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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01400
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/15/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01400
System ID: UF00028308:01400
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Tax notices sent
Columbia residents will start
seeing them in the mail.
---I EA
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TI- '[Ii LL.L L : i- -4


Sunday, August 15, 2010 www.lal


Diamond Dinosaurs
Women's softball league
begins this week.
Sports, I B






Reporter




r, omrn Vol. 136, No. 179 E $1.00


Body found outside local motel


Investigators say
body was man
from Kentucky.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Police found the body
of a 26-year-old man from
Kentucky in a parking
lot outside a local motel


Saturday.
The Lake City Police
Department said the body
of Clifford Bryant of Olive
Hill, Ky. was found next to
a vehicle linked to him.
Police said they were
interviewing people who
spoke with or saw Bryant
before his death.
According to official
reports, authorities arrived
at around 8:45 a.m. at


the Travelodge on U.S.
Highway 90 and found the
body.
Investigator Eddie Black,
State Attorney's Office
investigator Ryan Nydam
and the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement's
Crime Scene Unit respond-
ed to the scene.
LCPD's Sgt. John
Blanchard told the Lake
City Reporter that investi-


gators found no signs of
trauma on .Bryant's body
and the scene was not dis-
turbed. He said it was too
early to conclude if there
was any foul play involved
in the man's death.
"We want to process this
scene just in case it turns
out it was something other


PATRICK SCOTTISpecial to the Lake City Reporter
Investigators work outside the Travelodge on U.S. Highway
90 after a body was found at the motel's parking lot on


*BODY continued on 3A Saturday.


REMAIN SILENT?


Supreme Court adjusts Miranda warning


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
In-this photo illustration, LCPD Officer Rebecca Miles demonstrates how a suspect is read her rights while being helped
into a squad car. The Supreme Court recently tweaked the language of the Miranda warning.


You now need to talk to get


your right to remain silent


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

If you want to invoke
your right to remain
silent as part of the
Miranda warning
read by police offi-
cers, you will now have to
break your silence to tell
law enforcement officers
that's what you want to do.
The Miranda warning
was crafted more than 40
years ago and requires
that police officers tell
suspects taken into cus-
tody that they have the
right to remain silent and
to have an attorney rep-
resent them, even if they
can't afford one.
That original Miranda
warning was developed
from a 1966 Supreme
Court case in which the
court made the ruling


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
In this photo illustration, Lake City Police Officer Louis
Troiano pats down a suspect while Officer Rebecca Miles
reads a card that explains the suspect's Miranda Right.


regarding police question-
ing Ernesto Miranda in a
rape and kidnapping case
in Phoenix, Az.
Although in 2000 the
Supreme Court upheld
the requirement that the


90
T-Storms
WEATHER, 8A


Miranda warning be read
to criminal suspects, the
court recently issued new
interpretations, which
could impact the way law
enforcement officers and
prosecutors question sus-


Opinion
Obituaries
,/ --.- Adjice .
Life


pects.
Earlier this year, the
Supreme Court ruled that
after a suspect requests an
attorney, that request is
-valid for only 14 days after
the person is released
from police custody.
As a result of the ruling,
law enforcement officers
can attempt to question'
a suspect who asked for
a lawyer once the sus-
pect has been released
from police custody for
two weeks. The question-
ing will not violate the
suspect's constitutional
rights and authorities will
not have to repeat the
Miranda warning.
In addition, suspects
must now tell authorities
they are going to remain
silent to invoke their right
and stop the questioning.
MIRANDA continued on 5A


4A


EXCLUSIVE


Two District 10

hopefuls confront

criminal records

Newspaper probe "I got in trouble,
finds candidates but I 'paid my
debt and I came
with felony files. back."


By TOM MAYER
tmayer@lakecityreporter.com
Two Lake City District
10 city council candidates
have criminal records that
include felony convictions,
according ro police and
court reports researched
by the Lake City Reporter.

Adeed
candidates,
A d e e
Farmerand
Perry
Harris,
agreed
Farmer to ) speak




witbackground check by the
Reporters
about theF
cDpartment of Law-
tions.
The felo-
ny convic-
Harris were found to have
following a statewide
background check by the
Reporter through public
records and the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement database.
A background check was
performed on each candi-,
date running in local elec-
tive posts. Only Farmer and
Harris were found to have
a felony conviction in the


Adee Farmer
Candidate
District 10 city council

state of Florida.
On April 1, 1997, Adee
Farmer, now 47, was
charged with attempted
cocaine trafficking, more
than 28 grams, by the
Orange County Sheriff's
Office. According to
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, Farmer pled
no contest to the second-
degree felony in Orlando's
9th Circuit Court and was
placed under house arrest
and probation. Farmer
concluded his sentence in
February 2000.
On July 7, 1999, Tammy
Perry Harris, now 41, was
charged with withholdi-
ing support (desertion of
child), a third-degree felo-
ny. Harris pled no contest
to the charge to Columbia
County's 3rd Circuit Court
and was subject to two
years probation.
Candidates are eligible to
run for office under Florida
law despite felony convic-
tions if their civil rights
have been restored. Article
6, Section 4 of The Florida
CRIMINAL continued on 5A


Inland port site

anchored on

infrastructure


Companies
involved will need
roads, power.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Infrastructure is expect-
ed to play a significant role
in the development of an
inland port in Columbia
County as part of a Rural
Area of Critical Concern
catalyst site.
Needs such as roads,


DAILY
BRIEFING
C.'ba-iri .jf L ,a T.
open ,fc-r bu'iines,:


water supply, sewers, power
supply and telecommunica-
tions options could be the
determining factors for
companies hoping to locate
at the Rural Area of Critical
Concern catalyst site.
Given those infrastruc-
ture requirements, one
Lake City official says the
site is already ahead of the
game.
David Clanton, the
city's executive director of
Utilities, said Lake City has
PORT continued on 3A


COMING
TUESDAY
Get the latest on
health-r elated re .'..-,.


'F:


illUIIIUI1.








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


S-iA- CA$S 3.
Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
4-7-21-35 3 1-3-6-24-29 Afternoon: 6-6-9 Afternoon: 0-7-5-8 4-15-27-29-33-50 7-10-22-23-52-29
Evening: 7-7-9 Evening: 2-2-6-1



AROUND FLORIDA



Obama declares Gulf Coast 'open for business'


By JUUE PACE
Associated Press
PANAMA CITY BEACH
President Barack
Obama declared
Gulf Coast
beaches clean,
safe and open
for business as he brought
his family to the Florida
Panhandle and promised
residents that the govern-
ment wouldn't forget them
once efforts to stop the
leak are finished.
On a warm and muggy
day, Obama pledged
to "keep up our efforts
until the environment is
cleaned, polluters are held
accountable, businesses
and communities are made
* whole, and the people of
the Gulf Coast are back on
their feet"
Obama is in the region
for a brief weekend trip
with first lady Michelle
Obama, daughter Sasha
(her sister Malia is at sum-
mer camp) and the family
dog, Bo. Their-27-hour
stop in the Sunshine State
is as much a family vaca-
tion as it is an attempt by
the president to convince
Americans that this region,
so dependent on tourism
revenue, is safe for travel.
He said he "absolutely"
would go swimming in
waters that absorbed 200
million gallons of oil since
the spill began in April.
The highly anticipated dip
probably won't come until
Sunday, he said, adding
that he hoped to be able to
take his swim away from
the glare of the media.
Obama said his fam-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama greet airmen after arriving at Tyndall
Air Force Base in Panama City on Saturday during a brief weekend trip, part vacation, part
sales pitch, as the president seeks to boost a tourism industry reeling after the Gulf oil spill.


ily planned to "enjoy the
beach and the water to
let our fellow Americans
know that they should
come on down here."
Arriving at their beach-
front hotel, the first fam-
ily ventured to Lime's
Bayside Bar & Grill, where


they relaxed on an out-
door deck overlooking the
water and ate a lunch of
fish tacos, chicken tenders
and burgers.
The White House sched-
uled the trip after facing
criticism that the president
wasn'theeding his own


advice that Americafns
vacation in the Gulf.
Obama has vacationed in
North Carolina this sum-
mer and is heading to
Martha's Vineyard, off the
Massachusetts coast, later
in August. Mrs. Obama
also traveled to Spain this


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama and.
daughter Sasha walk off of Air Force One at Tyndall Air
Force Base in Panama City Saturday. The first family,
absent Malia, who is at summer camp, arrived in the Florida
Panhandle region for a brief weekend trip.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama eats lunch with first lady Michelle
and daughter Sasha at Lime's restaurant on Saturday near
Panama City.


month with Sasha.
Gulf Coast residents and
local officials are hoping
the president's stop here
'will jump-start the tourism
industry, which has been'
reeling since the spill
Although only 16 of the
180 beaches in the west-
ern part of the Panhandle
were affected by the spill,
tourism officials say many,
potential visitors have
stayed away, deterred
by images of oil-slicked


waters and tarball-strewn
beaches in other parts of
the region.
"It's the biggest single
commercial you could
imagine," Florida Gov.
Charlie Crist said of the
president's visit.
Crist was among the
local officials and small
business owners who
joined Obama earlier in
the day at a meeting to dis-
cuss the pace of recovery
efforts.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Lauer shows off interview skills


NEW YORK
att Lauer is now
reportedly the high-
est paid person in

in Friday's 'Today"
show interview with actress Lindsay
Lohan's mother, he showed why
NBC considers him so valuable.
In the two-part conversation with
Dina Lohan, Lauer refused to be
-knocked off stride when he was
insulted, had his facts questioned
and queries deflected emerging
with a portrait his subject surely
! -regretted later.
SLauer, who TVGuide.com estimat-
ed this week makes more than $16
million a year to host television's
top-rated morning show, landed
Lohan's first interview since her
daughter was jailed and sent to
drug rehabilitation. From the start,
Dina Lohan made viewers wonder
why she had agreed to be there in
the first place.
Lohan responded to Lauer's first
question, as well as the second,
third and fourth, by lashing out
at the judge in the case. She said
the judge played hardball with her
daughter.
"You don't think she deserved
time in jail?" Lauer asked. He
shrugged it off when she said no
and kept up her attack on the judge.


ASSOCIAtUD PRESB
In this photo provided by NBC Universal, co-host Matt Lauer talks With Dina
Lohan on NBC's 'Today' show in New York on Friday.


An aide says the fundraiser was
Lautenberg's idea. The senator and
his wife celebrated his 86th birthday
in January at a Gaga show at New
York's Radio City Music Hall.
Lautenberg was hospitalized Feb.
15 after falling at his home and was
treated for a bleeding ulcer. B-cell
lymphoma was found in his stomach
four days later.
He announced in June he was
cancer-free after six rounds of che-
motherapy.


two years for a case in which he
brought drugs to a jail facility.
"Redmond put his nose to the
grindstone and completed a very
vigorous drug court program,"
his attorney, Richard E Pintal said
Friday. "In the wake of that, he
earned the two dismissals from
Judge (Michael) Tynan."
The younger O'Neal has
remained out of trouble since he
was jailed for a probation violation
in January. Tynan placed him in a
drug diversion program a month
later that the judge said would be
"justifiably" severe. -
fi
Hayward, co-founder
of Little Feat, dies
NEW YORK Richie Hayward,
co-founder of the Little Feat, an
eclectic jamband that maintained a
strong cult following throughout the
decades, has died. He was 64.
The drummer had been suffering
from liver cancer and died Thursday
at a hospital near Vancouver,
Canada, after complications of pneu-
monia, his publicist, Bridget Nolan,
confirmed Friday.

* Associated Press


: TRENTON, N.J. Sen. Frank
Lautenberg is going gaga. Lady
Gaga, that is. The
Nation's oldest sena-
tor will hold a fund-
raiser at the pop
singer's Monster
Ball Tour at the
Verizon Center in
Washington on
Lautenberg Sept 7.
The Washington
Post reports the 86-year-old New
Jersey Democrat is offering seats in
a private suite for $2,500 a person
for political action committees and
$2,400 for individuals.


LOS ANGELES Redmond
O'Neal, the son of the late Farrah
Fawcett and Ryan O'Neal, has suc-
cessfully completed a drug diver-
sion program.
O'Neal's gradua-
tion from the treat-
ment program on
Thursday led to the
dismissal of two
felony drug-related
cases, district attor-
ney spokeswoman
O'Neal Jane Robison said.
The 25-year-old
will remain on probation for another


* Actress Rose-Marie ("The
Dick Van Dyke Show") is 88.
* Actor Mike Connors is 85.
* Actress Lori Nelson is 77.
* Actress Pat Priest ("'The
Munsters") is 74.
* Drummer Pete York of
The Spencer Davis Group
is 68..


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakectyreporter.com)


* Author-journalist Linda
Ellerbee is 66.
* Songwriter Jimmy Webb
is 64.
* Singer-guitarist Tom
Johnstonr of The .Doobie
.Brothers is 62.
* Actress Tess Harper is
60.


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A.-Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks . ............. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks . ............. $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture

"These are the words of the
Amen, the faithful and true wit-
ness, the ruler of God's creation.
Here I am! I stand at the door
and knock. If anyone hears my
voice and opens the door, I will
come in and eat with him, and he
with me."- Revelation 3:14,20


iLautenberg goes gaga;
plans to hold fundraiser Fawcett' s so completes
drug diversion program


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


PORT: Utilities ready, officials say


Continued Front Page 1A
a multitude of infrastructure
near the RACEC site that
could be easily accessed by
companies hoping to estab-
lish facilities at the RACEC
site.
"We have a 12-inch water
line along the south side of
U.S. Highway 90 to the pris-
on sites, and there is also
a six-inch natural gas line
running along that same
side of the road," he said.
Clanton said CCA, the
privately-run correctional
facility near the port site,
is on city sewage and the
facility has a private sew-
age pumping station that
pumps the sewage from
the prison three miles west
to the Lake City Municipal
airport.
"We've got all three utili-
ties out there available, it's
just a matter of doing some
long- range planning," he
said. "We have to know
what's maybe going out
there and what the natural
gas and sewage demands
are. In my opinion we could
handle whatever pops up
out there with what we
have in place."
The current capacity for
wastewater treatment that
could be accepted from the
RACEC site is about 15,000
gallons a day of sewage
in the form of raw waste
water.
Todd Powell, Plum
Creek director of real
estate, said there are two
essential steps that need to
take place for the project
to progress from the Plum
Creek side of things.
"We need to start work-
ing on zoning the prop-
erty and at the same point
in time there are some
things we are still working
on with solving some of
the infrastructure needs,"
he said.
Those needs include
things such as figuring
out water and wastewa-
ter requirements to also
working on a rail spur
and continued negotia-
tions with the U.S. Forest
Service on trying to nego-
tiate a rail easement to the
CSX rail line.
Powell said he is con-
fident they can meet the
deadline they've set for
project completion.
"We are working very
hard and tirelessly to get
there," he said.
Jim Poole, Columbia
County Industrial
Development Authority
executive director, said
the next step for the IDA
will involve the property's
environment.
"We have to complete
our wetlands identifica-
tion, to do a Phase 1 envi-
ronmental study, begin to
do a preliminary engineer-
ing plan and at that point,
hopefully come back and
begin to have an idea of
what the plat is going to
look," Poole said.
He said while that
process is taking place,
they'll be actively trying
to recruit a company that
will be housed at the site.
"Even before you have
an approved plat, you can
do at least one project,
and it will not disappoint
us to have one project on
there before we finish the
plat," Poole said.
Currently, the City of
Lake City provides water,
natural gas and some sew-
age capacity along the
U.S. Highway 90 corridor
where the inland port site
will be located.
"We've got the initial
infrastructure to get start-
ed," Poole said. "The city


BODY:
From Page 1A


than natural," Blanchard
said.
A news release from the
LCPD didn't provide more
details. It said an update will
be released after Bryant's
relatives have been notified.
Anyone having information
about this incident or oth-
ers can contact the LCPD
anonymously on the TIP
line at (386) 719-2068.


is working on upgrading
its wastewater facilities, but
we do want to look at an
ability of using re-use water
on this site and make it a
complete site. All of those
will go into the engineering
plan."
Poole said officials are
confident that if a com-
pany wanted to locate on
the site in the immedi-
ate future and just needed
potable water, sewage and
basic necessities; the city
could handle the job.
The City of Lake City .is
building a new wastewater
treatment plant that will be
located on KicklighterRoad,
near the city's sprayfield on
Sisters Welcome Road.
The plant will take
wastewater from the
Interstate 75 and U.S. 90
interchange area, creat-
ing more capacity at the
wastewater treatment
plant on St. Margarets
Street. Wastewater from
the RACEC site will
then be routed to the St.
Margarets' street facility.
"With some studies done
on the existing system, we
may be able to take to more
than the 15,000 gallons a
day," Clanton said. "We just
have to do a capacity study


er wastewater treatment
plant out there to handle
the additional flows gener-
ated," Clanton said. "When
we build, it will have pub-
lic access reuse capabili-
ties and we would use that
water to send back to the
public or irrigate lands
within the RACEC area."
Poole said there are cur-
rently no ongoing nego-
tiations with a prospective
company looking at locat-
ing at the inland port.
"We're working with
some companies, but not
on this particular site at
this time," he said.
Expansion of the
Panama Canal is expected
to be completed by 2014
allowing more goods to be
brought to the Jacksonville
Port by ships the driv-
ing force behind the inland
port site.
Poole said local officials
hope to beat the 2014
Panama Canal completion
deadline and have some
companies on-site when
the work is completed.
"I hope we're able
to beat the deadline by
about two years," Poole
said. "I think we have to
be ahead of the curve,
not just at the curve."


T oethae for A Batter Cop


ge Stephen


Butte A


(30%tt


NEW GYMNASTICS GYM

(Cheek's
S/fGymnastics
Checks Of Live Oak is now in Lake City
vina tics Tom Cheek, owner and coach invites
-" everyone to come check us out.
c \ 1 3228 NWHWY41
\ ( [3 miles from Hardees)
cell 205-8363 or 590-2519



OB/ YN

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Nominal Opening Bid: $1,000 5BR 2BA 2.268+/- sf Built in 1963.
LIVE OAK, FL
* 1398 White Ave SE Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000
4BR 2BA 1,766+/- sf. Built in 1955. NEWBERRY, FL 24321 SW 61st PI
Approx .29ac lot. 4BR 2BA 1,782-/- sf. Approx 10ac lot.


Open Houses: 1-4pm Sat Aug 21st and
2 hours before sale.
Above properties sell: 8:15pm, Wed
Aug 25th at 1593 NW Nash Rd, Lake
City, FL
See website for complete
area listings


Nominal Opening Bid: $1,000
BELL, FL 6100 NW 50th Terr
4BR 2.5BA 1,882+/- sf. Built in 1970.
Open Houses: 1-4pm Sat Aug 14th and
2 ours before sale
Above properties sell: 4:15pm, Thu
Aug 19th at 12807 NW 202nd St,
Alachua, FL


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worldwide real estate auction


New shoes, socks prepare

county children for school


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com

Almost 250 needy chil-
dren in Columbia County
will be outfitted in new
shoes when they go back
to school, thanks to the
community and a local ser-
vice organization.
The Christian Service
Center of Columbia County
Inc. held its Fifth Annual
Sock and Shoe Drive at the
Lake City Mall Saturday.
Members of the commu-
nity chose cards at the drive
with a needy child's name
and shoe size, received cou-
pons for discounts to shop
for the child and purchased
socks and shoes from mall
stores for the service center
to give to the children.
Area dance, karate and
gymnastics schools pro-'
vided entertainment at the
drive. They were joined by
the local veterans musical
group Reflections of Lake
City and an Elvis imperson-
ator.


ENDS
August 20
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS)


ADD/DROP
August 23-27
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS)
ALL FEES ARE DUE EACH DAY

Registrar's Office Hours:
8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday
8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday

Now August 13
7:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Celestine Levy (from left), a Christian Service Center
volunteer, explains how to choose a child's name from the
board to Jeannine Cormier of Lake City.


Any needy child's card
that did get chosen during
the drive will still receive
a pair of shoes and socks
provided by the service cen-
ter, said Shirley. McManus,
executive director.
'We will make sure every
child gets a pair of socks.
and shoes," she said.
The children receiving
the footwear are in grades
kindergarten through 12
and have all been screened
for need by the organiza-


tion, McManus said.
McManus has been mea-
suring the children for their
shoes sizes during the past
two weeks. She said during
that time, they all expressed
how grateful they were to
receive shoes from a will-
ing person who didn't know
them.
"Ift's not just about buy-
ing the shoes and socks,"
McManus said, "but the
impact you have on a
child's life."


Semester

YOU MAY ACCESS SCHEDULE
INFORMATION ONLINE AT:
www.fgc.edu



FLORIDA..
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
* 4 *


FOR INFORMATION CALL:
Registrar: (386) 754-4205 Admissions: (386) 754-4396

Florida Gateway College does not discriminate in education or employment related decisions or the basis of race, color, religion,
national origin, gender, age, disability, marital status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status in accordance with
the law. The Equity Officer is Sharon Best, director of human resources, and may be reached at
(386) 754-4313, Building 001, Room 136, 149 SE College Place, Lake City, FL 32025.


Mi'T.m

DaTf''yT Service^^


I william sautinco


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












OPINION


Sunday,August 15,2010


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Assuring

students

achieve full

potential

Jn the realm of public
education, two-thirds of a
million dollars doesn't go
very far, but in Columbia
County that might just be
enough to help Columbia High
School raise its level of student
learning.
- Although this year's
high school grades have yet to
be released, CHS did not fare
well in the 2008 to 2009 school
year. The school ranked near
the bottom, scoring a "D."
Yet, this should not be the
district's focus. What makes
a tentative federal grant for
$700,000 to fuel improvements
at the school so important is
not the school's ranking, but
what that ranking reflects
about student achievement.
S Today, that reflection is
poor.
The U.S. Census indicates
that about 63 percent.of high
school students graduate
and immediately attend col-
lege. But for 37 percent of
our nation's students, a high
school education is the last
bastion against underem-
ployment, and is vital for the
future opportunities a solid
high school experience can
offer.
Those opportunities must
be available to Columbia High
School students.
At this time, a $700,000
federal student improvement
grant is yet in its approval
phase. But with all signs
pointing to a green light for
the funding, principal Terry
Iuddleston is right to prepare
4ow to help his students and
staff reach their full potential.
" Huddleston's plan includes
significant changes in sched-
uling as well as bridge and
academic coaching programs,
professional staff development
and a bonus system to attract
and retain the best teachers.
Such improvements are
vitally needed at CHS, and the
state was right to grant its OK
on moving forward with the
award not yet confirmed.
Huddleston has a good plan
at the ready. We hope he gets
to use it.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers .
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished-
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
,work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: '
news@lakecityreporter.com


There is an interesting
story of the old sage
who lived on the side
of a mountain near a
lake. It was common
practice for the people of the
village below to come to him for
counseling and advice.
The wise old man spent
many hours sitting out in front
of his small cabin where he.
rocked to and.fro in a crude
little rocking chair made of the
branches of the surrounding
trees.
Hour after hour he sat and
rocked as he reflected.
One day he noticed a young
lad walking up the path past
the lake toward his cabin. The
boy walked up the hill and
stood erect before the sage.
The old man said, "What can
I do for you young man?" The
boy replied, "I am told by the
people in the village that you
are very wise. They say that
you can give me-the secret of
happiness and success in life."
The old sage listened intent-
ly and then cast his gaze at the
ground for several moments.
He silently rocked to and fro.
Not a sound was heard except
the creaking of the crude rock-
ing chair.
Then, the sage rose to his
feet, took the boy by the hand
and led him down the path
toward the lake.
Not a word was spoken.
The boy was bewildered,
but the old man kept walking.
They came to the edge of the


www.lakecityreporter.com


Seminars target local businesses


Everyone in business
is looking for more
efficiency in all
areas. We all want to
maximize our effort
to generate the most sales and
revenue while at the same time,
,holding the line on expenses.
Ifts easier said than done, but
there are two no-nonsense busi-
ness training seminars coming
to Lake City that can help with
fresh ideas during challenging
economic times.
The Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
continues, to work to bring more
business-enhancement seminars
to the local business commu-
nity and one of these is set for
Thursday morning.
The Chamber's Better
Business Series continues with
"Stop Selling and Start Making
Money" which will focus on
networking and creating strate-
gies .to build a smarter business
sales strategy. Greta Schulz,
who owns and operates Schulz
Training, is a nationally known
motivational and inspirational
business speaker and will lead
the program.
Schulz has advised profes-
sionals in all business cat- .


