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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01399
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/14/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01399
System ID: UF00028308:01399
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Not dead yet I
More drilling will kill
BP well, officials say.
Nation, 5A
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Saturday, August 14, 2010 www.la


Injury bug hits
Tigers lose Hill
to broken jaw.
Sports, I B


porter


yreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 178 0 75 cents


Jacksonville doctor arrested for Medicaid fraud


Suspect worked
at High Springs
Family Clinic.

From staff reports


A Jacksonville
was arrested for


doctor
alleged


Medicaid fraud Tuesday,
according to a report
released Friday by the
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Office.
Wayne Anthony
Rahming, 56, of ,.5106
Brompton Court,
Jacksonville, was charged
with 38 counts of Medicaid


fraud false claim and one
count
of third-
degree
theft.
He was
employed
as a physi-
Rahming cian at the


now-defunct High Springs.
Family Clinic in High
Springs, according to the
Florida Attorney General
communications office.
Rahming, the clinic's
only licensed physician,
allegedly allowed an unli-
censed.physician to provide
medical care to Medicaid


patients, but submitted
claims for approximately
$4,300 in reimbursements
to the Medicaid program as
if he provided the service.
Rahming also allowed
the unlicensed physician
to provide medical ser-
. vices when he was out of
state and unable to pro-


vide supervision, accord-
ing to the communica-
tions office.
The unlicensed physi-
cian, Jorge Prieto, was
arrested by the Florida
Attorney General office
in December for his
involvement in this
case.


Fighting backlog


Tax collector's Fort White branch shifts

gear to process driver licenses, ID cards


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lae City Pep,-:err
Fort White resident Kerri Hewes watches as her 16-year-old daughter, Katelyh, positions herself to get a photograph
taken for her driver's license Friday afternoon at the Columbia County Tax Collector's Office. 'We just couldn't wait 'till
Wednesday,' Kerri Hewes said. 'I'm excited for her. Now I don't have to chauffeur her around.'


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

The county
tax collector's
Fort White
branch office
has started processing
-state identification cards
and driver licenses in a
bid to reduce an estimated
22,000 card renewals that
statistics show will be
needed through the next
eight years.
Ronnie Brannon,
Columbia County tax col-
lector, said the number of
renewals needed based
on renewals needed in
the Fort White, High
Springs and Trenton areas
shows the potential
and the need of the Fort
White branch offering
driver licensing and ID
card issuance.
The branch is open for
business on Wednesdays
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Existing tax collector's
office services such as


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Tax'Collector Ronnie Brannon and deputy
clerk'Nikki Starling discuss the addition of limited driver's
license services that were extended to Fort White beginning
Wednesday.


processing property tax
payments and all vehicle
tag and title work will still
be offered at the branch.
Driver license ser-
vices provided by the Fort
White branch include
original issues, renewals,
change of address and
replacements.
Brannon noted that


9275
T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


the physical license or ID
card will not be printed
at the Fort White branch,
but will be mailed from
Tallahassee to the apply-.
ing resident's address
in three to five business
days, which saves on
costs related to printing
the cards. Residents will
be issued a valid receipt


in the meantime, Brannon
said.
Driver license services
not offered at the Fort
White branch office are
driving skill tests, HazMat
endorsements, commer-
cial driver licensing or for-
eign national registrations.
- To obtain a license,
residents must present
original documents prov-
ing identity, social security
number and residential'
address.
Adding the driver
license and ID card ser-
vices is expected to boost
business at the Fort White
branch, Brannon said, and
will be convenient for cus-
tomers.
"We do believe that
business will continue to
grow down there because
there are people down
there that have to drive to
Gainesville or Lake City
to get these services," he
said. "I think even being
there one day a week
BACKLOG continued on 3A


I Opinion ..... .......... 4A
Obituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics........ 4B
' Puzzles . ... . . . .....2B
Fa.ch & Values..... .. .. 6A


$700K grant


for CHS gets


tentative OK


Funds expected to
be used for school
improvement.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobirlsoh@lakecityreporter.com
A $700,000 school
improvement grant
through the Department of
Education has tentatively
been approved for Columbia
High School, according to
school officials.
The
grant' will
be used
for school
improve-
ment ,
said Mike
Millikin,
Columbia
Millikin County
school
superintendent.
Previously, CHS had
received a state grade of D
for the past couple of years,


said Terry Huddleston,
principal.
Initiatives to be imple-
mented this, upcoming
school year include having
math and science coaches,
new school hours of 8:29
a.m. to 3:15 p.m. and a
summer program for ninth
graders to help bridge the
gap from middle to high
school, Huddleston said.
The new coaches will
help improve FCAT scores,
especially in science, he
said.
CHS had ,a split shift
schedule, which made it
very difficult for common
planning .at the school,
Huddleston said. The new
hours will help provide
more professional: devel-
opment time for teachers,
which will in turn lead to
better direct instruction in
the classroom.
The grant money will also
GRANT continued on 3A


Music Park uses

contest triumph

to attract visitors


Spirit of the
Suwannee takes
top award.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A promotional calen-
dar featuring the' winning
women in a Daisy Duke
contest recently brought
home a state award for
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park.


The. park was award-
ed the Florida Festivals
and Events Association
Sunsational Award in the
category of state's best pro-
motional item for its Daisy
Duke calendar. The cal-
endar promotes the park
and its yearly events, high-
lighted the Suwannee River
Jam and featured differ-
ent cities, towns and clubs
throughout Florida where
DAISY continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Teena Peavey, the marketing director for the Spirit of ,
the Suwannee Music Park, holds a Daisy Duke calen-
dar, which helped the park win the Florida Festivals and
Events Association's Sunsational Award for the state's Best
Promotional Item.

DAILY COMING
BRIEFING SATURDAY
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.'rt .'.orld star corrnmiunit, e.enrts


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010


Friday:
Afternoon: 9-3-1
Evening: 4-6-8


Friday:
Afternoon: 8-0-4-7
Evening:7-5-4-1


Thursday:
C3-6-9-27-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



8-year-old is new art world star


HOLT, England
e's Britain's most
talked-about young art-
ist His paintings fetch
hefty sums and there's
a long waiting list for
his eagerly anticipated new works.
It has all happened so quickly -
he's still getting used to the spotlight
,- and Kieron Williamson fidgets a
Little when he's asked to share his
.-thoughts on art.
"Cows are the easiest thing to
paint," said Kieron, who has just
turned 8. "You don't have to worry
About doing so much detail."
'-: Horses, he says, are "a lot harder.
You have to get their legs right, and
you have to make their back legs
much bigger than their front"
Paintbrush prodigy Kieron -
dubbed "mini Monet" by the British
press is a global sensation. All
33 of the pastels, watercolors and
oil paintings in his latest exhibition
sold, within half an hour, for a total.
of 150,000 pounds ($235,000).
Buyers from as far away as the
United States lined up overnight
outside the gallery, and there is
a 3,000-strong waiting list for his
impressionistic landscapes of boat-
dotted estuaries, snowy fields and
wide marshland skies.

Doctor says Smith
medication 'overkill'
LOS ANGELES A hospital psy-
chiatrist testified Friday that medica-
tion given to Anna Nicole Smith by a
doctor now on trial was "overkill" for
the kind of pain she was describing.
Dr. Nathalie Maullin said she
believed Smith had "a borderline
personality disorder" and was addict-
ed to prescription medications.
Maullin said she was on staff at
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in April
-2006 when Smith was brought in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kieron Williamson, an eight-year-old painting prodigy, stands near some of
his work displayed in an art gallery in Holt, Norfolk in England on Thursday.
Williamson is Britain's most talked-about young artist.


pregnant and in withdrawal from
anti-anxiety drug Xanax and the
pain killer Methadone. The celebrity
model told her she had gone "cold
turkey," discontinuing her medica-
tions all at once because she was -
concerned for the welfare of her
expected baby.
By doing that, Maullin said, she -
had actually endangered the baby,
and herself.

Publicist says Gabor
returning to hospital
LOS ANGELES Zsa Zsa
Gabor's publicist says the actress is
being returned to a Los Angeles ho-.
pital because of complications in her
recuperation from a broken hip.
Publicist John Blanchette says an.
ambulance was at her home Friday
to take Gabor to the emergency


room. Blanchette says Gabor's hus-
band told him that the 93-year-old
actress is bleeding and in a lot of
pain.

Undsay Lohan will move
East, her mother says
NEW YORK Lindsay Lohan's
mom says the actress will be moving
away from California and back to
New York after she gets out of drug.
rehabilitation.
Dina Lohan, during an often tense
interview with NBC 'Today" show
co-host Matt.Lauer on Friday, said
her daughter was doing "wonder-
fully" after 14 days in jail and lashed
out at California Superior Court
Judge Marsha Revel, who put the
actress there.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Broadway lyricist Lee
Adams ("Bye Bye Birdie")
is 86.
* Baseball Hall of Fame
coach Earl Weaver is 80. '
* Rock singer David Crosby
is 69.
* Comedian-actor Steve
Martin is 65.
* Author Danielle Steel is
63. 0 Olympic gold medal

Daily Scripture


swimmer Debbie Meyer is
58.
* Former basketball player
Earvin "Magic" Johnson is 51.
* Singer Sarah Brightman
is 50.
* Actress Susan Olsen is
49.
* Rock musician Keith
Howland (Chicago) is 46,
* Actress Halle Berry is 44.


