.3161 through 163.3215,
Florida Statutes, as amended, and the
City of Lake City Land Development
Regulations, as amended, hereinafter
referred to as the Land Development
Regulations, objections, recommen-
dations and comments concerning an
amendment, as described below, will
be heard by the Planning and Zoning
Board of the City of Lake City, Flor-
ida, serving also as the Local Plan-
ning Agency of the City of Lake
City, Florida, at a public hearing on
September 8, 2010 at 6:30 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, in City Hall located at 205
North Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida.
CPA 10-01, an application by El-
wood Tyre, to amend the Future
Land Use Plan Map of the Compre-
hensive Plan by changing the future
land use classification from RESI-
DENTIAL, MODERATE DENSITY
(less than or equal to 4 dwelling
units per acre) to COMMERCIAL
on property described, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
29, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Commence at the North-
west comer of Block M of the North-
west Division of the Map of Lake
City, as recorded in the Public Re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida;
thence North 86o39'08" East 134.60
feet, along the North line of said
Block M of the Northwest Division
of the Map of Lake City, as recorded
in the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida, to the Point of Be-
ginning; thence continue North
86039'08" East 183.34 feet, along the


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SLegal

North line of said Block M of the
Northwest Division of the Map of
Lake City, as recorded in the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da; thence South 00057'52" West
371.38 feet to the South line of said
Block M of the Northwest Division
of the Map of Lake City, as recorded
in the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida; thence South
89004'07" West 148.19 feet, along
South line of said Block M of the
Northwest Division of the Map of
Lake City, as recorded in the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da; thence North 05033'52" East
363.09 feet to the North line of said
Block M of the Northwest Division
of the Map of Lake City, as recorded
in the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida and the Point of Be-
ginning.
Containing 1.39 acre, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future date. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
. calendar weeks from the date of the
above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the
amendment.
Copies of the amendment are availa-
ble for public inspection at the Office
of Growth Management, City Hall
located at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, during regular
business hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they mayeeed to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

04541395
August 27, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 10-133-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ARNOLD N. COMBS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL: PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS, OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You. are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of AR-
NOLD N. COMBS, deceased, File
No. 10-133-CP, by the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 1,73 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055; that the total cash
value of the estate is $30,000.00 and
that the names and addresses of those
to whom it has been assigned by
such order are:
NAME: Barbara D. Rose
ADDRESS: 266 SW Jazlynn PL.
Lake City, FL 32024
NAME: Katherine T. Hardee
ADDRESS: 707 SW Grizzly Way
Lake City, FL 32024
NAME: Richard A. Rose
ADDRESS: 352 SW Nursery Road
Lake City, FL 32024
NAME: Hunter A. Rose
ADDRESS: 352 SW Nursery Road
Lake City, FL 32024
NAME: Teresa N. Pierce
ADDRESS: 570 SW Nursery Road
Lake City, FL 32024
NAME: Heath H. Hardee
ADDRESS: 7819 NW 228th St.
Raiford, FL 32026
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAY'S
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THEIR NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is Friday, August 20,
2010
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386)752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Person Giving Notice:
By:/s/ BARBARA D. ROSE
266 SW Jazlynn P1.
Lake City, FL 32024

05523559
August 20, 27, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08000182CA
SOVEREIGN BANK, FSB,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANDREW TYLER; MARGIE TY-
LER; 'MORTGAGE ELECTRON-
ICS REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,
INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOM-
INEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS
CONDUIT; UNKNOWN TENANT
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE


Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-
styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Floridh, I will sell
the property situate in Columbia


Legal

County, Florida, described as:
LOT 10, LITTLE FORTY-SEVEN
ACRES, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE(S) 83, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, West door of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 145
N. Hemando Street, Lake City, FL
32056 at 11:00 AM on, September
15, 2010
DATED THIS 20TH DAY OF AU-
GUST, 2010.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 20th day of August,
2010.
P. DeWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the American
with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceeding
should contact the ASA Coordinator
no later than seven (7) days prior to
the proceedings. If hearing impaired,
please call (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or
(800) 955-8770 (voice), via Florida
Relay Service.

