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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01405
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/21/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01405
System ID: UF00028308:01405
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






S.-H
I~


Gubernatorial battle
McCollum, Scott enter final
frenzied days of primary race.
State, 8A
00o016 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11700F FLORIDA
205 SMA UNIV OF FLOR1IDA3
GAINESVILLE FL 32611


Saturday, August 21, 2010


r.co


Under the lights
Columbia High plans scrimmage
at 7:30 p.m. today.
Sports, I B


reporter



Vol. 136, No. 183 0 75 cents


stivals and events


Today
Backpack giveaway
Christ Central Ministries
will be hosting Operation
Backpack #VI from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. today at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Members will
be giving away backpacks
and school supplies. School
physical and haircuts will
also be offered. Parents
must be present with their
children.

Back-to-school bash
True Church of God in
Unity will be distributing
backpacks for its Back-to-
School Bash from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today. The church
is located at 629 NE Annie
Mattox St

School supply giveaway
A back to school sup-
ply giveaway is from 9
a.m. to noon today at the
Richardson Community
Center. About 200 string
backpacks and supplies,
for 125 elementary and 75
middle and high school stu-
dents, will be distributed.
Children must be present
to receive a backpack.
Students and parents will
be required to sign in for
the event.

Pet Fundraiser
Four Pets Sake is host-
ing a Bowl To Save a Pet
Fundraiser at 1 p.m. today at
the Lake City Bowl, which
is located on State Road 247.
The cost is $15 per person
and prizes will be awarded.
Call 935-0975 or send an e-
mail tofourpetssakel@wind-
stream.net.

YEP Volunteering
The Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce YEP is volun-
teering with Habitat for
Humanity at 7 a.m. today.
All volunteers are required
to stay for the duration,
which is until lunchtime.
Contact Sandy Kishton at
(386) 344-0433 for more
information.

Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
duction at High Springs
Community Theater is
"The Spell Of Sleeping
Beauty" at 7 p.m. today.
All tickets are $5 and avail-
able at The Framery, The
Coffee Clutch in High
Springs and through Pay
Pal at www.highspringcom-
munitytheater com.

UF Master Gardener
Presentation
Composting: Rot to
Richness is at 2 p.m. today
at the Columbia County
Library main branch. Learn
how to turn lawn waste
into rich organic compost
for use in gardening. The
free presentation is by Le
Simons, Master Gardener.


CHS implements major changes


New bus routes
have been added,
officials say.

By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
School improvement will
start with two big changes
this year at Columbia High


School.
The starting and ending
times for CHS have been
changed and the high
school also will be adding
new bus routes.
CHS school day times
are now from 8:29 a.m. to
3:15 p.m.
Terry Huddleston, prin-
cipal, said-school officials
would like to start ear-


lier like most secondary
schools, but the earliest


the school
day is 8:29
a.m.
With
the time


Millikin
the daily


change,
schedule has


also changed. There is no
early bird and all students
now have a total of eight
"classes.
CHS is still on a block
schedule so students will
have four classes a day.
Three of those classes are
82 minutes each and two
of those classes, which are
Tiger Blocks, are 50 min-
utes each.


= SUCCESS


IM--


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Donna McAdams, Pinemount Elementary School principal, smiles as she serves the first piece of cake at Pinemount
Elementary's 'A' celebration event Friday. The new school recently received the state's highest grade.


Pinemount spells celebration

using first letter in alphabet


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
It was no surprise
for Principal
Donna McAdams
when Pinemount
Elementary School
received an "A" on its
first report card.
"I expected it," she
said. "I had already calcu-
lated our grade."
Pinemount celebrated
being an "A" school at a
special luncheon Friday.
In attendance at the
celebration was everyone
who contributed to the
success of the school last
year, McAdams said. It
included faculty, staff,
school system directors,
and the PTO Board.
"Everyone in this room
played an important role
in what happened last
year," she said. "It far
exceeded my expecta-
tions."


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Ora Daar (from left), 8, Ronen Daar, 7, Colby Holton, 7, Christian Chiong, 10, and
Stephen Pilkington, 10, students at Pinemount Elementary, make the letter 'A' with their
hands at the school Friday to represent Pinemount Elementary earning an 'A' Florida
School Grade.


The support of school
staff, along with the cen-
tral office and parents,
helped the school make
the grade.
"They all came togeth-
er as a team all year
long," McAdams said.


The school had 440
students enrolled last
year and will have about
the same for 2010-2011,
she said. It plans to con-
tinue the 'A' tradition.
"We're looking for-
ward to a great year,"


McAdams said.
School staff met for
a day and a half this
summer to look at what
needs to be worked on

SUCCESS continued on 3A


Blocks one and two will
be from 8:29 a.m. to 9:51
a.m., blocks three and four
will be from 9:57 a.m. to
11:19 a.m., first and sec-
ond lunches along with the
,first Tiger Block will take
place between 11:19 a.m.
and 12:51 p.m., fifth and
sixth blocks will be from
CHS continued on 3A


'Fill the

boot' up,

running

for MDA

City firefighters
raise about $2.5K;
two weeks to go.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Fire
Department is giving the
community the boot for
a good cause.
The annual "Fill the
Boot" campaign runs until
Sept. 6.
The department is col-'
lecting donations in inter-
sections from stopped
motorists for the fundraiser,
which benefits the Muscular
Dystrophy Association:
The department started
collecting donations Aug. 2
and has raised about $2,500,
said Assistant Fire Chief
Frank Armijo. Three shifts
of six people collect dona-
tions.
Members of the depart-
ment's Shift B already raised
more than $1,000 alone, but
all the money ultimately
goes to the MDA
"We've had some that
have been busy," he said.
Last year the department
BOOTS continued on 3A



Labor

outlook
0 ,
remains

gloomy

Columbia County
unemployment
creeping higher.

From staff, wire reports .

TALLAHASSEE More
than a million Floridians
remained jobless in July as
the state's unemployment
numbers increased slightly.
Figures released Friday
by the Agency for Workforce
Innovation show unemploy-
ment increased from 11.4
percent to 11.5 percent.
Florida's unemployment
rate is higher than the
national unemployment rate
of 9.5 percent.
The agency said 1,055,000
LABOR continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-544S
i Fax: 752-9400


91 74
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ........ ...
Obituaries ........
Advice & Comics. .
Puzzles . . .. .. .
Faith & Values.....


4A
S3A
4B
. . 2B
6A


DAILY
BRIEFING
Stephen Colbert
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


mIa~4I


H 3. Friday:
Afternoon: 4-2-9
Evening: 8-2-6


Friday:
Afternoon: 0-6-3-7
Evening: 2-0-3-1


Thursday:
- 6-7-12-23-27


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Colbert to honor US troops


NEW YORK


Stephen Colbert is dusting
off his camouflage suit.
The comedian will
broadcast two special epi-
sodes of Comedy Central's
"The Colbert Report" to celebrate
the end of combat operations in Iraq
and to honor returning troops.
On Sept. 8 and 9, the show will fill
its audience with Iraq War veterans
and active duty service men and
women. Others will be beamed in
via satellite from Iraq, Afghanistan
and the Walter Reed Army Medical
Center in Washington, D.C.
"The Report," which likes to paro-
dy over-the-top cable news graphics,
is calling the episodes "Been There:
Won That The Returnification of
the American-Do Troopscape."
Guests will include Vice President
Joe Biden, U.S. Sen. Jim Webb and
the U.S. military commander in
Iraq, Gen. Ray Odierno.
Odierno famously shaved
Colbertis head on President
Barack Obama's orders when the
comedian broadcast four episodes
of "The Report" from Baghdad last
year. On that visit, Colbert donned a
camouflage suit and reported from a
desk supported by sand bags.
One of those Iraq episodes
earned "The Report" an Emmy
nomination for writing for a variety,
music or comedy series. The show
has three nominations, including for
outstanding variety, music or com-
edy series, heading into the Emmy
Awards on Aug. 29.
The 4th Stryker Brigade, 2nd
Infantry Division, which exited
Iraq on Wednesday, officially was
designated the last combat brigade
to leave Iraq under Obama's plan
to end combat operations there by
Aug. 31. Some 50,000 members will
stay another year in what is desig-
nated as a noncombat role.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this recent file photo originally released by the USO, comedian Stephen
Coibert, from the Comedy Central television program, 'The Colbert Report,' is
shown during a taping of the first of four shows in front of U.S. soldiers at Camp
Victory in Baghdad, Iraq. Colbert will broadcast two special episodes to celebrate
the end of combat operations in Iraq and to honor returning troops.


Jay Leno's show aims'
to benefit fishermen
BILOXI, Miss. Jay Leno will
be doing standup to help the Gulf
Coast.
The "'Tonight Show" host and
comedian will appear Saturday at
the Beau Rivage Theater in Biloxi,
Miss., in a benefit performance for
residents who've been affected by
the massive oil spill.
The appearance is billed as
"Stand Up for the Gulf Coast: A
Special Evening with Jay Leno to
Benefit the Gulf Coast Community
Foundation." Leno says the coastal
fishing community and others need
money, and he wants to help raise it
Tickets for the benefit are $40,
$80 and $150 each.


. Funds raised will be adminis-
tered by the foundation through its
Mississippi Oil Spill Recovery Fund.

Pat O'Brien back on air
with sports radio show
NEW YORK Pat O'Brien is
returning to the spotlight as co-host
of a sports radio show. But he isn't
leaving entertainment behind.
O'Brien, 62, can talk about
LeBron James and Mel Gibson with
the knowledge of an inside expert:
The former host of "The Insider"
syndicated entertainment newsmag-
azine and "Access Hollywood" also
worked for CBS Sports.

0 Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former football player
Pete Retzlaff is 79.
* Singer Kenny Rogers is
72.
M Actor Clarence Williams
III is 71.
* Football Hall of Famer
Willie Lahier is 65.
* Actress Patty McC6rmack
is 65.,
* CBS "Early Show" co-
host Harry Smith is 59.


Daily Scripture


* Singer Glenn Hughes is
58.
* College Football Hall of
Famer and NFL quarterback
Jim McMahon is 51.
* Baseball All-Star pitcher
John Wetteland is 44.
* Actress Carrie-Anne Moss
is 40.
* MLB player Craig
Counsell is 40.
* Actress Alicia Witt is 35.


"I have set the LORD always
before me. Because he is
at my right hand, I will not
be shaken."
-Psalm, 16:8


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056..
Publisher Todd Wilson.... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Edtor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tnayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) ,
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.en. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, -customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks......... ..... $48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks .............. '.....$82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Officer shoots
burglary suspect
HOMESTEAD A
Homestead police officer
shot and wounded a bur-
glary suspect after the
man reportedly pulled a
knife.
The Miami-Dade police,
who are investigating, say
the Homestead officer was
responding to a burglar
alarm at a gas station early
Friday morning when he
spotted someone running
away. The officer chased
the man for a short dis-
tance, and the suspect
turned with a knife. The
officer pulled his gun and
fired.
The suspect was taken
to a Miami hospital, where
he was listed in stable con-
dition.
Authorities had not
identified the officer or
suspect

Man gets 30
years for stabbing
DAYTONA BEACH A
South Daytona man has
been sentenced to 30 years
in prison for a 2009 fatal
stabbing.
A Volusia County judge
sentenced 33-year-old
Dangelo Belle Friday. He
was convicted in May of
second.degree murder. He
had initially faced a first-
degree murder charge.
Authorities say Belle
stabbed 20-year-old Chad
Alexis Hankerson during a
fight in March 2009.

Armed bicyclist
shot dead
MIAMI Miami police
say an officer has fatally
shot a suspect for the sec-
ond time in nine days.
Police Chief Miguel
Exposito says Officer
Ricardo Martinez was
among other officers and
federal immigration agents


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Celebrating 107th birthday
Harold Bergman celebrates his 107th birthday at McDonald's
with family and friends from Cypress Village, a living facility
in Jacksonville, on Thursday. This will be Bergman's third
year celebrating his birthday with a chicken snack wrap and a
giant sized Big Mac birthday cake at McDonald's.


who spotted two men rid-
ing bicycles shortly after
midnight Friday in Miami's
Liberty City neighbor-
hood. One of the men was
carrying a shotgun.
Detectives say the
two men may have been
involved in an earlier rob-
bery.
According to investiga-
tors, Martinez and a fed-
eral agent each fired a shot
that struck the armed bicy-
clist. He died at a hospital.
The other man fled into
the neighborhood but was
later apprehended.
Martinez fatally shot
a teen during a robbery
sting last week. He was
cleared to work earlier this
week.

3 mistakenly
freed from jail
WEST PALM BEACH
- Palm Beach County
sheriff's deputies are
searching for two alleged
gang members who were
mistakenly released from
jail over a paperwork mix
up.
Twenty-one year-old
James Roundtree, 18-year-


old Marquis Roundtree
and 17-year-old Tayaris
Herndon were charged
with aggravated assault
with a firearm, racketeer-
ing and other offenses.
Herndon was caught
Friday.-
The mistake happened
during a hearing last week
when new paperwork was
filed to reword the racke-
teering charges. Somehow
the bond section was left
blank.
The Clerk of Court noti-
fied jailers the charges had
been dropped and the men
were released Tuesday.

Dad pleads guilty
in drug case
JACKSONVILLE
- The father of a missing
North Florida girl pleaded
guilty Friday to drug traf-
ficking charges.
Ronald Cummings
pleaded guilty to three of
five charges against him
and agreed to testify for
the state in future cases
involving the drug counts
or his missing daughter,
Haleigh.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER



-STORMS CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE -RCHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS T-STORMS -STORMS


191 LO 74 HI 93 LO 74 HI 92 LO 74 HI 921.0 74 HI 92 LO 74
S I 21


Pensacola
91/78


I

Tallahassee *
92/75

Padnaa City
90/78


adesta
93/74
Lake City-
91/74


Gainesville .
S,91/75
Ocala *
'401 7/I


Tami
91/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday *
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


92
77
90
70
99 in 1915
66 in 1974


0.11"
3.19"
35.36"
4.35"
34.48"


* Jisomlle
'91/75


Daytona Beach
9 76
0


City
Cape Canavera
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Orlando Cap Canaveral Key est
93/76 91/76 Lake ity
i Miami
pa. \ Naples
West Palm Bach Ocala
S91/76 0 Orlando
~F F Lauderdal Panama City
FL Myers. 92/78 Pensacola
93/77 Naples Tallahassee
"91/78 Miami Tampa
Key West 91/78 Valdosta
01,1 '* W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


0
Aug.
24
Full


la lp 7p Y 6a
Saturday sunday








Fm=castd tmperatkn "Fs Re" tWqir b


7:01 a.m.
8:06 p.m.
7:02 a.m.
8:05 p.m.


6:17 p.m.
4:12 a.m.
6:52 p.m.
5:08 a.m.


Sept. Sept. Sept.
1 8 15 -
Last New First



On this date in
1979, a severe
weather outbreak
resulted in dozens
of reports of damag-
ing winds and large
hail, and at least
seven tornadoes,
across Oklahoma.
Hail reached up to
h baseball size, while
winds were clocked
at 87 mph in Ponca
SCity.


EXMNE
10 lmhtestolbu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Sunday
89/79/t
91/77/t
90/79/t
92/78/t
92/74/t
91/75/t
88/80/t
93/74/t
91/78/t
90/76/t
91/74/t
93/76/t
91/80/t
93/79/t
93/77/t
91/80/t
93/75/t
91/76/t


Monday
87/79/t
91/76/pc
91/80/pc
93/77/pc
91/74/t
91/74/t
90/81/t
92 74/t
91/79/t
91/76/pc
91/74/t
93/75/pc
88/79/t
91/78/t
91/77/t
92/79/pc
90/75/t
90/78/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


.. Forecasts, data and graph-
-' ... Ics 2010 Weather Central
:f_ ^:" LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com






Ge Connected


AROUND FLORIDA


prarm~r~r --, ~ ~,


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE'CITY ALMANAC


l


S1/01








3A


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


BOOTS: Firefighters collect near Walmart
Continued From Page 1A

raised more than $4,000, and
the goal for 2010 is $5,000,
said Candace Backinski,
MDA regional bookkeeper.
The money helps with
clinic visits, flu shots, '
orthopedic equipment and
more for local people with i ". r
MDA, she said. There are
17 active members with .,e
MDA that live in Lake "'
City.
Department members ..
can be found at Walmart,
Highway 90 and Branford
Highway, Highway 90 and
Bascom Norris Drive,
Highway 90 and Main
Street and Baya and 90. ROBINSON/Lake City Reorter
Armijo said the depart- ANTONIA ROBINSONILakeCityReporter
ment would like to thank Members of the Lake City Fire Department are collecting donations to benefit the Muscular
Walmart for allowing them Dystrophy Association through Sept. 6. Pictured (from left) are Frank Armijo, assistant fire
to collect there and Publix chief; Keith Mobley, engineer; Bobby Oliver, firefighter; Adam Brannon, engineer; and Sean
for counting the money. Tucker, firefighter.