"For we are God's
workmanship, created
in Christ Jesus to do good
works, which God prepared
in advance for us to do."


- Ephesians 2:10


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Iuc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityrei5orter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakectyreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreportercom).


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
'a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next .day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.............. $26.32
24 Weeks.................. $48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks....................$82.80
52 Weeks................. $179.40


CORRECTION
. The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Projects selected
for oil spill study
ST. PETERSBURG
The Florida Institute
of Oceanography says 27
research projects have
been selected to receive
a total of about $10. mil-
lion from BP PLC to study
the impact of the Gulf of
Mexico oil spill.
The projects were culled
from 233 proposals and,
announced Thursday in
St. Petersburg by the insti-
tute, which is a consortium
of the state's public and
private marine science
research centers.
Researchers will exam-
ine the full-scope of the
spill, from the effect of oil
and dispersants on reefs,
corals and salt marshes, to
Determining how coastal
and marine fqod chains
have fared.

Man convicted
in fatal stabbing
JACKSONVILLE -An
illegal immigrant has been
convicted of murder for
a second time in a 2005
north Florida stabbing.
,' A Duval County jury
founrid 39-year,-old Benito
LRamirez guilty of first-
'degree murder Thursday.
Authorities say Ramirez
had been out drinking
with 29-year-old Stacy M.
Replogle a woman he
had been dating when
the two got into an argu-
ment over the bill. Ramirez.
reportedly cut Replogle
14 times and dumped her
body-in a wooded area.
The Mexico-native
claimed self-defense.

Teen pleads no
contest to rape
PORT RICHEY A
Tampa Bay-area teen has
pleaded no contest to rap-
ing an 89-year-old woman
at her Pasco County home.


Back-to-school shopping fun
Francesca Tillem (left) and her two daughters Sarah
(center) 11, and Victoria, 13, walk through Sawgrass Mills
Mall during the first day of the back-to-school sales tax holi-
day Friday in Sunrise. Tillem took the day off from work to
take advantage of the tax break, which starts at 12:01 a.m.
Friday and runs through midnight Sunday, lifting the sales tax
on certain school supplies priced less than $10 and certain
books, clothing, footwear and accessories less than $50.


Court records show 16-
year-old Carlos Fernandez
pleaded no contest Friday.
to two counts.of sexual
battery, one count of home
invasion robbery and six
counts of burglary. He had
previously rejected a plea
deal for 30 years in prison.
He could face up to life at
his sentencing later this
year.
Authorities say
Fernandez, 16-year-old
Luis Reyes Jr. and 21-year-
old Johnathan Rodriguez
broke into the woman's
home in April 2009,
assaulted the woman in
bed and ransacked her
home.

Officials: Pitbull
attacked child
CITRA Authorities
say a child was apparently
attacked by a pitbull in
north Florida.
The 2-year-old child's
mother told authorities
that her son was riding his
tricycle between her and
her neighbor's home on
Thursday when she heard
him crying and saw him


covered in blood.
The woman told authori-
ties that he was bitten by
a pitbull. The child was
bitten on the left side of
head and face and had two'
puncture wounds on his
scalp. Authorities said the
wounds weren't life threat-
ening.,
The deputy captured the
dog and animal services
quarantined two pitbulls
because of conflicting
reports as to which dog
had bitten the boy.

Small plane lands
outside mall *
ST. PETERSBURG
- Back to school shop-
pers got a surprise in St.
Petersburg when a small
plane made an emergency
landing on a public street
outside a mall.
The single-seat Piper
PA-25-260 Pawnee, tow-
ing a Geico advertising
banner, landed in front
of the Tyrone Square
Mall Thursday evening
after experiencing engine
troubles.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


STOBRMSTORMS CHANCE CHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS


192 75 190 L074 HI193L0 73 HI94 L0 74


92/77
Psac-a A
92/79 .Pa iamaCR
91/79


-92/
Lake
92,
L \a


kta
^T


City


S *Jc lT Cape Canaveral
/7 t* 2/76 Daytona Beach
75t- R,.Lauderdale
aines D Beaih .LadFortMyers
93/75 78 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
3/75 Orand Ca Key West
a 95/77 9QW Lake City
95/77 Miami
TmI1e \ Naples \
94/80Nal
94/80/ West Pahi Bkac Ocala
92/77 Orlando
FL LauderdaI Panama City
FL. Myrs 92/79 0 Pensacola
95/78 Naples < Tallahassee
'2/79 i Tampa
9/80 Valdosta
9y/8est* W. Palm Beach
90/82


IrLAKE CITY ALMAN Ii


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday ,
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


90
76
90
71
98 In 1954
63 in 1962

0.30"
2.33"
34.50"
2.81"
32.94"


SUN l
Sunrise today 6:57 a.m.
Sunset today 8:13 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:58 a.m. BE
Sunset tom. 8:12 p.m. 10 nite Ibhn I
Today's
MOON ultra-violet
Moonrise today 11:59 a.m. radiation risk
Moonset today 11:07 p.m. for the area on
Moonnse tom. 1:04 p.m. t fro m
Moonset tom. 11:49 p.m.


Aug. Aug. Sept. Sept. Forec
16 24 1 8 NIC S
First Full Last New LLC,
,' l 1 1 w w w O


Sunday
89?78/t
90/78/t
91/80/t
94/77/t
91/74/t-
90/75/t
90/81/t
90/74/t
93/79/t
91/77/t
92/75/t
95/78/t
89/80/t
93/80/t
89/79/t
93/80/t
89/75/t
91/77/t


Monday
89/78/t
92/77/pc
91/80/pc
94/77/t
93/73/pc
92/74/pc
88/79/t
93/73/pc
93/78/t
91/78/pc
93/74/pc
95/76/pc
88/79/t
92/81/t
91/75/t
92/79/pc
93/75/t
91/78/t


AROUND FLORIDA


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
. Channel.


I t weather.com

asts, data and graph-
0 2010 Weather Central
Madison, WIs.
.weatherpubllsher.com


IUVllNIDE


I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


^.IJ~!L


SPOSORED3BY


C


wa,),









Page Editor: Roni Toidanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & STATE


SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010


.... .... ..G R A N T : F o r im p ro v e m e n t
From Page lA


COURTESY PHOTO

Regulatory scientist honored for 10 years of service
Lake City resident Louis Mantini (center), a regulatory scientist at the Suwannee River Water Management District, was
honored for 10 years of service at a district governing board meeting. Pictured are Governing Board Chairman Don
Quincey (from left), Mantini and District Director of Water Supply and Resource Management Jon Dinges.


COURTESY PHOTO

Banford resident recognized for 20 years of service
Banford resident Lloyd Baldwin-(center), the Suwannee'River Water Management District's senior systems administrator,
was honored for 20 years of service at a district governing board meeting. Pictured are Board Chairman Don Quincey
(from left), Baldwin and District Mission Support Director Melanie Roberts.
5 .,.. l, ;.,, k '" ',. ~. S \ '

DAISY: Park uses contest to attract more visitors
Continued From Page 1A


the Daisy Duke 'contest
was held.
Teena Peavey, park mar-
keting director, accepted the
award on the park's behalf
at FFEA's recent annual con-
vention in Bonita Springs.
Peavey said the park
decided to use a daisy duke
contest as a promotion to
attract more visitors to the
Suwannee River Jam, a con-


cert event hosted by the
park in April. After hold-
ing the contest at different
Florida locations, the park
produced the Ms. Suwannee
River Jam Daisy Duke Style
calendar featuring the con-
test winners and all locations
visited, Peavey said:
The calendar and Daisy
Duke promotion boosted
Jam attendance because


contest winners brought
their friends and families to
.the event, Peavey said.
"The attendance was way
up and the Daisy Duke pro-
motion had a lot to do with it,"
she said.
Peavey said the calendarwas
worthy of the award because
the judges liked its originality
arid its ability to promote many
park events and the Daisy


Duke contest locations in the
same package.
"Its fantastic," Peavey said.
"Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park hasn't received an award
in a long time. We're very hon-
ored."
The calendars are available
for purchase at the park for
$10. Call (386) 364-1683 or visit
the park website at musi-
cliveshere.com.


OBITUARIES


Marvin S. Martin
Marvih S. Martin, 75 of Jack-
sonville, Fl. and formerly of
Columbia County, Fl., passed
away at Northeast Florida
Community Hospice in Jack-
sonville, FL August 7, 2010
after an extended illness.
Mr. Martin was a native of Co-
lumbia County, Fl., son of-the
late Wilson Giles and Cora Lee
Hodges Martin and had made
his home in Jacksonville where
he was employed as a truck
driver prior to his retirement and
was a graduate of Mason High
School in Mason City, Fl. He
was preceded in death by one
brother, Wilson G. Martin, Jr.
He is survived by one sister, Lil-
lian Martin Cason (Delano), Lake
City, Fl, one niece, Delan Cason
Etheridge, Lake City, and two
nephews, F. Jon Martin (Cyn-
thia), Orlando, Fl and Martin
Dudley Cason, Gainesville, Fl.
Graveside Memorial. Services
will be conducted Monday,
August 16, 2010 at 11 A.M. at
Philippi Cemetery, Lake City,
.Fl with Rev. Lewis Daniels of-
ficiating. Arrangements are
under the direction of GATE-


WAY-FOREST LAWN FU-
NERAL HOME, 3596 South
U.S. Highway 441, Lake
City, Florida (386-752-1954).
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.