04541379
August 27, 2010
September 3, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 09-230-CA '
COLUMBIA BANK, formerly
known as, COLUMBIA COUNTY
BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
SETH HEITZMAN CONSTRUC-
TION, INC., a Florida corporation,
SETH A HEITZMAN, and CORY
L. HEITZMAN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
SCHEDULE "A"
TO NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
CASE NO. 09-230-CA
COUNT I
Lot 41, Emerald Cove,, Phase 1, a
subdivision according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Pa-
ges 35-36, public records of CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida.
COUNT II
Lot 13, Oak Meadow Plantation Unit
4, a subdivision according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8,
Pages 70-71, public records of CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida.
COUNT Ill
A part of the SE 1/4 of the NW 1/4'
of the SW 1/4 of Section 16, Town-
ship 4 South, Range 16 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida, more particular-
ly described as follows:
Commence at the SE comer of the E
1/2 of said SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of SW
1/4 and run thence N 01' 05' 42" W,
along the East line thereof, 313.93
feet; thence N 89* 33' 33" W, 197.79
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING;
thence N 01' 04' 18" W, 320.46 feet
to the South right-of-way line of SW
Legion Drive; thence run N 89' 33'
34" W, along the said right-of-way
137.66 feet; thence run S 01' 02' 56"
E, 320.46 feet; thence run S 89' 33'
33" E, 137.66 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated August 18, 2010, at the
Columbia- County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
September 15, 2010, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
18th day of August, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By: /s/B. 'Scippio
Deputy Clerk-

04541342
August 20, 27, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT
TO THE CITY OF LAKE CITY
LAND DEVELOPMENT REGU-
LATIONS BY THE PLANNING
AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY
OF IAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL
PLANNING AGENCY OF THE
CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
pursuant to Sections 163.3161
through 163.3215, Florida Statutes,
as amended, and the City of Lake
City Land Development Regulations,
as amended, hereinafter referred to
as the Land Development Regula-
tions, objections, recommendations
and comments concerning the
amendment, as described below, will
be heard by the Planning and Zoning
SBoard of the City of Lake City, Flor-
ida, serving also as the Local Plan-
ning Agency of the City of Lake
City, Florida, at a public hearing on
September 8, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. or as
soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, in the City Hall located at 205
North Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida.
LDR 10-02, an application by El-
wood Tyre, to amend the Official
Zoning Atlas of the Land Develop-
ment Regulations by changing the
zoning district from RESIDENTIAL,
SINGLE FAMILY-3 (RSF-3) to
COMMERCIAL, INTENSIVE (CI)
on property described, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
29, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Commence at the North-
west comer of Block M of the North-


west Division of the Map of Lake
City, as recorded in the Public Re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida;
thence North 86039'08" East 134.60
feet, along the North line of said
Block M of the Northwest Division


tLegal

of the Map of Lake City, as recorded
in the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida, to the Point of Be-
ginning; thence continue North
86039'08" East 183.34 feet, along the
North line of said Block M of the
Northwest Division of the Map of
Lake City, as recorded in the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da; thence South 00057'52" West
371.38 feet to the South line of said
Block M of the Northwest Division
of the Map of Lake City, as recorded
in the Public Records of Columbia
County; Florida; thence South
89004'07" West 148.19 feet, along
South line of said Block M of the
Northwest Division of the Map of
Lake City, as recorded in the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da; thence North 05033'52" East
363.09 feet to the North line of said
Block M of the Northwest Division
of the Map of Lake City, as recorded
in the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida and the Point of Be-
ginning.
Containing 1.39 acre, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future date. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-.
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
ceming the matters will be publish-
ed, unless said continuation exceeds
six calendar weeks from the date of
the above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with .respect to the
amendment.
A copy of the amendment is availa-
ble for public inspection at the Office
of Growth Management, City Hall
located at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, during regular
business hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

04541394
August 27, 2010


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING THE EVALUA-
TION AND APPRAISAL REPORT
OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY
THE PLANNING AND ZONING
BOARD OF CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS
THE LOCAL PLANNING AGEN-
CY OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections
163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida
Statutes, as amended, and the City of
Lake City Land Development Regu-
lations, as amended, hereinafter re-
ferred to as the Land Development
Regulations, objections, recommen-
dations and comments concerning
the Evaluation and Appraisal Report
of the City of Lake City Comprehen-
sive Plan, hereinafter referred to as
the Comprehensive Plan, will be
heard by the Planning and Zoning
Board of the City of Lake City, Flor-
ida, serving also as the Local Plan-
ning Agency of the City of Lake
City, Florida, at a public hearing on
September 8, 2010 at 6:30 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, in the City Hall located at 205
North Marion Avenue; Lake City,
Florida.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
calendar weeks from the date of the
above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the Evalu-
ation and Appraisal Report of the
Comprehensive Plan.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that for such pur-
pose they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the.tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