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Margaret Kirby (from left), Lisa Griffin, third-grade teacher Mandy Kerce and Monica Douglas share a laugh as they eat
together at Pinemount Elementary School's 'A' Celebration Friday. Pinemount Elementary teachers, administration, staff
and district officials gathered at the school to celebrate iis accomplishment of receiving an 'A' as its Florida School Grade in
its first year of operation.


SUCCESS: School system officials also thrilled


Continued From Page lA

and improved in the com-
ing school year, McAdams
said.
"We looked at different
ways to reach different
kids," she said.
Parents are very proud
of the school, said Wendy
Holton, PTO president.
'We just love our school


and are proud of all the
students," she said.
To its PTO, Pinemount
is the best in Columbia
County.
"We have the best
principal, best teachers
and best students," said
Wilda Drawdy, PTO vice
president. "We were


expecting an A."
The school system,
is also thrilled with
Pinemount's success,
said Superintendent
Mike Millikin. It's always
difficult to create a new
staff and student body
when pulling people from
other schools.


"Mrs. McAdams and
her staff have done a
phenomenal job in one
year's time," he said.
They've been successful
and we're thrilled and
excited for this school
to serve the west side of
the community for years
to come."


Recall expands to more

than half a billion eggs


By MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press

WASHINGTON-- More
than a half-billion eggs
have been recalled in the
nationwide investigation of
a salmonella outbreak that
Friday expanded to include
a second Iowa farm. The
outbreak has already sick-
ened more than 1,000 peo-
ple and the toll of illnesses
is expected to increase.
Iowa's Hillandale Farms
said Friday it was recall-
ing more than 170 million
eggs after laboratory tests
confirmed salmonella. The
company did not say if its


action was connected to
the recall by Wright County
Egg, another Iowa farm that
recalled 380 million eggs
earlier this week. The latest
recall puts the total number
of potentially tainted eggs at
about 550 million.
FDA spokeswoman Pat El-
Hinnawy said the two recalls
are related. The strain of sal-
monella bacteria causing the
poisoning is the same in both
cases, salmonella enteritidis.
Federal officials say it's
one of the largest egg recalls
in recent history. Americans
consume about 220 million
eggs a day, based on indus-
try estimates.


LABOR: Grim figures


Continued From Page 1A

of roughly 9,214,000 Florida
workers were unemployed
in July.
Columbia County's
unemployment rate is also
up slightly for July, at 10.4
percent a 0.1 percent
increase from June.
The agency's, director,
Cynthia Lorenzo, says the
good news is Florida's
annual rate of job creation
is growing slightly at
0.1 percent. The increase of
2,700 jobs is the first annual
job growth since 2007.
Rebecca Rust, the agen-
cy's chief economist, said
continued problems with
Florida's real estate market
and a reluctance by banks
to lend to small businesses
are reasons the state has


been slow to recover from
the recession.
Rust said businesses are
also less likely to hire than
in previous years.
"Historically there used
to be.more of a relationship
between profits and jobs,"
she said.
Walton County in the
Panhandle had the lowest
unemployment rate at 7.5
percent Rust said military
and other government
jobs boosted the county's
economy. Hendry County
in south central Florida
had the state's highest
unemployment rate at 19.7
percent. Rust said Hendry
County's unemployment
rate was due largely to sea-
sonal agricultural jobs.


CHS: Changes required


Continued From Page 1A

12:52 p.m. to 2:19 p.m. and
the second Tiger Block will
be from 2:25 p.m. to 3:15
p.m.
This change, a require-.'
ment of the $700,000 feder-
al school grant received by
CHS, also allows teachers
to have one planning time
during the day.
'The change 'in times
allows us to have better
communication, better
safety and also allows us to
have more enrichment pro-
grams," Huddleston said.
There will also be more
bus routes for CHS this
year.
There will be the same
number of buses coming
to CHS as last year, but at
least three to five extra bus
routes will be added this
year.


"There was a need for
more routes because
Columbia County is such
a large county," said Mike
Millikin, Cql.umbia, County
schpool.. superintendent.
"Some students are com-
ing from almost as far as
the Georgia line, Alachua
County, Suwannee County
or Union County."
School buses will con-
tinue to pick up from
both CHS and Richardson
Middle School or Lake City
Middle School.
"It will affect the middle
school pick up times slight-
ly, and (individual) drop off
times for some buses may
change," Millikin said. "If
parents have any questions
about the changes they
should call their child'.
school."


Mrs. Patricia Louise
Cardinal
Mrs. Patricia Louise
Cardinal, 73, of Lake City, died
unexpectedly Tuesday, August
17, 2010 at her residence. A na-
tive of Edwardsport, Indiana,
Mrs. Cardinal had been a resi-
dent of Lake City since 1982
having moved here from Mi-
ami, Florida. Mrs. Cardinal had
worked as a retail sales clerk for
several different super markets
prior to retiring. She was of the
Baptist faith and enjoyed cro-
cheting and spending her spare
time with her grandson, William
"Bird" Cardinal. She was pre-
ceded in death by her husband,
Robert Lee Cardinal Sr. and her
son Robert Lee Cardinal, Jr.
Mrs. Cardinal is survived by her
mother, Lucille Wydra of Naples,
Florida; a brother, Robert Wydra
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida and
her grandchildren, William Lee
"Bird" Cardinal of Lake Butler,
Florida; James Cardinal of Fort
Lauderdale and Elizabeth Cardi-
nal of Fort White, Florida. Four
great-grandchildren also survive.
Private family interment ser-
vices will be held Tuesday,
August 24, 2010 in the Florida
National Cemetery in Bush-
nell, Florida where Mrs. Cardi-
nal will be laid to rest with her
husband and her son. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
( 3 8 6 ) 7 5 2 -1 2 3 4
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Mrs. Judith A. Holmberg
Mrs. Judith A. Holmberg, 67, of
Ft. White, died Sunday August
15, 2010 at the Suwannee Valley
Care Center in Lake City, Flor-
ida, after an extended illness.


She was the daughter of the late
Treffle and Evelyn Miller Rob-
ert. She had
lived here for
the past thir-
ty-five years
after moving
from New
Haven, Con-
necticut. She
enjoyed read-
ing, painting, and crocheting.
She is survived by her husband
of fourteen years, Carl Holm-
berg, Ft. White, FL.; son, Rob-
ert Hampson, Lake City, FL.;
daughter, Shari Milatz (Mel), Ft.
White, FL.; brother, Donald Rob-
ert, (Marielle) Ormond Beach,
'FL.; four grandchildren and two
great grandchildren also survive.
Judee was an established profes-
sional in the printing industry in
Connecticut.' Later, as part of an
over-the-road semi truck driv-
ing team, she won safety awards
as well as being written up in
American Trucker Magazine as
the Galloping Gourmet for cook-
ing meals on the road. In High
Springs, she was News Director
for Radio Station WKAE, Sales
Manager for the Herald and
owner/operator of JB's, an of-
fice supply/book/gift store. She
chaired the committee for the
First annual Olde Tyme Christ-
mas Celebration, which contin-
ues today. In Ft. White, Judee
opened Engedi Place, an office.
supply and more store; was secre-
tary/treasurer and CFO for Enge-
di Specialities Contracting, an
original member of the Chamber
of Commerce in Ft. White. Judee
founded (EChoices), a health and
wellness business, and as an or-
dained Alliance of Divine Love
Minister and an International
Coach Federation member, start-
ed "Hearts Light" for life coach-
ing. After losing a beloved pet
pug, Zen, Judee established
"Pet Farewells" a website and


hotline for grieving pet owners.
To help give back to the com-
munity, Judee offered "Pos-
sibilities", a free-to-the-public
weekly life coach gathering at
Ft. White Town Hall, and was
a Columbia Sheriff CSU Offi-
cer. Judee touched hundreds of
lives to help deal with and heal
from life's challenges and will
be sorely missed. There will be
a private family remembrance at
home and on August 29, 2010 at
2:00 P.M., a memorial life cel-
ebration gathering at the Lions
Club facilities 26900 Hwy 27
West, High Springs, FL. In lieu
of flowers, the family suggests
donations be made to Haven
Hospice in her memory. 6037
U.S. Hwy 90 West, Lake City,
FL 32055. For further informa-
tion please call 352-316-1345.
GATEWAY FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME is in Charge
of arrangements US HWY 441,
south Lake City. (386) 752-
1954. Please sign the guest book
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.
M
Mrs. Lola Rhymer Norris
Mrs. Lola Rhymer Norris, 92, of
Lake City, passed away peace-
fully surrounded by her lov-
ing family on Friday afternoon
August 20, 2010, in the Haven
Hospice of the Suwannee Val-
ley. Mrs. Norris was preceded
in death by her husband David
R. Norris and is survived by her
children, Alice & Ray Cheshire;
Jerry & Shirley Norris; John
David & Jackie Norris; Carolyn
& George Moseley; Jane & Ed-
ward Ritch and Evelyn & Albert
Register. Funeral arrangements
are incomplete at this time but
will be available late this after-
noon by calling 752-1234. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
'FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,


458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386)752-1234
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Reverse Mortgage

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Foi-ReservaIo n D iin ,


OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












OPINION


Saturday,August 21, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Dumbing

down the

republic

These are times that
'. make one despair
for the republic.
Maybe as a nation
__ we are pretty dim.
A study of the results of the
2010 ACT college-entrance
exams found that less than 25
percent of high-school grads
nationwide had the skills to
pass entry-level college classes.
In Florida, that average was
worse, much worse, at 16 per-
cent.
The exams found that nation-
ally, 28 percent didn't score
enough to pass even one entry-
level class in math, reading,
English or science. These chil-
dren were just left behind; they
never got to the starting line.
Meanwhile, recent polls indi-
cate that being this far out of
touch persists into adulthood.
A poll this week by Time
magazine/ABT SRBI found that
24 percent of those surveyed
think President Barack Obama
is a Muslim. A separate Pew
poll found that 18 percent think
he's a Muslim, rising to 30 per-
cent among Republicans and
conservatives.
Where have these people
been? When asked where they
got that information, many of
them said television. Perhaps
that's why a TV was once
referred to as the "idiot box."
Those surveys were enough
to prompt White House spokes-
man Bill Burton tb come back
to the reporters' seats on Air
Force ,One to.insist that Obama
was, too, a Christian who
prayed daily.
Does Angela Merkel of
Germany, Stephen Harper of
Canada, David Cameron of the
United Kingdom or Nicolas
Sarkozy of France have to put
up with this? No wonder other
nations worry about us.
Come on, people. We're not
that stupid.
* Scripps Howard News Service

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Aug. 21,
the 233rd day of 2010. There
are 132 days left in the year.
, On Aug. 21, 1959, President
Dwight D. Eisenhower signed
an executive order making
Hawaii the 50th state.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
,..get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
-community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
Dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


No one but bigots would notice mosque


W hen the great
Monty Python
team wanted
to switch ,to
something dif-
ferent in their TV show, Graham
Chapman would come on
dressed as a British colonel and
officiously move everyone along
because the skit had become
"far too silly."
Where is Graham Chapman
when we need him? Things
have become far too silly. I went
away on vacation and when I
came back the right to religious
freedom for all Americaris had
gained an asterisk: No Muslims
Need Apply.
I cannot tell whether some-
one had dusted off and recast
the old asterisks, the ones that
said "No Catholics Need Apply"
or "No Jews Need Apply," but
the effect is pretty much the
same at least as far as the
Muslims who want to build a
mosque in lower Manhattan "at
the World Trade Center site"
are concerned.
Actually, it is not at the World
Trade Center site. (It is a couple
of blocks away.) And it is not a
mosque as that term is gener-
ally understood. It is a commu-
nity center with space reserved
for prayer but also a swimming
pool.
Imams are not likely to climb
to the top of minarets and call
the faithful to prayer. Heck, the
site is near Wall Street. The only
way to get anyone's attention
would be to read stock tips.
In truth, you probably would
not notice the Cordoba House
in the cultural kaleidoscope of
New York if the likes of Fox
News weren't so eager to alert
you to the alleged horror. On
my vacation, I briefly visited
New York City. It is the most
diverse place in America, where
nobody bats an eyelid at any-
thing.
In this melting pot of
America, it is no surprise that
local officials overwhelmingly


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
approved the community cen-
ter/mosque. Better a center that
practices a moderate brand of
the Muslim religion and wants
'to be a good neighbor than an
abandoned Burlington Coat
Factory.
You would think, if you
were not a silly person, that
if the plan was good enough
for those who were the very
neighbors of the 9/11 atrocity,
it would be good enough for
most everybody in America.
But, unfortunately, America
is full of people seething with
resentments and looking for the
political means to express them.
And what better than this? They
are splutter, splutter, shud-
der Muslims. They are all the
same, you know, just as back
in the woeful day the Catholics
were all the same, and the Jews
were all the same, before we
knew better before we knew
how stupid and destructive such
group thinking was.
So to honor the dead, we
must insult the intelligence of
the living by insisting that these
Muslims, no matter how differ-
ent they are from the extrem-
ists who are the real terrorists,
must not pray to their God "in
the shadow of the World Trade
Center."
Unfortunately for the purvey-
ors of this piety, the New York
Dolls Gentlemen's Club is also
in the same shadowy area. But,
apparently a mosque/commu-
nity center defiles the memory
of the 9/11 dead while ogling of
nude women does not Nor does
the worship of mammon, which


is what the Wall Street area is
all about
Now the political class seems
to think that this will be the
decisive issue in the mid-term
election. Not the economy, the
deficit, health care, Afghanistan,
or anything non-silly you can
think of. The mosque. Could we
become any sillier as a people
short of putting on clown noses
and wearing outsized shoes?
In the face of this, President
Barack Obama made an elo-
quent defense of freedom of reli-
gion for Muslims and then after-
ward shamefully backtracked to
say he was only speaking about
the broad principle. Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid,
with a tough re-election fight in
Nevada, cravenly threw in his
lot with the fear mongers.
(Calling all Democrats: If
you have any spare backbones,
please mail them to your lead-
ers in Washington, D.C. In the
meantime, New York Mayor
Michael Bloomberg for presi-
dent. He has been a brave voice
of reason on this issue it
doesn't take a pretend British
colonel to resist silliness.)
But "far too silly" doesn't
quite express the emotions of
the moment. That suggests a
juvenile naivete. Far too sinis-
ter is more like it More than
900 years ago, Christian forces
launched the first of a series of
crusades against Muslims in the
Holy Land. Osama bin Laden
harps upon this invasion to this
day, constantly promoting the
idea that in resisting Muslim
extremists, we are engaged in a
crusade against all Muslims.
So what do some fearful
Americans want us to do? Take
a leaf out of bin Laden's play-
book and treat Muslims as all
the same, even the ones who
just want to swim and pray. Lord
(or Allah) help us.
i Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


OTHER OPINION

Getting hot and bothered over religion


Hey, America, since
its August, why
don't we get all
hot and bothered
over religion and
politics?
Two new polls show
Americans increasingly falsely
believe President Obama prac-
tices Islam. Time magazine says
24 percent wrongly believe the
president is a Muslim. Another
poll by the Pew Research
Center and Pew Forum on
Religion and Public Life indicat-
ed 18 percent incorrectly think
Obama is Muslim.
More astonishing is Pews
finding that only one-third of
Americans correctly knows
Obama is Christian, down from
48 percent last year.
After the 2008 contretemps
when millions of voters were
furious at the anti-American
comments of Obama's Christian
minister, it's amazing so many
have forgotten his religion.
Are we getting dumber? Last
year only one in 10 wrongly said
the president is a Muslim com-


pared with one in four today.
Equally depressing is the
politics involved. Among
Republicans, 31 percent wrongly
are convinced that Obama is
a Muslim. Of course, many of
them still falsely think Obama is
not an American citizen despite
irrefutable evidence to the
contrary. Some GOP pundits
are unable to refer to Obama
without emphasizing his middle
name, Hussein. Are all men
named Benedict Catholic?
Just because people don't like
the president or his policies,
they cling to false information
about him. What happened to
know thy enemy?
Part of the reason for this lat-
'est hornet's nest is that Obama
weighed in on the great mosque
brouhaha in New York City.
Political pundits have stirred up
a huge, ridiculous, mind-bend-
ing fight over whether a moder-
ate Muslim sect (the Unitarians
of the Muslim world) should
build a long-planned commu-
nity center, swimming pool
and mosque two blocks from


Ground Zero in Manhattan.
Some pundits are advising
Obama to solve his religion
problem by being photographed
going to, church on Sunday
(instead of worshipping at Camp
David where photographers are
not permitted or playing golf).
It may be that when every-
thing seems to be falling apart
- the economy is terrible,
millions are out of work, the
environment is messed up, the
war in Afghanistan is going
badly, etc. its easier to chan-
nel outrage and frustration into
a phony issue. This August that
issue is building an Islamic com-
munity center on private prop-
erty two blocks from the World
Trade Center site, as if that
somehow demeans the memory
of the 9/11 victims. Wouldn't
it show the world America still
practices what it preaches?
After all these years there is
no proper memorial at Ground
Zero to the victims. That is the
true outrage.