Ervin Floyd Raymond Jr.
Mr. Ervin Floyd Raymond Jr.,
72, of Lake city died Thursday
August 12, 2010 at the Suwan-
nee Valley Care Center in lake
City following,.an extended ill-
ness. He was the son of the late
Ervin Floyd and Minerva Hill
Raymond Sr. One brother pre-
ceded him death Dale Raymond.
He was a member of the Our
Redeemer Lutheran Church, he
played the fiddle and anything
with a string, enjoyed wood-
working and Labors for Christ.
He is survived by his wife of for-
ty years of marriage Karen Ray-
mond, Wellborn, FL.; three sons
Floyd Raymond (Jan), Lapeer,
MI.; Kevin Raymond, Lapeer,
MI.; James Raymond (Diane),
Dallas, TX.; four daughters
Tonya, MI.; Kim,; Lisa Phillips
(Rick), Knoxville, TN. Ruth
Raymond, Wellborn, FL., three


* Sewing Machines



Starting at: $4500


o i' i


brothers Danny Raymond (
Barbara), Clifford, MI; Charles
Raymond (Penny), Brown
City, MI; Lonny Raymond
(Cathy), Brown City, MI; four
sisters Beverly Clark, Brown
City, MI; Elsie Lamie (Eu-
gene), Homerville, GA.; Sher-
rie Hutchinson (James), Stock-
bridge, GA.; Pamela Mutchler
(Bob), Decker, MI.; twenty-
four grandchildren and fifteen
great-grandchildren, a host of
niece and riephews also survive.
A memorial service will be con-
ducted at Our Redeemer Lu-
theran Church' on August 14,
2010 at 3:00P.M. GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME is in charge of all ar-
rangements. 3596 South US
Hwy 441, Lake City. 386-752-
1954 Please sign the guestbook
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com

James K. Wade Sr.
Born April 29th, 1931 in Su-
wanee County and died unex-
pectedly August
12th, 2010. He
was a Marine
Veteran of the ..... ,
Sf


Korean Conflict an4 retired after
30 years of service with the Flor-
ida Highway Patrol at the rank of
lieutenant. He also worked for
the Federal Marshall's Office and
the Orange County Sheriff's Of-
fice. He was a devoted father of
three children Jay & (Terri), Pat-
rica, and Keith & (Faye) Wade
and a grandfather of 4 Jennifer,
Ryan, James and Thomas and of
2 great grandchildren Landon &
Lia. He also leaves behind his ex-
wife Alice Lear of Branford, FI
and her family. He was an active
member of the Lake City Moose
Lodge #624, the VFW, The
Elks Club, and the Retired State
Troopers Association. 'A Memo-
rial is schedule Sunday 2PM at
the Moose Lodge in Lake City
"In lieu of flowers please
make donation to Ameri-
can Heart Association"



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


752-6306
CFC1427643 Back Flow #T05-08-8053




2744 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL


be used for recruitment
and retention bonuses for
teachers with a history of
student achievement, as
well as for performance
bonuses, Millikin said.
Money has not been
awarded to the school yet,
but the state gave its OK
on moving forward with
implementing the initia-
tives, he said.


Programs the school
worked hard to put into
place last year com-
bined with the new ones
through the grant will
help with school improve-
ment, said School Board
member Linard Johnson.
The school will see
continued success in
the upcoming academic
year, he said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Fort White Branch of the Columbia County Tax
Collector's Office, located in the Columbia County Sheriff's
Office sub-station, will be open on Wednesdays from 8 a.m'.
to 4:30 p.m.


BACKLOG: Extra duties
Continued From Page A -


will save some time and
perhaps money for some
of them because we'll be
closer to them."
The branch will have
two clerks working
instead of one, two of 11
stations offering driver
license and ID card duties
within the tax collector's


three different branch .
offices. Having 11 stations
throughout the county to
wait on customers should
reduce lobby wait time,
Brannon said.
The Fort White branch
office is located at 294 ;
SW Bryant Avenue. Call.
(386) 497-2456.


Northern Fprida Homes Aug 19th & 25th


Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000
LAKE CITY, FL
* 1593 NW Nash Rd
2BR 1BA 1,356+/- sf. Built in 1979.
Approx 1.8ac lot.
Nominal Opening Bid: $1,000
LIVE OAK, FL
* 1398 White Ave SE
4BR 2BA 1,766+/- sf. Built in 1955.
Approx .29ac lot.
Open Houses: 1-4pm Sat Aug 21st and
2 hours before sale. "
Above properties sell: 8:15pm, Wed
Aug 25th at 1593 NW Nash Rd, Lake
City, FL

See website for complete
area listings


Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000
ALACHUA, FL 12807 NW 202nd St
3BR 1.5BA 1,248+/- sf. Built in 1977.
Nominal Opening Bid:'$1,000
RAIFORD, FL 13244 County Rd 229
5BR 2BA 2,268+/- sf. Built in 1963.
Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000
NEWBERRYFL 24321 SW 61st PI
4BR 2BA 1,782+/- sf. Approx 10ac lot.
Nominal Opening Bid: $1,000
BELL, FL 6100 NW 50th Terr
4BR 2.5BA 1,882+/ sf. Built in 1970.
Open Houses: 1-4pm Sat Aug 14th and
2 hours before sale.
Above properties sell: 4:15pm, Thu
Aug 19th at 12807 NW 202nd St,
Alachua, FL


FL RE UC 1032049 WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS MRKTG SRVCS, INC., AUC LIC AU3010
TOMMY ASSITER, AUC LIC AU3928 TONY LANGDON., RE LIC
BK3223097 DANIEL NELSON. BUYER'S PREMIUM MAY APPLY.
1 On ni annR01 03


WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS
worldwide real estate auction


Il~lnmn~~~6 0~a


Ifyou care about where your business banks, perhapsyou
should choose a bank that cares about your business. Peo-
ples State Bank is not a branch of an out of state bank run
by a "Regional Executive" seeking to improve their annual
bonus by offering short-term incentives to lure you in before
the end of the next quarter. We are a Lake City bank and our
focus is on the local economy and your business. We lend our
money locally and seek to establish stable, long-term rela-
tionships with our customers. Perhaps it's old fashioned,..
but wejust think it's the right way to do business.


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W. US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES
STATE BANK












OPINION


Saturday, August 14, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


MOTHER


OTHER
OPINION


America's

dependence

difficult to

shore up

Here's an economic
indicator that may
be even more
depressing than
the nation's 9.5
percent unemployment rate:
Americans' dependence on gov-
ernment is at unprecedented
high for modern times.
The portentous news comes
from the Heritage Foundation,,
a conservative think tank
that each year calculates an
"Index of Dependence on
Government," which identifies
permanent government pro-
grams that encourage citizens
to rely on federal spending.
The organization includes
such expenses as unemploy-
ment compensation, Medicare,
Social Security, farm subsidies,
urban development grants,
housing assistance and food
stamps.
One can debate the merits
of these efforts and whether
some of them such as edu-
cation aid, child nutrition and
preventive health care services
may actually preventfuture
public and private costs.
o The United States, with
record debt, is taking on unsus-
tainable obligations.
As analysts William W. Beach
and Patrick Tyrrell write, in .
the last year, "Not only did the
federal government effectively
take over half the U.S. economy
and expand public-sector
debt by more than .all previ-
oius governments combined,
btit.also oversaw the largest
single yea.exp.ansion in total
government debt in U.S. his- *
tory. Much of that debt can be
traced to dependence-creating
programs.".
Social Security, which helps
people retire with dignity,.
remains popular. And in the
last few years many suddenly
jobless citizens have come to
appreciate the value of unem-
ployment checks, which allow
them to continue to meet their
basic expenses while searching
for work.
Providing a "safety net," as
President Ronald Reagan put it,
for troubled Americans is one
thing; seeking to offer costly
benefits to virtually every inter-
est group wanting assistance is
another.
SScripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Coldmbia and surrounding counties by
.Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
.strong communities -"Newspapers
.get things done!"
'* Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
' BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
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My life: Machines behaving badly


Today we shall put
aside all political
battles to discuss a
more insidious con-..
flict. The one con-
stantly waged between mankind
and machines.
It must first-be understood
that some people have techno-
logical,aptitude. Others and
that includes me have tech-
nological ineptitude. We who
are niot at peace with technology
pay dearly for this.
Machines be they comput-
ers or simple engines have
contempt for those who do
not understand them and plot
humiliating little schemes as
punishment. I would say that
this is a scientifically proven fact
if only this were proven. For the
moment, this theory is a Ph.D.
waiting to be awarded.
No doubt those of you who
are mechanically or technologi-
cally inclined think this idea is,
paranoid. You think machines
are inanimate objects without
the ability to reason or bear
grudges. "Huh!" is what I say
to that.
I understand why you cannot
see the truth: That is because
the machines that you techno-
logically inclined people deal
with immediately recognize
your aptitude and respond by
being obsequious. Even when
they break down, they react to'
your knowledgeable care by
behaving logically. They are like
horses that know what sort of
rider they have on their backs,
according to some sixth sense.
"Be nice to the well-informed
human," is the secret mantra
they hum among themselves.
"Henry and his machine-igno-
rant friends will be around later,
and then we can have some fun
by breaking down."
My first acquaintance with
machines behaving badly
occurred with motor vehicles.
While it is true that cars back


