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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01402
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/18/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01402
System ID: UF00028308:01402
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Contract near
Lake City, police union work
to finalize union negotiations.
Local, 5A
000016 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11700'7FLORID
205 SMA UNIV OF 3LORIDA-
GWe a ESVILLEA FL 320611-1943





Wednesday, August 18,2010


A" ~


Waiting game
Tigers first game
/ next Friday.
Sports, I B






reporter


Freporter.com Vol. 136, No. 181 N 75 cents


County
Officials adopt T
2010-2011 floor lor
budget, 3-2. cou
ask
By TONY BRITT furl
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com 201
T
Tight budget years call ma
for intuitive shortfall-solv- Tue
ing measures. ing


budget
To help cover a $2.1 mil- Comr
n deficit in the county's budg
tative 2010-2011 budget, works
nty employees will be from
:ed to take three days of Colun
lough during the 2010- Boar
1 fiscal year. Comp
Fhe proposal was attend
de and approved peoph
esday morning dur- Cot
the Columbia County ly ad,


woes force furlough days


mission's second
et workshop. The
shop, which lasted
9 am. to noon at the
abia County School
d Administrative
plex Auditorium, was
led by more than 20
e.
inty officials narrow-
opted the 2010-2011


floor budget, by a 3-2 vote,
with com-
missioners.
Stephen
Bailey
and Jody
Dupree
casting the
dissent-
ing votes. Bailey
Bailey and Dupree also


L


cast dissenting votes on
the days of
furlough
concept.
The fur-
lough days
would be on
holidays, yet
to be deter-
Dupree mined, when
the courthouse is normally


closed. The first day of
furlough will be Nov. 11.
Commissioners couldn't
recoup the $2.1 million
'funding shortfall through
budget cuts and are using
the furlough days to help
cover the amount.
Commissioner Dewy
FURLOUGH continued on 3A


Identifying talent


Richardson Middle School opens doors

for parents to discover'SAIL program


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School sixth-grade math and science teacher Kimberly Biehl,(right) answers questions from parents and
students at the Supporting Academic Independent Learners Program Open House on Tuesday. Pictured are Justin Thomas
(from left), his son, Dylan, 11, and wife, Michelle. 'I don't know a whole lot about it, but he's excited,' Justin Thomas said,
referring to Dylan. 'This is new to me. I'm anxious to learn what this is about.'


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A udrey
Angstadt, 12, a
seventh-grader
at Richardson
Middle School,
is looking forward to delv-
ing into her second school
year on a higher level of
learning through a special
program at RMS.
Angstadt joined at least
100 other Richardson
students, parents and
family members Tuesday
for an introductory open
house for the Supporting
Academic Independent
Learners program offered
at Richardson.
The SAIL program is
an accelerated course of
study available to accepted
students designed to pre-
pare them for high school
Advanced Placement
classes, high school and
college dual enrollment
classes and eventually a
full-time college course of
study.


111| I CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
11.. ..." .C 1 Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Sixth-grader Zachary Jolliffe, 11, helps his father Alex fill
out an application during the SAIL Program Open House.


"It is where we iden-
tify academically-talented
children, very high-ability
children, and we nurture
them intellectually, aca-
demically and socially,"
said Susan Summers,
Richardson assistant prin-
cipal.
At the open house, par-
ents and students had the
chance to meet and visit


9474
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


with SAIL teachers and
to get an overview of the
program.
Zachary Jolliffe, 11, an
RMS sixth-grader entering
his first year in SAIL, said
he feels excited about the
program.
"I'm looking forward to
being in advanced classes
because I like doing hard-
er and advanced work,"

Vly Opinion
SAct 2
Obituaries
Advice & Comic
Puzzles


he said.
"I'm proud of him
and excited that he was
accepted," said Jolliffe's
father, Alex.
SAIL affords students
the opportunity to earn
three high school credits
over three years of partici-
pating in the classes. '
Richardson Middle is
the only school in the-
district tiat offers the pre-
paratory program. This
is the school's'third year
providing the program
and the first year offering
it for each middle school
grade level.
Program enrollment
numbers 75 students
for the upcoming
school year. Students
ate accepted based on
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test Scores
and an application with
teacher recommendations
and an essay.
Summers said middle
school can often be a time
COURSE continued on 3A


4A
S C
5A
4B
2B


PATRICK SCOTT/I Special to the Lake City Reporter
Firefighters respond to a blaze that struck Cochran Forest
Products on northeast Cortez Terrace and Okinawa Street on
Tuesday. No injuries were reported.

Timber facility

catches fire after

lightning strike


Firefighters battle
blaze; no injuries
reported.
By TONY BRITr
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Lightning has been listed
as the primary cause of a
Tuesday fire that damaged
a local timber product facil-
ity.
The fire occurred at
Cochran Forest Products,
on northeast Cortez
Terrace and Okinawa


Street, just after 6 p.m.
Firefighters spent more two
hours on scene working on
the fire and extinguishing
hot spots. No injuries were
reported in the blaze.
,"'The fire was in an equip-
ment shed for the Cochran
Forest Products lum-
ber company," said Tres
Atkinson, Columbia County
Fire Chief. "It was fully
involved upon our arrival."
Columbia County Fire/
Rescue units responded to.
FIRE continued on 3A


Investigation


continues on


fatal car crash


Fort White woman
killed; two others
seriously injured.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Law enforcement' offi-
cials are continuing their
investigation into a two-
vehicle wreck that killed
a Fort White woman and
seriously injured two High
Springs women.
Nancy J. Vituli, 57, of Fort
White was killed in the mis-
hap. Her body has been sent
to the Medical Examiners
Office in Jacksonville for an
autopsy.
Barbara B. Chastain, 65,
and Joanne D. Duffy, 51,
both of High Springs, were
taken to Shands Hospital
at the University of Florida
with injuries they suffered
in the collision..
The wreck occurred
2:45 p.m. Monday on U.S.


DAILY
BRIEFING
Mele Gibson
:r -ishes [-las.erati


Highway 41 south of Gabe
Street, six miles south of
Lake City.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Vituli was traveling north
on U.S. Highway 41 in a
1997 Honda Civic.
Chastain was traveling
south on the roadway in a
2006 Ford Expedition with
Duffy as her passenger.
Reports said Vituli's vehi-
cle crossed the center line
and crashed, head-on, into
Chastain's vehicle in the
southbound lane.
After the impact Vituli's
vehicle spun counterclock-
wise and came to rest fac-
ing south in the roadway's
southbound lane, while
Chastain's vehicle spun
counterclockwise and came
to rest facing west on the
roadway's western shoul-
der.
Duffy was taken by
CRASH continued on 3A


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Get the latest
health-related ne.-.s.


~Sgd?~ne~arul~ I--ulc~lll~se7~,PIlr~sararar;u~ar~


;I~Ei~JI~P~.~L9Ualia~"siub-~5rii~Y~gy


cs


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 2-2-
7Evening: 7-5-9


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 1-2-4-1
Evening: 6-3-5-3


Monday:
1-13-17-19-22


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Mel Gibson uninjured in car crash


LOS ANGELES
M el Gibson was unin-
jured after crashing
his sports car into a
Malibu hillside, the
California Highway
Patrol said.
Gibson's 2008 Maserati careened
off southbound Malibu Canyon
Road on Sunday evening, the agen-
cy said.
Gibson's spokesman Alan Nierob
said in an e-mail the actor-director
was doing fine.
The 54-year-old Academy Award
winner was alone in the car:
Authorities do not suspect alcohol
was involved.
Gibson cooperated with the,
agency and was picked up from
the scene by a friend. The CHP did
not release any further details, and
it was unclear how much damage
Gibson's car sustained.
It's been a rough couple of
months for Gibson, who is locked
in a bitter custody dispute over
his infant daughter with Russian
singer Oksana Grigorieva. He also
remained under investigation by
the Los Angeles County Sheriff's
Department for an alleged assault
on Grigorieva earlier this year,
although he has not been arrested
and no charges have been filed.
Grigorieva, 40, is also under ,
investigation after Gibson accused
her of attempting to extort him. She
has denied the allegation.

All cool for Ice-T in NYC
unlicensed-driving case
NEW YORK Ice-T came out
on top in a brush with real-life law
and order Tuesday when prosecu-
tors dropped unlicensed driving
charges against the rapper-turned-
TV detective.
"That's what I'm talking about


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 4, file photo, Mel Gibson and Oksana, Grigorieva arrive at the 'Edge
Of Darkness' premiere in Paris. The California Highway Patrol said Gibson was
uninjured after he crashed his sports car into a Malibu hillside.


- dismissed!" he called out in a
Manhattan courtroom after a judge
did just that to the misdemeanor
case, which had prompted some
choice words about police from the
"Law & Order: Special Victims Unit"
actor.
"Like I said from the gate, I never
broke the law," Ice-T said as he left
court with his wife, Coco, a model.
Ice-T, 52, was arrested after a
traffic stop of his 2009 Cadillac
on Manhattan's West Side on July
20; he and his wife were on the
road after taking their bulldog,
Spartacus, to a vet for knee surgery.
Police said they pulled the enter-
tainer over for not wearing a seat-
belt which he contests and a
routine check showed his license
was suspended.

After overdose, Fantasia
back to promoting CD
NEW YORK A week after an
overdose, Fantasia is back to pro-


moving her new album.
In a statement released Monday,
Fantasia says she "can't thank my
fans enough for their prayers and
support during such a challenging'
time." The singer overdosed on
aspirin and other pills at her home
in Charlotte, N.C., last week.

Publicist: Zsa Zsa Gabor
in serious condition
LOS ANGELES A spokesman
for Zsa Zsa Gabor says the actress
is in serious condition at a Los
Angeles hospital and has received
the last rites.
John Blanchette on Sunday
described Gabor's health situation
following her surgery a day earlier
as "very sad."
Blanchette told the Los Angeles
Times the 93-year-old Gabor asked
for a priest and he administered the
sacrament Sunday morning.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


M Former first lady Rosalynn
Carter is 83.
* Academy Award-winning
director Roman Polanski is
77.
* Actor-director Robert
Redford is 74.
* Actor Denis Leary is 53.
* Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner is 49.
* News anchor Bob


Woodruff is 49.
* The president of Mexico,
Felipe Calderon, is 48.
* Actor Christian Slater is
41.
* Actor Edward Norton is 41.
* Actress Kaitlin Olson is 35.
* Actor-writer-director Hadjii
is 34.
* Rock musician Dirk Lance
is 34.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.. .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........7544428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6.30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.,
In all other counties wherehome delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
124 Weeks............... $48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading:.


AROUND FLORIDA .THE WEATHER


Man dies after
police chase
: JACKSONVILLE
-- Authorities have not
yet said how a Jacksonville
man died after crashing
his car during a police
chase.
Sheriff's Office Chief
John Harfley said police
tried to stop the blue
Corvette Monday night
for speeding. The car was
reported stolen.
' The driver took off,
crashing into another car.
He then ran into a wooded
area and refused com-
mands by police to come
out. A police dog was
released and bit him on
the upper thigh.
Hartley said the wound
did not appear to be life-
threatening.
The man eventually sur-
rendered. His name and
age were not immediately
released.
Police said the man
then began showing signs
of shortness of breath. A
rescue crew put him in an
ambulance. He died on the
way to the hospital.

Tailless dolphin
trains for movie
CLEARWATER The
dolphin who gained nation-
al fame because of her
prosthetic tail is in training
for her upcoming movie
role.
Winter will be playing
herself in "A Dolphin's
Tale," which begins film-
ing Sept 27.
In the meantime, she's
learning new behaviors
at the Clearwater Marine
Aquarium, which has been
set up with moving making
equipment to get Winter
accustomed before shoot-
ing begins. Trainers are
also tossing props her way
to get her used to scenes
required in the film.
The movie will star
Morgan Freeman, Harry


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stetson goes pet friendly
Emily Rosenfeld, a freshmen at Stetson University in DeLand,
spends time with her Chihuahua, Archie, in her dorm room
Tuesday. This year, Stetson has allowed students to have a
small pet in one of the dormitories, one of a small number
of colleges and universities that allow students to have pets
on campus. Rosenfeld chose Stetson over other schools
because of the pet policy.


Connick Jr. and Ashley
Judd. It'll tell the story of
an 11-year-old boy who
befriends an injured dol-
phin and helps her get an
artificial tail.

Elderly man dies
in Orlando crash
ORLANDO An
Orange County deputy
was involved in a crash
that killed one person, but
authorities have not yet
said if the deputy or the
man was at fault.
The crash happened
early Tuesday morning.
The unidentified deputy
suffered minor injuries and
taken to a hospital. The
other person, an elderly
man,, died at the hospital.
Fire ,rescue had to use
hydraulic tools to free one
person from the wreckage.

Father, stepmom
face charges
MIAMI A father and
stepmother are accused


of ignoring a young boy
until he weighed just more
than half of what the child
should weigh.
Roberto Fortin and
Yoselin Aguiree are
charged with one count of
child neglect:
Jail records show both
were being held late
Monday night in the coun-
ty jail. It was not immedi-
ately known if either has
an attorney.
The 30-year-old Fortin
told a doctor that his son
wasn't breathing properly.
The arrest report says the
doctor noticed that the boy
was severely malnourished
and weighed about 40
pounds, which was nearly
30 pounds under what
a normal child his age
should weight. The boy's
age was not released.
The Miami Herald
reported that Fortin plead-
ed no contest in 2006 in
the death of his 9-month-
old son who drowned in a
bathtub.
* Associated Press


CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS T-STORMS -STORMS


HI 94 L74 HI 94L074 HI 93 LO 7 HI 93 LO 74 HI 93LO73
R --------FOECAST---MAP or-Wed-esda, A ---.-----


P7sacda
92/79


*

. Talhasseeo
93/76 -"

9PaUi78 ity
91/78


CIty


93-74 -..
e Jacksde Cape Canaveral
Lake City 92/75 Daytona Beach
94/74 Ft.Lauderdale
Gainesville Day Beach F er
K92/74 9"j76 Gainesville
SOcala Jacksonville
2/74. Key West
OriandMo Ca Canaveral e Ct
93/76 ap 78 Lake City
93/76 Miami
9TBa \ Naples
92/79- West Panl Beach Ocala
90/78 Orlando
S FLR Laudaldal Panama City
Fl-,Myers,, 91/81 0 Pensacola
94/77 *. ples 41 Tallahassee
S Q1478 M.ma Tampa
S9V80 Valdosta
KeyWest* ", W. Palm Beach
91/82


LAKECIYALMANAC


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high .,
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


91
77
90,
71
97 in 1954
66 in 1937

0.00"
3.02"
35.19"
3.69"
33.82"


SUN
Sunrise today 6:59 a.m.
Sunset today 8:09 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 7:00 am.
Sunset tom. 8:08 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 4*04 p.m.
Moonset today 1:26 a.m.
Moonrise torn. 4:54 p.m.
Moonset tom. 2:20 a.m.