Todd Wilson
twilson@akecityreportercom
egories from entrepreneurs to
salespeople to legal and medical
professionals. See for yourself at
www.proactivetraining. biz.
First Federal Bank of Florida
is a co-sponsor of the event
with the Chamber. The break-
fast seminar is from 7:30 a.m.-
9:30 a.m. Thursday at Florida
Gateway College. Tickets are
$15 for Chamber members and
$20 for non-members.
Later this month, the Dale
Carnegie Course will take its
students on an eight-week jour-
ney through the motions of self-
improvement in the business
arena. The Carnegie course
teaches basic management tech-
niques that center on improving
relationships and communica-
tion in a business environment
The course meets once each
week for around three hours.


It is training that is recognized
worldwide as some of the best
instruction available.
At the Lake City Reporter,
we're honored to serve as co-
sponsor with the Chamber to
bring the Dale Carnegie Course
to Lake City. The course-is a
solid training investment and
there are a few seats available,
but enrollment will close later
this week.
Our involvement and co-
sponsorship with the Carnegie
course is a commitment to mar-
ket the seminar to the public
and help a program of this mag-
nitude be made available locally
in our business community. For
more information on either of
these business training oppor-
tunities, contact the Chamber
office at (386) 752-3690.
Take advantage of both of
these seminars and invest in
your staff, yourself and your
business. Both of these semi-
nars will offer some of the best
training available and pay off
tenfold. Get involved, learn
something and watch your busi-
ness grow.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


lake but did not stop.
Out into the water the old
man led the boy. The water
came to the boy's knees, to his
waist, then to his chin, but the
old sage kept walking. The lad
was completely submerged in
the water. .,
The sage stopped'for a
moment, then turned the boy
around and led him out of the
lake and up the path to the'
cabin. Still not a word was spo-.
ken.
The wise old man sat again
in his creaky chair and silently
rocked to and fro.
After several moments he
looked into the boy's question-
ing eyes and asked, "Young
man, when you were out in the
lake, under water, what was
it you wanted more than any-
thing else in life?" Quickly the
boy replied, "Why, sir, I wanted
a breath of air more than any-
thing."
Then from the wise old man
came these words of wisdom,
"My lad, when you want hap-
piness and when you want
success in life as much as you
wanted the breath of air, you
will have found the secret."
And so it is. So many people
are dissatisfied with their pres-
ent status in life. They wish for
something better. They dream
of the day when things.will be
just right, but they only wish
and dream.
They don't resolve, and plan,
and act. .
So many people don't know


what it is that they really
want. Before we can succeed
we must define .our goals. We,
must know specifically what
we want from life, then we
must want it enough that we
will be motivated to formulate
a plan that will enable us to
achieve it.
We must want it enough that
we will diligently follow the
plan, step by step, every day.
When our goals and our
plans become a living picture
of reality in our minds, a pic-
ture that will motivate us to
determined action, only then
can we expect to find the hap-
piness and success to fulfill our
dreams.
As the poet so aptly wrote:
"I bargained with Life for a
penny and Life would pay no
more.
However I begged at evening.
When I counted my scanty
store.
For Life is a just employer,
He gives you what you ask,
But once you have set the
wages,
Why you must bear the task.
I worked for a menial's hire,
only to learn, dismayed,
That any wage I had asked
of Life
Life would have willingly
paid."

* By Mike Rothenberger. For *
information on the upcoming Dale
Carnegie Course in Lake City,
call the Chamber of Commerce at
(386) 752-3690.


4A


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffman@shns.com



Military

brass nixes

medal for

war dogs


The
Pentagon has
slammed the
door again
on a request from former
military dog handlers to honor
U.S. war dogs with an official
medal for their service.
Hundreds of military
working dogs have put in
multiple tours in combat
in Iraq and Afghanistan,
and are credited with sav-
ing scores of U.S. lives by
detecting IEDs, serving as
sentries, walking dangerous
patrols and even shielding
their handlers with their
bodies.
About a dozen canine
troops have died in the wars
and twice that many have
been injured. Some, like
Marine Corps dog Lex, who
was wounded along with
* his handler in a 2007 rocket
attack in Iraq, demonstrated
their devotion by refusing to
leave the side of their part-
ners until help arrived.
In light of their contribu-
tions, the U.S. War Dogs
Association, which was
started by former Vietnam
War dog handlers, asked the
Pentagon to allow dogs to be
recognized with one of the
official medals awarded to
troops for combat service.
No way, the Pentagon
said, because medals are
for humans only. (In past
conflicts, however, some
U.S. war dogs were so hon-
ored with the blessings
of the military brass, and
some commanders in Iraq
and Afghanistan have unof-
ficially presented medals to
those who performed meri-
toriously.)
The war dogs group said
the Pentagon also turned
thumbs down on creating
a new medal specifically
for military working dogs.
And it wanted no part of the
group's most recent sugges-
tion that the military sanc-
tion the group to issue its
own award.
Undaunted, the group
uswardogs.org has
decided to go it alone, and
has created a 2-inch-diam-
eter medal adorned with
a red, white and blue rib-
.bon, which it will award to
deserving military, working
dogs.


ARC connection
The American Red Cross,
as part of an effort to figure
out how social media merg-
es with disaster communica-
tions, finds in an online sur-
vey that one in five adults
who couldn't get through on
911 after a disaster said they
would try e-mail or a social-
network site such as Twitter
to call for help.
Three out of four reaching
out this way said they would
expect a response from
emergency personnel in an
hour or less. But officials
at the Red Cross advised all
who do so not to hold their
breath.
While many police and
fire agencies use e-mail and
the Internet to issue warn-
ings and relief information,
almost none have any sys-
tem to monitor or respond
to such calls for help, the


relief organization said.
* Scripps Howard News Service


OTHER OPINION

Lesson in life from the old wise man








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


MIRANDA: Subject to interpretation?


Continued From Page 1A
The court also approved
a version of Miranda warn-
ings from some Florida
law enforcement agencies,
which did not spell out to
suspects that they have a
right to have an attorney
present during their police
questioning.
Local law enforcement
officials say the interpreta-
tions will not hinder the
way they question and
handle suspects.
Argatha Gilmore, Lake
City Police Chief, said
LCPD officers will contin-
ue what they're doing.
"The interpretation from
the Supreme Court men-
tioned that just a suspect
remaining silent does not
say that they're waiving
their rights," she said. "It's
given us that latitude to
continue going until that
suspect says, 'I don't want
to talk to you any longer.'"
Gilmore said LCPD offi-
cers were recently given
legal updates listing the
high court's interpretation.
"It's pretty clear cut, but
we'll get with the State
Attorney's Office to ensure
that if there are any con-
cerns or issues that he
may have from his office
that he'll pass on to us,
we'll certainly incorporate
it and give that information
to our officers," she said.
"This interpretation
clearly helps us to con-
tinue what we're doing,"
Gilmore continued. "It's
not that we'll be doing. any-
thing different, because
we don't want to violate
anyone's rights and we
don't want to do anything
to cause a case not to go
forward in a prosecutable


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
This photograph depicts an older card with all of the
Constitutional Miranda rights printed on it.


manner. We know just
because a person is not
saying anything that this
just lets us know we don't
have to stop. We'll just con-
tinue to question that sub-
ject until that subject says
he doesn't want to talk any
longer. I don't see where
its hampered or hindered
us in any way because fol-
low the law."
Sgt Ed Seifert,
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office public information
officer, also said the inter-'
pretation will not result in
changes at the sheriff's
office.
"The changes to the
Miranda warnings will
not change how the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office questions criminal
suspects," he said. 'The
changes to Miranda place
the burden on the person-
being interviewed to tell
the officer that they wish
to invoke their rights.


Suspects must break their
silence and tell police they
are going to remain quiet
if they want to invoke their
'right to remain silent' and
stop an interrogation, just
as they must tell police
that they want a lawyer.
Further, a suspect's 'right
to remain silent' expires
after a 14-day period."
Seifert said the U.S.
Supreme Court's interpre-
tations are not necessarily
a hindrance to law enforce-
ment, and they will not
appreciably charge the
way sheriff's office depu-
ties conduct business.
"Our deputies will con-
tinue to comply with any
court rulings and apply the
law equally to al" he said.
"CCSO deputies receive
continual training in all
manners of law efnforce-
ment and this new legal
ruling will certainly be
incorporated into the train-
ing curriculum."


Officials start issuing


property tax notices


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia County prop-
erty owners can now look
for property tax notices in
their mailboxes.
Approximately 38,000
proposed tax notices for
ad valorem taxes and tan-
gible personal property
were mailed Friday to
county residents owning
real estate and personal
property. The notices
began arriving in mailbox-
es Saturday.
"It's coming in the
mail," said Doyle Crews,
Columbia County property
appraiser. "Keep a lookout
for it."
The notices will allow
property owners receiving
them to see their exemp-
tions and both assessed
value and market value on
their property.
Crews said depending
on each taxpayer's spe-
cific, personal ,scenario,
taxpayers will see either a


decrease or slight increase
in their taxes.
Some taxpayers will
see decreases because
Columbia County assessed
values have decreased
by 3.5 percent from 2009
and market values have
decreased about 5 percent,
Crews said.
Some taxpayers who
have had homestead
for several years could
see increases,. he said,
because they fall under the
Save Our Homes Law and
their assessed value will
increase 2.7 percent.
"This is a little confusing
to the taxpayers because
they will see a decrease in
their market value and an
increase in their assessed
value," Crews said.
Crews stressed that
every taxpayer's situation
is different.
"It's hard, to put your
finger on exactly what's
going to happen because
there's so many different
scenarios on how exemp-


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter


tions are applied and on
the values because all the
values are capped by con-
stitutional amendments,"
he said.
Also listed on the notic-
es are all, county taxing
authorities and the dates,
times and locations of
their public hearings on
proposed taxes.
"This is a notice that
the taxpayer has one last
chance to review their
assessments and exemp-
tions and question the
taxing authorities on
where their money is
being spent before final
tax roles are certified for
collection in November,"
Crews said.
Any person receiving a
property tax notice who
has questions can call
the Office of Property
Appraiser by Sept. 7, the
last day before the tax
roll is set.
Call (386) 758-1083
or visit www.appraiser.
columbiacountyfla.com.


Runway practice
Kasey Frazier, 11, of Live Oak
strikes a pose while she
practices her runway walk
for the Belk KidFest fashion show
at the Lake City Mall Saturday.
KidFest provided children's games,
prizes and a fashion show
featuring local children and Belk
children's department clothes,
music. Attendees received light
refreshments to enjoy while
back-to-school shopping.


CRIMINAL: Farmer says he uses his arrest experience to help local youths
Continued From Page 1A


Constitution reads, "No per-
son convicted of a felony ...
shall be qualified to vote or
hold office until restoration '
of civil rights. ..."
It has been indicated
by the Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections
Office and statements to
the Reporter from Farmer
and Harris that each can-
didate is eligible to run for
office under this law.
Today, Farmer works
for the Columbia County
School Board with at-risk
youth at the Challenge
Learning Center. His
employment was subjected
to a criminal background
check and to local and state
laws ip place at the time
of hire, according to Mike
Millikin, superintendent of.
schools.
Farmer attributed his
arrest and conviction to
"falling in with the wrong
crowd," and said he uses
his personal experiences
to help the youths with
whom he works make bet-
ter choices.
"I tell them, the deci-
sions they make today will
affect them the rest of their
life," Farmer said. "I got in
trouble, but I paid my debt
and I came back."
In a letter given to the
Reporter, Farmer said that
upon conclusion of his sen-
tence he "vowed to become
a better citizen, father,
employee and most impor-
tantly, a positive mentor for
young men."
In addition to his work
with at-risk youths, Farmer
works as a recreation aide
and in 2009 was selected
football commissioner for
the Lake City Pop Warner
Little League program.
In 2006, the District 10
candidate said he formed
the nonprofit Lake City
Exposure Foundation to
"provide economically dis-
advantaged middle and
high school athletes the
opportunity to take part
in academic field trips and
sports camps."
A copy of a letter dated
Feb. 15, 2010, from the
office of C. Dennis Roberts,
public defender, indicates
that Donald R. Kennedy,
administrative director,
supports an application for
clemency submitted to the


state by Farmer.
"Mr. Farmer is a respect-
ed member of our com-,
:munity where" he is' vry'
involved with the youth of
our community," Kennedy'
writes.
Harris said that her con-
viction came from her part
in Columbia County's foster
care program while she was
a foster parent According
to Harris, an incident involv-
ing a 7-year-old foster child
and her 5-year-old biological
child prompted her to ask


the local agency of Florida
Department of Children
and Families to remove the
'7-year-oldd from her home.
After a week of no response,
Harris said, she took the
child to the agency herself.
"I tried for a week, and
then I took him to the office
and sat all day," said Harris.
"I told them I had to pick up
my child from school, and
I was told to leave the (fos-
ter) child at the office and
they would take care of him
when his worker arrived."


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Harris said it wasn't until
"much. later" that she was
notified of the charge. Court
records show the Harris'
case was disposed of on Nov.


13, 2000. In addition to pro-
bation, Harris paid $315 in
court costs.
Harris said the court
action stemmed from


responsibility to safeguard
her children..
"You .have to keep your
children safe," Harris
said.


Now there's an


Incisionless

Surgical Solution


C Call 1-800-


/ .


525-3248
To Register by Phone


Fix it with EsophyX'


I A* e


Thursday, August 26 at 6:30 pm
Lake City Medical Center Classroom
Enter through the main lobby. Light Refreshments will be served.

Presented by Gateway Surgical Specialists at

.--.,LAAKE CITY

MEDRAL CENTER
340 Northwest Commerce Drive
Lake City, FL


TheNe ciiones EopyX IFprceuresugialy rcostucs te atra
valv thtsopsaci frm cmin up Esph, isintodued ntothebod thoug
th ouh ntthogha icsin I ffr ls pi, es ikn'sa, n ms
pati nts an g t bak to wor and mostnorm l acivites n ony.a hortperi d.


I


*c


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


, ^ ]


** j P








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
'dluction at High Springs
Community Theater is
"The Spell Of Sleeping
Beauty" at 2 p.m. today.
All tickets are $5 and avail-
able at The Framery, The
Coffee Clutch in High
Springs and through Pay
VPal at www.highspringcom-
munitytheater com.

Community judging
The community is invit-
'ed to vote on the art on
display at the West Branch
of the Columbia County
Library through Aug. 20.
The votes will determine
the winning two artists for
the Patron's Award for the
Sixth Annual Art Exhibit
sponsored by the Art
League of North Florida
and The Friends Of the
Library. There will also be
a drawing from those who
voted, and the winner will
.receive an original paint-
:ing.

Artists wanted
The Art League of
North Florida is present-
ing the 6th Annual All
Media Juried Art Exhibit
Aug. 27 through Oct 28 at


James K. Wade Sr.
Born April 29, 1931 in Suwanee
County Jame K. Wade Si. died
unexpectedly on Aug.. 12. He
was a Marine Veteran of the
Korean War and retired after 30
years of service with the Florida
Highway -Patrol at the rank of
lieutenant. He also worked for
the Federal Marshall's Office
and the Orange County Sheriff's
Office. He was a devoted father
of three children; Jay & (Terri),
Patrica, and Keith.& (Faye) Wade
and a grandfather of four: Jen-
fiifer, Ryan, 3mes s ljoTTo-masi
and had two great grandchildren,
Landon & Lia. He also leaves
behind his ex-
,wife Alice Lear
of Branford and
her family. He
was an active
member of the Lake City Moose
Lodge #624, the VFW, The
Elks Club, and the Retired State


the Levy Performing Arts
Center. The exhibit is open
to all two and three dimen-
sion original works of art
by persons 18 years or
older. There will be cash
awards of $1,000. Entry
applications are available
at the Columbia County
Public Library and the
Fabric Art Shop. Contact
Fetchenj@comcast. net.

Monday
Early voting
Early voting for the
2010 Primary Election is
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
through Aug. 21. Early
Voting locations are at the
Supervisor of Elections'
Lake City Office at 971 W.
Duval St and at the Fort
White Community Center
at 17579 SW SR 47. Voters
should bring a picture and
signature ID.

Tuesday
Open House
The SAIL Program is
having Open House from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 17 at
Richardson Middle School
Cafeteria. Students will get
the opportunity to pick up
their schedules, meet their


OBITUARIES

Troopers Association. A Memo-
rial is scheduled at 2 p.m. Sunday
at the Moose Lodge in Lake City.
In lieu of flowers please
make donation to Ameri-
can Heart Association.
Carey Monteen Hagan
Mrs. Carey Monteen Hagan, 78,
resident of Ft. White died at her
home on Wednesday, Aug. .11,
2010, following an extended ill-
ness. She was the daughter of the
late Byron T. and Fannie Belle
Fugate Niblack. She was pre-
cded in deathh by her- husband,
Robert Hagan. She was a mem-
ber of the Bethlehem United
Methodist Church. She enjoyed
scuba diving in her younger
years, and later went on long
trail rides and raised cattle. She
is survived by one son, Bob
Hagan (Karen), Charleston, SC.;
two daughters, Linda Warfield,
Orlando; Stacey Goff, (Alex); Ft.


teachers and ask ques-
tions. Refreshments will
also be served. Call RMS
Guidance Office at 755-
8150 or Dr. Summers at
755-8134.

Domestic violence
support group to meet
A support group for
survivors of domestic vio-
lence meets at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Child care is pro-
vided. Call Another Way at
(386) 719-2700.

Meet the Author
Program
The Friends of the
Columbia County Public
Library Meet the Author
program is at 7 p.m. Aug.
17. Joe Bullard, author
of "Waiting for Agnes,"
a fictional account about
the fascinating true
story of the Coral Castle
and ifs builder, Edward
Leedskalnin, is the fea-
tured author. Bullard has
also been working on
a book about the Ruby
McCollum story.

Wednesday
Southside Idol
Registration for the
Southside Idol competi-


tion is from 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. Aug. 23 through
Sept. 17 at the Southside
Community Center.
Children in grades four
through eight are eligible
to participate. The cen-
ter is located at 693 SW
Margaret's St. Call Wayne
Jernigan, Liz Coker or
Tiffanni Aguirre at 758-
5448 or 758-5450.

Thursday
Alligator Festival
The Alligator Festival
is looking for 19th cen-
tury traders, modern food
vendors and other various
vendors wishing to partici-
pate in this year's festival.
Call Doug Vasco at 438-
5487 or Ray Macatee at
755-6177 or 344-0855.

Open House/Orientation
Fort White High School
Open House/Orientation
is from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 19
in the gymnasium. Student
schedules will be available
following a brief introduc-
tion. Parents and students
will then have the oppor-
tunity visit classrooms and
meet teachers. Upcoming
students and their parents
are invited to attend.


Friday
Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
duction at High Springs
Community Theater is
"The Spell Of Sleeping
Beauty" at 7 p.m. Aug.
20. All tickets are $5 and
available at The Framery,
The Coffee Clutch in High
Springs and through Pay
Pal at www.highspringcom-
munitytheater.com.

Community judging
The community is invited
to vote on the art on display
at the West Branch of the
Columbia County Library
through Aug. 20. The votes
will determine the winning
two artists for the Patron's
Award for the Sixth Annual
Art Exhibit sponsored by
the Art League of North
Florida and The Friends Of
the Library. There will also
be a drawing from those
who voted, and the win-
ner will receive an original
painting.

Saturday
Backpack Give Away
Christ Central
Ministries will be host-


ing Operation Backpack
#VI from 9 a.ni. to 2 p.m.
Aug. 21 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds.
They will be giving away
backpacks and school
supplies. School physical
and haircuts will also be
offered. Parents must be
present with their chil-
dren.

Pet Fundraiser
Four Pets Sake is
hosting a Bowl To Save
a Pet Fundraiser at
1 p.m. Aug. 21 at the
Lake City Bowl, which
is located on Branford
Highway. The cost is $15
per person and prizes
will be awarded. Call
935-0975 or send an e-
mail to fourpetssakel@
windstream.net.

Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
duction at High Springs
Community Theater is
"The Spell Of Sleeping
Beauty" at 7 p.m. Aug.
21. All tickets are $5 and
available at The Framery,
The Coffee Clutch
in High Springs and
through Pay Pal at www.
highspringcommunitythe-
ater com.


ASPE DENTAL GROUPlJ I


White; one brother, Joel Niblack
(Kathy), Ft. White; six grand-
children Jeff Hagan, Amanda
Bass, Michael Warfield, Carey
Warfield, Jason Languasco,
and Montein Languasco; three
great-grandchildren Makenzie
Bass, Jiselle Hagan, Presley
Noble. A memorial service
.was held on Friday, Aug. 13,
2010 at the Bethlehem United
Methodist Church at 11:00 a.m.
with the Reverend Clarence
Desue officiating. Arrangements
were under the direction of the
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
*South US Hwy 441, Lake City.
(386) 752-1954. Please sign the
guestbook at www.gatewayfor-
estlawn.com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake'
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


... We can see you today
,- .
or tomorrow...:

"- -.


r i,'. I& - -

- NEW

Patient
Exam and
Necessary X-rays


$29i

SAVINGS OF $107
DOI50, D0330


S netc www.lakec iyreporter.com
U fsI U ` z ,rcab.AdsOll .
..-..iAds 001100 RE RTER


DALE CARNEGIE l
TRAINING














Even in our wired world,

this is still the

success network


Learn to network successfully at the Dale Carnegie Course. We'll
show you how to win friends, influence people, speak persuasively and
lead with confidence. And, we'll teach you all this the only way that
works-by having you interact live with other real people.


If you are serious about success in a world still run by humans,
you can find out more by contacting the
Lake City-Columbia Chamber of Commerce at 752-3690.


Program starts: August 31, 2010
To reserve your space contact the chamber or 229-506-1387.
You can visit us at www.jacksonville.dalecarengie.com


"As I worked on the promotional
campaign for our new store's grand
opening, I explored all options as to the
ones I believed would have the greater 0
results.


The Lake City Reporter's Post-It Note
promotion was not just a homerun,
but a grand slam.


FOR 1ST STREET MUSIC & SOUND CO.


1st Street Music & Sound
Co. hit it out of the park
promoting its new store
grand opening in the
Lake City Reporter.


Find out ways to grow
your customer base
by calling 752-1293.


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


m


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


failure to appear for
arraignment for driving
while license suspended/
revoked charge.
Lake City
Police Department
Dominic Terrell
Brantley, no age given,
1750 SW Camellia Lane,
robbery by sudden snatch-
ing, battery on a law
enforcement officer, tam-
pering with victim, giving
false name to law enforce-
ment officer and criminal
mischief.
* From staff reports


ROAD REPORT


The following road-
work is now under way
by Florida Department of
Transportation and may
affect local traffic.
Columbia County
Interstate 10:
One eastbound lane
wilkbe closed just east *
of Interstate 75 from
8:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. on
Wednesday and Thursday
for routine bridge mainte-
nance.
Interstate 75: Daytime
lane closures in both direc-
tions between Interstate 10
and the Suwannee County
line while crews paint the
roadway markings.
Interstate 75: Various
southbound lanes will
be closed at the U.S. 90
overpass from 8:30 p.m.
to 5 a.m. on Monday and
Tuesday for routine bridge
maintenance.
State Road 47:
Possible daytime lane
closures just north of Fort
White High School while
driveways to the new Fort
White Library are built.
U.S. 90: Daytime
lane closures Monday and
Tuesday after 8:30 a.m. at


Southwest Birley Avenue
for construction of a new
westbound turn lane.
Alachua County
Archer Road (State
Road 24): Daytime lane
closures between the Levy
County line and Southwest
13th Street (U.S. 441) to
repaint the roadway mark-
ings.
Hawthorne Road
(State Road 20): Possible
daytime lane closures just
east of Southeast 24th
Street for driveway and
median modifications at
the Dollar General.
U.S. 41: Possible
daytime lane closures in
Newberry at the Oakview
development for driveway
modifications.
Dixie County
State Road 51: Traffic
is shifted onto temporary
lanes in two.locations
between the Lafayette
and Taylor County lines
for crews to replace four
bridges.
* From staff reports


I Special Interests IncLude:
S Diabetes Management
PRIMARY Women's Health
CARE .GeriatricCare .
vEDICIN\E .Preventive Care
Most Appointments in 24 Hours

Best of the Or
Best 4 Years!
Minesh Pate, MD Elizabeth "Kathy" We are a provider for
Newman, ARNP most aLL insurance companies



*





Fall Leagues


Now Forming
Mens Womens Mixed Seniors
Sign up today and you'll have a
weekly reservation for fun.

