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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01406
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/22/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01406
System ID: UF00028308:01406
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Hot seat
Zook among six coaches
who must win this season.
Sports, IlB -
000016 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV 1943OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


JzU"ILY


Sunday, August 22, 2010 w


Go vote!
See the official sample ballot
for the primary election.
Local, 2A


orter


I Vol. 136, No. 184 0 $1.00


Port's 'catalyst site' tagged rural Enterprise Zone


State's designation
offers financial
incentives.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com.
The Columbia County
catalyst site, which will
be adjacent to a proposed
inland port site, has
been declared as a rural
Enterprise Zone by the
Florida Office of Tourism,


Trade and Economic
Development.
The official designation
will allow financial incen-
tives, such as tax credits,
for companies hoping to
build and locate their facili-
ties on the catalyst site,
state and local officials say.
The Rural Enterprise
Zone designation will be
effective from Sept. 1, 2010
to Dec. 31, 2015.
"Getting an Enterprise
Zone designation is an


opportunity for businesses
located in the designated
area to apply for state tax
incentives," said Burt Von
Hoff, community develop-
ment liaisQn for the Office


of Tourism, Trade and
Economic Development.
"There are about five differ-
ent state tax incentives that
will be available to busi-
nesses in the designated


Enterprise Zone."
The most popular tax
incentive in an Enterprise
Zone is a jobs tax credit
which a business can get
if it creates jobs and hires


residents in a rural county
to work in the Enterprise
Zone. Business that create
jobs, purchase business
equipment and purchase
building materials can also
get a sales tax refund.
'The amount of tax cred-
its is based on the new
employees' wages," Von
Hoff said.
The basic incentive is
that the business should
ZONE continued on 3A


UNITED


More than 1,600 attend as community

groups give away back-to-school items


.' ',,


TONY BRITT/ Special to the Lake City Reporter
Krystal Norris (from left) checks Rachel MacDonald's blood pressure during a physical examination Saturday at Christ
Central Ministries Operation Backpack event. More than 80 children were given free physical as part of the event.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A t least 1,600
Columbia
County resi-
dents showed
up at local
back-to-school giveaways
Saturday as local children
and their parents prepared
for the beginning of the
2010-2011 school year on
Monday.
As a result of the recent
downturn in the economy,
several local businesses,
churches and community
centers formed partner-
ships to provide back-to-
school supplies for area
children in at least three
school supply giveaways.
Christ Central giveaway
An estimated 1,500
people attended the
Christ Central Ministries'


TONY BRITT/ Special to the Lake City Reporter
Wayne Jernigan (from left), City of Lake City's Southside
Recreation Center supervisor, and Nicole Smith, Columbia
County Recreation secretary, show school supplies and
book bags to Tierra Alexis Fleming and Tamrara Fleming
as Lynda Caldwell looks on. The girls were given the book-
bags as part of a school supply giveaway Saturday at the
Richardson Community Center.


Operation Backpack
school supply giveaway
at the Columbia County


fairgrounds. Although the
event didn't begin until 9
a.m., event organizers said


residents were in the line
around 8 a.m. or earlier.
Lonnie Johns, Christ
Central Ministries lead
pastor, said the event has
been held annually since
1998 and sponsors for
this year's event included
Christ Central Ministries,
the Boat Doctors,
Mercantile Bank, Quality
Equipment, Russell
Vought, Branford Love
N Care, Joyce Anderson,
Florida Department
of Transportation and
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Johns said
the sponsors provided
$6,000 -$8,000 worth of
materials and school sup-
plies.
"It's looks like we have
1,000-1,500 kids," he said,
noting several items in
addition to school supplies

UNITED continued on 3A


Figures reflect

,weak turnout

in early voting


1,752ballots
cast at Lake City
elections office.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Less than 5 percent of
Columbia County's regis-
tered voters participated
in early voting, accord-
ing to information from
the Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections


INSIDE


* List of Tuesday's polling
sites, 8A
* GOP governor
candidates focus
on Panhandle, 8A
office.
Early voting, which
began two weeks ago, con-
cluded 4:30 p.m. Saturday
with a total of 2,226 of the
VOTING continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lqke City Reporter
Sandy Kishton (from left), a local Realtor representing
Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce Young
Emerging Professionals, Helen Brunson of First Federal
Bank of Florida and Jan Smithey of Altrusa International work
together to dig space for a pipeline at the fourth Habitat for
Humanity Lake City-Columbia County house Saturday.


Habitat volunteers

work hard to make

dreams come true


Tasks include
marking studs,
digging trenches.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The buzzing sound of a
saws cutting through wood
and the constant rap of ham-
mers striking nails gave
audible proof on Saturday
that Habitat For Humanity
volunteers were putting
sweat equity into their lat-
est project.
Looking at their clothes
dripping with sweat was the
visual evidence.
More than 12 people
showed up to work Saturday
at the latest Habitat For


Humanity home on Dyson
Street.
It was part of Young
Emerging Professionals
Volunteer Day, where work
included digging trenches
for water lines, caulking,
marking studs to hang
sheetrock and hanging sid-
ing. The lion's share of the
work included finishing the
home's exterior siding.
"Every volunteer that
we had commit showed
up and we almost had too
many volunteers for the
work that we had allotted
today," said Sandy Kishton,
a member of the Lake City/
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce board of
HABITAT continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 7S2-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


94
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ... ... 4A
Business ..... I C
Obituaries . 6A
Puzzles ....... 2B
Life .... I D


DAILY
BRIEFING
jadc ..i r 1.,ll. 1 ei.e : :.jd :-,


COMING
TUESDAY
Update i-.ul
,-.2,r liT~i ~i in t :ilt rl, "


"Getting an Enterprise Zone designation is an
opportunity for businesses located in the designated
area to apply for state tax incentives."

Burt Von Hoff
Community development liaison
Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development


WE'RE


cl4I Il? J


U7








2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


CA- t$H 3. FLORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
5-30-35-43 18 4-14-28-33-34 Afternoon: 2-0-2 Afternoon: 0-0-3-5 2-3-5-22-41-45 4-32-33-47-55-39
Evening:5-9-3 Evening: 9-7-5-5



AROUND FLORIDA



Second inmate accidentally released is captured


WEST PALM BEACH

now appre-
hended two
of the three
alleged gang
members mistakenly
released from the Palm
Beach County Jail over a
paperwork mix up.
The Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office said 21-
year-old James Roundtree
was apprehended without
incident on Saturday.'
Deputies were still search-
ing for 18-year-old Marquis
Roundtree.
The Vto men, along
with 17-year-old Travis
Herndon, were charged
with aggravated assault
with a firearm, racketeer-
ing and other offenses.
Herndon was caught
Friday.
The three were mistak-
enly released Tuesday and
among eight men charged
in a 19-count indictment
They are accused of being
part of a gang that terror-
ized parts of Palm Beach
County and blamed in a
string of shootings.

Baby, locked in
hot car, rescued
WEST PALM BEACH
A South Florida mother
has been charged with
neglect after her toddler
was found screaming
locked inside a parked car
with the windows rolled
up.
A Good Samaritan was
walking through a strip
mall parking lot Friday
when she heard the


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thousands give soldier hero's welcome in Jacksonville
Cpl. Tyler Southern acknowledges the crowd from his wheelchair after his arrival at his Jacksonville home Friday evening.
Southern returned to his Mandarin home Friday evening to a hero's welcome as thousands of Jacksonville residents lined
the roads leading to his home to honor his sacrifice serving as a U.S. Marine in Afghanistan. Southern was awarded a Purple
Heart after he lost both legs and an arm to an explosive device in Afghanistan and was returning home from Walter Reed
Army Medical Center to celebrate his 21st birthday with his family. Smaller photos (clockwise, from top) show Southern riding
in the sidecar as he is escorted by motorcycle riders, as his sidecar rolls into the driveway of his home, and as a crowd of well
wishers greet him upon his return while his mother, Patti, looks on.


1-year-old's cries. She and
another person eventually
pried the sweaty, shaking
girl from the car.
Palm Beach County


Sheriff's deputies said the
unidentified woman went
inside a nearby beauty .
store and asked if anyone
left a child in a car. No one


in the, store responded, so
she called 911.
After deputies arrived,
the child's mother came
out of the store and said


she "does not know how
she forgot the child."
Twenty-two-year-old
Chekeena Hall was
charged with child neglect


Bus crashes at
Walt Disney World
ORLANDO -A Disney
bus carrying 26 passen-
gers was involved in a
crash at the Walt Disney
World Resort.
The Florida Highway
Patrol reports that the
bus and a PT Cruiser
were involved in a crash
Friday afternoon near the
Hollywood Studios theme
park. FHP said there were
no injuries, and the bus
driver was not at fault

Rebates issued
for new air-cons
MIAMI Florida
homeowners in the market
for central air conditioning
systems can qualify for a
new rebate.
Starting Monday, the
state will begin handing
out $15 million in rebates
for energy efficient air con-
ditioners. Rebates aren't
being issued for single-
room or window unit air
conditioners.

Host of 'Star
Gazer' dies at 72
MIAMI- Jack
Horkheimer, creator and
host of the PBS show "Star
Gazer," has died.
The Miami Museum of
Science and Space Transit
Planetarium, where
Horkheimer was director
emeritus, said the astrono-
mer died Friday afternoon
of a respiratory ailment
He was 72.
* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Asking price for Salinger's toilet: $1M


X(ERNERSVILLE, N.C. A North.
Carolina collectibles dealer iN hawk-
ing a toilet ripped from reclusive
author J.D. Salinger's former home.
Rick Kohl of The Vault said:Friday
he bought the standard white porce-
lain fixture from a New Hampshire
couple who owned a home where
the author of "Catcher in the Rye"
once lived.
To vouch that this is no phony,
Kohl has a letter from the hom-
eowner attesting that she and her
husband replaced the toilet while
remodeling, and that they knew the
workmen who installed it decades
ago.
The receptacle has an eBay asking
price of $1 million, though Kohl says
he's willing to see what the literary
giant's home throne will fetch.
The toilet's lid is stamped with
a manufacturing date of 1962, well
after the 1951 publication date of
Salinger's classic novel.

Haiti ruling ends Wyclef
Jean's run for president
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -
Singer Wyclef Jean's high-profile bid
for Haiti's presidency ended after
election officials on the earthquake-
ravaged Caribbean nation' disquali-
fled his candidacy.
The Haitian-American hip-hop
star expressed disappointment at
the late Friday ruling, but called on
his followers to act "peacefully and
responsibly."
"Though I disagree with the rul-
ing, I respectfully accept the com-
mittee's final decision, and I urge
my supporters to do the same," the
former Fugees frontman said in a
statement.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo shows a toilet
reportedly ripped from reclusive author
J.D. Salinger's former home.

A new exhibit, "Americans Now,"
opened Friday, featuring famous
names from science, business, gov-
ernment and the arts.
President Barack Obama and the
first lady are among those portrayed.
It's the first time Michelle Obama's
individual portrait has been shown at
the gallery.
Familiar names in the collection
also include actor.Tom Hanks and
music artists Willie Nelson and LL
Cool J. Video portraits in the exhibit
feature late-night comedians Jay
Leno, Conan O'Brien and David
Letterman, as well as actor George
Clooney and NBA star LeBron
James.


della Sera in the interview published
Saturday that working with Bruni-
Sarkozy was smooth and pleasant
The ex-supermodel was on set in
July for herappearance in Allen's
romantic comedy, which stars Owen
Wilson and Marion Cotillard.
Corriere said Allen made the com-
ments in a phone interview from
Paris.
Allen says Bruni-Sarkozy plays
a guide at the Rodin Museum and'
that she was so good he's going to
keep all her scenes in, according
to the newspaper. He said French
President Nicolas Sarkozy came to
the set one evening because he was
curious to see his wife act.

Jolie visits Bosnia
to support education
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina
- A top official in Bosnia says
Angelina Jolie is interested in sup-:
porting education and other projects
to help young Bosnians and people
who return to homes.they left during
the war.
Haris Silajdzic, chairman of
Bosnia's three-member Presidency,
said after meeting the actress
Sunday that she asked about ideas
for projects she could support and.
they both concluded that "the abso-
lute priority is education".
The aim would be turn Sarajevo
into a regional center of education,
he said.

UK pop singer in
apparent suicide fall
BRUSSELS The lead singer of
a British pop trio climbed a telecom-
munications mast behind the main
stage at a Belgian rock festival and
leaped to his death in the parking lot
below, police said Saturday.
Twenty-two-year-old Charles
Haddon of Ou Est Le Swimming
Pool died late Friday during the
Pukkelpop festival in Hasselt, a town
in eastern Belgium. District attorney
Marc Rubens said police were treat-
ing the death as a suicide.
* Associated Press


WASHINGTON Move over
Martha Washington. Martha Stewart
and Michelle Obama are getting
space in the National Portrait
Gallery in Washington for the first
time.


ROME Woody Allen says in
an interview that France's first lady,
Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, was very pro-
fessional on the set of his movie
"Midnight in Paris."
Allen told Italian daily Corriere


Celebrity Birthdays


* Author Ray Bradbury is
90.
* Heart surgeon Dr. Denton
Cooley is 90.
* Retired Gen. H. Norman
Schwarzkopf is 76.
* Broadcast journalist
Morton Dean is 75.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Carl Yastrzemski is 71.
* Actress Valerie Harper is


70.
* Football coach Bill
Parcells is 69.,
* Actress Cindy Williams,
is 63.
* Musician David Marks is
62.
* Actress Jenna Leigh
Green is 36.
* Rock musician Dean Back
(Theory of a Deadman) is 35.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, FR.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ............... $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks .............. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks............... $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Daily Scripture


"By day the LORD directs his
love, at night his song is with
me a prayer to the God of
my life."
Psalm 42:8


Michelle Obama portrait Woody Allen interview
debuts at Smithsonian praises Bruni-Sarkozy


- ------


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


VOTING: 202 cast ballots Saturday in Lake City


Continued From Page 1A

county's 39,723 registered
voters casting their ballots.
During the two-week
early voting period, 1,752
ballots were cast at the
Lake City Supervisor of
Elections office, while 474
ballots were cast at the Fort
White office.
On Saturday, the final
day for early voting, 202
people cast ballots in Lake
City, while 62 cast ballots in
Fort White.
"Early voting has been
a little slow," said Liz P.
Horne, Columbia County
supervisor of elections. "I
would have liked to see
more people come out and
vote. We're hoping people
will turnout Tuesday and
come out and vote."
Absentee voting statis-


"Florida is a closed primary state
and voters are voting by party, except
for the nonpartisan races in their
districts."

Liz P. Horne
Columbia County supervisor of elections


tics look more encourag-
ing, she said.
Home said 3,000 absen-
tee ballots were request-
ed and at last count 1,388
absentee ballots had been
returned.
People who .choose to
cast ballots through absen-
tee voting have to return
their ballots before 7 p.m.
Tuesday.
The election will be held
Tuesday and local polling


sites will be open from 7
a.m. 7 p.m.
The election has three
local contested races. The
City of Lake City District 10
city council seat race has
four candidates, while five
candidates are competing
for the Columbia County
Commission District 2
post. Only two candidates
are vying for the Columbia
County Commission
District 4 commissioner


post
"Voters need to vote in the
precinct where their voter's
information card informs
them to vote," Horne said,
noting that voters need to
have a photo identification
card with their signature.
"Florida is a closed primary
state and voters are voting
by party, except for the non-
partisan races in their dis-
tricts."
To win either of the races,
the candidate receiving the
majority of votes must gar-
ner 50 percent plus one vote.
If no candidate receives that,
a runoff will be held in the
Nov. 2 general election.
"Iwould hope thatwe would
have another 22 percent of the
voters participate on election
day," Horne said.


HABITAT: Volunteers
Continued From Page lA


directors.
Twelve volunteers were
coordinated through the
chamber of commerce
and the local Altrusa
chapter, as well as five
Habitat For Humanity
volunteers who normally
work on the project.
Kishton said the cham-
ber of commerce's Young
Emerging Professionals
group started the vol-
unteer day and Altrusa
members learned about
it and joined in.
"We've coordinated
the volunteer days
through the Chamber,
Altrusa and Habitat For
Humanity," Kishton said.
In the coming weeks,
work on the home's sof-
fits will be completed, as


will the interior sheet-
rock installation and
painting.
Kishton estimated it
would take four-to-six
weeks to complete the
project if the weather
permitted.
"What's so unique
about a project like this
is because it's tangible,,
you've got hands-on
opportunities and it's'
something you're going
to remember," she .said.
"It's just another part of
being part of the com-
munity. I'm just very
happy and pleased that
everybody showed up.-
All of the Habitat staff
or other volunteers have-
been very welcoming-
and helpful."


ZONE: Inland port site and catalyst site are located east of Lake City
Continued From Page 1A


receive a tax credit up to 30
percent of the wages paid
to an eligible employee. A
business can get a tax cred-
it for up to 24 months, if the
employee remains with the
company.
There are 58 Enterprise
Zones in Florida, includ-
ing the recent Columbia
County designation. A
catalyst site in Suwannee


County is expected to be
designated within the next
few weeks.
The Enterprise Zone
concept is in state statutes
until 2015.'
In 2014, the legislature
will review the program and
make a decision of whether
to extend the program or
let it expire.
Florida has a series of


statewide economic devel-
opment incentives that are
enhanced if they are locat-
ed within an Enterprise
Zone.
"It's definitely an advan-
tage to be in an Enterprise
Zone," Von Hoff said.
The inland port site and
the catalyst site are adja-
cent pieces of property on
U.S. Highway 90, east of


Lake City. State and local
officials, as well as Plum
Creek Timber, have plans
for local warehouses, distri-
bution centers and manu-
facturing operations to be
constructed on 2,500 acres
owned by Plum Creek at
the inland port site.
"What takes place on the
catalyst site will be tied to
the inland port, so it's an


additional selling tool to
assist us in locating busi-
nesses on that parcel of
property," said Jim Poole,
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority
executive director.
Poole said local officials
have been working on get-
ting the Enterprise Zone
designation for the catalyst
site for about three years.


"The designation means
we have one more asset in
our tool kit in working with
recruiting businesses,",
Poole said. "It's an addition-.
al tool you can use to pro-,
vide benefits to a company
to locate in our community.
It has extra tax advantages
and also has some advan-
tages for people living in
the region."


UNITED: Volunteers present children with bike helmets and backpacks
Continued From Page 1A A


were given to the children.
During Operation
Backpack, a staff of
100-150 Christ Central
Ministries volunteers gave
away 278 bike helmets,
148 haircuts, 84 free sports
physical and gave school
supplies and backpacks to
652 children. More than
1,000 drinks and 700 hot
dogs were given to attend-
ees.
"This is helping families
get ready for school espe-.,
cially in the tough eco-
nomic times where some
families need all the help
they can get," Johns said.
'"This is something where
we just want to give back
to the community and help
working families."

Richardson Community
Center
The Columbia County
Recreation Department
and City of Lake City
Southside Recreation
Center partnered together
for a school supply
giveaway at Richardson
Community Center.
Michael Anthony, 13,
and James Williamson, 11,
both received string back-
packs loaded with school
supplies from the center.
"The backpack is good,"
Anthony said. "The skinny
bookbag is better than a
bigger bookbag because
the bigger bookbag is
heavier for me to carry."


TONY BRITTI Special to the Lake City Reporter
Tashas Wilson and Sammie Daniels put school supplies in
a backpack as part of the inaugural True Church of God in
Unity school supply giveaway Saturday.


Nicole Smith, Columbia
County Recreation
Department secretary,
said this the fourth year
the event has been held
and it alternate sites
between Richardson
Community Center and
the City of Lake City
Southside Recreation "


,_i.l... .. .~,..,..., ~ I-


LaGloria

Jorden
May 10, 1953
August 18, 2007


- ~I ~
* .-. p. g
"2~ -i ,,' I
.4u? I
'U.
I'


4,


It has been years since our precious
angel went home to be with the Lord.
Gone but not forgotten.

You are forever in our hearts.
Mom, Bernie, Linda, Frank, Reggie
& Grandchildren


Center.
"We've had about 120
people show up," she
said noting there were


three hours of event time
remaining.
As part of the giveaway,
the center focused on dif-
ferent school aged groups
with age appropriate
school supplies and back-
packs.
Backpacks for elemen-
tary-aged kids contained
pencils, paper, crayons,
'scissors, rulers, papers
and folders, while the mid-
dle and high school spe-
cific backpacks contained
extra paper, pens and com-
position notebooks.
"I'm just happy people
came out and helped,"
Smith said. "We had a lot
of community members
come out to be a part of
this and it's good when
everybody can pitch in
and do something good
like this so that everyone
is going to be prepared
and have an equal start
to the beginning of the
school year."

True Church of God in
Unity
The True Church of
God in Unity held its first
back to school supply
giveaway Saturday with a
goal of providing supplies
to 50 children.


The event was held from
11 a.m. 2 p.m. and church
members gave away back-
packs to primary and sec-
ondary-aged students dur-
ing the three-hour event
'The event is centered
around the children in the
community," said church
youth director Sammie
Daniels. "What we are try-
ing to do as a local church
in the community is trying
to outreach to the children
in the community by,giv-
ing them school supplies
that can help those who
are in need. We feel like
this is something we need-
ed to do."
Tashas Wilson, the
church's second youth


director, said the book-
bags contained binders,
crayons, hand sanitizer,
paper, Kleenex and other
school supplies.
"We put everything in
the bookbags that was on
the lists that the schools
provided," she said, not-
ing it took church mem-
bers close to four hours
to pack the bags. "It was
a very proud feeling to
put the supplies together.
We felt like we- were '
accomplishing our mis-
sion. We were able to see
how the community really
pitched in and assisted in
donating. All of us were
thankful for the dona-
tions."


Marc


S-0Kazmierski


ForCounty CO onissioner

^^BDistrict 2


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School starts in two weeks!
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is the first day of school.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Ma.'r-l 4 i ,-Tfi: --NN,











OPINION


Sunday, August 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Life hands

you lemons,

sell them for

a nonprofit

H ow's this for an 8-
year-old's answer
to, "How I spent
my summer vaca-
tion?" Funding
research for pediatric cancer.
That's the theme Avery
Harwell of Lake City will
write after spending her final
Saturday of summer break
selling lemonade to benefit the
nonprofit foundation, Alex's
Lemonade Stand.
Avery's small business is
inspired by the type of entre-
preneurial spirit that fuels the
community spirit of Columbia
County. We saw this last week
on a more grand scale when a
local restaurant donated part of
a day's proceeds to Alex's can-
cer research organization.
Those donations, large and
small, are critical to families in
Columbia County and across
the nation. To date, Alex's
Lemonade Stand has funded
more than 150 research proj-
ects at more than 50 institutions
across the United States. The
foundation also assists families
experiencing a pediatric cancer
crisis with travel for treatments.
Filling a research gap by fill-
ing up on lemonade is a simple
idea. But as Avery discovered,
even the most simple of plans,
done for the benefit of others,
can make a lasting and mean-
ingful contribution to your com-
munity.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
Today is Sunday, Aug. 22.
On this date in 1879, the
Law and Order Committee
hanged two men convicted of
murder in the Phoenix plaza.
:. On this date in 1921,
Cave Creek flooded the entire
west end of Phoenix. Two feet
of water engulfed the State
Capitol.
On this date in 1928, five
members of a Maricopa ranch
family died as a high-voltage
line fell in their front yard.
On this date in 1930, a
road from Tucson to Yuma by
way of Ajo was proposed.
On this date in 1933,
Southern Pacific railroad
offered a roundtrip fare from
Phoenix to Tucson for $2.45.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer,,editor
Sue Brannon,,controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Obama hopes to restart Mideast talks


If at first you don't suc-
ceed try, try again goes
the old saw. After hercu-
lean efforts by Mideast
peace envoy George
Mitchell and Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton the U.S. is set to
try yet again to broker a lasting
peace agreement between Israel
and the Palestinians.
On Sept. 1, President Barack
Obama will meet separately
with Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu and
Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas. That evening the presi-
dent will host them at a dinner
where they will be joined by the
leaders of Egypt and Jordan,
the two Arab nations that have
peace treaties with Israel, and
former British Prime Minister
Tony Blair, representing the
"Quartet," the U.S., U.N.,
European Union and Russia.
The next day the first direct
- meaning face-to-face talks
in 20 months are to start with
the goal of reaching a compre-
hensive peace agreement within
a one-year deadline set by the
U.S.
Since the 1993 Oslo Accords,
the broad outlines of a final
settlement have been obvious
but despite repeated tries under
a variety of auspices the two

LETTERS TO

Highway billboard
not the issue
To the Editor:
I was dismayed with the letter
"Obama's opponents act like ter-
rorists" (Aug. 18) regarding the
Lake City Reporter's story on the
billboard located on.I-75 near
the 1-10 interchange.
The Lake City Reporter cov-
ered the story as a local interest
story and I am glad that they
cover these stories. I wasn't
even aware that the billboard
was there until I was contacted
by the Reporter. But, to try to
turn it into some sort of racist,
bigoted thing just isn't right. In
the first place, Glenn Beck did
not address this issue; and as
far as I know, never has. To call
people who may address the
issue "homegrown terrorists" is
going beyond reason.
We live in a constitu-
tional republic and our First
Amendment does guarantee
the right of free speech, just as
the letter writer used when he
wrote the letter. I would also
like to have him explain how the
policies that President Obama
and Congress are pursuing are
helping the United States to suc-
ceed. Our debt (as of June 30,
2010) is $13 trillion; that is 90.5
percent of our Gross Domestic
Product and growing every day


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.comn
sides have never been able to
get there, although they have
come achingly close.
And, frankly, neither side
holds out much hope this time
around. The fact that they
are sitting down at all is, in
the words of one British com-
mentator, "an achievement for
American arm twisting."
The negotiations may not
last much past Sept. 26. That
is the date a 10-month Israeli
moratorium expires on con-
struction of Jewish housing on
West Bank lands claimed by the
Palestinians. Both the Obama
and the Bush administration
have called for a halt to further
construction but to no avail.
Indeed, Israeli authorities deep-
ly embarrassed Vice President
Joe Bideh by authorizing more
settlements on the eve of his
visit to Jerusalem.
Whether Netanyahu extends


THE EDITOR
with no sign of reversing this
trend! Our deficit for July alone
was $165 billion. How long can
the United States go on this
way? We cannot keep spend-
ing this kind of money without
it coming "home to roost" in
short order. Who is going to be
saddled with this debt? Our chil-
dren and grandchildren? Every
time another unemployment
report is issued there are Mrore
Americans who have lost their
jobs. Where are the jobs going
to come from to replace those
lost?
Our country is in serious
trouble on many fronts and for
us to go off on name calling
over a billboard serves no pur-
pose at all. I urge all Americans
to do some research, make their
own decisions about whether
America is on the right path "
and then vote accordingly on
Tuesday, Aug. 24 and Tuesday,
Nov. 2.
Sharon Higgins
Lake City

Market growing
controversy
To the Editor:
I am so very upset over the
moving of the Farmer's Market.
I read the article in the Lake
City Reporter on Aug. 17.
Trinkets? Our market has a


the moratorium is considered a
major test of the faith he places
in these talks. The Palestinians
complain that the Israelis end-
lessly protract negotiations sim-
ply to buy time to build more
settlements.
The so-called final status
issues are no less intractable for
being familiar the borders
of a Palestinian state, providing
the Palestinians some part of
Jerusalem for a capital, security
guarantees for Israel and the
rights of Arab refugees who
fled Israel during the war that
secured its independence.
And now there is a further
complication. Abbas and his
Fatah party control only the
West Bank. They were expelled
from Gaza by the more radical
Hamas, which refuses to recog-
nize Israel, calls for its destruc-
tion and dismissed these talks
as a waste of time.
The Sept 1 opening 'night
White House dinner might be
high point of the talks. Holding
them might be, as is said of
third marriages, the triumph of
hope over experience. Try, try
again.

* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


wonderful array of handmade/
homemade items which is a
standard for all markets. Take
a trip to the High Springs mar-
ket, or any of the Gainesville
markets and you will see the
same type of items. Most of our
vendors participate in these
markets also. Handmade soaps,
chocolates, bags, jewelry, sea-
soned wood for barbecuing,
plants and of course produce
vendors.
The items available are
grown/made locally: Not stuff
from other countries. These
are our neighbors. What in
the world is the beef here?
The alternative site is ground
asphalt. How in the world are
they going to set up a market
there? Our market manager,
Cliff Neukam, was promised a
grassy area at the alternative
site. It will be hot and unbear-
able to set up on the asphalt in
the summer, plants and fresh
veggies will be a mess in a few
hours. The whole thing saddens
me to no end. The Farmer's
Market needs to stay in the
park. I believe the other issues
of the letter were parking, but
there are always parking places
available, and hurting the grass
in the park but it is a park,
we are supposed to walk on the
grass.
Patty Kimler
Lake City


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmaiLcom


Democrats

clueless

and costly

W hy are
Americans
enraged? As
this moribund
economy
limps through the third year
of doldrums, Americans are
sick of having their hard-
earned money swiped by the
Democrat-dominated political
class in Washington, which is
clueless, condescending, and
invariably costly.
Could anything but clueless-
ness explain what happened
. when Harv's Metro Car Wash
in Sacramento, Calif. owed the
federal government precisely
four pennies due to a mistaken
tax return? Rather than shrug
at a four-cent error, the IRS
dispatched two agents to deliv-
er a letter by hand informing
the owner of his tax debt
"They were deadly seri-
ous, very aggressive," Harv's
proprietor, Aaron Zeff told the
Sacramento Bee. That was the
first he heard his account was
amiss. Indeed, Zeff received
an official letter last October
saying that his business had
"filed all required returns and
addressed any balances due."
Even more clueless is the
Obama Administration's War
ori'Kindles. As the Washington
Examiner's Byron York
reported, several universities
collaborated with Amazon to
offer Kindles to students in a
voluntary program to see if the
electronic devices were a wor-
thy alternative to traditional,
tree-killing textbooks.
"Unfair!" screamed the
Justice Department's Civil
Rights Division. It investigated
Arizona State, Case Western,
and other universities for pos-
sible discrimination against the
blind. As division chief Tom
Perez told a House hearing,
"We must remain vigilant to
ensure that as new devices are '
introduced, people with dis-
abilities are not left behind."
Have Perez and Justice's
other geniuses noticed that
blind people couldn't read
regular books, either? Perhaps
fairness should require univer-
sities to close their libraries,
lest sighted students enjoy a
serious advantage over their
blind colleagues.
For that matter, is it equi-
table that sighted students
can see their professors while
blind scholars only can hear
them? Perhaps DOJ should
sue every university until
they force teachers to lecture
behind dark curtains. That
way, professors could be
heard, but not seen, equally by
all students.
Meanwhile, blind people
now can activate Kindle's new-
est model to read books aloud.
Crisis averted.
As the Bureau of Economic
Analysis recently concluded,
in 2009, average private-sec-
tor compensation (salary and
benefits) was $61,051. Among
federal civilians, however, such
compensation was $123,049
slightly more than double.
Since 2000, inflation-adjusted
private-sector pay has grown
8.8 percent. Among federal
civilians, compensation is up
36.9 percent
Come November, Americans
should take this justified fury
and fire it like catapults at the
Washington Democrats who
demolish this beautiful country
just a little more each day they
go to work.
New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


4A







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Dennille Folsom (left), Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce executive director,
and Lake City Reporter Publisher Todd Wilson discuss the new 2011 Community Information
Guide, which will feature a redesigned Guide to Columbia County combined with the
Chamber's member directory information. The new Community Information Guide will publish
on Oct. 31 as a partnership between the Lake City Reporter and the Chamber of Commerce.


Partnership to inform public


From staff reports
-. The Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce will partner
with the Lake City Reporter
to enhance the 2011
Community Information
Guide,an annual magazine
that will offer information
for local residents and new-
comers and also include the
Chamber's activity informa-
tion and membership direc-
tory.
"We're honored to be
awarded the bid for this
project and to partner with
the Chamber of Commerce
to produce this publication,"
said Lake City Reporter
Publisher Todd Wilson.
"Our Guide to Columbia
County is a full-size maga-
zine that is very familiar to
our readers and our busi-
ness partners. The Guide
also has an expansive reach
to newcomers interested
in our area. This year, we
will improve and redesign
this publication to become
the 2011 Community
Information Guide and wel-
come the Chamber's infor-
.mation and membership
directory as an important
part of our publication." ,,
The Lake 'City Reporter


US golf

clubs in

the rough

By JIM FITZGERALD
Associated Press
. MAMARONECK, N.Y. -
A few weeds have popped
up on the fairways, and
summer's heat has scorched
the grass here and there,
but the golf course at the
Hampshire Country Club
is still tidy and scenic, its
little waterfall still burbling
through the rocks.
Not that there's any-
one around to notice. The
Hampshire's 18-hole course
on Long Island Sound,
along with its tennis courts,
pool and restaurant, is
closed this year. Members
cited rising costs upwards
of $25,000 a year for a mem-
bership as the roster fell
from several hundred at its
peak to about 100.
"There was a lot of talk
last year about the increas-
ing costs, people not sure
what they could pay, the
assessments always going
up," said Barbara Mines,
a member for 15 years
who lives in a house on
the Hampshire course.
"I wasn't really surprised
when it closed."
The same thing has hap-
pened in recent years at
hundreds of other cours-
es nationwide even in
the golf meccas of Florida,
Arizona and California as
the economic meltdown and
changes in family dynamics
combine to threaten club
life. Whether it's a $45,000
initiation fee for a private
club or a $5 increase in the
cost of a round at a public
course, the price of a golf
habit is giving some duffers
pause.
"It's definitely connected
to the economic conditions,"
said Jay Mottola, executive
director of the Metropolitan
Golf Association.


will publish the Information
Guide on Sunday, Oct 31,
as an insert for all Lake City
Reporter readers on that
day. The Chamber also will
receive several thousand
copies of the Information
Guide to distribute to its
members and provide to
walk-in visitors and people
requesting information
about the area.
Advertising space is
available for purchase
by any business or orga-
nization, but Chamber of
Commerce members will
receive special recognition
in'the magazine.
"Combining the Guide
to Columbia County with
the Chamber's member-
ship directory met one
of the goals I had when I
envisioned what this new
directory should look like,"
said Dennille Folsom, Lake
City/Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
executive director. "I want-
ed it to serve as not only a
way to find Chamber mem-
bers, but as a relocation
guide and a guide that all
of our community could get
information from. It was a
perfect fit.
. "We sent out bids to sev-
eral companies, formed a


subcommittee of five board
members to review and
make a recommendation,
and we were very pleased
that the Reporter was the
company that came out on
top."
Wilson serves on the
Chamber's board of direc-
tors, but was not part of
the subcommittee that
reviewed the proposals on
the membership directory.
He recused himself and did
not cast a vote when the
board of directors consid-
ered the project.
Wilson said the Lake City
Reporter and the Chamber
of Commerce share the
same vision for the com-
munity.
"We believe strong part-
nerships enhance our busi-
ness. community," Wilson
said. "It's our job to be
an advocate for Lake City
and Columbia County. We
believe in giving back to
our community."
For information on
advertising in the 2011
Community Information
Guide, contact the Lake
City Reporter at (386) 752-
1293 or the Chamber of
Commerce at (386) 752-
3690.


SNorth Korea joins Facebook?


By SANGWON YOON
Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea
- North Korea appears to
have added Facebook to
the social networking sites
it recently joined to ramp up
its propaganda war against
South Korea and the U.S.
The account opened late
Thursday under the Korean
username "uriminzokkiri,"
meaning "on our own as a
nation," an official at South
Korea's Communications
Standards Commission
said Friday.
The account opened
hours after the commission
blocked North Korea's 1-
week-old Twitter account
from being accessed 'in the
South for containing infor-
mation that is illegal under
South Korean security laws,
the official said.
North Korea's gov-
ernment-run website,
Uriminzokkiri, announced
last week that it has a
Twitter account and a
YouTube channel created
in July.
The Twitter account,
under the name uriminzok
("our nation" in Korean),
gained more than 8,500 fol-
lowers in a week though
it posted just 30 tweets
linking to reports prais-
ing North Korean leader
Kim Jong II and lambasting
South Korea and the U.S.
over ongoing joint military


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A South Korean journalist looks at a computer screen show- -
ing an alleged North Korean Facebook account which carries
content condemning "warmongers" South Korea and the '
U.S. in Seoul, South Korea, Friday. Reclusive North Korea
appears to have added Facebook to the list of social network
services it has recently joined to ramp up its propaganda war.
against South Korea and the U.S.


drills.
Uriminzok has "content
that praises, promotes and
glorifies" North Korea that
was confirmed to be "illegal
information" under South
Korea's National Security
Law, a commission state-
ment said Thursday. The'
commission said it has no
immediate plan to block the


North's YouTube channel.
A South Korean gov-
ernment warning saying
"Illegal content" pops up
when an attempt is made to.
access the Twitter account
in South Korea.
Commission official Han
Myung-ho said the new
Facebook account could be
subject to the same fate.


From staff reports

Cheek's Gymnastic of
Live Oak is relocating to
Lake City and will open
Sept. 6.
Tom Cheek is the owner
and coach. His wife. Chris,
daughter, Stormy and
granddaughter, Lucy, will
also help at the gym.
The 5,000-square-foot
building will have equip-
ment such as uneven bars,
competitive balance beams
and more. Classes will be
available for preschool,


Join us for one of our bariatrics information sessions listed
below to start your journey to a healthier, happier life.

UPCOMING BARIATRICS INFORMATION SESSIONS

Tuesday,August 31st at 7:00 PM
Presented by Dr.Javier Herrera
Columbia County Public Library in Lake City
308 NW Columbia Avenue
For registration information, call 904-308-LINK.




ST. VINCENT'S
H E A L T H C A R E

bariatricservicesjax.com

This is a StVincent's HealthCare event, Columbia County Public Library is acting solely
as the location for this information session.


beginning, intermediate
and advance.
Cheek's Gymnastic will


be located at 3228 NW
Highway 41. Call (386) 205-
8363 or (386) 590-2529


...NEW GYMNASTICS GYM

. .heek s
Gvmnassics
k so Of Live Oak is now in Lake City
Tom Cheek, owner and coach invites
everyone to come check us out.
S3228 NW HWY 41
(3 miles from Hardees)
S;bcell 205-8363 or 590-2519


Special Interests Include:
Preventive Care/l Physicals
Geriatric Care
Women's Health
Diabetes Management
Most appointments in 24 hours
Mast Insurances accepted


FACTORY SALE!

Save $50-$250 t
OFF Woodstoves, Gas Stoveshru
and many Fireplaces.
10 MAJESTIC


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Ph. 377-9535


Gymnastic center balances fun, education


Mineh Patl, MDN riblh "Kath>
Newman, ARNP


1611 N. Main St. OPEN
Gainesville M-F 9:30-5:30


Carli eSpark

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755-0808


F w -odtovefloida JJm


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


I .- .. -.- -







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


Lemonade stand benefits


pediatric cancer research


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
Avery Harwell wanted to
make a difference in the
lives of children who are
battling cancer.
Saturday, she persuaded
her father Nick Harwell
to build a lemonade stand
called, "Shiver Me Lemons"
and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
she sold cups of lemonade
to fund cancer research.
Nick Harwell said the
proceeds from Saturday's
lemonade sales are to be
donated toAlex's Lemonade
Stand Foundation, a sup-
port group which uses the


funding to help find a cure
for children's cancer. The
foundation emerged from
the front yard lemonade
stand of cancer patient
Alexandra "Alex" Scott,
who died in 2004 at the age
of 8.
The program is spon-
sored and enand endorsed by
Country Time Lemonade,
which is partnering with
Alex's Lemonade Stand
Foundation to raise
money for pediatric cancer
research.
Although the Avery's
lemonade stand was made
from scrap wood, Avery's
is not giving a half-hearted
effort towards helping the


young cancer patients.
"I decided to do the lem-
onade stand because I like
lemonade alnd because I
thought it would be fun for
us to sell lemonade and get
money for them," said the
eight-year-old. "I decided
to help the cancer patients
(kids) because some of
them can't have their can-
cer done so they can have a
cure for their disease."
Contributions can be
made in care of "Shiver Me
Lemons," Post Office Box
813, Lake City, FL, 32056.
For more information,
go to www.alexslemonade.
org.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Nick Harwell (from left) watches as his daughter Avery Harwell sells a cup of lemonade
to Janet Snyder on Saturday. Avery Harwell was selling the lemonade to raise funds for
children's cancer research.


Kiwanis to kick off county food drive


From staff reports
When the members of
the Kiwanis Club of Lake
City heard children in
Columbia County were
going to bed hungry, they
took immediate action.
After hearing a presenta-
tion from Catholic Charities
Executive Director Suzanne
Edwards, Kiwanians were
told that one-in-three
school-aged children in
Columbia County only get
one meal to eat each day.
Touched by the story,
the group took immedi-
ate action and organized a
food drive to help stock the


Food Bank of the Suwannee
Valley, a Lake City organi-
zation overseen by Catholic
Charities that supplies food
for organizations helping
those in need.
Lake City Kiwanians
will launch their food drive
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Saturday at the Publix
Shopping Center. They
are asking residents to
drop off canned and non-
perishable food items that
will be transported to the
Food Bank. The event will
kick off a month-long food
drive in which collection
boxes will be placed in


offices around Lake City.
During September, Lake
City Kiwanis members will
gather the food and deliver
it to the Food Bank.
"Ift's appalling to think
that 30 percent of the chil-
dren in Columbia County go
to bed after eating only one
meal per day," said Kiwanis
of Lake City President
Koby Adams. "The Kiwanis
Club is focused on helping
children. We can do some-
thing about this."
During the food drive
kickoff on Saturday, people
who donate canned goods
will be eligible to win donat-


ed door prizes.
"We want to help the
children who are hungry,"
said Lake City Kiwanis
President-elect Kyle Keen.
'We know kids who arce
not hungry can do better
in school. When we found
out about this need, it was
perfect timing for us to get
involved."
Anyone needing more
information about thi
Kiwanis food drive or want-
ingto obtain food drop box
for their business should
call Kyle Keen at 365-5126
or Koby Adams at 623-7840
or Nobie Ronsonet at 752-
2180.
1


Today

Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
duction at High Springs
Community Theater is
"The Spell Of Sleeping
. Beauty" at 2 p.m. today.
All tickets are $5 and avail-
able at The Framery, The
Coffee Clutch in High
Springs and through Pay
Pal at www.highspringcom-
munitytheater.com.
Class Meeting ,
The Class of 1973 will
make a meeting at 5 p.m.
today at the Richardson
Community Center. Call
Estralita Taylor at (386)


867-06718 or Maenell
Bailey at (386) 961-1630.
Artists wanted
The Art League of
North Florida is present-
ing the 6th Annual All
Media Juried Art Exhibit
Friday through Oct. 28 at
the Levy Performing Arts
Center. The exhibit is open
to all two and three dimen-
sion original works of art
by persons 18 years or
older. There will be cash.
awards of $1,000. Entry
applications are available
at the Columbia County
Public Library and the.
Fabric Art Shop.. Contact
Fetchenj@comcast.net.


OBITUARIES


Linda Lee Borg
Linda Lee Borg, a resident of
Lake City, passed away Au-
gust 17, 2010. She was born
July 9, 1958 in San Francisco,
California. She was a wonder-
ful lady who was always caring
and giving to others. Linda will
be deeply missed and forever in
the heart of her loving husband,
Rocky Borg; children, Rocky II,
and Rita; thre grandchildren;
'sister, brother;: and son'in4aw.
There will be (t-oformal services.
Mrs. Borg's care -entrusted- to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City. (386) 752-4366.
"The Caring Professionals"

Phyllis Winifred Stewart
Whitaker
Phyllis Winifred Stewart
Whitaker, daughter of Roy
Glenn Stewart and Bianca Beck-
er Stewart, was born on March
26, 1921 in Winside, Nebraska.
She died on August 17, 2010 in
Lake City Medical Center, Lake,
City, Florida, after a brief illness.
A precocious child, she was
reading before she started school
and her love of literature never
waned. A graduate of Robert E.
Lee High School in Jacksonville,
Florida She also excelled in
sports, teaching archery in gym
class at the request of her gym
teacher, winning several archery
competitions, and was a member
of the Girls' Athletic Association
winning a letter and a silver cup
as captain of the volley ball team.
Her education continued at Lake
City Junior College,, graduating
in 1971, with an AA degree mag-
na cum laude. Florida Blue Key
honored her .as the outstanding
female student
of her graduat-
ing class and
she was includ-
ed in "Who's
Who in Junior
Colleges" and
was elected to
'Phi Beta Kap-
pa. At the request of the College,
she donated one of her paintings
to the College Art Hall of Fame.
SShe completed her college stud-
ies at Valdosta. State College,
graduating in 1977 cum laude
with a BS in English and a
teaching certification. She was
a member of the Georgia Stu-
dent Educational Association,
and the American Association of
University Women. She taught
reading for two years at JRE Lee
School in Jasper. She tutored
:for many years, helping adults
working on their GED, brain-
damaged children, elemen-
tary and high. school students.
On March 27, 1943, at Riverside
Park Methodist Church, she mar-
ried a handsome Second Lieuten-
ant, Frederick Struppa Whitaker,
'Jr. For the next few years she
followed him around the coun-
try, as he served the Army Air
Corps, reading her way through
the public libraries of Manhattan,
Kansas, San Antonio and Hous-
ton, Texas, Memphis, Tennes-
see and Richmond, California.
From her teen years, she was
tireless in serving others play-
ing the piano for the Vacation
Bible School at the Riverside
Park Methodist Church, where
she was also a member of the


Westminster Fellowship. She
joined the First Presbyterian
Church of Lake City, Florida in
1949 when the family moved to
Lulu, and was an active member
until her death. She assisted in
Vacation Bible School, taught
Sunday School classes of every
age group, helped in the church
nurseries, was adult advisor for
the Senior High Fellowship and
chairperson of several circles.
She also served as vice-president,
president-anld district chairper-
son ofthe Women of the Church.
'She served three terms as Elder
and on several committees of the
Presbytery and was active in the
General Assembly of the Pres-
byterian Church. It was at the
General Assembly of the presby-
terian Church in 1990 that a brief
three-minute speech she deliv-
ered on the floor changed the
entire course of the Assembly.
While she was deeply devoted to
her church, she was passionate
for Boy Scouting. A legendary
pioneer in Scouting, she began as
an assistant den mother in 1965,
later advancing to den mother.
She was the first woman to
serve as Cub Scout Round Table
Commissioner for the Suwan-
nee River District. She served
as Cub Scout District Com-
missioner, Cub Scout District
Chairman, Unit Commissioner,
District Commissioner and as a
merit badge counselor. She was-
appointed North Florida Coun-
cil Cub Scout 50th Anniversary
Chairman and submitted a photo
slide presentation of a Cub Scout
that was chosen to be included in
the opening ceremony of the na-
tional meeting of Cub Scouts in
New Orleans in 1980. She was
the first recipient of the District
Award of Merit from the Suwan-
nee River District, and the first
woman to receive the Silver
Beaver Award from the North
Florida Council. She served for
over twenty years on the North
Florida Council Advisory Board
and on the Executive Board. She
attended and received both the
very first Cub Scout and later the
Boy Scout Wood Badge training.
These are the highest level of
training available to adult lead-
ers in Scouting. Most recently,
on April 24, 2010, in an impres-
sive ceremony at World Golf Vil-
lage, she was honored as one of
the top four finalists out of a field
of 400, nominees for the Scout-
ing America Merit Award for the
100th Year Celebration of Scout-
ing in America. Her ties with lo-
cal Scout Troop 85 exceed twenty
years in various roles, including
service as Committee Chairman.
A long-time resident of Colum-
bia County, she always claimed
that her beloved Suwannee
River flowed through her veins.
Her interests and activities in the
community were many and var-
ied: member of the Coast Guard
Auxiliary and Executive Di-
rector of the Columbia County
United Way from 1979 to 1989,
doubling their contribution dur-
ing her tenure. In 1989 she was
chosen Woman of the Year for
Columbia County. She served
as Secretary-Treasurer and
President of the White Springs
Woman's Club and President
of the Stephen Foster Music
Club, as well as Secretary of the
White. Springs Recreation As-
sociation that raised the funds


to establish the softball park
in White Springs. For a num-
ber of years she was a docent
at the Stephen Foster Memo-
rial Museum in White Springs.
She is preceded in death by her
devoted husband of sixty-four
years, Frederick Struppa Whita-
ker, Jr., her daughter Laura El-
len Whitaker (Clifton) Bennett
and her only brother, Wallace
Theodore (Louise) Stewart. She.
is survived by her daughters, Pa-
tricia Louise (David) Durham of
Portland, Texas; and Mary Anne
Whitaker of Houston, Texas; and
by three sons: Frederick Stephen
(Andrea) of Wenatchee, Wash-
ington; George Edwin (Stacy) of
White Springs; and David John
of Toronto, Canada; 8 grand-
children, Edward Grant (Bretta)
Ogburn of Blairsville, Georgia;
Barbara Carol Durham of Aus-
tin, Texas; Shannon Michelle
Whitaker of Kodiak, Alaska; Ja-
son Michael (Shelly) Whitaker
of Spring, Texas; Bryan Zachery
Whitaker of Houston, Texas;
Rebecca Star Page of Westmin-
ster, Colorado; Russell Tyler
Whitaker of Lake City, Florida;
and Nichole Angelique (Adam)
Lavespere of Pineville, Loui-
siana; 2 step grandchildren, Ed
Brooks of Puyallup, Washington
and Shaina (Tony) Rodrigues
of Kent, Washington; 7 Great-
grandchildren: ChristaJoy (Josh)
Edmonds; Tyler Grant Ogbum;
Reece William Ogburn; Tommy
Griffin Potter; Caroline Bailey
Potter; Jordan Alesp Whita-
ker and Katie Elaine Whitaker.
Memorial Services will be con-
ducted at a later date. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake City
is in charge of the arrangements.

Lola Rhymer Norris

Mrs. Lola Rhymer Norris, 92, of
Lake City, passed away peace-
fully surrounded
by her loving
family on Friday
afternoon August 9
20, 2010, in the
Haven Hospice
of the Suwan-
nee Valley. Mrs. Norris
Norris was a
lifelong resident
of Columbia County. She was
born at Benton, a turpentine
settlement in the Northern area
of the County, on January 2,
1918 to the late Raymond and
'Organ Robinson Rhymer. Mrs.
Norris met and married her late
husband of fifty-six years, Da-
vis Norris and together they had
seven children. Mrs. Norris was
a homemaker and very much en-
joyed gardening, fishing, cook-
ing and especially spending time
with her family. Mrs. Norris was
a longtime member of the Deep
Creek Advent Christian Church.
She was preceded in death by her
parents, her husband, a daughter,
Mary Ann Norris and a great-.
grand daughter, Angie Register.
She is survived by her children,
Alice and Ray Cheshire; Jerry
and Shirley Norris; John David
and Jackie Norris; Carolyn and
George Moseley; Jane and Ed-
ward Ritch all of Lake City and
Evelyn and Albert Register of


LaCrosse, Florida; and a brother,
Sellers Rhymer of Chillacothe,
Ohio. Sixteen grandchildren,
twenty-seven great-grandchil-
dren and seven great-great
grandchildren also survive. Fu-
neral services for Mrs. Norris
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.,
Wednesday, August 25, 2010 in
the chapel of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home with Rev.
Howard Thomas officiating. In-
terment will follow in the Scott
Cemetery (located off of US 441
North at the Deep Creek Advent
Christian Church). The family
will receive friends in the cha-
pel of the funeral home from 5-
7:00 Tuesday evening. In lieu of
flowers the family requests me-
morial donations be made to the
Haven Hospice of the Suwan-
nee Valley, 6037 US Highway
90 West, Lake City, FL 32055.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,


458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386)752-1234, par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome.com.

Walter Thomas Hendrix

Mr. Walter Thomas Hendrix, 69,
of Lake City, passed away on
Saturday morning August 21,
2010, in the Haven Hospice of
the Suwannee Valley. Tom was
born on December 27, 1940, in
Lake City, Florida, to the late!
Walter and Lula Mae Witt Hen-
drix Gillen. He attended Wil-
liam and Mary College, Auburn
University and earned his Juris
Doctorate from the University
of Mississippi. He retired from
the U.S. Federal Government
in 1999 and lived and worked
in Atlanta, Georgia, for many
years. Later in life he relo-
cated'to Lake City. Tom loved
to read and travel. Tom was of
the Catholic faith. He was pre-
ceded in death by his parents,


a brother, Chuck Hendrix and
his step-father, Carl Gillen.
He is survived by his life part-
ner, Rod Alexander; his Aunts,
Doris Touchton and Jackie Bran-
non and several cousins all of
Lake City. The family requests
that memorial donations be
made to the Haven Hospice of
the Suwannee Valley, 6037 U.S.
Highway 90 West, Lake City, FL
32055. The family would like to'
"thank Dr. Brent Hayden and his
Staff, The Staff of the Lake City
Medical Center and the entire
Staff of the Haven Hospice for
all of the wonderful care and ser-
vice rendered Tom. Cremation
arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY.FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, gall thb Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Community Calendar


"Thanks to the Lake City
Reporter, we are able to reach
many more potential patients
through our advertising. We
have a growing practice and our
weekly advertising has had a
great impact on our success."


FOR DR. GREENE'S PRACTICE


The practice ofDaina Greene, GREENE
MD, OB/GYN has grown
through their marketing
efforts and consistent
advertising in the
Lake City Reporter


Find out ways to grow
your business by .Mee ,
calling 752-1293. *Dr Greene s -,OB ppts
Care enter chemedical officer at Pregnnc
Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.Thurs.. . ,
755-0500 449 SE BO a Dram-5:30pm






Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


Page Editor: Tom Mayer 754-0428










A VOTE is a terrible thing to waste.