Aug. Sept. Sept. Sept.
24 1 8 15
Full Last New First


1I


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10-


Thursday
89,' 78/t
90/77/t
02/81/pc
94/78/t
92/74/t
93/75/t
90/83/t
94/74/t
93/80/pc
94/77/t
92/74/t
94/77/t
90/80/t
93/79/t
93/77/t
92/79/t
93/74/t
92/80/pc


Friday
90/76/t
91/77/t
91/80/pc
95/77/pc
93/74/pc
93/75/pc
91/81/t
93/74/pc
92/79/t
91/78/pc
92/74/pc
94/76/t
89/81/pc
93/80/pc
92/77/pc
93/79/pc
91/75/pc
91/77/t


An exclusive
service -
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weathercom


S Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics O 2010 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


Daily scripture


"But, 'Let him who boasts boast
in the Lord.' For it is not the
one who commends himself
who is approved, but the one
whom the Lord commends."
2 Corinthians 10:17-18


-


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


1111 .!^l' I I I


I SPOSOEDBY I


0'217A


0)!-


VH








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18. 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School curriculum resource teacher Cindy Clark (from left) and social studies teacher Tobyn Lee
answers questions from seventh-grader Maria D'Antoni, 12.


COURSE: School prepares students for high school


Continued From Page 1A
when accelerated students
adopt poor work habits,
leaving them unprepared
for high school through
poor grades and not


enough preparation.
SAIL is a way to dis-
courage that behavior,
Summers said.
"We are trying to catch


those kids and nurture
them along, and instead
of letting them backslide,
we challenge them,"
she said. "The goal is


we're going to nurture
those kids, hook them
and challenge them. The
.mind is a terrible thing
to waste."


FIRE: Blaze controlled within 10 to 15 minutes
Continued From Page 1A


the scene with three units
from the Suwannee Valley
and Race Track Road sta-
tions and 10 firefighting
personnel.
The Lake City Fire
Department responded
with units as part of its
automatic aid agreement


with the county fire depart-
ment.
"The fire was extin-
guished fairly easy,"'
Atkinson said. 'The best we
can determine, the primary
cause of the fire appears to
be a lightning strike. The
way the fire traveled and


from where it looks like it
started, it appears to be a
lightning strike. We had a
heavy weather storm that
came through prior to the
fire being called in."
He said firefighters spent
most of their time on the
scene working on cleanup


operations because of the
debris that was compacted
in the areas where the fire
ignited.
"The body of the fire
was out within the first 10-
15 minutes, but the mop-up
was extensive," Atkinson
said.


Farmer seeking

city council seat

with passion


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
Passion for his commu-
nity is a driving force for
Adee Farmer.
Farmer, 47, is running
for the City of Lake City
Council District 10 seat.
"I'd like to be a servant
to the
people,"
he said.
"I'd like
to be held
account-
able and
know the
people's
needs and
Farmer not my
own/'
Farmer is the father of
four sons, Rodney, Shane
Washington, Nicholas
Fulton and Adeon.
Farmer is employed
with the Columbia County
School Board and the
Columbia County Parks and
Recreation'Department. He
is also founder of the Lake
City Exposure Foundation,
Pop Warner Association
commissioner, and a
mason.
Farmer said he believes
in second chances. He was
convicted of attempted drug
trafficking in 1997 after fall-
ing into the wrong crowd
and shares his story with
youth in the community.
"It just goes to show in
life everyone is human," he
said.



4.


As a lifelong resident of
the precinct, he knows the
people in the community,
Farmer said. He said he
has been available when-
ever they needed his help.
"I believe people are able
to identify with me," he
said.
Farmer wants the people
in District 10 to have the
same things and opportuni-
ties as other areas of the
city, he said.
"I've been in meetings
where no one spoke up for
our precinct," he said.
Infrastructure, such as
streets and drainage, are
the biggest issues in the
district.
"Not one street has been
paved in 12 years," he said.
One of his first priorities
in office would be to form
a committee with people
in the precinct to identify
their major needs for infra-
structure, Farmer said.
He also wants the city to
become more aggressive in
bringing jobs to the area,
he said. The inlet port will
be great for all of Columbia
County, he said,
If elected, Farmer said ,
he will not just be a council-
man for District 10 but the
city as a whole.
"I am human enough
to share my setbacks and
shattered dreams while
showing my tenacity and
sprit that allows someone
to succeed despite adver-
sity," he said.


FURLOUGH: County employees upset over decision
Continued From Page 1A' ,


Weaver als6 suggested
commissioners participate
in the furlough days, but
county commissioners sal-
aries are set by the state
and the move, if all com-
missioners agreed, would
only generate $1,677.
Dupree said the fur-
lough days are a nonrecur-
ring solution to a recurring
problem.
He said laying-off people
is inevitable and it will hap-


pen nextyeat-r- I" - "-"-1 -As-a -result'-efthe pr-''
In opening the meeting, jected budget $2.1 million
county commission chair- shortfall, county; officials
man Ron Williams said his initiated a 20-pronged
concern is to save as many plan, eliminated six posi-
jobs as possible and noted tions' and requested that
the furlough days would non-fee-based constitu-
save an estimated $71,598 tional officers reduce their


per day.
Some county employees
are upset, Williams said.
"But furlough days are bet-
ter than having no job," he
added.


budgets by 1 percent ,
The sheriff's office was
asked to reduce its budget
by $598,000.
Columbia County Sheriff.
Mark Hunter addressed


CRASH: Charges possible


Continued From Page 1A
helicopter to Shands
Hospital at the University
of Florida. She was listed
in critical condition.
Chastain was also list-
ed in serious condition.
Vituli was pronounced
dead at the scene of


the crash by Columbia
County Fire/Rescue per-
sonnel.
Charges in connec-
tion with the wreck are
pending completion of
the FHP investigation,
reports said.


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the commission to work
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Wednesday, August


18,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
0


THEIR
INION


Florida's

political

neophytes

T hey complain about
the attack ads
against them, but
the two multimil-
.lionaires running for
top offices in Florida only have
themselves to blame. Slick TV
ads by Republican gubernatori-
al candidate Rick Scott and U.S.
Senate Democratic candidate
Jeff Greene have pummeled
their primary opponents as
"career politicians" and pointed
to deals and votes they made
during public careers. That's
normal in a campaign.
So, too, should Scott and
Greene expect voters to 'ask
them about their past and
present business deals and
lifestyles even as they claim
they are free of "special inter-
ests" because they are financ-
ing their own campaigns.
Their slick messages prom-
ising to bring common sense
to Florida politics as astute
businessmen surely attract
voters frustrated by partisan
wrangling in Tallahassee and
Washington. But what do
Floridians really know about
these two men?
Not much if all voters see are
their glitzy ads.
After spending millions of
dollars on the campaign Scott, a
Texan until recently, 'stillhasn't
explained his role in the largest
Medicare fraud case in U.S. his-
tory as head of the mammoth
Columbia/HCA hospital chain
in the 1990s.
Greene, a billionaire thanks
to his betting-against the ..
housing bubble, has been
more available to the press
'and answered some tough
questions, but he, too, seems
surprised that his Democratic
opponent, Rep. Kendrick Meek,
'is attacking how Greene made
:his money. Greene, a California
:Republican until recently, scoffs
"at having to answer questions
about yacht trips to Cuba or
-recent business deals or who
.he counts as his friends. Yet
'those issues speak to his judg-
ment.
Voters should not let politi-
cal neophytes with fat wallets
get a free pass on their past
decisions simply because they
.made money in the private
sector.'

* Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
.get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom -Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Suicide watch: Do no harm


Here at the Reporter
we get all types of
phone calls.
I've had people
call and ask me if I
noticed the stars were spinning
counterclockwise this evening.
I've had the tip that Kurt Russell
was having a hot dog, with mus-
tard, at Phish Heads. I've been
offered, via the phone, the unso-
licited suggestion that David
Carradine never really attended
a Shaolin Monastery, but did go
to Fort White Elementary for a
short time.
Not so nice, I've had people
tell me I was not welcome in
certain sections .of town, or-that.r
I was in the pocket of some
good ol' boy and withholding
information.
But Monday's phone call was
really disturbing.
A gentleman calls my direct
line and asks what is the paper's
position on reporting suicide or
suicide attempts.
Suicide coverage is a subject ,
that every newspaper editor
has to deal with at some point.
The crime by its very circum-
stance is atypical from every
other crime we cover, and is one
instance where an editor must.
first consider the Latin phrase
that guides his job: "Primum
non nocere."
"First, do no harm."
For a journalist, the decision
to report on a suicide is ethi-
cal, and not legal, and must be
weighed against the newswor-
thiness of the incident. If the


LETTERS TO

Vote against every
incumbent politician
To the Editor:
Wake up America, the foxes
are in the hen house and most
of the chickens are dead!
The quality of government in
our country has dropped to
its lowest level in our entire
history. The Democrats and
the Republicans have used
their positions to reduce the
American political system to
the same level of corruption as
most of the other nations of the
world.
A few years ago, the
Republicans held all of the
power in Washington, DC.
However, because of party cor-
ruption, abuse of power, and
Republicans' self-serving desire
to meet their own selfish agen-
da; the party was stripped of all
power. Now we are under the
wrath of the Democrats, which
is proving to be even more dam-
aging to our country.
President Obama has
destroyed the economic and
financial strength of our nation.
He apparently views the presi-
dency as the world's largest
social club, dedicating his time
to vacations, social affairs and
beer parties.
Obama appears to think that
bailouts and money giveaway


Tom Mayer
tmayer@lJkecityreporter.com


report serves the public's need
to know and this typically is.
the case only when the crime
involves other crimes then
we consider publication. If the
report would serve nothing but
sensationalism and gossip, it
doesn't go to press.
For the record, I've reported
on very few suicides, and then
only after much research and
hand-wringing. If you've ever
had to -speak with the family of a
suicide victim, you'll know what
I mean.
That is what I told the gentle-
man on the phone.,.
'Then why did you report on
my suicide attempt," he asked.
I was stunned. To the best
of my knowledge, we had
reported on no low-profile sui-
cide attempts. My immediate
concern was that somehow or
other his story had made it into
the police blotter. '
I asked him the date of the
paper, so I could verify the
publication and try to make
amends. He assured me that
his friends were looking up
the paper and he would call


T'HE EDITOR R


programs are somehow sup-
posed to 'benefit our country. It
does not matter that the United
States will be in debt for the
remainder of our history. Much
of our debt is to countries that
hate us. Oh yes, tell me that is a
good thing.
Who would ever think that
our president would be suing
one of our states, Arizona, for
trying to defend itself from for-
eign invaders? The people who
live near the Mexican border
are in constant fear for their
lives and. their property.
The-Constitution mandates
that our federal government
protect every state in our great
country. Yet Obama sides with
Mexico. How ludicrous.
We can no longer trust or
depend on our state and federal
governments to save us from
political decay; we must do it
ourselves.
* The career politicians are
strictly out for themselves. Go
to the voting polls this year and
vote against every incumbent
on the ballot. If it requires you
to vote for a member of another
political party, so be it The
career politicians, Democrats
and Republicans, only care
about "what's in it for me." They
have got to go!
Norman McElroy
Wellborn


me back.
About 90 minutes later, he
did.
And he apologized. Yes,
he had attempted suicide a
few days ago, and his friends
thought that it would be a
good joke to tell him the paper
had covered it in detail. They
thought it would cheer him up.
Some friends.
The subject of suicide is
never funny. I get reports daily
about horrific crimes going
on throughoutthe nation, the .
world and too often in Columbia
County and for someone to take
lightly the subject of taking a
life repulses me..
I suggested he get some new
friends.
But the incident did give me
the opportunity to perform an
internal "gut check" about how
we report on certain subjects
in the newspaper, and about
the level of detail that goes into
verifying a story before it makes.
it to press.
Often we are provided infor-
mation from sources on stories
such as suicides that we cannot
verify to our satisfaction. When
that happens, no matter how
much we want to run the story,
it gets spiked.
The fact that the subject of
my Monday telephone conversa-
tion never made it to press was
the right call.
Primum non nocere.

Tom Mayer is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


Obama's opponents
act like terrorists
To the Editor:
Lake City Reporter's front
page story, "Billboard puts
big question mark on Obama
citizenship" (Aug. 7) shows
the misguided intentions and
the extent to which cynics and
racists will go in an attempt to.
denigrate President Barack H.
Obama.
Homegrown terrorists, the
likes of Glenn Beck, Rush
'Limbaugh and others, would
rather destroy America than
to see Obama and the United
States succeed. They and other
bigots are concerned (after the
fact) over an Obama birth cer-
tificate, which is or should be
a non-issue. They are no better
than terrorists their vitriolic
tirades give solace to other ter-
rorists.
Sen. John McCain probed
rumors questioning Obama's
birth certificate during the
presidential campaign and
dismissed them. Others tracked
down Obama's original birth
certificate, posted many photos
of it, viewed it, examined it and
concluded it to be authentic.
Some people can't accept an
African-American as president
and some never will!
Glynnell Presley ,
Secretary, Columbia County
NAACP


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmoaredu


Electric

car faces

US issues


ever embrace
automobiles
that run on
electricity
rather than gasoline?
The Chevrolet Volt, an all-
electric car supplemented by
a range-extending gasoline
engine, is on the market, but
its $41,000 price tag puts it
well beyond the means of
most Americans. In fact, Jonah
Goldberg, of the American
Enterprise Institute, contends
in a recent column that the
target market for the Volt is
trendy, young professionals
who have given'in to a guilty
conscience over the harm that
the internal combustion engine
has done to the environment.
Or who at least want to
appear as if they care about
pollution and global warming.
The Volt, Goldberg says, is
an expensive gadget that will
help "affluent hipsters ... preen
the plumage of their political
sanctimony."
His smug condescension
toward people who want to
do the right thing diverts
attention from the haunting
backdrop of life in the modern
world: The great majority of
scientists continue to agree
that the global climate is
warming and that the internal
combustion engine plays a
significant and growing role
in the creation of gases that
unbalance the natural atmo-
sphere.
No single weather event can
prove or disprove global warm-
ing but more than one scientist
has pointed out that the cur-
rent headlines are entirely con-
sistent with a quickly warming
world: torrential rains in China
and Pakistan, drought and
wildfires in Russia, unusual
congregations of jellyfish along
beaches in Australia and Japan
and in the Mediterranean,
rising ocean levels and, par-
ticularly disconcerting, the col-
lapse of a huge ice island, four
times the size of Manhattan,
into the sea below a Greenland
glacier. Of course, there's
much, much more.
Generally, our response to
these ominous portents has
been denial.
Furthermore, Goldberg and
others have argued that elec-
tric cars may do more harm
than good.
A great deal of our electrical
energy comes from carbon-
intensive sources, especially
coal and natural gas. He refers
to unnamed studies that con-
firm that China would produce
many more greenhouse emis-
sions if it switched entirely to
electric cars.
Unfortunately, the market is
never going to be able to save
us from global warming. The
market depends on balancing
what we desire with its avail-
ability, and it doesn't have
much capacity for dealing with
long-term consequences.
It will take ideology with-
out its negative connotations
to confront the realities of
global warming. In our pursuit
of a system of principles that
will enable us to deal with a
very serious dilemma, we will
have to favor rational thought,
discussion, and ideas over the
way we wish things were.
And that is why we probably
shouldn't expect to see a flood
of electric cars on our high-
ways anytime soon.