* Scripps Howard News Service


Cliff May


The secret

war against

al Qaeda

Back in 2007, those
of us assigned as
"expert advisers" to
the Baker-Hamilton
Commission were
given a straightforward assign-
ment Come up with a plan to
salvage the deteriorating situa-
tion in Iraq. Few of us thought
that was possible. Only a small
minority I was perhaps the
most vocal enthusiastically
supported the "surge" the
counterinsurgency strategy
conceived and implemented by
Gen. David Petraeus.
It will be years before we
know for sure whether the
surge permanently trans-
formed Iraq. But it clearly
averted what would have been
an American defeat at the
hands of al-Qaeda and Iran's
proxy militias. Such a defeat
would have been consequential
in ways most people includ-
ing most Baker-Hamilton
advisers have never taken
the trouble to imagine.
Whether it was wise for
President George W. Bush
to have invaded Iraq in the
first place is a separate ques-
tion. Also a separate ques-
tion: whether it was wise for
President Barack Obama to
have declared Afghanistan the
"good war," the war that must
be won.
Actually, I'd argue they are
the same war just different
theaters, much as Europe, Asia
and North Africa were differ-
ent theaters of World War II.
But I guess that, too, is a sepa-
rate question. The pertinent
fact is Obama did commit to
Afghanistan and he doubled
down on that commitment by
ordering a surge of his own
and assigning, once again,
Petraeus to command the mis-
sion.
On the left, support for
Obama's Afghanistan policy
now seems to be eroding.
Meanwhile, some conserva-
tives aren't convinced Obama
has the determination to
see the mission through.
Others believe the mission
has become too focused on
"nation-building," and not
enough on disabling America's
enemies.
That brings us to a rare
instance of left/right consen-
sus: Hardly anyone believes
that the U.S. should replicate
the Iraq/Afghanistan model
in Somalia or Yemen or other
corners of the globe. So
whether or not Plan A works
in Afghanistan, we will still
need a Plan B to fight the
long war being waged by what
Obama calls "violent extrem-
ists" sworn enemies of the
West who see themselves as
"jihadis," warriors commanded
by the Koran to fight non-
Muslims until all submit to
Islamic law and Islamic rule.
News bulletin: There is
a Plan B and it's already
being implemented. As The
New York Times reports, the
Obama administration is now
fighting a "shadow war against
al Qaeda and its allies."
Most Republicans are not
criticizing Obama for these
policies because they believe
that it is imperative to take the
war to the enemy rather than
wait for him to come to us.
Nevertheless, Plan B is
under way. We should hope
it succeeds. And we should
begin working on Plan C just
in case it does not.

* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


New guidelines may alter oil claims Jefferson: Experience
counts in council post


By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer
MIAMI A flower shop
in Florida that saw a drop-
off in weddings this sum-
mer is probably out of luck.
So is a restaurant in Idaho
that had to switch seafood
suppliers. A hardware store
on the Mississippi coast
may be left out, too.
The latest guidelines for
BP's $20 billion victims
compensation fuid say the
nearer you are geographi-
cally to the oil spill and the
more closely you depend
on the Gulf of Mexico's nat-
ural resources, the better
chance you have of getting
a share of the money.
Also, a second set of
rules expected this fall will
require that businesses
and individuals seeking
compensation for long-
term losses give up their
right to sue BP and other
spill-related companies -
somethiig that could save
the oil giant billions.
The new rules for
the claims process
were released Friday
by Washington lawyer
Kenneth Feinberg, who was
picked by President Barack
Obama to run the fund and
previously oversaw claims
for 9/11 victims. Beginning
Monday, the claims will be
handled by Feinberg rather
than BP, which is still foot-
ing the entire $20 billion
bill.
Who gets paid and who
doesn't will depend largely
on how much proof there
is that losses were caused
by the spill and not by
something else, such as
the recession. Feinberg's
guidelines say key factors
include a claimant's geo-
graphic proximity to the
disaster and how much
the business or property
is linked to "injured natural
resources."
Feinberg elaborated on
his reasoning during town
meetings this week in
Louisiana.
"How close are you to
the beach? To the Gulf? BP


*ASSOCIATED PRESS
Independent claims administrator Ken Feinberg and Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) conduct a
town hall meeting for residents economically impacted from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in
Kenner, La., on Wednesday.


got claims from restaurants
in Idaho. Go figure," he\
said. "How close are you?
That's a major factor. How
dependent are you, as an
individual or a business, on
the resources of the Gulf?"
That worries business
owners like Susan Mitchell,
who runs a flower shop
about a mile from Pensacola
Beach, Fla., where tarballs
from the spill washed up.
She said her business was
down about $4,000 this
year in July from the year
before.
"But it is hard to prove
exactly why that is and
everyone keeps telling us
we have to prove that it
was because of the oil,"
she said. '"We usually have
beach weddings all sum-
mer. We deliver to hotels
with people having birth-
day parties, and. celebra-
tions on the beach."
Jeffrey Breit,- a Virginia-
based lawyer *who repre-
sents more than 600 Gulf


LOCAL STOCKS


YTD
Name Ex DIv Yld PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.68 6.4 11 26.45 -.52 -5.6
AutoZone NY ... 15 213.07 +2.07 +34.8


BkofAm NY .04 .3 86
BobEvans Nasd .72 2.8 12
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 5.3 12
CSX NY .96 1.9 15
Chevron NY 2.88 3.8 9
Cisco Nasd ...... 17
Cigrp NY ......
CocaCI NY 1.76 3.2 17
Delhaize NY 2.02 3.0 ...
Dell Inc Nasd ... 14
DirFnBear NY
DrxFBuOs NY .15 .8
FamilyDlr NY .62 1.4 17
FordM NY 6
GenEec NY .48 3.2 16
HomeDp NY .95 3.4 16
iShEMkts NY .59 1.4 ...
iShR2K NY .77 1.3 ...
Intel Nasd .63 3.3 11
Lowes NY .44 2.1 16


-.15 -14.5
+.13 -11.0
-.01 -22.2
-.50 +2.7
-.79 -2.5
+.01 -7,1
-.04 +13.3
+.02 -3.0
-.36 -11.4
+.03 -15,9
+.10 -17.7
-.19 -23.1
-.34 +53.9
-.12 +17.7
-.22 -.7
-.05 -2.6
-.12 -1.2
+.06 -2.1
+.01 -7.3
+.24 -11.8


.YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


Mavel[T Nasd ...
McDlds NY 2.20
Microsoft Nasd .52
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.52
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs oQQ Nasd .26
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.22
SearsHIdgs Nasd ..
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27 16.16 +1.25 -22.1
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... 9.55 +.04' -8.6
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Pakistan thanks world

for opening its wallets


By EDITH M. LEDERER
Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS -
Pakistan thanked the world
Friday for opening its wal-
lets and said more than 20
million flood victims now
know that nations and peo-
ple around the globe are
standing with them during
the worst disaster the coun-
try has ever faced.
Wrapping up a hurriedly
called two-day meeting of
the U.N. General Assembly
to spotlight the immedi-
ate need for aid, Pakistan's
U.N. Ambassador Abdullah
Haroon said the initial
outpouring from some
70 countries was "indeed
heartening" and "a good
beginning," though he
stressed that the country
will need much more help
in the months and years to
come.
At the start of the meet-
ing on Thursday, U.N.
Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon said donors had
given just half of the $460
million the U.N. appealed


for to provide food, shelter
'and clean water for to up to
8 million flood victims over
the next three months. He
insisted all the money was
needed now.
Pakistani Foreign
Minister Shah Mahmood
Qureshi said at the end of
Thursday's session that he
was assured the $460 mil-
lion goal "is going to be
easily met,"
But U.N. humanitar-
ian chief John Holmes told
The Associated Press after
Friday's session ended that
the U.N. appeal wasn't fully
funded yet.
"At the moment, we're
about 70 percent funded,
about $350 million," he
said. "The situation in the
last few days has improved
very significantly in terms
of funding ... I think (the
appeal) will be funded
soon."
During the General
Assembly meeting,
Holmes said, countries also
announced 'contributions
directly to the Pakistani
government.


Coast fishermen, said the
geographic limitations will
certainly cut out many
deserving claimants.
"I think it's unfair to
draw arbitrary geographic
lines when it is clear that
many businesses rely on
the natural resources of the
Gulf for their livelihoods,"
Breit said.
The new rules govern
emergency claims that can
be made between Monday
and Nov. 23 at Gulf Coast
claims offices, by mail
or through the Internet.
Feinberg said his goal is
to issue emergency checks
within 24 hours for indi-
viduals and seven days for
businesses. Many people
have complained about the
sluggish BP process.
The attorneys general of
Alabama and Florida sent
Feinberg letters objecting
to many of the new rules.
Florida's Bill McCollum
said people will face a much
heavier burden of proof try-.


ing to show the spill caused
their losses.
"The current process
appears to ^be even less
generous to Floridians than
the BP process," McCollum
wrote. "Such an outcome is
completely unacceptable."
Those seeking emer-
gency payments will not
have to give up their right
to sue BP and other com-
panies. But the rules for
final, long-term settlements
will include a waiver of that
right.
That drew protests Friday
from a leading trial law-
yers group, the American.
Association for Justice,
which said the rule could
force claimants to decide
whether to accept a BP pay-
ment or go to court before
the full extent of the dam-
age is known. For exam-
ple, attorneys said, there
could be health effects
that take years to develop,
or environmental damage
that might not surface for
years.


Bembry: Two years of

making a difference


By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.com
Rep. Leonard Bembry
has been serving the con-
stituents of District 10 for
the past two years and is
eager and willing to do it
again.
Bembry, 62, is running
for re-election in the Florida
House of Representatives
District 10 race.
"I've thoroughly enjoyed
my first two years," Bembry
said. "It's been some of the
most rewarding work I've
ever done. It'll give you a
servant's heart and it's got
to be important to you. I
think that's something that
I've developed over time."
He and his wife, Susan,
have three children Lori
Weldon, 40, Leonard "Kipp"
Bembry Jr., 38, and Melissa
"Missy" Culp, 36 and
eight grandchildren.
Bembry resides in
Greenville on a family-run
farm, land that his family
has owned and operated for
35 years, and is predomi-
nantly in the timber busi-
ness. He recently retired
from working in retail in
Tallahassee after 42 years.
He belongs to the Florida
Manufactured' Housing
Association, was involved
in Habitat for Humanity and
was on the Madison County
Development Council, a
position he had to resign


from when elected.
Currently, Bembry repre-
sents all or part of 10 coun-
ties, nine of which are fis-
cally con-
strained.
He said
that he
is a fiscal
conserva-
tive and
is accus-
Bembry tomed to
B budgeting
and mak-
ing good fiscal decisions.
Bembry said that he
understands the issues sur-
rounding small counties,
water usage and protec-
tion, agriculture and for-
estry. He said growth is'
imperative and opportunity
ties to provide jobs cannot
be bypassed.
He also noted that he
thinks government focuses
too much on the parties
and not on the people and
how they're affected.
For Bembry, his work as
Representative hits close to
home, as all decisions the
legislature makes affects
his family and people he
knows.
"It makes this job very
personal to me," he said.
"It became personal when
I realized that I have the
opportunity to make a dif-
ference in a lot of lives. And
I have in a lot of ways."


752-6306
CFC1427643 Back Flow #T05-08-8053



2744 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The City of Lake City
Council is headed in the
right direction, said Eugene
Jefferson, and he wants to
continue to be a part of it
Jefferson, 50, is seeking
re-election for the City of
Lake City District 10. seat.
"I've been in the seat as
a councilman for he past
12 years," he said. "I have
a love for the city and dis-
trict."
He and his wife, Betty,
have three children: Carlos,
Chakoa and Eugene.
Jefferson is a member of
Trinity United Methodist
Church and works at the
State of Florida Department
of Corrections Reception
and Medical Center.
He is also a board mem-
ber for CARC, and board
chairman for the City's
Public Safety and Housing
committees.
As the incumbent, he
understands the city's
issues and budget process,
Jefferson said.
"By being a part of city
government, I understand
'the needs and the resourc-
es we have," he said.
There are several issues
facing District 10, one of


which is infrastructure
upgrades, Jefferson said.
Crime is an issue in the dis-
trict, as well as citywide, he
said. Also, the lack of jobs
is a challenge.
Improving the infrastruc-
ture in the
area is
one of his
top priori-
] ties if re-
elected,
Jefferson
s said .
Jefferson Projects
would
include.
resurfacing the streets and'
working on storm water
drainage.
"I will always try to make
the decisions in the best
interest of all citizens," he
said.
Jefferson said he would
also like to continue his
involvement in the commu-
nity and being visible to
constituents.
"I'll do what it takes to
meet the demands of a city
councilman," he said. "I
live in the district I'm here
everyday. I'm always avail-
able.
"I was committed then,
I'm committed now and I
will continue to be com-
mitted in the future," the
candidate said.


Big shoes to fill: Chiles

seeking governor post


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Bud Chiles doesn't want
to be recognized as the run-
of-the-mill politician.
Running as a non-party-
affiliated candidate in the
Florida gubernatorial race,
Chiles says for a long time
he enjoyed politics vicari-
ously through his dad, but
he recently felt like it was
his turn.
Chiles, 57, ofTallahassee,
is the son of the late Lawton
Chiles who served as gov-
ernor from 1991 to 1998
and a US senator before
that.
"People are just sick and
tired of this political system
fueled by special interest
money," he said. "It's past
time that somebody stood
up and said, 'We need elec-
tions, not auctions."'
He said as governor he
wants to make communi-
ties better and stronger and
that effort won't depend on
getting financial support
from trial lawyers, insur-
ance companies, banks
or other special interest
groups.
Chiles said the things vot-
ers care about are employ-
ment problems, health care
problems and school prob-
lems.


"Those are the problems
that people care about
- the agenda that my dad
focused on and I want to
focus on," he said.'
Chiles said he supports
creating "green jobs," man-
dating
business-
es have
a conser-
vation
standard,
alterna-
tive fuel
,standard
and also
Chiles create a
concept
that' cre-
ates a lot of capital invest-
ment allowing the state's
construction industry to
get back to work making
energy efficient houses.
Chiles also noted he
believes small businesses
are a key ingredient to the
state's economic future and
they should receive more
financial support.
"I'm committed to the
small businesses of Florida
being the engine of our
economy recovery," he
said. "I'm committed to
providing at least $100 mil-
lion of revolving loan funds
that we'll make available
through economic develop-
ment agencies.to be distrib-
uted through local credit
unions and banks to sup-
port existing small busi-
nesses."


Hometown Business?
Hometown Bank!


If you care about where your business banks, perhaps you
should choose a bank that cares about your business. Feo-
ples State Bank is nota branch of an out of state bank run
by a "Regional Executive" seeking to improve their annual
bonus by offering short-term incentives to lure you in before
the end of the next quarter. We are a Lake City bank and our
focus is on the local economy and your business. We lend
our money locally and seek to establish stable, long-term
relationships with our customers. Perhaps it's old fash-
ioned, but we just think it's the right way to do business.