Liz P. Home


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS, COLUMBIA COUNTY


Office (386) 758-1026 Fax (386) 755-7233
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3734
www.votecolumbia.com Email: election@votecolumbia.com
Branch Office:
17579 SW SR 47 Fort White, Florida 32038


NEED AN ABSENTEE BALLOT?
CALL 758-1026
OR COME BY THE OFFICE


Mark Ballot This Way
Completely fill in the oval opposite the
name of each candidate or issue you
wish to vote for.
USE ONLY THE MARKING PEN PROVIDED


EARLY VOTING
BEGINS: Monday, August 9, 2010
ENDS: Saturday, August 21, 2010
Voting from 8:30 AM 4:30 PM


REPUBLICAN PARTY
ONLY

THESE RACES APPEAR
ON ALL BALLOTS

CONGRESSIONAL

UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
0 William Escoffery III
0 William Billy Kogut"
CD Marco Rublo,
STATE

GOVERNOR & LIEUTENANT
GOVERNOR
(Vote for One)

C Mike McCalister
"Not Yet Designated"

Q Bill McCollum
"Not Yet Designated"

C0 Rick Scott
"Not Yet Designated"

ATTORNEY GENERAL
(Vote for One)
0 Holly Benson
C Pam Bondi
0 Jeff Kottkamp


THIS RACE APPEARS .
ON ALL REPUBLICAN BALLOTS IN
PRECINCTS: 1,3,4,5,8,7,8,11,13,14,16,17,18,19,22 and 23
AND PART OF PRECINCTS: 9,15 and 21
LEGISLATIVE

STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 11
(Vote for One)

CD Elizabeth Porter'
0 Terry Rauch
CD Charles E. Underhill
0 Paul Watson


DEMOCRATIC PARTY


ONLY


THESE RACES APPEAR
ON ALL BALLOTS
CONGRESSIONAL

UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
CD Glenn A. Burkett
CD Maurice A. Ferre
C) Jeff Greene
CD0 Kendrick B. Meek
STATE

GOVERNOR & LIEUTENANT
GOVERNOR
(Vote for One)

C Brian P. Moore
"Not Yet Designated"

CD Alex Sink
"Not Yet Designated"

ATTORNEY GENERAL
(Vote for One)
0 Dave Aronberg
CD0 Dan Gelber


NON PARTISAN COUNTY


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT # 2
THIS RACE APPEARS
ON ALL BALLOTS IN: 1,3,6 and 18

COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 2
(Vote for One)

0 Cedric L. Davis
0 Rusty DePratter
CD Leo Fleming
CD Marc Kazmierski
CD Stew Lilker


LAKE CITY COUNCIL
DISTRICT # 10
THIS RACE APPEARS ON
ALL BALLOTS IN:
PART OF PRECINCTS 10 AND 24
LAKE CITY COUNCIL PERSON
DISTRICT 10
(Vote for One)

CD Adee Farmer
CD0 Tammy Perry Harris
CD Eugene Jefferson
0 Clarence (Sonny) Tucker Jr.


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT #.4
THIS RACE APPEARS
ON ALL BALLOTS IN: 7,8,9,15 and 16
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 4
(Vote for One)

C) Stephen E. Bailey
C) Toby Witt


OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT

PRIMARY ELECTION

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FL

AUGUST 24, 2010


I I


_ __


--


.r i


- I












GOP governor candidates focus on Panhandle


By MITCH STACY
Associated Press
ANAMA CITY
With three
days to go in a
tight primary
race, Republican
candidates for governor
Bill McCollum and Rick
Scott turned their attention
Saturday to the conserva-
tive Florida Panhandle.
The bitter rivals were
hop-scotching each
other with their stops,
both starting with morn-
ing meet-and-greets
in the Pensacola area
before moving to Destin
and Panama City. Both
planned to end the day
in Jacksonville at the
Jacksonville Jaguars-
Miami Dolphins exhibition
football game.
Scott, accompanied
by his wife, mother and
one of his two daughters,
went table to table shak-
ing hands and chatting
with breakfast patrons at
the landmark Coffee Cup
diner in Pensacola and
later made the rounds
and spoke at a sunny
Panama City park where
his campaign served free
barbecue pork lunches to
several hundred people.
As he has throughout
the campaign, Scott touted
his business experience
and said ifs time to send
an outsider to Tallahassee
who will hold lawmak-
ers and state agencies
accountable.
"I will work my tail off,
use common sense and I'll
run the state on behalf of
taxpayers and families," he


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott laughs with Karen Donovan on Saturday during a campaign stop at the Coffee Cup Restaurant in Pensacola.
GOP gubernatorial candidate Bill McCollum waves to rush hour commuters on East Colonial Drive, at Bumby Avenue, during a honk-n-wave event with
supporters in Orlando on Friday.


told the receptive crowd.
Sue Krauss, a 68-year-
old retiree who lives in
Panama City Beach, said
she was leaning toward
Scott but hadn't complete-
ly made up her mind about
who to vote for Tuesday.
"I'm more interested in
getting people out of office
who have been in office for
a long time," Krauss said,
explaining her aversion
to McCollum, a former
congressman and current
state attorney general. "I'm
trying to find a reason to
vote everybody out."
However, she said she
was "concerned" about
what McCollum's TV
ads say about Scott and
his running of a hospital
conglomerate that paid


a record $1.7 billion to
settle criminal charges of
Medicare fraud. Scott says
he had no knowledge of
the criminal wrongdoing
at Columbia/HCA, but
acknowledges it as his
greatest business failure.
"If I had been perfect, I
would have prevented all
of the investigations and
gotten ahead of it," he said
in Pensacola.
Scott was greeted in
Panama City by an SUV
emblazoned with his face
and the words: "Rick Scott,
release the deposition," a
reference to his refusal to
make public a sealed depo-
sition he gave earlier this
year in a lawsuit against
another health care com-
pany he co-founded.


McCollum visited a
bait shop in Gulf Breeze
where the owners told
him business is off about
46 percent from last year
because of the Gulf oil
spill. They urged him to
pressure federal officials
to reopen the waters to
fishing soon. And they
said they're worried about
being compensated for lost
revenue under the federal
government's new oil spill
claims' administration
plan.
McCollum said he
has written letters to
BP PLC and administra-
tion officials on behalf
of Floridians who are
concerned about the com-
pensation system.
"I am really worried


about the new systeni,"
he said. "We are con-
cerned that the new stan-
dards about who is paid
for losses are different
from the previous stan-
dards. I will get my voice
out there."
Later McCollum
lunched on corned
beef and cabbage, bean
soup and a root beer
at McGuire's Irish Pub
with about 40( people. He
told them streamlining
the oil spill claims pro-
cess for Panhandle resi-
dents, getting the waters
reopened to fishing and
boosting the region's
economy are among his
top concerns.
Tuesday's election will
culminate a bitter four-


month contest that saw
record spending for a
state primary campaign
- mostly by Scott, who
has written checks for
more than $30 million
to blanket the state's TV
airwaves with his com-
mercials.
After trailing in some
polls by double-digits
less than a month ago,
McCollum overtook
Scott in a Quinnipiac
University poll out this
week. But nearly a fifth
of participants said they
hadn't yet decided on a
candidate and roughly
a third said they might
still change their mind.
The winner will face
Democrat Alex Sink in
November.


Chamber emerges as formidable political force


By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON At
times subtle, at times
loud, the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce is spending
record amounts on lobby-
ing and in election battle-
grounds, elbowing into the
nation's politics in unprec-
edented ways for the busi-
ness community.
The country's largest
business lobby has pledged
to spend $75 million in this
year's elections. That's on
top of a lobbying effort that
already has cost the orga-
nization nearly $190 mil-
Slion since
Barack
I S Obama
-. became
,.. President
in January
2009.
Obama Tose
numbers
alone, together with what
chamber officials say is a
network of online backers
that can amplify the pro-
business message, give
the group clout as a virtual
third party and a power-
ful voice in what laws are
made and who's elected to
write them.
"Elections have conse-
quences, votes matter,"
said Bill Miller, the cham-
ber's political director.
"And we're going to go out
and engage in an effort to
try and ensure we have
people on Capitol Hill that
will listen to our arguments
and propose and promote
ideas that are more sup-
portive of the free enter-
prise system."
In its dual lobbying-poli-
ticking roles, the cham-
ber has been a visible
player in congressional
debates, fighting Obama
administration initiatives
on health care, financial
regulations and energy
policy. It's weighed in on
Senate contests, spend-
ing more than $4 million
so far in Massachusetts,
Arkansas, Colorado,
Pennsylvania, Illinois
and Ohio. It's endorsed
Republican Senate candi-
dates in Florida, California
and Missouri, and it plans
another wave of ads around
Labor Day.
This expanded entry


into politics comes as legal
restraints on the political
activities of corporations
and unions are eased. As a
result, the chamber is not
operating in a void.
A group of independent
organizations is acting as a
sort of GOP auxiliary, rais-
ing big bucks to help GOP.
Their efforts led Obama,
in his radio and Internet
address Saturday, to decry
the "flood of attack ads
run by shadowy groups
with harmless-sounding
names."
Democrats see the cham-
ber as part of a larger army
arrayed decidedly against
them. Among the other
participants are:
American Crossroads,
created with the help of
Republican masterminds
Karl Rove and Ed Gillespie.
It has pledged to raise $50
million to help Republicans
this year. That group and
its affiliated Crossroads
GPS have already spent
more than $3 million airing
ads against Senate Majority


in Ohio.
Americans for Pros-
perity, founded by mil-
lionaire David Koch of
Wichita, Kan.-based Koch
Industries. It has aired ads
in at least eight House dis-
tricts criticizing Democrats'
voting records. AFP presi-
dent Tim Phillips said the
group has raised more than
$26 million this year and is
planning new ads in three
Arizona and three Florida
congressional districts next
week. The group is spend-
ing $4.1 million to air an ad
in 11 states that disparages


.ASSOCIATED PRESS
The United States Chamber of Commerce building in
Washington, seen in this recent file photo, is entering politics
in ways that are unprecedented for the business community.
It has pledged to spend $75 million in this year's elections, on
top of a lobbying effort that has already cost the organization
nearly $200 million since Barack Obama became president.

Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), in Missouri and Michael
and Democratic Senate Bennet in Colorado and for
candidates Robin Carnahan Republican Rob Portman


PRIMARY ELECTION
AUGUST 24,2010
POLLS OPEN: 7 A.M.
POLLS CLOSE: 7 RM.
ELIZABETH "LIZ" P. HORNE
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
COLUMBIA CO. FL.
971 W DUVAL ST. STE 102
LAKE CITY, FL. 32055
You will be asked to show a photo and signature identification
when you go to the polls to vote.
Acceptable forms of photo identification include:
* Florida driver's license
* Florida identification card issued by the Dept. of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles
United States passports
Debit or credit card
* Military identification
Student identification
* Retirement center identification
Neighborhood association Identification
* Public assistance identification

Primary Election
Florida is a closed primary state. That means that only voters
who are registered members of political parties may vote for
their respective party's candidates in a primary election. Voters
without party affiliation are not eligible to vote for party candi-
dates in a primary election. If all candidates have the same party
affiliation and the winner will have no opposition in the general
election, all qualified voters, regardless of party affiliation, may
vote in the primary election for that office. This is know as a
Universal Primary Contest. Nonpartisan judicial and school
board offices, nonpartisan special districts, and local referendum
questions' are included in some primary elections. All registered
voters, including those without party affiliation are entitled to
receive and vote these ballots.


Congress' economic stimu-
lus package. "We want to
make these guys on the
left defend on our issues,"
Phillips said.
Supreme Court and
lower court decisions have .
not altered the chamber's
political approach. It does
not have to disclose its
donors, many of them large
corporate contributors,
because its ads don't spe-
cifically call for the defeat
or election of candidates.
Rather, the ads admonish
candidates or salute them
for their stands on issues.


PRECINCT POLLING LOCATIONS


1 (&23) Mt. Salem Baptist Church
6334 SW County Road 240 L.C. 32024
2 Pinegrove Baptist Church
1989 N US Highway 441 L.C. 32055
3 (&11) Christ Central Ministries
359 SW Dyal Ave L.C. 32024
4 Lake City Shrine Club
771 NW Brown Road L.C. 32055
5 (&22) Gateway Baptist Church
3252 SW State Road 247 L.C. 32024
6 Fort White Comm. Ctr.
17579 SW State Road 47 F.W. 32038
7 Mikesville Club House
152 SE Sidney St L.C. 32024
8 Mason City Community Ctr
11110 S US Highway 441 L.C. 32025
9 Lulu Community Center
205 SE Community Dr. Lulu 32061
10 Richardson Community Center
255 NE Coach Anders Ln L.C. 32055
11 (&3) Christ Central Ministries
359 SW Dyal Ave L.C. 32024
12 Teen Town
533 NW Desoto St L.C. 32055
13 Wesley Mem United Meth Church
1272 SW McFarlane Ave L.C. 32025


14 Southside Baptist Church
388 SE Baya Dr L.C. 32025
15 (&24) Eastside Baptist Church
196 SE James Ave L.C. 32025
16 Bethel United Methodist Church
4843 S US Highway 441 L.C. 32025
17 Woodmen of the World Hall
1339 SW State Road 47 L.C. 32025
18 Lake City Christian Academy
3035 SW Pinemount Rd L.C. 32024
19 Pleasant Grove Methodist
4709 SW State Road 47 L.C. 32024
20 Winfield Recreation Ctr
1324 NW Winfield St L.C. 32055
21 Parkview Baptist Ch.
268 NW Lake Jeffery Road L.C. 32055
22 (&5) Gateway Baptist Church
3252 SW State Road 247 L.C. 32024
23 (&1) Mt. Salem Baptist Church
6334 SW County Road 240 L.C. 32024
24 (&15) Eastside Baptist Church
196 SE James Ave L.C. 32025
25 Deep Creek Comm Center
11936 N US Highway 441 L.C. 32055


LIZ P. HORNE
Supervisor of Elections
www.votecolumbia.com
July 26, 2010 146th Revision


''GOVERNO


LAKE CITY REPORTER POLITICS SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police position themselves outside the Intercontinental hotel after a gunbattle with gunmen
who took hostages in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday. A police spokeswoman said the hos-
tages were freed and the suspects surrendered after about three hours of negotiations.


Gunmen invade luxury


hotel in Rio de Janeiro


By FELIPE DANA
Associated Press

RIO DE JANEIRO -
Gunmen engaged police
in a shootout and took 30
people hostage Saturday at
a luxury hotel popular with
foreign tourists, but sur-
rendered within hours after
freeing their captives.
The upscale, beachside
neighborhood where the
Intercontinental Hotel is
located was transformed
into a virtual war zone as
the 10 suspects armed
with high-caliber rifles,
grenades and pistols -
exchanged fire with police
in a shootout that killed a
bystander as she was get-
ting out of a taxi.
Dozens of other sus-
pects fled into a nearby
slum where the shootout
began. Spent casings from
high-caliber weapons lit-
tered the pavement in front
of the hotel and residents


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police stand guard as tourists leave the Intercontinental hotel
after it was invaded by gunmen who took hostages in Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday.


of the neighborhood said
they were awakened by the
shooting.
"It seemed as if I was
in Iraq," Jose Oliveira e
Silva, a resident of the Sao
Conrado neighborhood,
told the Globo television
network.
Amateur video aired on


Globo showed a group of
black-clad police taking
heavy fire and returning it
as they took cover behind a
garbage truck.
Sanitation workers in
bright orange jumpsuits
huddled behind the truck,
waiting for the onslaught
to end.


Army of diplomats takes

the lead in fractious Iraq


By ROBERT BURNS
Associated Press

WASHINGTON As
the White House eagerly
highlights the departure
of U.S. combat troops
from Iraq, the small army
of American-diplomats left
behind is embarking on a
long and perilous path to
keeping the volatile coun-
try from slipping back to
the brink of civil war.
Among the challenges
are helping Iraq's deeply
divided politicians form, a
new government; referee-
ing long-simmering Arab-
Kurd territorial disputes;
advising on attracting for-
eign investment; pushing
for improved government
services; and fleshing out
a blueprint for future U.S.-
Iraqi relations.
President Barack
Obama also is banking on
the diplomats about 300,
protected by as many as
7,000 private security con-
tractors to assume the
duties of the U.S. military.
That includes -protecting
U.S. personnel from attack
and managing the training
of Iraqi police, starting in
October 2011.
The Iraq insurgency,
which began shortly
after U.S. troops toppled
Baghdad in April 2003,
is why the U.S. only now
is entering the post-com-
bat phase of stabilizing
Iraq. Originally, the U.S.
,thought Iraq would be
peaceful within months of
the invasion, allowing for
a short-lived occupation
and the relatively quick
emergence of a viable gov-
ernment.
Although the insurgen-
cy has been reduced to
what one analyst terms
a "lethal nuisance," it
will complicate the State
Department's mission and
test Iraq's security forces.
Much is at stake as the
department negotiates


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 20, 2009, file photo, President Barack Obama
meets with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in the Oval
Office at the White House in Washington.


with the Pentagon over
acquiring enough Black
Hawk helicopters, bomb-
resistant vehicles and
other heavy gear to outfit
its own protection force
in Iraq.
"Regardless of the rea-
sons for going to war,
everything now depends
on a successful transition
to an effective and unified
Iraqi government and Iraqi
security forces that can
bring both security and sta-
bility to the average Iraqi,"
says Anthony Cordesman
of the Center for Strategic
and International Studies.
In his view that transition
will take five years to 10
years.
The question is wheth-
er progress will be inter-
rupted or reversed once
American combat power
is gone.
The U.S. will have 50,000
troops in Iraq when the
combat mission 'officially
ends Aug. 31; they are
scheduled to draw down
to zero by Dec. 31, 2011.
Until then, they will advise
and train Iraqi security
forces, and provide secu-
rity and transport for the
diplomats.
Gen. Ray Odierno, the


top U.S. commander, in.
Iraq, said in an interview
to be broadcast Sunday on
CNN's "State of the Union"
that he believes Iraq's secu-
rity forces have matured to
the point where they will be
ready to shoulder enough
of the burden to permit the .
remaining 50,000 U.S. sol-
diers to go home at the end
of next year.
"My assessment today
is' they they will be,"
Odierno said, according to
an excerpt of the interview
released Saturday by CNN.
"We continue to see
development in planning,
in their ability to conduct
operations," he added.
"We continue to see politi-
cal development, econom-
ic development and- all of
these combined together
will start to create an atmo-
sphere that creates better
security."
Once the U.S. troops are
gone, the State Department
will be responsible for the
security of its personnel.
Obama administration
officials say the diplomats
are well prepared for what
the .State Department -'
expects to be a three- to five-,
-year transition to a "normal"
U.S.-Iraqi relationship.


Egyptian police recover

stolen Van Gogh painting


By HADEEL AL-SHALCHI
Associated Press

CAIRO Police recov-
ered a painting by Vincent
van Gogh at Cairo airport
Saturday, hours after it was
stolen from a museum in
the Egyptian capital, the
country's culture minister
said.
Farouk Hosni said secu-
rity officers at the airport
confiscated the painting
from an Italian couple as
they were trying to leave
the country. The work of
art, which Hosni said was
valued at $50 million, was
stolen earlier Saturday
frpm Cairo's Mahmoud


Khalil Museum.
No further details were
immediately available
on how the artwork by
the 'Dutch-born postim-
pressionist was stolen or
recovered.
It is the second time this
painting, which is called
both "Poppy Flowers"
and 'Vase with Flowers,"
has been stolen from the
Khalil museum.
Thieves first made off
with the canvas in 1978,
before authorities recov-
ered it two years later at
an undisclosed location in
Kuwait.
Officials have never
fully revealed the details


of that theft., When it was
recovered, Egypt's then-
interior minister said three
Egyptians involved in the
heist had been arrested
and informed police where
the canvas was hidden.
Authorities never
reported whether the
thieves were charged or
tried.
The one-foot-by-one-
foot canvas, believed
to have been painted in
1887, resembles a flower
scene by the French artist
Adolphe Monticelli, whose
work deeply affected van
Gogh. The Monticelli
painting also is part of the
Khalil collection.


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Foi-ReservationsandDirectio


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I











1 OA LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


THE WEATHER



CHC. OF CHC.F C CHCOF CHC. OF CHC. OF
-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS | T-STORMS T-STORMS



H1 94 L075 H192I9 73 2 H7923LO 2 LO HI2ULO HI^'LO


1711.1 77l .l'.M~t^-f
ILla OlflI.


NATIONAL FORECAST: An intensifying storm system will produce numerous showers and
thunderstorms across the East today. Heavy rain will be possible in parts of the Northeast.
Thiuniders.ornis will also be scattered along the Gulf Coast and throughout much of the
Intermountain West. High pressure will promote much less humid weather over the Midwest.


1k-" '. .


Pensacola
94, 79


Vaeuta
93/74

Tallahassee Lae City
94 76 94 -5
* Gainesville *
PanamCity 93 75
92,. 78 Ocala *
93 75


Tampa *
00,7-10 i


"at'


Jacksonville
90 77

Daytona Beach
90 77

*0


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Kav, Went.


Olando Cape Canaveral ..
9476 90 77 LakeCity
Miami


' West Palm Beach
9i:- 77
Ft Lauderdale
FL Myers 91 79 *
93, 77 Naples a
59' 78 Miami
Key West 90 79
90 81


LAE li T A N


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


90
77
90
70
99 in 1983
64 in 1961


0.02"
3.21"
35.38"
4.57"
34.70"


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunnse tom.
Sunset tom.


7:02 a.m.
8:05 p.m.
7:02 a.m.
8:03 p.m.


MOON
Moonnse today 6:52 p.m.
Moonset today 5:08 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 7:23 p.m.
Moonset tom. 6:03 a.m.



Aug. Sept. Sept. Sept.
24 1 8 15
Full Last New First


Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


Monday
.9 76 I

-31 SI I

92 7j
S7I
9 1 7

92 803 I

91 77 I
91 73 I
93 77 i
89 78 I
91 7S
91 741
*1 79 1
90 5
41 I *3 1


Tuesday
90 76 I

91 51 p,:
9? ;6 I
91 72r
91 $3 r

92 7; 2
92 80 r
91 77 p:
91 73
93 ,5 pc
89. 79 I
92 78 I
92 75 I
91 7S pI.
90 72 1 ,
90 79 1
. _


Cold Foml

Warm Front

Stallonary
Fronm
Occluded
Front


..YESTER S NAT L - -EXREME
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


S. ,,"', ..





10 nmitestonbum t, '
Toda, 5 j +..-,+.-,
uli.r iolet '.
raoiati.on risl "
for me area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

S veat her.com

*. Forecasts, data and graph-
SIcs 2010 Weather Central
SLLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp
Albany NY 75/50/0
Albuquerque 90/64/0
Anchorage 59/51/0
Atlanta 91/75/0
Baltimore 86/70/0
Billings 99/62/0
Birmingham 93/75/0
Bismarck 88/5410
Boise 90/63/0
Boston 73/62/0
Buffalo 82/63/0
Charleston SC 91/79/.09
Charleston WV' 82/65/0
Charlotte 90/72/0
Cheyenne 86/54/0
Chicago 84/71/.45
Cincinnati 2/69/.04
Cleveland 82/73/0
Columbia SC 91 79 01
D-tlas 102/82/0
Daytona Beach 93/76/.18
Denver V i.' ". '


. Hl/Lo/W CITY
74/65/t Des Moines
93/63/pc Detroit
59/47/sh El Paso
91/74/t Fairbanks
85/70/t Greensboro
93/57/t Hartford
97/75/pc Honolulu
100/65/pc Houston
,80/45/pc Indianapolis
75/64/t Jackson MS
74/63/sh Jacksonville
91/78/t Kansas City
86/63/pc Las Vegas
92/70/t Uttle Rock
92/60/pc Los Angeles
81/67/s Memphis
&85 64 a Miami
.62 pc Minneapolis
-93,. 75, i Mobile
104/80/pc 'New Orleans
90/77/t New York
97/64/s Oklahoma City


High: 104,Yuma, Ariz. Low: 31, Stanley, Idaho


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/WN
91/68/0 88/67/s
76/72/.23 81/64/pc
96/75/0 100/74/pc
58/40/0 68/44/pc
87/68/0 87/71/t
79/57/0 78/65/t
82/76/0 89/73/s
97/78/0 99/80/pc
88/72/.04 87/65/s
93/78/0 97/76/t
96/77/0 90/77/t
90/68/0 91/69/s
103/86/0 104/85/pc
100/80/0 97/75/s
71/60/0 76/63/pc
99/81/0 98/76/pc
94/78/.02 90/79/tc
82/69/0 88/68/s
92/77/.01 95/77/t
94/78/0 94/80/pc
83/66/0 82/70/t
99/79/0 97/71/s


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
90/68/0 90/68/s
92/75/0 94/76/t
87, 69. ,0 85/72/t
100/89/0 106/87/pc
87/67/0 80/62/pc
75/52/0 70/63/sh
63/53/0 69/53/dr
89/67/0 90/72/t
99/59/0 102/64/pc
87/56/0 82/51/s
89/70/0 92/70/t
70/54/0 ,87/59/s
88/72/.43 91 67
97/70/0 89/62/pc
97. 78. 0 100/77/pc
74/64/0 76/65/pc
61/56/0 68/56/pc
64/52/0 64/49/sh
73/55/0 74/46/pc
89/78/.86 92/79/t
93/81/0 100/78/t
88/74/0 86/71/t


-1L, _. Saturday Today Saturd
-P'. ; CITY HI, Lo, Pcp. HI Lo..-W CITY HI.'Lo,'
Acapulco 5.4 7; l ) 71 5 4r. La Paz 59 25
Amsterdam I' c. 593 I LUma .4 $9
Athens e; 0 i 93 1 pc London ;5 66
Auckland I.: ,. Ja *r. Madrid f* F6
Beijing I5 e 2. t 5 '., .: .r, Mexico City : ;
Berlin 84/57/0 82/64/sh Montreal 70/57
Buenos Aires 75/52/0 71/54/sh Moscow 66/45
Cairo 100/79/0 96/78/pc Nairobi 77/54
Geneva 84/61/0 87/66/s Nassau 95/81
Havana 90/72/0 93/73/s New Delhi 83/70/.
_____f .______ _-___, Helsinki 72/48/0 69/57/pc Oslo 72/57/.
Hong Kong 93/82/0 88/80/t Panama 86/77
SKingston .88'79"'06 91/78'c Paris 88/61
-0' KEYT .00dNDITIONS: r-, I,,u.,, ir-d=dizzle, f=fair, fg-fog, h
aim4e4ai i4. .1 ,i rn r. .,rI.wers, sn=snow, ts-thun


ay
Pcp.
Su

I'l
6 0

/0
/0
/0
/0
/o
02
03
/0
/0O


Today
HI. Lo,,W
66 30 p,:
(.4 57 ;r.
74 57 r
i96. :.2
6.8 5s )nr
77/64/sh
68/57/sh
78/57/sh
93/79/t
87/77/t
66/54/pc
89/75/pc
84/66/sh


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday'
HI/Lo/Pcp.
77.,63 0
?8 tob 0
89, 79. 01
.*: 77 ,05
72 39 0
90/75/0
90/77/.15
63/48/0
91 81'0
91/77/0
7 1 65 0C
79/55/0
79/52/0


-=hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain,.s-sunny,
derstorms, w=windy.


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On mis dale in
1923, the tempera
lure aa Anchorage.,
Alasla reached &2
degrees, a record
for August for me
IO 31ion that ,as.
after tied orn te 2nd
in 1978.


Today
HI/Lo,W
78.62'p.:
91 69
89 82 sn
85 79 4n
62 39-s
89/77/t
87/73/pc
66/48/s
93/78/pc
95/78/sh
72/63/sh
86/60/s
82/64/s


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. . . .