John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


4A


I II












Woman arrested after wreck I


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
An Old Town woman was
arrested and faces numer-
ous charges after she alleg-
edly forced several cars off
local roads and crashed
into a parked truck at a
local convenience store.
Carol J. Gordon, 52, 131
NE 842nd St, Old Town,
was charged with driving
under the influence (alco-
hol or drugs), and two
counts of drug possession
in connection with the inci-
dent.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
around 2:10 p.m. Saturday,
a trooper was dispatched to
the S&S convenience store
at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 441 and County


Road 240.
When he arrived, the
trooper saw a Columbia
County Sheriff's Office dep-
uty questioning Gordon.
Two witnesses approached
the trooper and reportedly
told him Gordon was driv-
ing all over the road, .was
able to keep her lane, nearly
struck a guard rail and ran
several cars off the road, so
they called authorities. The
witnesses said they contin-
ued to follow Gordon and
watched as she crashed her
vehicle into a pickup truck
that was parked at the S&S
store.
Trooper C. Bailey report-
ed that the woman was
unsteady on her feet and
was unable to stand with-
out leaning on her car.
"There was no odor of a


alcoholic beverage, but the
subject was very slow to
respond to questions and
lethargic," he wrote. "The
subject actec confused as
to what she was doing and
where she was."
Gordon reportedly pulled
two prescription bottles
with pills froin her purse
when the trooper request-
ed her driver's license.
Bailey reported find-
ing Ibuprofen in one of
the bottles, as well as four
Oxycodone pills and the
second bottle contained
34 yellow Xanax pills and
seven blue Xanax pills.
After field sobriety tests,
Gordon was arrested and
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $2,500 bond.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 14 file photo, survey technician Jim Burkitt adjusts bottles used to capture sub-
surface water samples on a Conductivity-Temperature-Depth carousel onboard the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel Henry B. Bigelow near the coast of
Louisiana. Scientists are giving different estimates on how much oil remains in the ocean and
the long. terms effects on the environment.

Gulf questions muddy the water


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON -
Researchers are warning
that the Gulf of Mexico oil
spill is a bigger mess than
the government claims and
that a lot of crude is lurk-
ing deep below the sur-
face, some of it settling
perhaps in a critical under-
sea canyon off the Florida
Panhandle.
The evidence of micro-
scopic amounts of oil mixing
into the soil of the canyon
was gathered by scientists
at the University of South
Florida, who also found poi-
soned plant plankton the
vital base of the ocean food


web which they blamed
on a toxic brew of oil and
dispersants.
Their work is prelimi-
nary, hasn't been reviewed
by other scientists, requires
more tests to confirm it is
BP's oil they found, and is
based on a 10-day research
cruise that ended late
Monday night. Scientists
who were not involved said
they were uncomfortable
drawing conclusions based
on such a brief look.
But those early findings
follow a report on Monday
from Georgia researchers.
that said as much as 80
percent of the oil from the
spill remains in the Gulf.
Both groups' findings have


already been incorporated
into lawsuits filed against
BP.
At the White House
on Aug. 4, National
SOceanic and Atmospheric
Administration chief Jane
Lubchenco said! "At least 50
percent of the oil that was
released is now complete-
ly gone from the system,
and most of the remainder
is degrading rapidly or is
being removed from the
beaches."
That's not what the sci-
entists from South Florida
and Georgia found.
"The oil is not gone,
that's for sure," University
of South Florida's David
Hollander said Tuesday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Retailer saluted for service to local veterans
Commandant Ted Whitcomb (left) of the Sgt. Maj. Thomas H. Griggs Jr. Detachment of the
Marine Corps League, presents Allan Crews, the store coordinator of the Lake City Walmart,
a League Certificate of Appreciation for his ongoing support of the local veterans and the
Lake City VA Medical Center.



City, police union contract near


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
One more meeting may
be all that is needed to
finalize police union nego-
tiations.
Representatives from the
City of Lake City officials,
Florida Police Benevolent
Association, Inc., and the
Lake City Law Enforcement
Bargaining Unit met to
discuss a union contract
Tuesday at City Hall.
The group first met ear-
lier, in July, regarding the
proposed contract Several
articles in the contract were
tentatively approved.


Modified areas from the
first meeting came back
before the group..
One article dealt with
grievance procedures and
wording was inserted for
it to mirror actions set in
place by the city's employ-
ee policies.
The contract allows
members of a union to have
a say in wages, benefits
and employment, said Jim
Wiggins; FPBA director
of organizational services.
Without a union contract,
the city could do as it pleas-
es with the department.
"We appreciate the city's


professionalism during this
process," he said.
The next meeting will
reach resolutions for any
lingering areas of the con-
tract.
The city's labor attorney
will attend the next sched-
uled union meeting and
will review the contract for
legal sufficiency, said City
Manager Wendell Johnson.
It will be presented to the
city council for approval.
'We're making progress,"
he said. "We're headed to a
mutually beneficial agree-
ment."


ENDS


August 20 J m
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS)


ADD/DROP YOU MAY ACC
August 23-27 INFORMATION
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS) WWWJ.f
ALL FEES ARE DUE EACH DAY

Registrar's Office Hours:
8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday F L O
8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday F

Now-August 13 GA
7:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday ~ cc- C(

FOR INFORMATION CALL:


Registrar: (386) 754-4205


:ESS SCHEDULE
N ONLINE AT:
gc.edu



URIDA
LTEWAY
)LLEGE
A A *


* Admissions: (386) 754-4396


Florida Gateway College does not discriminate in education or employment related decisions on the basis of race, color, religion,
national origin, gender, age, disability, marital status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status in accordance with
the law. The Equity Officer is Sharon Best, director of human resources, and may be reached at
(386) 754-4313, Building 001, Room 136,149 SE College Place, Lake City, FL 32025.


IColumbia Countfy's Most Wanted
Nickel Anthony Donald Marvin
Johnson Watts
AKA: Michael A. Johnson DOB: 6/30/81
A OB: 8/12/75 Height: 5' 10 -Weight:155bs.
Height: 6' 01" Weight: 266 lbs. Hair: Blonde Eyes: Green
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown Tatoo: Chest-"Mom & Dad";
Tattoo: Left Forearm Right Arm-Skull
Wanted for Tampering With Wanted For: VOP 2 Counts Driving
Evidence, Possession of 20 Grams While License Suspended or
of Cannabis or Less, Possession of Revoked (Felony), Attached Tag
Drug Paraphernalia Not Assigned
WANTED AS OF 8/16110
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
COLUMBIe COUTwww.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010


Report: Man tries to hire

hitman to murder family I .-


From staff reports
The Perry Police
Department and the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement on Sunday
arrested Robert Wayne
Cornwell, 32, of Perry,
and charged him with
four counts of solicitation
to commit murder, a first
degree felony, according to
a report released Tuesday.
On Aug. 11, the Perry
Police Department
received information that
Cornwell was attempting
to hire someone to kill his
ex-wife. The Perry Police
Department requested
the assistance of FDLE's
Tallahassee Regional
Operations Center in the
investigation. Four days
later, Cornwell met with
an individual he believed
was a hit man but who was
actually an undercover law
enforcement officer.
Cornwell asked the
undercover officer to
rob and kill his ex-wife,
her child, her fiance and


the fiance's child at her
residence in Perry and
suggested that all four be
tortured first.
Cornwell provided spe-
cific instructions on where
cash
and jew-
elry were ..
located
and
advised
that he
wanted
the mur- Cornwell
der to
take place
that night. The undercover
officer was told he would
get half of the cash and
possessions taken as pay-
ment for doing the job.
'"The final outcome of
this investigation is a great
example of a superb level
of cooperation between
law enforcement agencies.
This investigation led to
the arrest of a potentially
violent offender that was
actively seeking someone
to commit murder for
him," said Perry Police


Department Captain
James Cruse. "By making
this arrest, these agen-
cies protected the lives of
four innocent citizens of
the State of Florida. The
ultimate goal of everyone
in law enforcement is to
make a positive impact into
the lives of the citizens we
serve; in this case, that
goal has been obtained
and the innocent have
been protected."
"There is no doubt that.
the quick action by law
enforcement put a halt on
what could have been a
horrific quadruple homi-
cide," said FDLE Special
Agent in Charge Don
Ladner. "We're pleased
that this ended safely for
this family and with the
individual who tried to
harm them behind bars."
Cornwell was appre-
hended without incident
and booked into the Taylor
County Jail where he is.
being held without bond.
He faces up to 30 years in
prison.


COURTESY PHOTO

Here we come: School days on the way
Kindergartners Cameron (left) and Alexia Saunders, who will begin school this year on Aug.
23, are excited and equipped with a tote bag filled with an activity book, pencils and crayons.
Each kindergartner entering public.school this year will receive a bag and tools provided by
community businesses and clubs.


DALE CARNEGIE'
TRAINING


Even in our wired world,

this is still the

success network

Learn to network successfully at the Dale Carnegie Course. We'll
show you how to win friends, influence people, speak persuasively and
lead with confidence. And, we'll teach you all this the only way that
worksby having you interact live with other real people.


If you are serious about success in a world still run by humans,
you can find out more by contacting the
Lake City-Columbia Chamber of Commerce at 752-3690.

Program starts: August 31, 2010
To reserve your space contact the Chamber or 229-506-1387.
You can visit us at www.jacksonville.dalecarengie.com .


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.
Friday, Aug. 13
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Rohan A. Gray, no age
given, unknown address,.
fleeing and eluding, driv-
ing while license suspend-
ed/revoked and warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of driving
while license suspended/
revoked.
Dominique S. Wilson,
21, 170 SW Winter Way,
warrant: Violation of pro-.


Florida

ballot fills

with tea

partiers
By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Patricia Sullivan, a local tea
party movement leader in
central Florida, thinks it's
time for people to take the
running of government
away from professional poli-
ticians and power brokers.
That's what motivated
the Eustis homemaker
and mother of four home-
schooled children to run for
Congress.
"Who best to put govern-
ment back in the hands of
the people than one of the
people?" Sullivan asked in a
telephone interview.
She's one of at least a half
dozen members of the con-
servative tea party move-
mentrunningfor U.S. House
seats in Florida's Aug. 24
primary one Democrat
and the rest Republicans.
They are among 40
Republicans seeking nomi-
. nations in 12 districts and
29 Democrats in 11 dis-
tricts. Two Republican and
five Democratic incumbents
have drawn intraparty oppo-
sition, but all are favored to
be nominated again.
Political analysts also
give tea party activists little
chance of defeating oppo-
nents who usually are bet-
ter known, better organized
and better funded.
Theirchances, said retired
University of South Florida
political scientist Darryl
Paulson, are "similar to
most third party candidates,
and that's slim to none."
Paulson, a Republican, said
they have influenced the
GOP's agenda, though, to
some degree.


bation on original charge
of third-degree grand theft.
Saturday, Aug. 14
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jonathan A. Antosiak,
26, 902 Golden Beach
Blvd., Indian Harbor, war-
rant Violation of probation
on original charges.of
possession of a controlled
substance.
Marcus T. Grant,
33, 4005 Angol Place,
Jacksonville, warrant:
Grand theft.
Florida Highway
Patrol
Rodolfo Martinez
Lopez, 24, Post Office
Box 574 Jennings, driving
'under the influence of alco-


hol or drugs and operating
a motor vehicle without
valid license.
Sunday, Aug. 15
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Thomas Leon
Fletcher, 45, 25070 49th
Road, O'Brien, warrant
Third-degree grand theft '
(uttering a forgery).

Monday, Aug. 16
Lake City
Police Department
Sheila Diane Miller,
no age given, 401 SE Allen
Place, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of felony petit theft.
* From staff reports


Bands: Mayhem
Copy rite
David Herringer
Ladybug Landslide
Have you Seen My Ghost

Call Josh for more information 386-755-4004

281N.9 aron t. Lae ity B
^^~* Sml^ J^


Community Concerts Of Lake City presents its
2010-11 SERIES OF LIVE PERFORMANCES
AT LEVY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE


SBIG ORANGE CHORUS &THE HUMDINGERS
Florida's champion barbershop chorus teams up with a
fabulous barbershop quartet for a rousing concert.


LEGACY OF FLOYD CRAMER Yourig pianist Jason Coleman brings new
life to his Grandaddy's beloved music. Learn about his unique "slip-note"
style. Enjoy a video backdrop with nostalgic memories of his grandfather.


GREG GIANNASCOLI Award winning Juiliiard faculty member and world-
class marimbist & percussionist performs Gershwin, Pagannini, Liszt, and his
riotous version of "Flight of the Bumblebee."


THE NUTCRACKER BALLET This colorful Christmas classic favorite
returns with professional dancers from Dance Alive National Ballet plus over
fifty local dancers and tumblers. Two shows. Guaranteed seating for members.