Saturday Homing

Youth League Regisation

August 410 -1 1 0

2-4pm
lake city 5 5
iJDrZ5m2


COURTESY PHOTO
Helping Catholic Charities out of a sticky situation
George Knighton (from left), Catholic Charities staff member, Tammy Hartley, Columbia County Tax Collector's Office deputy
clerk, Kyle Keen, deputy clerk, Lawanda Rentz, deputy.clerk, and Suzanne Edwards, Catholic Charities executive director
wear John Lennon-style glasses while posing for a photograph at the tax collector's main branch Monday displaying pea-
nut butter and jelly that the tax collector's office collected for Catholic Charities' 'Jammin' for PBJ'. drive. Keen. holds a John
Lennon specialty 'Imagine No Hunger' license plate that the office sells. Part of the license plates' proceeds go to the Florida
Association of Food Banks, which provides funding to the Food Bank of Suwannee Valley, a program operated by Catholic
Charities. The 'Jammin for PBJ' drive will continue through Aug. 31.



EvryDyvmtes


U


friday sunday,.


august 13-,15



no florida state sales tax charged

on clothing, footwear, handbags,

backpacks or wallets individually

priced $50 or less
see store associate for details


extended hours:

friday 8am 11 pm

saturday 7am 11 pm

sunday 10 am* 9 pm


*Except where prohibited by law.


ARREST LOGS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.
Thursday, Aug. 12
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Brett Everett
Holcombe, no age given,
warrant: Failure to appear
for driving while license
suspended/revoked and
possession of a controlled
substance charges and


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


>


le










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


THE WEATHER



I. STORMS CHANCEl CHANCE
1W-~STORMS HiSTORMS


190 LO75 HI9S2LO 5 7-HI93LON
Imm.mmm -n Bi


Tallaassee
90/76


Valdosta
90/75
Lake CityJ
90/75


Gainesville .
Panana City 92/74
89/79 Ocala
93/75


Tampa *
93/80


* Jacksonville
90/76


Daytona Beach
91J78


Orlando Cape Canaveral
95/77 89/78

West Palm Beach
92/77 0


FtL Lauderdale
FtL Myers 92/79 *
94/78 *Naples 0
91/79 Miami

Key West 92/79
90/81


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


92
75
90
71
97 in 1918
66 in 1904


0.01"
2.88"
35.05"
3.03"
33.16"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:58 a.m.
8:12 p.m.
6:58 a.m,
8:11 p.m.


1:04 p.m.
11:49 p.m.
2:08 p.m.


Aug. Aug. Sept. Sept.
16 24 1 8
First Full Last New


NATIONAL FORECAST: Numerous showers and thunderstorms are expected from the Gulf
Coast northwards to the eastern Great Lakes today. A few thunderstorms will also be pos-
sible over the Central Plains, the Desert Southwest and across the southern Cascades.
Meanwhile, a strong ridge of high pressure will promote record heat over much of the Pacific
Northwest.

.. ... ,,f
i L .t, ? .', = . ..


CHANCEi
S, -STORMS



HI H194 L.074


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa


Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


10

10 minutes to bu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
- r '-
: . . _, .


Monday
88/78/t
89/78/t
91/80/t
94/77/t
92/74/pc
91/75/pc
91/80/t
92/74/pc
92/79/t
92/77/t
92/75/pc
94/78/t
90/78/t
89/78/t
92/76/t
92/80/t
94/74/t
91/77/t


Tuesday !

91 .6 pJ,
92 .1 p
9 7 4 T
92 75 ,

91/81/t
93/74/pc
92/80/t
91/78/pc
92/75/pc
94/76/t
92/78/pc
92/79/pc
96/75/pc
92/80/pc
94/75/t
92/79/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weathar
Channel.




weather.coom


S. Forecasts, data and graph-
aS: ,' Ics 2010 Weather Central
S'-- LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Pallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp.
81/63/0
85/68/0
60/53/0
86/75/0
79/66/0
64/54/.03
79/75/1.04
73/59/0
76/58/0'
77/60/0
85/65/0
87/75/0
92/73/.02
88/75/0
64/48/0
85/72/0
91 74 6
90/71/0
89/75/0
98/83/0
93/76/0
71/54/0


HI/Lo/W
84/69/pc
94/68/pc
66/53/c
86/75/t
84/72/pc
77/51/pc
93/76/t
75/49/pc
90/56/s
79/66/pc
86/71/t
91/75/t
90/73/t
90/73/t
75/51/pc
87/66/pc
92/70/t
89/69/t
92/73/t
104/82/pc
91/78/t
79/57/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


High: 1040, Clinton, Okla. Low: 310, Stanley, Idaho


. Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W


81/72/0
86/76/0
94/74/0
62/53/0
83/75/0
81/57/0
80/74/0
95/79/0
88/75/0
92/75/0
90/78/0
88/70/0
* 95/77/0.
100/80/0
65/59/0
96/80/0
93/82/0
85/68/0
88/77/.12
91/79/0
" I 65 1)
98/78/0


81/62/s
91/68/t
100/75/pc
85/57/s
A9/72/pc
83/66/pc
89/73/s
98/82/pc
91/65/t
99/77/t
90/76/t
87/65/pc
107/82/s
100/77/pc
73/62/s
100/79/pc
92/79/t
78/61/pc
92/78/t
91/80/t
83/72/pc
98/72/pc


Saturday Today


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
87/70/0
93/76/0
84/67/0
100/87/0
88/69/0
78/50/0
89/61/.01
86/74/0
68/57/.02
81/61/0
86/68/0
70/54/0
92/73/1.64
78/59/0
94/80/0
63/61/0
. 62/56/0
84/66/0
76/59/0
91/82/0
96/83/0
83/69/0


HI/Lo/W
81/60/pc
95/77/t
86/71/pc
113/90/pc
86/71/t
77/63/pc
97/62/s
-91/71/pc
78/53/pc
95/60/s
90/71/pc
89/56/s
92/70/pc
89/69/s
99/79/pc
73/63/s
62/53/pc
94/65/s
87/60/s
93/80/t
107/81/pc
85/73/t


_______________________________ ~ ~' 9 I' 1 *1


Sunday


r- c F astedtetmphrature


Monday


SFeels like" lempel re


L~-IID6srnaalu ~-5uer~


COn ric.s date n
Sr199u3. erot,ormi o I
produ' ed tlorrerti al
rain ars "f isl,-er
Counri Minn.
Rairnfall e, ee'led
4.00 oer mcl. t
of the country wair
the rghestl (3oIl ,[ t _______, _____
10.25 at Adan


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beljling
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
79/77/.14
73/54/0
lia/74/0
61/55/0
97/7370
66/63/0
48/34/0
97/79/0
70/59/0,
91/73/0
79/66/0
91/81/.69
6j 9 r,


Today
HI/Lo/W
86/77/pc
69/60/sh
96/73/s
60/52/sh
91/68/s
84/60/t
55/39/s
98/78/s
68/46/t
87/75/t
80/50/c
86/82/t
ed, ) ,; t


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris.


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
59/28/0 64/28/s
66/59/0 64/97/pc
24- 55 1 71/52/pc'
81/57/0 87/59/s
72/59/0 75/55/sh
77/70/0 77/68/sb
90/66/0 84/60/s
73/54/0 75/57/pc
91/82/0 ,90/78/sh
92/na/0 93/80/t
72/59/0 75/41/pc
84/82/0 87/75/t
,70/54/.03 -62/51/sh


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
68/66/0
86/647.14
88/79/.08
89/79/1.31
68/34/0
86/77/0
88/79/.08
70/46/0
90/79/0
90/81/0
79/68/0
77/63/3.62
88/66/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
69/59/sh
84/60/s
87/82/sh
87/80/r
57/35/s
86/71/t
89/75/t
66/46/sh
92/74/sh
95/73/pc
84/64/t
87/60/pc
-? '..,. C.


KEYTO CONDmONS: c-cloudy, dr-ddzzein iir ifg=f.:., r.=na:-, ce, pc=partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny,
sh-showers, .'= ',,.: ., -=ir.luJ,3 i.:.rl..rm w-windy.


u,.%je-t- -o


' -y ' '
I{ ." ' : 7 : ) 7


"YES!"


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* $150 Home Depot Gift Card when
you sign up for Automatic Payment


CAMPUS Closing Costs
Son a $250,000 Mortgage


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CAMPUS


SUSA
1 c r !{e d ll'i or


Call 754-9088 and press 7 today!

Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!2
1. APR= Annual Percentage Rate. Offer for a limited time only. Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. No closing costs offer is available only when obtaining a CAMPUS portfolio mortgage and only in the State of onda.Offer
applies only to standard buyer's closing costs as itemized in the CAMPUS Good Faith Estimate. Offer subject to credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation, and maximum $300,00 loan amount. On loans over $300,000, CAMPUS will pay up
to $5,000 of closing costs. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes and new construction. Prepaid interest, initial escrow deposit and fees for rare buy down, if any. must be paid by borrower. Property and Flood Insurance may be required. If loan is
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NA LENDER
^^ .a- I LENDER


Lake City1~I~ r 18 WBso orsD.Gvle-E aps1 2001' SW&U 5thAve.ipy W Ca mptl to us 1900 SW34thISt. Jonesviv l~rule 0 W1 40wzI~uuth T rrace L' IJHune 's alk 5 15 NW43rd Stm~ u. TwrSu.J a re 5725I SW 75tA'h St.
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Pensa89/7cola
89/78


-7I--,








Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary
Front

Occluded
Front


---aa ~------'-ao~l.sUR'-IP-31---II--~Y


_ ____llilllilP------------------~


sp~;t;~em~lnaF"sl~


w 1 3" 131


1


-----------J----


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


-.., z i '


r- "'IF








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I


SPORTS


Sunday,August 15,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the Jones Fieldhouse.
Season tickets, parking
passes and gifts available
at McDuffie Marine &
Sporting Goods.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.
INDIANS CROSS COUNTRY
Meeting at track
set for Monday
The Fort White High
cross country team will
begin the season with
a meeting at 6 p.m.
Monday at the Fort
White track. All
interested athletes in
grades 6-12 are
encouraged to attend,
along with their
parents. Coaches will be
introduced, and a
practice schedule,
workout requirements
and team vision shared.
An up-to-date physical is
required to compete.
For details, contact
Bill Jones at
ncanes@earthlink. net.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Fundraiser set
at Phish Heads
The Fort White
Quarterback Club is
hosting its annual
fundraiser from 6-9 p.m.
Wednesday at Phish
Heads restaurant on
Main Boulevard in Lake
City. Senior football
players and coaches will
be waiting and bussing
tables for tips.
For details, call
Shayne Morgan at
(386) 397-4954.

Community pep
rally Saturday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
annual Jam at the Gym
is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday at the Fort
White High gymnasium.
The preseason football
community pep rally is
a chance to meet
varsity and junior
varsity players,
cheerleaders and
dancers. The
Quarterback Club will
sell memberships, food
and drink, T-shirts and
season tickets.
For details, call
(386) 397-4954.
FALCONS VOLLEYBALL
Conditioning set
for Wednesday
Lake City Middle
School volleyball
conditioning begins
4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday
at the LCMS gym.
Interested students must
Shave an updated physical
and completed consent
forms.
For details, call coach
Machon Kvistad at
623-6833.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Players needed
for travel team
A 12-under travel
baseball team is looking
for experience players
for local tournaments.
Practices and tryouts
are 5:30 p.m. Sunday
at Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Chris
SWilliams at 344-5976.


.- .: '.

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jennifer Chasteen (left) positions the Columbia High football team during picture day for the
Tigers program on Saturday in Lake City.


Diamond

Women's softball
leaguehas
tournament.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

rare as a real
diamond begins _
this week at the
Girls Softball
Complex.
The Lake City Parks
and Recreation Women's
League plays its postseason
tournament, with the first
set of games on Monday.
It is a slowpitch league,
something that has almost
disappeared since the
advent of fastpitch softball
in the mid-1990s.
The Winfield Wildcats
won the nine-team league
and received a first-round
bye in the tournament. It is
a single-elimination format
with a consolation bracket
so each team is guaranteed- 't '
two games.
Monday's opening-round
games are:
6:45 p.m. IHOP
Stackers vs. Power Trip on
field 4; Lady Firebirds vs.
Ole Time on field 3;
8 p.m. -TTLR 1
Performance vs.
Dangerous Curves on field
4; Wheeler Agency vs.
Angels on field 3.
There will be a
second round of games
on Tuesday and the
tournament will wrap up on
Aug. 23-24.
"I checked the Internet
and we are one of the
rare slowpitch leagues in
North Florida," Cassandra
Wheeler said.
Wheeler was the driving
force behind the league.
She played high school ball
at Evans High and moved
on to FCCJ (1990-91)
and Valencia Community
College (1991-92).
"We were the last
community college to play .
slowpitch and it was the ....
same thing in high school,"
Wheeler said. "I played
travel ball growing up and 4k
anybody who plays knows
that is your competition."
Wheeler was a member
of the Orlando Dominoes,
which placed fourth in
the 16-under national
tournament in Texas.
"Back in those days, .. ZV
there was only one national ..- .
tournament," Wheeler said.
When Wheeler moved ': -
to Lake City, she wanted to -. -
play softball.
"There were no :
slowpitch teams for women . .. _. :.


Tigers show


off new look


Columbia has
Nike jerseys for
2010 football year.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High will take
the field in new uniforms
during the 2010 football
season. .
The Tigers unveiled the
new look during picture day
for the 2010 football pro-
gram at the practice field
on Saturday. Gone are the
purple jerseys of old and in
are the Nike Pro Combat
jerseys.


Coach Craig Howard
has been wanting to get
the Tigers into Nike gear
since arriving at Columbia,
and the deal came through
this season. He thinks that
the players will enjoy the
move.
"The boys are excited
about it," he said. "We'll
break them out against
Brooks County (Ga.). If you
look good and feel good,
you'll play good. We wanted
to put them in good jer-
seys."
It's something that many
high school programs won't
CHS continued on 2B


Dinosaurs


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


ABOVE: Mary Beth Millikin,
20, who plays right center for
the Lady Firebirds women's
softball team, keeps her eyes
on the ball as she swings
during a practice at the Girls
Softball Complex.


LEFT: Third baseman Errin
Lee, 22, fires a ball to first
base during a drill.


League
Standings


Winfield Wildcats 8-0
Lady Firebirds 6-2
IHOP Stackers 6-2
TLR Performance 5-3
Wheeler Agency 5-3
Angels 3-5
Dangerous Curves 2-6
Power Trip 1-7
Ole Time 0-8


* From staff reports


__ _ _n


SOFTBALL continued on 2B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


SCOREBOARD.


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Carfax
400, at Brooklyn, Mich.
10 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Lucas Oil Nationals,
final eliminations, atBrainerd, Minn. (same-
day tape)
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ESPN2 Men's national teams,
exhibition, Global Community Cup,
France vs. U.S., at New York
EXTREME SPORTS
4 p.m.
NBC -DewTour.Wendy's Invitational,
at Portland, Ore.
GOLF
II a.m.
TNT PGA of America, PGA
Championship, final round, at Sheboygan.
Wis.
2 p.m.
CBS PGA of America, PGA
Championship, final round, at Sheboygan,
Wis.
3 p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S.WomensAmateur
Championship, championship match, at
Charlotte, N.C.
LITTLE LEAGUE
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs,West Regional Final,
at San Bernardino, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS L.A. Dodgers at Atlanta
2:05 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at St. Louis
8 p.m.
ESPN -.Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, Czech Grand Prix,at Brno,
Czech Republic
5 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, Czech
Grand Prix, at Brno, Czech Republic
(same-day tape)
12 Midnight
SPEED AMA Pro Racing, at Alton,
Va. (same-day tape)
PREP BASEBALL
8 p.m.
FSN All-American Classic, at San
Diego
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Jack Daniel's
Invitational, at Nashville, Tenn. (same-day
tape)
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 -ATP, Rogers Cup, champion-
ship match, at Toronto (same-day tape)
5 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Western
& Southern Financial Group Open,
championship match, at Mason, Ohio
(same-day tape)

Monday
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, Mid-Atlantic
Regional Final, at Bristol, Conn.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
WGN San Diego at Chicago Cubs
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Preseason, N.Y. Giants at
N.Y. Jets
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Newcastle
at Manchester United

BASEBALL

AL standings


Ne
Tai
Bo
To
Ba


Mi
Ch
De
Cle
Ka


Te:
Lo
Oa
Se;


East Division
W L Pct
ewYork 71 44 .617
mpa Bay 70 46 .603
3ston 66 51 .564
ronto 61 54 .530
Itimore 41 76 .350
Central Division
W L Pct
nnesota 66 50 .569
hicago 65 51 .560
etroit 55 60 .478
eveland 48 68 .414
nsas City 48 68 .414
West Division
W L Pct
xas 66 48 .579
s Angeles 59 58 .504
akland 57 57 .500
battle 45 7! .388
Friday's Games
Seattle 3, Cleveland 2
Baltimore 5.Tampa Bay 0
Texas 10, Boston 9, I1 innings
Chicago White Sox 8, Detroit 4
Kansas City 4, N.Y.Yankees 3


Pettitte


rejoins


Yankees
Associated Press


KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Left-hander Andy Pettitte
rejoined the New York
Yankees Saturday to meet
with trainers after experi-
encing soreness during a
simulated game Friday.
On the disabled list since
July 19, Pettitte was both-
ered by soreness when he
threw 50 pitches in Tampa.
He's trying to come back
from a strained left groin.
"Whenever I start to
(throw) home, my body's say-
ing, 'Don't do it,'"' Petfitte said.


Minnesota 4, Oakland 3
Toronto 3, LA.Angels 0
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay 7, Baltimore 3
Detroit at Chicago White Sox (n)
Seattle at Cleveland (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Kansas City (n)
Oakland at Minnesota (n)
Boston at Texas (n)
Toronto at L.A.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-9) at Cleveland
(Masterson 4-1 I), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 4-3) at Tampa Bay
(Hellickson 2-0), 1:40 p.m.
Detroit (Galarraga 3-S) at Chicago
White Sox (EGarcia 10-5), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-9) at
Kansas City (Bullington 0-2), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Mazzaro 6-4) at Minnesota
(Slowey 10-5), 2:10 p.m.
Boston (Matsuzaka 8-3) at Texas
(C.Wilson 10-5), 3:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 9-7) at LA.Angels
(Haren 1-2), 3:35 p.m.:
Monday's Games
Detroit (Scherzer 7-9) at N.Y.Yankees
(Vazquez 9-8), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Fister 4-8) at Baltimore
(Bergesen 4-9), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (CI.Lee 10-5) at Tampa Bay
(Garza 11-7), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Marcum 10-6) at Oakland
(Bre.Anderson 3-3), 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 67 48 .583 -
Philadelphia 64 51 .557 3
NewYork 58 57 .504 9
Florida 57 57 .500 9'h
Washington 50 66 .431 17'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 65 50 .565 -
Cincinnati 65 51 .560 'h
Milwaukee 54 63 .462 12
Houston 49 65 .430 15'
Chicago 49 68 .419 17
Pittsburgh 39 7j .339 26
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego 68 47 .591 -
San Francisco 67 51 .568 2h%
Colorado 60 55 .522 8
Los Angeles 59 57 .509 9A
Arizona 46 71 .393 23
Friday's Games
Washington 4,Arizona 2
Cincinnati 7, Florida 2
N.Y. Mets I, Philadelphia 0
Atlanta I, LA. Dodgers 0
St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 3
Houston 4, Pittsburgh I
Colorado 5, Milwaukee 4 1
San Diggo 3, San Francisco 2
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 2
San Francisco 3, San Diego 2
Arizona at Washington -(n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)
Florida at Cincinnati (n)
LA. Dodgers at Atlanta (n)
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets (n)
Milwaukee at Colorado (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Ant.Sanchez 9-7) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 1-2), 1:10 p.m.
Arizona (Enright 3-2) at Washington
(Strasburg 5-3), 1:35 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Padilla 6-3) at Atlanta
(Jurrjens 4-4), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 2-8) at Houston
(Happ 2-I),2:05 p.m. :
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-8) at St.
Louis (.Garcia 10-5), 2:15 p.m.
Milwaukee (M.Parra 3-9) at Colorado
jimenez 17-3), 3:10 p.m.
San Diego (LeBlanc 6-10) at San
Francisco (Lincecum 11-6), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 7-5) at N.Y.
Mets (Pelfrey 11-6), 8:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Florida (Volstad 6-8) at Pittsburgh (Ja.
McDonald I-2), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 9-7) at
Atlanta (Hanson 8-8), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-5) at Houston
(W.RodrigueT 9-I I), 8:05 p.m.
San Diego (Correia 9-7) at Chicago
Cubs (Gorzelanny 6-6), 8:05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
New England 27, New Orleans 24
Baltimore 17, Carolina 12
Oakland 17, Dallas 9
Friday's Games
Washington 42, Buffalo 17
Philadelphia 28, Jacksonville 27
Atlanta 20, Kansas City 10
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay at Miami (n)
Detroit at Pittsburgh (n)
Cleveland at Green Bay (n)
Minnesota at St. Louis (n)
Houston at Arizona (n)
Chicago at San Diego (n)
Tennessee at Seattle (n)




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. "

I TRAAL I


Today's Games
San Francisco at Indianapolis. I p.m.
Denver at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, 8 p.m.
Thursday,Aug. 19
Indianapolis at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 20
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 21
Baltimore at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Miami at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Oakland at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 9 p.m.
Green Bay at Seattle, 10 p.m.

Arena Football playoffs

Conference Championships
Saturday
American: Orlando at Tampa Bay (n)

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
CARFAX 400
Site: Brooklyn, Mich.
Schedule:Today, race, I p.m. (ESPN).
TraclcMichigan International Speedway
(oval, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 200 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
Lucas Oil NHRA Nationals
Site: Brainerd, Minn.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 10 p.m.-I a.m.).
Track: Brainerd International Raceway.

CARFAX 400 lineup

At Michigan International Speedway
Brooklyn, Mich.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 187.183.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
187.086.
3. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
186.577..
4. (14) Tony. Stewart, Chevrolet,
186.572.
5. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
186.461.
6. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 186.35.
7. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 186.268.
8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
186.176.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
186.167. ,
10. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 185.912.
11. (31) Jeff Burton; Chevrolet,
185.73.
12. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
185.715.
13. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 185.596.
14. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
185.596.
15. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
185.467.
16. (43) A J AIlmendinger, Ford,
185.419.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
185.333.
18. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 185.29.
19. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
185.276.
20. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
185.071.
21.(13) Max Papis,Toyota, 184.952.
22. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
184.876.
23. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 184.867.
24. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 184.776.
25. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford,
184.729.
26. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
184.634.
27. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 184.615.
., 28. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
184.582.
29. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 184.535.
30. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 184.43 1.
31. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 184.417.
32. (38) Travis Kvapil. Ford, 184.341.
33. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
183.885.
34. (83) Reed Sorenson, Toyota,
183:87.
35. (07) Robby Gordon, Toyota,
183.744.
36. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
183.439.
37. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
183.388.
38. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
183.337.
39. (34) Tony Raines, Ford, 182.764.
40. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
41. (7) P.J. Jones, Toyota, Owner
Points.
42. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
183.257.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


6 I
LEUXED E

S. F WHAT ROVER FELT
-'l i I I -- LIKE AFTER
CHASING THE CAR.
SCLISHE
-- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: ABIDE TANGY DAWNED PRYING
Answer: What the pudgy diner did at the end of the
buffet line GAINED "WAIT'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lady Firebirds' pitcher Melissa Bullard, 21, makes a slow pitch and delivers a strike during
on of the teams practices at the Girls Softball Complex in Lake City.