I WFAINEt BY -THE -HOUR ., I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


10A


LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


1









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@jakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, August 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

WOLVES VOLLEYBALL
Conditioning
begins Monday
Conditioning for
Richardson Middle
School volleyball is
3:15-5:15 p.m. Monday
and Tuesday. Tryouts
are 3:15-5:15 p.m.
Wednesday. Tryout
packets are at the front
office. An updated
physical, and signed
drug and parent consent
forms must be provided.
For details, call Casey
Fulford at 623-4893.
SEMINOLES
Kickoff Tailgate
Party Sept. 2
The Lake City
Seminole Club is hosting
a Kickoff Tailgate Party
from 6-9 p.m. Sept. 2 at
the Lake City Elks Club
on Lake DeSoto. Fans
are invited to bring their
favorite tailgate food to
kick off the new era in
Seminole football.
For details, call Steve
Gordon at 365-5413.
CHS BASEBALL
Dugout Club
meets Thursday
The first meeting of
the season for the CHS
Dugout Club is 6 p.m.
Thursday in the Career
Center at the school.
All parents of interested
players are requested to
attend.
For details, call Tyson
Johnson at 755-7275.
CHS FOOTBALL
Season tickets
at McDuffie's
Season tickets,
parking passes and gifts
are at McDuffie Marine
& Sporting Goods. The
season ticket package
is $40 for five games.
General admission is $7.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Players needed
for travel team
A 12-under travel
baseball team is looking
for experience players
for local tournaments.
Practices are 5:30 p.m.
Sunday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Chris
Williams at 344-5976.

Fall league
registration set
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has fall season sign-up
set for 5-7 p.m. Friday,
and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex. Fee of
$50 includes jersey, hat,
socks and insurance.
Ages for the five leagues
range from 5-6 coach
pitch to 13-15. A parent
or guardian must provide
a birth certificate.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.


* From staff reports


Football


Quarterback club
at Fort White has
Jam at the Gym.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High unveiled all
its football teams during
the Jam at the Gym on
Saturday.
The annual event is spon-
sored by the Fort White
Quarterback Club, which
served hamburgers and
hot dogs for the fundraiser
and signed up members.
The event helped turn
families into fans.
Chris Coleman and his
wife, Lori, brought sons
Bryce and Chase to sup-
port big brother, Mason,
who is a sixth-grader on the
middle school team.
'We have done baseball,
so this is something new,"
Lori said.
'This is his first time play-
ing football and he's excited
about it," Chris said. "We
hope the whole team does
real good."
Bryce, 9, said he likes
football and baseball and
is waiting until he gets his
chance in middle school.
Alphonso Brown and
Fernanda Legree are the
parents of varsity player
A.J. Legree. Both went to
school in Fort White, but
graduated from Columbia,
High before the new high
school was built
"I think they are going
to have a great season,"
Fernanda said. 'They are
working on being a lot
closer as players. It is like a
brotherhood."
"I think they will be
pretty good," Alphonso said.
"They are sort of young
and I don't know about the
new guys coming up. They
are pretty motivated from
last season. They are disap-
pointed they didn't make
the playoffs."
Probably the most
important group was Doug
Bentley, Randy Pitts and
Jeff Newman, dads who
were handling the cooking.
Randy's son, Wesley, had
a cast on after breaking
his left arm and said he
would be out at least three
months.
"According to my son
(Zack), the offensive line is


greetings


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High football fathers Doug Bentley (from left), Randy Pitts and Jeff Newman tend the grill for the Jam at the Gym'
event sponsored by the Fort White Quarterback Club. The varsity, junior varsity and middle schools teams were introduced.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Regina Reed (left) and Pam Bentley sign up members for the
Fort White Quarterback Club on Saturday.


the same and he is excited
about the new kids," Doug
said. "We have never had a
great amount of depth."
Jeff has sons Dylan on
the varsity and Shayne on
the junior varsity. 10
"If they remain a family
and a team, I think they will
do good," Jeff said. "With


the amount of players we've
got, compared to the other
schools, we stand up pretty
well."
One lady selling food was
especially upbeat
"I think they are going
to be district winners,"
she said. 'We have a good
group of kids, a good


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Voice of the Indians Shayne Morgan (from left), middle school
coach Mike Hunter and Athletic Director John Wilson visit.


coaching staff and good
fans. We are ready to go
forth this season."
Thank yop, Mrs.? ...
"I'm Gloria Jackson, (head
coach) Demetric's mom."
Another Mrs. Jackson,
Demetric's wife Kemberly,
who is a coach in her own
right, weighed in.


'We have a pretty tough
schedule, but I know the
boys liave been practic-
ing hard all summer long
and I think we will have a
successful season."
The season starts on
Friday when Columbia vis-
its Arrowhead. Stadium for
a kickoff classic game.


The hot seat H
Zook among Six A losing record will almost"
coaches who must certainly finish him in Ann
W tsson Arbor. ,
win this season. M Dan Hawkins, -


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
One bad season can put
a coach in danger of being
fired, and these guys are in a
precarious position entering
this season.
They are six coaches who
really need some wins. You'll
notice a distinctly Big Ten
flavor.
Rich Rodriguez,
Michigan.
No surprise here.
Rodriguez has lost 16
games in two seasons with
the Wolverines and he's
gotten the program in
trouble with the N.CAA.
Oh yeah, and he's now
working for an athletic direc-
tor who did not hire him.
But Michigan does not
hastily fire coaches. Eight
victories and a bowl game
should buy Coach Rod
another year.


Colorado.
A hefty buyout about $3
million reportedly proba-
bly kept Hawkins in Boulder
for a fifth season after the
Buffaloes went 3-9 in 2009.
He's been to one bowl
game in four season and
has yet to have a winning
record.
He was in a tough, spot
when he took over following
Gary Barnett's messy depar-
ture, but there have been
few signs of progress.
Unfortunately for Hawk,
the schedule does him no
favors (at California, Hawaii,
Georgia, at Oklahoma and at
Nebraska).
'* Ron Zook, Illinois.
Since taking the Illini to
the Rose Bowl in 2007, Zook
has won eight games. He
cleaned out his coordinators
after last season, bringing
in Paul Petrino (Bobby's
COACHES continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 5, 2009, file photo, Illinois coach Ron Zook shouts from the sidelines while
playing against Fresno State in Champaign, III.


- I


I r.,










LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
3 p.m.
SPEED -American Le Mans Series, at
Elkhart Lake,Wis.
5 p.m.
VERSUS- IRLGrand Prix of Sonoma,
at Sonoma, Calif.
BEACH VOLLEYBALL
4:30 p.m.
ABC Manhattan Beach Open,
women's championship match, at
Manhattan Beach, Calif.
BASKETBALL
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Men's national teams,
exhibition, Global Community Cup, U.S. vs.
Spain, at Madrid, Spain (same-day tape)
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Czech
Open, final round, at Celadna, Czech
Republic
Noon
TGC PGA Tour, Wyndham
Championship, final round, at Greensboro,
N.C.
2 p.m..
CBS PGA Tour, Wyndham
Championship, final round, at Greensboro,
N.C.
4 p.m.
NBC Champions Tour, JELD-WEN
Tradition, final round, at Sunriver, Ore.
5:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Safeway Classic, final
round, at North Plains, Ore.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
ESPN World Series, elimination
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
2 p.m.
'ABC World Series, elimination
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
3 p.m.
ESPN World Series, elimination
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
6 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, winner's
bracket final, at South Williamsport, Pa.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, winner's
bracket final, at South Williamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
TBS San Francisco at St. Louis
2:10 p.m.
WGN -Atlanta at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN L.A.Angels at Minnesota
MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE
SI p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, championship game,
Boston/Chesapeake winner vs. Denver/
Long Island winner, at Annapolis, Md.
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NBC Preseason, Minnesota at San
Francisco
TENNIS
Noon
CBS ATP, Western & Southern
Financial Group Masters, championship
match, at Mason, Ohio
3 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Rogers Cup,
championship match, at Montreal (same-
day tape)

Monday
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
ESPN2 World Series, consolation,
at South Williamsport, Pa.
2 p.m.
ESPN World Series, winner's
bracket final, at South Williamsport, Pa.
4 p.m.
ESPN World Series,, elimination
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
6 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, winner's
bracket final, at South Williamsport, Pa.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, elimination
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Cincinnati at San Francisco
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Preseason, Arizona at
Tennessee
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Liverpool
at Manchester City


BASEBALL

AL standings


New York
Tampa Bay
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore


East Division
W L
76 47
74 48
69 54
64 57
44 80


Central Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 71 52 .577 -
Chicago 66 55 .545 4
Detroit 59 63 .484 II 'A
Kansas City 51 70 .421 19
Cleveland 50 72 .410 20'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 68 54 .557 -
Oakland 61 60 .504 6%'
Los Angeles 62 62 .500 7
Seattle 49 74 .398 19'h
Friday's Games
Detroit 6, Cleveland 0
Seattle 6, N.Y.Yankees 0
Texas 2, Baltimore 0
Toronto 16, Boston 2
Minnesota 7, L.A.Angels 2
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
ppd., rain
Oakland 5,Tampa Bay 4
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 9, Seattle 5
L.A.Angels 9, Minnesota 3
Baltimore 8,Texas 6
Cleveland at Detroit (n)
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City
(n), Ist game
Toronto at Boston (n)
Tampa Bay at Oakland (n)
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City
(n), 2nd game
Today's Games
Cleveland (J.Gomez 3-1) at Detroit
(Verlander 13-8), 1:05 p.m.
Seattle (French 2-3) at N.Y. Yankees
(Sabathia 16-5), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (Tom.Hunter 9-2) at Baltimore
(Millwood 2-13), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Marcum 11-6) at Boston
(C.Buchholz 14-5), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks .12-8) at
Kansas City (Greinke 8-1 I), 2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Garza 12-7) at Oakland
(Braden 8-8), 4:05 p.m.
LA. Angels (Jer.Weaver 11-8) at
Minnesota (S.Baker 10-9), 8:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Kansas City at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Seattle at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L*
Atlanta 72 51I
Philadelphia 69 52
Florida 61 60
New York 61 61
Washington 52 70
Central Division


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago
Pittsburgh


San Diego


W L
71 51
65 54
58. 64
53 68
73
40 82
West Division
W L
73 48


Pct GB
.585 -
.570 2
.504 10
.500 10'h
.426 19'/`

Pct GB
.582 -
.546 4'/
.475 .13
.438 17'I
.411 21
.328 31


San Francisco 69 54 .561 5
Colorado 62 59 .512 II
Los Angeles 62 61 .504 12
Arizona 48 75 .390 26
Friday's Games
Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 3
N.Y. Mets 7, Pittsburgh 2
Philadelphia I,Washington 6
Florida 9, Houston 0
Milwaukee 10, San Diego 6
San Francisco 6, St. Louis 3
Arizona 4, Colorado 3, 10 innings
Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers I
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5,Atlanta 4
N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh (n)
Washington at Philadelphia (n)
Houston at Florida (n)
San Diego at Milwaukee (n)
San Francisco at St. Louis (n)
Colorado atArizona (n)
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Houston (Figueroa 3-1) at Florida


(Nolasco 14-8), 1:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 10-7) at Pittsburgh
(Duke 5-12), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Olsen 3-5) at Philadelphia
(Oswalt 8-13), 1:35 p.m.
San Diego (Garland 12-8) at Milwaukee
(M.Parra 3-9).210 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 8-7) at St. Louis
(.Garcia 10-6), 2:15 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 1-0) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Wells 5- 11),2:20 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 13-7) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 11-7), 4:10 p.m.
Colorado (j.Chacin 5-9) at Arizona
(D.Hudson 3-1),4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Washington, 7-05 p.m.
Houston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

Little League

WORLD SERIES
At South Williamsport. Pa..
(Double elimination)
Friday
Fairfield, Conn. 3,AuburnWash. I
Pearland,Texas 10, Plymouth, Minn. 8
Manati, Puerto Rico I I, Ramstein AFB,
Germany 0.4 innings, 10-run rule
Tokyo, 4, Nuevo Laredo, Mexico 2
Saturday
Hamilton, Ohio 16,Toms River, N.J. 6
Vancouver, British Columbia 4, Chitre,
Panama 2
Columbus, Ga. 6,Waipahu, Hawaii 2
Game 8 Kaohsiung, Taiwan vs.
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia (n)
Game 9 -Auburn,Wash.vs. Plymouth,
Minn.(n)
Sunday
Game 10 Ramstein AFB, Germany
vs. Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, Noon
Game II Toms River, N.J. vs.
Waipahu, Hawaii, 2 p.m.
Game. 12 -.Chitre, Panama vs.
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, 3-p.m.
Game 13 .- Manati, Puerto Rico vs.
Tokyo, 6 p.m.
Game 14 Fairfield, Conn.. vs.
Pearland,Texas, 8 p.m.
Monday
Consolation .- Game 9 loser, vs.
Game 10 loser, Noon
Game 15 Vancouver, British"
Columbia vs. Kaohsiung,Taiwan, 2 p.m.
Game 16 Game 13 loser vs. Game
10 winner, 4 p.m.
Game 17 -Hamilton, Ohio vs. Game
7 winner, 6 p.m.
Game 18 Game 14 loser vs. Game
9 winner,'8 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
Buffalo 34,Indlanapolls 21
New England 28,Atlanta 10
Friday's Game
Cincinnati 22, Philadelphia 9
Saturday's Games
Baltimore at Washington (n)
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants (n)
Miami at Jacksonville (n)
St. Louis at Cleveland (n)
Kansas City atTampa Bay (n)
N.Y. Jets at Carolina (n)
Houston at New Orleans (n)
Oakland at Chicago (n)
Dallas at San Diego (n)
Detroit at Denver (n)
Green Bay at Seattle (n)
Today's Game
Minnesota at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
Monday's Game
Arizona at Tennessee, 8 p.m.

Arena Bowl XXIII

Friday
At Spokane
Spokane 69,Tampa Bay 57

AUTO RACING


Race week

INDYCAR
Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule:Today, race, 5:30 p.m. (Versus,
5-8 p.m.).
Track: Infineon Raceway (road course,
2.303 miles).
Race distance: 184.2 miles, 80 laps.


COACHES: Terps' Friedgen on list


Continued From Page 1B


brother) to run the offense
and Vin Koenning (from
Kansas State) to handle the
defense.
Bill Lynch, Indiana.
Lynch stepped into the
toughest of situations, tak-
ing over the program after
Terry Hoeppner's death in
2007. He took the Hoosiers
to a bowl that season, buf
has had two losing seasons
since.
Tim Brewster,
Minnesota.
He came to Minneapolis
and energetically tried to
rally support for a program
that has been mostly medi-
ocre for a while. He won
one game his first season,
bounced back with eight
his second helped by a
weak schedule and fell
off to six last year. With a
fancy new stadium to fill,
the university is unlikely to
swallow another clunker.
N Ralph Friedgen,
Maryland. The Fridge was
31-8 in his first three sea-
sons at Maryland, but the
Terps haven't been the same


since and they crashed to
2-10 last year. Offensive
coordinator James Franklin
already has been tapped




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. z

I RUYLB I


as Friedgen's successor in
2012, but that plan could go
out the window if Maryland
falters again.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHEN THE FOREMAN
| S5AIP HE WAS AL-L-
S < WR-RCONG,
z_ ^ THE WORKERS
GAIMBY 5AIPm HE WA5---
-- -- I Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: WINCE TRULY LIZARD WAYLAY
Answer: They were motivated to hunt for snakes by
the "CRAWL" OF THE WILD


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter

Junior Gold bowlers

Lake City youth bowlers who participated in the 2010 USBC Junior Gold Championships in
Indianapolis in July are Josh Fancy (from left), Cody Howard, Colin Madden, Cody Stuart
and Courtney Schmitt.


S Next for gold

Christine Peters (left) and
Cody Stuart have qualified
Sfor the 2011 Junior Gold
Championships scheduled
for Las Vegas. The Lake City
bowlers won the female and
male Junior Gold local
qualifying events at the
Donald R. Suhl Memorial
Youth Tournament on Aug.
.. 14. The USBC Junior Gold
S Championships provides
competition for bowlers for
scholarship prizes and a
chance to represent the
United States as a member
TIM KIRBY/Lake City Bowl of Junior Team USA.




Vickers had heart surgery


By JENNA FRYER'
Associated Press

BRISTOL, Tenn. Brian
Vickers had heart surgery
last month as part of his
treatment for blood clots,
but the NASCAR driver
said he fully expects to
resume his racing career
next season.
Vickers has been out
since May because of clots
in his leg and lungs. In his
first update in three months,
Vickers said Saturday he
had two procedures in July
to close a hole in his heart
and insert a stent into a


ACROSS

1 Pop's compan-
ion
4 Decked out
8 Genetic letters
11 "The Greatest"
12 Mecca resident
13 Summer
Games org.
14 Preferring soli-
tude
16 Novak of
"Vertigo"
17 Buddies
18 Not here
20 Get the drift
21 Large parrot
22 Coal
25 Merlot, e.g. (2
wds.)
29 Woodland crea-
tures
30 Outfit
31 Geisha's
accessory
32 Choler
33 Psyche parts
34 spumante


vein in his left leg.
Although doctors diag-
nosed him with the blood-
clot disorder May-Thurner
syndrome, Vickers believes
he'll be off blood thinners
by Jan. 1 and driving for
Red Bull Racing when next
season begins.
'"They gave me full, clear-
ance for next year," the
26-year-old driver said at
Bristol Motor Speedway. "I
will be back next season
racing in January. I'm really
excited about that. I had
two issues I never knew
about fixed. It's a *bit of
fresh air for me to really


15 License
18 Cloudburst
39 Zero
10 Jungle crusher
41 Kind of buffet
14 House menace
,8 Depot info
19 Remote area
51 Near the
ground
52 Presses
53 Aurora, to Plato
54 RN assistant
55 Mr. Blair
56 Vane dir.

DOWN

1 Painter
Chagall
2 Ersatz butter
3 Wis. neighbor
4 Hindu group
5 San Obispo
6 Part of speech
(abbr.)
7 Lost some
8 Sea barrier
9 Roulette color


kind of know part of what
caused this."
Vickers was hospitalized
in May with chest pains that
led to the discovery of blood
clots in his leg and lungs.
He said .he'd stop driving
the rest of the season while
undergoing treatment, and
revealed Saturday the dis-
covery of a third clot, in his
finger, that doctors believe
moved through a hole in
his heart.
He had surgery July 12
to close the passageway,
and a second procedure to
insert the stent was done
the next day.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

DATA ROE LOOM
READ URN GALA
ARID MAG NETIC
MOLES TAE HOE


U HF RUSE EPIC
MAL GN FRODO
PHONE RNGER
SAPS CHIN OAK


L ES HAN DOWNS
OUTFOXED KOOL
FREE ESE ERGO
TOME STA REST


Peak
More confident
Comes in last
Word to a mule
Frat-party
orders


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 12 13 4 15 16 17 8 19 110 I


22 Actress
Adams
23 Dawn, in verse
24 Edible root
25 Carnival fea-
ture
26 In that case (2
wds.)
27 Defense org.
28 Camelot lady
30 Brooklet
34 Fort of note
36 - rush
37 Morsel
38 River cross-
ings
40 Musician
Goodman
41 Vend
42 Up above
43 Croquet site
44 Cel character
45 Freezes over
46 Ring wins
47 To be, to
Brutus
50 Aragon gold


8-23 2010 by UFS, Inc.








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


Kirkman strikes out side

in major league debut


Associated Press

BALTIMORE Rookie
Josh Bell hit his first two
major league home runs,
part of an unprecedented
long-ball barrage against
Cliff Lee that carried the
Baltimore Orioles past the
slumping Texas Rangers
8-6 Saturday.
Ty Wigginton and Luke
Scott also connected
against Lee, who never
before yielded four homers
in a game. The left-hand-
er has given up 13 home
runs this season seven
against Baltimore.
Lee (10-7) had gone five
starts since July 22 without
surrendering a homer. He
allowed a career-high tying
eight runs, 10 hits and a
walk in 5 2/3 innings.
It was the first time this
season Lee failed to go at
least six innings.
Making his major league
debut, Texas lefty Michael
Kirkman struck out the
side in the seventh and got
the first out in the eighth.
Bell began the onslaught
with a two-run shot in the
third. Wigginton and Scott
homered in succession in
the fourth, and later in the
inning Bell connected with
two on for a 7-2 lead.
Bell went 3 for 4, drove
in five runs and scored
three times. He missed a
third homer with a drive to
right that hit high off the
7-foot wall.
Josh Hamilton hit his
27th homer and had three
RBIs for the Rangers, who
have lost five of six and 11
of 15.
Orioles starter Brad
Bergesen (5-9) allowed five
runs and nine hits in seven
innings.
Mike Gonzalez gave up
an RBI double to Mitch
Moreland in the eighth
and Koji Uehara.got three
outs for his first major


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Baltimore Orioles' Craig Tatum (left) and Felix Pie (right)
celebrate with Josh Bell (25) after Bell's three-run home run
off Texas Rangers pitcher Cliff Lee in Baltimore on Saturday.


league save.

Yankees 9, Mariners 5
NEW YORK Eduardo
. Nunez drove in the go-
ahead run with his first
career hit in the seventh
inning, and the New York
bullpen patched together
six stellar innings in a vic-
tory over Seattle.
Nunez got the start in
place of Alex Rodriguez,
who was placed on the dis-
abled list with a lingering
left calf injury.
Relievers Chad Gaudin,
Boone Logan (1-0) and
David Robertson helped
get the ball to Mariano
Rivera, who allowed a run
in the ninth while getting
four outs for his 25th save.
Ichiro Suzuki hit a pair
of homers and Russell
Branyan belted one of the
longest ever at the new
Yankee Stadium, but it
wasn't enough for Jason
Vargas (9-6).

Angels 9, Twins 3
MINNEAPOLIS -
Peter Bourjos hit his first
major league home run
and added a triple and four
RBIs to lead the Angels.


The speedy center field-
er also threw out Jason
Kubel at home plate. Erick
Aybar added three hits and
an RBI for the Angels.
Kevin Slowey (11-6) last-
ed just three innings for
the Twins.
Francisco Rodriguez
(1-3) allowed one hit in
2 2/3 innings of relief for
the win.

Cubs 5, Braves 4
CHICAGO Aramis
Ramirez had three hits and
two RBIs, Tom Gorzelanny
pitched seven strong
innings and the Chicago
Cubs held on to beat the
Atlanta Braves Saturday.
Cubs reliever Sean
Marshall entered with the
bases loaded in the eighth
inning. Brooks Conrad hit
a ball off the center-field
ivy. Derrek Lee and Alex
Gonzalez came around
to score, and David Ross
scored when shortstop
Starlin Castro dropped the
relay throw for an error to
make it 5-4.
After giving up a three-
run triple to Rick Ankiel in
Friday's loss, Cubs closer
Carlos Marmol pitched a
scoreless ninth.


k.
ff4
~4 -2;~,
V


Tennis campers
The Lake City Parks and Recreation
Department sponsored a summer
tennis camp at Youngs Park. Those who
participated are (group photo front row, from
left) Colin Broome and Austin Green. Second
row (from left) are Kaleb Lang, Christian
Chiong, Kyle Hardy, Avona Randolph and
Eva Kirby. Back row (from left) are
Nick Ghayal, coach Andy Creel, Dillon
Kapadia, Anthony Broome, Emily De Lisle,
Shane Keen and Theo Chiong. Trophy
winners are (top left, from left) Eva Kirby and
Avona Randolph for 12-under girls; (top, from
left) Kyle Hardy and Christian Chiong for
12-under boys; (left, from left) Dillon Kapadia
and Kaleb Lang for 16-under.


Tommy John surgery has come a long way


By JON KRAWCZYNSKI
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS On a
pitcher-perfectJune night in
the Twin Cities, Francisco
Liriano and Tim Hudson
dueled for eight dazzling
innings, making every hit
look like pure accident and
every run scored feel like a
minor miracle.
Liriano struck out 11 and
allowed one run .in eight
innings for the Twins.
Hudson went the distance
for the Braves, losing 2-1
after giving up five of his
seven hits and both runs in
the seventh inning.
Even more impressive,
both have reasserted them-
selves as top-shelf starters
this season after having
Tommy John surgery, the
elbow-ligament-replace-
ment procedure that once
spelled the beginning of the
end for a pitcher's career.
"That's the modern mir-
acle of what doctors can do
to put people back togeth-
er," ,Twins manager Ron
Gardenhire said after the
game. "We all know the arm
takes a beating. Goodness
gracious, we saw two guys
who were both throwing
the ball 90-plus mph with
sliders and stuff. That's
because some doctors did
some really good jobs."
As the pennant races
heat up, more and more
pitchers are showing that
there is life after Tommy
John. Hudson, Liriano,
Florida's Josh Johnson,
Atlanta's Billy Wagner and
St. Louis Cardinals ace
Chris Carpenter are among
the many coming back
from the surgery almost as
good as they've ever been, a
development that surprises
even the physician who pio-
neered the. technique more
than 30 years ago.
"I had no idea it would
do this," Dr. Frank Jobe
told The Associated Press by
phone from his California


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 11 photo, Atlanta Braves pitcher Tim Hudson works against the Minnesota Twins


in a baseball game in Minneapc

offices. "It startles me even
today that it has done that.
The doctors are recognizing
the condition early enough
to fix it and they are learn-
ing how to do the surgery
so well. They rehab it so not
just the arm, but the whole
body gets better."
It's even working for
power pitchers. Rays closer
Rafael Soriano's fastball is
still in the mid-90s, Johnson
is hitting 96 regularly and
Liriano's superb slider is
biting again.
"I feel great," said
Hudson, who had the sur-


gery in 2008. "I can't feel
any better. My arm's as
good as it's ever been. I
wish they had similar pro-
cedures for the rest of your
body."
When Jobe told Dodgers
pitcher Tommy John he
wanted to take a tendon
from John's right forearm
and use it to replace the
torn ulnar collateral liga-
ment in his left elbow, John
wasn't the only one in that
room who was unsure how
the whole thing was going
to turn out
S"I told him I wasn't sure


and that he didn't have
much of a chance coming
back, but itwas probably the
only chance," Jobe recalled
of their 1974 meeting.
After 18 months of rehab,
John returned in 1976 and
remarkably pitched for
13 more years, proving
the surgery was a viable
option to treat an injury that
otherwise would have
ended a pitcher's career.
Still, Jobe wasn't totally con-
vinced in the early going.
"When he did come back,
I thought maybe we could
do it on somebody else," he


said. "I waited two years to
try it on somebody else, but
we had no idea we could -do
it .again."
But there were many
others, including some
earlier this decade, who
never returned to their
previous form. Minnesota's
Joe Mays, Atlanta's Mike
Hampton and former Mets
prodigy Bill Pulsipher are
among the long list who
struggled to make it back,
with some developing
shoulder problems or other
injuries in the process.
In the last five years or
so, team physicians have
been perfecting the deli-
cate rehabilitation process;
and skilled surgeons like
Dr. James Andrews and
Dr. Lewis Yocum have
helped reduce what was a
four-hour procedure into a
one-hour deal.
"It seems like the whole
thing is turning out better,"
Jobe said.
Liriano had the surgery
in 2006 after dominating
the American League in a
superb rookie season. It
took him four long years to
work his way back, but now
he appears close to being
the ace he once was. Liriano
had a 21-inning scoreless
streak end last week and
has said his arm has felt
stronger and stronger after
each start.
Hudson and Johnson
each made much quick-
er recoveries. Hudson
returned from surgery in
2008 to pitch late in 2009,
performing well enough
to earn a three-year, $28
million contract to stay in
Atlanta.
Hudson has rewarded
the Braves' faith, going 13-5
with a 2.24 ERA this season
to lead the team to first
place in the NL East.
"I think gradually every-
thing gets a little bit better,"
Hudson said. "I'm not say-
ing there's going to be crazy
leaped and strides from one


week to another. The more
you get out there, the stron-
ger you're going to be."
It's seemingly been even
easier for Johnson, who
returned from the surgery
in July 2008. He is 32-10
since coming back and has
been better than ever this
season, going 10-4 with a
1.97 ERA and a career-best
4.33 strikeout-to-walk ratio.
"You go back to Tommy
John and how it's evolved
over the course of time, it's
definitely at the point where
it's not a negative anymore,"
Rays manager Joe Maddon
said. "You do believe that if
it happens to a young guy,
you know you're, ,going to
have him back and possibly
even better. It's the world
we live in, man."
An entirely new world
where the procedure is
starting to be .viewed as rou-
tine maintenance, Rockies
manager Jim Tracy said.
"It's like taking your
car to Jiffy Lube," he said.
"Does your car run better
when you get an oil change?
Same thing here."
Ligament-replacement
surgery is even start-
ing to creep into the NFL
now. Quarterback Jake
Delhomme had Tommy
John surgery while with
Carolina and is now likely
to start for the Cleveland
Browns this season..
Jobe said the key is tak-
ing an entire year to reha-
bilitate, being patient as arm
strength is restored, and
not rushing back, which
exponentially increases the
risk of re-injury.
So will the advancements
continue?
"I'm sure they can," Jobe
said. "You never want to say
in medicine this is the end.
You're always coming up
with something a little bit
different. Even with Tommy
John, there's people doing
things slightly different. In
their minds they're getting
better."