04541378
August 27, 2010


010 Announcements


05523646
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Is now accepting applications
for the Rotation Wrecker List
and the CCSO Fleet Vehicle On-
ly Towing Agreement. Applica-
tions may be picked up between
8-5 Mon-Fri at the CCSO Oper-
ations Center located at 4917
U.S. Hwy 90 East, Lake City,
Florida. All applications must be
returned by
5 pm September 3, 2010.


100 Job
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Only $10 forStarter Kit,
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05523661
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.


100 Job
o100 Opportunities

04541382
The Mobile Mechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolavemployment.com


04541389
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position open for a PT
(20 hours per week)
Switchboard Operator.
Front desk receptionist and
miscellaneous clerical duties as
assigned. Applicants must have
excellent interpersonal and
organizational skills.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
and forwarded to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City, FL 32056 or
email Turbeville.J(5)ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

CLASS A CDL LONG HAUL
Driver needed Must have frame-
less dump exp. Must pass drug
test. Requires out of town travel.
386-719-9482 between 9a & 5p
Delivery driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring St, Lake City
Energetic, motivated,
Sales Person, retail & computer
exp. a plus Apply in person@
Smitty's Western between 9-11 am
F/TCashier in Service Dept,
pd.vacation, eligible for ins, 40 hr
wk, see Brenda T @ Roundtree
Moore Ford service dept
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record, 386-963-
5026, Drug Test.
Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Lve Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746
Seeking experienced
Satellite Installer with tools
and truck ready to go
407-460-9225
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
Please fax resume to
386-758-4523


Want to make a difference
in someone's life?
Residential Training Specialist
positions available, one yr exp, di-
ploma or GED, current FL DL,
CPR/lst Aid/ HIV Training req'd,
Apply in person at CARC
512 SWSisters Welcome Road,
Lake City

120 ^Medical
120v Employment

F/T LPN (IV cert. req'd) needed,
for medical office.
Computer skills a plus.
Fax resume to 386-754-1712.

04541386
Medical Billing Manager.
Experience in coding, billing,
collections req'd. Excellent
salary based on experience.
Send resume in confidence to:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com
or Fax # 386-758-5987


Bi
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010


120 Medical
120 Employment

04541374
OPS DENTAL HYGIENIST
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking an OPS
Dental Hygienist, position
#64912060 to work on mobile
dental unit at Elementary
Schools for an eight week
period for 2 days a week,
Wednesday and Thursday.
Must be licensed as a Dental
Hygienist in accordance with
Florida Statute 466. Rate of pay
is $25.00 per hour. Applications
will be accepted online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com
State of Florida application may
be mailed to State of Florida,
People First, Staffing
Administration, PO Box 44058,
Jacksonville, Fl 32231 or faxed
to (904)636-2627 by 08/29/10.
EEO/AA/VP Employer.

04541385
Medical Receptionist
Experience in a medical office
required. Send resume to PO
Box 3009, Lake City, FL 32056,
or fax to 386-758-5987

04541397
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
Full-Time Positions
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
Will be over ER, OR and Med
Surge Floor, Current RN
License, Ward or Hospital
Management Helpful.
Teaching and/or Supervisory
Exp. Preferred.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT
High School Graduate,
AA Degree in Acct. Preferred.
2 yrs Exp. in all aspects of Acct.
General Ledger, Accts Payable
and Payroll. Accounting Skills,
Computer Skills, knowledge of
Word, Excel Software &
10 key Punch
PRN Position
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
Current Florida PT/ST/OT
license. Evaluate, Assess, Plan
and Implement Treatments.
Hand Therapy Preferred.
ARNP/PA
To staff Emergency Room
Small Acute Care Critical
Access hospital. Exp. Required,
FT/PT/PRN
Great benefits and salary.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace
Busy Medical Practice with multi-
ple doctors is seeking responsible
individual for Receptionist and
Scheduling. Medical experience a
must. Fax resume to 386-758-5628
Fast Paced Medical Office needs
experienced only
Medical Assistant
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email:
to office manager @
primarycaremedic.com
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