SOFTBALL: Fall league planned


Continued From Page 11

and my church did not
have a team," Wheeler
said. "I joined another
team and I think I was the
only woman in the church
league."
When Wheeler worked
at Shands in Gainesville
she played co-ed softball
for a couple of years.

Wheeler remembered
the popularity of women's
leagues when she was -
in high school and went
to Heyward Christie of
the Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department to
ask about a local league.
"I talked with Heyward
and placed a brief in the
,paper and it took off from
there," Wheeler said. "I
probably had 40 women
contact me. We created
eight teams and that is
phenomenal."
Wheeler said the goal
was- 60 women and more
than 150 signed up to play.
That was enough for eight
teams and the already
formed Winfield Wildcats


travel team joined the
league.
The traditional softball
leagues for the city play
two games per week for
five weeks. Wheeler was
allowed a 10-week season
with games one day a
week. The league had to
play on the smaller Girls
Softball Complex fields,
since the adult fields were
spoken for on Monday.
"We wanted to make this
mommy friendly," Wheeler
said. "You only have to'
,commit one night a week
and you practice when you
can. It bled into 12 weeks
with the holiday and a bye
week for each team."

The interest led league
members to form a yet-to-
be-named organization for.
slowpitch.
'We want to be the voice
of women's slowpitch ,
softball," Wheeler said.
"We have a meeting
Thursday (6:30 p.m. at
Phish Heads) to vote for
a chair, vice-chair and


ACROSS 40 Corp. exec
41 Ribs of a leaf
1 Ludacris' music 44 Build, as
4 Grime assets
8 Take it on the 48 Upper limb
49 Beach wear
11 Festive nights 52 Narrow inlet
13 Fully qualified 53 Fictional gov-
14 Turkish poten- erness
tate 54 PDQ
15 Added vitamins 55 Urge
17 Horse color 56 Average
18 Veer (hyph.)
19 Book feature 57 Exultant cry


21 Not neathh
22 Rival
23 Fuses
26 Quick fix
29 Marie's friend
30 Life stories
31 Washboard-
33 Less than one
34 Mme.'s daugh-
ter
35 Movie mogul
36 Onassis, e.g.
38 Hunts for food
39 Worn-down
pencil


DOWN

1 NBA officials
2 Confess
3 Marquette's
title
4 Less risky
5 Kimono acces-
sory
6 Bravo, in Spain
7 Boring
8.. "Shane" star
9 Chills
10 Tailless cat


secretary. Everybody is
welcome to come. We
have had two meetings
so far. The first was to
talk about the future of
women's softball and we
decided to create a board.
At the second meeting, we
decided what the board's
function will be. There will
be one representative from
each of the nine teams."
A fall league is planned
and interested players may
call Wheeler at 365-2168.
Wheeler said retraining
fastpitch pitchers to the
slowpitch game is the
biggest problem. The new
organization is planning
camps for pitching, fielding
and hitting.
"We want to work
alongside the city and
county to fit women's
slowpitch into their fall
schedule," Wheeler said.
"Our goal is to have at
least six teams. We are just
a group of people getting
together sharing ideas
and a vision of slowpitch
softball."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MSA G EL F ALMIA
A PO ALTO ELA I D
NSAVYBLEU AEBLCE




BAK ED RA ES
AX E EPI C SW
YI PE A TO A l
STABE TA BL
ROE ST U
F NK HARES
WIRE JA|YWALKS
AVIS I DEAB HIE
REST MAR IST


12 Took big steps
16 Currier's partner
20 Actor Beatty
22 Iceberg
23 Pale
24 Throw out heat


25 Floating
flower
26 Drying oven
27 Look a long
time
28 Auction
site
30 Splotch
32 Almost-grads
34 Frothy
desserts
35 Spring
bloomer
37 TV news
source
38 Chest
muscles
40 Granny's
brooch
41 Change
42 Ontario neigh-
bor
43 Statuesque
model
45 Meter maid of
song
46 Bryce Canyon
state
47 Is, to Pedro
50 Mont. neigh-
bor
51 1040 org.


2010 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


Michigan completes


hearing before NCAA


By TIM BOOTH
Associated Press

SEATTLE Rich
Rodriguez walked briskly
toward the escalator, ready
to get out of a hotel ball-
room and back on a plane
to Michigan.
"Certainly glad this part
of the process 'is over,"
Michigan's football coach
said in his only comment
Saturday afternoon after a
7 1/2-hour hearing before
the NCAA committee on
infractions.
Rodriguez, athletic direc-
tor David Brandon and
school president Mary
Sue Coleman were among
a large contingent of
Wolverines who spent most
of Saturday holed' up in a
downtown hotel defending
themselves against NCAA
claims that Rodriguez failed
to promote an atmosphere
of compliance within the
Michigan football program.
The hearing began about
8:30 a.m. local time and,
with the exception of an
hour break for lunch, con-
tinued until 4 p.m.
"We had a very fair and
thorough hearing and we
feel good about the fact we
were given that opportu-
nity," Brandon said. "And


the process will continue
and under the rules based
on the process as it's been
laid out we're going to be
very quiet. We're going
to go back, we're going to
prepare for a great season,
we're going to get focused
on football and let the
NCAA do their work." ,
And even though he was
busy defending his athletic
department, Brandon the
former head of Dominos
Pizza found time to have
an order of pizza delivered
to the media waiting out the
hearing.
Coleman did not speak
after the hearing.
Brandon, Rodriguez
and Coleman were among
the first of the Michigan
contingent to arrive in the
hotel ballroom around 8
a.m. local time. Dressed in
a dark suit with a Michigan
pin, Brandon gave'a "good
morning gang," as he
entered the room.
They were followed by as
many as 12 boxes of mate-
rial being brought into the
hearing.
"When you have never
done something before you
never know what it's going
to be like. We were very
well prepared, our represen-
tatives, our internal coun-


sel, our legal counsel we
brought in, our specialists,
everybody did a great job
preparing us for what took
place in there," Brandon
said. "We went in there
with a lot of confidence and
a clear understanding of
what our objectives were
and as I said we got a very
fair and open hearing."
The NCAA has accused
Michigan of five major
rules violations related to
practices and workouts.
The allegations came after
a Detroit Free Press report
that led to investigations by
the school and the NCAA.
The school admitted in
May it was guilty of four vio-
lations, but spent Saturday
challenging the allegation
that Rodriguez failed to
promote an atmosphere of
compliance.
Michigan will likely have
to wait six to eight weeks to
have the case closed bar-
ring an appeal.
When it admitted guilt in
May, the school imposed it's
own punishments., It repri-
manded Rodriguez and six
other people and announced
self-imposed sanctions, *
including two years of pro-
bation. Michigan also said it
would cutback practice and
training time by 130 hours


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This March 16, file photo shows Michigan head football coach Rich Rodriguez
answering questions from the media at a news conference on the first day of spring football
practices, in Ann Arbor, Mich. Rodriguez concedes he is nervous about this weekend's
hearing with the NCAA. He's not alone. On Saturday, Rodriguez will join university president
Mary Sue Coleman and athletic director Dave Brandon in Seattle for the meeting with NCAA
officials.


over two years, double the
amount of time it exceeded
NCAA rules.
It also trimmed the num-
ber of assistants the so-.
called quality-control staff
- from five to three and
banned them from prac-
tices, games or coaching'
meetings for the rest of
2010.
Michigan hopes the
NCAA agrees the school


punished itself enough and
agrees with its defense of its
embattled coach. Rodriguez
is 8-16 in two disappointing
seasons.
The school had a mock
hearing to get prepared for
the private session with the
NCAA infractions commit-
tee.
"It's not an ambush
thing at all, it's not really
the nature of the process,"


Brandon said. "It was very
collegial and professional
and everybody was given
a handful of opportunity to
-express their views, as it
should be."
Rodriguez had his
team practice in pads for
the first time this season
Friday morning, gave
players Saturday off, and
scheduled two workouts for
Sunday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Padraig Harrington of Ireland chips up to the 16th green
during the first round of the PGA Championship golf
tournament Thursday at Whistling Straits in Haven, Wis.

Another missed

cut for Harrington


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

SHEBOYGAN, Wis.
- Padraig Harrington
spent two days fighting to
get back to even par at the
PGA Championship, hope-
ful of having the weekend
to state his case for making
the Ryder Cup team.
It all fell apart in one hole
at the end.
From the middle of the
18th fairway, Harrington
chunked a hybrid 4-iron into
a water hazard that shouldn't
even come into play, making
a double bogey to miss the
cut at Whistling Straits.
Harrington, who only two
years ago became the first
European with successive
majors in the same season,
headed home after missing
the cut in a major for the
third time this year.


The Irishman has no tour-
naments left to earn points
toward making the Ryder
Cup team, and must rely on
Colin Montgomerie taking
him as a captain's pick in a
year in which Europe has
no shortage of candidates.
"There are Ryder Cup
implications," Harrington
said. "I hope Monty is a guy
who looks through things
and sees stats 16 top 10s
in the last year is going to
be a lot of comfort. I'm sure
he needs some experience
in that team and some older
guys. I have done every-
thing I can now, and there
is nothing more I can do.
"My majors have been
poor this year, but every-
thing else has been good."
Harrington had emerged
as the most accom-
plished European of his
generation.


CHS: No scrimmage


Continued From Page 11

have on their chest. Howard
believes that Columbia will
be one of the only high
schools in the country with
the new swoosh jerseys,
and that the Tigers will be
the only team in Florida.
"That's all about being
a class program," he said.
'We're staying with the
same look in the white jer-
seys. It has a certain neat-
ness to it. It's one of a kind
in high school."
After breaking in the new
jerseys, the Tigers caught
a break as weather post-
poned a scheduled scrim-
mage. Coach Howard isn't
sure when the Tigers will
break into 11-on-ll mode.
'We might try to work


some in next week," he
said. "If not, we'll scrim-
mage under the lights on
Saturday at 7:30 p.m. We
just didn't want anymore
injuries today. We'll go out
on Saturday, under the
lights, and I might even try
to bring in some officials."
The time for fundrais-
ers is almost over for the
Tigers, as football games
take place of local events,
but Columbia will be out in
the community this week.
"We'll have them out
selling ads and gas cards,"
Howard said. "If people see
the players out it help them
have more accountability to
raise money for the things
they need to have."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASCAR Nationwide Series driver Brad Keselowski drives around the track after winning the Carfax 250 at Michigan
International Speedway on Saturday in Brooklyn, Mich.

Keselowski wins Nationwide at Michigan


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press

BROOKLYN, Mich. A
bum clutch didn't trip up
Brad Keselowski. Neither
did racing in close prox-
imity with nemesis Carl
Edwards.
Keselowski managed
to make it through pit
stops despite mechanical
problems, then grabbed
the lead on a restart
with eight laps to go and
pulled away to win the
NASCAR Nationwide race
at Michigan International
Speedway on Saturday.
'"The clutch issue was
something I was really
nervous about," said
Keselowski, a Michigan
native who also won last


year's Nationwide race
here. "I didn't know if
that was going to cost us
the race. I tried to be cool
about that, but it's easy to
get upset."
Edwards finished sec-
ond, barely edging out a
charging Kyle Busch.
Edwards and Keselowski
raced side-to-side for a
large portion of the race
without incident. Both driv-
ers are on probation for a
high-profile confrontation
at Gateway International
Raceway last month.
"It's like both of us are
probably thinking the same
thing, don't be the guy that
messes this up," Edwards
said. "But he raced me
very cleanly, I thought we
raced very well together,


and that's the kind of rac-
ing that I'm sure both of us'
want to be doing."
Meanwhile, it was anoth-
er rough day at the race-
track for Danica Patrick,
who went down a lap to
the leaders early on and
struggled to a 27th-place
finish.
Patrick said her car was
extremely loose early on
- "I hope I don't crash,"
she remembered thinking
- but the team got a han-
dle on the car's handling
late in the race.
"If we could have started
the race the way we fin-
ished it, it would have been
a very different story,"
Patrick said. "It's all right.
It's all part of it."
Justin Allgaier was


fourth, followed by Paul
Menard.
Driver Robert
Richardson Jr. was trans-
ported to a hospital after a
crash. A team spokesman
said Richardson would
undergo a precautionary
CAT scan after hitting his
head. He also injured his
left leg.
It was the fourth
Nationwide victory of the
season and 10th of his
career for Keselowski, who
holds a dominant 347-point
lead in the series stand-
ings.
Keselowski won despite
clutch issues that gave him
problems during pit stops
-, and during an attempt
at a post-race victory burn-
out.


By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

SHEBOYGAN, Wis. Nick
Watney won't be overlooked at this
major.
Watney opened a three-stroke
lead at the PGA Championship on
Saturday afternoon, making birdies
on five of his first seven holes on his
way to 12 under.
Liang Wenchong broke the
Whistling Straits record by a stroke
with a bogey-free, 8-under 64. As he.
finished his round, Liang smiled and
pumped his fist
He'd missed the cut in his only
other PGA Championship appear-
ance, and his low score this year on
either the PGA or European tours


was a 66.
Joining Liang at 9 under were
Dustin Johnson, who melted down at
Pebble Beach after being the 54-hole
leader, Rory Mcllroy, Bryce Molder,
Martin Kaymer and Jason Day. All
were still on the course.
Tiger Woods had a chance to make
things interesting, pulling within five
strokes of the lead after the second
round was completed Saturday morn-
ing. The fog that wreaked havoc on
the first two days of the tournament
finally lifted and the wind shifted
- perfect conditions for Woods to
make a run.
"The course is the easiest I have
seen it and it is there for the taking,"
said Paul Casey who, like Woods, is at
3-under 213.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nick Watney reacts after making
a birdie putt on the seventh hole
during the third round of the PGA
Championship Saturday at Whistling
Straits in Haven, Wis


Watney alone in front


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420







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Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday,August 15,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


FRUGAL LIVING


Sara Noel
sara@frugalvillage com


Teaching

important

life skills
W hen living
on a tight
budget,
you real-
ize quickly
which skills are important.
Often, basic skills can be
the difference between a
small bump in the road and
a financial crisis.
You can give the next
generation a huge gift by
teaching them skills that
can help them as adults.
There are plenty of skills
such as gardening, first-
aid, childcare/babysitting
basics, tool identification
and how to use them,
etiquette/manners, basic
home/car repairs and
maintenance, reading food
labels or bartering, that
you can teach that aren't
useful just during recent
tough times but all the
time.
You can teach kids grad-
ually and informally or on a
schedule.
One reader, Denise from
Illinois, shares: "We started
teaching life skills when
my kids were small. My
kids have told their friends
that they couldn't go some-
where with them because
today was a life skills day,
etc. We've even had some
of their friends come over
for lessons at times. My
kids have input on what
they'd like to learn, and we
teach them things we feel.
are imperative to know.
They all learned to sew
a simple item and mend,
and they all learned to
plan and fix simple meals.
My kids liked the idea of
learning certain things
on certain days during
the summer, too. Cooking
class on Monday, sewing
on Wednesday, budgeting/
finances on Saturday and
so forth."
What life skills do you.
think are important for
kids to know?
CHORES: It seems
like common sense, but
it's amazing that some
children don't have to do
many chores. Visit www.
familyroi.org/Family_ROI_
Age_AppropriattChores.pdf
for a handy age-appropriate
chore guide.
BUDGETING: Kids
need to have money experi-
ences. This can start with
a piggy bank, books and
games that teach money
skills and transition to
earning their own money
to buy some of their own
items, how to make/count
back change and having
their own bank account.
INDEPENDENCE:
This is tough and isn't
taught overnight, but kids
need to learn critical think-
ing, healthy habits, social
,and research skills. You
can't do everything for
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* Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.frugalvil-
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ON


SOLID


GROUND


Local correctional facility retains accreditation


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jason Medlin, the warden at the Corrections Corporation of America's Lake City Facility, poses outside of the prison's entrance. The American Correctional
Association recently re-accredited the facility due to its management and personnel procedures, physical layout, training programs and delivery of inmate
rehabilitation services.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
m he Corrections
Corporation of
America's Lake
City Facility
was recently
re-accredited by the
American Correctional
Association.
The re-accreditation
status was announced
during the
American.
Correctional "They
Associations' every
summer con- our Op
ference from and
July 30 -Aug. and h
2 in Chicago,- positi
Mh. ments,
The about t
association's
decision was tions, b
based on a the s1
recommen- inmat
dation from i
an auditor
following a
recent audit Jaso
at the local Jasor
correctional CCA
facility. The
CCA facility
was found to be 100 per-
cent in compliance with
all mandatory standards
and 99.7 percent in com-
pliance with all nonman-
datory'standards.
"The re-accreditation
marks the pinnacle of
correctional operations,"
said Jason Medlin, CCA
warden. "ACA sets the
highest operating stan-
dards for correctional
institutions and this is
like a good housekeeping
mark or seal of approval
on our operations. We're
very pleased with the re-
accreditation from ACA,
but also pleased with the
auditor's comments."
The CCA facility in
Lake City, which opened
January 1997, is a 900-
bed, close-custody
youthful offender facility
which houses inmates
for the Department of
Management Services.
The audit was per-


f
)e
a
V4
v

h
6u
ta
e
or

n
w


formed by a warden from
New York, probation and
parole supervisor from
the Federal Probation and
Parole system and a nurse
with auditing experience.
"They audited every
facet of our operations
and had very positive
comments, not only about
the operations, but about
the staff and inmate
behavior," Medlin said.
The
re-accredi-
audited station pro-
acet of cess goes
rations in three-
d very year cycles.
Medlin
e com- said the
not only staff has
e opera- already
it about begun
Samaking
aff and prepara-
behav- tions for
r," the next
re-accredi-
tation pro-
Medlin cess.
warden The
Lak City
CCA facil-


ity employs 280 staff in
security, academic and
vocational education,
health services, inmate
programs, facility mainte-
nance and management
and administration.
The facility has an esti-
mated annual economic
impact of more than $15
million generated from
salaries, taxes and the
purchase of goods and
services from local ven-
dors.
Medlin said earning
the accreditation rein-
4forces the professional-
ism shown at the facility
and the CCA corpora-
tion. It also solidifies the
facility's partnership
with the Department of
Management Services,
who CCA contracts with
to manage and operate
the facility.
The local CCA staff
was given a plaque, which
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ution business, xpedx, I also offer printing, packaging, graphic arts; and
oil and gas, renewable energy, telecommiunica- maintenance and industrial products. My brands include Hammermill,
tions, and transportation infrastructure. I toiled ecotainer, and many others, and my products include barrier board, fluff
on the trans-Alaska pipeline in the 1970s and pulp, office paper, corrugated sheets,,paper bags, retail displays, cups and
St Aasalids, tobacco packaging, and much more. I rake in about $23 billion annu-
recently worked on the world's largest polysilicon ally. Fortune magazine gave me top marks for social responsibility, and
facility in China. I've built refineries, pipeline pump- Ethisphere magazine named me one of the world's most ethical companies..
ing stations, missile, sites, copper mines and power Who am I? (Answer: International Paper)
plants, and have worked on six continents. Who am I? Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
0Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
Kn'o, the an-w'er' Sean it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you'll \"* to Fool@fool'.6m'or via regular maiil /o this newspaper, attn: The
't 'tvd a dining for a nifty prize! ." .Jotle.y F9l. Sorry, wecca 't pi ide in,di, iidualfinancialadvice.
2010 TlE MOTLEY F00InIST. BYN UNIVERSAL UCICK (iOR RELEASE 7/22/2010)


In a sluggish economic summer, no easy fix ahead


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON The
Federal Reserve has little
power left to lift the economy
out of its rut Congress, with
an election looming, has no
appetite for more stimulus.
Shoppers are reluctant to
spend, and businesses are
slow to hire:
Let's face it There is no
easy or imminent fix for the
flagging recovery.
The sluggish economic
summer wore on Friday
with news that Americans
spent less. at most retail


stores in July. Earlier this
month came word that the
trade deficit is ballooning
and companies are not add-
ing jobs fast enough to bring
down unemployment
Typically, the Fed' can
lower interest rates to
encourage' Americans to
borrow money and spend
it, invigorating the economy.
But the benchmark interest
rate controlled by the Fed
has been almost zero for
more than a year now.
The Fed this week took
a new step by announcing
it would use the proceeds
from its huge portfolio of


mortgage securities to buy
government debt. The idea
is to make cheap credit a
little cheaper, particularly for
things like mortgages.
The "problem there:
Amqricans who are wor-
ried about their jobs, .not
to mention volatility in the
stock market, don't. want
to borrow. They saved 6.2
percent of their disposable
income this spring. Before
the recession, it was more
like 1.2 percent
"You can't force people
to take out a loan or spend
money that they don't
want to spend," says Alice


Rivlin, who served as the
Fed's No. 2 official in the
late 1990s.
Sure, the Fed still has
options. It could launch
another trillion-plus-dollar
program to buy government
debt' or mortgage securities


like it did when it was bat-
tling the recession and finan-
cial crisis. Or the Fed could
cut to zero the rate it pays
banks to keep money parked
there, a move aimed at get-
ting banks to lend more. But
banks are not exactly feeling


free with their cash, either.
"Ifs a pervasive level of
uncertainty that people and
businesses feel about their
economic .futures," says
Ken Mayland, president of
ClearView Economics. "Ifs
frozen them into inactivity."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Staff members of the Corrections Corporation of America's Lake City Facility pose for the
camera: Misty Halbrook (front row, from left), Twylah Queen, Margie Miller, Catlyn Wade,
Anita Cook, Warden Jason Medlin,'Jodi Morgan, Ruth Shaw, Tashas Wilson, Cleveland
Collins and Elissa Wilcox. From the back row, from left are Steven Bowie, Cassandra Hitt,
Mark Richardson, Dan Devers, Tasha Cockburn, Brenda Monk, Chris Brantley, Chris Tylutki,
Time Cheshire, Harvey Byrd, Joseph Gottuso and Ricky Bell.


SOLID: Accreditation is a tribute
Continued From Page 1C.


contained a certificate from
the CCA corporate office, in
honor of securing re-accredi-
tation.
"The plaque is something
that is part of showcasing
the accomplishment and
the commitment from our


company, noting that every
facility that can be ACA
accredited will be," Medlin
said.
'This is a tribute
to the staff, inmates,
our government part-
ners, Department of


Management Services
and Department of
Corrections which allow
this to happen," he said.
"Without the talent and
professionalism of our
staff this wouldn't have
been a reality."


PEOPLES

INVESTMENT PROFESSIONALS


Matthew N. Greene,CFP
Certtifed F'nancial PlannerTM
Inverrnert Professionals, Inc.
Located ad Peoples State Bank
3392 Vv US Hwy. 90
Lake >Cty FL 32055
Tel (356) 487-1374
CeI. (386) 365-0118
Email: matthew.greene@invpro.com
http://www.invpro.com


CFP, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER'" and i, are ctfication marks owned by Cetfied Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. 2001008 CFP Board,


'I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW oTHE WEEK IN REVIEW .THE WEEK IN REVIEW .THE WEEK IN REVIEW .THE WEEK IN REVIEW

.. .-.. S..i. .r. .-. ,c .- %, c .-' ..