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 7 file photo, Alabama running back Mark Ingram (center) holds the championship trophy with his teammates after
winning the BCS Championship game against Texas in Pasadena, Calif.




Tide stays on top


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

NEW YORK Alabama
will start this season where
it ended last season.
The Crimson Tide is on
top.
Coach Nick Saban has
the Tide rolling the way
Bear Bryant did in his day,
first in The Associated Press
preseason poll for the first
time since 1978.
Alabama received 54 of
60 first-place votes from
the media panel and 1,491
points to easily outdistance
second-ranked Ohio State
in the Top 25 released
Saturday.
The Buckeyes, who have
been ranked no lower than
11th in the last eight pre-
season polls, received three
first-place votes.
Boise State is third, its
best preseason ranking,
following another unde-
feated season. Underdogs
no more, the Broncos even
received one first-place
vote. ,
Florida, Alabama's
Southeastern Conference


rival, is fourth. Fifth-ranked
Texas received a first-place
vote.
The rest of the top 10
has TCU sixth, followed by
Oklahoma, which received
a first-place vote, Nebraska,
Iowa and Virginia Tech.
The 10th-ranked
Hokies face Boise State at
FedEx Field, home of the
Washington Redskins, on
Labor Day night
As for Alabama, Bryant
was coach the last time the
Crimson Tide was the APs
preseason No. 1. The Tide
started and finished that
1978 season on top of the
rankings, the first of two
straight national champion-
ships for Alabama. The only
other time Alabama was
preseason No. 1 was 1966,
when Bear's boys were
coming off back-to-back
national championships.
Saban's Tide, led by
Heisman Trophy winner
Mark Ingram, will try to
make Alabama the first
program to win back-to-
backiAP titles three times.
Oklahoma and Nebraska
also have done it twice.


But please don't call
Alabama the defending
champion at least not in
front of its coach.
"What was accomplished
by last year's team has
nothing to do with this
year's team. The players
have to understand that,"
said Saban, who in three
seasons has fully restored
Alabama's status as an elite
program.' "This team has
to develop an image, an
identity of its own by its
performance. What was
accomplished last year is
just a standard for some-
body else to top.
"Complacency, is why the
mighty fall."
Saban has been trying
to downplay this team's
No. 1 worthiness since
the morning after the Tide
beat Texas 37-21 at the
Rose Bowl to win the BCS
championship.
Back in January he practi-
cally was lamenting the fact
that his team likely would
be preseason No. 1 in 2010,
quick to point out that while
the Tide's offense would be
returning most of its stars,


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its dominant defense was
facing major turnover.
Gone are All-Americans
Terrence Cody, Rolando
McClain, Javier Arenas and
six other starters from last
season.
Stepping in will be a cast
of former five-star recruits
and talented players who
will be asked to expand
their roles.
"We have confidence
in our defensive players..
I think it's more a matter
of knowledge and experi-
ence and maturity that the
defense is going to have to
develop," Saban said.
There's no doubting
Alabama has the creden-
tials to be No. 1, but poll
history suggests the odds
are against the Tide finish-
ing on top again.
Only 10 of the 60 previous
preseason No. 1 teams have
won the national champion-
ship. And only Florida State
in '99 and Southern Cal '04
have held the top spot for
the entire season.


AP Top 25
The Top Twenty Five teams in The
Associated Press preseason college football
poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
2009 records, points based on 25 points
for a first place vote through one point for
a 25th place vote and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1.Alabama (54) 14-0 1,491 I
2. Ohio St. (3) 11-2 1,400 5
3.Boise St.(l) 14-0 1,336 4
4. Florida 13-1 1,237 3
5.Texas (I) 13-1 1,223 2
6.TCU 12-1 1,160 6
7. Oklahoma (I) 8-5 1,104 -
8. Nebraska 10-4 1,033 14
9. Iowa 11-2 1,007 7
10.VirginiaTech 10-3 973 10
I1. Oregon 10-3 870 II
12.Wisconsin 10-3 822 16
13. Miami 9-4 785 19
14. Southern Cal 9-4 590 22
IS. Pittsburgh 10-3 516 IS
16. GeorgiaTech 11-3 511 13
17.Arkansas 8-5 496 -
18. North Carolina 8-5 397 -
19.Penn St. 11-2 382 9
20. Florida St. 7-6 379 -
21. LSU 9-4 300 17
22.Auburn 8-5 296 -
23. Georgia 8-5 206 -
24. Oregon St. 8-5 198 -
.25.WestVirginia 9-4 184 25
Others receiving votes: Cincinnati 108,
Stanford 81, Utah 80, South Carolina
71, Houston 66, Connecticut 32, Notre
Dame 31, Missouri 27, BYU 19, Arizona
15, Clemson 15, Texas Tech 14, Navy 12,
Washington 8,Texas A&M 7, Mississippi 6,
Oklahoma St. 3, Cent. Michigan 2, Middle
Tennessee 2, Temple 2, Boston College I,
SMU I.UCF I.

AP poll board
NEW YORK The voters for the
2010 Associated Press college football
poll:
Mark Anderson, Las Vegas Review-
Journal; Greg Archuleta, Albuquerque
(N.M.) Journal; Bob Asmussen, Champaign
(Ill.) News-Gazette;: Jack"..'Bogaczyk,
Charleston (W.Va.) Daily Mail; Kirk Bohls,
Austin (Texas) American-Statesman; Lisa
Byington, WLNS-TV, Lansing, Mich.; Scott
Carter, The Tampa (Fla.) Tribune; Robert
Cessna, Bryan-College Station (Texas)
Eagle; Bill Cole, Winston-Salem (N.C.)
Journal; Bob Condotta,The Seattle Times;
Desmond Conner, The Hartford
(Conn.) Courant; Steve Conroy, Boston
Herald; Chip Cosby, Lexington (Ky.)
Herald-Leader; Chadd Cripe, The Idaho
Statesman; Mike DeArmond, Kansas City
Star; Wade Denniston, Logan (Utah)
Herald-Journal; Pete DiPrimio, The
Fort Wayne (Ind.) News-Sentinel; Ray
Fittipaldo, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; Dave
Foster, WZTV-TV Nashville, Tenn.; Chris
Fowler, ESPN;,
Marcus Fuller, St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer
Press; Joe Giglio. The News & Observer,
Raleigh, N.C.; Garland Gillen, WWL-TV
Channel 4, New Orleans; Doug Haller,The
Arizona Republic, Phoenix; Bob Hammond,
Laramie (Wyo.) Daily Boomerang; Travis
Haney, The Charleston (S.C.) Post and
Courier; Eric Hansen, The South Bend
(Ind.) Tribune;Tom Hart, BigTen Network;
Coley Harvey, The Macon (Ga.) Telegraph;


20f0-201f


LYCE|uM


Kirk Herbstreit, ESPN/ABC;
Mike Hlas,Cedar Rapids (Iowa) Gazette;
John Hunt. The Oregonian; Cecil Hurt,
Tuscaloosa (Ala.) News; Sal Interdonato,
Times Herald-Record, Middletown, N.Y;
Craig James, ABC; David Jones, Florida
Today, Melbourne; Tom Keegan, Lawrence
(Kan.) Journal World; Doug Lesmerises,
The Plain Dealer, Cleveland; Ferd Lewis,
Honolulu Star-Advertiser; Rob Long, FOX-
1370 Radio, Baltimore;
Matt McCoy, 610 WTYN-AM,
Columbus, Ohio;Tom Mulhern,Wisconsin
State Journal; Tom Murphy, Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette, Little Rock; Manny
Navarro, The Miami Herald; John Niyo,
Detroit News; Ray Ratto, Comcast
SportsNet Bay Area, San Francisco; Kyle
Ringo, Daily Camera, Boulder, Colo.; Randy
Rosetta, The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La.;
Wes Rucker, Chattanooga (Tenn.) Times
Free Press; Keith Sargeant, Home News
Tribune, East Brunswick, N.J.;
John Shinn, The Norman (Okla.)
Transcript; Steve Sipple, Lincoln (Neb.)
Journal Star;Jon Solomon,The Birmingham
(Ala.) News; Andy Staples, Sl.com; Kyle
Tucker, The Virginian-Pilot, Norfolk; Kyle
Veazey. The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Miss.;
JohnWerner,Waco (Texas) Tribune-Herald;
JonWilner, SanJose (Calif.) Mercury News;
Scott Wolf, Los Angeles Daily News;Adam
Zuvanich, Lubbock (Texas) Avalanche-
Journal.

Poll facts & figures
FOUNDER Alan J. Gould, sports
editor of The Associated Press.
FIRST POLL Oct. 19, 1936.
FIRST PRESEASON POLL 1950.
FIRST YEAR OF PANEL VOTING
- 1960.
YOTERS College football writers
and broadcasters whose publications, TV
and radio stations are members of TheAP.
POINTS -A first-place vote is worth
25 points, a second-place vote is worth
24, etc.
SCHOOLS ELIGIBLE All NCAA
Division FBS and FCS teams. Teams on
NCAA probation are eligible to receive
votes.
VOTING BREAKDOWN By state
(1-3 schools I voter; 4-6 schools 2
voters; 7-9 schools 3 voters; 10-12-4
voters) and four national voters for total
of 60.
PRESEASON TIDBITS -Ten of the 60
previous preseason No. I teams, have won
the national championship.... Florida State
(1999) and Southern California (2004) are
the only schools to hold the top spot for
the entire season. ... Six national cham-
pions were not ranked in the preseason)
poll. The last team was Brigham Young
in 1984. ... Twenty-two different teams
have been ranked No. I. ... This is the
third time Alabama has been No. I (1966,
1978,2010).

Latest champions /
2009 -Alabama
2008 Florida
2007- LSU
2006 Florida
2005 -Texas
2004 Southern Cal
2003 Southern Cal
2002 Ohio State


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428


BUSINESS


Sunday, August 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


New rules make it

tougher to get loans


"If you don't like
something, change it.
If you can't change it,
change your attitude."
Maya Angelou

So many of the
entrepreneurs we
help at the Jim
Moran Institute
are expressing
frustration with financial
institutions and their new
lending processes. In the
past, entrepreneurs could
get bank loans without too
much hassle. However,
because of the recent cred-
it crunch, these financial
institutions have adopted
much stricter loan require-
ments.
Financial institutions have
a gross margin of less than
5 percent That is, the dif-
ferential between the rates
they lend and the rates they
pay depositors is very low.
Under normal circumstanc-
es, financial institutions have
to make 20 good loans to
make up for one bad loan.
Because of the collapse
of the real estate and con-
struction industries, many
financial institutions have
experienced large losses.
As a result, their ability to
take on risk has been signifi-
cantly diminished.
While financial institu-
tions would like to give
more loans, they are simply
unable to do so. If banks or
credit unions are making
commercial loans at all right
now, they are requiring so
much more in an effort to
minimize their risk. For
example, they now want


ON BUSINESS


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcastnet
great business plans backed
up by documented facts, not
projections.
First, if you are going
in for a loan, you just need
to expect it to be a much
more exhaustive process
than previously. Just about
all financial institutions are
now requiring some form of
collateral to cover the loan.
While this might seem oner-
ous, it is just a precaution
these financial institutions
are taking to ensure'they do
not lose any more money.
The more collateral you
offer, the higher your likeli-
hood of getting a loan.
If you are currently in
the market for a loan, you
just have to realize that the
rules have changed drasti-
cally. Getting a loan is much
tougher, but understanding
the new rules and being
able to anticipate what finan-
cial institutions are now
looking for will make the
process far less frustrating.
N FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A nurse and a dentist perform a dental procedure on Taiya Driggers, 7, aboard the Mobile Dental Clinic.


Bus comes rolling with a smile


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
drobinson@lakecityreporter.com
A new school
S year will
also bring
new smiles.
. parkling
smiles.
The Miles of Smiles
Dental Bus starts its
school year rotation in
September.
The 40-foot dental
bus is provided by the
Columbia County and
Hamilton County Health
Departments. It offers
dental services to chil-


dren in pre-K through
third grade who are on
free or reduced lunch.
The bus rotates around
all the elementary schools
in Columbia and Hamilton
counties.
The bus is staffed
by Lisa Swisher, dental
coordifiator and hygien-
ist; dental assistant April
Jefferson, dental hygien-
ist Ann Thrasher and Dr.
Lauren Cartwright
Cartwright is on the


bus three days each week.
The staff provides preven-
tive care on the other two
days she is out.
The dental bus was
established through
grants and money from
Lake Shore Hospital
Authority and Hamilton
County Hospital Authority,
Swisher said. Funding
for the bus now comes
through Medicaid.
The state of Florida
received an "F" the


lowest grade in pro-
viding dental care to
low-income children for
the 2009 year, according
to a Centers for Disease
Control and PIevention
reports.
There are no Medicaid
provider dentists except
for the bus, Swisher
said. The closest is in
Gainesville.
The dental bus is one

BUS continued on 2C


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


s The Motley Fool

Q How can I be a socially
responsible investor? _ ,----------__
P17' A7_ .--77- 771- A.- .. .-- 0 '


r.r., NourwalK, .Conn.
A First off, understand that there
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.women in management andnot pro-
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Still, you do have several options '
for socially responsible investing
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As with most funds, not all, SRI
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Still, some do, such as the Neu-
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Learn more about SRI investing
arid issues at www.socialinvest.org,
www.socialfunds.com,
www.csrwire.com and
www.corpwatch.org. You can /
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is www.socialfunds.com/csr.
If you're not online, check out
these Books: "Socially Responsible
Investing for Dummies" by Ann
Logue (For Dummies, $25) and
"Compelling Returns" by Scott J.
Budde (Wiley, $30).


Q If a mutual fund closes its
doors to new investors, is that a
bad sign? TN., Alakatu; Minn.
A It's usually a good sign, sug-
Sgesting that the fund managers
recognize that they're having trouble
finding eitough top-notch places to
invest their growing pile of share-
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releases digitally remastered for
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percent from a year ago.
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per-screen average through the first
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in the prior year," CEO Richard
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give it a little more skin in the game.
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helps IMAX grow its global
empire. It recently announced a
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scheduled at this point last year.
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is, the more lucrative each theatrical
release becomes. Some multiplex
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02010 TIE MOTLEY Fooli/Disr.T IYUNIITRSl UCICK (FOR RELEASE 7/29/2010)


BUS: Dental work provided to 1,600 children in Columbia County last year


Continued From Page 1
way of helping to provide
dental care.
Medicaid only reimburs-
es for a certain percentage
of services to a private
dentist, Cartwright said.
Private dentists would
essentially donate their
services to see a Medicaid
patient.
In the future, the Miles
foir Sfniles bus would-like
to have a clinic, Swisher
said.
Last year, the bus pro-
vided services to 1,600
children in Columbia
County and a little more
than 300 in Hamilton
County, Swisher said.
The bus is only at a
school for two to three
weeks at a time and has to
prioritize which students
are seen first, Cartwright "
said. Services include
extractions, cleaning and
fluoride treatment.
The bus comes into


contact with many chil-
dren needing major defital
work.
'. "We see kids in pre-
K that need baby teeth
extracted," she said.
As a disease, dental
decay is number one in
children, Swisher said.
"People don't see dental
decay as a disease," she
said.
Dental decay is prevent-.
able with proper treat-
ment, Cartwright said.
Between dentist visits,
parents can help pro-
vide proper dental care.
Children below the age of
9 need assistance in brush-
ing their teeth, she said.
They should brush for at
least two minutes twice a
day and also floss. :.
After an appointment on
the dental bus, children
receive a toothbrush,
toothpaste and floss.
Parents are also given


the option to schedule
'appointments after school
and during the summer.
'This is the first, sum-
mer we've been entirely
booked," Swisher said.
The bus is already
booked for the first few
weeks of the school years,
Cartwright said.
The Miles of Smiles
school schedule is
Sept. 7-23 at Niblack
Elementary, Sept. 24
- Oct. 10 at Melrose
Elementary, Oct. 15 to
Nov. 4 at Five Points
Elementary, Nov. 5
to Dec. 2 at Eastside
Elementary, Dec. 3-
Dec. 17 and Jan. 1 to
Jan 7 at Columbia City
Elementary, Jan. 10-31
at Summers Elementary,
Feb. 1-14 at Westside
Elementary, Feb. 15-
March 17 at. Ft. White
Elementary, March
18-25 and April 4- 8 at


Pinemount Elementary,
April 11-21 at South
Hamilton Elementary,
May 2-16 at Central
Hamilton Elementary


and May 17-31 at North
Hamilton Elementary.
On, the first day of
school, eligible children
will receive a consent


form to visit the dental
bus, Swisher said.
Call (386) 752-9914, if
you need more informa-
tion.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
This 40-foot bus parks at a county school for two to three weeks at a time and needs to
prioritize its schedule of providing dental services, officials say.


CFP, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER'" and are certifcatlon marks owned by Certifled Finandal Planner Board of Standards Inc. 20012008 CfP Board.


1


Page Editor:Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


A Costly Victory
About 13 years ago, a friend
who worked for sound card maker
Aureal Semiconductor
told me I should invest in
it. Since I was a computer
geek and thought Aureal
made the best sound cards ever, I
sunk $500 into the stock. About
six months later, the company
went out of business.
Helping drive it into bankruptcy
was the cost of fighting a patent
infringement lawsuit from Creative
Labs. Aureal won the lawsuit,
though. Yay. Mike Lindley,
Davenport, Iowa
The Fool Responds: This is
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ended up buying much of Aureal's
remaining assets and its technol-
ogy, and then didn't have to pay
royalties to it for its use. The lesson
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or losing cash, and also to be mind-
ful of any ongoing or potential
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. You also need the resources to
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print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap!












Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW



The Week in Review


I Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


Y NYSE 3 Amex
6,813.15 -47.89 1,864.60 -32.31


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
3Par 18.04 +8.39 +86.9 LGLGrp 18.00 +592 +49.0
McAfee 47.03+17.09 +57.1 InvCapHId 3.60 +.53 +17.1
Potash 149.67+38.33 +34.4 ChinaNet 4.48 +.65 +17.0
JinkoSoln 24,73 +5.82 +30.8 Fronteerg 7.37 +1.04 +16.4
TAMSA 21.03 +4.34 +26.0 OdenPapn 4.99 +.66 +15.2
Carnetlnf n 13.19 +2.54 +23.8 CAMACn 3.05 +.38 +14.2
OwensCwtB2.17 +.38 +21.2 GlblScape 2.85 +.34 +13.5
Cenveo 6.54 +1.04 +18.9 AlldNevG 22.00 +2.51 +12.9
Compellent 13.95 +2.09 +17.6 Solitano 2.03 +.23 +12.8
StageStrs 11.87 +1.76 +17.4 AmDGEnn 2.78 +.31 +12.6


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GtAPc39 13.72 -3.58 -20.7
ITTEd 52.22-12.11 -18.8
Acomlntl 3.24 -.71 -18.0
AmbacF pfZ 7.26 -1.44 -16.6
Triple-S 16.08 -3.12 -16.3
HighOnen 11.31 -2.10 -15.7
Reddylce 2,18 -.40 -15.5
DB3xShUST19.48 -3.12 -13.8
Care Inv 7.77 -1.19 -13.3
GMX Rs 4.43 -.67 -13.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Ciigrp 21356027 3.75 -.13
S&P500ETF8691471107.53 -.78
BkofAm 6723671 12.87 -.36
SPDR Fncl3344416 13.83 -.24
GenElec 3056918 15.03 -.35
FordM 2842132 11.77 -.38
iShR2K 2596214 61.15 +.08
SprintNex 2391885 4.19 -.29
Pfizer 2362061 15.92 -.16
iShEMkts 2034761 41.02 +.34

Diary
Advanced 1,664
Declined ,1,486
New Highs 434
New Lows 141
Total issues .3,210
Unchanged 60
Volume 19,150,501,867


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Ever-Glory 2.36 -.47 -16.6
EngySvcun 4.90 -.80 -14.0
lncOpR 5.03 -.82 -14.0
SinoHub 2.09 -.34 -14.0
PemixTh 2.95 -.47 -13.7
BovieMed 2.40 -.37 -13.4
OrionEngy 2.34 -.36 -13.3
AlldDefen 2.86 -.42 -12.8
Chrmcft 2.15 -.30 -12.2
HallwdGp 33.34 -4.44 -11.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(0O) Last Chg
GrtBasGg 142723 2.04 +.19
GoldSlrg 138220 4.60 +.20
KodiakOg 118663 2.71 -.23
Taseko 96599 4.39 +.18
AmO&G 73572 7.00 -:18
NovaGIdrg 71173 6.79 +.22
NwGoldg 60857 5.72 +.16
VantageDdr 56961 1.29 +.02
VistaGold 51692 1.95 +.48
NAPallg 50004 3.13 -.08

Diary
Advanced 254
Declined 290
New Highs 41
New Lows 34
Total issues 566
Unchanged 22
Volume 353,289,419


ANasdaq
5 2,179.76 +6.28


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BSDMed 2.25 +1.17 +108.3
Osteotech 6.39 +2.55 +66.4
WHXCorp 9.48 +3.15 +49.8
ValVisA 2.17 +.71 +48.6
VocalTrs 38.00+12,10 +46.7
ProspMed 8.53 +2.41 +39.4
Cardica h 2.34 +.65 +38.5
ChelseaTh 4.06 +1.11 +37.6
HiSoft n 15.87 +4.30 +37.2
HaupgDig 3.00 +.81 +37.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CorinthC 4.49 -2.17 -32.6
ECOtalors 2.45 -1.16 -32.1
Kirklands 12.15 -4.65 -27.7
SinoCkg n 12.33 -4.35 -26.1
EducMgtn 9.15 -2.98 -24.6
SchoolSp 13.86 -3.24 -18.9
ChinaNGas 5.42 -1.22 -18.4
FstCapVA 4.49 -1.01 -18.4
NwLead rs 6.49 -1.46 -18.4
Strayer 163.25-36.76 -18.4

Most Active ($1S or more)
Name Voi(00) Last Chg
Intel 4035327 18.91 -.24
Cisco 3627760 22.23 +.87
PwShs QQQ307001944.92 +.20
Microsoft 2424731 24:23 -.04
Dell Inc 1521762 12.07 +.06
Symantec 1240803 13.80+1.46
Nvidia 1127820 9.97 +.58
CorinthC 1116662 4.49-2.17
Oracle 1089435 23.02 +.36
eBay 1069100 23.37+1.87

Diary
Advanced 1,375
Declined 1,461
New Highs 81
New Lows 264
Total issues 2,892
Unchanged 56
Volume 9,063,831,023


Name Ex


Wkly Wkly YTD
Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.68 26.45
AutoZone NY .. 213.07
BkofAm NY .04 12.87
BobEvans Naso .72 25.76
BostonSci NY 5.69
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.44
CSX NY .96 49.79
Chevron NY 2.88 75.05
Cisco Nasd ... 22.23
Citigrp NY 3.75
CocaCI NY 1.76 55.30
Delhaize NY 2.02 67.95
Dell nc Nasd ... 12.07
DirFnBear NY 15.99
DrxFBull s NY .15 18.99
EMCCp NY ... 18.69
FamilyDIr NY .62 42.83
FordM NY ... 11.77
GenElec NY .48 15.03
HewlettP NY .32 39.85
HomeDp NY .95 28.17
iShEMkts NY .59 41.02
iShR2K NY .77 61.15
Intel Nasd .63, 18.91
JPMorgCh NY .20 37.14
LVSands NY ... 29.63
Lowes NY .44 20.64
McDnlds NY 2.20 73.08


-1.0 -5.6
+2.5 +34.8
-2.7 -14.5
+2.9 -11.0
+3.8 -36.8
+1.6 -22.2
-1.2 +2.7
-2.1 -2.5
+4.1 -7.1
-3.4 +13.3
-0.8 -3.0
+2.5 -11.4
+0.5 -15.9
+4.0 -17.7
-4.5 -23.1
-0.4 +7.0
-0.2 +53.9
-3.1 +17.7
-2.3 -.7
-1.5 -22.6
+3.1 -2.6
+0.8 -1.2
+0.1 -2.1
-1.3 -7.3
-1.0 -10.8
+4.4 +98.3
+5.4 -11.8
+1,7 +17.0


Name Ex Div
McAfee NY
Microsoft Nasd .52
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .56
OcciPet NY 1.52
Pactiv NY
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs OQQNasd .26
PrUShS&PNY
QwestCm NY .32.
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.22
SearsHldgs Nasd ..
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SpdrintNex NY
SPDRFndNY .17
Symantec Nasd ...
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
YRCWwd hNasd .