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W.US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES

STATE BANK


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428











FAITH


Saturday, August 2 1,2010 w


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Angie Land
angielaond3@windstreaom net

Teaching

children

God's Word

t is a humbling day in
the life of any parent
when you realize your
child has outsmarted
you. No matter the
age.
If you haven't already
figured it out, your kids, are
experts at reading you, and
they instinctively know to
ask a critical question at
the exact moment that 47
other things are demand-
ing your attention, which
explains why they appear
from nowhere the moment
you try to talk on the phone.
Then later they swear that
you said yes to their request,
even though you cannot
even recall the question.
Then you know you've been
had.
Cheer up. Help is on the
way!
In the book of Proverbs,
the Bible has this to say:
"Listen, my son, to your
father's instruction and do
not forsake your mother's
teaching. They will be a gar-
land to grace your head and
a chain to adorn your neck."
(Proverbs 1:8-9)
While these verses appear
to be directed to children
and their responsibility to
respect and obey their par-
ents, there is more to this
passage than meets the eye.
In the original language
of the Old Testament, the
words "instruction" and
"teaching" give us insight
as to how our job as parents
can be fulfilled. The Hebrew
word for "instruction" is
defined as discipline, cor-
rection, and doctrine, while
"teaching" actually translates
from the word 'Torah."
Torah is the Hebrew
name for the first five books
of the Bible written by
Moses, and is considered
part of the "doctrine" of
Christian, believers.
This lengthy explanation
was to make a significant
point
Our instruction and the
teaching of our children
should be straight from
God's Word.
We veer off course when
we simply teach our chil-
dren our preferences and
opinions.
The truth is that no mat-
ter how much our children
are "like" us, they are
uniquely individual and will
most likely form many pref-
erences and opinions that
will be different than ours.
When we teach the truth
of the Bible, we are assured
that these truths will never
change.
In Matthew 24:35, (in red
letters!) Jesus said, "Heaven
and earth will pass away, but
my words will never pass
away." It is also worth not-
. ing that this instruction is to
come from Dads and Moms,
not teachers or preachers.
Their job. is to add to the
knowledge that our children
are receiving at home. The
bottom line is this: We need
to know what the Bible has
to say, not only for our own
lives, but also to fulfill this
responsibility to our chil-
dren.

* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


Calif. drive-thru takes orders to go


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miriam Moran (center) prays with Shawn Heggi (left) and Gary Carrera in a vacant lot off Barton Road in Loma Linda, Calif. on Friday. Heggi's
unconventional ministry caters to worshippers on the go, strategically placed near a traffic-heavy intersection and two hospitals.


By NARDINE SAAD
Associated Press
LOMA LINDA,
Calif. Joyce
Kim needed a
sign to remind
her to pray.
She found it a few
months ago along a
stretch of rural road
where she and hun-
dreds of other Southern
California commuters
drive home every day.
A 4-foot placard reads
"Need Prayer?" Shawn
Heggi, a self-appointed


Christian spiritual coun-
selor, sits in a blue tent in
the field nearby.
Now Kim tries to stop
every Friday to pray
with Heggi, 35, and two
of his friends. They pray
for a solution to Kim's
financial troubles, the
domestic violence victims
she works with and the
medical career she put on
hold during her mother's
11-year battle with ovarian
cancer.
"I go to church when
I can, but that's on a set
time," Kim said. "There


may be times when I don't
have time to go to church.
This is just open, it's free,
it's available for anybody,
so I stop as often I can,
when I can."
Heggi's unconven-
tional ministry caters to
worshippers on the go,
strategically placed near a
traffic-heavy intersection
and two hospitals. It offers
a more convenient venue
to pray than an institu-
tionalized church setting,
especially in an era when
church attendance is
shrinking, said Richard


Flory, senior research
associate at University
of Southern California's
Center for Religion &
Civic Culture.
"People.can stop by and
unload what they have and
it keeps them from having
to go to church," he said.
"It's 20 minutes and you
go away. There's no long-
term commitment."
And they do, by the doz-
ens. Motorists frequently
pull over to make a prayer
request, read scripture
or chat about God and
they'll change the occa-


sional flat tire, too.
"It's just a dirt field,
but to us it's church,"
said Heggi, a stout
Redlands garbage truck
, driver who has been
manning the drive-
through stand for about
nine months.
Heggi began the minis-
try, but his friends Gary
Carrera and Calvin Hart
do a lot of the talking and
praying, too. Their goal
isn't to convert people,
they say, but to comfort
them in what may be the
worst times of their lives.


Today
Ushers Celebration
Greater St. Paul
Outreach Ministries will
be celebrating the first
annual Ushers Celebration
at 6 p.m. today. Call
Brenda Perry at 288-437.

Backpack Giveaway
Christ Central
Ministries will be host-
ing Operation Backpack
#VI from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds. They
will be giving away back-
packs and school supplies.
School physical and hair-
cuts will also be offered.
Parents must be present
with their children.

Gospel Sing
Watertown Congre-
gational Methodist
Church will host a Gospel
Sing at 7 p.m. today.
Mama's Angels will be the
featured singers. Call 752-
1329.

Gospel Service
Angel Ministries of
Lake City, Inc. will host
a pre-anniversary appre-
ciation and celebration
gospel music service at 7
p.m. today at The Church
of Faith and Deliverance
Through Christ. The
church is located at 37.9


NW Long St. Call Minnie
Gomes at 758-1886.

Back to School Bash
True Church of God in
Unity Will be distributing
backpacks for its Back
to School Bash from It
a.m. to 2 p.m. today. The
church is located at 629
NE Annie Mattox St.

Sunday
Homecoming
Pine Grove Baptist
Church will be host-
ing their 64th annual
homecoming at 10:30
a.m. Sunday. The guest
speaker will be the Rev.
Jerry Tyre. There will also
be a covered dish lunch at
noon. Call 752-2664.

Academic Success
The Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church will host
Academic Success Sunday'
at 11 a.m. Sunday in the
Olivet Sanctuary. There
will be a special dedica-
tion prayer for a safe' and
successful school year.
The attire is dress down
and all students, school
employees, school admin-
istrators and the commu-
nity at large are invited.

Evangelist calling
Gloria Jackson has
accepted the call of evange-


list and will be recognized
at 4 p.m. Sunday at Antioch
Missionary Baptist Church.
Call (386) 497-3121.

Monday
Fashion Show
The Lake City Aglow
Lighthouse will host a
fashion show at 7 p.m.
Monday at the New
Generation School.
Members will be model-
ing the latest fashions
from Maurice's. Everyone
is welcome. Call 935-4010
or 752-1971.

Sunday, Aug. 29
Worship service
Union AME Church
is having its Women
Missionary Society
Worship Service at 11 a.m.
Aug. 29. The guest speak-
er is William Murphy,
Niblack Elementary
principal. Contact (386)
755-0858.

Building Fund Rally
The Good Shepherd
Tabernacle Church is
celebrating their Building
Fund Rally at 4 p.m. on
Aug. 29. The guest speak-
er will be the Rev. David
Jordan of Word in Power
Outreach Ministry. The
church is located at 504
Dixie St.


Monday, Aug. 30
Revival services
Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church is hav-.
ing a revival starting at
7:30 p.m. nightly Aug.
30- Sept. 3. The speaker
is Dr. Michael D. Warren,
Pleasant View Missionary
Baptist Church in Apopka.
The church is located at
1015 SW Birley Ave.

Homecoming
Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church is having
a homecoming celebra-
tion at 11 a.m. Sept. 5. The
speaker is Rev. Wyndell
Wallace, pastor. The
church is located at 1015
SW Birley Ave.

Sept. 11
Women's Conference
The Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
their annual women's con-
ference prayer breakfast
at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 11. The
speaker is Helen Davis.
Call Conda Green at 719-
3852.

Sept. 12
Women's Conference
The Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
their annual women's con-


ference worship service
at 3 p.m. Sept. 12. Janice
Stockton is the speaker.
Call Conda Green at 719-
3852.

Every Tuesday
Addiction support
group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
in the fellowship hall of
Christ Central Ministries,
217 SW Duval Ave. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 755-2525.

Free Biblical counseling
Free Biblical counsel-
ing is available at Hopeful
Baptist Church. Many
are struggling with prob-
lems including marital,
financial, communication,
emotional, spiritual and
addiction. To make an
appointment, call (386)
752-4135 between 8:30
a.m. and 4 p.m.
Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes
in writing no later than
5 p.m. Tuesday to Tom
Mayer at tmayer@lakecity-
reporter.com, (386) 754-
0428, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or visit 180 E. Duval
St., Lake City. Call (386)
754-0428 with questions.


CHURCH NOTES


I - I


FE


EE









LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


,North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights

w.tkewil0top.com

Lake City, Fl.
386-752-0024








To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 55-2427


GWHz
Chevron


hunter, Inc.
chevron Oil
Jobber


Hol electric, Inc.
"Quality /work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
Scan do all things through Christ which strengtheneh me"
Philippians 413

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


RISK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A ..
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours W/
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Chrisdan
1881 SWMcFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: .9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Wed.Fami. BleStudy ., 7:00PM
"Achurch where JESUS is Real".

BERA BAPTIST CHURCH
S.SR47S*3755-0900
SundaySchool 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave, 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9-45AM
Sun. Worship I IAM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mig/Bible Smdy 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Win
FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
Columbia/Suwannee Co. Line Rd.
Rev. Glen Lawhon, 386-963-1028
Sun School 10-00AM
Morning Worship I I.00AM
Evemng Worship 6:00PM
Wed. Prayer Servite 7:00PM
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCHUR
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship. 10:30AM & 600PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry, 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City, 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OLIVETMISSIONAYBA'TIST CHURCH
541N.E. Davts Street
N L(386) 752-1990
Ronald Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 1 l:00AM
Wed Mid Week Worship 6:00PM
"In Gods Word, Will & Way0

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
26fiNWLake Jeffer Rd. a7:52.0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc corn
* Sunday School 8-30, 9.45 ii I AM-
Sunday Worship 9.45 & IAM & 6PM
AWANA 5-30 PM
Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wed Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservanon)l 5PM
Children's Ministry 6PM
Youth Worship 6:00PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule- St. 8/21/08
Parkvliew Edge 8:30PM
'Pastor: MichaelA.Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N USHwy441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
SundayWorship IAM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson
A* "


CELEBRATION COMMUNITY CHURCH
Hwy 47 between Ft.White & Columbia City
Sunday Services,
Bible Study 9AM
Worship 10:15AM
Wednesday Evening Schedule
AWANA 6-30PM
Prayer and Bible Study 7:PM
Pastor: BillBlackrick* a 754-1144
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
7524198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E, Baya Drive' 755-5553
Bible Study 9:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
EveningWorship 6:15PM
AWANA 5:45PM'
Prayer & Bible Study 6:15 PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Bapnsil
144 SE Montrose Ave., 752-4274
Sunday School 0JAM
Sun. Morn. Worship AI AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meenng 7 30 PM
Pastor. Mike Norman
THEVINEYARD
S A Southern Bapd%.t Church
2091 SW Main Blvd '623 0026
Sunday Worship I 00AM
Where lesus is Preached
and jeans are appropriate
Pastor, Bo Hammock

EPIPHANYCATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470





CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S *755-9436


Sunday School
Sun. Morn. Worship
Wed. Prayer Meeting


9:30 AM
10:30 AM
7 PM


NEW HORIZON
church of Christ
Directions &Times 755-1320
lack Exum.Ir. Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen*'755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs a
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway


..-. .. Do you know someone who

always has a smile on their

face? Wouldn't it be great

to approach the ups and

Downs of life with an upbeat

attitude? God tells the story
of Job, a good man who

experienced great suffering.

r SDespite his troubles, Job

S kept worshipping God.
No matter what is

going on in our lives
we can focus on

our Father; with
.His help we can be

optimistic. Focus on

the positive at your
S house of worship this



Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
2 Timothy 2 Timothy 2 Timothy Titus Titus Titus Hebrews
2.14-26 1.1-11 41-22 1.1-16 2.1-15 3.1-15 11.1-19

Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest' The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Dt'aor The Rev Jimmie Hunsingr
UirefIoroJMiit" Dr. Alfonso lev

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1 dmles S. ol 75 on SR 47
,5..4244
Sunday Seices 9-30AM
INursery Protidedi
Chnsnan Education Hour
For all ages at Iu45AM
Paitor Rev Bruce Alkre
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1.5 miles West of 1-75e 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail
Wed Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar john David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 IS 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8-30 & 1-001AM
386-755-1353
rychnst@earhlink.net
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 945AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8:301AM
Tradiuonal Service I1:00AM
Program opportumuem available in all
areas for all ages
For a complete schedule
contact church otfice at
752-4488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNT ED
1272 SW McFarlane. :52-3513
lAdjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9.00AM
Worship 10:00AM
Nursery provided
Young Adult group resumes Sept
AWANA resumesWed. 9/15'
Pastor: Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun, Worship- 11AM&6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum


Services: '
SundaySchool ,9:45AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday, 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place


629 SWBaya Drive*752-0670
Sunday School 9-00AM
Sunday Sserite 10-00 AM
NURSERYPROVIDED
Pasctor Dr Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


NE lones Way & NE Washington St.
Sunday School 10 00 AM
Morruning Worship II11 00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6 00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7 0OPM
MNid.-week Service Wednesday 7.00 PM
Fli Info call 755-3408, FeryroneWelcaime
Pastor: Rev. Stan Elhs

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:OAM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 DyalAve., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration '10:30 AM
Pastor Chnris ones* 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second d Founh Sundays 300 PM.
Pastor: Rev. CherylR.Pingel
NEWBEGINNINGCHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford lighway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MomrningWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church- Everyone Welcomed
(386)755-5197


Call





752.1293!


MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance

/ X


Toaderis i tisChrc iretr Cl5554


Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc,
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectrlc.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

GENTIVA:
great healthcare has come home-
*Nursing *Orthopedic Rehab Program *Balance Dysfunction
Program iPhysical & Occupational Therapy
*MSW -Home Health Aide Services
Medicare/Medicaid CertdiedICAttO Accredited
IHA206340963 & t11HA299991379
Lake City 386-748-3490 Uve Oak 386-364-4593
ClyrAN


iresfor every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
* Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store' *
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (fornierly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register "
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

S HARRY'S
Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

P 3 752-2308 e

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEAMTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




!? 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitoriat Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residenfl:d & Cotmmercial
755-6142


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


wo


cl
11









Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 21 file photo, Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott speaks at a campaign
stop at the Sweetwater Senior Center in Sweetwater. Scott, a 57-year-old multimillionaire who
is financing his own campaign, is running neck-and-neck against Bill McCollum, the current
attorney general.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 7 file photo, Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill McCollum gestures as
he speaks during a forum sponsored by the Christian Family' Coalition, in Miami. McCollum is
in a tight race with newcomer Rick Scott. McCollum is trying to convince voters that they need
an experienced executive to guide the state out of tough times.