I Weeldy Stock Exchange Highlights


Y NYSE 3 Amex
,861.04 -292.68 1,896.92 -40.45


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AllisCE 3.70 +1.14 +44.5
Fabretn 15.45 +4.20 +37.3
SdldHcre 3.35 +.86 +34.5
DrxSOXBr 38.52 .11 +26.7
Dyneg 4.53 +.94 +262
CNBorunn 8.54 +1.68 +24.5
DrSCBearrs37.65+6.21 +19.8
PrUPShR2K55.39 +9.14 +19.8
DrTcBearrs45.15 +7.27 +W1.2
TataCom 13.94 +2.10 +17.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ADairy 8.13 -4.75 -36.9
Jaguars 6.11 -1.94 -24.1
n 5.93 -1.84 -23.7
DenSOXBe 25,34 -7.64 -23.2
DexOnen 12.41 -3.68 -22.9
GtnAlPac 2.95 -.87 -22.8
AegeanMP 15.73 -4.34 -21.6
Systemax 1286 -3.36 -20.7
GreenbCos 10.22 -2.63 -20.5
GMXRs 5.10 -1.31 -20.4

MoSt Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cti rp 17763708 3.88 -.18
S500ETF8933180108.31-4.08
BkofAm 6748574 13.23 -.73
HewletdP 3942035 40.45-1.54
SPDRFnd3119721 14.07 -.71
iShR2K 2716964 61.07 -4.07
GenBsc 2684518 15.38-1.07
FordM 2621855 12.15 -.89
iShEMkts 2501907 40.68-1.40
AMD 2402990 6.49 -.96

Diar
Advanced 887
Declined 2,295
New Highs 473
NewLows 119
Total issues 3,216
Unchanged 34
Volume 19,300,210,448


Gainers ($2 or more) '
Name Last Chg %Chg
EnySvcun 5.70 +1.55 +37.3
UtvPwr 3.22' +.80 +33.1
CNMarFd 5.89 +1.21 +25.7
TravelCrs 3.28 +.64 +24.4
EngySvcs 4.35 +.85 +24.3
Enigex 4.59 +.73 +18.9
ChintLgn 3.25 +.35 +12.1
AvalonHId 2.84 +.28 +10.9
PatGpMet 2.01 +.17 +9.1
Aurizon g 5.82 +.48 +9.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HQSusIM 3.10 -1.48 -32.3
CAMACn 2.67 -1.00 -27.2
OrienPapn 4.33 -1.17 -21.3
Aeroatty 15.35 -4.11 -21.1
ChiMetRur 2.06 -.52 -20.2
Kernet 3.09 -.76 -19.7
UQMTech 2.63 -.56 -17.6
Ubbey 10.25 -2.04 -16.6
HstnAEn 8.87 -1.71 -16.2
CheniereEn 2.52 -.48 -16.0

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
KodiakO g 236445 2.94 -.22
GoldSrg 112845 4.40 +.05
AmO&G 96025 7.18 -.42
Nthg tg 92666 2.89 -.02
AlmadnMg 80680 1.83 +.86
NwGoldg 78109 5.56 +.02
UbAcqwt 75573 1.31 -.09
SamsO&G 73862 1.14 -.12
NovaGldg 73715 6.57 +.11
Taseko 67267 4.21 -.09

Diary
Advanced 195
Declined 354
New Highs 46
New Lows 28
Total issues 566
Unchanged. 17
Volume 366,405,090


2,173.48 -114.99


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Unica 20.84+11.82 +131.0
COPDigrs 2.50 +1.20 +92.3
CoSnrBcp 35.00+12.01 +50.1
ZionO&Gwt 2.35 +.75 +46.9
TrubionPh 4.50 +1.40 +45.2
Intersects 8.01 +2.42 +43.3
Wowjoint 3.90 +1.05 +36.8
VocalTrs 25.90 +6.22 +31.6
ZST Dig n 8.61 +1.46 +28.3
S&WSeed n 3.79 +.82 +27.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MedicAct 8.60 -4.99 -36.7
Vermillion 6.95 -4.00 -36.5
Answers 4.99 -2,76 -35.6
WaveSys 2.09 -.97 -31.7
SciClone 2.41 -1.02 -29.7
Synutra 12.28 -5.13 -29.5
A123Sysn 7.63 -3.05 -28.6
Broadwind 2.06 -.79 -27.7
Iridex 2.77 -1.06 -27.7
Pegasysif 2165 -815- -274

Most Active (Si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cisco 4742259 21 36 -2 I
Inlei 4177235 1915-1 50
Mi:tosolo 3347865 24140-1 15
PwuSn 3000 1530044 72-2 04
SnusyM 2990873 I 00 05
MicronT 1547961 7.28 -.30
Oracle 1372280 22.66-1.72
Nvidia 1260361 9.39 -.16
Dell Inc 1228401 12.01-1.11
SeagateT 1140468 11.18-1.03

Diary
Advanced 519
Declined 2,315
New Highs 114
New Lows 242
Total issues 2,889
Unchanged 55
Volume 9,740,587,249


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


WMy Wly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&T nc NY 1.68 26.72 +.18 +0.7 -4.7
AMD NY 6.49 -.96-12.9 -33.0
AutZone NY ...207.88 +.47 +02 +31.5
BkofAm NY ..04 13.23 -.73 -52 -12.2
BobEvans Nasd .72 25.03 -.69 -2.7 -13.6
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.24 +.22 +1.8 -23.5
CSX NY .96 50.39 -3.01 -5.6 +3.9
Chevron NY 2.88 77.40 -1.33 -1.7 +.5
Cisco Nasd ... 21.36 71 11.3 -10.8
Citigrp NY 3.88 -.18 -4.4 +17.2
CocaCh NY 1.6 55.73 -1.02 -1.8 -2.2
Delhaize NY 2.02 66.30 -9.97 -13.1 -13.6
DellInc Nasd ... 12.01 -1.11 -8.5 -16.4
DirFnBear NY ... 15.38 +1.90 +14.1 -20.8
DraFBullis NY .15 19.89 -3.07 -13.4 -19.5
Dynegyrs NY ... 4.53 +.94 +26.2 -49.9
EMCCp NY ... 18.76 -1.48 -7.3 +7.4
FamilyDIr NY .62 42.92 +.92 +2.2 +54.2
FordM NY ... 12.15 -.89 -6.8 +21.5
GenElec NY .48. 15.38 -1.07 -6.5 +1.7
HewlettP NY .32 40.45 -1.54 -3.7 -21.5
HomeDp NY .95 27.31 -1.37 -4.8 -5.6
iShEMkts NY .59 40.68 -1.40 -3.3 -2.0
iShR2K NY .77 61.07 -4.07 -6.2 -2.2
Intel Nasd .63 19.15 -1.50 -7.3 -6.1
JPMorgCh NY .20 37.50 -2.94 -7.3 -9.9
LVSands NY ... 28.39 -.42 -1.5 +90.0
Lowes NY .44 19.59 -.69 -3.4 -16.2


Name Ex Div


Wkly Wuy YTD
Last Cho %Chg %Cho


McDnlds NY 2.20 71.89 +.15 +0.2 +15.1
MicronT Nasd 7.28 -.30 -4.0 -31.1
Microsoft Nasd .52 24.40 -1.15 -4.5-19.9
Motorola NY ... 7.64 -.36 -4.5 -1.5
NY Times NY ... 7.71 11.02 -11.7 -37.6
NextEraEnNY 2.00 52.02 -1.69 -3.1 -1.5
NobltyH Nasd ... 9.51 -.51 -5.1 -9.0
Nvidia Nasd ... 9.39 -.16 -1.7 -49.7
OcPdPet NY 1.52 75.39 -.94 -1.2 -7.3
Oracle Nasd .20 22.66 -1.72 -7.1 -7.6
Penney NY .80 19.82 -1.99 -9.1 -25.5
PepsiCo NY 1.92 65.56 -.34 -0.5 +7.8
Pfizer NY .72 16.08 -.16 -1.0 -11.6
Potash NY .40 111.34 -2.20 -1.9 +2.6
PwShsQQQNasd .26 44.72 -2.04 .-4.4 -2.3
PrUShS&PNY ... 33.64 +2.35 +7.5 -4.0
QwestCm NY .32 5.69 ...... +35.2
Ryder NY 1.08 40.33 -3.19 -7.3 -2.0
S&PSOOETFNY 222 108.31 -4.08 -3.6 -2.8
SearsHldgsNasd ... 66.55 -6.68 -9.1 -203
SiriusXM Nasd ... 1.00 -.05 -4.8 -66 7
SouthnCo NY 1.82 35.84 -.04 -0.1 +7.6
SprintNex NY ... 4.48 +.03 +0.7 +22.4
SPDRFndNY .17 14.07 -.71 -4.8 -2.3
TimeWam NY .85 30.81 -1.55 -4.8 +5.7
WalMart NY 1.21 50.40 -1.08' '-2.1 -5.7
WellsFargoNY .20 25.84 -1.91 -6.9 -4.3
YRCWwd hNasd .29 -.02 -6.8 -65.5


Stock Footnotes g = Drilends and eaugs in Car.al.an do r n = Does ..i mee co.itnued-laIri. daridsa
h : Late fling wtn SEC n = New an past 52 wear pi Prseerred rin m rSlo nas undergone a reverse st-x]) sfpii
ol t31 lea 50 percent wtir,n Ine pasl year n = igrI to buy county 31at a seofled pnr. s = Sloc mas sp.i ry ai
leasI 20 percent *iin e ast yeat unt = Units vj = In t bankruptcy recel,.rstlp wa When adisnbuled w. =
When issued wl = Warrants
Mutual Fund Footnotes: D = Fee covaieng manerr 1osts Z pad rom i'und assets a = Deierred sales cdtalq orr
redempari tee t Itron iO asailes cnaiJes) m Mulnrije e w ae chaold NA= r11 avai11 = pre=.1oui a3y s
netl asset vaIue s f= tund s0t tstia during j week A : lurid piad a dlitbuion. dunrrg drie we.Galners and
Losers emua as orm at least $2 io no lemim laies at eh. Most Actives imuni te worth at least $1 Vurei .nn
nunardeds or snares Source: rtie Associalead Press Sals., figure are urtanolioal


Money Rates
Last PvsWeek
PrimeRate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate I 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.15 0.14
6-month 0.18 0.19
5-year 1.45 1.50
10-yeat 2.68 2.82
30-year 3.87 4.00


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.1196 1.1186
Britain 1.5588 1.5569


Canada
Euro
Japan
Mexico


1.0424 1 1444


.7840
86.24


.7798
85.88


12.7240 12.7170


Weekly Dow Jones


-54.50 -265.42 -58.88 -16.80


TUES WED THUR FRI


11,000 .1- -1. ..... ............



10,500


10 ,00 ..... ... ... ........ .. .... ... ............ ........
9500F...F.................M. A.. ...



MUTUAL FUNDS' .
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pet MIn Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetls Cl
Vanguard TotStldx LB
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
American Funds CaplncBuA.m IH
FRdelity Contra LG
American Funds CpWIdGriAm WS
Anierr.,an Fundst IrcAmerA m MA
vanguard 5Wilrn LB
vanguard In:lial LB
AT.ericar. Funds lnCoAmA m LB
.q9.ge Co S100r LV
Airi.incar. Funds EurPa,:GrA m FB
Dude & CointSik FV
Amencarn Funds WAMuanrvA m LV
PIMCO TolRetAdm v Cl
Franr Temp-Fra ii.r Inc.meA tm CA'
Amrencar, Funds NeePerspA m WS
Amencan Funds FnlnvA m LB
Vanguard ToaSIIAOim LB
Amien.an Funds BalA m MA
Var.uard Welitr MA
Vanguard 500Adml LB
PIMCO TotRetA m Cl
American Funds BondA m .Cl
Fidelity Divrinl d FB .
Vanguard Totlnll d FB
Fideity GrowCo LG


137,039
63,566
61,323
55,373
53,952
51,442
48,436
46,968
46,671
45,460
39,482
36,776
36,687
36,140
33,800
31,232
30,154
29,724
29,636
29,359
28,516
28,336
28,027
27,718
26,227
26,161
25,891


11.47
26.74
26.13
46.88
57.03
31.89
15.41
99.60
98.97,
24.68
91.50
36.47
30.78
24.13
11.47
2.05
,24.56
31.61
26.75
. 16.28
28.76
99.62
11.47
.12.38
26.06
13.74,
67.48


+12.6/B
+9.1/A
+545/D
+8.4/B
+11.3/A
+5.8/C
+12.2/A
+8.6/B
+8.8/B
+6.8/C
+5.9/C
+5.3/B
+7.0/A
+10.5/A
+12.3/B
+14.8/A
+7.9/B
+8.0/B
+9.2/A
+9.8/B
+9.5/B
+8.8/B
+12.1/B
+11.6/C
+2.2/C
+4.7/B
+11.8/A


+4.0/A
-0.1/B
+0.4/B
+3.1,t
+2.6/A
+3.6/A
+2.6/B
'-:0.6/C
-0.5/C
+0.1/B
-2.7/1
+4.8/A
+43.1/A
-0.5/B
+7.8/A
+3.7/B
+3.8/A
+1.9/A
0.0/B
+1.9/B
+4.1/A
-0.5/C
+7.5/A
+3.6/E
+0.6/C
+2.8/B
+3.3/A


1,000,000
3,000
250
250
2,500
250
250
3,000
5,000,000
250
2,500
250
2,500
250
1,000,000
1,000
250
250
100,000
250
10,000
100,000
1,000
'250
2,500
3,000
2,500


Switzerind 1.0539 1.0513 CA-ConservativeAllocatin, Cl teedateTe Bond, ES -Europe Stock, F -Foreign Uage Blend, FG -Foreign Largeowh, FV-Fre
Large Value, IH -Wordd Atocaton, LB -Large tend, LG -Lg rothLV Lar Value, MA.4tderale'Alkcan, MB -MiB-Cp ler4 Mv
@ritish pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- MkCap Vlue, SH p y WSt -W Sto.Tot Return: Chng in lA wh ds renestl. VRa How fund peM ned vs
ers show dollar in foreign currency. otheswithsaneoo*t :AAisinlop20%,2E.boltom205%. inilnt tri Minm$needed itoinvest inund.Source: Momgs.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wly
Name Div YId PE Cho %Chg Last


AES Corp ... ...
AFLAC 1.12 2.3
AK Steel .20 1.5
AMR ... ...
AT&T Inc. 1.68 6.3
AbtLab 1.76 3.5
Accenture .75 1.9
AMD ...
Aeroposti s ...
Aetna .04 .1
Agilent .. .
Agriumtg .1.1 .2
AlcatelLuc ... '...
Alcoa .12 1.1
AldIrish
Allstate .80 2.8
AlphaNRs ......
Altria 1.40 6.3
AmbacFh ...
Ameren 1.54 5.6
AEagleOut .44 3.7
AEP 1.68 .4.7
AmExp .72 1.7
AmintlGrp ...
AmTower ... ...
Americdt .. .
Ameriprise .72 1.7
Anadarko .36 -.7
AnalogDev .88 .3.1
Annaly 2.61 15.0
Apache .60 .7
ArcelorMit .75 2.5
ArchCoal .40 1.6
ArchDan .60 2.0
AssuredG .18 1.0
ATMOS 1.34 4.7
Avon .88 3.0
BB&TCp .60 2.5
BakrHu .60 1.5
BcoBrades .51 2.8
BcoSantand.81 6:7
BcSBrasil n .33 2.6
BkofAm .04 .3
Bklreind 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .36 1.5
Barclay .22 1.1
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .48 1.1
Baxter, 1.16 2.5
BerkHBs ......
BestBuy .60 1.8
Blackstone .40 3.8
BlockHR .60 4.2
Boeing 1.68 2.6
BostonSci ...
Brinker .56 3.7
BrMySq 1.28 4.9
CB R lis ... ...
CBS B .20 1.4
CF Inds .40 .5
CIGNA .04 .1
CMS Eng .84 4.8
CSX .96 1.9
CVS Care .35 1.2
Calpine ..
Cameron
CdnNRs gs .30 ...
CapOne .20 .5
CardnlHlts .78 2.5
CareFusn n ...
Carnival .40 1.2
Caterpillar 1.76 2.6
Cemex .43 ...
CenterPnt .78 5.4
CntryLink 2.90 8.0
ChesEng .30 1.4
Chevron 2.88 3.7
Chicos .16 1.8
Chimera .63 16.3


11 -.03 -20.2 10.62
12 -2.99 +3.3 47.76
14 -1.67 -38.8 13.07
... -.28 -10.7 6.90
12 +.18 -4.7 26.72
13 -.51 -7.3 50.06
17 -1.42 -6.4 38.85
4 -.96 -33.0 6.49
9 -1.75 +1.8 23.11
8 -1.93 -11.2 28.14
29 -1.38 -12.0 27.35
17 +.98 +9.4 67.27
... -.26 -18.4 2.71
... -.95 -34.0 10.64
... -.35 -37.9 2.18
15 -.88 -6.5,28.10
98 -4.48 -9.3 39.34-
13 -.19 +13.9 22.35
1 -.19 -16.9 .69
10 +.38 -1.3 27.58
13 -.42 -29.1 12.04 ,1
14 -.46 +2.1 35.52
16 -1.77 +3.0 41.73
... -4.26 +22.3 36.67
56 -.99 +5.9 45.76
15 .-.05 +26.5 24.08
11 -.75 +8.7 42.201
48 -3.31 -16.1 52.37
19 -2.10 -11.1 28.07
9 -.11 +.2 17.39
12 -4.69 -11.5 91.26
23 -3.41 -34.0 30.20
43 -2.04 +9.3 24.31
10 -.13. -4.0 30.05.
12 -.80 -18.9 17.64
13 -.87 -2.4 28.68
20 -1.49 -6.7 29.40
22 -1.37 -6.1 23.83
37 -1.94 -1.7 39.79
-.50 -.8 17.93
-1.47 -26.6 12.97
... -.35 -8.5 12.76
88 -73 -12.2 13.23
.. -.46 -31.0 4.12
... -.93 -11.3 24.80
... -1.17 +12.0 19.71
... +2.38 -30.2 23.78
... -.47 +9.0 42.92
12 +.58 -22.1 45.71
14 -3.69 +16.8 76.78
11 -1.77 -16.0 33.14
... -.70-19.0 10.63
10 -.74 -37.5 14.13
51 -3.86 +19.8 64.84
... -:32 -39.1 5.48
10 -.64 +1.0 15.07
13 -.05 +4.2 26.32
33 -.82 +19.0 16.15
38 -f.41 -.7 13.95
26 +.44 -6.8 84.65
7 -1.01 -5.4 33.38
17 +.47 +10.9 17.36
15 -3.01 +3.9 50.39
,11 -1.14 -10.9 28.70
69 -.20 +19.0 13.09
18 -1.13 -9.2 37.94
... -3.33 -10.6 32.15
8 -2.05 +1.3 38.82
18 -1.74 -2.7 31.36
... +1.36 -8.6 22.85
15 -3.12 +2.6 32.51
28 -3.55 +19.3 68.01
... -.87 -24.2 8.61
13 -.14 -.1 14.50
10 -.34 -.4 36.05
15 -1.51 -19.7 20.78
9 -1.33' +.5 77.40
17 -.02 -37.1 8.84
6 -.02 -.3 3.87


Name DIv
Citigp ..
CliffsNRs .56
CocaCI 1.76
ColgPal 2,12
ConAgra .80
ConocPhil.2.20
CohEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Cott Cp
Covidien .72
Cummins 1.05
DR Horton .14
DTE 2.24
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.20
DeltaAir ..
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv '.08
DevonE 8.64
DrSCBearrs...
DirFnBear ...
.DrxFBulls .15
DirxSCBull 4.83
DirxLCBear ....
DirxLCBull 8.17
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
Dynegyrs ....
EMC Cp ...
EOG Res .62
Edisonint 1.26
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGldg .05
EmersonEl 1.34
EsteeLdr .55
EvergmEn ...
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FedExCp ..48
FibriaCelu ...
FidNatlnfo .20
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .60
FordM ....
FMCG 1.20
FrontierCm .75
GameStop...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenMills a 1.12
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .17
Goldcrpg .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac ...
HCP Inc 1.86
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HeclaM
Hertz
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwllIntl 1.21
HostHolls .04
Huntsmn .40
iShCprxGs ...
iSAstla .81.
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn ..16
iShSing .38
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -.18 +17.2 3.88
1.0. 14 -1.40 +26.9 58.49
3.2 18 -1.02 -2.2 55.73
2.8 16 -.11 -7.0 76.39
3.7 13. -.59 -6.2 21.62
4.0 10 -1.91 +7.7 55.02
5.0 14 -.02 +4.7 47.55
3.2 1 -.59 -15.7 29.66
1.2 9 -1.93 -12.6 16.87
... 8 +.57 -22.9 6.32
1.9 25 +.36 -19.4 38.58.
1.4 20 -3.38 +69.5 77.75
1.5 ... -.32 -5.8 10.24
4.8 13 -.62 4.0 46.21'
.., 9 -.71 -43.5 10.20
1.9 19 -3.19 +19.9. 64.85
... ... -.26 +1.5 11.55
... 20 -1.04 +6.4 15.74
.8 ....- .88 +14.4 10.59
1.0 9 -1.05 -13.3 63.70
....... +6.21 -23.6 37.65
...... +1.90 -20.8 15.38
.8 .,; -3.07 -19.5 19.89
.5 ... -7.86 -17.0 35.49
... ... +1.59 -10.5 15.32
3.7 .. -5.57 -15.3 44.45
.5 8 -.63 -.2 14.68
1.0 16 -1.32 +4.4 33.68
4.2 15 +.24 +12.8 43.91
2.4 15 -.28 -8.9 25.16
5.8 13 -.16 -1.2 17.01
... ... +.94 -49.0 4.53
... 26 -1.48 +7.4 18.76
.7 41 -5.09 -3.2 94.17
3.7 10 -.06 -2.4 33.94
.3 10 -1.02 +18.1 11.61
... 48 +.39 +24.3 17.61
2.8 19 -1.80 +13.2 48.23
1.0 21 -5.64 +19.6 -57.82
... -.03 -52.2 .16
5.1 11 -.27 -15.3 41.37
2.9 12 -1.62 -12,1 59.91
.6 21 -4:52 -3.2 80.80
... ... -.75 -29.5 16.10
.8 17 -1.20 +13.1 26.50
6.1 13 -1.28 -22.0 36.24
4.8 23 -.74 +12.3 12.51
... 7 -.89 +21.5 12.15
1.7 9 -4.54 -12.7 70.07
9.9 11 -.05 -2.7 7.60
... 8-1.40 -10.8 19.57
1.3 5 -.49 -14.7 12.66
2.3 10 -.61 -15.3 17.67
3.2 15 +1.29 -1.5, 34.86
... 23 -1.15 +4.8 11.90
1.5 .... -1.09,-16.5 14.13
1.2 31 +.03 +6.5 13.96
.5 ... -.82 +.8 39.66
.9 7 -7.10 -12.3.148.08
... 15 :1.17 -29.2 9.98
...... -.87 -75.0 2.95
5.4 82 -.79 +13.0 34.51
1.3' 21 -2.82 -6.6 28.10
1.0 7 -1.63 -10.2 ?0.88
... 37' -.28 -21.7 4.84
.. 38 -.84 -20.9 9.43
.8 11 -1.54 -21.5 40.45
3.5 16 -1.37 -5.6 27.31
2.9 15 -2.45 +5.4 41.32
.3 ... -.85 +17.2 13.68
4.3 85 -1.11 -17.4 9.32
.. +.09 +10.7 11.89
3.9 ... -1.07 -8.1 21.00
3.8 ... -2.47 -8.0 68.61
3.0 ... -.19 +3.8 16.25
1.7 ... -.42 -3.1 9.44
3.2 .. -.42 +4.4 12.00
... ... -.15 -3.2 12.55
...... -.33 +7.3 17.74


Name Div YId
iShChina25'.68 1.7
iShEMkts .59 1.5
iShB20 T 3.73 3.6
IS Eafe 1.38 2.7
iShR2K .77 1.3
iShREst 1.81 3.6
rrTW 1.36 3.2
IBM 2.60 2.0
IntlGame .24 1.6
IntPap .50 2.3
Interpublic ...
ItauUnibH .59 2.8
JPMorgCh .20 .5
Jabil .28 2.4
JanusCap .04 .4
JohnJn 2.16 3.7
JohnsnCtl .52 1.9
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25 2.4
Kellogg 1.62 3.2
Keycorp .04 .5
Kimco .64 4.4
KingPhrm ...
)inrossg .10 .7
Kohls
Kraft 1.16 3.9
LDK Solar ...
LSICorp ...- ..
LVSands
LennarA .16 1.2
UllyEli 1.96 5.5
Umrted .6(l- 2.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last


... -1.90
-1.40
+2.19
-3.04
-4.07
-1.85
14 -2.59
12 -2.27
25 -28
48 -2.06
32 -.65
... -.30
11' -2.94
21 -1.67
17 -.95
13 -1.81
14 -2.18
48 -2.36
... -.95
15 +.49
... -.35
46 -.48
50 -.21
32 -.60
13 -3.64
11 -.86
... -.08
-13 -.18
-.42
78 -1.06
9 -.68
16 -1.24