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Qhg %Chg %Chg
47.03+17.09 +57.1 +15.9
24.23 -.04 -0.2-20.5
7.48 -.16 -2.1 -3.6
7.72 +.01 +0.1 -37.5
53.29 +1.27 +2.4 +.9
9.55 +.04 +0.4 -8.6
9.09 +.23 +2.6 -29.3
75.06 -.33 -0.4 -7.7
32.36 +1.18 +3.8 +34.1
21.18 +1.36 +6.9- -20.4
64.80 -.76 -1.2 +6.6
15.92 -.16 -1.0 -12.5
149.67+38.33 +34.4 +37.9
44.92 +20 +0.4 -1.8
34.06 +.42 +1.2 -2.8
5.65 -.04 -0.7 +34.2
39.32 -.74 -1.8 -4.5
107.53 -.78 -0.7 -3.5
61.59 -4.9 -496 -7.5 -26.2
.97 -.03 -2.7 +62.2
35.78 -.06 -0.2 +7.4
4.19 -.29 -6.5 +14.5
13.83 -.24 -1.7 -4.0
13.80 +1.46 +11.8 -22.9
30.31 -.50 -1.6 +4.0
50.22 -.18 -0.4 -6.0
24.60 -1.2 -4.8 -8.9
.28 -.01 -2.8 -66.4


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars., = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks., pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year.rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deterred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
"Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.14 0.15
6-month 0.19 0.18
5-year 1.44 1.45
10-year 2.61 2.68
30-year 3.66 3.87


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.1211 1.1215
Britain 1.5530 1.5596
Canada 1.0487 1.0395
Euro .7867 .7798
Japan 85.76 85.32
Mexico 12.7730 12.7320
Switzerlnd 1.0357 1.0331
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


:II


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 10,213.62
1-week change: -89.53 (-0.9%)
11,500


11,000


10,500t


10,000


9,500 F


-1.14 103.84 9.69 -144.33 -57.59


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


M A M J J A


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetis Cl 137,039
Vanguard TotStldx LB, 63,566
American Funds GrIhAmA m LG' 61,323
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 55,373
Fidelity Contra LG 53,952
American Funds CpWdGrIA m WS 51,442
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 48,436
Vanguard 5001nv LB 46,968
Vanguard Instldxl LB 46,671
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 45,460
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 39,482
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 36,776
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 36,687
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 36,140
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl 33,800
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 31,232
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 30,154
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 29,724
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 29,636
American Funds BalA m MA 29,359
Vanguard Welltn MA 28,516
Vanguard 50OAdml LB 28,336
PIMCO TotRetA m Cl 28,027
American Funds BondA m Cl 27,718
Fidelity Divrlntl d FB 26,227
Vanguard Totintl d FB 26,161
Fidelity GrowCo LG 25,891


'11.50
26.61
' 26.10
46.73
57.21
31.61
15.36
98.95
98.32
24.47
90.77
36.35
30.59
23.92
11.50
2.05
24.45
31.54
26.62
16.28
28.64
98.97
11.50
12.40
25.87
13.71
68.23


+12.3/B
*+9.2/A
+6.1/D
+8.1/C
+12.2/A
+5.3/D
+12.2/A
+8.4/B
+8.6/B
+6.3/D
+5.9/C
+5.3/B
+6.6/A
+10.2/A
+12.0/B
+15.4/A
+7.8/C
+8.7/8
+9.3/A
+10.0/B
+9.1/C
+8.5/B
+11.8/B
+11.5/C
+2.0/C
+5.3/B
+14.0/A


+8.1/A
0.0/B
+0.6/B
+3.2/C
+3.0/A
+3.7/A
+2.7/B
-0.6/C
-0.5/C
+0.1/B
-2.7/D
+5.0/A
+3.4/A
-0.5/B
+7.8/A
+3.8/B
+4.0/A
+2.1/A
+0.1/B
+2.0/C
+4.2/A
-0.5/C
+7.6/A
+3.6/E
+0.9/C
+3.2/B
+3.7/A


1,000,000
3,000
250
250
2,500
250
250
3,000
5,000,000
250
2,500
250
2,500
250
1,000,000
1,000
250
250
100,000
250
10,000
100,000
1,000
250
2,500
3,000
2,500


CA-Conservative Alcation, Cl -Intermnedate-Tenn Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large alue, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialy-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How lund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Inv: Minimum $ needed to invest In fund. Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cho %Chq Last


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly I
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last [


Wkly YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg


Wkly
Last Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


16 -2.21 -31.5 34.11
14 -.25 +2.8 46.70
1 -.76 -17.8 28.90
8 -.77 -16.6 16.10
... +.03 -5.5 10.27
13 -.30 +5.3 45.91
19 -.69 -3.4 36.33
10 -4.73 -33.1 37.98
9 -.11 -44.1 10.09
17 +.28 +20.4 65.13
... -1.02 -7.5 10.53
19 -1.05 -.7 14.69
... -.30 +11.1 10.29
9 -1.56 -15.5 62.14
... -.43 -24.5 37.22
... +.61 -17.7 15.99
... -.90 -23.1 18.99
... -.01 -17.0 35.48
... +.21 -9.2 15.53
... -.78 -16.8 43.67
... -1.87 -32.5 26.79
8 -.41 -3.0 14.27
16 -.63 +2.5 33.05
15 +.02 +12.9 43.93
15 -.73 -11.6 24.43
17 -.08 +29.9 36.76
13 +.05 -.9 17.06
... +.25 -47.2 4.78*
26 -.07 +7.0 18.69
40 -2.75 -6.0 91.42
10 -.11 +17.0 11.50
50 +.81 +30.0 18.42
18 -1.55 +9.6 46.68
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... -.84 -73.1 1.08
11 -.96 -17.3 40.41
11 -1.02 -13.6 58.89
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... -.07. -22.4 10.27
12 -.40 -22.8 35.84
23 -.12 +11.2 12.39
6 -.38 +17.7 11.77
12 -.28 -14.0 27.60
9 +1.30 -11.1 71.37
11 +.12 -1.2 7.72
8 -.76 -14.3 18.81
5 -.34 -17.0 "12.32
10 -.35 -17.0 17.32
16 +.28 -.7 35.14'
22 -.54 +.1 11.36
... -.22 -18.3 13.83
31 +.17 +7.8 14.13
... +2.25 +6.5 41.89
7 +.16 -12.2 148.24
15 -.13 -30.1 9.85
... -.03 -75.2 2.92
81 -.32 +12.0 34.19
21 -.28 -7.5 27.82
7 -.75 -13.5 20.13
38 +.11 -19.9 4.95
17 +1.46 +10.1 47.10
37 -.23 -22.8 9.20
10 -1.53 -15.3 51.24
11 -.60 -22.6 39.85
16 +.86 -2.6 28.17
14 -.37 +3.7 40.64
... -.25 +15.1 13.43
... +.87 -6.9 69.48
... -.09 +3.2 16.16
... +.07 -2.4 9.51
... +.01 -3.2 12,56
... -.15 +6.4 17.59'
... +.49 -4.1 40.54
+.34 -1.2 41.02
... +3.75 +18.0 106.04
-.40 -9.0 50.31
... +.08 -2.1 61.15
-.16 +9.5 50.27
5-12.11 -45.6 52.22


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ITW 1.36 3.2 14
IBM 2.60 2.0 12
IntlGame .24 1.6 25
IntPap .50 2.4 46
Interpublic ... ... 32
ItauUnibH .59 2.8
JPMorgCh .20 .5 11
Jabil .28 2.5 21
JanusCap .04 .4 17
JohnJn 2.16 3.7 13
JohnsnCtl .52 1.9 14
JnprNtwk ... ... 51
Kellogg 1.62 3.3 15
Keycorp .04 .5
KimbClk 2.64 4.1 13
Kimco .64 4.5 45
kingPhrm ... ... 54
Kinross g .10 .6 32
Kohis ... ... 13
Kraft 1.16 4.0 11
LDK Solar ... ... ...
LSI Corp ... ... 14
LVSands ... ... ...
LennarA .16 1.3 75
LillyEli 1.96 5.7 9
Limited .60 2.3 15
LincNat .04 .2 11
UoydBkg 1.45 ... ...
MBIA ... ... ...
MEMC ... ... ...
MFA Fncl .76 10.5 8
MGIC ... ... ...


-.92 -12.3
-.37 -2.6
+.11 -18.3
-.66 -20.8
-.07 +16.1
+.01 -6.3
-.36 -10.8
-.38 -35.7
+.25 -25.7
+.59 -8.8
+.66 +2.9
+1.61 +2.1
-.89 -6.5
-.18 +37.7
-.10 +1.6
-.20 +6.3
+.66 -24.7
+.32 -15.9
+1.33 -14.1
-.40 +7.1
-.26
+.22 -26.5
+1.24 +98.3
-.56
-1.53 -4.3
+.67 +32.8
-1.36 -14.3
-.08 +32.1
-.16 +127.6
+.01 -23.1
+.01 -1.1
+.13 +27.7


Name


Div Yld PE


MGM Rsts ...
Macys ,20
Manpwl .74
Manulife g .52
MarathonO1.00
MktVGold .11
MarlntA .16
MarshM .80
Marshlls .04,
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McDrmlnts ...
McAfee
MedcoHith ...
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ..
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCR Corp ..
NRG Egy ..
Nabors
NatGrid 7.17
NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .40
NY CmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .60


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Chg Last


-.17
15 +.84
... +.51
... -.42
12 -.99
... +1.54
35 +.13
17 -.35
... 34
... +.08
... +.64
7 -.28
27+17.09
16 -1.66
12 -.80
13 -.56
11 -2.28
15 +.22
23 +.44
... -.75
9 +.02
30 +5.44
44 -.16
13 +.22
10 -1.23
+.05
... -.87
11 -1.26
15 +.53
12 -.14
13 -.68
15 +1.30


NextEraEn 2.00 3.8 13 +1.27
NiSource .92 5.6 15 -.07
NobleCorp .20 .6 5 -1.10
NokiaCp .56 6.2 ... +.23
Nordsltrm .80 2.5 14 +.72
NorflkSo 1.44 2.6 16 -.24
Novartis 1.99 3.9 12 +.56
OcciPet 1.52 2.0 15 -.33
OfficeDpt ... ... -.11
OfficeMax ... ... 20 +.07
Oi[SvHT 2.60 2.0 ... -3.05
OwensCom ... 20 +2.17
PG&ECp 1.82 4.0 14 +.15
PMI Grp ... ... ... +.43
PNC .40 .8 10 -2.36
PPLCorp 1.40 5.3 20 -.32
Pactiv ... ... 16 +1.18
PatriotCoal ... ... 19 +.24
PeabdyE .28 .6 22 -.71
Penney .80 3.8 17 +1.36
PepcoHold 1.08 6.1 27 +.33
PepsiCo 1.92 3.0 17 -.76
Petrohawk ... ... 19 -.81
PetrbrsA 1.18 3.9 ... -.73
Petrobras 1.18 3.4 ...-1.45
Pfizer .72 4.5 9 -.16
PhilipMor 2.32 4.5 14 -.01
Potash .40 .3 32+38.33
PrinFncl .50 2.2 10 -.50
ProShtS&P ... ... ... +.35
PrUShS&P ... ... ... +.42
PrUIShDow ... ... ... +.40
ProUltQQQ ... ... ... +.46
PrUShQQQ ... ......-.20
ProUltSP .40 1.1 ... -.51
ProUShL20 ... ... ... -2.50
ProUSRE rsm... +.07
ProUShtFn ... ... .. +.64
ProUFinrs .17 ... -1.66
ProUSR2K ... ... ... -.16
ProUItR2K .02 ...... +.01
ProUSSP500... ... ... +.60
ProUltCrude... ... ... -.48
ProgsvCp .16 .8 12 +.27
ProLogis .60 6.0 ... -.28
Prudently .70 1.3 8 -3.05
PulteGrp ... ... ... -.06
QksilvRes ... ... 28 +.35
QwestCm .32 5.7 21 -.04
RRIEngy ... ... ... -.10
RadianGrp .01 .1 ... +.41
RadioShk .25 1.3 11 -.13
RangeRs .16 .5 ... -2.19
Raytheon 1.50 3.4 8 -.99
RedHat ... ... 69 +1.61
RegionsFn .04 .6 ... -.33
RepubSvc .80 2.6 25 +1.11
RetailHT 1.66 1.9 ... +.92
SLMCp 7 -.23
SpdrDJIA 2.53 2.5 ... -.82)
SpdrGold ... ... ... +1.23
SP Mid 1.65 1.2 ... +.36
S&P500ETF2.22 2.1 ... -.78
SpdrHome .12 .8 ... +.20
SpdrKbw RB .32 1.5 ... -.16
SpdrRett .56 1.5 ... +.55
SpdrOGEx .23 .6 ... -1.12
SpdrMetM .35 .7 ... +1.18.
Safeway .48 2.4 ... -1.17
Saks ... ... ... -.03
Salesforce ... ... ...+15.51
SandRdge ... ... ... -.33
SaraLee .44 3.0 23 +.25
Schlmbrg .84 1.5 22 -2.30
Schwab .24 1.7 24 -.39
SemiHTr .52 2.0 ... +28
SiderNacs .58 3.5 ... -.17
SilvWhtn g ... ... 38 +1.15
Smithintl .48 1.2 65 -1.58


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ADC Tel ...
ASML Hid .27
ATP O&G ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AllscriptM ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
AmkorTIf ...
A123Sys n ..
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ..
ApIdMatl .28
ArenaPhm...
Atheros
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36
BMC Sft ...
BSD Med ...
Baidus ...
BedBath ...,
BrigExp
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc .16
Cadence
CpstnTrb ...
CareerEd ...
Celgene ....
CellTherrsh...
CentAl
CienaCorp...
Cirrus
Cisco


39 +.02 +103.2
.. +.16 -17,2
... -.90 -37.8
16 +.19 -.5
39 -.09 -24.1
59 +3.64 +88.9
37 +.58 -13.4
16 +.66 +13.1
53 +3.07 -5.0
5 +.13+105.3
11 -2.68 -7.5
5 +.18 -21.9
... -.64 -68.9
10 +1.78 -32.8
20 +.54 +18.5
23 -.08 -20.4
... +.30 +95.2
17 +.85 -22.6
... -.02 +24.3
37 -.01 +10.6
17 -.39 -8.0
16 +2.79 -6.1
... +1.17 +34.7
89 -.66 +99.8
15 +1.26 -.7
52 +.38 +19.9
28 +1.04 +4.8
16 -.12 -37.2
13 +.03 -18.3
... +.70 +18.2
'... -.01 -46.1
10 -1.25 -24.8
29 -2.00 -3.6
... +.01 -66.7
36 -.11 -37.4
... +.39 +16.1
20 -1.57 +150.7
17 +.87 -7.1


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


CitzRepBh ...
CitrixSys ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
CorinthC ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
Crocs ...
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV'A ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DIlrTree s ...
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EndoPhrm ...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ..
FifthThird .04
FstNiagara .56
Flextm
FresKabi rt ..
GT Solar ...
GenBiotc h ..
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC s...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
HumGen
Intel .63
Intuit
IrvinSens


-.04 +15.9
47 +2.45 +42.3
30 +1.33 +31.5
14 -.06 +6.3
13 -.04 +5.2
3 -2.17 -67.4
20 -.27 -7.0
40 +1.17 +2.8
20 -.29+117.6
14 +.06 -15.9
... +1.74 +45.4
25 -.51 +14.1
11 +.39 -13.9
17 +2.30 +38.6
17 -.14 -25.9
... -.33 -22.6
12 +1.87 -.7
... +.12 -11.0
10 +4.33 +42.0
... -.06 +12.7
18 -.04 -8.1
26 -.57 +5.0
... -.57 +18.6
24 -.58 -13.2
+.04 -26.8
-.02 -79.7
12 -.31 +37.4
... +.05 -20.9
... +.59 +36.5
10 -1.67 -24.6
20-24.33 -25.5
64 +1.55 +19.5
36 -.08 +1.2
10 +.40 -12.9
... +1.18 -11.1
11 -.24 -7.3
25 +6.04 +45.1
... -.01 -69.0


Name Div
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
LeapWirlss ..
Level3
LibtyMlntA ..
LifeTech ..
LinearTch .92
MannKd ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .75
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.37
MicronT
Microsoft .52
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NorTrst 1.12
Novell
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OmniVisn
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
PDLBio 1.00
PMC Sra
Paccar .36
PacEth h
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
PetsMart .50
.PhnxTc
Popular


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 12 -.08 -.2 5.69
... ... +.15 +25.3 10.42
... 32 -.24 +5.3 5.74
3.4 51 +.62 -17.8 29.72
... ...+1.30 -36.6 11.13
-.05 -30.1 1.07
... 11 -.21 -3.1 10.50
... 15 +.18 -15.1 44.33
3.1 19 +.85 -1.5 30.10
... ... -.59 -32.2 5.94
... 27 +1.65 -22.1 16.16
3.5 13 -.01 +8.8 21.73
5.0 42 +.17 -17.8 16.71
... ... +.37 +24.4 4.18
4.8 20 +.19 -1.5 28.61
.... 5 -.16- -32.6 7.12
2.1 7 -.04 -20.5 24.23
... 14 -,43 -1.6 19.51
... 30 +2.39 +18.0 40.53
... 52 -2.30 +135.9 129.96
1.2 13 -.22 -7.0 12.73
2.3 16 -1.09 -7.8 48.31
+.13 +40.0 5.81
13 +.26 -.5 15.45
25 +.58 -46.6 9.97
-1.19 +46.2 21.23
12 +.07 -27.1 6.43
.9 19 +.36 -6.2 23.02
18.4 6 +.26 -20.7 5.44
17 +.12 -15.6 7.31
.9 67 +.20 +16.3 42.18
+.13 -9.9 .64
1.4 ... -.57 -7.4 14.22
4.9 19 +.41 -17.2 25.38
4.7 43 +.03 -20.7 13.24
1.5 18 +3.11 +22.6 32.72
... +.74 +37.5 3.78
... -.01 +13.3 2.56


AMEX Most Active


Name Div
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ .26
PriceTR 1.08
Qualcom .76
RF MicD
RschMotn ...
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol
Sonus
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
StemCellh ...
SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr ...
TakeTwo
Tellabs .08
TerreStar
TevaPhrm ,72
TibcoSft
TriQuint
UAL
UrbanOut
Veecolnst ...
Verisign
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.32
WholeFd ...
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .64
YRCWwdh...
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -.39 +132.2 10.10
.6 ... +.20 -1.8 44.92
2.3 21 -.32 ,-13.4 46.09
2.0 19 +.96 -15.9 38.91.
14 +.63 -2.1 4.67
... 10 -4.68 -27.9 48.72
9 -.04 +43.2 41.50
... -.19 -39.6 10.99
.. -.03 +62.2 .97
22 +.63 +24.6 17.68
99 -.04 +41.2 2.98
1.9 17 -.18 -23.0 18.93
2.2 22 +.06 +4.3 24.05
2.1 15 +.65 -19.1 14.34
... +.03 -28.6 .90
... 31 -1.18 -54.0 10.89
14 +1.46 -22.9 13.80
15 +.35 -18.7 15.77
... +.15 -16.0 8.44
1.1 14 +.32 +25.7 7.14
... -.00 -75.5 .23
1.4 18 +.31 -10.5 50.28
30 +.60 +43.5 13.82
... 16 +.18 +18.0 7.08
-.97 +58.9 20.51
... 21 +2.05 -5.8 32.95
14 +1.34 -1.2 32.63
25 +.84 +21.2 29.37
.8 .. +.18 +21.8 20.50
5.6 ... -.40 +2.0 23.55
... 30 +.30 +33.8 36.72
8.9 17 -.14 +1.8 11.19
2.5 15 +.41 +1.6 25.45
... ... -.01 -66.4 .28
23 -.04 -17.8 13.79
.2 ... -.75 +49.2 19.14


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AlIdNevG ...
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ...
AmO&G ...
AntaresP ...
Augusta g ...
Aurizon g ...
BarcGSOil...
BootsCoots ...
CAMAC n ...
CapGoldn ...
CardiumTh ..
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChiArmM
ChiMarFd ...
Crystallxg ...
DenisnM g ...
Endvrlnt
ExeterR gs ...
Fronteer g ...
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
HQ SustM ...
Hemisphrx ..
HstnAEn .02
InovioPhm ...
Kemet
KodiakO g ...
Ubbey
LibertyAcq ..
MaqHRes ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
6.3 ... ... +7.4 6.68
40 +2.51 +45.9 22.00
... +.16 +89.5 1.99
... -.66 -75.8 .75
21 -.18 +66.7 7.00
... -.02 +40.4 1.60
... ... -.13 -16.3 2.03
... +.50 +40.4 6.32
-.59 -17.3 21.41
... 23 +.01 +80.6 2.98
... +.38 -34.7 3.05
-.14 -5.9 3.35
...9 +.04 -34.0 .45
... -.01 -45.6 .49
.1 ... +.13 +8.2 14.91
+.10 +8.3 2.62
.... 7 -.41 +13.9 3.61
... 10 +.25 -14.7 6.14
... ... -.03 -3.9 .37
... ... +.06 +11.0 1.41
... ... -.01 +3.7 1.12
... ... +.17 +15.8 6.22
... ... +1.04 +87.5 7.37
10.4 ... +.06 -1.0 16.16
... ... -.02 -40.0 .32
... ... +.20 +50.0 3.12
... 46 +.20 +47.4 4.60
... ... -.05 +3.0 5.90
... ... +.19 +19.3 2.04
.. 3 -.31 --60.4 2.79
... ... +.02 -10.5 .50
.2 ... +.66 +54.7 9.53
... ... +.01 -21.1 .90
... ... +.08+166.4 3.17
... ... -.23 +22.1 2.71
... 4 +1.01 +47.2 11.26
... -.07 +4.7 10.12
... +.15 +165.8 4.12


Name Div
Metalico ...
Minefnd g
NIVS IntT ...
Nevsun g
NDragon ...
NwGold g ...
NAPaltg ...
NthnO&G
NthgtMg ...
NovaGId g ...
Oilsands g ...
OpkoHlth
OdenPapn ...
PacRim ...
Palatin
ParaG&S
PionDrill
PolyMet g ...
PudaCoal n ...
RadientPh ...
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ..
SeabGldg ...
TanzRy g ...
Taseko
TimberlnR ...
TmsatlPtn ...
UQM Tech ...
US Gold ..
Uluru .
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold ...
YM Bio q ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
22 +.21 -29.1 3.49
... +.22 -12.6 9.00
... -.04 -17.1 2.14
... +.45 +83.1 4.45
... ... -.01 -50.0 .07
... ... +.16 +57.1 5.72
... ... -.08 -10.6 3.13
...77 -.49 +23.1 14.57
... 20 -.03 -7.1 2.86
... +.22 +10.8 6.79
+.03 -53.0 .54
+.03 +20.2 2.20
... 5 +.66 -52.4 4.99
... -.02 -6.7 .17
... ... .01 -43.5 .21
-.04 -9.7 1.31
... -.50 -28.7 5.63
... ... +.04 -51.0 1.50
.. 35 -.93 +13.5 8.34
... ... -.21 +95.8 .47
... ... -.10 -31.7 .84
... ... +.24 -9.6 4.26
... ... +.02+383.3 1.16
... ... +3.06 +16.9 28.36
... ... -.13 +51.9 5.30
... ... +.18 +4.0 4.39
... ... +.12 -4.6 1.03
... ... -.03 -11.1 3.04
... ... -.17 -64.1 2.46
... ... +.25 +98.0 4.91
... -.00 -51.4. .11
... ... -.03 -10.2 1.17
... ... +.05 -34.4 2.48
... 43 +.02 -19.9 1.29
... 5 +.18+117.0 6.38
... ... +.48 -20.4 1.95
... -.07 -3.0 1.31


3C


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Stee! .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68
AbtLab 1.76
AberFitc .70
Accenture .75
AMD
Aeropostl s ...
Aetna .04
Agilent
Agrium g .11
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Allstate .80
Altria 1.40
AmbacF h ...
Ameren 1.54
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.68
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp ..
AmTower
Americdt
Ameriprise .72
AmeriBrgn .32
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .88
AnnTaylr
Annaly 2.61
Apache .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
ATMOS 1.34
BB&TCp .60
BHP BilILt 1.66
BakrHu .60
BcBilVArg .58
BcoBrades .51
BcoSantand .81
BkofAm .04
BkNYMel .36
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.16
BerkH B s ...
BestBuy .60
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.28
CB REllis
CBS B .20
CF Inds .40
CIGNA .04
CMS Eng .84
CNOFincl ...
CVS Care .35
Cameron
CapOne .20
CardnlHIt s .78
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .78
CntryLink 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .63
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56
Coach .60
CocaCE .36
CocaCI 1.76
ConAgra .80
ConocPhil 2.20


11 -.22 -21.9
12 -.85 +.8
14 +.39 -37.0
... -.33 -15.0
11 -.27 -5.6
13 -,72 -8.6
28 -1.27 +4.4
16 -.43 -7.4
4 -.24 -35.4
9 -.43 -.1
8 -1.03 -14.5
18 +1.21 -8.1
17 +1.44 +11.7
... -07 -20.5
... -.07 -34.4
15 -.35 -7.6
13 +.36 +15:7
1 -.17 -37.6
10 -.44 -2.9
14 +1.01 -23.1
14 -.70 +.1
15 -.97 +.6
..-1.50 +17.3
58 +1.67 +9.8
15 +.04 +26.7
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.- I I







LAKE CITY REPORTER HOME SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


THE FUN OF






ake ecoAatKg
P28. ali gJ


Today's


hottest


hobby

fWMiD FEAili~ts
H hobbies otTffer a sense
of accomplishment
as well as many
forms of expression.
There's one hobby
that has recently exploded as
perhaps the sweetest option of
all cake decorating.
According to the Craft &
Hobby Association Attitude
& Usage Study, sales of cake
decorating supplies gre\\ 103
percent in 2009. the largest craft
segment increase in the industry
In the list of the Top Ten Crafts
by U.S household participation,
cake decorating comes in third
114 percent), preceded by scrap-
booking memory crafts (17 per-
cent) and crocheting 116 percent ).
If you've ewer %wanted to try
your hand at making fun or
beautiful cake creations, a cake
decorating course from \Wilon can
get you started on the way to a deli-
cious new hobby. In-store classes can
take you from the basics of cake decorating
to helping you master the finer techniques
used by the pros
Here's a sampling of "hat you can learn


Re


w


A


,i ~J
I


4
I**!&^
;

SA.F






.
: t ; ". " ', -*/ '
**' '*M . i,, :.'. "* ,'*' t'

^ * '* .. ,,g


S-. .. .'' ^ F ^ '. ," .. '..
": "' .".i '-:. '
>:f^^-'tl(


What's In-Store for
Cake Decorating?
Over the years, both amateur and professional
cake decorators have relied on Wilton, the cake
experts, and their long history of offrirmg classes
and products. The Wilton School of Cake
Decorating and Confectionery Art, located in
Darien, Ill., held its very first class in 1929,
more than 80 years ago.
In.1975. a curriculum was created for local
craft and specialty stores nationwide, making
The Wilton Method classes more accessible to
more people. These classes have attracted more
than 4 million students.
This year, marking its 35th anniversary in
stores, the original in-store curriculum has been
refreshed to offer more techniques and more
interaction.



Visit www.wilton.com for more decorating tips and
ideas and to find classes near you.


'4J


I. l


4gI~


Creative Cookies Decorating cookies in a variety of ways is simple with
the star tip.


Blooming Cupcakes -
A colorful Ribbon Rose adds
the finishing touch to these
party cupcakes. The Ribbon
Rose is a new addition to the
Wilton curriculum and offers
a contemporary twist to the
classic piped rose.


Dazzling Dots Cake -
Rolled fondant is a flexible, easy-to-shape
icing that lets you get creative with cake decorations.
Here the entire cake is covered in yellow neon fondant
and decorated with fondant-based ribbon and bow.


TECHNIQUES
Fondant
Having originated in the mid-19th century, probably in France, fondant is now one
of the most popular ways to finish and decorate a cake in America. even for amateurs.
These tiny cupped flowers can accent any dessert just add buttercream or a tiny
fondant ball to make a pretty center.
FONDANT BLOSSOMS


Tools: St
Roll & Cut Mat
Perfect Height
Rolling Pin
Floral Collection
Flower Making Set
(Blossom cutter St
used)
Confectionery
Tool Set
Foam square ,
Tip: 2
Ingredients:
Ready-To-Use White
Rolled Fondant
Icing Colors (to
color fondant, St
as desired)
Royal Icing



Using the Star Tip


[ep I. Roll'out fondant about
1/8 inch thick, on
surface dusted %with
cornstarch. Cut with
blossom cutter.

tep 2. Remove excess fondant
around blossoms, trans-
fer blossoms one at a
time to foam square.
Use ball tool from
Confectionery Tool Set
to make a cupped shape
blossom, by depressing
tool in center of flower.

tep 3. Pipe a Round Decorat-
ing Tip 2 dot flower
center using thinned
royal icing, or roll a tiny
fondant ball and push
into center.


'A










+
"-- ..






1


Students learn how to use the Star Tip in the "Decorating Basics" class, the founda-
tion for all Wilton Method courses. Use this versatile tip to add fun texture and
captivating designs to cookies and cakes, make festive borders or to create beautiful
drop flowers.