Governor campaign: A tale of two GOP hopefuls


By MITCH STACY Obama for not speaking
Associated Press out against a proposed
TAMPA Islamic center near the
lorida gover- site of the Sept. 11 terror-
nlorhda gover- ist attacks in New York.
SBillMcCollum "Rick is going to contin-
and Rick Scott ue to work 24 hours a day,
entered the traveling around the state
final frenzied days ofetheir and talking to people about
tight Reubicad primary his message," spokeswom-
tight Republican primary an Jennifer Baker said.
race Friday hoping to sway an Jennifer Baker said.
race Friday hopihg to sway "The No. 1 issue is jobs.
the sizable chunk of voters
that polls suggest are still Who can create jobs, who
teetering on the fence. can cut costs, who can get
Tuesday's election will spending under control
culminate a bitter four- and who can make Florida
month contest between great again."
self-financed newcomer McCollum, who was
Sc-f ancdl ne m elected attorney general
Scott and longtime pohiti- in 2006, gets some star
cian McCollum that saw power Friday from former
record spending for a New York mayor and
state primary campaign presidential candidate
mostly by Scott, who has Rudy Giuliani at an event
written checks for more in West Palm Beach before
than $30 million to blanket talking about his jobs plan
the state's TV airwaves at a Tampa ship yard. He's
with his commercials. scheduled four stops in
The former hospital cor- the Panhandle Saturday
portion CEO planned at and plans to attend ser-
least five campaign stops vices at Baptist church in
around the state Friday Jacksonville Sunday morn-
and more through the ing with Mike Huckabee,
weekend in the Panhandle the former Arkansas
and southern Florida. governor and presidential,
Scott's appearances will be candidate.
augmented by his biggest Spokeswoman Kristy
blast of TV commercials Campbell said the last
yet, including one where days will be critical for
he slams President Barack McCollum, whose cam-


paign must reach out to as
many voters as possible
in various ways to offset
Scott's spending on TV
ads.
"We've really been
talking to people who've
been voting absentee,
we've been talking to early
voters through a pretty
aggressive ground game,
but obviously it's a very
close race and it's going
to come down to Election
Day," Campbell said.
"What they're fighting
for are those who are still
sitting on the fence," said
Dan Smith, a University
of Florida political science
professor. "And I think
that's really difficult to do
when the campaign has
been so negative. You
have Republicans who two
months ago were excited
about the race. With all
the negative ads, I think
many of them will end up
staying home."
McCollum, a former
congressman and twice
unsuccessful candidate for
the U.S. Senate, was the
presumptive nominee until
Scott jumped into the race
in April. Scott blasted out
TV commercials introduc-
ing himself as a "conserva-
tive outsider" and trash-


inf McCollum as career
politician who is part of
Florida's problems.
McCollum came back
with commercials raising
questions about how much
Scott knew about a huge
Medicare fraud scandal at
Columbia/HCA, the hos-
pital conglomerate he led
as CEO in the 1990s. His
latest ad shows Scott at a
news conference refusing
to release a sealed deposi-
tion he took in a lawsuit
against a chain of urgent
care clinics he co-founded.
It ends with Scott running
away from reporters who
are shouting questions at
him.
The narratives were
driven home in two tele-
vised debates dominated
by the candidates' bicker-
ing and name-calling.
After trailing in some
polls by double-digits
less than a month ago,
McCollum overtook Scott
in a Quinnipiac University
poll released Tuesday.
That survey showed he
was favored by 44 percent
to 35 percent out of 807
likely Republican voters.
But nearly a fifth of par-
ticipants said they hadn't
yet decided on a candidate
and roughly a third said


they might still change
their mind.
Smith thinks
McCollum's constant
hammering of Scott for
the Columbia/HCA fraud
made the difference.
"I think that has,
raised questions among
Republicans who got
excited about Rick Scott's
candidacy because he was
an outsider talking tough
on issues," Smith said.
"But him being on the
defensive has moved them
away from his candidacy
and back to thinking of
Bill McCollum as a safer
choice."
Presumptive Democratic
nominee Alex Sink, who
will run against the win-
ner in the Nov. 2 general
election, made campaign
commercial appearances
this week, too in one of
her own and in an attack
ad put but by a commit-
tee tied to the Republican
Governors Association.
Sink has generally gotten
a free ride this summer
while the two Republicans
*focused on tearing each
other down.
The attack ad was a
rehash of one that ran ear-


lier this year, suggesting
that Sink eliminated jobs
while taking big bonuses
as a top executive at Bank
of America. The tag line
labels her a "financial
disaster."
In the first TV ad for
her campaign, Sink makes
light of the bickering
between the Republicans.
It features actors portray-
ing Scott and McCollum
standing toe-to-toe and
yelling at each other as
Sink talks to the camera.
"Don't know about you,
but I've had just about
enough of politicians
attacking each other,"
she says. "I'm Alex Sink,
and I'm ready to attack
Florida's challenges."
The Quinnipiac poll
this week showed Sink
with an edge over both
Republicans. But she'll
also have to contend with
independent candidate
Lawton "Bud" Chiles, a
lifelong Democrat and
governor's son who is a
long shot to win but could
siphon votes away from
her.
On Tuesday Sink named
former state senator and
gubernatorial candidate
Rod Smith as her running
mate.


Suwannee sill entrance closed


From staff reports

Access to the Suwannee
River Sill, a secondary
entrance to Okefenokee
National Wildlife Refuge
located off Highway Spur
177, East of Fargo, Ga., will
temporarily be suspended
beginning Aug. 30 in order
to ensure public safety
while restoration work is
under way. Access to the
sill is expected to resume
ho later than Dec. 31.
The restoration project,
which will be overseen by
the US Fish and Wildlife
Service, will facilitate
improved public access and
restore the natural hydrol-
ogy of this portion of the
Okefenokee Swamp.
The sill is a 4.8-mile
long earthen dam with two
concrete and steel water
control structures that
spans two branches of the
Suwannee River as they
exit the refuge. The sill
structure, built in 1960, was
put in place in hopes of
holding water within the
swamp during drought
conditions to prevent large
*wildfires from moving over
the landscape and possibly
damaging commercial tim-
ber and/or communities.


Through the years, it
became apparent to service
staff that the sill was not
fully successful in its efforts
'to prevent large wildfires
and fire was actually nec-
essary to perpetuate the
swamp environment.
An environmental
assessment was complet-
ed along with a study of
downstream effects by the
US Geological Survey. The
resulting proposal was to
remove the two water con-
trol structures and breach
the earthen dam in three
places.
Recently, funding
received from the American
Recovery and Reinvestment
Act of 2009 will allow the
Fish and Wildlife Service to
proceed with the breaches.
The water control struc-
tures will not be removed
during this phase of the
project.
The Federal Highways
Administration has funded
a project to improve access
to the Suwannee River
which includes the widen-
ing of a one mile section
of road leading to the first
water control structure.
The building of a boat
launch and vehicle park-
ing area in close proxim-


ity to the Suwannee River.
The Federal Highways
Administration has also
been made available to fund
a project that will improve
access to the Suwannee
River within the refuge.
The project will include
the widening of a one-mile
section of road leading to
the sill's first water control
structure, the main out-
flow from the swamp into
the Suwannee River, and
the construction of a boat
launch and vehicle parking
area. -
Beyond the environmen-
tal benefits, the sill restora-
tion project will increase
public access opportunities
including all-season vehi-
cle and boat access to the
Suwannee River.
"Breaching the Sill will
once again connect the
river and swamp, facilitat-
ing movement of fish," said
former deputy project lead-
er, Maury Bedford. "This
project will restore the
habitat and improve public
access. As a result, anglers
will benefit."
For more information
contact the Okefenokee
National Wildlife Refuge at
(912) 496-7366 or visit www.
fws.gov/okefenokee/.


Half leave mortgage-aid program


In this file photo taken July 21 a 'bank owned' sign is seen on a home that is
foreclosure on a HUD website, in Hawthorne, Calif.


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON -
Nearly half of the home-
owners who enrolled in the
Obama administration's
flagship mortgage-relief
program have fallen out.
A new report issued
Friday by the Treasury
Department said that
approximately 630,000 peo-
ple who had tried to get


their monthly mortgage
payments lowered through
the effort have been cut
loose through July. That's
about 48 percent of the 1.3
million homeowners who
had enrolled since March
2009. That is up from more
than 40 percent through
June.
The report suggests fore-
closures could rise in the
second half of the year and
weaken the ailing housing
market, analysts say.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
listed as a


Another 421,804, or 32.3
percent of those who started
the program, have received
permanent loan modifica-
tions and are making their
payments on time.
Many borrowers have
complained that program is
a bureaucratic nightmare.
They say banks often lose
their documents and then
claim borrowers did not
send back the necessary
paperwork.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


1










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@oakeatyteporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday August 2 1 20 10


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@Jakecityreporter.com


Best left

unsaid
There are
certain words
I still won't
say around
my mother,
preacher or extended
family. I won't claim to be
a saint, but I hardly
practice some of these
words in any context.
Rex Ryan is not one
of those guys. The New
York Jets head coach has
come under fire for his
use of the F-bomb in the
HBO television series
"Hard Knocks."
Ryan iss old school
as it gets. He is the son
of former Chicago Bears
defensive coordinator
Buddy Ryan, who in his
own right, was pretty
loose with the tongue.
I don't condemn Ryan
fbr his actions. This is
football, but there's a
way you conduct
yourself when the
camera is rolling and the
world is watching.
Ryan isn't the first
coach to be involved in
this program, but he's
certainly the first to have
the F-word become his
favorite adjective. Using
the word sporadically is
one thing. Using it for
the sake of using it is
another.
These are grown men
that Ryan is coaching,
but it's not a rare thing
to see in high school
football. The coaches in
Columbia County are a
rarity, as they often don't
use that kind of language
to talk to the players.
I've been at both
Columbia and Fort White
practices, and while I've
heard dirty words slip at
both practices, it wasn't
anything to write home
about.
I talked to Columbia
coach Craig Howard
about the role of
language for his team,
and he admitted it's
something, that's come
up'in team meetings.
Howard wants his
team to be feared, but
not for the way they talk.
That fear should come
from play on the field.
"If you get loose with
your tongue, you'll get
loose with other things,"
he said. "We want to be
known as hard-nosed,
aggressive hitters, but
we also want to be
gentlemen."
Most of us that have
played sports realize it's
not always easy to hold
back on a swear word.
Whether it's a missed
free throw, a strikeout or
missing that easy birdie
putt, we are all guilty
from time to time.
Howard made a good
point that nobody is
perfect, but to condone it
is to endorse it.
At the high-school
level, it shouldn't be
condoned. Sure, there
are worse things said in
the halls throughout the
day, but being a part of a
program is being part of
something much bigger.

Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Under the lights


Columbia High has
scrimmage planned
for 7:30 p.m. today.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

The rain washed away what was
scheduled to be Columbia High's
first scrimmage last Saturday, but
the Tigers are hoping for clear
skies tonight as they plan to scrim-
mage under the lights.
It's a chance for the coaching
staff to see how the players handle
playing without a coach in their
ear.
"It's going to culminate every-
thing," Howard said. "We run a
no-huddle, so it's going to get the
coaches away from the players.
They'll be on their own once the
games get here, so it kind of forces
the coach to coach from the side-
lines instead of the huddle. It's a


dress rehearsal."
Howard hasn't diagrammed how
the scrimmage will be run, but he's
looking at setting it up on a play-
'limit basis.
"Normally you'll run X amount of
plays, between 70 and 80," he said.
"We don't want injuries to occur. We
don't want to beat up ourselves for
next week. When you do this, you
always roll the dice."
It's a gamble that Howard is
ready to take for the Tigers, as he
wants to have Columbia prepared
for game speed,
"You have to hit like you're play-
ing a game," he said. "You have
to practice at game speed. I think
that's what gets a lot of teams in
trouble is that they don't practice at
game speed, and when Friday night
gets here its a lot faster."
Howard is particularly interested
in how the offensive line will per-
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High players John Zeighler (18), Timmy Jernigan (8) and Bradley
Holmes (70) work on a block recognition drill at practice on Aug. 12.


Kirkman gets the call


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Reporter file photo
Michael Kirkman is at Tiger Stadium following a workout soon after he graduated from
Columbia High in 2005. Kirkman was called up by Texas and reported Friday in Baltimore.


Bristol feeling economic

pinch in selling tickets


Run of 55 sellouts
at track ended
with March race.

By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

BRISTOL, Tenn. Rob
Stiens won two tickets to
Bristol Motor Speedway as
his company's employee of
the month. Unable to find
affordable lodging close to
the track, and unwilling to
stay in a hotel three hours
away, his seats will go
empty tonight.
Once the toughest ticket
in NASCAR, Bristol is now
just like every other track
that's struggling to attract
fans in a tough economy.
The track's streak of 55
consecutive sellouts was


snapped during its March
race, and Saturday night's
event one of the most
beloved on the schedule
- will also fall short of
capacity.
"My last race at Bristol
was the spring race (in
2009) and we decided that
it's just too much money
to continue going," said
Stiens, a Fayetteville, Ohio,
milkman who gave up his
season tickets to Bristol
Motor Speedway last year
after 14 years.
"I got these tickets from
my company two weeks
ago, tried to find some-
where reasonable to stay,
and the nearest place was
$189 a night," Stiens said.
"Anything cheaper was in
Knoxville, and that's about
three hours away. It's easier


to just watch it on TV at
home."
There won't be a. full
house at Thunder Valley on
Saturday night when the
speedway celebrates its
100th Sprint Cup race. Kevin
Triplett, vice president of
Bristol's public affairs, did
not release ticket sale infor-
mation but said if everyone
Swho bought a ticket shows
up, "it's going to look pretty
.close to full."
Still, anything less than
capacity was unheard of
during a massive growth
spurt in the 1990s, when
track officials had a lengthy
waitlist and ran ticket sales
much like the NCAA does
for its annual basketball
tournament. Fans signed up
BRISTOL continued on 3B


Lake City local
joins Rangers for
Baltimore series.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comrn

Scott and Lisa Kirkman's
vacation was cut short in a
magnificent way.
Their son, Michael
Kirkman, was called up
to the Major Leagues by
the Texas Rangers while
they were visiting him in
Oklahoma City.
'We took him and (wife)
Lorie to the airport this
morning," Scott said Friday
on the drive back to Lake
City. 'We were planning
on leaving (Saturday), but
there is no reason for us to
stay now. We have been oiut
here since Aug. 11."
Michael was playing
for the Oklahoma City
RedHawks, the Triple A
affiliate of the Rangers in
the Pacific Coast League.
Michael was in the
starting rotation for the
RedHawks and compiled a
13-3 record in 22 starts. He
had a .309 ERA and 130
strikeouts and 68 walks in
131 innings. The Kirkmans
didn't get to see a start.
"We saw him pitch two
times in relief," Scott said.
"They had moved him to
the bullpen because they
were planning on calling
him up on Sept. 1."
On a four-game slide after
being swept by the Rays


and losing 4-0 to Baltimore
on Thursday, the AL West
Division leading Rangers
changed their plans.
"It was funny how it hap-
pened," Scott said. "As the
latest pitcher, in the bull-
pen, Michael had to bring
the water to the other guys
and he had gone back to
the clubhouse to get it.
His pitching .coach,.Terry
Clark, told him manager
Bobby Jones wanted to see
him. Jones told him he was
going back into the starting
rotation, then said you won't
be pitching here, you'll be
pitching in Baltimore.
"Michael was tickled to
death."
Scott said someone from
the Rangers would meet
Michael at the airport
Friday and take him direct-
ly to Camden Yards.
The Baltimore-Texas
game is one of the Fox .
games of the week at 4 p.m.
today, and could be shown
in this area of the country.
Kirkman played Babe
Ruth Baseball in Lake City
and starred for Columbia
High, where he graduated in
2005. He agreed to a schol-
arship to play for Tom Clark
at Lake City Community
College, but opted to sign
with the Rangers after he
was drafted.
"We are so happy for
him," Scott said. "He has
put in a lot of time and
effort. He .has worked his
butt off for this and he defi-
nitely earned it"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Driver Jimmie Johnson climbs from his car after qualifying
on the pole for the NASCAR Irwin Tools Night Race at Bristol
Motor Speedway on Friday. Today's lineup is on page 2B.