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
in the day were more prone
to mechanical malfunction
than they are now, they misbe-
haved with me to, a remarkable
degree. Regularly, they would
not start and, once started, they
found every possible excuse to,
break down.
My worse experience as a
young, mechanically clueless
person was a trip made around
Europe in an old Volkswagen
Kombi (known to Americans
as the VW Bus), the'traditional
vehicle of hippies in the 1960s.
As a product of a technologi-
cally efficient culture, those
Kombi vans had a reason to
hate hippies, what with their
unkempt looks and indifference
to German engineering, and
they must have mistaken me for
one. While mostly kempt, my
youthful beard may have put me
on their wrong side.
On my spluttering grand tour
of Europe in that sulky vehicle,
I visited the historic garages of
Italy. The final adventure was
crossing the Austrian Alps with
fast-diminishing braking ability.
Thank goodness France was
flat.
But automobiles have pretty
much given me a free pass on
aggravation since then. I sup-
pose the fun went out of it for
them. Yet even to this day, my
car has a permanent engine
warning light on. The car has
been checked and all appears
well, but the light stays stub-
bornly lit. Of course, I know
the problem. It is the eye of the


pagan, machine god keeping
watch on me, telling me that
at any time, if it so pleases the
engine community, my troubles
will return to put me in my
place.
Meanwhile, the baton of driv-
ing me crazy has been passed
to new machines.' Certainly,
computers have given me chal-
lenges over the years. When.
computers do go bad on me,
the tech support people are apt
to say, "Well, I have never seen
this before." Of course not.
The computers have complete
respect for them.
In recent months, my battle
has been taken up on a new
front; one that hits home.
Yes, my household appliances
appear to be in full revolt. When
the toaster got toasted and its
replacement operated moodily,
I thought nothing of it. Then
the hot water heater went cold
and the air conditioner went
hot When the air conditioner
was repaired, it waited only
long enough for a heat wave to
go hot again. It needed a part,
we were told true enough,
it needed part of my wallet as
tribute.
My heart was truly broken
When the fridge broke. It wasn't
even old. I loved that fridge it
was where I kept my beer, not
to mention the milk, etc. Nlow
I am reduced to saying nice
things about the other appli-
ances in their presence to keep'
them on my side "This stove
bakes up a storm, eh?" "I love
the way the washer and dryer
are sensitive to my underpants."
I know they are watching and
listening, biding their time, wait-
ing for the chance to punish my
lack of interest in their work-
ings. That is life for us who are
machine clueless.

N Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


The discovery of
Britain's oldest
house shows one
real estate constant
over 11,000 years
the craving for waterfront
property.
The house was built around
8,500 B.C. in northeastern
England on the shores of a lake
that has since disappeared.
It was round, about 11 feet, 6
inches across, built of timber
posts and, said the Associated
Press sounding a little like a real
estate ad itself, had "a thatched


roof and very original features."
The owners had a dock and
a loat. Archeologists found
the remains of jetty extending
into the lake, believed to be the
oldest example of carpentry in
Europe, and we know the resi-
dents had a boat because the
remains of a paddle were also
found at the site.
They also had a dog, perhaps
several, and made their living by
hunting, fishing and gathering.
There is evidence there were
other houses nearby, meaning
it was an actual neighborhood,


sort of a Stone Age subdivision.
The original owners of the
house were also pioneers of a
sort. The archeologists believe
they were among the first to
move into the area after the gla-
ciers moved out.
Britain at the time was still
connected to Europe by land,
which in addition the waterfront
lot, the thatched roof and the
"original" features would have
made for a wonderful real estate
ad: "Walk to France."
U Scripps Howard News Service


Cliff May


Western

intellectuals

won't face

Islanms sins

over plans to build
a mosque near
Ground Zero in
Manhattan has
taken an odd twist On one
side are those opposing the
project, along with those who
merely have questions they
would like answered so they
can decide for themselves
whether this project will honor
the victims of 9/11 or mock
them. On the other side are
those who support the proj-"
"ect wholeheartedly and who
respond to both arguments
and questions by saying: Shut
up!
Most prominent among the
second group is New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Those with misgivings about
the 13-story Islamic center, he
said, "ought to be ashamed of
themselves..... It is a shame
that we even have to talk about
this."
Last week on CNN, I
'debated the issue with Peter
Beinart, former editor of The
New Republic. As soon as we
were off the air he called me
at a high decibel level a
"bigot." Echoing Bloomberg,
he added that I should be
ashamedd of'myself." .
This.week, Newsweek edi-
tor and CNN anchor Fareed
Zakaria returned an award
given to him five years ago by
the Anti-Defamation League in
protest of the ADL's opposition
to. the project. Zakaria called
the ADL's decision "bizarre"
and a form of "bigotry." ITl
wager that Zakaria has spent
not one hour investigating
those behind this project, their
finances and their motives.
I know: Ifs so retro of me
to expect elite reporters to
report.
Or even to read much. It's
hardly a secret that some
mosques in America are cen-
ters of extremism. The Dar
al-Hijrah Islamic Center and
mosque in Falls Church, Va.,
a suburb of Washington, D.C.,
has provided a pulpit for sev-
eral radical imams.
In his Newsweek column,
Zakaria asserts that Imam
Feisal Abdul Rauf, who is,
spearheading the project, "is a
moderate Muslim clergyman.
He has said one or two things
about American foreign policy
that strike me as overly critical
but it's stuff you could read
on The Huffington Post any
day."
Among Rauf's Huffingtonian
statements: that American
policy was "ah accessory
to the crime" of 9/11 and
that Osama bin Laden was
"made in America." Rauf will
not say whether he views
Hamas which intentionally
slaughters civilians, has been
designated as a terrorist orga-
nization under U.S. law, and
advocates the extermination
of both Israelis and Jews as
a terrorist organization. Rauf
also has ties to two organiza-
tions named by the Justice
Department as unindicted
co-conspirators in a terrorism-
financing case.
Anyone who says that Rauf's
project is "confrontational" or
"in bad taste" or disrespectful
of non-Muslims to borrow a
few descriptions from Raheel
Raza, board member of the,
Muslim Canadian Congress -
must be intolerant and a bigot
and an Islamophobe. Shame
on her! She is appalling! End of
discussion.
Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


OTHER OPINION


World's oldest house had water views








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010


Kids buy tickets, fly alone to Tennessee


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE -
Bored on a hot summer
day, three Florida young-
sters were just sitting
around when one sent a
text message to another
with an adventurous idea.
"Hey do you want to go
2 Tennessee today," the
message read.
"Sure," the other
responded.
Not even old enough to
get a driver's license, they
took a taxi to the airport
Tuesday, bought tickets
with baby-sitting mohey
and unbeknownst to
their parents, the three
(ages 15, 13 and 11)
- boarded a Southwest
Airlines flight from
Jacksonville to Nashville,
according to a TV news
account of the incident_
Nobody asked a ques-
tion. Nobody asked for
identification.
Not the taxi driver. Not
the ticket counter. Not
security officials'or flight
attendants or other passen-
gers. So when they landed
in Nashville with just $40
left and their destination,
Dollywood, still hundreds
of miles away, they finally
called home.
The jig was up.
"I just wanted to fly,"
15-year-old Bridget


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this frame grab from video by First Coast News in Jacksonville, the three kids who decided
to fly to Nashville to go to Dollywood talk about their experience from their Jacksonville home
Friday. The kids Codie Brown (from left), 11, friend Bobby Nolan III, 13, and Bridget Brown,
15, flew with money saved from babysitting, unbeknownst to their parents.


Brown, told WJXX-TV in
Jacksonville. "I had the
money."
Now their parents are
wondering how the trip
was possible.
Southwest Airlines
said in a statement that
the company's policy on
minors is similar to other
carriers in that it covers
children ages 5 through 11
traveling alone, and that
the 11-year-old in this case


was accompanied by two
older companions. The
Transportation Security
Administration does not
require anyone under
age 18 to show identifica-
tion, but all bags are still
screened. '
It is still unclear if any
of the three should have
been allowed to purchase
tickets. A Southwest
spokesman did not imme-
diately return a message


seeking comment on that
issue.
Messages left by The
Associated Press on Friday
at the families' homes
were not immediately
returned.
In an age of heightened
security and terrorism
threats, some are con-
cerned that three young-
sters could so easily board
an airline without parental
consent.


Obama backs mosque

near NY's ground zero


By ERICA WERNER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama on
Friday forcefully endorsed
building a mosque near
ground zero, saying the
country's founding princi-
ples demanded no less.
"As a citizen, and as presi-
dent, I believe that Muslims
have the same right to prac-
tice their religion as any-
one else in this country,"
Obama said, weighing in
for the first time on a con-
troversy that has riven New
York City and the nation.
"That includes the right
to build a place of worship


and a community center on
private property in lower
Manhattan, in accordance
with local laws and ordi-
nances," he said. 'This is
America, and our commit-
ment to religious freedom
must be unshakable."
Obama made the com-
ments at an annual dinner
in the White House State
Dining Room. celebrating
the Islamic holy month of
Ramadan.
Republicans were quick
to pounce on the president's
remarks.
"President Obama is
wrong," said Rep. Peter
King (R-N.Y.)