-5.2 40.05
-2.0 40.68
+13.8 102.29
-8.3 50.71
-2.2 61.07
+9.8 50.43
-10.4 43.02
-2.3 127.87
-18.9 15.22
-18.3 21.87
+17.1 8.64
-6.3 21.39
-9.9. 37.50
-33.5 '11.55
-27.5 9,75
-9.7 58.15
+.5 27.37
-3.9 25.63
-24.6 10.32
-4.8 50.64
+40.9 7.82
+7.8 14.58
-30.1 8.58
-17.6 15.16
-16.6 44.99
+8.5 29.50
+3.7 7.27
-30.1 4.20
+90.0 28.39
+4.4 13.33
... 35.70
+29.4 24.89


Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg


UncNat .04 .2
UoydBkg 1.45 ...
MBIA
MEMC ..
MFAFncl .76 10.5
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20 1.0
Manpwl .74 1.7
Manulife g .52
MarathonO 1.00 3.1
MktVGoId .11
MarlntA .16 .5
Marshlls .04 .6
Masco' .30 2.9
MasseyEn .24 .8
McDrmlnts ...
McKesson .72 1.2
MedcoHith .. .
Medtmic .90 2.5
Merck 1.52 4.3
MetLife .74 1.9
MetroPCS ...
MindrayM .20 .8
Monsanto 1.12 2.0
MorgStan .20 .8
Mosaic .20 .4
Motorola
MuellerWat .07 2.7
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy ...
Nabors


YTD (Wkly
%Chg Last


12 -2.00 -8.8
-.45 +34.6
+.35+131.7
+.49 -23.1
8 -.08' -1.2
.. -.90 +25.4
... -.62 +10.6
14 +.69 +20.1
... -2.98 -18.7
-1.34 -33.5
12 -1.63 +4.9
... -.43 +7.6
35 -1.70 +22.9
-.44 +22.9
: -.46 -24.1
... -2.73 -25.2
7 -.58 +4.9
13 -2.16 -3.0
16 -.72 -26.6
13 ,-2.24 -19.1
13 +.02 -4.2
11 -1,86 +11.9
15 -.35 +14.8
20 -5.72 -23.3
23 -3.31 -29.9
9 -1.75 -12.5
28 +.01 -14.3
45 -.36 -1.5
... -.51 -49.6
13 -1.24 +11.3
10 -1.03 -7.0
... -1,52 -24.8


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NatGrid 7.17 6.9 ... -.14 -13.2 42.38.
NOilVarco .40 1.0 11 -2.14 -10.4 39.49
NatSemi- .40 3.1 15 -.96 -16,5 12.83
NYCmtyB 1.00 6.2 12 -1.03 +11.6 16.19
NewellRub .20 1.2 14 -.35 +6.7 16.02
NewmtM .60 1.1 15 -.32 +19.9 56.72
NextEraEn 2.00 3.8 13 -1.69 -1.5 52.02
NiSource .92 5.6 15 -.23 +7.7 16.57
NobleCorp .20 .6 5 -1.83 -19.9 32.60
NokiaCp '.56 6.3 ... -.66 -31.1 8.86
Nordstrm .80 2.6 13 -2.91 -17.4 31.05
NorflkSo 1.44 2.6 16 -2.38 +4.3 54.68
OcciPet 1.52 2.0 15 -.94 -7.3 75.39.
OfficeDpt ... ....... -.42 -36.1 4.12
OilSvHT 2.60 2.0 ... -6.26 -14.0 102.24
Omncre .13 .6 11 -1.49 -16.3 20.25
PG&ECp 1.82 4.0 14 +.07 +2.4 45.71
PMI Grp ... ... ... -.40 +5.2 2.65
PNC .40 .7 10 -3.74 .+4.4 55.09
PPLCorp 1.40 5.2 20 +.10 -16.8 26.88
PatriotCoal ..... 19 -1.64 -27.6 11.20
PeabdyE .28 .6 23 -3.01 +.9 45.63
Penney .80. 4.0 17 -1.99 -25.5 -19.82
PepsiCo 1.92 2.9 17 -.34 +7.8 65.56
Petrohawk .. ... 20 -1.08 -32.7 16.15
PetrbrsA 1.18 3.8 '.. -1.93 -26.1. 31.32
Petrobras 1.18 3.3 ...-2.46 -24.8 35.87
Pfizer, .72 4,5 9 .16 -11.6 16.08
PhilipMor 2.32 4.5-~ 4 -.20 +7.9 51.99
Potash .40 .4 24 -2.20 +2.6 111.34
PwshDB' ... ... ...-.88 -9.0 22.41.
PS USDBulls.. ....+.76 +4.5 24.11
PrinFncl .50 2.2 10 -1.11 -4.8 22.89
ProShtS&P .......... +1.88 -1.0 52.04
PrUShS&P ... ...... +2.35 -4.0 33.64
PrUIlShDow ... ...... +1.64 -7.4 27.28
ProUltQQQ ... ...... -5.25 -7.4 55.06
PrUShQQQ... ... ...+1.50 -5.5, 18.00
ProUltSP .40 1.1 ... -2.77 -7.6 35.33
ProUShL20 ... ...... -1.59 -31.5 34.19
ProUSRE rs... ... ... +1.64 -34.5 24.58
ProUShtFn .. ......+1.83 -10.8 21.61
ProUSR2K ... ...... +2.57 -11.8 22.23
ProUltR2K .02 ...... -3.71 -7.9 26.12
ProUSSP500... ...... +3.36 -9.1 32.99
ProUltCrude... ...... -1.35 -25.9 9.40
ProLogis .60 .5.8 ... -.68 -24.5 10.33
Prudentl .70 1.3 8 -3.59 +11.5 55.49
PSEG 1.37 4.3 10 -1.03 -4.6 31.71
PulteGrp ... ... ... -.57 -19.0 8.10
QwestCm .32 5.6 21 ... +35.2 5.69
RAIT Fn ... ... 3 -.63 +6.9 1.40
RRI Engy ... ...... -.34 -37.2 3.59
RadianGrp .01 .2 ... '-.93 -11.2 6.49
Raytheon 1.50 3.4 9 -1.40 -13.2 44.74
RegionsFn .04 .6 ... -.25 +35.2 7.15
RepubSvc .80 2.7 24 -2.24 +3.9 29.40
RetallHT 1.66 1.9 ...-2.44 -6.1 88.11
RiteAid ... ... ... -.01 -37.2 .95
RylCarb ... ... 19 -3.61 +1.7. 25.70
SLMCp ... ... 7 -.45 +3.5 11.67
SpdrDJIA 2.48 2.4 ... -3.34 -.7103.35
SpdrGold ... ... ... +.90 +10.7 118.74
SPMid 1.65 1.2 ... -6.52 +1.4 133.58
S&P500ETF2.22 2.0 ... -4.08 -2.8 108.31
SpdrHome .12 .8 ... -.84 -6,4 14.15
SpdrKbwBk .16 .7 ...-1.24 +8.0 22.86
SpdrKbwRB.32 1.5 ...-1.69 -1.3 21.95
SpdrRetl .56 1.5 ... -1.30 +3.6 36.88
SpdrOGEx .23 .6 ...-2.07 -2.4 40.23
SpdrMetM .35 .7 ... -3.92 -5.8 48.61
Safeway. .48 2.3, ... -.13 -.5 21.18
Saks ..., ... ... -.77 +17.8 7.73
SandRdge ... ......-.66 -51.0 4.62
SaraLee .44 3.0 23 -.29 +19.5 14.55
Schlmbrg .84 1.4 23 -3.58 -9.7 58.76
Schwab .24 1.7 25 -.70 -22.8 14.52
SemiHTr .52 2.0 ...-2.02 -8.0 25.70
SiderNac s .58 3.5 -.87 +3.5 16.52


Name


SilvWhtng ... ... 36 +.05 +32:4
Smithlnti .48 1.2 68 -2.53 +50.2
SouthnCo 1.82 '5.1 14 -.04 +7.6
SwstAirl .02 .2, 95 -.55 -.3
SwstnEngy ... ... 21 -2.98 -28.5
SpectraEn1:00 4.7 15 -.41 +3.7
SprintNex ... ......+.03 +22.4
SP Mats .52 1.7. -1.19 -5.1
SPHIthC .55 1.9 ... -.61 -6.3
SPCnSt .75 2.8 ... -.29 41.2
SP Consum .42 1.4 ... -1.28 +3.3
SP Engy 1.00 1.9 ...-2.29 -6.4
SPDRFnci .17 1.2, ... -.7.1 -2.3
SP Inds .59 2.0 ... -1.45 +5.8
SPTech .31 1.5 ... -1.01 -7.2
SPUtil 1.26 4.1 ... -.29 -1.0
StateSir .04 .1 ... -1.80 -14.4
Suncorgs .40 .. 75 -1.66 -10.5.
Suntech ... ... 14 -.77 -47.4
SunTrst .04 .2 ...-1,46 +20.2
Synovus .04 1.6 ... -.08, +1815
Sysco 1.00 3.3 16 -.63 +7.3
TECO .82 5.1 13 -.82 -.5
TJX .60 1:5 13 -.63 +11.9
TaiwSemi .47. 4:8 :.. -.26 -15.2
Target 1.00 2.0 14 -1.51 +5.0
TeckRes g .40 ........-2,.47 -8.0
TenetHth ...' ... 15 -25 -22.6
Teradyn ... ... 10 -1.23 -10.4
Tesoro ... ... 23 -.80 -11.7
Texlnst .48 -2.0 12 -1.18 -6.8
Textron .08 .4 ... -2.66 -3.5
ThermoRis ... 19 -1.47 -7.1
3MCo 2.10 2.5 15 -3.28 +1.6
Tiffany 1.00 2.4 17 -1.55 -2.8
TimeWam .85 2.8 14 -1.55 +5.7
TitanMet ... ...80 -1.56 +52.4
Total SA 3.23 6.5 ... -3.71 -22.3
Transon ... ... 6 -2.96 -34.6
Travelers 1.44 2.9 8 -.13 +.6
TycolntI .84 2.3 16 -1.20 +2.2
Tyson .16 .1.0 60 -.87 +32.6
UBS AG.... ... ... -1.07 +5.9
US Airwy ... ...... -.35 +88.8
UtdMicro .08 2.7 ... -.06 -24.5
UPS B 1.88 2.9 23 -1.79 +12.3
USBancrp .20 .9 16;-1.00 -1.3
US NGsFd... .... .-.28 -27.7
USOilFd ........-2.41 -14.0
USSteel .20 .4 -3.35 -18.2
UtdhithGp .50 1.6 9 -1.42 +5.1
UnumGrp .37 1.8 8 -1.00 +6.6
ValeSA .52 1.9 ... -1.25 -4.4
ValeSApf .52 2.1 .. -.74 -2.2
ValeroE .20 1.2 ...-1.21 +.6
VangEmg .55' 1.3 ... -1.33 +.8
VerizonCm1.90 6.3 ... +.48 -3.9
ViacomB .60 1.8 12 -1.09 +9.4
Visa .50 .7 20 +.21 -17.4
Vishayint ... ... 10 -.57 +13.6
Waigm .70 2.5 14 +.17 -23.3
Weathfintl ... ... ...-1.16 -14.2
WellPoint ... ...5 -3.26 -11.2
WellsFargo .20 .8 10 -1.91 -4.3.
WendyArby .06 1.5 24 -.29 -13.4
WDigital ... ... 4 -1.73 -44.6
WstnUnion .24 1.5 13 -.31 -15.2
Weyerh .20 1.2 ... -.81 +3.3
WmsCos .50 2.6 26 -1.40 -7.8
XLGrp .40 2.2 40 +.01 -1.8
XcelEngy 1.01 4.5 14 +.30 +5.7
Xerox .17 1.9 13 -.58 +6.5
Yamanag .08 .8 29 -.25 -14.5
YumBmds .84 2.1 18 -1.51 +16.8


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg


39 -.1.1+102.9 12.60
... -4.00 -17.7 28.06
.. +1.19 -32.9 12.27
15 -.12 -2.2 10.87
39 -1.22 -23.8 28.01
55 +4.32 +74.5 44.22
15 -2.69 +10.2 24.94
52 -3.63 -7.3 124.69
4 -.61+100.0 4.88
11 -.92 -2.7 55.02
5 -.62 -24.4 5.41
... -3.05 -66.0 7.63
10 -3.55 -35.7 38.94
20-10.99 +18.2 249.10
32 -.67 -19.9 11.17
... -.53 +86.8 6.63
17 -.61 -25.1 25.66
... -.33 +24.7 5.75
37 -.65 +10.7 28.12
17 -1.78 -7.1 39.79
15 -.86 -13.0 34.88
.. -3.70 +101.4 82.83
15 -1.75 -4.0 37.08
51 -1.60 +17.1 15.87
27 -4.53 +1.5 31.93
25 -.38 -35.6 4.91
13 -1.50 -18.4 18.32
15 -2.01 -6.7 8.06
... -.60 +6.5 6.38.
... -.27 -45.3 .70
10 -1.76 -19.4 18.79
... -2.99 -.5 23.72
30 -1.00 ... 55.67
37 -.97 -36.8 10.24
... -1.24 +12.5 12.19
22 -1.25 +173.8 18.67
16 -2.71 -10.8 21.36
45 -1.56 +36.4 56.76


Name DIv
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
CorinthC' ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
Crocs
Ctrip.coms ...
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DiscvLabh ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EntropCom...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ..
FifthThird .04
Finisar rs
Flextm
FresKabi rt...
GT Solar ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
GreenMtC s...
HudsCity .60
Intel .63
Intuit
JA Solar
JDS Uniph...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last I Name


30 -2.65 +28.6
14 -.77 +6.6
13 -.78 +5.5
4 -1.34 -51.6
20 -1.23 -6.5
38-13.86 +.7
20 -1.15 +122.6
... -2.54 +11.3-
61 -.75 -1.5
15 -1.11 -16.4
... -2.57 +38.8
25 -.05 +15.6
... +.00 -59.6
10 -3.35 -15.8
13 -1.17 -26.4
17 -.44 -23.5
... -1.17 -20.7
11 +.05 -8.6
... -1.40 -11.7
78 -1.08+130.0
-.71 +13.4
18 -.93 -8.0
26 -.42 +6.3
-.56 +24.4
-2.90 +58.9
-.86. -27.4
... -.01 -72.3
12 -.05 +43.0
... -2.88 +35.3
10 -1.51 -20.7
61 +.18 +13.8
10 -.58 -15.8
12 -1.50 -6.1
23 -2.11 +25.5
13 -.72 +1.2
...-1.12 +24.5
33 -.26 +9.7
50 -2.95 -19.5


Wkiy YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cha %Cho Last


Kulicke
LTX-Cred ...
LamResrch...
Lattice
LeapWirtss ..
Level3
UbtyMIntA ...
UnearTch .92
MarvellT ...
Mattel .75
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.37
MicronT
Microsoft .52
NasdOMX ..
NetApp
Nelflix
NewsCpA .15
NorTrst, 1.12
Novell
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20
Oxigene h ...
PDLBio 1.00
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .36
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
Penwest
PeopUtdF .62
Popular.
Power-One...
PwShsQQQ.26
PriceTR 1.08
Qualcom .76


5 -1.10, +5.6 5.69
... -.48 +20.8 2.15
14 -4.21 -4.0 37.66
17 -1.07 +61.9 4.37
... -.37 -44.0 9.83
... -.04 -26.8 1.12
10 -.78 -1.2 10.71
19 -2.26 .--4.3 29.25
24 -,69 -30.1 14.51
13 -.31 +8.8 21.74
23 -1.00 -17.6 16.75
... -.08 +13.4 3.81
20 -1.74 -1.0 28.77
5 -.30 -31.1 7.28
7 -1.15 -19.9 24.40
14 -.27 +.6 19.94
34 -4.97 +11.0 38.14
53+13.94+140.1 132.26
13 -1.15 -5.4 12.95
16 +.82. -5.7 49.39
... -.40 +36.9 5.68
13 -2.15 -2.2 15.19
23 -.16 -49.7 9.39
12 -.47 -27.9 6.36
19 -1.72 -7.6 22.66
... -.02 -72.4 .32
6 -1.25 -24.5 5.18
17 -1.04 -17.0 7.19
67 -3.39 +16.0 42.07
... -1.34 -3.6 14.79
19 -.59 -18.5 24.97
12 +.76 +91.9 4.97
43 -.36 -20.9 13.22
... -.11 +13.7 2.57
... -1.86 +141.1 10.49
...-2.04 -2.6 44.72
21 -2.85 -12.8 46.41
19 -.70 -18.0 37.95


Name DIv
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ...
STEC
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
SiriusXM ..
SkywksSol ..,
Solarfun
Sonus
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SunHIthGp ...
SunPowerA...
SuperWell ..
Symantec ...
TDAmeritr ...
TakeTwo
Tellabs .08
TerreStar ...
TevaPhrm .71
TibcoSft ...
TriQuint
UAL
UrbanOut ...
Veecolnst ...
Verisign
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.32
WholeFd ...
Windstrm 1.00
XOMA h ...
Xilinx .64
YRCWwdh...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 12 -.36 -15.3 4.04
... 11 -.05 -20,9 53.40
14 -1.23 -23;6 12.49
... 9 -3.60 +43.3 41.54
... ... -1.03 -38.5 11.18
... ... -.05 +66.7 1.00
21 -1.25 +20.2 17.05
38 -.38 +34.7 10.28
S+.08 +43.1 3.02
1.9 17 -1.06 -22.3 19.11
2.2 22 -1.34 +4.0 23.99
2.2 15 -1.30 -22.7 13.69
... 9 -.14 -12.5 8.02
... 34 -.75 -49.0 12.07
...... +3.86 +54.9 22.09
... 13 -.70 -31.0 12.34
... 15 -1.03 -20.5 15.42
... ... -1.90 -17.5 8.29
1.2 13 -.28 +20.1 6.82
... ... -.40 -75.2 .23
1.4 20 +.12 -11.1 49.97
... 29 -.75 +37.3 13.22
... 16 -.67 +15.0 6.90
-.84 +66.4 21.48
22 -2.21 -11.7 30.90
... 13 -8.62 -5.3 31.29
... 24 -.97 +17.7 28.53
.8 ... -1.42 +20.7 20.32
5.5 ... -.80 +3.7 23.95
... 29 -.06 +32.7 36.42
8.8 17 -.22 +3.1 11.33
... ... -.03 -62.9 .26
2.6 14 -2.71 -.1 25.04
... ... -.02 -65.5 .29
... 23 -.51 -17.6 13.83
.2 ... -1.75 +55.0 19.89


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GenMoly
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GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
HQ SustM ...
Hemisphrx ...
InovioPhm ...
Kemet
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Ubbey


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... +.09 +7.4 6.68
35 +.26 +29.2 19.49
... +.86 +74.3 1.83
71 +.02 -54.5 1.41.
22 -.42 +71.0 7.18
... -.07 +42.1 1.62
-.14 -10.7 2.16
+.48 +29.3 5.82
32 +.25 +123.3 8.33
... -.82 -5.3 40.02
...-1.64 -15.0 21.99
23 ... +80.0 2.97
...-1.00 -42.8 2.67
:.. +.20 -10.2 .88
8 -.04 -40.4 .41
... -.01 -44.4 .50
... -.04 +7.3 14.78
... -.48 +4.1 2.52
8 +.02 +26.8 4.02
10 +1.21 -18.1 5.89
... -.02 -31.6 .13
... -.01 +3.9 .40
... -.17 +6.3 1.35
... -.17 +4.6 1.13
12 +.04 +28.5 4.46
... -.27 +61.1 6.33
... -.33 -1.4 16.10
+.00 -36.8 .34
-.27 +40.4 2.92
44 +.05 +41.0 4.40
-.22 +3.8 5.95
+.04 +8.2 1.85
3 -1.48 -56.0 3.10
-.05 -14.3 .48
-.14 -21.9 .89
-.76+159.7 3.09
... -.22 +32.4 2.94
4 -2.04 +34.0 10.25


Name DIv
UbertyAcq ...
UbAcq wt ...
MagHRes ..
Metalico ..
NIVS IntT ...
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NDragon ...
NwGoldg ...
NA Pall g ...
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TanzRy g ...
Taseko
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TravelCtrs ...
US Gold ...
Uluru
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold ...


WkIy YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -.12 +5.4 10.19
... ... -.09 +89:9 1.31
... ... -.47+156.1 3.97
... 21 -.56 -33.3 3.28
... ... -.28 -15.5 2.18
... ... +.10 +64.6 4.00
... ... -.01 -42.3 .08
... ... +.02 +52.7 5.56
... ... -.15 -8.3 3.21
79 +.17 +27.2 T5.06
... 21 -.02 -6.2 2.89
... ... +.11 +7.2 6.57
... ... -.06 -55.2- .52
... ... -.37 +18.6 2.17
... 4 -1.17 -58.7 4.33
-.02 -47.3 .20
... ... -.07 -6.9 1.35
... ... -.55 -22.4 6.13
... ... -.08+183.3 .68
... ... -.05 -23.7 .94
... +.26 -14.6 4.02
... ... -.12+375.0 1.14
... ... -.42 +4.2 25.30
... ... +.05 +55.6 5.43
... ... -.09 -.2 4.21
... ... -.05 -10.2 3.07
... ... +.64 -25.8 3.28
... ... -.27 +87.9 4.66
... ... -.01 -50.0 .11
... ... -.09 -7.7 1.20
... ... -.18 -35.7 2.43
... 42 -.09 -21.1 1.27
... 5 +5 + +110.9 6.20
... ... +.09 -40.0 1.47


Waterlnv 2.00 12.4 12 -.99 +12.9 16.18
WizzardSft ... ... ... ... -41.2 .20
YM Bio ... ...... -.08 +2.2 1.38


Dow Jones Industrials 45.19
Close: 10,303.15 M
1-week change: -350.41 (-3.3%) MON
11,500 ...... ..........