LyJ-%U,5M.M A. I, -w 9










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
6 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, pole qualifying for
Grand Prix of Sonoma, at Sonoma, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
ABC NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Irwin
Tools Night Race, at Bristol,Tenn.
BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN Men's national teams,
exhibition, Global Community Cup,
Lithuania vs. U.S., at Madrid, Spain
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Czech
Open, third round, at Celadna, Czech
Republic
Noon
TGC PGA Tour, Wyndham
Championship,third round,atGreensboro,
N.C.
2 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Wyndham
Championship,third round,at Greensboro,
N.C.
4 p.m.
NBC Champions Tour, JELD-WEN
Tradition, third round, at Sunriver, Ore.
5:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Safeway Classic,
second round, at North Plains, Ore.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
II a.m. -
ESPN -World Series, opening round,
Toms River, N.J. vs. Hamilton, Ohio, at
South Williamsport, Pa.
I p.m.
ESPN -World Series, opening round,
Chitre, Panama vs. Vancouver, British
Columbia, at South Williamsport, Pa.
3 p.m.
ABC -World Series, opening round,
Columbus, Ga. vs. Waipahu, Hawaii, at
South Williamsport, Pa.
4 p.m.
ESPN2 -Junior League,World Series,
championship game, teams TBD, at Taylor,
Mich.
6 p.m.
ESPN -World Series, opening round,
Kaohsiung, Taiwan vs. Dhahran, Saudi
Arabia, at South Williamsport, Pa.
8 p.m.
ESPN World Series, elimination
game, teams TBD, at South Williamsport,
Pa.
LITTLE LEAGUE SOFTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Junior League,World Series,
championship game, at Kirkland,Wash.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, Atlanta at
Chicago Cubs, LA Angels at Minnesota,
or Texas at Baltimore
7 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Kansas City
MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE
Noon '
ESPN2 Playoffs, semifinal, Boston
vs. Chesapeake, at Annapolis; Md.
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Blackpool
at Arsenal
TENNIS
2 p.m.
ESPN2 ATR Western & Southern
Financial Group Masters, semifinal, at
Mason, Ohio
7 p.m.
ESPN2 ATR Western & Southern
Financial Group Masters, semifinal, at
Mason, Ohio
I am.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Rogers Cup,
semifinal, at Montreal (delayed tape)
WNBA BASKETBALL
II p.m.
ESPN2 Los Angeles at Seattle

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 75 46 .620 -
Tampa Bay 74 47 .612 I
Boston 69 53 .566 6'h
Toronto 63 57 .525 11 '
Baltimore 43 79 .352 32'/
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 70 51 .579 -
Chicago 66 55 .545 4.
Detroit 58 63 .479. 12
Kansas City 51 70 .421 19
Cleveland 50 71 .413 20
West Division
W L Pct GB"
Texas 67 53 .558 -
LosAngeles 61 61 .500 7
Oakland 60 60 .500 7
Seattle 48 73 .397 19'/
Thursday's Games
N.Y.Yankees I I, Detroit 5
Baltimore 4,Texas 0
LA. Angels 7, Boston 2
Chicago White Sox II, Minnesota 0
Cleveland 7, Kansas City 3
Oakland 4,Tampa Bay 3
Friday's Games
Cleveland at Detroit (n)
Seattle at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Texas at Baltimore (n)
Toronto at Boston (n)
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City (n)
LA.Angels at Minnesota (n)
Tampa Bay at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Seattle (J.Vargas 9-5) at N.Y. Yankees
(Vazquez 9-9), 1:05 p.m.
LA. Angels (T.Bell 1-3) at Minnesota,
(Slowey 11-5),4:10 p.m.
Texas (CI.Lee 10-6) at Baltimore
(Bergesen 4-9). 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Tomlin I-2) at Detroit


(Scherzer 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 10-5) at
Kansas City (Bullington 1-2), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 10-7) at Boston
(Matsuzaka 8-4), 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 15-5) at Oakland
(Bre-Anderson 3-4), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Cleveland at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
2:10 p.m.


Tampa Bay at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 72 50
Philadelphia 68 52
Florida 60 60
NewYork 60 61
Washington 52 69
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 70 5 I
St. Louis 65 53
Milwaukee 57 64
Houston 53 67
Chicago 50 73
Pittsburgh 40 81
West Division
W L
San Diego 73 47


Pct GB
.590 -
.567 3
.500 II 1
.496 I I'A
..430 19'%

Pct GB
.579 -
.551 3h
.471 13
.442 16/'
.407 21
.331 30

Pct GB
.608 -


San Francisco 68 54 .557 6
Colorado 62 58 .517 II
Los Angeles 62 60 .508 12
Arizona 47 75 .385 27
Thursday's Games
Washington 6,Atlanta 2
San Diego 5, Chicago Cubs 3
Florida 4, Pittsburgh 2
San Francisco 5, Philadelphia 2
Houston 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Cincinnati 9,Arizona 5
LA. Dodgers 2, Colorado 0
Friday's Games
Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 3
N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh (n)
Washington at Philadelphia (n)
Houston at Florida (n)
San Diego at Milwaukee (n)
San Francisco at St. Louis (n),
Colorado at Arizona (n)
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (Hanson 8-8) at Chicago Cubs
(Gorzelanny 6-7), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-5) at Pittsburgh
(Ja.McDonald 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 5-3) at
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 8-5), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 9-11) at
Florida (Volstad 6-9), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Correia 10-7) at Milwaukee
(Narveson 9-7), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum I 1-7) at
St. Louis (C.Carpenter 13-4), 7:15 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 17-3) at Arizona
(Enright 3-2),8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 11-3) at L.A.
Dodgers (Billingsley 9-7), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Houston at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Cincinnati at LA. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.

Little League

WORLD SERIES
At South Williamsport, Pa.
Friday
Fairfield, Conn. 3, Auburn,Wash. I
Pearland,Texas 10, Plymouth, Minn. 8
Game 3 Manati, Puerto Rico vs.
Ramstein AFB, Germany (n)
Game 4 Tokyo, Japan vs. Nuevo
Laredo, Mexico (n)
Today
Game 5 Toms River, N.J. vs.
Hamilton, Ohio, II a.m.
Game .6 Chitre, Panama vs.
Vancouver, British Columbia, I p.m.
Game 7 Columbus, Ga. vs.Waipahu,
Hawaii, 3 p.m.
Game 8 Kaohsiung, Taiwan vs.
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, 6 p.m.
Game 9 -AuburnWash. vs.Plymouth,
Minn., 8 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
Buffalo 34, Indianapolis 21
New England 28,Atlanta 10
Friday's Game
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Mianmi at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Kansas City atTarnpa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Oakland at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
,Dallas at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 9 p.m.
Green Bay at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Minnesota at San Francisco, 8 p.m.'
Monday's Game
Arizona at Tennessee, 8 p.m.

NFL calendar

Aug. 31 Roster cutdown to



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. B

SENWIC I


maximum of 75 players.
Sept. 4 Roster cutdown to
maximum of 53 players.
Sept. 9 Opening game of regular
season.

Arena Bowl XXIII

Friday
Tampa Bay at Spokane (n)

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Irwin Tools Night Race
Site: Bristol,Tenn.
Schedule:Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (ABC,
7-11 p.m.).
Track: Bristol Motor Speedway (oval,
0.533 miles).
Race distance: 500 laps, 266.5 miles.
INDYCAR
Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Versus, 6-7 p.m.); Sunday, race, 5:30 p.m.
(Versus, 5-8 p.m.).
Track: Infineon Raceway (road course,
2.303 miles).
Race distance: 184.2 miles, 80 laps.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
American Le Mans Series powered by
eStar, Sunday (Speed, 3-6 p.m.), Road
America, Elkhart Lake,Wis.

Irwin Tools qualifying

At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol,Tenn.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
123.475.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 122.937.
3. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 122.764.
4. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
122.584.
5. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
122.497.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
122.372.'
7. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
122.287.
8. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
122.248.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
122.178.
10. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
122.154.
11. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 122.131.
12. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 122.131.
13. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
122.022.
14. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 121.999.
15. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
121.999.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
121.968.
17. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
121.952.
18. (83) Reed Sorenson, Toyota,
121.89.
19. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 121.867.
20. (2).Kurt Busch, Dodge, 121.813.
21. (16) Greg Biffle. Ford, 121.79.
22. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
121.651.
23. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 121.512.
24. (13) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
121.474.
25. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
121.466.
26. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
121.42.
27. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
121.382.
28. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
121.29.
29. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
121.274.
30. (09) Bobby Labonte, .Chevrolet,
121.113.
31. (26) Jeff Green, Ford, 120.999.
32. (66) Scott Riggs,Toyota, 120.953.
33. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 120.915.
34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 120.915.
35. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
120.915.
36. (64) Todd Bodine,Toyota, 120.816.
37. (07) Robby Gordon, Toyota,
120.763.
38. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 120.71.
39. (37) Tony Ralnes, Ford, 119.678.
40. (7) Kevin Conway, Toyota, Owner
Points.
41. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, Owner
Points.
42. (71) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
43. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 120.664.
Failed to Qualify
44. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
120.286.
45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
120.24 I.
46. (4) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet,
I119.269.
47. (46) J.J.Yeley, Dodge, 118.863.
48. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge,
I 17.957.
49. (32) Mike Bliss,Toyota, 112.997.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

[ We have so l I
much to learn <- kf-
about them &


/T'VVIlLTY i ,
/ A / Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
/ 7 / -7~ 17~^ 17~ OF *7 ~
Ans: ., THE
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: ADAPT SAUTE CALLOW BEGONE
I Answer: What the defense lawyer wanted the plaintiff
to do SETTLE "DOWN"


BRIEFS


WOLVES VOLLEYBALL

Conditioning
begins Monday

Conditioning for
Richardson Middle School
volleyball is 3:15-5:15 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday
in the gym. Tryouts are
3:15-5:15 p.m. Wednesday.
Tryout packets are at the
front office. An updated
physical, and signed drug
and parent consent forms
must be provided.,
For details, call Casey
Fulford at 623-4893.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL

Community pep
rally today in gym

The Fort White
Quarterback Club's annual
Jam at the Gym is 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today at the Fort
White High gymnasium.
The preseason football
community pep rally is a
chance to meet players,
cheerleaders and dancers.
The Quarterback Club will
sell memberships, food
and drink, T-shirts and
season tickets.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at (386) 397-4954.

YOUTH FOOTBALL

Little League

sign-up today

Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
has youth football
registration scheduled
for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today
and Aug. 28 at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Ages
are 8-13, with Sept. 1
the cutoff date, and two
leagues are offered. Cost
is $40.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.


Future Tiger

Football Camp
The Future Tiger
Football Camp, sponsored
by the Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
and Columbia Youth
Football Association is 9-11
a.m. Aug. 28 at Memorial
Stadium. Boys and girls
ages 7-14 are eligible for


ACROSS

1 Information
5 "Sheila" singer
Tommy
8 Impend
12 Enjoy a novel
13 Samovar
14 Fete
15 Lacking mois-
ture
16 Irresistible
18 Double agents
20 kwon do
21 Garden imple-
ment
22 Backed out
25 TV band
28 Clever ploy
29 "Iliad," e.g.
33 Bad-mouth
35 Tolkien hero
36 Make a call
37 Horseshoes
throw
38 Weakens grad-
ually
39 Lower jaw
41 Acorn maker


the free camp. Campers
will get lunch and a
T-shirt. Pre-registration
is 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today
at Teen Town Recreation
Center. Late registration is
the day of the camp.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.


Mush Softball Tournament
on Sept. 18. Proceeds will
go to her children. Groups
are encouraged to form
teams at a cost of $10 per
member. Teams may
register at Brian's Sports.
For details, call Chad at
755-4271.


Boys Club flag YOUTH BASEBALL

football sign-up Fall league
r fdiStratinn torida


Registration is under
way for the Boys Club of
Columbia County's flag
football program. The
program is for ages 6-7,
and 8-year-olds who weigh
less than 66 pounds.
Practice is twice weekly at
the club and games are on
Saturday. Cost is $40.
For details, call the club
at 752-4184.

YOUTH SOFTBALL

Fort White fall

registration today

Fort White Babe Ruth
Softball registration for the
fall season is 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. today and Aug. 28,
and 5-7 p.m. Wednesday.
Registration is at the South
Columbia Sports Complex.
Cost is $40 per child.
For details, call Lynn
Harvey at 365-5688.


Fall season

sign-up continues

Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration
for its fall league through
Aug. 29 at Brian's Sports.
Ages are 4-17 for T-ball,
machine pitch and
fastpitch leagues. Cost is
,$45 or $65 for two players
from the same family. A
birth certificate is required
at registration.
For details on coaching,
scholarships, evaluations
or registration, e-mail
information@girlssoftball
association.org.


Wood memorial

tourney Sept. 18

The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County is hosting the Jodi
Elaine Wood Memorial


42 Ticket giver
45 "- Mis-
erables"
48 "Star Wars"
rogue
49 Football plays
53 Got the best of
56 & the Gang
57 Let loose
58 Vane dir.
59 Proof word
60 Hefty book
61 Depot (abbr.)
62 Take a load off

DOWN

1 Tot of whiskey
2 Space preced-
er
3 Comet feature
4 Viper
5 Daiquiri ingre-
dient
6 Spouts rhetoric
7 Hold rapt
8 Size above
med.
9 Firm promise


Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has fall season sign-up set
for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today
and and 5-7 p.m. Friday at
Southside Sports Complex.
Fee of $50 includes jersey,
hat, socks and insurance.
Ages for the five leagues
range from 5-6 coach
pitch to 13-15. A parent
or guardian must come to
registration and provide a
birth certificate.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810 or
Kevin Stalters at 623-9497.


Players needed

for travel team

A 12-under travel
baseball team is looking
for experience players
for local tournaments.
Practices and tryouts
are 5:30 p.m. Sunday at
Southside Sports Complex.
For details, call Chris
Williams at 344-5976.

CHEERLEADING

Columbia Cheer

registration today

Columbia Cheer has
registration for returning
little league cheerleaders
(girls ages 4-12) from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at
the Southside Community
Center. Registration for
new cheerleaders is
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Aug. 28
and Sept 4 at Southside
Recreation Center.
Registration in Fort White
is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today,
and Aug. 28, and
6-8 p.m. Aug. 27. Cost is
$90. Columbia Cheer is
looking for coaches.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at 292-4668.

* From staff reports


Answer to Previous Puzzle

JAxW D I K DIGrIT'


PLAN MILKYWAY
SPRITES OIN KS
NOD AMP
BANGS PHOE BE
APE STOA SLAG
SPAS HOBO EVA
TRIBAL TO WEL
TA I L IB
ALEUT PASTDUE
COMPOSED URLS
,RIM NIKE SONS
ESA SPED EPA
COgpE MURTS

.R I IvfN ~I KE S~S
E S^B Slp~p EP|


Potpourri
Medieval
weapon
Before marriage
Suit material
Habit wearer


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


24 Bruce or.
Laura
25 Foul-ball
callers
26 Joke response
(hyph.)
27 Failure
30 Kelly's pos-
sum
31 "Good -!"
32 Wine stopper
34 Technical sch.
35 Penalized
37 Criticize
39 Persuades
40 Up front
43 Letter after pi
44 Weatherman
Al
45 Art studio,
maybe
46 Drachma suc-
cessor
47 Flower part
50 Had on
51 Seasonal liba-
tions
52 Coin receiver
54 Retainer
55 Gov't narcs


2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


n r- 9 Aa r


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of Team Tumblemania are (front row, from left) Kayley Halbrook, Briley Larsen,
Madison Weber, Austin Benkoczy, Hannah Paul, Allison Vargas and Olivia Paul.
Back row (from left) are Emma Scott, Katie Vaughn, Brooke Gillingham, Josh Gillen,
Taylor Burgin, Mary Jo McGrath and Casey Hammen. Hunter Hammen also is on the team.


Summer of awards for


Team Tumblemania


From staff reports

Team Tumblemania of
High Springs competed
at two national champion-
ships during the summer
and bought home 30 Top 10
national titles, including a
national championship.
Marci Schneider is
owner of Tumblemania,
and all 15 team members
competed at the USTA
Trampoline & Tumbling
National Championships in
Springfield, Ill., from June.
15-19. Three members com-
peted for Team Florida at
the AAU Junior Olympic
Games in Virginia Beach,
Va., from July 30 to Aug. 2.
Kayley Halbrook of
High Springs was national
Champion in Sub-Advanced
Double-Mini, second
overall in Sub-Advanced
C Trampoline and fourth
overall in Intermediate
Tumbling.
Other individual results:
Austin Benkoczy of
Fort White third over-
all in Novice Trampoline
and Novice Double-Mini,
fourth overall in Sub-Novice
Tumbling;
Taylor Burgin of
Newberry third in
flight and fourth overall in
Intermediate Double-Mini,
fifth inflightin Sub-Advanced
Trampoline, eighth in flight


in Intermediate Tumbling;
Josh Gillen of High
Springs first in flight and
third overall in Advanced
Double-Mini, fifth overall in
Advanced Trampoline and
Elite Doubl-Mini, sixth over-
all in Advanced Tumbling;
Brooke. Gillingham
of High Springs sixth
in flight in Intermediate
Double-Mini, ninth in
flight in Sub-Advanced
Trampoline and Sub-Novice
Tumbling;
Casey, Hammen
of Newberry first in
flight and sixth overall in
Advanced Double-Mini,
third overall in Advanced
Tumbling, sixth overall in
Advanced Trampoline;
Hunter Hammen of
Newberry first in flight
and eighth overall in Novice
Trampoline, sixth in flight in
Intermediate Double-Mini
and Sub-Novice Tumbling;
Briley Larsen of Fort
White fourth in flight
and ninth overall in Novice
Trampoline, seventh
in flight in Sub-Novice
Tumbling, eighth in flight
in Beginner Double-Mini;
Mary Jo Mc Grath
of Fort White third in
flight and sixth overall in
Sub-Advanced Trampoline,
third in flight in Sub-Novice
Tumbling, seventh in flight
in Intermediate Double-


Mini;
Hannah Paul of
Gainesville second in
flight and 11th overall in Sub-
Advanced Tumbling, 11th
overall in Sub-Advanced
Trampoline, eighth in flight
in Sub-Advanced Douible-
Mini;
OliviaPaul of Gainesville
first in flight and 10th
overall in Sub-Advanced
Double-Mini, fourth in
Flight in Intermediate
Tumbling, fifth in flight in
Sub-Advanced Trampoline;
Emma Scott of High
Springs fifth in flight in
Novice Double-Mini, sixth in
flight in Novice Trampoline,
seventh in flight in Sub-
Novice Tumbling;
Allison Vargas of
Newberry fourth in flight
in Intermediate Double-
Mini and Sub-Novice
Tumbling, sixth in flight in
Intermediate Trampoline;
Katie Vaughn of High
Springs third in flight
and 10th overall in Novice
Trampoline, fourth in flight
in Novice Double-Mini,
fifth in flight in Sub-Novice
Tumbling;
Madison Weber of
Alachua fourth in flight in
Sub-Advanced Trampoline,
seventh in flight in Novice
Tumbling, eighth in flight
in Sub-Advanced Double:
Mini.