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex DIv YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.68 6.3 12 26.72 +.06 -4.7 Microsoft Nasd .52 2.1 7 24.40 -.09 -19.9
AutoZone NY ... ... 15 207.86 +1.36 +31.5 Motorola NY .. 45 7.64 -.38 -1.5
BkofAm NY .04 .3 88 13.23 +.17 -12.2 NYTimes NY ... ... 7 7.71 -.14 -37.6
BobEvans Nasd .72 2.9 11 25.03 -.42 -13.6 NextEraEn NY 2.00 3.8 13 52.02 -.04 -1.5
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 5.4 12 12.24 -.29 -23.5 NobltyH Nasd ......... 9.51 ... -9.0
CSX NY .96 1.9 15 50.39 -.33 +3.9 Nvidla Nasd ... ... 23 9.39 +.43 -49.7
Chevron NY 2.88 3.7 9 77.40 +33 +.5 OcciPet NY 1.52 20 15 75.39 -1.07 -7.3
Cisco Nasd ... 16 21.36 ... -10.8 Oracle Nasd .20 .9 19 22.68 -.28 -7.6
Citgrp NY ......... 3.88 +.01 +17.2 Penney NY .80 4.0 17 19.82 -.98 -25.5
CocaCI NY 1.76 3.2 18 55.73 +.04 -2.2 PepsiCo NY 1.92 2.9 17 65.56 +.38 +7.8
Delhaize NY 2.02 3.0 ... 66.30 -8.39 -13.6 Pfizer NY .72 4.5 9 16.08 -.12 -11.6
DrxFBulls NY .15 .8 ... 19.89 -.13 -19.5 Potash NY .40 .4 24 111.34 -.70 +2.6
Dynegyrs NY .........4.53 +1.75 -49.9 PwShsQQQNasd .26 .6 44.72 -.32 -2.3
FamilyDIr NY .62 1.4 17 42.92 -.01 +54.2 Ryder NY 1.68 2.7 29 40.33 -.41 -2.0.
FordM NY ...... 7 12.15 -.12 +21.5 S&P500ETFNY 2.22 2.0 ... 108.31 -.32 -2.8
GenElec NY .48 3.1 16 15.38 -.12 +1.7 SearsHIdgs Nasd ...... 33 66.55 -.75 -20.3
HelettP NY .32 .8 11 40.45 +.31 -21.5 SidusXM Nasd ... ... .. 1.00 -.01 +66.7
HomeDp NY .95 3.5 16 27.31 -.30 -5.6 SouthnCo NY 1.82 5.1 14 35.84 +.06 +7.6
iShR2K NY .77 1.3 ... 61.07 -.70 -22 SPDRFnd NY .17 1.2 ... 14.07 -.04 -2.3
Intel Nasd .63 3.3 12 19.15 -.30 -6.1 TimeWam NY .85 2.8 14 30.81 +.02 +5.7
Lowes NY .44 2.2 16 19.59 -.15 -16.2 WalMart NY 1.21 2.4 13 50.40 -.03 -5.7
McDnlds NY 2.20 3.1 16 71.89 -.17 +15.1 YRCWwdhNasd ... ...29 +.01 -65.5


Feds: More drilling will kill well


By TOM BREEN
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS BP's
broken oil well is not dead
yet
The government's point
man on the crisis said
Friday that the blown-
out well is not securely
plugged to his satisfaction
and that the drilling of the
relief well long regarded
as the only way to ensure
that the hole at the bottom
of the Gulf of Mexico never
leaks oil again must go
forward.
'The relief well will be
finished," said retired Coast
Guard Adm. Thad Allen.
"We will kill the well."
Work on the relief well
was suspended earlier
this week because of bad
weather. Allen did not say
when it would resume, but
when the order comes, it
could take four days to get
the operation up and run-
ning again.
From there, it could be
only a matter of days before
the "bottom kill" is done
and the blown-out well
that wreaked havoc on the
Gulf Coast economy and
environment is no longer
a threat.
Last week, BP plugged
up the ruptured oil well
from the top with mud and
cement, and for a while, it
appeared that the relief well
that BP has been drilling 2
1/2 miles under the sea all
summer long in an effort
to seal up the leak from the
bottom might not be nec-
essary after all. But Allen
dashed those hopes after
scientists conducted pres-
sure tests on Thursday.
Scientists had hoped that
the cement pumped in from
the top had plugged the gap


ASSOCIATED PRESS
National Incident Commander Thad Allen (left) speaks at a
news conference next to a subsurface monitoring map of the
Gulf of Mexico where he urged that crews must move forward
with the drilling of the Deepwater Horizon relief well.


between the well's inner
pipe and its outer casing.
The pressure tests showed
some cement was in that
gap, but officials don't
know enough about what's
there or how much of it
- to trust that there is a
permanent seal, said Allen,
who has repeatedly insist-
ed on an "overabundance
of caution" when it comes
to plugging the well.
The well spilled an esti-
.mated 206 million gallons
of crude into the sea before
BP finally put.a cap on it
July 15. But that was always
regarded as a temporary
fix until the relief well and
the bottom kill could be
completed.
Bob Bea, a petroleum
engineering professor at
the University of California,
Berkeley, said that given


the results of the pressure
tests, proceeding with the
relief well makes sense.
"Everything we know
at this time says we need
to continue the work with
the relief wells," he said.
"We don't know the details
of how they plugged the
well from the top. We don't
know the volume of materi-
al they put in the well bore,
and without that we can't
tell how close to the bottom
of the well they got."
Drilling of the relief well
began in early May, and
the tunnel is now just 30
to 50 feet from the blown-
out well. To intercept the
well, the drillers must hit
a target about the size of
a dinner plate. Once they
punch through, heavy drill-
ing mud and cement will be
injected into the bedrock.


Trend: 2nd hottest July on record


By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON The
Earth continues to feel the
heat.
Last month was the
second warmest July on
record, and so far 2010
remains on track to be the
hottest year.
Worldwide, the average
temperature in July was
61.6 degrees Fahrenheit,
the National Climatic Data
Center reported Friday.
Only July 1998 was hotter
since recordkeeping began
more than a century ago.
And the January-July


period was the warmest
first seven months of any
year on record, averaging
58.1 F In second place was
January-July of 1998.
The report comes after
a month of worldwide
extremes including floods,
fires, melting ice and feyer-
ish heat. Atmospheric sci-
entists have grown increas-
ingly concerned about
human-induced global
warming in recent years,
though political pressures
and fierce arguments about
climate change have slowed
efforts to develop solutions.
The climate center noted
that a condition called La


Nina developed during July
as the waters of the central
Pacific Ocean cooled. This
is expected to last through
the Northern Hemisphere
winter 2010-2011.
That could be bad news
for the Gulf of Mexico as
La Nina years tend to have
more hurricanes, and such
storms could interfere
with the clean up of the oil
spilled in that region.
For the United States the
center noted that "intense
heat either tied, or shat-
tered, July monthly tem-
perature records in several
East Coast cities.


BRIDGET LOPEZiLake City Reporter

Hot Dog! First place winner in Reporter contest
Lake City resident Dorothy Wright (left) receives a $25 gift certificate Friday morning to Spring
Fresh from.Lake City Reporter classified ad rep Mary Sexton. Wright was the first place
winner in the Lake City Reporter's National Hot Dog Month Word Search.


DALE CARNEGIE
TRAINING


Even in our wired world,

this is still the most

important connection


Learn to connect successfully at the Dale Carnegie Course. We'll
show you how to win friends, influence people, speak persuasively and
lead with confidence. And, we'll teach you all this the only way that
works-by having you interact live with other real people.


If you are serious about success in a world still run by humans,
you can find out more by contacting the
Lake City-Columbia Chamber of Commerce at 752-3690.


Program starts: August 31, 2010
To reserve your space contact the chamber or 229-506-1387.
You can visit us at www.jacksonville.dalecarengie.com


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428











FAITH


Saturday, August 14, 2010


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


BIBLICAL MEDITATION AP
'77c


Carlton McPeak
cariton_mc@msn.com

Dog, sow

illustrate

turning

away

A dog returning
r rto vomit A sow
J returning to wal-
low in the mire.
,Awhat do these
illustrations have in com-
mon with people returning
to their former life after
coming to a "knowledge of
the Lord and Savior Jesus
Christ" (2 Peter 2:20)?
Peter says that these
people at one time had
"escaped the defilements of
the world" (2 Peter 2:20).
They had "known the way
of righteousness" (2 Peter
2:21).
The standard for their
"escape," their "way" of
living, Peter says, is "the
holy commandment" that
had been handed down to
them (2 Peter 2:21). It is
the "words spoken beiore-
hand by the holy prophets
and the commandment of
the Lord and Savior spoken
by your apostles" (2 Peter
-3:2).
So why would "turning
away" from this standard
or returning to their for-
mer way of living be such a
bad thing? Why would this
action be compared to the
action of a dog or a sow?
Peter wants his read-
ers to understand how
disgusting such an action
would be, not only in the
sight of God, but also to
them. Peter says that "the
last state has become
worse than the first" (2
Peter 2:20).
This latter state is
worse not because he is
lost for a person who has
never "known the way of
righteousness" or "the
holy commandment" spo-
ken by the prophets and
apostles is lost. The latter
state is worse because if a
person "turns away" from
what the prophets and
apostles have commanded
.there is not another way
:for that person to "escape
the defilements of the
world" which lead to eter-
nal destruction.
Eternal destruction is
going to be very horrible!
It will be the worse thing
that has ever happened to
an individual.
When people realize
all the pain and anguish
.they are enduring, how
much worse will they feel
if they know that they did
not have to be in such a
place? To know that at
one time they were obedi-
ent to what the prophets
and apostles had com-
manded and they could
have escaped this type of
punishment, and then to
realize that there will be
no end to this suffering,
*that it will be eternal, how
are they going to feel?
What one has when
they have a knowledge of
the Lord and Savior Jesus
Christ is far greater than
what they have given up.
Let us not be like the dog
or the sow.
Let us not return to our
former way of living.

Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working with the
L'akeview Church of Christ in
Lake City. All Scriptural
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Muslims pray at the Darul Uloom Institute in Pembroke Pines Wednesday on the first day of Ramadan. The lunar calendar that Muslims follow for religious
holidays is creating a potential for misunderstandings in a year when American Muslims are already confronting a spike in assaults on their faith and pro-
tests against new mosques. Eid al-Fitr, a joyous holiday marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, this year falls around Sept. 11.


t's


around


9/11


US Muslims prep for Islamic holiday


By RACHEL ZOLL
AP Religion Writer

The lunar
calendar that
Muslims
follow for
religious holidays is cre-
ating a potential for mis-
understandings or worse
in a year when American
Muslims are already con-
fronting a spike in assaults
on their faith and protests
against new mosques.
Eid al-Fitr, a joyous
holiday marking the end
of the holy month of
Ramadan, this year falls
around Sept. 11. Muslim
leaders fear that their
gatherings for prayer
and festivities could be
misinterpreted by those
unfamiliar with Islam as
a celebration of the 2001
terrorist strikes.
The Muslim Public
Affairs Council, an advo-
cacy group based in Los
Angeles, is contacting
law enforcement and .the
Justice Department civil
rights division to alert
them to the overlap.
The Islamic Circle of
North America, which
organizes Muslim Family
Days at the Six Flags
amusement park in sev-
eral cities around Eid
al-Fitr, this year planned
nothing for Saturday,
Sept 11, because of the
anniversary. A founder of
Muslim Family Day, Tariq
Amanullah, worked at the
World Trade Center and
was killed in the attacks.
The Council on
American-Islamic
Relations, a Washington-
based civil rights group, is
urging mosques to review
the group's security guide-
lines; including clearing
brush where people could


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Muslim leaders fear that their gatherings for prayer and festivities could be misinterpreted
by those unfamiliar with Islam as a celebration of the 2001 terrorist strikes.


hide and installing surveil-
lance cameras.
"The issue I can sense
brewing on hate sites on
the Internet is, 'These
Muslims are celebrating
on Sept. 11,"' said Ibrahim
Hooper, national spokes-
man for CAIR "It's getting
really scary out there."
The exact date of Eid
al-Fitr this year is not yet
known. Muslims follow dif-
ferent authorities on moon-
sightings and astronomical
calculations to decide
when a holiday begins. In
North America, the eid
could fall on Thursday,
Sept. 9, Friday, Sept 10, or
Saturday, Sept 11.
It is one of the two big-
gest Muslim holidays of
the year, often compared
to Christmas in its signifi-
cance and revelry. (The
other major holiday is Eid
al-Adha, at the end of the
hajj, the annual pilgrimage
to Mecca.)
Muslims who rarely
attend congregational
prayer fill mosques to
overflowing on Eid al-Fitr.


Mosque leaders often rent
hotel ballrooms or con-
vention centers to handle
the crowds. Families
wear their best clothes,
exchange gifts, plan spe-
cial meals with friends and
relatives, sometimes deco-
rate their homes inside
and out, and organize car-
nivals for children.
In. predominantly
Muslim countries, the cel-
ebration can last for three
days. But because of work
and school obligations
in the U.S., American
Muslims generally attend
congregational prayer on
the day of the holiday,
then continue the festivi-
ties over the next week-
end or two.
Most mosques usually
intensify security around
Ramadan because of
the attention the month
brings. This year, leaders
have grown especially
concerned about safety. In
recent months, mosques
around the country
have faced protests and
vandalism. The debate


over a proposed mosque
and Islamic center near
ground zero has become a
national issue.
Yet well before these
recent tensions, American
Muslim leaders saw
trouble ahead when they
checked the calendar.
Haroon Moghul, a New
York Muslim leader
who speaks regularly at
mosques, said mosque
leaders have been discuss-
ing Eid al-Fitr for months.
"When we realized that
Ramadan would be end-
ing around that time, a lot
of people started sitting
down together and saying,
'How do we handle this
in a way that's appropri-
ate?"' said Moghul, execu-
tive director of Maydan
Institute, a communica-
tions consulting company.
Moghul said most
New York Muslims
likely won't celebrate
the way they normally
do, and noted that a
significant number
lost relatives when the
World Trade Center was


destroyed. Many imams
in the city plan sermons
on dealing with loss and.
grief.
"It's a very painful day.
for everyone," Moghul
said.
However, he and other
American Muslim lead-
ers don't want to make so
many changes that they
appear to be giving in
to those who reject any
Muslim observance in
the United States. Some
critics have said Muslims
should move the date of
the eid.
"It's like being offended
that 9/11 and Christmas
fall on the same day," said
Safaa Zarzour, secretary
general of the Islamic
Society of North America,
an Indiana-based com-
munal group with tens of
thousands of members.
'There is something
unsettling about that."
Yvonne Maffei, 35, of
Des Plaines, Ill., a Chicago
suburb, said she and her
husband plan to stick with
their usual Eid al-Fjtr
plan. They will attend
morning prayers at their
local mosque, go out for
brunch then visit friends
during the day.
"I think most Americans
understand the value
and place of religious
holidays in a person's life,"
said Maffei, editor of My
Halal Kitchen, a blog with
recipes that meet Islamic
dietary laws. "For those
who don't, I just hope they
will take the time to try
and understand not only
why we are celebrating at
this time, but also what
we are celebrating, which
is the end of the holy
month of Ramadan, a
blessed month of fasting
and attaining closeness
to Allah."


CHURCH NOTES


Sunday
Homecoming
Celebration
Philadelphia Baptist
Church is celebrating
homecoming at 11 a.m.
Aug. 15. Moderator
Gilford Carter of St. Paul
Baptist Church, Archer, is
the speaker. Please come
in old fashion attire.

Family and Friends Day
The Church of Faith
and Deliverance Through
Christ will host Family and
Friends Day at 4 p.m. Aug.
15. The speaker will be the
Rev. Lillie Mae Hogue. The
church is located at 379
NW Long St. Call Minnie
Williams Gomes at 466-
1078 or 758-1886.

Night of Music
First Baptist Church


presents Great Sunday
Night of Music at 6 p.m.
Aug. 15. The event fea-
tures Alfonso Levy, Randy
Bragg and other musi-
cians. Admission is free
and open to the public..
Call 752-5422.

Back Pack Blessing
St. James Episcopal
Church's Outreach
Ministry will be having
a blessing for backpacks
during the morning ser-
vice at 10 a.m. Aug. 15.
The backpacks filled with
school supplies will then
be sent to the Christian
Service Center to be
distributed to children in
need.

Saturday, Aug. 21
Ushers Celebration
Greater St. Paul


Outreach Ministries will
be celebrating the first
annual Ushers Celebration
at 6 p.m. Aug. 21. Call
Brenda Perry at 288-437.

Sunday, Aug. 22
Homecoming
Celebration
Pine Grove Baptist
Church will be hosting its
64th annual homecoming
at 10:30 a.m. Aug. 22. The
guest speaker will be the
Rev. Jerry Tyre. There
will also be a covered dish
lunch at noon. Call 752-
2664.

Sept. 11
Women's Conference
The Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
,its annual women's con-


ference prayer breakfast
at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 11. Call
Conda Green at 719-3852.

Sept. 12
Women's Conference
The Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
its annual women's confer-
ence worship service at 3
p.m. Sept. 12. Call Conda
Green at 719-3852.

Every Tuesday
Support group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
in the fellowship hall of
Christ Central Ministries,
217 SW Duval Ave. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in


a non-judgmental setting.
Call 755-2525.

Free Biblical counseling
is available
Free Biblical counsel-
ing is available at Hopeful
Baptist Church. Many
are struggling with prob-
lems including marital,
financial, communication,
emotional, spiritual and
addiction. To make an
appointment, call (386)
752-4135 between 8:30
a.m. and 4 p.m.
Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes
in writing no later than
5 p.m. Tuesday to Tom
Mayer at tmayer@lakecity-
reporter.com, (386) 754-
0428, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or visit 180 E. Duval
St., Lake City. Call (386)
754-0428 with questions.








LAKE CITY REPORTER


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Faith is the foundation of God's house; love and

forgiveness are important building blocks. God can

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when we shine with the love of God it is reflected

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Scnptures Selected by The Amenrican Bible Society
Copynght 2010. Keister-Williams Newspaper Services. P 0 Boxd187, Charlotnesville, VA 22906, www kwnews com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations Io Sene Sou
Lak Cnirs. Ft ivi'a ? Bra.rukrd
Cjetlaind M.,Lt, & kes~toric Height-


www.thaewi 0top.com

Lake City, Fl.