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


19.88
40.82
35.84
11.40
34.47
21.27
4.48
31.30
29.10 .
26.80
30.75
53.35
14.07
29.40
21.27
30.70
37.28
31.59
8.75
24.39
2.43
29.98
16.14
40.90
9.70
50.81
32.16
4.17-
9.61
11.97
24.28
18.16
44.30
84.01
41.79
30.81
19.08
49.76
54.15
50.14
36.48
16.27
16.43
9.14
2.93
64.44
22.22
7.29
33.79
45.10
32.03
20.81
27.75
24.27
16.85
41.31
30.03
32.51'
72.22
8.52
28.17
15.37
51.79
25.84
4.06
24.46
15.98
16.36
19.44
18.00
22.42
9.01
9.73
40.85


ADC Tel
ASML HId .27
ATPO&G ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
AmkorTif ...
A123 Sysn ...
ApolloGrp ..
Apple Inc ...
ApIdMatI .28
ArenaPhm ...
Atheros ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36
BMC Sft
Baidu s
BedBath
BrigExp
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ..
CA Inc .16
CVB Fnci .34
Cadence ...
CpstnTrb ...
CareerEd ...
CaviumNet ...
Celgene
CentAl
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitrixSys


~---


i







LAKE CITY REPORTER HOME SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


iFsinY FE
FAMILY FEATURES 'r|


Parents are looking for ways to get their kids back into the
learning mode. Making education a part of the norm is
essential for an easy transition back to school. Not only is it
important for success, but childhood development as well. Exposure
to books in the early childhood stages plays a key role in a child's
reading development, and while most parents and caregivers know
that children benefit from reading time, many struggle to fit it into
their children's hectic schedules.
A survey conducted on behalf of VTech, a leading electronic
learning products provider, found that more than 40 percent of moms
with children ages 3 to 7 years old said that not having enough time
to spend reading with their children is the biggest challenge they face
in trying to make reading a daily activity. And nearly half wished
there were ways to include reading in their child's on-the-go schedule.
Fortunately, there are plenty of fun and practical ways to make
reading a part of everyday family life.
Making Reading Fun
You can help a child develop reading skills even when you're
running errands or doing activities together. By going places and doing
things with" children, you help build their background knowledge and
vocabulary, giving them a basis for understanding what they read..
Telling stories and interacting with each other while on the go
helps them develop their listening and thinking skills.
And now there are technologies that let you take interesting reading
material wherever you go. The new V.Reader, the first interactive,
animated e-book system for children,' creates an engaging reading
experience for early readers, ages 3 to 7, so they love to learn to read.
"We understand that parents are looking for ways to merge
learning and fun and VTech is excited to offer the V.Reader, which
does exactly that," said Tom McClure, director of marketing, VTech
Electronics North America, LLC. "Parents can trust this cutting-edge
e-book to aid in their children's development while proving how
learning can be fun too."
The touch-and-read e-book brings stories to life with narration,
characters, animation, graphics, sounds and music. Kids interact as
they listen and follow along with a story, or touch the screen and play
games to learn each word and sentence. The V.Reader helps teach
Reading comprehension, vocabulary, phonics and word building.
Reading is a skill that requires nurturing. Creating a literacy-rich
home is the best way to engage children with the joys of books and
help them become readers for a lifetime. One convenient way to keep
a constant stream of new books available to young readers is by


iecn


er


Photo courtesy of Getty Images






Readers


ology Makes It Fun


downloading new e-book titles. Through the VTech website, new titles
are available at your fingertips to add to your child's VReader library.
To find out more about the V.Reader and to download titles, visit
www.vtechkids.com
Create a Reading-Friendly Environment
Research' shows that lack of access to books and educational
materials is the single greatest barrier to literacy development in the
US and beyond. Books, magazines, newspapers and other reading
tools should be within easy reach of the whole family. Try designating
a bookcase or shelf where children can keep a personal library. '
According to First Book, a nonprofit organization that provides new
books to children in need, a steady stream of new, age-appropriate
books has been shown to nearly triple interest-in reading within
months. By visiting www.firstbook.org, families, teachers and reading
programs can help children from low-income communities build their
own home libraries and start the journey to becoming lifelong readers.
"It's important for beginner readers to continue practicing their
newly acquired reading skills," said Ron Fairchild, founding CEO of
the National Summer Learning Association and a national authority
on how to expand learning opportunities for youth. "Research shows
that access'to reading material that matches kids' ability levels and
interests, and assistance to ensure comprehension, are important to
sustaining and advancing reading skills."
Some other tips for helping young readers develop include:
* Read with your child every day, even if it's just for a few minutes.
* Ask open-ended questions, such as "What do you think is going to
happen next?" or "Why do you think he did that?"
* Read your child's favorite book over and over.
* Find out what interests your child and get reading materials to feed
that interest.
a Let children see you read and invite them to read with you.
The US Department of Education (DOE) also recommends that
when reading a book aloud to young children, point to each word as
you read. This helps the child make a visual connection that the
word said is the word seen.


Literacy Milestones
Most children develop certain skills as they move through
the early stages of learning language. According to the
Department of Education, these are some milestones to be
working toward:
From ages 3 to 4, most preschoolers:
Enjoy listening to and talking about storybooks
Understand that print carries a message
Identify familiar signs and labels
Participate in rhyming games
Identify some letters and make some letter-sound matches
At age 5, most kindergartners:
m Retell simple stories
n Use descriptive language to explain or to ask questions
v Recognize letters and letter-sound matches
n Show familiarity with rhyming and beginning sounds
n Begin to match spoken words with written ones
At age 6, most first-graders:
Use a variety of ways to help with reading a story such as
rereading, predicting what will happen, asking questions,
or using visual cues or pictures
Read some things aloud with ease
Identify new words by using letter-sound matches, parts of
words and their understanding of the rest of a story or
printed item
Sound out and represent major sounds in a word when
trying to spell
Try to use some punctuation marks and capitalization

'Susan B. Neuman, Ph. D. University of Michigan, Center for the
Improvement of Early Reading Achievement


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


]









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SOneem M p Mlr ad
aim n Each add tions.
4 lines 6 days neaditional25

Each I nem t clud.e price. .
Thips Isa nonrteuindable rafte



|Omn l tmperngad l |
4 lines 6 days a ditional
Rate appe to private Indduals selling
peonal merchandise totalling $500 or tss.




O Eac em must Include a price
4 lines *6 days line on.15




Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise talling ,00 Or less.
k Each item muat Inciie a price.



This Is a non-refundable rate.







One em per ad ah additional
ys lines y line $1.55

R ppie to private Individuals selling
Smerchandise totIg $,.000 or less.
must Include a price
This s a non-refundable rate.





Hem per ad %27
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rat apples to private Id vduaI s selli
persona merchandise toting ,000 or ss.
Each item must lIclude a price


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.'
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdlistoApear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10M00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thrs., 1100a.m. Thurs., 9:00am.
Saturday Fi., 10:00 am. Fri., 9:00 am.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to. the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.comn


Legal

Value Adjustment Board Organiza-
tional Meeting
An Organizational Meeting for the
Value Adjustment Board has been
scheduled for Tuesday, August 17th
at 4:00 PM. The meeting will be
held in the Columbia County Com-
missioners Conference Room 2nd
Floor Courthouse Annex.
04541259
August 15, 2010

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!

Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219

Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY TO ADOPT RULE AND
SET PUBLIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, September 14, 2010,
at 7:00 p.m., at the School Board Ad-
ministrative Complex, 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida, on
proposed amendments to rules, regu-
lations and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Columbia County School
District. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
ed.
TITLE: 2010 2011 Student
Pro-
gression Plan
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
Var-'
ious revisions are being made in or-
der to comply With district policy,
Florida Statutes and State Board of
Education Rules.
Elementary Section: Change from
Sunshine State Standards (SSS) to
Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards (NGSSS). Stated the pur-
pose for collecting the Social Securi-
ty Number. Clarified information on
absences.
Middle School Section: Change from
Sunshine State Standards (SSS) to
Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards (NGSSS). Stated the pur-
pose for collecting the Social Securi-
ty Number. Clarified information on
absences. Limited the number of
summer school courses taken for
promotion purposes to one at a non-
public school.
High School Section: Change from
Sunshine State Standards (SSS) to
Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards (NGSSS). Stated the pur-
pose for collecting the Social Securi-
. ty Number. Clarified information on
absences. Semester grade determina-
tion for courses assessed with an End
of Course;Exam to be in accordance
with Staite Board Rule/DOE
Policies/Procedures.
High. School Graduation Require-
ments:
* Inserted for students entering ninth
grade in the 2010-2011 school year.,
* Amended language in require-
ments for students who entered in
2009-2010, 2008- 2009, 2007-
2008 to reflect changes: Credit in
Fine Arts or Approved Practical Arts
and delete Majors/Minors.
The requirements ... for
Valedictorian/Salutatorian were
clarified to include language in the
event of ties. Revised classification
of potential graduates. Revised the
number of required classes per day.
Deleted auditing a class.


Legal

Adult Education Section: Students
enrolled at Challenge Leaniing Cen-
ter cannot co-enroll in Adult Educa-
tion.
Exceptional Student Education Sec-
tion: Changed from Sunshine State
Standards (SSS) to Next Generation
Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS).
Added Response to Intervention
(Rtl) to provide instruction and inter-
vention matched to all student aca-
demic and behavioral needs. RtI is
composed of three tiers: Tier 1:
Core Curriculum, Tier 2: Strategic
Interventions and Tier 3: Compre-
hensive and Intensive
SPECIFIC LEGAL -AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1008.25;
230.23,
Florida Statutes
TITLE: 2010 2011 Code of
Stu-
dent Conduct
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
Var--
ious revisions are being made in or-
der to comply with district policy,
Florida Statutes and State Board of
Education Rules.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1006.07;
1008.25,
Florida Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
' amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL, be-
tween the. hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday Friday. Eco-
nomic impact statements, where ap-
plicable, are on file in the Office of
the Superintendent at the above list-
ed address.
DATED THIS 10th DAY OF Au-
gust, 2010.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY: Keith Hudson, Chairman
ATTEST: Michael F. Millikin, Su-
perintendent
04541269
August 15, 2010



060 Services

Home Daycare PT/FT/After-
school. Birth to 12. Zoned for
Pinemount Ele. West of Lake City
386-719-9100 or 386-292-9817 for
info. Lic# R03CO0020

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100 Job
Opportunities

04541248
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a part-time Legal Assistant
position available. Performs
legal secretarial duties including
preparing legal papers and
correspondence such as
summonses, complaints,
motions, subpoenas and other
pleadings as needed. Additional
support services for a wide
variety of legal functions.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Minimum two
years previous clerical
experience in a legal setting.
Excellent typing and computer
skills required. Applications
may be. obtained from any
First Federal Branch and
submitted to Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, Fl. 32056 or email
'Turbeville.J(a)ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05523521
EARN Extra Money
-Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. Fr/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri

05523527

nPEMCO
WORLD AIR SERVICES

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have been waiting for!
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
Aircraft Mechanics
Aircraft Structural Mechanics
Production Supervisors
e Quality Control Manager/
Supervisor/Inspector
Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careers(5pemcoair.com;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at
U "' v. pemcoair corn
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

04541206
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
No CDL, No Problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 4Q1K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to,
set up an interview..


Green Acres Learning Center
seeking qualified applicants for a
teaching position, preferably with
40 hr DCF training, apply in
person 1126 SW Main Blvd

Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
.(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW
OFFICE MANAGER.
Local Finance Office looking for
enterprising capable individual,
bookkeeping, filing, other D2D
tasks, good pay, opportunity to
advance. Fax Resume to:
386-755-8608
Stylist Needed
@ La Fleur de Jeunesse Day Spa.
Following preferred, for more info
call Frances 386-365-1557


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Lye Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746.
04540698
Do you get satisfaction from
making something?
:Do you get excited about
technology?
Do you like to analyze problems
and come up with creative
solutions?
If so, a degree or certificate in
Engineering Technology
at Florida Gateway College
is for you!
Engineering Technicians are in
demand by manufacturing and
other high-tech industries.
Enroll now for the Fall semester.
Classes begin Aug. 23.
Financial Aid available.
Call 386,754-4442.for details.

Saturday Welding Class
Enjoy working outdoors? Like to
earn a good income, have.
equipment in need of repair?
Consider Saturday Welding class
at Florida Gateway College. No
high school diploma or GED
,needed. Financial aid avail. Call
(386) 754-4214 for details.
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
. experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills, and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
WAITRESS/WAITER
Experience Required. Apply in
person. Part-time 297 N Marion
Ave. DeSoto Drugs Restaurant
Westfield Realty Group: seeks
Office Manager/Executive
Assistant. Must have previous
office mgmt. exp, excellent
people/telephone/computer skills
and exceptional professionalism.
Email resume to:
info@westfieldrealtygroup.com
or fax to 386-755-0805


0b Employment
05523543
Route Sales salary and commis-
sion paid, van required,will
train, Please fax resume to
Map Supply, Inc 336-731-2297


120 Medical
1 Employment

05523327
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328 ,

Medical Office has an
immediate opening in
the financial department.
F/T, HS Diploma Req.,
Medical Exp. A Must -
Please fax resume to
386-628-9231, Attn: H/R Dept
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. V32025.

240 Schools &
S Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-08/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-09/13/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


To place your
classified ad call


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?















Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
.4 Lake City, FL 32025
I 386.754.8562
SEPl www.sitel-com EOE


BUY I


SEL L I


FIND IJ


Classified Department: 755-5440





LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


You already know you love shopping here, we think you'd love working here too. With flexible
schedules, friendly faces, a supportive environment, and of course, employee discounts, we've got
everything you need to maximize your career potential! And now that we're right in your neigh-
borhood, T.J. Maxx has the job that fits your life, and the resources to take you to the next level!

Monday, August 16 &

Tuesday, August 17

l0am-7pm

Lake City Mall
(Former Rex Electronics) 2469 West US
Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
For more information, or if unable to attend, please call our Hiring Line:
1-866-TJ MAXX-5 1(I-866-856-2995).
TJX is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to workplace diversity.



www.tjmaxx.com
U ITJ 4lT .1 Alma arshails -Ikwriaods Av,' T.thn.KE WINNERS' HOMESENSE STYLESENSE
<- ^P.^NI'-i,,m'


Classified Department: 755-5440









CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


310 Pets & Supplies
Amazon Green Female Parrot.
about 6 yrs. old. non-escaper,
clean talk, Ig vocabulary, great
entertainer/companion w/rollling
cage. $400. FIRM 386-752-0347
BEAUTIFUL PUPS
Chocolate Labradors
Registered $350
386-965-2231
Free to good home,
Female Chihuahua 2 yrs old,
spayed,fawn color, very sweet &
lovable 386-755-1034
Lovely Rat Terrier.
3.5 months old
$100.
386-697-9950
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies
2 MARES $500 each, gentle, 1
mini horse, 1 mustang, both take
saddle and rider, lead well, make
great family horse 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances


Dishwasher & Stove
$50 EACH
Leave Message 386-344-5706
or 386-344-1783
GE White Washer/Dryer set
Works Good
$225.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Computer Desk
with Hutch top, dark wood,
$35.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Tall Bookshelf
$35.00 obo
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
Youth Bed, metal frame + mat-
tress, head and foot board,
blue in color $135 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
/i 0 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
! Craftsman Riding Mower, 20 hp
turbo cool engine, 42 cut, auto,
runs great, $550 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
High WheelPUSH MOWER.
5.5 engine Runs super!
22" cut. $100.00
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

114 Machinery &
411 Tools
Lrg Craftsman Dbl Tool Box,
with side closets, include name
brand auto tools, $1200 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Fri/Sat/Sun 8A- 6P,
NEW dresses & p/suits
$35 ea, all sizes 908-472-0651
3720 NW Huntsboro St #101,L, C.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Air-Pro Air compressor,
tank on wheels,l hp,
$50'OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-9840387
Diamond Plate Tool Box
for small truck, in good shape
$60
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 3876-965-2231
Upgraded Running Boards
Rubber covered. Fits Ford truck.
Extended or King cab. $100.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

S450 Good Things
45 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

520 Boats for Sale
12' JON Boat. New troll motor
& trailer. Life Jackets, oars &
paddles. $1,500 FIRM.
Cell 386-871-7005. Anytime


520 Boats for Sale
14FT. V-HULL ALUMINUM
BOAT With trailer and
trolling motor. $850.
386-755-4247

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1BR/1BATH
Low Deposit Moves you in.
$395 a monthly. Only 1 !
386-755-5488
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3 bdrm/2bath MH,
N of town, $575 monthly
plus Sec dep,
386-288-6280
3/2 d/w; on 1/2 acre,
all major appliances, included as
well as W/D. Spacious & com-
pletely remodeled. Great location
Asking $650 first, $650 Deposit
Call 305-537-8751
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Clean older 2br/lba MH in park
on Racetrack Rd. Lot #7. CH/A
Washer /Dryer, Ice maker. $425
mo. $100. dep. 386-755-6422
Furnished or Unfurnished Clean
2 &3br's, In quiet, private park.
Large lot Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017


SWMH 3/2 on 1 ac. Very nice.
No pets! Smoke free environment.
Close to town. 650.mo + $500 dep.
386-288-6786


Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

6A4 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
1978 S/W 2 bdrm, in Paradise
Village MH Park 195 SE Bikini
Dr, Lake City, Lot # 25, 2 blks
from College, great for student,
. asking $6,000 OBO 850-295-4717
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K:
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn..
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
.c Mobile Home
650 & Land "
D/W on almost 1/2 acre lot, 3/2,
new AC, appliances included,
$50,000 on Branford Hwy
386-208-0665 or 386-466-2825
"/ f Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05523300
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423 .

1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423 '

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security.
Call Michelle
386-752-9626
3 bdrm/2 bath,very clean, no lawn
maint, washer/dryer inside,
$650 month, w/$650 sec,
no pets or smoking, 386-755-3929
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-1002 -
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Unfurnished 2br Apt.
w/Gorgeous Lake View. Must see!
$485. mo plus deposit.
Close to shopping. 386-344-2972
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
^720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
f730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3br/2ba home for rent in Wise
Estates. Brick exterior, new
flooring, great location. $1100.
mo. lst,last, & sec. 386-965-8633


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ENTRY FORM
Name: ---------.
IE Phone Number:

READY TO WIN. Address:
Find all 16 of the 'Dance' related words hidden in the Subscriber: ID Yes I- No
word search above. Words can be found in the banners *
on the ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and return it Deadline is Monday, August 16, 2010 at,5:00 p.m.
to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City,
FL by 5:00pm, for your chance to win Lake City Reporter


3322 W US Hwv 90
386-755-2502


[ Eagle

Properties
(386) 752-9226
Office Space

Oak Hill Plaza
Tom (386) 961-1086
DCA Realtor


TACO
BELL
386-755-9673





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<.FiTrhESS.
1191 SW Bascom Norris Dr
Suite 1.03
Lake City, FL
(386) 754-1724
www.anytimefitness.com


Lake Citg

Kiddy Club
"Where learning is hn
Pre-K & VPK

755-0256


1290 SE Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025

Chagrleston
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(386) 752-7034


Live Oak
(386) 364-1000
Lake City
(386) 755-3558


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Insurance Agency

4447 NW American Lane
(386 752-6058


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
04541182
FOR RENT IN A
GREAT LOCATION
3/2 newer brick duplex,
both units are available.
Approximately 1300 sf. with a
one car garage. A real deal at
only $790./month with
security. Call BJ Federico at
386-365-5884 to schedule your
showing. Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
* Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,150
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-984-9599
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets..
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LG 3BR/2BA house
Nice property. $745. mo.
$600 security. Application req'd.
386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Very nice older home, 2br/2ba
w/fenced yard, garage, huge Fl.
room. CHA, appli. Application,
credit check & lease req'd. 1st, last
& sec. $650/mo. (904)259-4126
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeffrey. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181
750 Business &
Office Rentals
05523530
WAREHOUSE SPACE
For Lease near 1-75 in
Cannon Creek.
1247sf w-office,
restroom & utilities included.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757.
Westfield. Realty Group.,
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep. Tom 386-
961-1086 DCA Realtor
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18: This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
04541245
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
August 28th, 2010 @11:00 AM
518 SW Explorer Glen
Ft. White, FL 32038
10+ acres with Doublewide
Mobile home and out buildings!
A peaceful sanctitary away from
the hustle and bustle!! For
pictures and info see
www.brewerauctions.com
Phone: (386)497-4438
Cell: (904)838-1575
Conducted by:
Brewer Auction & Realty
Roy J. Brewer, Jr.,
CAI, auctioneer
AU#2604/ACB#1940
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors..
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135

820 Farms &
SAcreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landrifl.com
J,


930 Motorcycles
2005 V-STAR 650.
Low miles.
Excellent condition. $5.400.
386-935-2166



Contact us

at te paper3







LASSIFIED ADS

386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


,ElCTONIC ADS SENDTO.

Sads@akecityreporterco


m: n . .W . ,. ,, '







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NEED HELP!


Let Us Write

Your

Classified Ad


T-
I !



ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2008 Dodge SLT
4x4 Big Ram
20" Factory rims, Hemi
full power, extra clean.
10,290 mi.
$26,000
Call
386-755-2909


cxc. conu. Ai uptiouna
incl cust cover. Seats 6.
Bought in '08 for carpool
(now over) Great MPG.
$8,875
Call
386-752-3204
386-961-4561


14Ft. V-Hull
Aluminum Boat'
With trailer and'
trolling, motor.
$850
Call
386-755-4247


In Print,
& Online
One Low
Price!


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"Always fresh and always on time!"
Lai. C..,v
"It's about time a sub taste like a
sub. Thanks 1tilli/' J's!"
Ln'viiu Huihne"i
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Listen to Mix 94.3 and Big 98 to win FREE SUBSI
Open Monday Saturday loam-9pm
Sunday llam-7pm
(386) 752-7949 3525 4ascom Norris
(Acros from WaMuMar% e to L.w 3 ,


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Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, August 15, 2010


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest


Foreign

plant pests

invade US

She United
States is being
invaded by for-
eign plant pests,
diseases, and
weeds. They float in quietly
on air currents and ocean
currents. They arrive as
hitchhikers on shipment
containers, cut flowers,
nursery stock and produce.
With our expanding global
marketplace, the potential
for unwanted alien pests
crossing our borders is
ever increasing.
Many of these newly
introduced pests have
arrived in the U.S. with-
out a natural predator.
Populations can explode
if the pests find favorable
living conditions. They
become invasive when they
destructively feed on local
plants and crops, compete
.with native species, and
throw the ecosystem out of
balance.
The harmful effects of
these alien pests can be
devastating. Our natural
areas suffer when native
species are pushed out
and the diversity of life
is reduced. Local and
national economy can be
affected when crops are
lost or exports are reduced
because of quarantines.
Treatments to control
invasive species can cost
industry and government
millions of dollars.
APHIS, a service of
the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, has
proclaimed August as
"Invasive Plant Pest
and Disease Awareness
Month." The purpose is to
increase public awareness
of invasive species and how
they can harm America's
agriculture and natural
resources.
The mission of APHIS is
to protect the health and
value of American agricul-
ture and natural resources.
But individual citizens play
an important role in this
mission. Go to the website
"http://www.aphis. usda.
gov/hungrypests/index.
shtml" http://www.aphis.
usda.gov/hungrypests/index.
shtml to learn about the
invasive pests that are
threatening us in Columbia
County. If you see any of
these species, report them
to the Extension office or
to "http://www.aphis.usda.
gov" www.aphis.usda.gov.
What can gardeners do
to help fight off the attack
of the aliens? Buy nursery
stock that is certified and
pest free. Some invasives
are very attractive, so resist
temptation. Avoid planting
invasive plants and remove
any existing ones from
your garden. Go native.
Some common sense
will help you choose wisely
during other outdoor activi-
ties. Instead of transport-
ing firewood, purchase and
use what is available near
your camping area.
Clean off your camp-
ing and outdoor gear to
prevent spreading seeds.
Learn to recognize pests
and avoid activities in
infested areas.
The UF Master
Gardeners can help you
identify suspicious pests.
Join them at 2 p.m., Aug. 28
at the downtown library for
their "Composting" presen-
tation.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida


Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


FIDDLIN' 'RO UND



Country superstar Charlie Daniels


sends mean fiddle to Lake City boy


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City's Jacob Gravel, 9, displays an autographed fiddle recently given to him by country singer, guitarist and fiddler Charlie Daniels. Daniels is known
for his No. 1 country hit 'The Devil Went Down to Georgia' and has been influential in country and southern rock.


By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
L ast year, 9-year-old
Jacob Gravel received
a fiddle bow from coun-
try music hall of.famer
Charlie Daniels. This
year, he got the whole fiddle with
an autograph to match.
Jacob received the autographed
fiddle from Daniels about three
weeks ago. That gift came when
the Lake City youth met Daniels
for the third time, with his moth-
er and father, in Mount Juliet,
Tenn. The family annually attends
the Charlie Daniels Fan Club
Family Reunion where about 150
die-hard fans are invited each
year.
The Gravel family is always in
the front row for Daniels' concert,
said patriarch Mike Gravel.
Jacob met Daniels for the first
time in 2007 at the Reunion. The
youngster requested Daniels sing
his favorite song, "Drinkin' My'
Baby Goodbye." The musician ful-
filled the request and gave Jacob
a fiddle bow.


The boy and country:
met again in
2008 at the
Reunion
and Jacob
Gravel again t
requested his
favorite song.
Then Daniels
invited him to
come on stage
and sing with
him.
Jacob Gravel
said he was
excited to get
the opportu-
nity to have that
experience, and
this time, Daniels ga
actual bow he was. play
Daniels also called himr
to help in calling out do
Jacob Gravel's.moth
said Daniels remember
this year when they we
his autograph and takii
portrait with him. This
Jacob Gravel told Dani
been wanting a fiddle.