Clemens: 'Going to deal with it'


Associated Press

BOSTON In his first
Public comments in the
' media since being indicted
on federal charges that he
lied to Congress in 2008
about being injected with
human growth hormone
and steroids, former Red
Sox pitcher Roger Clemens
told radio station WEEI in
Boston that he is looking
forward to having his say
in court.
Clemens, who said he was
"doing fine," spoke with the
station Friday during the
WEEI/NESN Jimmy Fund
Telethon.
He talked extensively
about his introduction into
the Jimmy Fund, which
he was first made aware.
of in 1984, before talking
briefly about the news of
his indictment.
"I'm not going to get into


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Feb. 13, 2008, file photo
shows baseball pitcher Roger
Clemens being sworn in on
Capitol Hill in Washington.

details," Clemens said. "All
I'm going to say is that I
learned a lot through what
happened, and what did not
happen. We're going to deal
with it. I don't know what
else to say. We're going to
deal with it and have our
day."


Clemens was asked if
he was taken by surprise
by Thursday's federal
indictment.
"It wasn't really a sur-
prise," he said. "I got my
eyes opened up quite a bit
... I sent it out in a Tweet,
thought that was the best
way to go about it."
Clemens said that he
Wasn't going to go into hid-
ing, and kept reiterating,
"We'll get to have our say."
Asked if he was worried
about not making the Hall
of Fame, the seven-time Cy
Young Award winner said,
"I didn't play the game to
go to the Hall of Fame. It's a
tremendous honor. I played
the game because I was
taking care of my family."
Clemens said he does not
talk to New York pitcher
Andy Pettitte, his former
teammate with the Yankees
and Astros.'


BRISTOL: Sellout streak began in 1982


Continued From Page 1B
for a package of four, and if
something came available,
names were picked through
a lottery.
Now, with 160,000 seats
and only about 6,000 hotel
rooms in the immediate Tri-
Cities area, Bristol officials
are having to launch cre-
ative marketing strategies
for the first time in over
two decades. The sellout
streak began in 1982 when
the track had 30,000 seats.
"I don't think anyone is
immune," said five-time
Bristol winner Jeff Gordon.
"It's just like a top team


is not immune to sponsor-
ship negotiations, and a
race track is not immune to
the economy and whatever
decision-making is going on
out there among fans as to
what races they choose to
go to and what obstacles lie
in their way to get to those
tracks. I still think people,
everywhere I go, love
Bristol and love Talladega
and love NASCAR. But I
think when there are tough
times, they have to make
tough decisions:"
Bristol officials this year
gave tickets to four driv-


ers active on Twitter, as
well as Red Bull Racing, to
give away. Red Bull gave
its 10 sets out through
weekly trivia sessions, but
even some of those will go
unused.
Josh Jones has been out
*of work since April, and
even after winning tickets
from Red Bull, he couldn't
swing the trip from Guilford,
Ct. He's already been to
races this season at New
Hampshire, Pocono and the
All-Star race in Charlotte,
all paid for before he lost
his job.


Bama's Ingram latest to


chase second Heisman


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala.-
Archie Griffin knows that
one day he won't be the
only multiple Heisman
winner.
"Somebody's going to do
it three times," the former
Ohio State star said. "It's
not going to be an easy
deal, but somebody out
there can get it done."
Enter Alabama's Mark
Ingram.
The Crimson Tide run-
ning back has a chance this
season to win his second,
and if he sticks around for
his senior year, possibly a
third.
Last season he became
the third straight sopho-
more to strike the Heisman
pose, when only juniors
and seniors had previously
won the award.
But Florida's Tim Tebow
couldn't do it. He made two
unsuccessful runs at win-
ning a second Heisman.
And Oklaloma's Sam
Bradford had his quest
for a two-peat end early
with a shoulder injury last
season.
For his part, Ingram
sidesteps talk of a Heisman
repeat.
"You really can't worry
about that type of stuff,"
the compact tailback said,
"all the pressure that peo-
ple put on you."
But it's there, and will
likely be there all season.
So will the scrutiny, the
attention and of course the
trophy which is on dis-
play in Alabama's football
building. It's the only one,
after all, a Tide player has
ever won.
Before the sophomore
surplus, 11 juniors had
won the Heisman since
Griffin captured his sec-
ond straight in 1975. Only
Oklahoma running back
Billy Sims (1978), BYU
quarterback Ty Detmer
(1990), Oklahoma quarter-
back Jason White (2003)
and Southern California
quarterback Matt Leinart
(2004) returned for another
shot
The rest turned pro
early.
Ingram has a couple of
things in his favor: He plays
for the defending national
champions at a program
that prides itself on win-
ning national titles.
Bradford and Tebow
say that makes winning
Heisman No. 2 secondary.
"There was people talk-
ing about it, but in my mind
it wasn't a big deal because
there was always so much
more pressure in trying
to win games and trying
to win a championship
than winning a Heisman,"
said Tebow, now a Denver
Broncos rookie.
"So, if you were maybe
somewhere else where
you didn't have that pres-
sure and that expectation
of winning a champion-
ship, maybe the Heisman
would affect you more. But
I don't think it really had
an effect because of our
level of expectations and
then the expectations oth-
ers put'on us, too, were so
high that you were always
more focused onf winning
a championship than win-
ning a Heisman."
He came close twice.
Tebow was the first three-
time finalist and the first
player since Georgia's
Herschel Walker, the 1982


ASSOCIATED PRES3
This Jan. 7 file photo shows Alabama running ba-'k Mark
Ingram signaling to spectators after scoring a touchdown.
during the fourth quarter of the BCS Championship football
game against Texas, in Pasadena, Calif.


winner, to finish in the Top
5 three times. He was third
in 2008 behind Bradford
and Texas quarterback
Colt McCoy, and fifth last
season.
Bradford never got a
crack at it, injuring his
right shoulder in both the
season opener and his
brief comeback attempt.
He insists winning the
Heisman a second time
was pretty much a non-
issue, anyway. -
"I put no extra pressure
oni myself," said Bradford,
drafted No. 1 overall by St.
Louis. "I think it depends
on who you are but I've
-always had the approach
that individual awards are
really based on team suc-
cess. I know going into
each year you're not play-
ing for individual awards,
you're playing for champi-
onships. If you help your
team, if you do what you're
supposed to do, then those
things will come."
It's the same advice
Ingram got from Tebow.
The two became friends
during the trip to New York
for the Heisman ceremony
last December.
. "He just tells me don't
worry about all that, just to
be the best player I can be,"
Ingram said. "Just focus on
being the best player I can
be for my team and win-
ning games, because that's
all that really matters. And
that's the same mindset
that Ihave.
"It's the same mindset
that he had. You really
can't worry about that type
of stuff, all the pressure
that people put on you.
You've just got to be
focused on yourself and
your teammates."
One of those teammates
might hinder Ingram's
chances to match his
school-record 1,658 yards.
Trent Richardson ran for
751 yards as a freshman
and could be in line for
more carries this season.
Another challenge, says
Andre Ware, is opposing


defenders would love to
take shots at the Heisman
Trophy winner. '
"The thing that you face
is you're everyone's target
when line up on Saturday,"
said Ware, who left Houston
for the NFL after winning
the Heisman as a junior
in 1989. "Everyone wants
to say, 'I hit the Heisman
Trophy winner.' You
become everyone's claim
to fame. so-to, speak. So
every weekend, 'because
last year's Heisman win-
ner plays for Alabama,
it's ammunition enough
but when you've got the
Heisman winner on your
team, everyone wants that
shot to say that they beat
the Heisman winner."
Depending on who you
ask, being the reigning
Heisman Trophy winner
doesn't necessarily give
you a leg up when the
votes are tallied.
"I think it's wide open and
I think that's the beauty of
the award is that after last
December you can wipe
the slate clean and every-
body starts over," said
Ware, now a college foot-
ball analyst with ESPN.
Griffin would write
Ingram in as the front-
runner in pencil, of
course.
"I always have 'the
incumbent being the favor-
ite because they won it the
year before," he said. "I
know it's tough to do, but
you've got to have them up
there pretty high. With the
type of team that Alabama's
going to have and with
what they've got coming
back, I would imagine that
he's probably the favorite."
Ingram publicly down-
plays the significance of
another Heisman.
Whatever happens,
Griffin plans to take it all
in.
"It doesn't bother me if
somebody wins it a second
time or even a third time,"
Griffin said. "It's one of
those, situations where I
just enjoy the race."


CHS: Ratliff only O-line veteran


Continued From Page 11
form in that atmosphere.
"The offensive line
right now is a junior var-
sity offensive line playing
a varsity schedule," he
said. "Our only returning
veteran is Danny Ratliff,
and he's seen a significant
amount of time.
"Other than that, we're
young guys that have to
grow up fast."
Growing up also means


a mental and physical
toughness.
"You have to be tough,"
Howard said. "People are
going to hit you in the
mouth. They have to be
ready to work hard and
know their assignments."
Contrasting the offen-
sive line is the defensive
front, where Howard feels
the Tigers can be strong.
"The defensive line


is hard to block up fr at
with (Jernigan)," he said.
"We're missing a starter ir
(Justin) Kennedy, who has
been out for a week with a
death in the family, but that
enabled Dequan Ivory to
come along well."
Columbia will take the
field at 7:30 p.m. for a
taste of what Friday night
football will look like in
Lake City.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BLONDIE


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
KAGAR 4AI '"4 V4o MAN',
PLACE 16I1 7NM NoMe"F


SNUFFY SMITH
BL RAND-NEW COCKA -DOODLE-DOO !!
BABIES !! GOOD COCKA- DOODLE-
JOB, PENNY ( DO0 !
~-< -- -- ^ ~ /~~^ ^'-


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEARABBY


Teen mom is pushed around

by her baby daddy's mama


DEAR ABBY: I'm a
teen mom who feels like I
am being taken advantage
of by my newborn's grand-
mother. (I'll call her "Liz.")
My baby's father, "Todd,"
lives with her. They pro-
vide no financial support.
Liz puts me on the spot
constantly and makes
me feel bad if I tell her
she can't have the baby
that day or take her to a
certain place. Since day
one, she has wanted to
take my baby out of town.
That bothers me because
I don't want my daughter
going out of town unless I
am with her.
I feel obligated to let
Todd's mother see the
baby all the time to avoid
the drama she would
cause in my life if I don't. I
don't want to be mean, but
I need to let her know how
I feel. How do I approach
her? YOUNG MOM
IN RICHMOND, IND.
DEARYOUNG MOM:
No one can be taken ad-
vantage of unless she (or
he) allows it. Do not allow
anyone no matter how
well-intentioned to do
anything with your baby
that makes you uncomfort-
able. You may be young,
but as a mother you are re-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com -
sponsible for your child's
welfare.
Do not "approach"
Liz; let her approach you.
When she does, be po-
lite, firm and stand your
ground. If she tries to turn
it into a power struggle,
end the conversation. Do
not allow her to make you
lose your temper.
DEAR ABBY: My
boyfriend of four years,
"Omar," and I have been
having major arguments
lately. They're about the
relationship he has with
his sister. I feel he con-
fides in her more than he
does me.
I realize she's his sister,
but he consults her about
finances, what kind of pet
to buy, how things are go-
ing at work, etc. He's never
open with me about those
issues. He shuts me out to
the point that I have told
him if it doesn't change,
we're through. He says
I'm "overreacting."


Even more peculiar,
she makes phone calls
for Omar like when his
mortgage payment was
late or when he had to ask
the IRS a tax question.
Omar is 34 and should be
handling these things him-
self.
It galls me when he puts
her on a pedestal and puts
me down when I make a
mistake..I'm a single mom,
doing well on my own, but
he refuses to acknowledge
it. What should I do? -
SECOND FIDDLE IN
ARIZONA
DEAR SECOND FiD-
DLE: It is possible that
Omar's sister has been
running his life for so long
that she's the first person
he thinks of when he gets
into a bind. And obviously
she has done a capable job
of it, or he wouldn't keep
having her intercede for
him.
It should be clear to you
by now that putting your-
self in competition with her
is getting you nowhere. So
accept the two of them as a
package deal or find a man
who is independent.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES.


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): A change of
plans may disrupt your
day. Look beyond what ev-
eryone else is doing and
concentrate on what you
need to accomplish. Don't
fear what's to come; think
of it as a new adventure.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Be open to inno-
vative ideas and you will be
a part of an experience you
won't want to miss. 'There
is plenty to learn and to
contribute. Unexpected
change will influence the
way you do things in the
future. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): A little fun
coupled with shopping
and pampering will do you
good. Getting together
with someone you love or
meeting someone special
(if you are single), looks
promising. Impulsive be-
havior will be due to emo-
tional uncertainty. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Embellishing
a story may make it more
entertaining but in the end
you will be considered a
gossip. Stick to the truth.
Problems with a lover,
child or close friend will be
trying and will require pa-
tience. ***
LEO (July ,23-Aug.
22): Don't let doubt cause


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

you to miss out on some-
thing you should be taking
part in or stop you from
visiting someone you miss
or want to get to know bet-'
ter. Inconsistency will be
your downfall, so respond
with confidence. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Don't let the
past drag you down. In-
stead, be progressive and
forward-thinking. Success
is ahead of you but only if
you are prepared to make
the effort Speak from
the heart and you will be
heard. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): It's not the time for
you to take the stage or
share your opinions, ideas
or plans. Keeping the
peace will not be as easy
as you hoped. Focus more
on creating something you
can offer others in the fu-
ture. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't let any-
one stand in your way. If
you want to pursue some-
thing, do so without feeling
guilty. A practical approach
will help someone who
needs your assistance. A
poor love relationship will
hold you back. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): A job you
are working on isn't likely
to turn out as planned.
Take a break to mull over
what went wrong. Open
your doors to friends and
enjoy the company of peo-
ple who offer insight and
entertaining conversation.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't jump
into something impulsive-
ly, even if it appears to be
an amazing opportunity.
Nothing is as it appears.
Avoid joint ventures and
you will save financially
and maintain your reputa-
tion and the status quo.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You will be faced
with dissatisfied customers
if you try to oversell. There
is money to be made but it
must be done by your own
means, not someone else's.
Someone from your past is
likely to contact you. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Offer help and
don't resist change and you
will be ahead of the game
by the end of the day. You
must allow others to do as
they please if you want to
maintain the relationship
and gain the right to speak
openly about future plans.
Be willing to compromise.
****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals K
"LMY WYS RHY? EL'D UIDL LMY AGC
RHY DLIBN EW R KEBXASRZY AZYW


OAX OEOLYYW DYBAWCD."


U R KY D


X R W C E
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There's something liberating about not pretending.
Dare to embarrass yourself. Risk." Drew Barrymore
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-21


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
BO'/, RM I E-XHRSTED. SHE GOES ON IND
- MRS. 6aFIOD CaRE ON NONSTOP, JOHN-
OVERT-ODFA IT REALLY
ARND NEVER I WEFRS ME
V9S1PPED1FILKING! I .V OUT!-,


CLASSIC PEANUTS


OH, FORGET IT!