THE DIAMONDS The real Diamonds revisit their dassical pop music / Doo-
Wop heritage from the 50's 80's, singing their biggest hits, like "Little Darlin,"'
"Why Do Fools Fall in Love," and "The Stroll"


JOHN DAVIDSON The real John Davidson star of TV, theater, film, and
Broadway entertains with vocals, humorous stories, & banjo. His credits
include 13 albums and appearances at major Las Vegas showrooms.


7:30 pm Saturday
Sep 11 2010


7:30 pm Tuesday
Oct 122010


7:30 pm Monday
Nov 1, 2010


2:30 & 7:30 pm
Sat Dec 11, '10


2:30 pm Sat
Jan 22, 2011


2:30 pm Sunday
Feb 13, 2011


Memberships same low price: $50/Adult, or -
)>Members get free admission to all Live! At Dowling Park Artist Series events.
THREE EASY WAYS TO JOIN (by Aug 28 to have name in program):
1. Pay by credit card at www.communityconcerts.info, OR
2. Pay by cash or check at the ticket table in the PAC lobby just before the first concert, OR
3. Join at Lake City Chamber of Commerce, 162 S Marion Ave.
Any questions? Visit www.communityconcerts.info or call (386)466-8999


ARREST LOGS


r7i


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010 7A


Important:
Always follow
Guidelines On
ATVs For Age
Requirements


a1 =" -


3322 WUSHwvy90

386-755-2502


288-3484


URS Corporation
Engineers, Architects, Planners'
1009 SW Main Blvd,
Suite 135
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone.754-9053
Bill Prange, PE
billprange@urscorp.comrn


QuickThinkingInAn
Emergency Can Make
A Difference Keep
Irmportant Phone
Numbers Handy.

Learn to Draw Blood
Local Phlebotomy
Course offered in Lake City.
Certificate program.
A(904) 566-1328


386-755-5941
"Quality 1A, Price 2w'"


.Martin
ORTHODONTICS
701 SW SR 47, Lake City

755-1001


,Secure your
future Stay
in school.


For Life Insurance
Go With
Someone You Know




John Bums, III Mary H. Summerall
Agent Financial Services Rep.
S234 SW Main Blvd
wb 752-5866


SYou Should
Know Your
Name,Address
& Phone Number
A0EYE CENTER Em
Gneral Ee CTare & Sorgefy
Eye Exams
Cataract Surgery
Gauco Treaent
DiabeticExanst



386-75S-7595
Toll Free 866-755.0040
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hu i -p .6* Uwes s ur imwsun o


24 Hour
Emergency Service.
(386) 590-7798
963-3360

[ t.,Nevep Go-
Anywhere With
A Stranger



Northside

Motors, Inc.
"In God We Trust"

1974 E. Duval St.
Lake City

Mon-Fri. 9am-5pm
Closed Wednesday


Together
everyone
achieves
more...
remember
the buddy
system





TAX PLUS SOLUTIONS
755-0877
Fax: 755-7331
4158 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055


"A church on the move"
Pastor Lonnie Johns

217 SW Dyal Ave.,
Lake City
755-2525
christcentral.org


458 S. MARiON AVE.
386-961 -9500


Go Over
Important Phone
Numbers And
Safety Instructions
With Your Sitter.



GAINEY
AUTOMOTIVE

& TOWING
3468 SWCR13,
FORTWH-454-3580
306-454-3580


insurance Agency
Full Service Agency Including:
Auto, Home, ULive Boat, Motorcycle,
Health, Annuities & Commercial
Insurance
"Specializing I Friendly
Service"
4447 NW American Lane
752-6058


10042 S. US Hwy 441

386-755-0993


Ballet Pointe Tap Jazz
*Hip op Cogging
( ges 3+)
Home of "'Praise in Motion'
1197 SW Qrandview St.
386-755-8869
Laurie Reafdout Owner/Instructor


Vacant Lots
And Buildings
Should Be
Avoided.

MVP Auto Dealer, Inc
"Quality Cars You Can.Count On"
WE ARE DIFFERENT!
WE WILL FINANCE, BUT WE
DON'T CHARGE INTEREST!
WE DON'T HAVE A DEALER FEE!
ANGEL & ANA ULLOA
Office,(386) 961-9961
Cell (386) 965-6552
Fax (386) 269-0776
mvpautodealer@hotmail. com
1839 WUS HWY 90
Lake City, FL 32055
We also sell affordable
good used tires!!
Se Habla Espanol


Wear Proper
Protective
Equipment
While Playing
MASIR COmmii.<(BT
35 YU ExrpEmkntc

Wezzle' s
Haircuts





386-365-7117
Fij r l -
Vou Ceow i t, wt c(u to!
AF9OlMNIms & WALe-INS WtLCOe!M


----I rL








8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010


Making This Right

Beaches

Claims

Cleanup
Economic Investment

Environmental Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


/ grew up on the Gulf Coast. I know these waters. And I'm
doing everything I can to clean them up.
Fred Lemond, BP Cleanup Operations

BP has taken full'responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And that
includes keeping you informed.

Searching For And Cleaning Up The Oil
You may have heard that oil is no longer flowing into the Gulf. But
every morning our spotter planes and helicopters continue to
search for oil off the coast, heading to areas previously mapped
with satellite imagery and infrared photography. If oil is found, they
radio down to the ships and boats of all sizes that are supporting
the cleanup effort and working to collect the oil. These are local
shrimping and fishing boats organized into task forces and strike
teams, plus specialized skimmers mobilized from around the world.

We have recovered more than 35 million gallons of oil-water
mixture from the Gulf. Other methods have also helpedd remove
millions of additional gallons of oil from the water. We've deployed
millions of feet of boom to protect beaches and sensitive
wildlife areas.

Hurricane Preparedness
In the event of a hurricane, our first priority is keeping people safe.
In coordination with the Coast Guard and local officials, we may
suspend operations temporarily but have organized to resume
them as soon as possible.

Our Responsibility
We have already spent more than $3.9 billion responding to the
spill and on the cleanup, and none of this will be paid by taxpayers.
We will work in the Gulf as long as it takes to get this done. We
may not always be perfect but we will do everything we can to
make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com


I.,;


'V.


2010 BP, E&P








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@jakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, August 18, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS CROSS COUNTRY
Team meeting at
track Thursday
Columbia High cross
country has an
organizational meeting
at 5:15 p.m. Thursday at
Columbia High Stadium.
For details, call Donnie
Harrison at 755-8080.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Fundraiser today
at Phish Heads
The Fort White
Quarterback Club is
hosting its annual
fundraiser from 6-9 p.m.
today at Phish Heads
restaurant on Main
Boulevard in Lake City.
Senior football players
and coaches will be
waiting and bussing
tables for tips.
For details, call
Shayne Morgan at
(386) 3974954:
FALCONS VOLLEYBALL
Conditioning,
tryouts today
Lake City Middle
School volleyball
conditioning and
tryouts begin from
4-5:30 p.m. today at the
LCMS gym. Interested
students must have an
updated physical and
completed drug consent
and parent permission
forms.
For details, call coach.
Machon Kvistad at
623-6833.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White fall
sign-up today
Fort White Babe Ruth
Softball has registration
for the fall season from
5-7 p.m. today and
Aug. 25, and 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday and
Aug. 28. Registration is
at the South Columbia
Sports Complex. Cost is
$40 per child.
For details, call Lynn
Harvey at 365-5688.
CHS FOOTBALL
Season tickets
at McDuffie's
Season tickets, parking
passes and gifts ate
available at McDuffie
Marine & Sporting
Goods. The season ticket
package is $40 for five
games. General
admission is $7.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.
CHS BASEBALL
Dugout Club
meeting Aug. 26
The first meeting of
the season for.the CHS
Dugout Club is 6 p.m.
Aug. 26 in the Career
Center at the school.
All parents of interested
players are requested to
attend.
For details, call Tyson
Johnson at 755-7275.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Little League
sign-up Saturday
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
has youth football
registration from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Saturday and
Aug. 28 at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Ages
are 8-13. Cost is. $40.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.


* From staff reports


Thompson dies


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Oct. 3, 1991, file photo shows former Brooklyn Dodgers baseball player Ralph Branca
(right) pretending to choke former New York Giants player Bobby Thomson on the 40th
anniversary of Thomson's Oct. 3, 1951, ninth-inning homer off Branco to win the National
League pennant, in New York. Famed home run hitter Bobby Thomson died Monday night.
He'was 86. '


Waiting


Former player
hit shot heard
around the world.
BEN WALKER
Associated Press
NEW YORK Bobby
Thomson, whose "Shot
Heard 'Round the World"
in 1951 has echoed through
baseball history as perhaps
the game's most famous
home run, has died. He
was 86.
Thomson had been in
failing health for several
years. He died at home in
Savannah, Ga., on Monday
night, the Fox & Weeks
funeral home said Tuesday.
On that October after-
noon, with one swing,


game


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Darius Williams (right) makes a catch as Anjre Caldwell (left) and Ronald Timmons trail on the play during
a practice sessiori on Thursday in Lake City.


Tigers first game next Friday


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It's one of the longest weeks of the
season for football players. The week
before the first game has arrived at
Columbia High, and the Tigers are
playing the waiting game.
'"These are the dog days of foot-
ball," Columbia coach Craig Howard
said. 'This is our last week without
games."
Columbia opens up the season


in the kickoff classic at Fort White
High on Aug. 27.
The Tigers are still in the middle
of ironing out the wrinkles, and will
begin fine-tuning for the Indians on
Monday.
'.We're still installing the offense
and defense, getting the players accli-
mated," Howard said. '"We're work-
ing on the fundamentals of blocking,
tackling and running routes. We've
got to get the timing down. We can't
sprinkle on magic dust and be ready.


It takes time doing the same thing
over and over."
Columbia will practice from
5-8 p.m. this week before switching
back to the normal hours of 4-6 p.m.
next week.
The Tigers will scrimmage at
7:30 p.m. on Saturday. Sunday begins
coaches preparation.
"We'll start Sunday on the kickoff
classic," Howard said. "It's not really
a game, but it is a game. It helps you
get ready for the seasonal stuff."


Thomson transformed a
pennant race for one sea-
son, and his life forever. He
connected off Ralph Branca
for a three-run homer in the
bottom of the ninth inning
in the decisive Game 3 of
a National League playoff,
lifting the New York Giants
over their dreaded rivals,
the Brooklyn Dodgers.
The drive into the left-
field stands at the Polo
Grounds, and broadcaster
Russ Hodges' ecstatic call
of "The Giants win the pen-
nant!" remain one of the
signature moments in major
league history.
"I never thought it
was going to be that big.
Hell, no," Branca told The
THOMSPON continued on 2B


Favre

back in

Purple?

Quarterback
arrives on plane
in Minnesota.
Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE Brett
Favre is back in Minnesota,
stirring hope amongVikings
fans that he may be ready to
play this season.
A private jet trimmed in
the Vikings' purple and gold
carrying th,&-'40-year-old
quarterback landed at an
airport outside Minneapolis
on Tuesday afternoon.
Favre was then Whisked
to Viking, headquarters,
and disappeared into the
building.
Favre's website posted
a message earlier saying
"stay tuned for breaking
news from the Minnesota
Vikings today on Brett
Favre's possible return."
There's still no official word
from the team.
Favre will turn 41 in
October and has flirted
with retirement for years
while playing for the Green
Bay Packers, the New York
Jets and now the Vikings.
He threw 33 touchdowns
and seven intercep-
tions last season to help
Minnesota reach the NFC
tile game.
The three-time MVP
has been thinking about
retirement again this year
after injuring his ankle in
the NFC championship loss
to New Orleans in January.
He had surgery on his left
ankle in June.


Nuggets mull what

to do about 'Melo


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This April 28 file photo shows Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony warming up
before facing the Utah Jazz in the first quarter of Game 6 of the teams' first-round Western
Conference playoff series in Denver.


Anthony seems
destined to pull a
Lebron, bolt city.
By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press
DENVER Just how
much longer will Carmelo
Anthony play for the Denver
Nuggets?
He can opt out of his
contract after the upcom-
ing season and become
the headliner of the 2011
free agent class or he could
play out the final two years
of his contract and put off
the wine-and-dine tour for
a year.
He could sign a three-
year, $65 million extension
that's been on the table all
summer and would keep


him in Denver through
2015.
Or maybe he's already
played his last game for
the Nuggets, who don't
want to be spurned like the
Cleveland Cavaliers were
when LeBron James went
on national TV to divorce
them for a fresh start in
Miami.
The All-Star forward who
won a national tile as a
freshman at Syracuse and
a gold medal at the Beijing
Olympics but has been
able to guide Denver out of
the first round of the play-
offs just once in his seven
NBA seasons could
be dealt before the sea-
son starts if team owner
Stan Kroenke decides to
ANTHONY continued on 2B


_ i ~










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
4:30 p.m.
SPEED -14NASCARTruck Series, pole
qualifying for O'Reilly 200, at Bristol,
Tenn.
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCARWhelen Modified
Series, UNOH Perfect Storm 150, at
Bristol,Tenn.
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
O'Reilly 200, at Bristol,Tenn.
BOXING
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Junior middleweights,
Erislandy Lara (12-0-0) vs. Willie Lee
(17-6-0), at Monroe, La.
LITTLE LEAGUE SOFTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series, championship
game, at Portland, Ore.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN San Francisco at Philadelphia
10 p.m.
ESPN Colorado at LA. Dodgers

BASEBALL

AL standings


Ne
Tai
Bo
To
Bal

Min
Ch
De
Cli
Ka

Te:
Lo
Oa
Se;


East Division
W L Pct
ewYork 72 46 .610
tmpa Bay 72 46 .610
ston 67 52 .5635
ronto 63 55 .534
Itimore 42 77 .3533
Central Division
W L Pet
nnesota 68 50 .576
licago 65 53 .551
troit 58 60 .492
eveland 49 69 .415
nsas City 49 69 .415
West Division
W L Pct
xas 67 50 .573
sAngeles 60 59 .504
akland 57 60 .487
little 46 73 .387
Monday's Games
Detroit 3, N.Y.Yankees I
Baltimore 5, Seattle 4, II innings
Tampa Bay 6,Texas 4
Toronto 3, Oakland I
Tuesday's Games
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees (n)


GB

1/2
9
01/2

GB

3
10
19.
19

GB

8
10
22


Seattle at Baltimore (n)
L.A.Angels at Boston (n)
Texas at Tampa Bay (n)
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota (n)
Cleveland at Kansas City (n)
Toronto at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Texas (D.Holland 2-1) at Tampa Bay
(J.Shields 10r 11), 1:10 p.m.
Toronto (Rzepczynski I -I) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 10-8), 3:35 p.m.
Detroit (Bonderman 6-8) at N.Y.
Yankees (Moseley 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Pauley 1-4) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 7-1 I), 7:05 p.m.
LA. Angels (Kazmir 8-10) at Boston
(Lackey 10-7), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 8-9) at
Minnesota (Liriano 11-7),8:10 p,m.