240 Schools &
Education
04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/13/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees, Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Jack Russell puppies, with health
certificates, 8 weeks, asking $300
for females, $250 for males
386-935-1722
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &

20 Month old laying hen
Live Oak
$20
386-330-0168
Grandma,
I want a Pony...
Call for details
386-965-2231

401 Antiques


ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

407 Computers
IBM Computer,
Many extras
$80.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170
To place your
classified ad call
755-O5440


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Multi Family Sat only, 7AM,-?,
lots of toys!, DVD's, furniture,
clothing, misc items
3090 NW Nash Rd
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat -9-1, Quail Heights 147 SW
Wren Crt. Baby/Toddler Clothes
/shoes, Kid toys, Fum, Fish Tanks,
Pet stuff, electronics, misc. hshold.
Sat/Sun, 8AM ?, woodwork
tools, lawn mower, boat trailer,
lots of other tools
249 SW Bedrock St (47),

440 Miscellaneous
Full Sized School Chalkboards
$25 each
386-344-5706 or
386-344-1783
Hospital Bed, electric wheelchair,
lift chair, recliner, vacuum cleaner,
TV stand, kitchen table w/4 chairs
call for prices 386-752-6051

g Good Things
450 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

6 0n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1,2 & 3 BR I BTH
MH's & House
Close to town 1st & Deposit.
386-755-5488
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP,
386-752-6422
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, acre,
big front porch $650 mo,
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2br/lba CH/A, screen porch. Lg
Syard. fishing pond. Clean, quiet.
*No Pets. References. Long term
rentals $475 mo. $475 sec. Smoke
free environment. 386-965-3003.
3BR /2BA DWMH. 10 miles from
Lake CIty off Hwy 247.
$650. mo plus 1st, last and $500
securtiy deposit. 386-935-6699
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
NICE 3BR/2BA on 1/2 ac. fenced
New workshop. Pets ok, comcast
avail., $650. mo. 1st and last
required. 386-697-6621
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park.setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

A{\ Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
,new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
71 Unfurnished Apt.
0 For Rent
Io552330o
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
/ (386) 758-8455
[5523675
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security.
Call Michelle
386-752-9626
A Landlord You Can Love!


2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move .in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $500. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-1002


S Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 38,6.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
S For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/Bdrm/2 bath, w/office, 2 car ga-
rage, gas fireplace, safe neighbor-
hood $1200 mo, dep required,
386-623-4403
3bd/2ba's
Multiple Locations
Call for details
386-755-3649.
4/2/2 2800 sqft. 2nd fairway
Southern Oaks CC. 174
NW Harris Lake Dr. $1350. mo.
plus security. (941)545-6731
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,000
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-758-3166
Clean lBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-,
1833.suwanneevallevproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225


Large 4 br/2ba, Family Rm, Living
Rm, Recreation Rm, large yard,
Old Country Club Road; No pets;
$800/mo + sec dep. 623-2642
Remodeled 3/2 w/2 Car Garage.
1/2 Acre near US 41 & 1-75. New
appliances, ceramic tile, interior
/exterior paint & roof $785 mo +
dep. 386-623-3834/904-514-3677
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-984-7150

7 0i Business &
0 Office Rentals
Convenient Store
with gas
for lease,
81 3-286-2323
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018
1 ACRE exclusive lots in gated
community on Hwy 47.
Will subordinate to builders.
$39,000 and up. 386-752-1364
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St **Sold**
FSBO: No realtors'please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
MUST SEE! New 3500 foot
spec home. Reduced to $299,000
5% interest. 0% down or trade.
386-752-1364
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Bmfrd, Irg shed, sm down, $725
mo 386-590-0642/386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Saturn Lane 4/2 block,
5 acres, half cleared,2 sheds,
reduced from $140K to $120K
LCFR 386-754-0800

820 Farms&
SAcreage
10 acres'for price of 5.
Rolling land @ Columbia City.
$8,900 per acre. 5% int.
386-752-1364
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com


820 Farms &
Acreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


930 Motorcycles
1993 Harley Davidson FXRP
Super Glide, 23K miles, crash bar,
windshield, good condition $4900
386-758-9750
1995 HONDA Shadow 600cc
Motorcycle. Mileage 19,500.
New battery. $2,500.
386-752-8157 or 397-6717


940 Trucks
1999 CHEVROLET 1500,
4 wheel drive, Z-71. Extended cab
w/3rd door. 1 owner. $7500.
Call after 8pm. 386-963-4788

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
MOTORHOME 1995 Ford F350
29ft long, 29,011 miles slight
water damage on top bed of truck
cab. $10,000.00 call 935 1270


Tell'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.