.^ ..-.V f:'I I (D a n ii-
1971


ho

at







-".. an aut
'. .Danie
authe
ve him the said he would send him one. Eve
ing with. And he did. play t
a on stage "Charlie Daniels remembered wanted
oor prizes, him," Lisa Gravel said. 'There's home
er, Lisa, just something about Jacob that fan of
red Jacob he likes." I Ih
ere getting Jacob Gravel became a fan of fiddle
ng a family Charlie Daniels from listening to for on
is when him with his father on the way to' give r
els he had cub scout meetings. stunn
Daniels Mike Gravel, Jacob's father, has he evi


n a fan of Daniels since the
)s.
Charlie Daniels is an awe-
lie, down-to-earth guy;"
ke Gravel said. "It was an
nor to meet him."
Lisa Gravel said five weeks
after the Reunion the fam-
y wondered if Daniels had
remembered to send the
fiddle.
"Then one day there
was a package in the mail
addressed to me," Jacob
Gravel said. "In the pack-
age there was the fiddle,
tographed picture of Charlie
*ls and a certificate of
nticity."
en though Jacob does not
he fiddle, he has always
ed one to put on display at
because he is such a huge
Daniels.
iad been saving up to buy a
, so I asked Charlie Daniels
ne, and he said he would
ne one," Gravel said. "I was
ed he actually said yes, and
en gave me a hug."


Morgan hits the right notes with good company


By TOM MAYER
tmayer@lakecityreporter.com
It took country music star
Craig Morgan a decade to reach a
partnership with Cracker Barrel,
but now that he's there, his new-
est release has found a home
amid the chicken n' dumplin's
and fellow Grand Ole Opry
inductees such as Wynonna Judd,
Alan Jackson and George Jones.
Morgan's in good company
for good reason. "That's Why:
Collector's Edition" contains 13
solid tracks from this former
soldier turned crooner, and con-
tinues the restaurant chain's suc-
cessful run of music exclusives.
To date, that run has included the
likes of not only Judd, Jackson
and Jones, but also Dolly Parton,
Kenny Rogers, Charlie Daniels
and Sara Evans.


COURTESY PHOTO
Craig Morgan's 'That's Why:
Collector's Edition' contains 13 solid
tracks and includes his top radio hits
'Bonfire' and 'This Ain't Nothin."'
"That's Why" ($11.99) is
Morgan at his "everyman" sto-
rytelling best. The disk includes
top radio hits "Bonfire" and "This
Ain't Nothin'" and also captures


two previously unreleased songs
sure to advance the singer's
career. "You," a song about his
wife, Karen, and "Evel Knievel,"
a song about himself, are classic
Morgan tunes.
Like his hits "Almost Home"
and "That's What I Love About
Sunday," both songs find pur-
chase in the paydirt of the collec-
tive unconsciousness of Morgan's
myriad fanbase. These songs are
about Morgan, but they're also
about every American family
you've ever met, yours included.
If there's any downside to the
disk, it's that Cracker Barrel
chose newer chart toppers from
the Morgan catalogue over the
2003 "Almost Home" or the 2005
No. 1 "That's What I Love About
Sunday." With the CD cash regis-
ter-ready at Cracker Barrel's 594
restaurants and country stores,


"That's Why" is sure to grab
a few new fans. It would have
been nice if those fans could
have had a taste of Morgan
before he was Morgan that
is, back in 2000 sans record deal
and when he was still a hungry
man with a guitar and a dream.
But fans new and old will
get their fill with 'That's Why,"
and like other Cracker Barrel
releases, veterans will also ben-
efit from the project. Morgan,
a former Army paratrooper, is
the spokesperson for Not Alone
(www.notalone.com), an organi-
zation that provides counseling
to America's warriors and their
families and friends.
Like "That's Why," the promo-
tion for both that organization
and America's soldiers finds a
fine voice in Morgan's latest
effort.


I I - -`


v I... .


L ....









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


alive: Don't text while driving


e hope our
efforts will
save lives,
says Barry
Congress,
president of the Student
Government at Florida
Gateway College.
Congress was referring
to the campaign to warn
the community about the
dangers of text messaging
and driving.
"We're a small college in.
a small town, and there are
people all over the United
States that won't see us,
no matter how much we
advertise," he said. "In
the end we hope to take
it to a legislative level and
petition for real laws to
prevent deaths and injuries
caused by texting and driv-
ing."
According to the
Governors' Highway Safety
Association, in the state of
Florida there are no feder-
al or state laws prohibiting
tle use of cellular devices


to perform text messaging
while driving.
Studies by the National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration have shown
distracted driving, which
includes text messaging,
is a prominent cause of
vehicle-related fatalities
and accidents.
During studies conduct-
ed by Clemson University,
it was proven that text
messaging takes your eyes
off of the road. Drivers tex-
ting while using a 3D driv-
ing simulator spent about
10 percent of the driving
time out of their lane. This
is the highway equivalent
of driving the length of
almost two football fields
without being able to see
the road in a matter of 10
seconds.
Reading a text mes-
sage while driving can be
undoubtedly fatal.
There are also no state
or federal laws banning
the use of cellular devices


Alisha Williams
vice president, Florida Gateway
College student government

for text messaging by bus
drivers, even for vehicles
which transport minors to
and from school, in Florida
or many other states.
Bus drivers who crash
with a full load of pas-
sengers, especially young
children, are not simply
endangering their own.
lives, but the lives of sons
and daughters of parents
who entrust the safety of
their children into a person
they may have never even
met.
The campaign is a
joint effort by Florida
Gateway College's Student


Government Association
and the Student Activities
Office.
The SGA and SAO
will be pushing the idea
of abstaining from text
messaging while driving
for the duration of the
year, beginning with the
"Welcome Back" event
to be held Aug. 23 to
26, where both new and
returning students are pro-
vided information on the
upcoming semester and
guidance around campus
facilities.
Free T-shirts will be
handed out to students by
SGA members, who will
also give away information-
al "Don't Text and Drive"
pledge cards for students
to sign.
The "Stay Alive, Don't
Text and Drive" campaign
will extend to all other
student events hosted by
the SGA/SAO on campus.
The SGA/SAO partnership
will also be visiting the


local community to raise
awareness of the deadly
nature of text messaging
while driving, targeting the
high schools in and around
Florida Gateway College's
district of service.
'"We hope these kids will
listen," Amy Dekle-Hunt,
Student Government advis-
er, says. "We have a pile of
things to hand out to them,
and we want to let them
know before they sit down
behind the wheel of a car
that they could be injuring
not just themselves, but
their friends, or worse,
even killing them."
However, the real
goal is not to confine the
campaign to the Florida
Gateway College campus,
or even to the focal com-
munity; the SGA hopes
to travel to Tallahassee to
meet with Florida state
senators and legislative
representatives and push
the need for a law banning
text messaging while driv-


ing.
"If alcohol and illicit
drugs will get you put in.
jail while you're on the
road, then something with
just as much of an effect
on your reflexes and judg-
ment should, too. People
won't like not getting
the latest info from their
friends while driving, but
it's not about that it's
about saving someone's
life," said Denise Johnson
of the Student Activities
Office. "Even if we only
save a few, I think that's
worth all of the effort
we've already put into it,
and all the work we're
going to in the future."
Call Student Government
adviser Amy Dekle-Hunt at
(386) 7544317 or e-mail her
at deklea@fgc.edu but not
while you're driving.

* Alisha Williams is vice
president of student
government at the Florida
Gateway College.


'Moseley-Hudson
Lamar and Connie
Moseley, of Fort White,
announce the engage-
ment and approach-
ing marriage of their
granddaughter, Brittany
Moseley, of Fort White,
to Michael Hudson, of
Fort White.
He is the son of
Edmund and Wanda
Hudson, of Fort White.
The wedding date Is to
be announced.


Witt-Douglas
Larry Witt and Judy
Smith, of Lake City,
announce the engage-
ment and approaching
marriage of their daugh-
ter, Hailey Melissa Witt,
of Lake City, to Wesley
Raymond Douglas, of
Lake City.
He is the son of Judge
E. Vernon Douglas and
Joy Davis, of Lake City.
The wedding is
planned for 6 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 18 at the
home of Kenneth and
Louise Witt. A reception
will also follow there.
All friends and family
are invited.


Altman-Wilson
Steve and Felecia
McKenney, of Lake City,
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Joni
McKenney Altman, of Lake
City, to John Gary Wilson
II, of Lake City.
He is the son of
Hambone and Patti
Wilson, of Lake City. ,
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Columbia High
School. She is a member of
Tabernacle Baptist Church-
and involved with the
youth group and choir. She
is employed at Wilson's
Ace Hardware.
The future groom is a
1999 graduate of Columbia
High Class. He is a mem-
ber of Tabernacle Baptist
Church.
He is employed at
Wilson's Containers, Land


COURTESY PHOTO
Hailey Melissa Witt and
Raymond Douglas.


MILITARY TRAINING


Rhodes completes
US Navy training

Navy-Airman Apprentice
Corey J. Rhodes, recently.
completed U.S. Navy basic
training at Recruit Training
Command, Great Lakes,
Mll.
During the eight-week
program, he completed& a
variety of training which
included classroom study
and practical instruction on
other areas. An emphasis
was also placed on physical
fitness.
The capstone event
of boot camp 'is "Battle
Stations" which is designed
to stimulate sacrifice, dedi-
cation, teamwork and
endurance in each recruit
through, the practical
application of basic Navy
skills and the core values
of Honor, Courage and
Commitment.
Rhodes is the son of
Glenda C. Cole of Keystone
Heights and PaulJ. Rhodes,
of Fort White.
He is a 2006 graduate of
Santa Fe High School of
Alachua.

Brown graduates
from Lackland AFB

Air National Guard
Airman James M. Brown
graduated from basic mili-
tary training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.


He completed an inten-
sive, eight-week program
that included training in
military- discipline and
studies, Air Force core val-
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles
and skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training, earn four
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Brown is the son of Karen
Brown, of Lake City.
He is a 2006 graduate of
Columbia High School.

Trespalacios gets
basic training
Air National Guard
Airman Chad A.
Trespalacios graduated
from basic military training
at Lackland Air Force Base,
San Antonio, Texas.
He completed an inten-
sive, eight-week program
that included training in
military discipline and
studies, Air Force core val-
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles
and skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earn four
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Trespalacios is the.
son of Ralph and Mitzi
Trespalacios, of Lake City.
He is a 2007 graduate of


Columbia High School.

Vasco receives
US Navy training

Navy Seaman Recruit
William D. Vasco recently
completed U.S. Navy basic
training at Recruit Training
Command, Great Lakes,
.Ill
During the eight-week
program, Vasco completed
a variety of training which
included classroom study
and practical instruction on
other areas. An emphasis
was also placed on physical
fitness.
The capstone event
of boot camp is "Battle
Stations" which is designed
to stimulate sacrifice, dedi-
cation, teamwork and
endurance in each recruit
through the practical
application of basic Navy
skills and the core values
of Honor, Courage and
Commitment.
Vasco is the son of Janice
P and Dale L. Vasco of Fort
White,
He is a 2008 graduate of
Fort White High School.

Derringer, BHS
grad, gets training

Navy Seaman Recruit
Jesse A. Derringer recent-
ly completed U.S. Navy
basic training at Recruit
Training Command, Great
Lakes, Ill.


COURTESY PHOTO
Joni McKenney Altman and
John Gary Wilson.

Services and Wilson's Ace
Hardware.
The wedding is planned
for 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
2 at Tabernacle Baptist
Church, in Lake City.
A reception will follow at
the Wilson Family Barn.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT


Chuck and Kristina
Basford, of Marianna,
announce the birth of
their son, Brantley Drake
Basford, on July 2 in
Florwfrs Hospital in
Dothan, Ala.
He weighted 9 pounds
and 5 ounces and mea-
sured 20 inches. Brantley


a \l I


joins brother Alec
Basford, who is 3-years-
old.
Grandparents are Greg
and Kim Bailey, Lester
and Myrtle Basford and
Rick Witt. Great-grand-
parents are 'Helen Byrd,
Jackie Bell, Ester Bailey
and Hoyt Andrews.


.ww lrakeitrepolrer.coin
,%k 7


During the eight-week
program, Derringer com-
pleted a variety of training
which included classroom
study and practical instruc-
tion on other areas. An
emphasis was also placed
on physical fitness.
The capstone event
of, boot camp is "Battle
Stations" which is designed
to stimulate sacrifice, dedi-
cation, teamwork and
endurance in each recruit
through the practical'
application of basic Navy
skills and the core values
of Honor, Courage and
Commitment
He is the son of Christa
M. and James R. Derringer
of Branford.
Derringer is a 2005
graduate of Branford High
School.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Jamie Williams
Ronnie Crews
July 31, 2010

'Holly Helms
Patrick, Hadlock
August 21, 2010

Tifanie Mosely
Garre Miller
September 18, 2010

Hailey Witt
Wes Douglas
September.18, 2010

Jessica Powers
Eric Johnson
October 10, 2010

Rebecca Busby
Robert Murray
October 23, 2010
We know exactly what they
want In a wedding or shower gift.
We update their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

SWARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


ENGAGEMENTS


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


111111111 N 11VI










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010 3D


DEAR ABBY


Nagging over grandkids puts

happy marriage in jeopardy


DEAR ABBY: My child-
hood was difficult My
mother was a bitter, unfor-
giving, jealous woman. My
father traveled a lot for his
business and just tolerated
my mother when he was
home. I decided to never
have children to bring into
this family.
When I first met Dave
- my husband of 10 years
- I told him my feel-
ings. He said it was fine
with him he never had
a strong desire to be a
father. Until recently, our
marriage has been a happy
one.
After constant nag-
ging by my mother about
"When are you going to
give me grandkids?" I lied
and said that Dave had a
low sperm count and we
wouldn't be having any.
Now Dave is no longer
invited to their home for
monthly Sunday dinners.
Mother is suggesting I
divorce Dave and marry
"someone who can give
her grandchildren." Dave
says that because he is
"uninvited" I shouldn't go
either. My father sides
with my mother and says
she's a lonely person. He
says he will change his
will if I upset Mom by not
visiting.
Abby, this has caused
a real strain on our


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

marriage. Please help.
- NOBODY'S MAMA
IN CALIFORNIA
DEAR NOBODY'S
MAMA: I'll try. The suc-
cess of a marriage is not
measured by the ability to
produce grandchildren.
If you hadn't lied to your
mother, she wouldn't be
blaming your husband for
the fact that she doesn't
have any. Tell her the real
reason why you won't be
having children, and how
she influenced that deci-
sion. Her treatment of your
husband and her meddling
in your marriage are outra-
geous.
Tell your father to keep
his money, and if your
mother is "lonely" it's HIS
job to fill her empty hours.
If you allow your parents
to continue to manipulate
you, you will find yourself
alone.
DEAR ABBY: My best
friend, "Nancy," is wonder-
ful, generous and kind to
everyone except her hus-


band, 'Ted." She belittles,
yells and embarrasses him
constantly.
Nancy has suggested
that my boyfriend and I
take a vacation with them,
but I can't stand hearing
her constant criticism. Just
having dinner with them is
painful enough.
Ted is a nice guy
who tries hard to please
Nancy, but he can't seem
to do anything right in
her eyes. Is there any-
thing I can do or say to
Nancy without offending
her or sticking my nose
where it doesn't belong?
- EMBARRASSED IN
VIRGINIA
DEAR EMBAR-
RASSED:. As I see it, you
have two choices. Keep
dodging your friend's
efforts to arrange a joint
vacation, which will wear
thin after a while. Or, have
a frank chat with her. Tell
her as gently as pos-
sible that she may not
realize how uncomfortable
she makes others when
they must witness her con-
stant bickering with her
husband, and until they
mend fences, you and your
boyfriend will be unavail-
able for vacations.
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box.69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): There is money to be
made. Send out your r6su-
m6 or offer to help some-
one you would like to work
with in the future. Take an
honest look at your per-
sonal life. * *
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You may want to lend
a helping hand but don't
set yourself up to be taken
advantage of. Know where
and when to draw the line.
The more time spent tak-
ing care of your needs,
the better you will feel.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You may be impressed
by what others do and say
but have a little confidence
in yourself and your abili-
ties. You have just as much
to offer as anyone else.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Listen carefully so you
can detect lies from the
truth. Do your homework.
You don't want to let any-
one take advantage of you,
especially those you are
close to. * *
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
Travel should be on your
agenda. No matter how far
or near, the experience you
gain will lead to greater
knowledge and insight into
others as well as yourself.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Take a closer look at
your personal financial sit-
uation to see what you can
do to make your dollars
stretch further. A problem
with someone from your
past is likely to surface. Be
precise and you can con-
trol whatever situation you
face.* * *
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Not everything will be
readily available or easy
to see. So much is riding
on the decisions you make
but, if you jump too quick-
ly, you will probably have
to backtrack. * *
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You know what you
want, so ask for it There
is nothing unattainable if
you put in the effort. You
don't have to spend to get


CELEBRITY CIPHER
CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograma are created from quotat(ons by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
Today's clue: Z equals V
A ADEKKS RX RE: X D A K H K X M K ONX
CRWK'X W R H K : RN RX TE
KLOK CC KEN X K HZT EN, U J N T
N K H H'RUCK ATXN K H M. N U T H E J A
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Like everyone else who makes the mistake of getting
older, I begin each day with coffee and obituaries." Bill Cosby
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-16


ahead, but you do need
to put in the time. Keep
your emotions in check.

SAGrITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): A little adven-
ture can be expected if
you mingle with people
who are new to you or who
come from different back-
grounds. Your status can
change quickly by an offer
or commitment you make.
Don't worry about opposi-
tion. *"
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stick close
to home. Problems while
traveling or dealing with
groups, organizations
or authority figures can
be expected. Do your
research before getting
into a financial agreement
Please family and you will
be rewarded. * *
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
'Feb. 18): Emotional upset
will stifle your chance of
clearing an unfortunate
situation with a friend or
neighbor. Focus on your
financial situation and
your physical well-being.
Someone you love will be
able to relieve you of a bur-
den. *
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You can form a part-
nership with someone
interested in the same
project you are. A discus-
sion with someone you
respect will change your
way of thinking. Good
fortune is in the stars and
coming into money or a
gift is likely. * ,*


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


3 X 8 By Pam Klawitter / Edited by Will Shortz 2-A5 6 7 8 1 0 11 I 12 41 5 161171 1 8


Across
1 One-named teen
idol of the late
'50s/early '60s
7 Fashionably
nostalgic
12 Came out even,
in a way
19 God who killed
the dragon
Python four days
after his birth
20 Bygone shampoo
brand
21 Heads
22 See circled
letters in 96-
Down
24 Dow Jones
publication
25 Can
26 Join the crew
27 Kind of acid
found in spinach
29 Hook's right-
hand man
30 Frankfurt term of
address
32 Demanding
overseer
34 Tennis's Nastase
36 New York
subway inits.
37 In order (to)
39 ... in 79-Down
42 Teen's room,
stereotypically
44 Like some
proverbial milk
46 Dweller on the
Baltic
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


47 Two-baggers:
Abbr.
48 People holding
signs at airports
51 Dwellers on the
Baltic
53 Why
55 Noted wine
region
56 Underworld
bosses
57 Take off
58 Stephen of "The
Musketeer"
60 Does some
freestyling
61 ... in 13-Down
63 Big letters in
fashion
64 CBS show with
Laurence
Fishburne
65 Very reverent
67 "Charles in
Charge" co-star
68 Mathematical
ordinal
69 "What was __
think?"
70 ... in 62-Down
74 Star turns
75 River to the
Rh6ne
76 ___ place
77 New Balance
competitor
78 Flatware finisher
80 Furniture mover
82 On-base
percentage and
others
83 At the earliest
opportunity
84 Will of "The
Waltons"
85 Florida city, for
short


86 Word with love
or honey
87 Row of stables,
in Britain
88 ... in 89-Down
91 Telecom hookups
94 Highway hazard
95 Spree
97 Inside flight
99 Mane, for a
female lion, e.g.
101 Concerning
103 Lieu
106 Gluck works
108 Spider-Man's
aunt
109 Igneous rock
111 ... in 1-Across
114 Home to Mount
Chimborazo
115 Brachyodont
perissodactyls
116 One of the
Kennedys '
117 Some carry-on
items
118 Apple purchases
119 Tot tender

Down
1 Palestinian party
2 Climbers' goals
3 1928 musical
composition
originally called
"Fandango"
4 Qu6bec's Grosse-

5 River in "Kubla
Khan"
6 Tiring problem for
bicyclists?
7 Soak back in
8 Drink from a bowl
9 Cycle attachment?
10 Jazz phrase


11 Aware of
12 Art installation
13 They can always
be counted on
14 TiVo, for one, in
brief
15' Relative of -ists
16 ... in 65-Across
17 Actor Ed and
family
18 Microwave
button
20 Lincoln Center
institution
23 Bottom-fishes
28 Melodic speech
31 Some Jamaicans,
for short
33 TV marshal who
frequents the
Long Branch
Saloon
35 Sets off
38 Job detail
40 Silly ones
41 Some sporty cars
43 P.G.A.'s Ernie
45 Heat source?
47 "The Wreck of
the Mary ___"
48 Cross of
"Desperate
Housewives"
49 Band
composition
50 ... in 48-Down
51 Not in
52 Make a choice
53 Like a successful
dieter's clothes
54 Candy giant,
informally
56 Brilliant
successes
57 Goes for, as a fly
59 Jazz great
nicknamed
Jumbo


61 #2 or #3
62 Rash remedies
65 Boycott, e.g.
66 ___ peace
71 "Coming at you!"
72 Jason who plays
Lucius Malfoy in
Harry Potter
films
73 River island
74 It has a bottom
but no top
78 Don Ho fan fare?


79 Laze
81 Singers do it
82 "Mamma Mia!"
song
83 Shepherd of "The
View"
85 Unadorned
'86 Arrowhead
Stadium team
87 One of the
friends on
"Friends";


88 Works a wedding,
maybe
89 Wee
90 Heists
92 "Anything you
say!"
93 "Make yourself

94 Leader succeeded
by his brother
Ratil '
96 Prevent
98 Wise ones


100 Orchestra leader
Kay
102 Part of Q.E.D.
104 Theater opening
105 60 grains .
107 Feng ___
110 Swear words in
'a swearing-in
112 Pronunciation
guide std.
113 Cause of a big
bang


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.



WEIGHTHREEKINGS WOOLFF

SHARPE PEN CREMA SPARA
N W AR SA H ASEL E I T I SIM

R ON D CZAR TANGLE
BITTE FIFED SI GHTSAW
H H J E N AM I PHI

RIG E YE SCHIPH O L SAR G
ERICSSON YALIE HAYESD

ILER AGREE REDBARON
CENTRIC AAR G H LEB EC0
0 R GS N 0BLY GENERALLY
RAT IGOR ATRA DADS
SRIC T BAY RN0 TT 0BAY
NEALE INURES CRIMPER
ASYET EX CESS ESPIAL


9 7 3 4


5 7 1


4 2 8





8 3 9 7


6 5


1 3 4 2


9 1 7


2 4 6


9 L 1768 9 ~I I L


6SL 8 ZL 9 6 9


Z 9 6 7 L S 98 L


17 L I 618 L 9


L69898 LIT


L 8 9 L 79' 18 6


89 L 9 6 z 7 LS





9t7 9 9 LL 68








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


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/ am from Louisiana and I know our beaches are our home,
our way of life and our livelihood. Protecting the coast and
cleaning up the beaches is very personal to me.
Keith Seilhan, BP Cleanup


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


At BP, we have taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And
that includes keeping you informed.

Looking For Oil
You may have heard oil is no longer flowing into the Gulf, but-our work
on the beaches continues. When oil is spotted, the Response Command
Center is notified, a Shore Cleanup Assessment Team is mobilized and
work begins immediately. Efforts are being coordinated frorm staging
areas in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

,If you see oil on the beach, please call 1-866-448-5816 and we'll send a
team to clean it up.

Cleaning Up The Beaches
The number of people mobilized to clean up the beaches depends on the
size of the affected area. Individual teams can number in the hundreds,
and thousands of additional workers remain on-call. Working with the
Coast Guard, our teams continue cleaning up until the last bit of oil has
been removed.

Our Responsibility
Our beach operations will continue until the last of the oil has been
skimmed from the sea, the beaches and estuaries have been cleaned up,
and the region has been pronounced oil-free. We have already spent more
than $3.9 billion responding to the spill and on the cleanup, and none of
this will be paid by taxpayers.

Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes. We may not
always be perfect, but we will do everything we can to make this right.


For information visit: bp.com For assistance, please call:
restorethegulf.gov To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
facebook.com/bpamerica To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
twitter.com/bp_america To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
youtube.com/bp floridagulfresponse.com


bp


U'"::


S 2010 BP, E&P


SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2010


4 .