Cleveland (Carmnnona 11-10) at Kansas
City (Chen 7-6),8:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
LA.Angels at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota.
8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 69 49
Philadelphia 66 51
New York 59 59
Florida 57 60
Washington S I 67
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 67 51
St. Louis 65 51I
Milwaukee 55 64
Houston 51 66
Chicago 50 69
Pittsburgh 40 78
West Division
W L
San Diego 70 47


Pct GB
.585 -
.5642 1/2
.500 10
.487111/2
.432 18

Pct GB
.568 -
.560 I
.462121/2
.436151/2
.420171/2
.339 27


San Francisco 67 52 .563 4
Colorado 61 56 .521 9
Los Angeles 60 59 .504, II
Arizona 47 72 .395 24
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh 7, Florida I
Atlanta 4, LA. Dodgers 3
N.Y. Mets 3, Houston I
San Diego 9, Chicago Cubs 5
Tuesday's Games
Florida at Pittsburgh (n)
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
Washington at Atlanta (n)
N.Y. Mets at Houston (n)
San Diego at Chicago Cubs (n)
Milwaukee at St. Louis (n)
Cincinnati at Arizona (n)
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Ra.Wolf 9-9) at St. Louis
(Wainwright 17-6), 2:15 p.m..
San Diego (Richard 10-5) at Chicago
Cubs (Coleman 0-0), 2:20 p.m.
Florida (jo.Johnson 10-5) at Pittsburgh
(Ohlendorf I-9), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 9-9) at
Philadelphia (Blanton 4-6), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (L.Hernandez 8-8) at
Atlanta (T.Hudson 14-5), 7:10 pmrn.
N.Y Mets (Dickey-8-5) at Houston
(Myers 8-7), 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 3-1) at Arizona
(R.Lopez 5-1 I), 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 8-7) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kuroda 8-11), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants 31, N.Y. jets 16
Thursday's Games
Indianapolis at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.


New England at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Friday's Game
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 8 p-.m
Saturday's Games
Baltimore at Washington, 7 p.m-
Pittsburgh at N.Y Giants, 7 p.m.
Miami at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Oakland at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 9 p.m.
Green Bay at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Minnesota at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
Monday.Aug. 23
Arizona at Tennessee, 8 p.m.

Arena Bowl XXIII
Friday
Spokane vs.Tampa Bay, 8 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Wyndham Championship
Site: Greensboro, N.C.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sedgefield Country Club
(7,130 yards, par 70).
Purse: $5.1 million. Winner's share:
$918,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 3-6 p.m., 9 p.m.-midnight; Saturday-
Sunday, noon- 1:30 p.m., 9-11:30 p.m.) and
CBS (Saturday-Sunday, 2-5 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
LPGATOUR
Safeway Classic
Site: North Plains, Ore.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club,
Ghost Creek Course (6,546 yards, par
72).
Purse: $1.5 million. Winner's share:
$225,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday,
12:30-2:30 p.m.; Saturday, 3-5 a.m., 5:30-
8 p.m.; Sunday, midnight-2 a.m., 5:30-
8 p.m.; Monday, midnight-2 a.m.).
Online: http://www.lpga.com
CHAMPIONSTOUR
TheTradition
Site: Sunriver, Ore.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sunriver Resort, Crosswater
Golf Club (7,533 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.6 million. Winner's share:
$392,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
6:30-9 p.m.; Friday, 12:30-3 a.m., 6:30-
9 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-3 a.m.) and NBC
(Saturday-Sunday, 4-6 p.m.).
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Czech Open
Site: Celadna, Czech Republic.'
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Prosper Golf Resort (7,155
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.57 million. Winner's share:
$428,445. ,
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday-Sunday, 8:30-
1I 1:30 a.m.). /
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Next event: Knoxville News Sentinel
Open,Aug. 26-29, Fox Den Country Club,
Knoxville,Tenn.


COURTESY PHOTO

Gold medalist meeting

Bard Gymnastics competitive team members visited with 1996 Olympic gold medalist
Dominique Moceanu while attending the Balcony Gymnastics Camp in Ocala on
July 15-18. Meeting with Moceanu (second from right) are Eva Kirby (from left), Selena
Sullivan and Jessie Newbern.


THOMPSON

Continued From Page 11B

Associated Press from his
home in suburban New
York. "When we went into
the next season, I thought
it'd be forgotten."
"I'll miss him," Branca
said. "I mellowed over the
years and we became good
friends. I enjoyed being
around him."
A three-time All-Star as
an infielder and outfielder,
Thomson hit .270 with 264
career home runs and 1,026
RBIs from 1946-60 with sever-
al teams. He led the league in
a hitting category only once,
and that was for triples.
Yet the fly ball that flew
over the wall vaulted "The
Flying Scot" to a place of
almost mythic status.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Myj ob is
one letter to each square, as bad as
to form four ordinary words. my arch

FRASC ,


S" WHAT THE APVIC.E
I ^ ^ ^! COLUMNIST PIP
z WHEN 5HE WENT TO
BE ^THE FOOT DOCTOR.
BELMAM II-
7 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: HER
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BATHE GUARD SUBMIT FORMAL
Answer: When the sculpture was unveiled, critics said
it was FOR THE "BIRDS"


GOLF REPORTS



Burnham hits big in. blitz


Good golf and good
luck led to a banner day
for George Burnham in the
Wednesday Blitz.
G6od golf led to his score
of +7 for a split of the blitz
purse. Nick Slay also had a
+7 to share the proceeds.
Good luck came when
a check of scorecards
revealed that the golfer
who appeared to have
killed Burnham's birdie on
No. 18 wasn't in the skins
game, leaving Burnham
with the skin on that hole.
Burnham's luck got a lot
better when No. 18 was
drawn as a pot hole that
had reached its maximum
possible amount
A lucrative day indeed.
Burnham had another
skin to add to his big one,
joining Blayne Barber with
two and Steve Patterson
with one. One big pot
remains .in play, while
another is building.


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

Steve Osborne and Dave
Mehl traded the lead in
the Saturday Blitz until
Osborne pulled out the win
by one stroke with a birdie
on the last hole.
Dennis Crawford was
hot in the skins game. He
topped two birdie skins
with an eagle for half the
pot. Don Howard, Steve
Thomas and Osborne had
one. apiece.
The LGA adopted a
scramble format using full
handicaps for this week's


Bormolini were a half-
stroke back at 64.5. Natalie
Bryant, Faye Warren and
Dottie Rogers managed a
fourth-place finish at 69.
In the first of two featured
matches in Good Old Boys
play, Monty Montgomery,
Howard Whitaker, Merle
Hibbard and Dan Stephens
took an 11-8 win over Mark
Risk, Jim Bell and Carl
Wilson.
Match 2 took a scorecard
decision to break a 5-5 tie
and give Ed Snow, Eli Witt,
Bobby Simmons and Joe
Persons the win over Don
Christensen, Tom Elmore
and Mack Reeder.
Montgomery took med-


event alist honors with a 36-35-71,
Caroline Stevens and edging out West at 36-37-73.
Nancy Edgar had the for- Other scores of note came
mat down pat, finishing from Risk (76), Hibbard
.with a net 60 and a four-shot (77) and Stephens (79).
victory over Sally Rivers The MGA tournament is
and Roberta Whitaker. Aug. 28 with format to be
Carol Felton and Ann announced.


Horn wins Par 3 tournament


The LGA Par 3
Tournament on Saturday
drew nine ladies. Playing all
18 holes as. par 3s, Darlene
Horn took the win with a
gross 69. Sue Terlaje won
first net and Susie Mick
placed second net.
Fourteen men braved
the heat to play in the
Wednesday Blitz on Aug.
11. Shelton Keen placed
first in the A Division with


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

Frog Niewisch and Chet
Carter tied for second.
In the B Division, Jack
Tuggle placed first, Alan
Phillips was second and
Pete Skantzos 'was third.
In the C division, Keith
Denmark placed first, with


Richard Skipper in second
and Jerry Perkins in third.
Keen captured three
of the 'six skins. Carter,
Niewisch and Denmark
each had one. Denmark
won the pot with his skin.
Susie Mick won the
Ladies Blitz on Aug. 10.
Rita Gallager was second.
Bill Bryant won the
Top of the Hill on Aug. 9.
Shelton Keen was second.


ANTHONY: Signs point to his exit


Continued From Page 11


jump-start a rebuilding
program.
With a sign-and-trade
deal, 'Melo would get the
money he may not be able
to earn with a new collec-
tive bargaining agreement
while the Nuggets land
players to help them get on
with life after 'Melo.
Kroenke might choose
to deal the face of his fran-
chise at the February trade


deadline, too. '

ACROSS'

1 Log home
6 Meadow
rodents
11 Dig
12 Figaro's job
13 High priority
14 Iditarod locale
15 Detroit team
16 Songbird
17 Agent 007
18 Coal measure
19 Hand over
23 "Bootnose" of
hockey
25 Deceived (2
wds.)
26 Morse code
symbol
29 Southpaw
31 Environmental
prefix
32 GP group
33 High dudgeon
34 Plaintive cry
35 Lomond and
Ness
37 General vicinity


The secluded owner likes
to operate out of the public
limelight, so his intentions
aren't clear.
Neither are Anthony's.
Some observers,' how-
ever, see plenty of signs
pointing toward his exit:-
He didn't jump at
the chance to sign his
extension.
He's put his 25,000-
square-foot mansion in sub-
urban Denver up for sale.


39 John'swidow
40 Fay's role in
"King Kong"
41 Clutch
45 Ger. or Sp.
47 Stage
48 Perpetrate
51 Rye and barley
52 Admires one-
self
53 Outlaw pur-
suers
54 Swelter
55 Late summer
flower

DOWN

1 Unusual item
2 Inert gas
3 Starr or
Vaccaro
4 Free electrons
5 Can. province
6 Glen or dale
7 Citrus tree
8 Deli units,
9 Startled cry
10 Mexican Mrs.


AtAnthony's New York
wedding to television per-
sonality LaLa Vazquez this
summer, New Orleans point
guard Chris Paul report-
edly toasted the newly-
weds by predicting a future
Knicks dream team made
up of himself, Anthony
and Amare Stoudemire to
counter the one in South
Beach featuring James,
DWyane Wade and Chris
Bosh.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BAIA 8 OD SWAP
ABC UK ES HEI R
HUMPBACK REDO

BUS TOE D

TITLE RISKED
ECHO GIUNS KOA
DEE GANG SELL
SNAILS SIDLE
SJ"l ^ N^i|U

N FL LU G
AV ATE UNMASK
LANK YEASAYER
ANTI SHUE LEI
NEON SST ADS


11 Tulip source
12 Square-dance
site
16 Mozart's narme
18 Preadult
20 Footnote word


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 12 13 14 15 16 17 l 19 110-1


21 Sotto-
22 Plenty, to a
poet
24 Lesage hero
Gil -
25 Ancient harp
26 Actress Tyne

27 Melville novel
28 Pushpin
30 Gull relative
36 Rathbone role
38 Speechless
40 Diligent
insects
42 Lift
43 "Lou Grant"
lead
44 She preceded
Mamie
46 "- No
Sunshine"
47 Votes in favor
48 ER practice
49 Incan treasure
50 Drop -- line
51 Student stat


8-18 C2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I









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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010 ~age Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


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HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Adult daughter's bedroom

antics displease her mom


DEAR ABBY: My adult
daughter, "Suzie," spent
the weekend at our home,
bringing along her boy-
friend of six months. This
was "[Lam's" first visit.
I allowed them to share
Suzie's old bedroom, which
we have converted into a
family office. We keep a
large futon in there for my
daughter when she comes
to visit. I didn't make a big
deal out of where [Lam and
Suzie should sleep because
I didn't want to embarrass
them, and I was sure there
would be no "hanky-panky"
because our bedroom is
right across the hall.
Well, I was wrong. In
the middle of the night I
was awakened by Suzie's
squeals and moans. For-
tunately, my husband is a
sound sleeper. The next
morning, while my hus-
band was out on his daily
run, I let the kids have it
to the point of slapping
Liam around a little. I told
Suzie her actions were dis-
respectful and I was highly
disappointed in her.
Suzie arid I are no lon-
ger speaking and I am
,miserable. Do you think I
overreacted? Did I silently
'give permission for such
behavior by allowing them


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
to share the same futon?
And did Liam really think
it would be OK to have sex
in my home? MISERA-
BLE MOM IN WISCON-
SIN
DEAR MISERABLE
MOM: I will respond to
your questions in reverse
order. The answers are yes,
yes and yes. And all of you
owe each other an apology.
DEAR ABBY: "Dave" is
49, well-educated, gainfully
employed and still lives
with his parents. He has
never been -married and
has no children. His dating
history is "sketchy" he
claims never to have had a
serious relationship with a
. woman. When I asked him
why he has never lived on
his own, he told me he feels
comfortable living with his
parents.
Dave and I have enjoyed
a strictly platonic relation-
ship for nearly, a year. He
recently told me he's in love
with me and wants us to be


exclusive, with marriage
as the ultimate outcome. I
have been divorced for 20
years. My children are in-
dependent, thriving adults.
Marrying again is not a pri-
ority in my life.
Dave is kind, sensitive
and thoughtful. I care for
him deeply, yet I am skep-
tical about becoming seri-
ously involved with a man
who seems to be "hiding"
something. Am I being
overly critical, or is there
something wrong with this
picture? JADED IN
JERSEY
DEAR JADED:-The sit-
uation you have described
is unusual, but it doesn't
necessarily indicate that
Dave is "hiding" anything.
He could be a simple man
who enjoys the living ar-
rangement he has with his
folks and the lowest sex
drive in New Jersey. Before
making any hard and fast
decisions, you and Dave
need to have some frank,
serious and ongoing con-
versations. You also need to
determine how his parents
-will feel about "losing" their
son after 49 years of togeth-