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ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.





2008 Dodge SLT 2003 Cadillac 2006 35 Ft. Denali
2008.Dodge SLT 2003 Cadillac 5th wheel camper tow 1993 Harley
4x4 Big Ram DeVille truck combo, 3 slides,
20" Factory rims, Hemi many extras, like new with Davidson FXRP
AM/FM/CD, leather, 2002 Chevy Silverado Super Glide, 23K miles,
full power, extra clean, heated seats. crew cab PU w/6.6CI turbo crash bar, windshield,
10,290 mi. 67,000 miles, diesel. good condition.
$24,900 $9,500 $37,900 $4,900 -
Call call Call Call
386-755-2909 386-965-5484 1 386-758-2465 386-758-9750


A+ EyeCare


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555-5555


Classified Department: 755-5440








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 2010
3 Bedroom Kitchen Whirlpool appliances, 18 cubic ft
7-" 7 2 Bath refrigerator, 30" free standing range, Marble
windows seals throughout, porcelain lavatories,
l-_- N LY wired & braced for ceiling fans

Ss55PKESTE
771 51995 HOME CENTERS
I"'" Price Includes A I/C, .Monday-Friday 8:30am-6pm Saturday 8:30am-5pm Sunday 12pm-5pm
setup, skirting and stes 3973 HWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY 386-752-7751 or 1-800-355-9385

|ORT WHITE indian'

iinof the week


Fort White High's A.J.
season.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Legree (3) intercepts a pass against Union County during a game last


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams is brought down by a Madison County defender during the
Indians' loss last season.

Indians defend classic title


Fort White High is out
to prove last year's kickoff
classic win was no fluke.
The Indians host
Columbia High in the
second year of the classic
series at 7:30 p.m. Friday.
Demetric Jackson enters
his fourth season as head
coach of the Indians.
Jackson is 19-14 overall and
guided Fort White to the
playoffs in 2007-08.
Fort White was 5-5 last


year and 3-2 in District
2-2B.
Fort White had, to
replace its quarterback
this season and had settled
on Wesley Pitts. However,
Pitts suffered a broken arm
and was lost for a minimum
of three months.
The Indians return a
strong line, led by Zack
Bentley, Dylan Nerwman
and Jonathan Dupree.
Fort White also returns





d d
ggig W il


d mM MMUNIA- m., I--
JASON MATTEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Montre Cray breaks free against Florida High last season.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER'
Lake City Reporter
LEFT: Fort White High's
Alexis Blake makes a
Taylor County defender
miss in a game played
last season.


2010 Indians Football Schedule


Wk 1 Madison Co. H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 2 Newberry A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 3 Suwannee H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 4 Union County A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 5 N.F. Christian H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 6 Florida High A 7:30 p.m.
Wk 7 East Gadsden H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 8 Taylor County A 7:30 p.m.


Wk 9 Bradford H 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Sante Fe A 7:30 p.m.


*: =3 J .T.I. l .2 k1*


.IS(' SV AriPh r o n e Ild 4II(3 752-050k irv
Phone (386) 752-0580
Lic # RR282811326
a I9c c o s r c io .c m


Funeral Services Cremation Services Prearrangement Planmng
458 S. Marion Ave, Lake City
752-1234 www.parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com


I -- .. I


24 Pack Case AL
SorM $M9

& _-_-----------


POWERADE.
THIRST QUENCHER
320Z.
2 for
:$2
- - - - - - - - -


Enjoy our Lunch & Dinner.Buffets!

Breakfast & Dine In-
Lunch Daily Take Out

Dinner 'jsIe Cream
Thursday- Shop
Saturday M

N US 27 1 Mile From Light Ft. White
(386) 497-4725
OPEN LATE GAME NIGHT


*It *-