Step 3. A line of stars used to
edge a cake is a Star
Border.


I
Step 1. Hold bag
straight up;
squeeze to
form star.


Step 2. Stop pressure
and pull tip
straight up
and away.


Step 4. Covering a section or the
entire cake surface with
stars is a Star Fill-In.


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


B










Classified Department: 755-5440


IBUmI
SL!L'i


lFIND I I

yy --


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000304
DIVISION:
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL-
LON FKA THE BANK OF NEW
YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
BENEFIT OF THE ASSET-
BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES
2007-2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THERON E. WATERS, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated August 17,
2010 and entered in Case NO. 12-
2009-CA-000304 of the' Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein THE BANK OF
NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE
BANK OF NEW YORK AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2007-2, is the
Plaintiff and THERON E. WA-
TERS; CHANDRA D. WATERS;
MARVYNE A. WATERS A/K/A
MARVYNE C. WATERS; TEN-
ANT #1 N/K/A LANITRA SAPP;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 15th day of Sep-
tember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 2 AND THE WEST 1/2 OF
LOT 3, BLOCK D, NORTHSIDE
ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION, AS
PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 18,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 822 NW SPRINGDALE
GLENN, LAKE CITY, FL 32055-
Any person claiming an interest ii
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 18, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you are a person with a disa-
bility who needs any accommodation
in order to participate in.this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance. Persons. with a disability'
who need any accommodation to
participate should call Court Admin-
istration, 173 NE Hemando Avente,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
30255, 386-719-7428, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing impaired
call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice
impaired call (800) 955-8770.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.:
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09030607-COUNTRY-CONV B/C
04541354
August 22, 29,2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-00073,1
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DONALD D. JONES, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENjpur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated August 12,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12
2009 CA 000731 -of the Circuit Court
of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA. County, Florida
wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff and DONALD D.
JONES; LINDA L. JONES; are the


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lie & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Conun'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!

Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200
Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lie.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219

Tree Service

AAA TREE EXPERTS
Fully Insured., Free Estimates.
Over 35 yrs exp in risky removal,
386-454-4905. F386-418-4721


Legal

Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 15 day of September,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
-LOT 3 AND THE NORTH 1/2 OF
LOT 4 OF BLOCK 5, LAKE-
WOOD, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 6-C, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 1519 SE LOQUAT WAY,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 16, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you are a person with a disa-
bility who needs any accommodation
in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance. Persons with a disability
who need any accommodation to
participate should call Court Admin-
istration, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
. Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, 386-719-7428, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing impaired
call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice
impaired call (800) 955-8770.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09107653 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-
R-ejayska
04541350
August 22, 29, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000839
DIVISION
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MYLES D. SAPP, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated August 12,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000839 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein CHASE HOME FI-
NANCE LLC, is the' Plaintiff and
MYLES D. SAPP; KELLY SAPP;
are the Defendants, I.will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at.
FRONT STEPS. OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 15th day of Sep-
tember, 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTH
1/2 OF LOT 3, BLOCK 1, MEL-
ROSE FARMS, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 34,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/K/A 1337 SE LANVALE ST.,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the.Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND 'and the seal
of this Court on August 16,2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in Order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should call Court
Administration, 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Flor-
ida 32055, 386-719-7428, within two
(2) working days of your receipt of
this notice, if you are hearing im-
paired call (800) 955-8771; if you
are voice impaired call (800) 955-
8770.
Florida Default Law Group, PL.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09122877 CHASEDIRECT-
CONV-abiven
04541346
August 22, 29, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-171-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILBUR L. PURDY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Wilbur L. Purdy, deceased, whose
date of death was July 10, 2010, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida. Probate Di-
vision, 'the address of which is 135
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
tomey are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate eon whom
a copy of this notice is required to be.
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.


Legal

All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is August 22, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Henry Grafton Purdy
8488 127th Drive
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ Tom W. Brown
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
Florida Bar No. 0091332
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386) 752-3213
Fax: (386) 755-4524
04541352
August 22, 29, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 12-2009-CA-000596
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
4 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-4
Plaintiff
vs.
KIM B. FITZHUGH, et al.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
or Order dated August 12, 2010, en-
tered in Civil Case Number 12-2009-
CA-000596, in the Circuit Court for
COLUMBIA County, Florida,
wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION
ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2005-4 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-4 is the
Plaintiff, and KIM B. FITZHUGH,
et al., are the defendants, I will sell
the property situated in COLUMBIA


Legal

County, Florida, described as:
Parcel 18: Township 5 south Range
16 East
Section 1: Commence at a concrete
monument which is the Northeast
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5
South, Range 16 East, thence S 89
degrees 06' 22" W, along the North
line of said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, 443.36 feet to point of
beginning; run thence S 0 degrees
15' 31" E, 320 feet to the North line
of a 60 foot graded road; thence N 89
degrees 06' 22" E, along said North
line, 147.79 feet; thence N 0 degrees
15' 31" W, 320 feet; thence S 89 de-
grees 06' 22" W, 147.79, feet to point
of beginning.
Parcel 19: Township 5 South Range
16 East
Section 1: Commence at a concrete
monument which is the Northeast
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5
South, Range 16 East, thence S 89
degrees 06' 22" W, along the North
line of said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, 295.57 feet to point of
beginning; thence S 0 degrees 15'
31" E, 320 feet to the North line of a
60 foot graded road; thence N 89 de-
grees 06' 22" E, along said North
line, 147.79 feet; thence N 0 degrees
15' 31" W, 320 feet; thence S 89 de-
grees 06' 22" W, 147.79 feet to point
of beginning.
Parcel 20: Township 5 South Range
16 East
Section 1: Commence at a concrete
monument which is the Northeast
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5
South, Range 16 East, Columbia
County, Florida, and also the point of
beginning; thence S 89 degrees 06'
22" W along the North line of said S
1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4,
147.78 feet; thence S 0 degrees 15'
31" E, 320 feet to the North line of a
60 foot graded road; thence N 89 de-
grees 06' 22" E, 147.78 feet to the
East line of said NW 1/4 of the NW
1/4; run thence N 0 degrees 15' 31"
W, along said East line 320 feet to
point of beginning.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055, at
11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of Sep-
tember, 2010. Any person claiming
an-interest in the surplus fro the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
,sale.
Dated: August 16, 2010


Q W 0 Z J E I F K

Q T Q S J Z C S S

0 I N 'S P I R E W

U N M V L 0 C G' J

H W Y E H L I U R

S I G V 0 S S. E R

M N F. V, J S K 0 L

A G E F R I. E N D

R S G B F R J P Z

C G H O B S E Z I

C H J H Y, C K V, F

Q F A T N S F. M I

P M H S, K X E A L

I X C R E. C O G N I






I E

READY TO rI
Find all 16 of the 'Dance' related words hidden in the
word search above. Words can be found in the banners
on the ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and return it
to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duva Street, Lake City,
I FL by 5:00pm, for your chance to win


3322 W US Hwy 90
386-755-2502







SEagle

Properties

(386) 752-9226

Office Space

Oak Hill PLaza
Tom (386) 961-1086
DCA Realtor


IIEncou a


TACO
BELL

386-755-9673






"LIm T I IIV

1191 SW Bascom Norris Dr
Suite 103
Lake City, FL
(386) 754-1724
www.anytimefitness.com


Legal


Dewitt Cason
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT C
By: B. Scippio
"In accordance with the Am
With Disabilities Act, pers
need of a special accommodate
participate in this proceeding
within seven (7) days prior
proceeding, contact the Adm
tive Office of the Court, Co
County Courthouse, P.O. Box
Lake City, FL 32056-2069
phone 386-758-1342, TDD
955-8771 or 1-800-955-877
Florida Relay Service".
Florida Foreclosure Attorneys
601 Cleveland Street, Suite 69
Clearwater, Florida 33755
Telephone: (727) 446-4826
04541347
August 22, 29, 2010

NOTICE OF PUBLIC ME
OF THE NORTH FL(
BROADBAND AUTHORITY
OPERATIONS COMMITTEE
The North Florida Broadba
thority ("NFBA") announces
ing of the NFBA Operation:
mittee that all interested pers
invited to attend. The NFBA
gal entity and public body
pursuant to the provisions of
163.01, Florida Statutes, and
terlocal Agreement among
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie
christ, Hamilton, Jefferson,
ette, Levy, Madison, Putna
wannee, Taylor, Union and
Counties and municipalities o


Legal


Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live
OURT Oak, Monticello, Perry, White
Springs and Worthington Springs,
iericans Florida. The NFBA's Operations
ons in Committee meeting will be held at
nation to 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, September
g shall, 2, 2010; at the Cabot Lodge Board
to any Roorm, 3726 SW 40th Boulevard,
inistra- Gainesville, FL 32608. The NFBA's
olumbia Operations Committee meeting will
x 2069, be to conduct general business of the
, tele- committee. If a 'person decides to
1-800- appeal any decision made by the
70 via NFBA with respect to any matter
considered at the meeting, such per-
,PLLC son will need a record of the pro-
90 ceedings and may need to ensure that
a verbatim record is made, including
the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be made. In
accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, persons needing
special accommodation or an inter-
ETING preter to participate in this proceed-,
ORIDA ing or have any questions please con-
Y tact Faith Doyle,'Clerk to the NFBA
E Board at (877) 552-3482 or (407)
nd Au- 629-6900 at least one (1) business
a meet- day prior to the date of the meeting.
s Com-
ons are 04541349
,is a le- August 22, 2010


created
Section
I an In-
Baker,
e, Gil-
Lafay-
m, Su-
Wakulla
f Cedar


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


Apply Online or In Person!


SiTEL


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


M Y C W J Y Q 'C I G U

E N D N I K V G F S L

G K S X D M C0 F A L 0


Z 'D Y Z


H E

P X

A 'H


C B F A P A M


L P L J' E P P I I

E 0 E G N C R C T

I Y A U C K E E U


S H I P X A O O C P A

G S N' J H R U E I S V


Y G O V I D R V


A C A


C X P U W I A S T Z H

Z M K J L A G I I T V


G S B. X T N E

Z E P B B' B R


G O C S

W N N K


ENTRY FORM


Name:


Phone Number:

Address:

Subscriber: DI Yes D No
Deadline is Monday, August 23, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.


Lake City Reporter


Lake Citg

Kidd Cklub
"Where learning is fu "n
Pre-K & VPK

755-0256


1290 SE Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025



Gurin
U-i TFiii^ ^^i^^^^^^1" ^^^


(386) 752-7034


Live Oak
(386) 364-1000
Lake City
.(386) 755-3558


Etdie
insurance Agency

4447 NW American Lane

(386) 752-6058


l S 0r S -SLi
Halo I ,BEBEFBEEdshi
If ou re ntresed.n avetisng n or eeky wrdsearh uzle


- - ~ ---- ----------- ---------


I


- - - - - -


-1 1






6C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


HAVE YOU TRIED IT?
"It's about-time a sub tastes like a sub.
Thanks Willy J's!"
Loretta Holmes
Lake Citv
"Best subs in town!"
Chri. Dowell
Lake (C.
Listen to Mix 94.3 and Big 98 to win FREE SUBS!
Open Monday Saturday o0am-9pm
Sunday IIam-7pmn
(386) 752-7949 3525 Bascom Norris
(Acroos from Wal-Mart, neut to Lowes) .


EUROTOP '' UPE
Serta SUPREME DEAL,
WAS NOW WAS NOW
TWIN SET sJA8 s244 QUEEN SET sIM s$374


' FULL SET $59M


$344 : KING SET S09 $494


kL_--_--__--- --- L---------- ----
1ES' 1678 US Hwy 90 W
(L0e7 CitEDS _
a B PS Fi LESS Lakecit,tvFL
BDcgitxng foPteBiX~~W~ ~I J~ 33?^(^ mJfWi^IXEO~ l'oW


, .. . .. www.aspenlakecity.com


UUBISVV&1
~AND^

STATION


3Z 77 &aE
rpraan~n^Cl


2a~m


0445 3)


45i
FORGER FASkET
WITH CHIPS


BLVDO 5-04*0
^,__ __ : _________' ___ r * -


-y A


AALL'VO
CAM EAT
PRIAAE RIU
m R 2 SIDES
11KJQRSAAY, IIDAY. fATURPAV
(NO S$WitNG)


pJLM


- -


How Do You KNOW

You GOT THE BEST DEAL 7AV






H BYDEALING WITH THE O
"At Our Dealership, My Office is Right Up Front!" r j
Come in and Let Me Share With You Why Our /
Customers--Become Customers for Life." 0' --
-Norbie Ronsonet ,A IjJr J l a


0r FoR
%PR


MONTHS
WAC


S12,999-


$18,9099


2008 Ford
F-150 XL


PlusTax &Tags


1997 Ford
Ranger PU


Plus Tax & Tags


2010 GMC
Terrain SLE2


PlusTax & Tags


1996 Buick 2006 Buick 2007 GMC
Century Sedan PlusTax&Tags Rainier CXL PlusTax&Tags Sierra SLE1 PlusTax&Tags


Ov, 50 ws O, of
SAW'-is&ie C*s+womvs!


RONSONET -


b~pr~lre-. -sz~fy~~b ~ ~ ~ e


2007 Chevrolet
Tahoe LT


2006 GMC
Envoy SUV


Plus Tax & Tags


Plus Tax & Tags


2007 GMC
Yukon SLT


2006 Dodge
Caravan SXT


Plus Tax & Tags


Plus Tax & Tags


Hwy 90 East
386-752-2180
-.. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ U .'.;';PRL+S S&"A&^~& PuL^ -r.


^^^B^^WI,~~~ra~if iEii^^KZiei~tvK7-1


C ALL PAY EVERYDAY
(DINE IN ONLY)


B


- -


-- ---


---- ---


i


. I










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


010 Announcements


05523646
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Is now accepting applications
for the Rotation Wrecker List
and the CCSO Fleet Vehicle On-
ly Towing Agreement. Applica-
tfons may be picked up between
8-5 Mon-Fri at the CCSO Oper-
ations Center located at 4917
U.S. Hwy 90 East, Lake City,
Florida. All applications must be
returned by
5 pm September 3, 2010.



060 Services

04541324
CMSMG
BARIATRICS
480 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386)758-1965
Ask About our medically
supervised and individualized
Weight loss program,
designed for you.
Obesity shortens your life,
so why not live longer.
Let us help you live longer
and healthier start now!
It's not too late to
extend your life.


100 Job
SOpportunities

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:00A-4:30P Mofi-Fri

05523527


mPEMCO
WORLD AIR SERVICES

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have been waiting for!.
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
* Aircraft Mechanics
* Aircraft Structural Mechanics
* Production Supervisors
* Quality Control Manager/
Supervisor/Inspector
* Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careers(i)pemcoair.com;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at.
www.pemcoair.com.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

05523587
WAREHOUSE
OPERATIONS
SUPERVISORS

The nations leading retail and
supply chain organization, SU-
PERVALU, Inc. has an excel-
lent career opportunity available
for a Warehouse Operations Su-
pervisor to assist in.ongoing op-
erations for a perishable facility
(35 degrees to -15 degrees)
called SUPERVALU LOGIS-
TICS Florida located in the
Lake City area. This position
will be responsible for supervis-
ing and directing the warehouse
workforce and providing direc-
tion to the support staff. The op-
erational areas that will require
direction and leadership include
receiving, order selection, load-
ing, letdowns and sanitation.
Previous experience in ware-
house logistics is required in-
cluding the following areas of
expertise:
4+ years of prior warehouse
logistics experience
Perishable warehouse
experience preferred
Knowledge of a mechanized
warehouse operation is desired
Excellent human relations and
communications skills
Proven record of achieving
operational and personal
objectives
Ability to maintain a safe and
productive working environment
* Bi-lingual in English-Spanish
is a plus
College preferred
Effective coaching, training
and counseling skills
Technical/PC skills desired

Work schedules will be fluid as
typical with a warehouse. Posi-
tion requires availability which
includes weekends. In return for
the above qualifications and'
skills we offer a competitive
compensation program includ-
ing medical, dental, life insur-


ance, Short Term Disability,
LTD, 401-K, vacation and holi-
days. If you feel that you meet
or exceed the above qualifica-
tions and are seeking a new op-
portunity with a solid, profitable
and progressive organization
please apply at Florida Crown,
1389 US Hwy. 90 West, Suite
170B, Lake City, FL 32025.


04541206
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
No CDL, No Problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

05523626
TEACHERS, FT and PT,
Early Head Start
(birth to 3 yrs old), positions in
Lake City, Live Oak, and
Jasper-HS Diploma/GED, CDA
(Child DevelopmentAssociate)
or FCCPC
(Fl Child Care Professional
Credential) preferred.
Bilingual (Span/Eng) preferred.
Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
Current 1St Aide/CPR pref.
To Apply-
E-Mail:arobinson@sv4cs.org
call (386) 754-2222
or Fax 386-754-2220,
In Person 236 SW Columbia
Ave, Lake City FI or 843
SW Marymac St, Live Oak Fl
EOE

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided.- Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Disabled and would like to work?
Rest Area Attendant position
Apply in PERSON at CARC
512 SWSisters Welcome Rd
Lake City
Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers.. .telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows.95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be. experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Lye Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746
04540698
Do you get satisfaction from
making something?
Do you get excited about
technology?
Do you like to analyze problems
and come up with creative
solutions?
If so, a degree or certificate in
Engineering Technology
at Florida Gateway College
is for you!
Engineering Technicians are in
demand by manufacturing and
other high-tech industries.
Enroll now for the Fall semester.
Classes begin Aug. 23.
Financial Aid available.
Call 386-754-4442 for details;

Security Officers
needed Live Oak/Lake City Areas,
must have current D Sec Lic., Clr
background, Drs Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB1000084
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
Please fax resume to ,
386-758-4523
Want to make a difference
in someone's life?
Residential Training Specialist
positions available, one yr exp, di-
ploma or GED, current FL DL,
CPR/lst Aid/ HIV Training req'd,
Apply in person at CARC
512 SWSisters Welcome Road,
Lake City
WE ARE GROWING
Qualified, Experienced Teachers
needed, apply in person
Wee Care Preschool & Daycare
corner of 240 & 47,386-754-5111

120 Medical
1 Employment

05523427



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
C.N.A. in PRN Pool
Evening & Midnight
Shifts
PRNRN
Lake City
Adult/Child Case


Manager
Live Oak/Lake
Butler/Starke/Lake City
CO m Rehab
Bachelors in Psyche,
Social Work or Related
CO IV
Discharge Planner
Lake City
wwW.mbhci.org
to see our current
needs and online
applications
EOE, DFWP

P/T CLERICAL
-help needed for medical office,
Fax resume to
386-487-1234


120 Medical
Employment

05523572
Medical Office
with immediate opportunies for
Medical Assistant, LPN &
Nurse Practitioner with experi-
ence in medical procedures
Send resume to P.O.Box
2204 lake City, FL 32056

Busy Medical Practice with multi-
ple doctors is seeking responsible
individual for Receptionist and
Scheduling. Medical experience a
must. Fax resume to 386-758-5648
Fast Paced Medical Office needs
experienced only
Medical Assistant
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email:
to office manager @
primarycaremedic.comn
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

Schools &
240 Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-08/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-09/13/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Chocolate Lab Pups
AKC Registered, health certs
$350 Come by and snuggle
with one!! 386-965-2231
Free
Two Yorkie Pups
ps.me02@yahoo.com
386-755-4110
Lovely Rat Terrier.
3.5 months old
$100.
386-697-9950
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
j3 Supplies
20 Month old laying hen
Live Oak
$20
386-330-0168
Mini Horses,Mares $500 each,
gentle, both take saddle and rider,
lead well, make great family horse
386-965-2231


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances

GE Dishwasher,
slide in, white, works good,
$100 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
GE White Washer/Dryer set
Works Good
$250. OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
Microwave Oven
good shape, works well, revolving
-plate, welcome to see $30
386-755-3682
Upright Freezer,
14/16 Cu Ft, white,
works well,$150
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

407 Computers

IBM Computer,
Many extras
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Tall Bookshelf
$25
386-754-9295 or
386-292-3927
Twin Bed, metal frame + mattress,
.. head and foot board,
blue in color $125
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman Riding Mower, 20 hp
turbo cool engine, 42" cut, auto,
runs great, $525
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
Poulan Pro PUSH MOWER.
6.5 engine Like New!
22" cut.rolls easy, $145 obo
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927


A411 Machinery &
411 Tools
Lrg Craftsman Dbl Tool Box,
with side closets, include name
brand auto tools, $1200 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat/Sun 7a-?, Men's med & Irg
clothing, womens/juniors (0-4)
clothing, baby girl clothes, toys,
misc, household Vemdale Apts


440 Miscellaneous
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 386-965-2231
Tool Box,
will fit small truck,
in fair shape,$50 obo
386-754-9295, 386-292-3927
Upgraded Running Boards
Rubber covered. Fits Ford truck.
Extended or King cab. $85.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. rhonthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2BR/1BA MH
No Pets.
$450. mo. $300. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
SWhite Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Quiet, Secluded,Private
2/2 MH, on 5 acres
,includes utilities,
Avail Sept 1st 386-755-0300
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 Mobile Homes
4 0 for Sale
1978 S/W 2 bdrm, in Paradise
Village MH Park 195 SE Bikini
Dr, Lake City, Lot # 25, 2 blks
from College, great for student,
asking $6,000 OBO 850-295-4717

& Land
D/W on almost 1/2 acre lot, 3/2,
new AC, appliances included,
$50,000 on Branford Hwy
386-208-0665 or 386-466-2825

0 Unfurnished Apt.
S For Rent
U5523300
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 Bedroom, Garage Apt,
W/D included, $400 month,
1st & last
386-208-4702
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security.
Call Michelle
386-752-9626
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-75.8-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+ Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600& up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392


7 0 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $500. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.

The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

7 20 FFurnished Apts.
720 For Rent
1 bedroom upstairs apartment,
utilities included,
$150 a week, $300 deposit,
758-2080 or 755-1670

Furnished Studio Apt
w/cable & all utilities included.
$500. mo. & $150. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
Rooms for Reit. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730A Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/Bdnnrm/2 bath, w/office, 2 car ga-
rage, gas fireplace, safe neighbor-
hood $1200 mo, dep required,
386-623-4403

3br/2ba home for rent in Wise
Estates. Brick exterior. new,
flooring, great location. $1100.
mo. 1st,last, & sec. 386-965-8633
3br/2ba Lease/Purchase Option
New Construction, very nice area,
study, dining rm, wood floors,
granite counters, place, Ig back-
yard & deck. 1800 sf. $1295 mo
sale price $234, 900
Call 386-867-0591
4 Bdrm $850 mo, south of town,
off of 47 ,S/W MH 2/2 in Well-
born, $625 mo 1st, last, 1/2 of sec.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

4/1, 2 car garage,
East Baya Ave,large yard $850
dep, No Pets! $850 per month
386-752-7578
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,150
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-984-9599

Clean lBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-
1833.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.,
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LG 3BR/2BA house
Nice property. $765. mo.
$600 security. Application req'd.
386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals

05523530
WAREHOUSE SPACE
For Lease near 1-75 in
Cannon Creek.
1247sf w-office,
restroom & utilities included.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757.
Westfield Realty Group.

Convenient Store
with gas
for lease,
813-286-2323
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035 '
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7


805 .Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone numbernto the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

04541245
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
August 28th, 2010 @11:00 AM
518 SW Explorer Glen
Ft. White, FL 32038
10+ acres with Doublewide
Mobile home and out buildings!
A peaceful sanctuary away from
the hustle and bustle!!
For pictures and info see
www.brewerauctions.com
Phone: (386)497-4438
Cell: (904)838-1575
Conducted by:
Brewer Auction & Realty
Roy'J. Brewer, Jr.,
CAI, auctioneer
AU#2604/ACB#1940
3br/2ba NEW CONSTRUCTION
Very Nice area, Upgrades! Wood'
floors, granite counters, study,
place, dining rm, Ig backyard &
deck. VERY NICE! 1800 sf.
$234,900. (386)867-0591
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5'ac,near
Brnfrd, Irg shed, sm down, $725
mo 386-590-0642/386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&
2 Acreage

4 Ac.,Ft. Whte. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing!' NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-75,2-4339 www.landnfl.com


930 Motorcycles

1993 Harley Davidson FXRP
Super Glide, 23K miles, crash bar,
windshield, good condition $4900
386-758-9750


940 Trucks

08 Dodge SLT.4x4 Big Ram, ex-
tra clean. 20" Factory Rims, Hemi
full pwr. 10,290mi. Price $24,900
386-755-2909


950 Cars for Sale

2003 Cadillac DeVille,
am/fm/cd, heated leather seats,
67K miles, $9500
386-755-5127 or 386-965-5484

951 Recreational
95 Vehicles __
2006 DENALI 35 ft 5th Wheel
Camper, w/3slides, 02 Chevy Sil-
verado crew cab P/U w/6.6 CI
Die-
sel $37,900 for both 386-758-2465


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle.' The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.






14Ft. V-Hull 2003 Cadillac 2006 35 Ft. Denali 2008 Dodge SLT
5th wheel campr tow
Aluminum Boat DeVille truck combo, 3 slides, 4x4 Big Ram
With trailer and many extras, like new with 20" Factory rims, Hemi
trolling motor. AM/FM/CD, leather, 2002 Chevy Silverado, ,
heated seats, crew cab PU w/6.6CI turbo full power, extra clean.
$850 67,000 miles, diesel. 10,290 mi.
$9,500 $37,900 $24,900
Call Call Call Call
386-755-4247 386-965-5484 386-758-2465 386-755-2909


Classified Department: 755-5440






8C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY AUGUST 22, 2010


Fabric, ,' j i "l ; Meeting all your sewing needs
Fabrc quilt & Over 2,000 Bolts of Fabric
custom embroidery store Fabric, notions, zippers
216 SW Mdia Blvd, Lake City Simplicity patterns
(Messt tfo Wendy') *-Quilting
75 4 -3741 Authorized -Sales & Service for
wwwaaygenes-cozn SingerSewing Machines

B^@ V@ @T@0M@@IL
r - ---- - -
I tI.2 -A-Do n I' 1," IM ck1-A-Do I
HAIRCUT SENIOR DAYS
EVERYDAY HAIRCUT
Haircut Just or You! tw@e
Hwy 90 between I I i m
Wendy's and McDonald's Regular Price '9" Tues Thur Only
Baya & Country Club .r.-.---. r - .
758-3093 I ac-A-Do 1' OIiAck-A-D OI
SatewayPlaza HIGHLIGHTS I @Z @W/ I
Full Service Store I I1I
752-0706 ,5 FOILS FOR
,VBranford 1C|sn 1 I 0 CHEMICAL 1
1I' SERVICEE A i
e' Gateway Location Only I Gateway Location Only
r ..>, wg l .i',' .t~a ^., :,, :, # ,t


4 N iE i Oi a tA'P I I


Voted Best of the Best for 3 Years
J(386) 752-6306
CFC 1427643 Back Flow 105 08 8053



Rountree ,l
TOYOTA y,


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10 i

business5 j this pageS

please cal 152-1293


t!; & Service
..No W USHwy 9
'1 7 i. -o


* Rotate &
Balance
Tires
S Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 8/31/10


U


MOVE IN FOR ONLY

Two Weeks FREE Rent!