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Impulsive deci-
sions based on emotions
will not bode well. You have
to give yourself a chance
to digest what's going on
around you. There is no
reason to feel pressured.
The worst that can hap-
pen is that you have to wait
for another opportunity.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Just because
someone asks you to do
something doesn't mean
you have to or should.
Question whether it is an
imposition and will com-
promise fulfilling your re-
sponsibilities. Apply a bit of
pressure if you are having
trouble getting your way.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Make time for
precious moments with
children, your lover or a
close friend. You must take
care of your own needs. So-
cializing will bring you in
contact with someone who
can make your life much
easier. Be proactive. ***-
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Avoid anyone
looking for a fight. Make
sure you do what's required
of you. Allowing someone
to involve you in something
you aren't familiar with will
cause anxiety. Prepare to
say no. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Ifs simple when you
play by the rules and you
give your all. You will- at-
tract attention as well as
love and affection. This is a
perfect time to take a plea-
sure trip or to let someone
pamper you. You can turn
any negative you face into a
positive. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Bypass any emotional
madness going on around
you. Concentrate on what
will get you ahead, not what
will hold you back. Timing
is everything and, if you let
your intuition lead you, it
will not let you down. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Your discipline and
intelligence, coupled with'
an extra strong intuition,
will help you find your way
to the top. Don't let emo-
tions overwhelm you. Fo-
cus on getting the job done.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): You'll be asked
to help someone you've
assisted in the past. If you
don't get any sort of pay-
back, you may want to re-
consider what you do for
this person in the future.
Don't be fooled by a sob
story. ***
SAGHITARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): You may
have all the angles 'covered
but watch out for the one
person who is watching
your every move. Cover ev-
ery aspect of what needs to
be done. Leave no room for
mistakes. Be prepared for
last-minute changes. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Avoid any-
one with the potential or a
reason to twistyour words.
An emotional matter will
arise around a money deal
or debt. Find a way to make
it possible for everyone to
feel comfortable with the
decision. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): A relationship
that allows you to work to-
gether to obtain personal,
financial and emotional
growth is apparent. Don't
shy away from someone
who wants to spend more
time with you. Equality can
be achieved if you work
alongside someone with
similar goals. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your unpre-
dictable ways will unnerve
some people and attract
others. A partnership may
start on shaky ground but,
once you iron out the wrin-
kles, you will realize how
much you complement one
another. It's time to put
your idea& and talent on the
line. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals V
"H O X W H C SWH B ZL KMC W BB K O WMVW

VHM NW KMUWICWS KM KOMZXHMVW

JFWM CFW MW MWWS' LZX KBBAIKZM KI

SWWG." IHAB NWBBZJ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Real success is... off the stage as a human being,
and how you get along with your fellow man." Sammy Davis, Jr.
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-18


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


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ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010 age Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS



























Health and exercise begin at home, 4c
Wednesday, August 18,2010 www.lakecityreporter.com IC


Debby Freeman
CCSO executive director

To giving

thanks and

partnering

services

In the current
economic climate
Columbia County
Senior Services,
Inc., has been con-
cerned about the loss of
status quo community
funding for its programs.
We have been blessed as
the city and the county
governments deal with
funding issues in their own
areas of concern.
At this time our local
leaders have recognized
the essential nature of the
services we provide to
senior adults and have not
taken services to seniors
out of the funding stream.
If you are an older per-
son, or if you have family
members who are elderly,
please take the time to
thank our leaders for help-
ing us to help you.
During this past year
we have seen the utiliza-
tion of the services at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center grow every week.
We now see more male
participants than ever in
our 38-year history. We
serve breakfast and lunch
Tuesday-Friday. We pro-
vide transportation for
essential activities such as
doctor visits and shopping.
We provide space for
self-directed activities
(cards, bridge, computer
activities, sewing, crafts,
exercise, art classes, and
a camera club) as well as
daily directed activities.
We have a staff which is
committed to treating our
senior participants with
respect and care.,I can
truly say if my mother
lived in Lake City, I would
be very happy to have her
involved with our staff.
We have partnered
with Meridian Behavioral
HealthCare to provide a
series dealing with pre-
vention, mood, coping,
and stress management
This series will be help-
ful to anyone dealing with
a multitude of stressors.
Caregivers are espe-
cially in this category.
The classes will be held at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center from 2-3 p.m. on
Thursday in October.
The instructor, Dottie
Baker, is a lively and
knowledgeable teacher.
She promises to make the
classes fun and informa-
tive. She also suggests that
you get the most from the
series if you attend all four
sessions
Session 1:
"Prevention," Oct 7
Session 2: "Mood,"
Oct. 14
Session 3: "Coping,"
Oct. 21
Session 4: "Stress
Management," Oct 28
Please call Debby, Janet


Social Security Administration
this month.


S- JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
District Manager Kay Louder (left) and Operations Supervisor Aaron Zelaya are geared up for the program's 75th anniversary


Social Securi'


From staff reports
f t's celebration time
for Social Security.
The program is
celebrating 75 years
of public service this
month.
Social Security is the
most successful domestic
program the government
has created, according
to Kay Louder, Lake City
Social Security district
manager. More than 53
million people receive
more than $57 billion each
month in Social Security
benefits.
About the program
n The Social Security
Act was signed by


President Franklin D.
Roosevelt on Aug. 14,
1935.
N Taxes were first col-
lected in January 1937, and
the first one-time, lump-
sum payments were made
that same month. Regular
ongoing monthly benefits
started in January 1940.
P The first person to
receive Social Security
benefits was Ernest
Ackerman, who received
a payment for 17 cents in
January 1937. This was
a one-time, lump-sum
payout, which was the
only form of benefits paid
during the start-up period
January 1937 through
December 1939.


Originally, the Social
Security Act of 1935 was
named the Economic
Security Act, but this
title was changed during
Congressional consider-
ation of the bill.
The term "Social
Security" was first used
in the U.S. by Abraham
Epstein in connection with
his group, the American
Association for Social
Security.
Under the 1935 law,
Social Security only paid
retirement benefits to the
primary worker. A 1939
change in the law added
survivors benefits and
benefits for the retiree's
spouse and children. In


1956, disability benefits
were added.
The original 1935
law also contained the
first national unemploy-
ment compensation pro-
gram, aid to the states for
various health and welfare
programs and the Aid to
Dependent Children pro-
gram.
Social Security num-
bers were first issued in
November 1936. To date,
more than 420 million dif-
ferent numbers, have been
issued.
From 1937 through
2007 the Social Security
program has expended
$10.6 trillion.
The community can


help celebrate the anniver-
sary of Social Security by
sharing personal stories,
Louder said.
People across the nation
are asked to share how
has Social Security made
a difference in their lives
and that of their family and
friends.
Stories can include how
people felt after receiv-
ing their first retirement
payment, how a Social
Security employee went ,
above and beyond great -
service or how working at
Social Security has been a'*
rewarding experience.
Visit ssa.gov/
75thanniversary/stories.
html to share stories.










The Social
Security
Administration
building
is located
at 1348
Southwest
Bascom Norris
Drive in Lake.
., City.


SESON otiudon4 JSMATE WALKERLk Cit Rpote


turns 75


-`"


SESSIONS continued on 4C I


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


ti-ll


I







LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18. 2010


Pierce Kelley


Mortgage

loans

with no

recourse?

L.W. of Williston: "A
-lawsuit has been filed
-against me to foreclose
-on my mortgage because
I fell behind on my pay-
ments after I lost my job.
-However, the promissory
- note I signed has a stamp
-:on it saying "Without
:Recourse." What does that
mean?"
Dear L.W.: The answer
-to your question in a nut-
shell is that a non-recourse
loan entered into in con-
nection with a real estate
transaction is one where
the lender cannot recover
any money from you. The
only remedy available to
the lender is to recover
the collateral for the loan,
:which is usually the house
and property. Non-recourse
loans create more risk for
the lender and, therefore,
-lenders usually charge a
:higher interest rate for
Such loans and they usual-
ly require more of a down
payment.
Most real estate loans
are "recourse" loans, which
means the lenders can
go after the borrower for
the amount of money you
owe even after they have
taken the property from
you by way of foreclosure
sale. With the value of real
estate plummeting as it is
today, it is not unusual for
borrowers to owe more
money to the lenders than
their house is worth. That
is called being "upside
down" on a loan.
If you have a "non-
recourse" loan, the most
the lender can do is take
your property and sell it
for the best price. Even if
they are unable to sell it
for as much as you owe
on it, the lender cannot
come after you for the defi-
ciency, or the difference
between what you owe and
what the property sold for.
There are exceptions, of
course, and you must read
the fine print, but that is
the general rule of law in
Florida. Some states, such
as California and South
Carolina, for example, have
laws which prevent lend-
ers from ever seeking a
deficiency judgment, which
is a judgment for money in
addition to the property.
However, a word of cau-
tion ... nowadays mortgage
loans are bought and sold
without the borrower
ever knowing about it
until well after the fact.
Sometimes those loans are
non-recourse against the
assignor, or seller of the
loan, which means that
whoever sells the loan tells
the entity to which the loan
is sold that their only rem-
edy in the event of default
by you, the borrower, is
against you and not against
them. So the note could
be a "recourse" loan as far
as you are concerned but
"non-recourse" as between
the subsequent purchas-
ers of your note. You have
to read the note carefully
to know for sure, but usu-
ally "non-recourse" loans
are negotiated. Banks and
other lenders don't like
to limit their remedies
unless they get something
Sin exchange for it, like a
Higher rate of interest or a
larger down payment.
Readers with specific
legal questions for this
"Ask a Lawyer" column
are invited to submit those
questions to tmayer@lakec-
ityreporter com.


* Pierce Kelley is a mem-
ber of the Florida Bar
Association. The contents of
this column reflect his per-
sonal opinions and beliefs.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 2, photo, brothers and historians Frank Watson (second left kneeling) and William Watson (second right standing) survey the site that they believe
is a mass grave for immigrant Irish railroad workers in Malvern, Pa. Continuing field work seems to indicate some were killed not by cholera but by human
hands. Despite their lack of archaeological experience, historians at Immaculata University are leading the excavation in suburban Philadelphia.


Old Irish bones may yield murderous secrets


By KATHY MATHESON
Associated Press
MALVERN, Pa.
- Young and strapping, ,
the 57 Irish immigrants
began grueling work in
the summer of 1832 on the
Philadelphia and Columbia
railroad. Within weeks, all
were dead of cholera.
Or were they murdered?
Two skulls unearthed
at a probable mass grave
near Philadelphia this
month showed signs of
violence, including a pos-
sible bullet hole. Another
pair of skulls found earlier
at the woodsy site also dis-
played traumas, seeming
to confirm the suspicions
of two historians leading


the archaeological dig.
"This was much more
than a cholera epidemic,"
William Watson said.
Watson, chairman of
the history department
at nearby Immaculata
University, and his twin
brother Frank have been
working for nearly a
decade to unravel the 178-
year-old mystery.
Anti-Irish sentiment
made 19th-century
America a hostile place
for the workers, who lived
amid wilderness in a shan-
ty near the railroad tracks.
The land is now preserved
open space behind sub-
urban homes in Malvern,
about 20 miles west of
Philadelphia.


The Watsons and their
research team have recov-
ered seven sets of remains
since digging up the first
shin bone in March 2009,
following years of fruit-
lessly scouring the area
for the men's final resting
place. One victim has been
tentatively identified, pend-
ing DNA tests.
The brothers have long
hypothesized that many of
the workers succumbed to
cholera, a bacterial infec-
tion spread by contami-
nated water or food. The
disease was rampant at
the time, and had a typical
mortality rate of 40 per-
cent to 60 percent.
The other immigrants,
they surmise, were killed


White House backdrop is fine art


By MARK S. SMITH
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
- When President Barack
Obama addressed the
nation from the Oval
Office for the first time,
Americans-knew in an
instant the Gulf oil spill
had become a full-blown
crisis.
His prime-time speech,
in a setting that bespeaks
the power of the presi-
dency, telegraphed a vital
message: The spill is huge,
but I'm on it.
The president's house
is filled with iconic back-
drops the gilt-trimmed
East Room, the verdant
Rose Garden, the stately
Grand Foyer, to name just
a few and Obama has
carefully employed them
all to communicate with a
public that's still making
up its mind on how he's
doing his job.
Choosing among these
is an art, as much as a sci-
ence. Each venue has its
aesthetic and political
- pros and cons.
To those who manage
the optics of presidential
appearances, the White
House is a mansion with a
message.
I "Every room within the
White House tells a story,"
said Daniella Gibbs Leger,
who directs the choice for
Obama. "We've used pret-
ty much every nook and
cranny. It's all wonderful.
It's all rich in history. It all


looks great."
Take the East Room, the
mansion's largest, where
Abigail Adams hung her
wash, Abraham Lincoln's
body lay in state and cel-
list Pablo Casals played
for the Kennedys. Most
Americans know it for
state dinners, bill signing
and news conferences.
"It's really the most for-
mal you can get, particular-
ly if you're doing a night-
time news conference,"
said Martha Joynt Kumar,


a political science profes-
sor at Towson University
and author of the book
"Managing the President's
Message: The White
House Communications
Operation." 'That's what
I think of as the political
high-wire act."
Obama's first such news
conference, in February
2009, drew an estimated
49 million viewers. "When
you do that, you don't want
to waste their time," said
Kumar.


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by vigilantes because of
anti-Irish prejudice, ten-
sion between affluent resi-
dents and poor transient
workers, or intense fear of
cholera or a combina-
tion of all three.
Now, their theory is .sup-
ported by the four recov-
ered skulls, which indicate
the men probably suffered
blows to the head. At least
one may have been shot, '
said Janet Monge, an
anthropologist working on
the project.
"I don't think we need to
be so hesitant in coming
to the conclusion now that
violence was the cause
of death and not cholera,
although these men might
have had cholera in addi-


tion," Monge said.
Other findings: Coffin
nails commingled with
the remains establish that
at least some workers
received formal burials;
bones indicate the labor-
ers were muscular despite
relatively poor diets; and
teeth reveal the men were
not wealthy enough to
afford the sugary sweets
that cause cavities.
'They do have indica-
tions on their skeletons
that life was not a bowl
of cherries," said Monge,
who is also the keeper of
skeletal collections at the
University of Pennsylvania
Museum of Archaeology
and Anthropology.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


9









Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CiTY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 18. 2010


FAMILY FEATURES


ave you ever thought about trying something new but it seemed too complex
or intimidating? The "For Dummies" series of books takes these topics and
explains them in clear, simple language that makes learning fun and easy.
These excerpts from four popular "For Dummies" books show you the kinds of tips offered
in the series. They'll help you navigate the world of wine, keep your computer files safe,
build a stylish wardrobe and learn some Facebook lingo.
For more tips, videos and articles, visit dummies.com.