386-752-0024


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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
I US 90 WEST 55-2427


Ho Inc.
"Quality ark at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me"
Philippins 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A ,
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Fist Advent Christian
1881SWMcFarlane Ave
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service I 1 00AM
Wednesday Service. 7.00PM


GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake leffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed Farm. Bible Srudy 7 00PMNI
"A church where IESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47S@755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10-45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve Service 7PM
Pastor LarryE. Sweat

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE fames Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 1lAM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer lig/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G Win

FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
ColumbiaiSuwannee Co. Line Rd.
Rev. Glen Lawhon 386-963-1028
Sun. School 10.00AM
Morning Worship I 1:OAM
Evening Worship 6:00lPM
Wed. Pryer Service 7:00oP

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM1
Sunday Worship 10-30AM & 6.00PM
Wed. 6-00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6-15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422,
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pasior
OLIVET NUSSIONARYBAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Davis Street
1386) 752 1990
Ronald V. Walters, Paior
Sunday School 9:45AMI
Sunday MorningWorship 11:00AM
Wed Mid Week Worship 6:101.PM
"In God's Wrd, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake leffery Rd. 752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
vww pbdc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
Sunday Worship 9.45 & I 1AM & 6PM
AWANA 5:30 PM
Evening Worship 6"00 PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservalton) 5 PM
Chddrens Ministry 6 PM
Youth Worship 600 PMNI
Prayer Meeting 6:110 PMN
Thursday Evening Schedule- St. 8/l21i8
Parkview Edge 8.30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Taiemrn

PINEGROVE BAPTISTCHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9 45AM
Sunday Worship II AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministrn 6 30PM
Paslor: Ron Thompson

'N.,


CELEBRATION COMMUNITY' CHURCH
Hwy 47 between Fi. While & Columbia City
Sunday Services
Bible Study 9AM.
Wolship 10:15AM
Wednesday Evening Schedule
AWANA 6'30PM
Prayer and Bible Study 7-PM
Pastor: BIl Blacknck,* 54-r1144

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Seices 10:30AM
Pastor. Elder Herman Griffin
7524198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E Baya Drive' 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Mornmg Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15 AMI
10.30AM
6 15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Bapistil
144 SENiMntroseAve. *752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun Mom. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

THE VINEYARD
A Southern Bapst Church
2091 SW Main Blvd., 623-0026
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Where less is Preached
and jeans are appropriate.
Pastor, Bo Hammrck,

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court- 752 4470
Saturday Vigl Mass 5.00 PM
Sunday Mass 8.15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM iSpanish/Englishi
Sunday School/Religious Education
9.00 AN10:I15AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY '
239 SE Baya Ave
Sunday Serve 11011 O AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7 3u PM

AKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247S '755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mornm Worship 1030 AM
Wed Prayet Meeting 7 PM


NEW HORIZON
church of Chnst
Directions & Times 755-1320
lack Exum,Jr, .Itnister

LAKECITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St 75.-5965
Sunday School 9J:45 AM
Sun Worship O.j30AM & 6 10PM
Wed. Family Nitght 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monilor Glen *755-1939
Sunday Schoro:l 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spintual Enrichment 7PM
'Shock Youth Church"
Buys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor lohn R. Hathaway


SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010


ST JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SWBascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
-Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon:The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director oMusic Dr. Alfonso Levy


OURREDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
I 12mileS.of 1-75onSR47
755-4299
Sunday Seices 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided
Chrisnan Educaton Hour
For all ages at 10 45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkue

SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwvy 90, 15 miles West of 175.752-3807
Sunday Worship 10 00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pol Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar lohn David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US441 Suuth
Sunday Worship Services.
Tradinonal Servces 8:30 & 10AM .
386-755-1353
trychrisat'eahlinkLue

First United Methndl;.t Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School .15AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Serce 8:30AM
Traditional Service I1:00AM
Program opponunimes available in all
areas for all ages
For a complete schedule
.contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane,'752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School i
Sunday School 9 00AM
Worship 10 000AM
Nursery provided
loung Adult group resumes Sept.
AWANA resumes Wed. q/15
Pastor: Louie Mabrey
www.wegleymem corn

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez next to Quahry
Ind.1 night on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun.Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum



Services:
Sunday School 9 45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM, 6 30PM
Wednesday 6-30PNM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place


629 SW Baya Drive, 752-0670
Sunday School 9-00AM
Sunday Sservice 10 00 AM
NURSERY) PROVIDED
Pastor Dr Roy A. Martin
Director uf Music Bill Poplin


NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
Sunday School 1000 AM
Morning Worship I1100 AM
Evangelistc Service 6 00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:0OPM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7 00 F'PM
For info call 755.34u8,* Everyone Welcoi ie
Paston Rev Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9.00AM
Sunday Mornihg ll:00AM
Wednesday Service 7.00PM
217 Dyal Ave, from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on leh. 755.2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie lohns
"A Church on the Mose"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebradnn lu:30 AM
Pastor Chns lones'752.9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road -755.0580
Firsi and Third Sundays 9:311 A M.
Second arid Fourth Sundays k.00 P.M.
Pastor Ret. Cheryl R Pingel
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. nf Branford Highwav
Sunday School 10.00tAM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Ebening 600PM
Wednesday :iiOPM
A Full dGspel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


Toadetie nthshrc iretoyCal7540


i Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


GENTIVA'
great healthcare has come home-
*Nursing *Ortbopedic Rehab Programn Balance Dysfunction
Program Physical & Occupational Therapy
*MSW *Home Health Aide Services
Medicare/Medicaid Certified/JCAHO Accredited
HHA206340963 & HHA299991379
LakeCity 386-748-3490 Lve Oak 386-3644593




Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
'v Ci.I, r"i Idavis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
"':.'910 or 1-800-597-3526
M.., ..I 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday

Patty Register '
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
197 E4 Du 3r1Lt Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Ladr CIII Fl 32055 ClosedWednesday.

ANDERSON COLUMIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIALA
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

-M HARRY'S
Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


P n. 752-2308 z

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this Directory
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S755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia (ounr's Feed Headquarters
FELD PET SUPPLIES L%1N & t RD[EN
ANIMAL. KLILTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
),our Lamon .& Garden Headquaners
NtOi ERS t(i-LIN S~S *-TRIMMERS
|1 2 Is, i \\EST. LAlkE C'iT 1FL
386-752-8098




1701 S.a I s
n 755-7050


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this Directory
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755-5440


. To Advertise in
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755-5440


To Advertise in
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas!

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreportercom


- -


SPORTS


SaturdayAugust 14 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE






Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@olkecityreporter.com


True


love


never


dies
irst loves are
hard to get
over. I know,
because at 26,
I'm still trying
to get over mine..
My love does the same
thing to me every year. I
become so engulfed in it
for four months, and then
my love leaves me. I'm
speaking of course about
my original crush, the
game of football.,
Football is like the
coldest of loves. I
compare the game to
a flirt. For months, the
flirt will leave you with
nothing at all,'but then
return to tease you.
There have been
women who do me like
this, but football has the
upper hand. Women have
often flirted with me
to the point that I have
thought it was a sure
thing that there must be
an interest, and football
does the same thing.
The preseason is the
biggest of flirts. Just like
that hot girl that flirts
with you, the preseason
can be a tease. Yes, it's
football, but like that
extremely attractive
member of the opposite
sex, you just can't get her
out on a real date.
It boggles me down
until I'm in a compulsive
mood. I must have
football. I can't live
without football. I won't
sleep until I have football,
but yet, the preseason is
the ultimate tease.
It looks like football.
There are players
out there in uniforms
running routes, carrying
the pigskin and making
tackles.
It smells like football.
There's sweat on the
field and in certain cases
there's dirt on the jersey.
Of course, for most of
the big-time players, the
dirt on the jersey doesn't
come until the regular
season.
It almost even tastes
like football. Certain
people begin their '
barbecue creativity
during this time, but
it's a given the biggest
of football feast won't
come until Thanksgiving
weekend.
Why does football do
this to me? Is itlove, or
is it an obsession? Do the
two cross paths?
Alas, football does give
in unlike certain flirts.
It will draw me in so
close that I could almost
feel a marriage proposal
between myself and the
sport.
Still, like any really
good tease,/ as soon as
football draws me in
close enough, it pushes
me away leaving me
wanting more.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


Indians chill


300 pounds of ice
help Fort White
players cool off.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORTWHITE Despite
two-a-day practices and
sleeping in the gym, Fort
White High football players
have found time for some
chillin'.
"We put about 300
pounds of ice and water in
a trough and submerged
then up to their chests,"
assistant head coach Ken
Snider said between prac-
tices on Thursday. "It helps
them recover and get their
legs under them. With the
bumps and bruises from
(Thursday's first day in
pads), we will have even


more getting in."
Snider said for Friday's
final camp practice the team
would cover all aspects of
special teams in addition to
regular position segments,
and finish with a "scrim-
mage-type setting."
"We saw some promise
- some things we do well
and some things we need
to work on individually and
as a team," Snider said. "I
like the way we are break-
ing down segments. There
is no, standing around and
in 2-21 hours we are out of
there. That is something
two-platoon has allowed us
to do."
Snider said the plan to
two-platoon is taking hold
and provides more teach-
ing time.
INDIANS continued on 3B


Injury

Tigers lose Hill
to broken jaw
during practice.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. conf
Football is a rough sport,
but even in football a bro-
ken jaw is a rare injury.
Columbia High was bitten
by the rarity on the Tigers'
first full day in pads.
.Adrian Hill was consid- V
ered the best offensive play-
er returning to the Tigers .-
in 2010, but after a fluke ,, -.
injury, the Tigers aren't .' .4... 4Y"
sure if Hill will be able to : .:
compete during his senior ..i :
season. X
"It hurts to have your
best player injured," head
coach Craig Howard said.
"Hill broke his jaw and
we're looking at four to six
weeks, maybe the season. It
was just devastating to lose
our best offensive player."
To compound the prob-
lem, the Tigers had two
injuries on the same play. i
"It was just one of those
flukes of football," Howard
said. "Everything had to
happen the right way for it
to happen. Drew Clark was
injured on the same play.
He's got a back strain, and
he'll miss at least four or
five days."
Being that it was the first
day in pads, the Tigers were
cautious not to let any other
injuries happen, but at the
same time they had to use
this valuable time to condi-
tion and train.
"It kind of shook -the
team up," Howard said.
"For Adrian, it was just. so
CHS continued on 3B


COURTESY PHOTO
Fort White High football players eased aches and pains by taking an ice-water dip on
Wednesday.