IT NEVER FAILS, TH' FELLER L
WHO DOES TH' LEAST BRAGS
TH' LOUDEST !! .


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER










Classified Department: 755-5440


Y-
FIND IJT


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
1988 FORD BRONCO
VIN# 1FMEU15N9JL463307
To be held on SEPTEMBER 6,
2010.
At Daniel's Towing & Recovery
Arrowhead Road Lake City, Florida
32056-3026
At 9:00 am
05523642
August 21, 2010
STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL
JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAIN-
ING COMMISSION,
Petitioner
vs.
CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, Case
#28886
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHARLES J. WILLIAMS,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Ad-
ministrative Complaint has been
filed against you seeking to revoke
your CORRECTIONAL Certificate
In accordance with Section
943.1395, F.S., and any rules pro-
mulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written
copy of your intent to request a hear-
ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S.
upon Michael Crews, PROGRAM
DIRECTOR, Criminal Justice Pro-
fessionalism Program, Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement, P. 0.
Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before September
29, 2010. Failure to do so will result
in a default being entered against yod
to Revoke said certification pursuant
to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule
I11B-27, F.A.C.
Dated: July 29, 2010
Ernest W. George
CHAIRMAN CRIMINAL JUS-
TICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Cliff Chitwood, Division
Representative
04540848
July 31, 2010
August 7, 14, 21, 2010


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Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
FOR REHABILITATION AND RE-
PLACEMENT
Project No. 08DB-T3-03-22-02-NEl
City of Lake City (herein referred to
as the City)
Sealed bid marked "Sealed Bid -
City of Lake City Small Cities Com-
munity Development Block Grant
Project for Fiscal Year 2007, Emer-
gency Set-aside" to be financed by
the State of Florida Department of
Community Affairs under the provi-
sions, and subject to the require-
ments, of Title I of the Housing and
Community Development Act of
1974, as amended, will be received
by the City for rehabilitation or re-
placement on behalf of the following
owners of the following dwelling
units: -
Unit No. NEl- 07-8, Lille Adams,
northeast comer of NE Gurley Ave.
and NE Famu Lane, Lake City;
Unit No. NE1 07-9, Jessie McSwain,
230 NE Trinity Place, Lake City;
Unit No. NE1 07-10, Chapman, 580
NE MLK Street, Lake City; and
Unit No. NE107-11, Christiana Da-
vis, 955 NE Famu Lane, Lake City.
The owners listed above invite bids
for the rehabilitation or replacement
of dwelling units located on the
above referenced properties. In order
to be considered, the proposal must
be made upon the Bid Proposal Form
and in accordance with the Instruc-
tions to Bidders. Copies of these
forms can be obtained at City 'Hall,
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida on August 26, 2010 at
1:00 p.m.
The improvements are to be made
for and under contract to the owners
of the subject properties as described
above. Disbursements for funds for
the improvements will be made by
the City on behalf of the owner.
Bids will be received at City Hall,
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, by Office of the City
Manager, not later than September 3,
2010 at 11:00 a.m. Bids must be en-
closed in a sealed 'envelope marked
with the property owner's name and
address. Bids will not be accepted if
they are turned in later than the dead-
line specified above. The sealed bids
will be publicly opened and read
aloud on September 3, 2010 at 11:00
a.m. in City Hall located at 205
North Marion Avenue, Lake City.
CONTRACTORS, please note that
the City will need to know the fol-
lowing information: 1) your state of
licensure, 2) your license number, 3)
your license class, 4) certificate of
Completion of Lead-Safe Work
Practices Training, and 5) your insur-
ance coverage.
A "walk through" of the above prop-
-erties is scheduled for August 26,
2010 at 1:00 p.m. Please meet at City
Hall, 205 North Marion Avenue.
Lake City, on August 26, 2010 at
1:00 p.m. prior to going to the dwell-
ing units. If you plan to submit a bid,
a representative of your firm must at-
tend the "walk through" of the dwell-
ing units to become familiar with the
properties and the work to be com-
pleted. The City reserves the right to
reject any or all bids.
No contractor shall visit the subject
properties for any reason without
first making arrangements with the
City and owner.
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OP-
PORTUNITY
EMPLOYER/HANDICAP ACCESS
JURISDICTION
05523635
August 21, 2010
PUBLIC NOTICE ON CITY OF
LAKE CITY SURPLUS AUCTION
The City of Lake City is conducting
an online auction for City surplus
items. To register to purchase surplus
items log onto
http://www.govdeals.com. Items can
be viewed online at
http://www.govdeals.com. For any
questions please contact Debbie Gar-
bett at (386) 719-5818 or Larry Wil-
son at (386) 758-5407.

05523636
August 21, 2010

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-284-CA
Judge Leandra G. Johnson
THE SHILOH RIDGE COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GARY A. WHITENECK and
BARBARA A. WHITENECK,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the third floor of the
Columbia Cqunty Courthouse, 173
N.E; Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m.
on September 15, 2010, the follow-
ing property described in Exhibit
"A" attached hereto.
LOT 75
THE SW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF
THE SE 1/4, SECTION 16, TOWN-
SHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
SAID LANDS BEING SUBJECT
TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT
FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS IN
THE NORTHEAST CORNER
THEREOF. CONTAINING 10.05
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
PROPERTY:
60-FOOT EASEMENT FOR IN-
GRESS AND EGRESS
A STRIP OF LAND 60 FEET IN
WIDTH BEING 30 FEET EACH
SIDE OF A CENTERLINE DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COM-
MENCE AT THE SOTfHEAST
CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE
NE 1/4, SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP
7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE S 89' 03' 48"
W, 20.45 FEET TO THE WEST
LINE OF FRY ROAD AND TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE S 89 03' 48"
W, 3952.99 FEET TO THE EAST
LINE OF SECTION 16, TOWN-
SHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
THENCE S 89' 06' 19" W, 661.99
FEET TO REFERENCE POINT
"C", THENCE CONTINUE S 89
06' 19" W, 1323.98 FEET TO REF-
ERENCE POINT "D" AND TO
THE POINT OF TERMINATION.
ALSO BEGIN AT REFERENCE
POINT "C" AND RUN THENCE N
00' 45' 21" W, 701.45 FEET TO
THE RADIUS POINT OF A CUL-
DE-SAC HAVING A RADIUS OF
50 FEET AND TO THE POINT OF
TERMINATION. ALSO BEGIN AT
REFERENCE POINT "C" AND
RUN THENCE S 00' 45' 01" E,
1323.20 FEET, THENCE S 00" 44'
52" E, 701.59 FEET TO THE RADI-
US POINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC
HAVING A RADIUS OF 50 FEET
AND TO THE POINT OF TERMI-
NATION. ALSO BEGIN AT REF-
ERENCE POINT "D" AND RUN
THENCE N 0046' 46 46" W, 701.37
FEET TO THE RADIUS POINT OF
A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 50 FEET AND TO THE
POINT OF TERMINATION. ALSO
BEGIN AT REFERENCE POINT
"D" 'AND RUN THENCE S 00' 46'
12" E, 1323.42 FEET, THENCE S
00' 46' 00" E, 701.68 FEET TO
THE RADIUS POINT OF A CUL-
DE-SAC HAVING A 50 FEET RA-
DIUS AND TO THE POINT OF
TERMINATION.
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a clam within 60 days after the
sale.
Date: August 16, 2010.
R DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04541345
August 21, 28, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
wwwilakecityreporter.com


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ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle'does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be Hsted in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


- ~uo~rn'More etils Call Mary'~

at38-755-544


060 Services

04541324
CMSMG
BARIATRICS
480 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386)758-1965
Ask About our medically
supervised and individualized
Weight loss program,
designed for you.
Obesity shortens your life,
so why not live longer.
Let us help you live longer
and healthier start now!
It's not too late to
extend your life.

100 Job .
Opportunities

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

05523527


JPEMCO
WORLD AIR SERVICES

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have been waiting for!
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
Aircraft Mechanics
Aircraft Structural Mechanics
Production Supervisors
Quality Control Manager/
Supervisor/Inspector
Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careerst(pemcoair.com;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at
www.pemcoair.com.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

05523597
Looking For A
Superstar Employee!!!

Administrative assistant
work & light phone sales.
Must be an energetic,
outgoing, enthusiastic, individu-
al with an intuitive personality.

ONLY serious superstar appli-
cants apply if you feel that you
can prove you
have what it takes.

Email application to
Ryan@CadyFundraising.com

05523626
TEACHERS, FT and PT,
Early Head Start
(birth to 3 yrs old), positions in
Lake City, Live Oak, and
Jasper-HS Diploma/GED, CDA
(Child DevelopmentAssociate)
or FCCPC
(Fl Child Care Professional
Credential) preferred.
Bilingual (Span/Eng) preferred.
Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
Current 1St Aide/CPR pref.
To Apply-
E-Mail:arobinson@sv4cs.org
call (386) 754-2222
or Fax 386-754-2220,
In Person 236 SW Columbia
Ave, Lake City Fl or 843
SW Marymac St. Live Oak Fl
EOE

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Disabled and would like to work?
Rest Area Attendant position
Apply in PERSON at CARC
512 SWSisters Welcome Rd
Lake City

-^UTRST rB


10n Job
100l Opportunities
Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW

Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105 '
Grand Street, Lve Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746

Security Officers
needed Live Oak/Lake City Areas,
must have current D Sec Lic., Clr
background, Drs Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
comptiter skills and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
Please fax resume to
386-758-4523

Want to make a difference,
in someone's life?
Residential Training Specialist
positions available, one yr exp, di-
ploma or GED, current FL DL,
CPR/1st Aid/ HIV Training req'd,
Apply in person at CARC
512 SWSisters Welcome Road,
Lake City

WE ARE GROWING
Qualified, Experienced Teachers
needed, apply in person
Wee Care Preschool & Daycare
comer of 240 & 47,386-754-51.11 .

120 ^ Medical
1 Employment

05523572
Medical Office
with immediate opportunies for
Medical Assistant, LPN &
Nurse Practitioner with experi-
ence in medical procedures
Send resume to P.O.Box
2204 lake City, FL 32056

Busy Medical Practice with multi-
ple doctors is seeking responsible
individual for Receptionist and
Scheduling. Medical experience a
must. Fax resume to 386-758-5628

Fast Paced Medical Office needs
experienced only
Medical Assistant
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email:
to office manager @
primarycaremedic.com

P/T CLERICAL
help needed for medical office,
Fax resume to
386-487-1234
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City. FL. 32025.

240 Schools &
240 Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-08/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-09/13/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
exoresstrainineservices.com


OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, August 21, 1lpm-4pm


Directions: From Baya Ave, South on
Country Club Rd. for approx. one mile,
then left on Lindale Glen, last.house on
right.
Description: Very well -maintained 3BR/
2BA home on dead-end street. Quiet
country living close to downtown Lake City.
Built in 2006, 1301 sq. ft., 1/2 acre lot.


Lisa Waltrip
386-365-5900


/


M11114i









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010


310 Pets & Supplies
Chocolate Lab Pups
AKC Registered, health certs
$350 Come by and snuggle
with one!! 386-965-2231
Free
Two Yorkie Pups
ps.me02@yahoo.com
386-755-4110
Lovely Rat Terrier.
3.5 months old
$100.
386-697-9950
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock&
330 supplies
20 Month old laying hen
Live Oak
$20 .
386-330-0168
Mini Horses,Mares $500 each,
gentle, both take saddle and rider,
lead well, make great family horse
1 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum. ha, China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
GE Dishwasher,
slide in, white, works, good,
$100 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
GE White Washer/Dryer set
Works Good
$250. OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
Microwave Oven
good shape, works well, revolving
plate, welcome to see $30
386-755-3682
Upright Freezer,
14/16 Cu Ft, white,
works well,$150
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

407 Computers
.IBM Computer,
Many extras
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Tall Bookshelf
$25
386-754-9295 or
386-292-3927
Twin Bed, metal frame + mattress,
hea ad and foot board,
blue in color $125
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

410 Lawn & Garden
41tv. Equipment
Craftsman Riding Mower, 20 hp
turbo cool engine, 42 cut, auto,
runs great, $525
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
Poulan Pro PUSH MOWER.
6.5 engine Like New!
22" cut.rolls easy, $145 obo
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

411 Machinery &
411 Tools
Lrg Craftsman Dbl Tool Box,
with side closets, include name
brand auto tools, $1200 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat/Sun 7a-?, Men's med & Irg
clothing, womens/juniors (0-4)
clothing, baby girl clothes, toys,
misc, household Verndale Apts
Sat/Sun 8 4, over 100 DVD's,
hammock, steam pro shark, hutch,
lots of misc, 910 S Marion Ave
(across from Methodist Church)

440 Miscellaneous
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 386-965-2231


Tool Box,
will fit small truck,
in fair shape,$50 obo
386-754-9295, 386-292-3927
Upgraded Running Boards
Rubber covered. Fits Ford truck.
Extended or King cab. $85.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rentos
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2BR/1BA MH
No Pets.
$450. mo. $300. security deposit..
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
3/1 1/2 Double Wide,
Mobile Home,
big screen porch,
386-752-2254
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Quiet, Secluded,Private
2/2 MH, on 5 acres
,includes utilities,
Avail Sept Ist 386-755-0300
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

6 0 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
1978 S/W 2 bdrm, in Paradise
Village MH Park 195 SE Bikini
Dr, Lake City, Lot # 25, 2 blks
from College, great for student,
asking $6,000 OBO 850-295-4717
5 Mobile Home
650 & Land
D/W on almost 1/2 acre lot, 3/2,
new AC, appliances included,
$50,000 on Branford Hwy
386-208-0665 or 386-466-2825

0 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
552330U)
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 Bedroom, Garage Apt,
W/D included, $400 month,
1st & last
386-208-4702
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security.
Call Michelle
386-752-9626
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+ Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $500. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable .
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs:
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2W For Rent
1 bedroom upstairs apartment,
utilities included,
$150 a week, $300 deposit,
758-2080 or 755-1670
Furnished Studio Apt
w/cable & all utilities included.
$500. mo. & $150. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730{ Unfurnished
/73 Home For Rent
3/Bdrm/2 bath, w/office, 2 car ga-
rage, gas fireplace, safe neighbor-
hood $1200 mo, dep required,
386-623-4403
3br/2ba home for rent in Wise
Estates. Brick exterior, new
flooring, great location. $1100.
mo. lst,last, & sec. 386-965-8633
4 Bdrm $850 mo, south of town,
off of 47 ,S/W MH 2/2 in Well-
born, $625 mo 1st, last, 1/2 of sec.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
4/1, 2 car garage,
East Baya Ave,large yard $850
dep, No Pets!$850 per month
386-752-7578
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-


it, lease/references req'd. $1,150
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-984-9599
Clean lBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-
1833.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LG 3BR/2BA house
Nice property. $765. mo.
$600 security. Application req'd.
386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
1-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals

05523530
WAREHOUSE SPACE
For Lease near 1-75 in
Cannon Creek.
1247sf w-office,
restroom & utilities included.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757.
Westfield Realty Group.
Convenient Store
for lease,
813-286-2323
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7


805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-

discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

04541245
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
August 28th, 2010 @ 11:00 AM
518 SW Explorer Glen
Ft. White, FL 32038
10+ acres with Doublewide
Mobile home and out buildings!
A peaceful sanctuary away from
the hustle and bustle!!
For pictures and infQ see
www.brewerauctions.com
Phone: (386)497-4438
Cell: (904)838-1575,
Conducted by:
Brewer Auction & Realty
Roy J. Brewer, Jr.,
CAI, auctioneer
AU#2604/ACB#1940
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Brnfrd, Irg shed, sm down, $725
mo 386-590-0642/386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Penske Truck Rentals
moved to
W Hwy. 90 & Brown Rd,
12 % disc. to new customers

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


940 Trucks
08 Dodge SLT.4x4 Big Ram, ex-
tra clean. 20" Factory Rims, Hemi
full pwr. 10,290mi. Price $24,900
386-755-2909

950 Cars for Sale
2003 Cadillac DeVille,
am/fm/cd, heated leather seats,
67K miles, $9500
386-755-5127 or 386-965-5484

9 Recreational
Vehicles
2006 DENALI 35 ft 5th Wheel
Camper, w/3slides, 02 Chevy Sil-
verado crew cab P/U w/6.6 CI
Die-
sel $37,900 for both 386-758-2465

G E T mw.lakecityreporter.comr

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