Life Made


Common Facebook Terminology
From "Facebook For Dummies, 2nd Edition"
by Leah Pearlman and Carolyn Abram.
Facebook connects you with the people you know
and care about. It enables you to communicate,
stay up-to-date, and keep in touch with friends and
family anywhere.
You can share photos, videos, notes, gifts, even
chat live with others online at the same time as you.
If you're new to Facebook, you'll run into some
unfamiliar terminology. Here are some common
terms and their definitions:
Profile: This is your page. It contains your
photos and videos, a list of your friends, your
recent activities, and anything else you choose
to include on it.
Gift: This is a whimsical or cute icon. You
can give these gifts to your friends for prices
ranging from free to $1. Gifts appear in your
friend's Gift box on their Profile.
Wall: This is where you and your friends can
write on your Profile. Your friends may write
on your Wall to communicate with you,
congratulate you, embarrass you, and more.
You post on your own Wall to let your friends
know what you're up to.
a News Feed: This is a continuous stream of
updates about your friends' activities on and
off Facebook. It appears on your Home page.

Marrying Wine With Food
From "Wine For Dummies, 4th Edition"
by Ed McCarthy and Mait Ewing-Mulligan
Food and wine interact, based on the components
of the wine. These tips will help you pair the right
wines with your food to make a memorable meal.
Tannic Wines. Have you ever taken a sip of a red
wine and experienced a drying-out feeling in your
mouth, as if something had blotted up all your
saliva? That's tannin. Tannic wines include most
wines based on the Cabernet Sauvignon grape,
northern Rhone reds, and any wine that has
become tannic from aging in new oak barrels.


These wines can:
Diminish the perception of sweetness in
a food.
a Taste softer and less tannic when served
with protein-rich, fatty foods such as steak
and cheese.
a Taste less bitter when paired with salty foods.
Taste astringent (mouth-drying), when drunk
with spicy-hot foods.
Sweet Wines. Wines that often have some sweet-
ness include most inexpensive California white
wines, White Zinfandel, many Rieslings, and
medium-dry Vouvray. (Dry is the opposite of
sweet.) These wines can:
Taste less sweet, but fruitier, when matched
with'salty foods.
Make salty foods more appealing.
Go well with sweet foods, such as desserts.
Acidic Wines. All vines contain acid, but some
are more acidic than others. Acidity gives the wine
firmness in your mouth. White wines with high
acidity feel crisp, while those without enough feel
flabby. Acidic wines include most Italian whites;
Sancerre and Chablis, and most dry Rieslings.
These wines can:
Taste less acidic when served with salty foods.
Taste less acidic when served with slightly
sweet foods.
Make foods taste slightly saltier.
Counterbalance oily or fatty heaviness in food.

Practice Safe Computing
From "Windows 7 For Dummies," by Andy Rathbone
Viruses can travel not only in emails, programs and
files, but also in screen savers, themes, toolbars
and other Windows add-ons.
Protect yourself by practicing safe computing -
after all, the best defense is often a good offense.
Consider these safe-computing tips:
a Make sure your antivirus program scans
everything you download, as well as anything


that arrives through email or a messaging
program.
Only open attachments that you're expecting.
If you receive something unexpected from a
friend, don't open it. Instead, email or phone
,that person to see whether he or she really sent it.
Don't install two virus checkers, because
they often quarrel. Windows comes with
a built-in antispyware program, Windows
Defender, but no antivirus program. You need
to buy your own program and pay its subscrip-
tion fees so that it will keep recognizing the
latest viruses.
Windows 7's Parental Controls offer several
ways to police how people can access the computer
as well as the Internet. These controls offer three
categories of safeguards: *
Time Limits you can define certain hours
when children (or other account holders) may
log onto the computer.
Games Some computer games come with
rating levels. This area lets you choose which
rating level your children may play, helping
keep them from mature or violent content.
Allow or block programs This lets you
set certain programs off-limits while allowing
access to others.

Building Your Stylish Wardrobe
From "Fashion For Dummies, by Jill Martin and
Pierre A. Lehu
Quality, fit and style are the most important factors
when creating your wardrobe. This means that
everything in your closet must be first rate. Nothing
less than a 10 that is, the best should be in
your closet. Here's how to start deciding what to
keep and what to get rid of:


What condition is it in? Before you try any-
thing on, take a look at each garment and
survey its condition. Is it permanently stained?
Are there holes beyond repair? Is the material
pilly or stretched out'so that it no longer fits?
If you answer yes to any of those questions,
you don't need to try it on. Toss those pieces
straight into the donation pile.
Does it fit? And, more importantly, is it flatter-
ing? Do you feel like a million bucks when
you put it on? If not, it's outtl there.
Is it in style? If not, is it a classic piece that
will always be in style? If it's not a classic or
if it's last year's trend (or even last decade's
trend), out it goes.
n Is it relevant to your current life? Take stock
of your day-to-day life and evaluate what you
actually need and actually wear. If anything in
your life has changed that affects your ward-
robe, you need to be okay with letting those
pieces go.
Fashion Staples Every Woman Should Invest In
You can spend a little more on these fashion items
because they're essentials for every woman's
closet, and you'll wear them over and over again:
Little black dress
Dark denim jeans
Black blazer
Black pumps
White button-down shirt
Two cardigan sweaters, one black and one white
Black trousers
Black leather bag
Knee-length black skirt


I I


Make life a little easier with For
Dummies apps for the iPhone and
iPod Touch. Available at iTunes, there
are apps for Spanish, digital photog-
raphy, SAT practice and other topics.
"Selecting Wine For Dummies," for
example, lets wine enthusiasts get
up to speed on the latest wines and
novices figure out how to get started.
Find out more at iTunes.com.


Leah Pearlman
Carolyn Abram


.3


LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18. 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428







LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18. 2010


~. -A


. ,
I\


WA ar


--F


COURTESY PHOTO

Cannon Creek mermaids make time for health and healing with water aerobics
Members of the Handicapped Mermaids pose for a photograph at a pool in the Cannon Creek Airpark subdivision during a water aerobics lesson. Most of the members have had knee
replacements or surgery on their knee or foot. Pictured are Pat Redding (front row, from left), Sue Rose, Dee Riley, Marilyn Adams and Penny Kaefer (back row, from left), Judie Wells, Judee
Mundy, Agnes Hjelsand and Mary Plunkett. Not pictured is Kathy Wilson.


How di

By JOCELYN NOVECK
AP National Writer
NEW YORK Robb
Dougherty, a Texas hair-
stylist, used to be a fre-
quent flier on the Lubbock
to San Antonio route. But
he couldn't stand the nasty
travelers he'd constantly
encounter people who
felt entitled, who talked
down to flight attendantss"
who raged when they
Weren't poured a full cup
of soda or given an extra
pillow.
"Once, it was such
a thrilling, exciting
adventure to fly," says
Dougherty, 41, who
now stays close to home
in Corpus Christi. "It's
become just a nasty expe-
rience. People swat you
with their bags and don't
apologize. No smiles. No
nothing."
Dougherty is just one
of countless disillusioned
travelers who've been vent-
jng their frustrations since
"fews broke of the spec-
tacular meltdown of Steven
Slater, the JetBlue flight
attendant who cursed a


pass
addr
left
his c
one
an e
M
aboi
gers
dant
for u

pie,
gott(
year
he'd
he g
requ
trips
mea
attei
0
tally
on h
up a
"S
me,'
ness
Wor
ber i
gen
her)
tinuf
at m
of th


the friendly sl
senger.on the public- attendants did nothing.
press system and then Not even a quick apology
his plane and likely while the meanie wasn't
career behind with looking!".
dramatic escape down Erickson, who was even
emergency slide. a platinum-level flier, using
[any, but not all, gripe the carrier (he prefers
ut nasty fellow passen- not to say which) twice a
3. To some, flight atten- week, hastens to add that
ts are equally to blame this is one bad experience,.
unfriendly skies. not an indictment of all
m Erickson, for exam- flights or flight attendants.
says he wouldn't have But he bemoans the '
en on a plane a few incivility or mere indif-
rs back if he'd known ference that he sees
be getting sick. But on airplanes these days
ot worse on board, even if most flights pass
airing a number of smoothly with little drama.
to the lavatory, which "Airline travel used to be
nt squeezing by flight a big event that prompted
idants with their carts, you to put on your suit
ne attendant acciden- and tie," says Erickson, 34.
splashed a bit of water "Pilots stood at the door-
lerself as she backed way ... flight attendants
row to let him pass. were glamorous hosts and
3he got very rude with hostesses. Now, many
says Erickson, a busi- American carriers have
analyst from Fort become cattle cars."
th, Texas. "I remem- Of course, it's hardly
it left me feeling just on airplanes that
finely bad. Not only many see a breakdown in
words, but her con- civility.
ed attitude and looks "It's everywhere," says
e for the remainder Courtney Mitchell, 42,
ie flight Other flight of Hollywood, Fla. "No


SESSIONS: Thursdays in October


Continued From Page 1A

or Juliette for information
on any of the programs
which we offer at the LEC.
Don't miss the Aug.
28 presentation of "Jazz
Rendezvous" by Wayne
Levy & the Organics.


Tickets are $20 per person.
The event is sponsored
by the Lake City Medical
Center.
For information on all of
the exciting opportunities
to participate in the "active


re-imaging of what it
means to age in Columbia
County," give us a call at
(386) 755-0235.
* Debby Freeman is execu-
tive director of Columbia
County Senior Services.


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kies get so unfriendly?


one makes eye contact
anymore, and if you say
hello, people act like
you're going to kill them.
Honestly, everyone is just
so stressed out."
How did it come to this?
Passengers and those in
the travel industry cite a.
number of factors, among
them post-9/11 security
concerns, packed planes,
and budget-tightening,
leading to those dreaded
fees.
"I think there's a feeling
out there that you're get-
ting taken when you fly on
an airline," says Pauline
Frommer, creator of the
Pauline Frommer Guides
and daughter of Arthur
Frommer.
Plus, flying, she added,
"is a high-stress experi-
ence. You're just a number


when you fly. It's not like
other parts of your life.
Any feeling of control you
have is gone."
So for all the depressing
stories, it's worth noting
the heartening ones.
Like that of Mollie
Hemingway, a mom from
Washington, D.C., who
fondly recalls a flight
attendant traveling
as a passenger, no less
- that became her guard-
ian angel on what seemed.
destined to be a flight
from, well, a place with no
angels.
Flying to Denver with
her daughters, ages 1
and 2, Hemingway was
stressed to the point of
sobbing when her older
child soiled her car seat
minutes after takeoff,
meaning Mom had to bal-


" from 'I
2 Complete Pair,
Eyeglasses
Includes Lenses & Frames
Some restrictions apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES AUGUST 31, 2010

, ,


1 Pair Eyeglasses
Includes lenses & frames.
Some restrictions apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRESAUGUST 31, 2010

REMEMBER, YOUR FLEX PLAN
INSURANCE COVERS EYECARE


ance two kids on her lap.
Changing diapers in
the tiny bathroom was a
challenge. And the sleep-
deprived girls were melt-
ing down, "turning into
crazed beings that kicked
the seats in front of them,"
Hemingway reports. The
flight attendants were
"nowhere to be seen, until
the angel appeared, offer-
ing to take the baby.
"I practically threw the
baby at her," Hemingway
says. "Later she
exchanged seats so she
could sit next to me and
she helped me entertain
the girls. I am so thankful
for her help."
Hemingway says she
had a great return flight
on Southwest, where the
attendants were helpful
and fellow passengers
kind.


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a tf .- *-- *. ** t:. "' "1 : --'-^. .. -
-.. ." ;-7" "f--^


.







.F- <.'


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


.. -."- -..As












(oum ia, Lc.

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010 1D


Smitty's rounds up customers with superior service


At Smitty's
Western Store,
traditional mer-
chandise and
high fashion
style meet sound customer
service to create an enjoy-
able shopping experience.
"With the combination
of being trendy in the
clothing market and also
offering tack and work
attire, it makes us well-
rounded," said Bob Smith,
who co-owns the store
with his wife, Andrea.
Smitty's offers its cus-
tomers a wide range of
traditional western attire
and tack, work and hunt-
ing apparel and fashion
lines of clothing, acces-
sories and jewelry such as
Brighton.
Separate departments
selling home decor, boots,
hats and men's, women's
and children's clothing
make for a versatile and
diverse shopping trip.
Smitty's carries the larg-
est boot selection in North
Florida, Andrea Smith
said, selling work, fashion,
duty and western boots.
New lines recently
added to the store include
Guy Harvey, Salt Life and
Tervis Tumblers.
Andrea Smith said cus-
tomers are surprised at
the variety of the store's
merchandise, which the
Smiths find during buy-


ing trips always on the
lookout to keep Smitty's
stocked with fresh and
interesting items.
'There's something for
everyone here," she said.
"For every walk of life,
we offer something that's
interesting for them."
The store also has an
arena on its property
where adult and youth
rodeos are hosted.
Andrea and Bob Smith
opened Smitty's in 1997,
building a 3,000-square-
foot building to house the
store.
"We built it from the
ground up," Andrea Smith
said.
In 2005, growth in busi-
ness and merchandise led
the Smith's to enlarge the
store with another 3,000
square feet.
The need for a local
shop selling cowboy and
cowgirl products urged
the Smith's a former
cowboy and cowgirl them-
selves to open a store in
Lake City.
'We wanted to bring
something to the com-
munity that it didn't have,"
Andrea Smith said.
Since its opening, the
store has been heavily
involved in the community,
Bob Smith said.
The store won the Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce's


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bob and Andrea Smith, owners of Smitty's Western Store, pose for a photograph inside of
their store, where they also offer merchandise that includes jewelry, handbags and casual
apparel.