$299

(WAC)


GREENTREE TOWNHOUSE


WINDSOR

ARMS


AMBERWOOD HILLS


4


2 BEDROOM /1 BATH
OR 2 BEDROOM & 11/2 BATH
Free water/sewer, laundry facility


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1 BEDROOM / 1 BATH
OR 2 BEDROOM & 1 BATH
Washer & Dryer Hookups
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COLUMBIA ARMS


2 BEDROOM / 1 BATH
Washer & Dryer Hookups


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FREE 200 Channels Dish Network, Gated
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dryer hookups, tankless hot water heater,
energy efficient appliances


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1 BEDROOM / 1 BATH
OR 2 BEDROOM & 1 BATH
Pool, picnic area, playground,
laundry facility


PRICING BEGINS AT $499

CALL NOW! 754-1800 or 758-8029


aj


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in.reate!n
Most cars & trucks
expires 8/31/10


7-0,I~T


I IlrlC I











Story ideas?


Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreportercom

Sunday, August 22, 2010


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK






Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Unusual

vegetable

varieties

for fall

Ift's that time of year
when the vegetable.
gardens are worn
and withered, and it's
time to let them go.
Compost the remains and.
plan to put the garden to
rest for the winter, or make
plans for a fall crop. Either
way, it means going out in
the heat to do some manual
labor. I prefer morning
stints outdoors because I
can avoid the pesky mos-
quitoes.
Some vegetables to
consider for August plant-
ing are beans, broccoli,
cauliflower, corn, cucum-
bers, tomatoes and squash.
Check the UF/IFAS docu-
ment, Florida Vegetable'
Gardening, at http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/vh021 for
information on fall veg-
etable selections for North
Florida!'
While you're at it, check
out the "minor" vegetable
selections at http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/topic hs minorveg-
etables.
Floridians have the
opportunity to grow many
unusual and lesser-known
vegetable varieties because
of the favorable climate.
If you have a passion for
home gardening, you prob-
ably have already experi-
mented with a "minor"
vegetable or two.
Comfrey is a hardy
perennial that grows 3 to 4
feet tall, has large leaves,
and forms an attractive
clump. The drooping bell-
shaped flowers are white,
purple, or pale yellow. This
plant tolerates the cold
winter and only needs to
be cut back in February
to allow a new flush of
growth. Use comfrey as a
cooking green, an herb, or
a pretty ornamental.
Salsify, or oyster plant,
is a vegetable with an oys-
ter flavored edible root.
Salsify is grown similarly
to carrots or parsnips. It
needs a long season and
is usually grown from
October through March.
The light brown roots of
salsify are used in soups,
stews, and in creamed
dishes. They can be cut
into strips and boiled, and
then fried or mashed.
Would yod like some
real, down to earth
answers to your questions
about vegetable gardening
in North Florida? The UF/
IFAS Extension Agents and
Master Gardeners are plan-
ning a "Home Vegetable
Gardening Mini-Series" to
help you get your fall gar-
den off to a great start.
The sessions will be held
from 6 to 7:30 pm. on Sept.
9,14, and 16. Each ses-
sion will address different
topics. Join us at 1 p.m. on
Aug. 26 and learn how to
attract butterflies and keep
them around. The classes
are free, but space is lim-
ited, so call 752-5384 to
reserve your seat.
E.D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida


Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Lake City's Frank Innusa takes background actor

roles for TV's 'Law & Order: Special Victims Unit'


*..-r ., .*- .
n'


COURTESY PHOTO
Frank Innusa, a graduate of Columbia High School, moved to New York in 2007. He is appearing in an episode of 'Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.'


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
rank Innusa
Jr., 25 had
never watched
"Law & Order:
Special Victims
Unit" before.
Now the 2003 Columbia
High graduate may be
appearing in the season
premier.
Innusa filmed a role as
a background actor for the
show July 17. The season
premiere is at 10 p.m.
Sept. 22.
"From being there
shooting, it looks like a
pretty good episode," he
said.
He is the son of Frank
and Joan Innusa of Lake
City.
Initially, Innusa was not
interested in acting, he


"It's a hard thing to get into and
involves a lot of luck.You have to be
motivated and can't just wait until
someone comes around.You have
to go out there and be hungry
enough to want this."

Frank Innusa


said. After a drama class
one semester at Columbia
High School, the acting
bug hit him.
Innusa moved to New
York in 2007 and started
going to auditions, he said.
Appearing in the epi-
sode came after a long
wait
"I was with this com-
pany .that gives you work
like this," Innusa said.
"I wasn't getting a lot of
work from them."
He talked to a friend


about his lack of roles and
was told to stick with it
'Two days later, they
said, 'We'd like to use you
for Law & Order,'" he
said. "It was a good thing I
stuck with it."
Being on set was a good
learning experience, he
said.
"You learn a lot from
talking with the other
actors," Innusa said. "You
don't really talk to lead
actors, but it was fun and
really nice."


Innusa said the work
day lasted for about 10
hours.
"It's a lot of waiting
around, and then they'll
tell you, 'OK we're ready
to shoot this scene,'" he
said.
The first scene was
in a subway, he said. A
section of Grand Central
Station was closed off
and directors told all the
"background actors where
to stand.
"Some would go into
the train and do it over
and over," he said. "It was
20 takes of just going into
a train, sitting down and'
going back out and stand-
ing again."
Eventually other scenes
were filmed.
Although he only has
SPECIAL continued on ,2D


COURTESY PHOTO
Innusa works at the Hard
Rock Caf6 in Times Square
and auditions during the day.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Faculty and staffmembers of Florida Gateway College, along with law enforcement representatives attended a ribbon cutting at the Public Service Training
Center in Olustee Wednesday.


FGC holds training center ribbon cutting


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Florida Gateway College
hosted a ribbon cutting
at the Public Service
Training Center in Olustee
Wednesday.


The training center offers
programs in corrections, law
enforcement, emergency
medical services and more.
It was the second ribbon
cutting for the college under
the new name after the first
one July 1, said Chuck Hall,


president Ribbofi cuttings
are being held at all off
campus locations before the
start of the new school year
Aug. 23.
"We want these locations
to know they are an impor-
tant part of college," he


said. "Although we had the
ribbon cutting on campus,
all sites are important"
Ribbon cuttings will be
held later in Gilchrist, Dixie
and Union counties, he said.
The name change has been
going well for FGC, which


was formerly known as Lake
City Community College,
Hall said.
"Everyone is excited, and
hit's gave new energy to the
college which will hopefully
pass on to the students,"
he said.


Section D


-


'


ICTI


SPECI









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


Kazmierski, Powell were FGC students


W here are .
they now"
is a col-
umn about
former stu-
dents of Florida Gateway
College, formerly Lake
City Community College,
and where their life's jour-
ney has taken them since
they left Lake City. The
fourth installment begins
with Steve Kazmierski.
Steve graduated from
Columbia High School in
1987 and began attend-
ing the college with the
ultimate goal of follow-
ing his late father James
Kazmierski and becoming
a physician.
While a student, Steve
would get up early and,
before classes, would
watch his dad perform
surgery. After class he
worked at a pathology lab
operated by Dr. Frank
Ravelo. Steve says that his
interest in Cytology and
Histology, the study of
cells and tissues, started
during this time.
From Lake City, Steve
moved to Tallahassee and
Florida State University
where he would earn a


bachelor's in biological sci-
ences, but instead of going
on to medical school, he
applied to graduate school
and a Ph.D. program
where he could do medical
research. '
In 2000, Steve received
his doctorate at FSU and
then moved to Tucson and
the University of Arizona
where he became a post
doctoral fellow and gained
additional research train-
ing. His goal was to do
academic research and
get a faculty position at a
university.
After two years of
research and training in
Arizona, Steve's career
moved in another direc-
tion. He had heard from
colleagues that certain
law firms needed trained
Ph.D.s in chemistry and
biological sciences to work
in intellectual property and
patent law.
So in 2002, he applied
to Washington University
law school in St Louis
Missouri. Four years later,
Steve had his juris doctor
degree, ready to practice
law.
In October 2009,


Our next former stu-
dent is Andrea Powell.
Andrea attended Lake City
Community College after
graduation from Columbia
High School in 1983. She
appeared in several plays
while taking classes at
Mike McKee LCCC but Andrea told me
mike.mckee@fgc.edu her connection to the col-
lege really began at age 12
Steve moved to the firm when she played the lead
Armstrong Teasdale role in the college produc-
where his specialty is in tion of "Oliver."
patent law. The firm repre- From Lake City, Andrea
sents companies such as moved to Hawaii, where
Monsanto and the phar- she studied theater, and
maceutical giant Abbott. then to Baton Rouge,
His firm also represents La., and LSU where she
researchers and universi- earned a bachelor's degree
ties where discoveries in in speech and theater.
science take place every- From Louisiana State
day. University, she and her
Steve and his wife, husband Paul moved to
Kathy, whom he met Chapel Hill, N.C., where
at Florida State, live in Paul would accept a faculty
. University City, a suburb position at the University
of St Louis, with their two of North Carolina.
children, seven-year-old Andrea would flourish
Lucas and four-year-old in an area that had many
Jocelyn. regional theaters and a
Steve enjoys the out- major film studio in nearby
doors and the Kazmierski Wilmington, N.C.
tradition of turkey hunting. It was Wilmington
It looks like his son, Lucas, where Andrea appeared
will carry on the turkey in such television series
hunting legacy. as "Matlock," starring


Andy Griffith, "Dawson's
Creek," and the WB
series "One Tree Hill." It
was also during this time
that Andrea began work-
ing in films. In 1993, she
appeared in "Super Mario
Bros." followed by several
made-for-TV movies. In
2000, Andrea appeared in
"The Legend of Bagger
Vance," directed by Robert
Redford. She told me at
an early rehearsal Redford
walked into the room
and spoke to her about
the role. Andrea says all
she could think of was,
"That's Robert Redford,
Oh my gosh, that's Robert
Redford!" She was so star-
struck in his presence she
didn't hear a word he said.
"Bagger Vance" was
followed by roles in
"Runaway Jury," '"The
Dale Earnhardt Story,"
and a role in the critically
acclaimed "The Limbo
Room."
Andrea's most recog-
nized work has been on
television this summer.
She is currently appear-
ing on the ABC series
"The Gates" in which
she plays Karen Crezski,


who also happens to be a
werewolf. The show has
just wrapped production
and will continue to air at
10 p.m. on Sundays until
mid-September. She's not
sure ABC will renew the
program for another sea-
son, but the experience on
network TV has been an
exciting one.
When I spoke with
Andrea for this column,
she and her husband,
-Paul, were driving to an
audition in.Wilmington for
a science fiction movie.
Chances are you'll be
seeing her on the big
screen in another project
soon. You can follow her
career on Andrea's blog at
Andreapowell. com.
If you know of someone
who has graduated from
a local high school and
Florida Gateway College
and has a story to share,
please email me at "mailto:
mike. mckee@fgc. edu"mike.
mckee@fgc.edu or call me
at 386-754-4329.

* Mike McKee is the
executive director of Media
and Community Information
at Florida Gateway College.


ENGAGEMENTS


Vaughan-Blair
Dan and Ann Hagan
of Des Moines, Iowa, -
announce the engagement
and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter,
Emily Ann Vaughan of
Des Moines, Iowa, to Evan
Blair of Lake City.
He is the son of Lee and
Joanne Blair of Lake City.
The bride-elect'gradu-
ated in 2007 from Central
-College and is currently
working in the behav-
ioral and health field at
Principal Financial group.
The future groom
attended Central College
and.owns-his own spray
foam business in addition
to working with his father
at KK Construction.
The wedding is planned
for 6:30 p.m. Aug. 28 at
the home of Tom and Deb
Dean, followed by a recep-
tion.


Brown-Walters
Laura Williams of Lake
City and Charles Brown
of Jasper announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their
daughter, Latonya Denise
Brown of Lake,City to
Andre' Carlos Walters of
Fort White.
He is the son of Bernice
Watson Walters of Fort
White and Ralph Walters
of San Jose, Calif.
The bride-elect gradu-
ated from Columbia
High School and is
employed with the State
of Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
The future groom grad-
uated from Oak Grove.
High School in San Jose,
Calif. and is employed
with Conrad Yelvington
Railyard.
The wedding is planned
for 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
18 at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church. A recep-


Emily Ann Vaughan and Evan Blair.


COURTESY PHOTO


SPECIAL: Hard work pays in acting


Continued From Page 1

a background role in the
episode, Innusa said he is
hoping it leads to bigger
parts. Sometimes back-
ground parts are upgrad-
ed to speaking roles.
When he's not audition-
ing, Innusa works as a
host at
the Hard
Rock Cafe
in Times
Square.
"The
Hard
Rock Caf6
Innusa is a nice
place to
work," he said. "Everyone.
that works there is singer,
actor or in some type of
entertainment."
He has seen Aerosmith
and Kim Kardashian at
events hosted by the res-
taurant.
Working at the restau-
rant allows flexibility in


' his auditioning schedule,
he said. He auditions
during the day but if
something comes up later
he is able to work with
someone to cover his shift
at the restaurant.
"They understand if you
do stuff on side," he said.
"But I try not to make a
habit of it" .
Since Law & Order,
Innusa has auditioned for
the upcoming "Men In
Black .3."
"Hopefully I'll get it," he
said. "It's the latest thing'
I've audition for."'
.. ,nAnusa said.he is,trying,,
to build up his r6sum6.
He is also getting into
stunt work. Several of his
friends at the Hard Rock
do stunt work for movies,
he said. They have started
training for a movie that
would begin filming in
October, he said.


"Definitely that was a
lot of fun," Innusa said.
Innusa said his parents
are very supportive of
him working toward a
career in acting.
'They want me to do
what makes me happy,"
he said.
In the future, he would
like to work with actor
Emile Hirsch and director
Christopher Nolan.
To other aspiring
actors, Innusa would offer
this advice: "Just go out
and do it"
"It's a hard thing.
Thafs one thing.my par-
ents said.," he said. "It's
a hard thing to get into
and involves a lot of luck.
You have to be motivated
and can't just wait until
someone comes around.
You have to go out there
and be hungry enough to
want this."


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT


Aaliyah Fasnacht
Aaliyah Cailynn
Fasnacht was born
Aug. 7 at Shands at UF
weighing 6 pounds and 1
ounce and 18 and a half


inches long. She is the
daughter of Chrysten
A. Hudson and Kenneth
"Kam Fasnacht.
Her grandparents
are George H. Hudson
Jr., Rhonda H. Hudson,


Ken Fasnacht and Cindy
Rautio. Great-grandpar-
ents, include Mr. and
Mrs. G.H. Hudson Sr.,
Barbara Hodges. and
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
Fasnacht.


COURTESY PHOTO
Latonya Denise Brown and Andre' Carlos Walters.


tion will follow at Lake
City Shrine Club.
An invitation is


extended to all family and
friends for the wedding
only.


Ratliff-Moses
Glenda Register
announces the engage-
ment of her daughter,
Sarah Michelle Ratliff to
Justin Harriss Moses. She
is the daughter of the late
Charles Owen Ratliff.
He is the son of Mike
and Melinda Moses.
The bride-elect is a
2007 graduate of Lake
City Community College
and is currently employed
with Ed Fraser Memorial
Hospital in Macclenny and
Shands Homecare in Lake
City as a physical therapist
assistant.
The future groom is
a 2000 graduate of the
University of Central


Sarah Michelle Ratliff and Justin Harriss Moses.


Florida and is currently
employed with Momex
Foods Inc.
Both are graduates of


Columbia High School.
A private wedding in
California is planned for
November.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


'i


~LrLT~IY~


-CIC-CLq-rCrC~J--rS)










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010 3D


DEAR ABBY


New wife tries to exorcise


late wife from man's life


DEAR ABBY: My wife,
"Jan," is having problems
related to my late wife,
"Ellen." Ellen and I were
married 31 years. We
built a business together
and raised three sons.
Obviously, I have a lifetime
of memories associated
with her. I admit that I still
grieve, but I have tried to
move on.
I am forbidden to men-
tion Ellen's name around
Jan. She says five years
should be long enough to
"forget" When we married
two years ago, she moved
into my home because it
was bigger and closer to
my business than hers. Jan
now says she has no "place"
in this house, although we
moved most of her furniture
in and sold mine.
Abby, Jan won't let me
have a photo of Ellen, even
in a drawer. I had to buy her
a second piano because she
refused to play the one that
Ellen had played on, nor
will she consider a certain
make of car to replace hers
because Ellen drove one.
She says she feels like
"the other woman" in our
marriage. It's not a three-
some, and I'm not trying to
mold her into my first wife.
Did I make a mistake mar-
rying just three years after
my wife died? Am I incon-
siderate of Jan's feelings, or
is she being unreasonable?
- REMARRIED TEXAN


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR TEXAN: Its not
unusual for a second wife
who moves into an existing
home to want to "steril-
ize" the interior so she can
make it her own. However,
I agree that Jan's reaction
is extreme. Obviously, you
married a woman with seri-
ous insecurities. Her insis-
tence that the name of the
mother of your children not
be mentioned, or a photo
of her kept even in a
drawer is unrealistic and
heavy-handed.
If you made a "mistake"
it may have been in mar-
rying while you were still
grieving. Because you and.
Jan are at odds, I strongly
advise scheduling some
sessions with a marriage
counselor.
DEAR ABBY: I was laid
off recently and my hus-
band does not make much
money. We have lived within
our means, but due to a
recent rash of bad luck, nec-
essary home repairs, kids'
braces and medical bills, I
don't know what to do.
My parents are not
helping us in this time of


need, and I am becoming
resentful. They are elderly
and we are always helping
them cutting grass, paint-
ing, driving them to family
get-togethers and doctor's
appointments. These are
things they would have to
pay someone else for, but
we do for free.
I want to say, "I need
your help NOW, not an
inheritance down the road."
I have no siblings nearby
and I know my parents'
care will eventually fall to
me, putting even more
stress on my situation. Am
I wrong to feel resentful,
knowing they can afford to
help us out but don't? -
DUTIFUL DAUGHTER
IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR DUTIFUL
DAUGHTER: Before you
allow your resentment to
build any further, have a
talk with your parents. Have
you asked them for help
and been refused? Do you
know all the details of their
finances, and whether their
savings are earning enough
for them to live and still give
you the help you're looking
for? If you haven't already
done so, start a dialogue
with them without a
chip on your shoulder or
expectations about what
they "should" do.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Love, romance and
sharing dreams for the
future will help you bring
them to fruition. Single
Aries should get involved
in a worthwhile event and
opportunities will open for
an interesting and engag-
ing relationship. ***

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): A chance to change
your vocation or try your
hand at something new
that can lead to greater
income is highlighted.
Don't let an emotional
encounter stop you from
exploring the avenues
unveiling before you. *
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Making empty prom-
ises isn't going to get you
anywhere. This is a great
time to show what you
have to offer and to make
your services readily avail-
able. ** *
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't count on
getting help. Trying to
get others to pitch in or.
dwelling on a relationship
that isn't going anywhere.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
will be a waste of time.
Overreacting, overdoing or
overindulging will result in
added responsibilities. *

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
The places and people you
encounter during a short
trip will bring you ideas
and the information you
need to pursue your plans.
Someone special will help
you make a decision. *

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You may be able to
talk your way in and out of
situations you encounter,
but someone from your
past will bring up a valid
point that may require you
to change your tune. *
**
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Focus on home, family
and making things work
more efficiently for you
personally. An innovative
approach to the way you
handle the ones you love
and how you run your
household will bring you


CELEBRITY CIPHER


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are.created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue.: H equals P
" UMVX F V Y H Z WIEPNX WT ? U W Z L F
ZPVRRA MVZE... VOE VGMFPCFOB V N'
Y I G M V N F G W I R E ." PRPOV L VBVO '
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: '"The'New Age? It's just,the old age stuck in a
microwave oven for fifteen seconds." James Randi
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-23


greater respect and enthu-
siastic assistance. "" *

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't take uncom-
plimentary comments to
heart By moving forward,
you will discover there is
jealousy accompanying the
comments. Rise above any
discouragement and pres-
ent what you have to offer
in a positive manner. *
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Make a move
personally, professionally
or financially and you will
discover a host of opportu-
nities. * *
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stick close to
home and keep a tight rein
on your money and your
possessions. Not everyone
will have your best inter-
ests at heart Be careful
with whom you share your
personal information. *

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put your money,
your ideas and your heart
on the table. It's up to you
to make the first move.
There is plenty to gain if
you are open and honest
about your intentions and
plans. * *
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): A secret or
legal matter will give rise
to gossip or a revision of
something you were trying
to accomplish in the past
Reconnect with someone
who can play an important
part inhelping yoe move
forward. A


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


IS THERE AN ECHO IN HERE? By Daniel C. Bryant / Edited by Will Shortz 1r 1 3- 4 7 -- 8 ---10[11-- 12- |1- 14T 17 18


Across
1 Writer of the short
story "The
Overcoat"
6 Sitcom with three
.stars
10 Compos mentis
14 Some Latinas:
Abbr.
19 Hersey novel
setting
20 Cream, e.g.
21 Angel
22 Parts of many a
still life
23 Underachiever's
motto?
26 SALT topic
27 Vladimir
Nabokov novel
28 It's noble
29 Sol .mates?
30 Some court pleas,
for short
31 U.N.-created
land: Abbr.
33 Places where
.masseurs
massage
35 Trouble's partner
37 Milk containers
38 Being debated
41 "The Mystery of
-__Vep," 1990s
Off Broadway
play
42 E is its lowest
note
43 Majorcan
affirmation?
47 She-bear: Sp.
50 7-0 record,.e.g.
,51 Something for a
kid to keep on
hand?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


52 Portuguese wines
54 Worthy of
mention
56."The lowest form
of humor," per
Samuel Johnson
57 Grps. that know
the drill?
58 Roam and raid
61 Not yet acquired,
as knowledge
65 ___-all
66 Inhabitant:
Suffix
67 Registering a
poodle?
71 Steve Martin's
"boy king"
72 What atoms do
74 Liza Minnelli's
father
75 Contents of
sleeves
77 N.S.A. concern,
for short
79 Ultimate
80 Hulk Hogan or
Andre the Giant,
slangily
83 "Vitruvian Man"
artist
85 Part of batting
instruction
87 "Twin Peaks"
actor Jack
91 Misspeak, e.g.
92 Guy holding a
Hostess snack
cake?
95 Canadian curling
championship,
with "the"
97 Procrastinator's
response
98 Decimal system
99 The beginning
101 Dom _..._
."Inception" hero
102 ___Ed
104 Letter run


105 Skyscraper
support
106 300 to 3,000
MHz range
107 ___ fixe
109 Popular
fragrance
112 Slithering
menace
113 Words of
caution from
Rodolfo?
118 "___ I might

119 "__ Diana's
altar to protest":
Shak. ,
120 Dinner crumbs
121 Certain Central
Asian
122 Puts back in
123 Politico
Gingrich
124 [Over here!]
125 Bounce

Down
1 Group of whales
2 Harem room
3 Annual parade
subject
4 "Go !"_
5 Fin de sibcle
writer Pierre
6 V.J.'s employer
7 The "A" of sports'
A.F.L.
8 Begets
9 Red Skelton
persona
10 Organizer of
many a sit-in:
Abbr.
11 Windblown
12 Like Bob Dylan's
voice
13 Opposite of
Thanatos, to
Freud
14 More thin and
frail


15 Modify, as
software
16 Reservation at
aJohannesburg
restaurant?
17 Mail
18 112-Across sound
24 Follow
25 Hors d'oeuvre
follower
31 Pet food
company since
1946
32 Worry
34 Constant, in
product names
36 "Toe" of the
Arabian
Peninsula
37 Coll. in La Jolla
39 Tuscan town,
home of the
painter Duccio
40 Biblical
correspondent
41 Very emotional
42 Designer Versace
44 Gently roast ...
or something ,
that's roasted
45 Out of the office,
perhaps
46 Blue pixie
48 Hipbone
attachment
49 Ledger list
53 Sports org. since
1894
55 Year Columbus
returned from
his final voyage
to the New
World
56 Something that's
"Miss" titled?
58 Where the driver
is driving Miss
Daisy
59 Sorry soul?
60 Landlord's
ultimatum?


62 Sculptor Maya
63 Board, in a way
64 Purveyor of
nonstick
cookware
68 Bit of air
pollution
69 Div. of biology
70 Actresses Kristen
and Graff
73 Locale for a
trophy display
76 Astronomer
Tycho ___


78 Traditional 90 Time on end


church
celebration
81 Univ., e.g.
82 Held in reserve
84 First president of
South Korea
85 Supercilious sort
86 Nearly worthless
88 Almost
89 What's expensive
in Paris?


93 Currently
94 Must
96 Try to scare off,
'in a way
99 Library shelfful:
Abbr.
100 End early
101 Work that's no
fun
102 Jury members
103 Track meet
events


106 Japanese noodle
108 Sell-off, say
110 Play money?
111 Key with five
sharps: Abbr.
114 It has a blast
115 Mar. weekend
shortener
116 and cheese
117 Operator of the
original N.Y.C.
subway


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
FAB IAN RETRO MADE PAR
APO0 LL|O TEGRIN O VERSE
TELEPATHSGIF T BARRONS
AX E HIRE 0 N MEE

HERRSRAMROD ILIE TIRT



ALSACE CAPI0 S S 0 AR REA
R L I E T I T S
RAPS 00TNETWOR ESA

IT O RNSPEC I ALTY S LI

AS ERTT A|TS S 0 0oqNE ST

MEWS CASHCACHE PLANS
FOG TEAR STAIRS LACK
INRE STEAD OPERAS MAY

CDIORIU A TE CR A P MEF IGHTE RS


3 8 5


82 41


1 9


94 28


625 7


2 9 6


27 5


5 1 3


3 6 1


L 9 9 6 Z L8 C1V











1 L 9 9 8 6


L 8 9 9 1 6 L 9


8 6 9 L C8 V9 L


8 LL lV 9 9 6 Z8


9S IZ1 7 L 6 8 L 9 C








4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, AUGUST 22, 2010


-. .- ,-f -. ,
, k-..4: ;. ;


I
r -~ -


/ am from Louisiana and I know our beaches are our home,
our way of life and our livelihood. Protecting the coast and
cleaning up the beaches is very personal to me.
Keith Seilhan, BP Cleanup


Making This Right


Beaches
Claims
, Cleanup

Economic Investment
,Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


At BP, we have taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And
that includes keeping you informed.

Looking For Oil
You may have heard oil is no longer flowing into the Gulf, but our work
on the beaches continues. When oil is spotted, the Response Command
Center is notified, a Shore Cleanup Assessment Team is mobilized and
work begins immediately. Efforts are being coordinated from staging
areas in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

If you see oil on the beach, please call 1-866-448-5816 and we'll send a
team nto clean it up.


Cleaning Up The Beaches
The number of people mobilized to clean up the beaches depends on the
size of the affected area. Individual teams can number in the hundreds,
and thousands of additional workers remain on-call. Working with the
Coast Guard, our teams continue cleaning up until the last bit of oil has
been removed.

Our Responsibility
Our beach operations will continue until the last of the oil has been
skimmed from the sea, the beaches and estuaries have been cleaned up,
and the region has been pronounced oil-free. We have already spent more
than $3.9 billion responding to the spill and on the cleanup, and none of
this will-be paid by taxpayers.

Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes. We may not
always be perfect, but we will do everything we can to make this right.





For information visit: bp.com For assistance, please call:
restorethegulf.gov To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
facebook.com/bpamerica To report impacted wildlife: (866). 557-1401
twitter.com/bp_america To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
youtube.com/bp floridagulfresponse.com bp


2010 BP, E&P