2005 Small Business of the
Year award for community
service and for volunteer-
ing with events and organi-
zations such as the March
of Dimes, the American
Cancer Society and Tough
Enough to Wear Pink.
"We're real, real commu-
nity-oriented," Bob Smith


said. "We are a part of the
community and we want to
continue to be a part of the
community. We like giv-
ing back to an effort that
makes us successful."
Smitty's will also fully
serve the customer.
The Smith's said they
strive to make a custom-


er's experience in the
store one that the custom-
er looks forward to.
The staff is well-edu-
cated, on the products
they sell and if customers
choose, they can bring
along their horse for the
fitting of a saddle.
"We are there to make


their shopping as easy as
it can be," Andrea Smith
* said.
"A good day is a day you
feel like you helped some-
one feel pampered and
appreciated," she said.
Shopping at Smitty's will
also be a friendly experi-
ence, Bob Smith said.
"We like to sell fun and
try to balance work with
pleasure," he said. "You
come in as a customer and
leave as a friend."
Advertising with the
Lake City Reporter is
another way the Smith's
draw customers to their
store and update the com-
munity on what's going on
at Smitty's.
"It's our way of showing
what we're up to," Bob
Smith said.
'"We've definitely seen
a lot of results from it,"
Andrea Smith said.
She also said her and
husband's goal and the
store's is "to be the
best at what we do" in cus-
tomer service, quality mer-
chandise and good prices.
Smitty's Western Wear
is located at 7015 West
U.S. Highway 90. The
store is open from 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Fridays and from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
It is closed on Sundays.
Call (386) 755-2668.



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HAVE YOU TRIED IT?
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ub "Ift's about time a sub tastes like a
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Lake City
S, Listen to Mix 94.3 and Big 98 to win FREE SUBS!
w Open Monday Saturday loam-9pm
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CAM EAT
PRIME RIP
NTrH 2 sEs
T rHURS,.Y, FRIDAY, & SATURDAY
~(WO SWgING,)


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


aSs--


ne It 250m per ad
4 lines 6 days a itiona
p I,,e.. . 8line $ .10.2
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00 or s.
Each lto,, must Include a prim.
This is a nonrelundable rae.



One Hem per ad 1
4 lines 6 da Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad additional
4 lines. 6 days line1.5
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
O This Is a non-refundable rate.



One a Item per ad $ 3u 7
4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.45
Personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
" Each Item muant include a ce.
This Is a no-ef able pa e. Orat




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Eac tonal
Rate applies to privateIndividuals selling
pesonaO l merchandise totaling $4000 or less.
toEach Iem 0ust Include. prce
This is a non-relundable rate




One Item per ad 3
4 lines 6 days Eachadd onal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
TEach item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundablerat


Gaag-


I


4 lines
3 days p 7
Includes 2 Signa hdgalia j111.0 -s


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional fine .
Includes an additional $2.00,per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Fridafyfrom 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 pim.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon, 10:00 a.m Mon, 9:00 am.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon, 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 m. Thurs., 9:00 am.
Saturday Fi., 10:00 am. Fri., 9:00a.m.
Sunday Ki., 1a00 am. Fi., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility-for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal,. State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wv w .ltheccitv'reporter.conm


Pe mortal Merchandise]


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!

Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200
Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219

Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


Legal

Liz P. Home
Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections
(386) 758-1026
The Canvassing Board will canvas
absentee ballots on 8/18/10 @ 8
a.m., 8/19/10 @ 1 p.m.. 8/20/10 @ 1
p.m., 8/23/10 @ 1 p.m., 8/24/10 @ 1
p.m. & 5 p.m. at the Supervisor of
Elections Office, 971 W Duval St,
Lake City, FL for the August 24,
2010 Primary Election

060 Services

04541324
CMSMG
BARIATRICS
480 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386)758-1965
Ask About our medically
supervised and individualized
Weight loss program,
designed for you.
Obesity shortens your life,
so why not live longer.
Let us help you live longer
and healthier start now!
It's not too late to
extend your life'.

Home Daycare PT/FT/After-
school. Birth to 12. Zoned for
Pinemount Ele. West of Lake City
386-719-9100 or 386-292-9817 for
info. Registration# R03CO0020

100 Job
v Opportunities

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri

05523527

UPEMCO
WORLD AIR SERVICES

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have been waiting for!
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
Aircraft Mechanics
*Aircraft Structural NMechanics
Production.Supervisors
Quality Control Manager/
Supervisor/Inspector
Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careers(@pemcoair.com;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at,
www.pemcoair.com.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an.
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatc4ers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW


Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
WAITRESS/WAITER
Experience Required. Apply in
person. Part-time 297 N Marion
Ave. DeSoto Drugs Restaurant
WE ARE GROWING
Qualified, Experienced Teachers
needed, apply in person
Wee Care Preschool & Daycare
comer of 240 & 47,386-754-5111

11 Sales
hOU vEmployment

05523543
Route Sales salary and commis-
sion paid, van required,will
train, Please fax resume to
Map Supply, Inc 336-731-2297


1 Medical
1 VU Employment

05523572
Medical Office
with immediate opportunies for
Medical Assistant, LPN &
Nurse Practitioner with experi-
ence in medical procedures
Send resume to P.O.Box
2204 lake City, FL 32056

P/T CLERICAL
help needed for medical office,
Fax resume to
386-487-1234


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05523527
!PPEMCO

WORLD AIR SERVICES

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have been waiting for!
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
Aircraft Mechanics
Aircraft Structural Mechanics
Production Supervisors
Quality Control Manager/
Supervisor/Inspector
Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careers( pemcoair.com;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at
www.pemcoair.com.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

04541231
Drivers: Intermodal
OwnerOps Needed!
Rite-way Transport is
Expanding in Jacksonville
18mo TT Exp. TWIC Card.
JAXPORT Badge. Free Secure
Yard Parking. CDL-A;
Paid More with Haz/Tanker
904-781-0457
Fax 904-781-6330

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800.275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412
OFFICE MANAGER.
Local Finance Office looking for
enterprising capable individual,
bookkeeping, filing, other D2D
tasks, good pay, opportunity to
advance. Fax Resume to:
386-755-8608
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
-accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Lve Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746
04540698.
Do you get satisfaction from
making something?
Do you get excited about
technology?
Do you like to analyze problems
and come up with creative
solutions?
If so, a degree or certificate in
Engineering Technology
at Florida Gateway College
is for you!
Engineering Technicians are in
demand by manufacturing and
other high-tech industries.
Enroll now for the Fall semester.
Classes begin Aug. 23.
Financial Aid available.
Call 386-754-4442 for details.

PROGRAM DIRECTOR
position Live Oak, FL.
Send resume to: oprows.e
camelotcommunitycare.org


ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Dishwasher & Stove
$50 EACH
Leave Message
SOLD

GE Dishwasher,
slide in, white, works good,
$100 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-292,-3927
Microwave Oven
good shape, works well, revolving
plate, welcome to see $30
386-755-3682
Upright Freezer,
14/16 Cu Ft, white,
works well,$150
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

407 Computers
IBM Computer,
Many extras
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Full Sized School Chalkboards
$25 each
386-344-5706 or
386-344-1783

Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 386-965-2231
Tool Box,
will fit small truck,
in fair shape,$50 obo
386-754-9295, 386-292-3927

450 GoodThings
45 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

520 Boats for Sale
12' JON Boat. New troll motor
& trailer. Life Jackets, oars &
paddles. $1,500 FIRM.
Cell 386-871-7005. Anytime


120 Medical
120 Employment
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

240 Schools &
240 Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-08/23/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-09/13/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstraininservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
BEAUTIFUL PUPS
Chocolate Labradors
Registered $350
386-965-2231

Chocolate Lab Pups
AKC Registered, health certs
$350 Come by and snuggle
with one!! 386-965-2231
Lovely Rat Terrier.
3.5 months old
$100.
386-697-9950
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
S Supplies
Mini Horses,Mares $500 each,
gentle, both take saddle and rider,
lead well, make great family horse
386-965-2231

401 Antiques


* I i,,


Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Wh Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 Bedroom, Garage Apt,
W/D included, $400 month,
1st & last
386-208-4702
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456


2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security.
Call Michelle
386-752-9626
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+ Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $500. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-1002
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Unfurnished 2br Apt.
w/Gorgeous Lake View. Must see!
$485. mo plus deposit.
Close to shopping. 386-344-2972
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

1BR/1BATH
Low Deposit Moves you in.
$395 a monthly. Only 1 !
386-755-5488
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2/2 S/W $550 monthly, central
heat/air, 1 + wooded acres, 6 miles
east of Live Oak, in Houston area,
1st, last & security 386-935-4014
3 bdrm/2bath MH,
N of town, $575 monthly
plus Sec dep,
386-288-6280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Quiet, Secluded,Private
2/2 MH, on 5 acres
,includes utilities,
Avail Sept 1st 386-755-0300
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
1978 S/W 2 bdrm, in Paradise
.Village MH Park 195 SE Bikini
Dr, Lake City, Lot # 25, 2 blks
from College, great for student, ,
asking $6,000 OBO 850-295-4717
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
, Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824

650 Mobile Home
S& Land
D/W on almost 1/2 acre lot, 3/2,
new AC, appliances included,
$50,000 on Branford Hwy
386-208-0665 or 386-466-2825

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent


05523530
WAREHOUSE SPACE
For Lease near 1-75 in
Cannon Creek;. -
1247sf w-office,
restroom & utilities included.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757.
Westfield Realty Group.

Convenient Store
with gas
for lease,
813-286-2323
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7


805 Lots for Sale


1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pimt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
. limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex, .
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?














Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
wWw.sitel.com EOE


- ADvantage


720 Furnished Apts.
12 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04541182
FOR RENT IN A
GREAT LOCATION
3/2 newer brick duplex,
both units are available.
Approximately 1300 sf. with a
one car garage. A real deal at
only $790./month with
security. Call BJ Federico at
386-365-5884 to schedule your
showing. Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co..

3br/2ba home for rent in Wise
Estates. Brick exterior. new
flooring, great location. $1100.
mo. lst,last, & sec. 386-965-8633
4 Bdrm $850 mo, south of town,
off of 47 ,S/W MH 2/2 in Well-
born, $625 mo 1st, last, 1/2 of sec.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
4/1, 2 car garage,
East Baya Avelarge yard $850
dep, No Pets!$850 per month
386-752-7578
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,150
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-984-9599
Clean lBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-
1833.suwanneevallevproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LG 3BR/2BA house
Nice property. $745. mo.
$600 security. Application req'd.
386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
' I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeffrey. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
UI


.


w u w mu





LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in orint and online.


zuu5 uoage uLI
4x4 Big Ram
20" Factory rims, Hemi
full power, extra cJean..
10,290 mi.
$24,900
Call
386-755-2909


14Ft. V-Hull
Aluminum Boat
With trailer and
trolling motor.
$850
Call '
386-755-4247


- Ia o r i' Mo re eti r .ls Cal
ya B-75-5~440


4--, i ,.

s ^..-.- *4

Repwavt Gktss*rids.

K^^ ^ -^K


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445

M = ILI] tr


and ake- sc
Make Some


3rd Annual FMZA/IMZA Miniature Zebu Extravaganza
August 21 & 22, 2010
Youth Show Saturday 9 am with open show at 1:30 pm
Sunday there will be a meet and greet beginning at 9 am to provide infor-
mation on Zebu miniature cattle followed by a cattle sale.
Event is held at the Suwannee Stables.
Miniature Zebu serve many purposes, including
4-H projects, kids rodeo and as pets.


g~~~T Lei.. *:
. WW. .W


ADVERTISE YOUR


GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER


RI'M R


$


Only


50


400 Wings!


4 LINES


S3 DAYS


S2 FREE SIGNS


(38 6)755-5440


Ask About OurCabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!


Classified Department: 755-5440


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cash






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010


/1 l' o *advertiseo

businessonthis paeS
.r prmease cap~I1152-1293
- 1 se-calliI


- ." -1 l i


sau:St.
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4 fc hbri ui, qk .Jn
cs wn mbrojuidr) s0re
216 SW Main Blvyd, Laks City
(ust t9 W 47idy')
754-3741
www, amvne e8soom


Meeting all your sewing needs!
Over 2,000 Bolts of Fabric
Fabric. notions. zippers
Simplicity patterns
Quilting
Authorized Sales & Service for
Singer Sewing Machines


4 NEW TIRES F


Lb 32* .ff..@*@@ 0001%
HAIRCUT SENIOR DAYS I
I EVERYDAY HAIRCUT
aircut usoru $o@@U
Hwy 90betTien.. ,B I
Wendy's n o d Regular.Prlce s" Hee-Thurs Only.
a & Country Club "' 470 - L f l
7B-305 i IBPrA-. I!
Gateway Plana HIGHLIGHTS 11
F Seice O 5 FOILS FOR CHEMICAL
It roa"Cm,,l'1 i I CHEMICAL IN


"aw- ----



tinl ction I
mm and Veterans
ue Best for 3 Years

52.63061
iE .foB8-80o53 "-'


Rountree
TOYOTA

P-es Service
4310 W US Hwy 9
*1386) 755-0611
U tn;,, v-F- i,1 ',y -spni


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
S Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
SNot valid with any other offer
,1 11


Full Synthetic
Oil Change
$3495
Includes up to 5 quarts
of Oil and Fiter 1

MolcErs z iru.3k
..*-; ..- .. * P


S Central States Enterpr! se, .


CSE FEEDS jo DEEREANNutre MOSA
Smart Choice 10% Sweet 501b................................... 7.25
Smart Choice 12% Pellet 501b.......................................$7.25 SOUTHERN STATES FEEDS
Showtime 12% Performance 501b.....................................$9.95 Layer Crumble or Pellets 501b..............................................$9.25
410 Steer Grow-Finish 50b.................................9.40 Genomax Show Pig 5b................................................... 3.95


NUTRENA FEEDS
Stock & Stable 10% Sweet 501b..................................$6.95
Stock & Stable 10% Pellet 501b................................. $6.95
Complete 10% 501b................................................... 11.50
Safechoice 14% 501b..................................................11.25
Nutrena Semior 501b.................................................13.95

EQUINE DEWORMERS
Ivermectin ...................$3.49 Pyrantel .......................$4.49
Safe Guard ................ $6.99 Equimax............... 0.79
Zimecterin Gold.......................... 0.79
ERTL & John Deere Toys, Bikes and Wagons


Legends Show and Pleasure Pellets 501b...................................$11.25
Triple Crown Complete 501b.............................................. 14.95
Triple Crown Senior 501b........................................................... 4.95

Full Line of Pet Supplies,
Animal Health, Water Softener Salt,
Lawn Garden and Fertilizer.

Brn nthsA n


15%/ OFF CLOTHING AND FOOTWEAR
Choose from Georgia Boot, Rocky, Durango and Mossy Oak
MieFor. Nto K ids, Women and Me n .. .

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 41, 1 I l]# 40 11 .. .):' L .. i .. ..- ........ (J......I."P...--" 0 -, ;l : .J0. -- .V.I


PRICE


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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