U


hits


Year of development


Meyer talks state
of Florida football
during 2010 year.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Some programs around
the country rebuild. Other
programs just reload.
The University of Florida
is one of those programs
that reloads. Despite the
departure of Tim Tebow,
Brandon Spikes, Joe Haden
and a record nine players
to the NFL, the Gators
are looking at another


chance to play for a SEC
Championship in 2010.
Coach Urban Meyer and
the Florida football team
addressed the state of the
Gatornation at media days
on Tuesday in Gainesville.
"It's the year of develop-
ment and accountability,"
he said. "We are coaching as
hard as we ever have. Other
than '07, this has been one
of the newest (teams), but I
will tell you what, there is a
lot of talent running around
on that field."
With the new talentcomes
a sense of anxiety for the
Florida football team. It's


an anxiousness that may
turn into excitement when
the Gators open the season
on Sept. 4 against Miami
(Ohio) in Gainesville.
"I think you will be excit-
ed to see what that Florida
team looks like," Meyer
said. "Not now, they are
awful right now, but in a
couple of weeks, they will
be pretty good."
With the excitement also
came a different approach
in the coaching scheme. In
the past, the Gator have
returned many of the same
GATORS continued on 3B


JASON MATTEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida coach Urban Meyer answers questions
at Media Day on Tuesday in Gainesville.










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
9 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Carfax 400, at Brooklyn,
Mich.
10 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Carfax 250,.at
Brooklyn, Mich.
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
Carfax 400, at Brooklyn, Mich.
2 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Carfax 250, at Brooklyn, Mich.
5:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Too Tough to Tame 200, at
Darlington, S.C. (same-day tape)
7:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, Too
Tough to Tame 200, at Darlington, S.C.
II p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Lucas
Oil Nationals, at Brainerd, Minn. (same-
day tape)
BOXING
10 p.m.
FSN Ji-Hoon Kim (21-5-0) vs.
Miguel Angel Vazquez (25-3-0), for vacant
IBF lightweight tide, at Laredo,Texas
10:30 p.m.
HBO Champion Jean Pascal
(25-1-0) vs. Chad Dawson (29-0-0), for
WBC light heavyweight title, at Montreal
EXTREME SPORTS
4 p.m.
NBC-DewTour,Wendy's Invitational,
at Portland, Ore.
GOLF
II a.m.
TNT PGA of America, PGA
Championship, third round, at Sheboygan,
Wis.
2 p.pn.
CBS PGA of America, PGA
Championship, third round, at Sheboygan,
Wis.
3 p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S.Women'sAmateur
Championship, semifinal matches, at.
Charlotte, N.C.
GYMNASTICS
8 p.m.
NBC Visa Championships, at
Hartford, Conn.
LITTLE LEAGUE
I p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, Midwest Regional
Final, at Indianapolis
5 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, Great Lakes Regional
Final, Hamilton, Ohio vs. Moline, III., at
Indianapolis
7 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, New England
Regional Final, at Bristol, Conn.
9 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, Northwest Regional
Final, at San Bernardino, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FO< Regional coverage, Chicago
Cubs at St. Louis, San Diego at San
Francisco, or Baltimore at Tampa Bay
7 p.m.
WGN Detroit at Chicago White
Sox
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
NBC -AMA Motocross 450, at New
Berlin, N.Y.
10 p.m.
SPEED AMA Pro Raing, at'Alton,
Va. (same-day tape)
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Jack Daniel's
Invitational, at Nashville,Tenn.
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Manchester
City at Tottenham
SOFTBALL
II a.m.
ESPN2 Girls, Senior League,
championship game, at Lower Sussex,
Del.
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP, Rogers Cup, semifinal,
atToronto
7 p.m:
ESPN2 ATP, Rogers Cup, semifinal,
at Toronto
9 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Western &
Southern Financial Group Open, semifinal,
at Mason, Ohio (same-day tape)

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 71 43 .623 -
Tampa Bay 69 45 .605 2
Boston 66 50 .569 6
Toronto 60 54 .526 II
Baltimore 40 75 .348 31'k
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 65 50 .565 -
Chicago 64 51 .557 'I
Detroit 55 59 .482 9kA
Cleveland 48 67 .417 17
Kansas City 47 68 .409 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 65 48 .575 -
Los Angeles 59 57 .509 7k
Oakland 57 56 .504 8
Seattle 44 71 .383 22
Thursday's Games
Toronto 6, Boston 5
Cleveland 4, Baltimore I
Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox I


N.Y.Yankees 4, Kansas City 3
Friday's Games
Seattle at Cleveland (n)
Baltimore at Tampa Bay (n)
Boston atTexas (n)
Detroit at Chicago White Sox (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Kansas City (n)
Oakland at Minnesota (n)
Toronto at L.A.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Matusz 4-11) at Tampa Bay
(Sonnanstine 2-1I), 4:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 5-10) at Chicago
White Sox (E.Jackson 1-0), 7:05 p.m.


Seattle (J.Vargas 8-5) at Cleveland
(Talbot 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (P.Hughes 13-5) at Kansas
City (O'Sullivan 1-3), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 12-4) at Minnesota
(Duensing 5-1), 7:10 p.m.
Boston (Lester 12-7) atTexas (C.Lewis
9-8), 8:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 9-5) at LA. Angels
(E.Santana I -86, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Seattle at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox,
2:05 p.m.
N.YYankees at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Boston at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
Toronto at LA.Angels, 3:35 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 66 48
Philadelphia 64 50
Florida. 57 56
NewYork 57 57
Washington 49 66
Central Division


Pct GB
.579 -
.561 2
.504' 8'
.500 9
.426 17'


W L Pct GB
St. Louis 64 49 .566 -
Cincinnati 64 51 .557 I
Milwaukee 54 62 .466 II'
Houston 48 65 .425 16
Chicago 48 67 .417 17
Pittsburgh 39 75 .342 25k'
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego 67 46 .593 -
San Francisco 66 50 .569 2'A
Colorado 59 55 .518 81A
Los Angeles 59 56 .513 9
Arizona 46 70 .397 22h
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Mets 4, Colorado 0
Milwaukee 8,Arizona 4
San Francisco 8, Chicago Cubs 7
San Diego 3, Pittsburgh 0
Florida 5,Washington 0
Philadelphia 10, LA. Dodgers 9
Friday's Games
Arizona at Washington (n)
Florida at Cincinnati (n)
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets (n)
LA. Dodgers at Atlanta (n)
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis (n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)
Milwaukee at Colorado (n)
San Diego at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs, (Zambrano 3-6) at St.
Louis (C.Carpenter 13-3), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 12-5) at San
Francisco (Bumgarner 4-4), 4:10 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 6-9) atWashington
(Marquis 0-4), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholm 7-10) at Houston
(Figueroa 3-1I), 7:05 p.m.
Florida (West 0-1) at Cincinnatl
(Leake 7-4), 7:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Lilly 5-8) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 11-9), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 14-8) at N.Y.
Mets (Misch 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 9-7) at
Colorado (Rogers 2-2), 8:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Florida at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Arizona atWashington, 1:35 p.m.
LA Dodgers atAtlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Milwaukee at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 8:10 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
New England 27, New Orleans 24
Baltimore 17, Carolina 12
Oakland 17, Dallas 9-,
Friday's.Games
Buffalo atWashington (n)'
Jacksonville at Philadelphia (n)
Kansas City at Atlanta (a)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Miami, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 8 p.m.
Chicago at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Francisco at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Denver at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at N.Y.Jets, 8 p.m.

NFL calendar

Aug. 31 Roster cutdown to
maximum of 75 players.
Sept. 4 Roster cutdown to
maximum of 53 players.
Sept. 9 Opening game of regular
season.

Arena Football playoffs



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

I DAIBE i


Conference Championships
Thursday
Spokane 60, Milwaukee 57
Today
American: Orlando at Tampa Bay,
.7:30 p.m.
Arena Bowl XXIII
Friday, Aug.20
Spokane vs. Orlando-Tampa Bay
winner

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
CARFAX 400
Site: Brooklyn, Mich.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
9-10 a.m.. noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunday, race,
I p.m. (ESPN, noon-4:30 p.m.).
Track:Michigan International Speedway
(oval, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 200 laps.
NATIONWIDE
CARFAX 250
Site: Brooklyn, Mich.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed,
10 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Michigan International
Speedway.
Race distance: 250 miles, 125 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Too Tough To Tame 200
Site: Darlington, S.C.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 5:30-7 p.m.); race 7:30 p.m. (Speed,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: Darlington Raceway (oval, 1.366
miles).
Race distance: 200.8 miles, 147 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
Lucas Oil NHRA Nationals
Site: Brainerd, Minn.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2, II
p.m.-I a.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 10 p.m.-I a:m.).
Track: Brainerd International Raceway.

CARFAX 400 qualifying

I. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 187.183.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
187.086.
3. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
186.577.
4. '(14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
186.572.
5. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
186.461.
6. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 186.35,
7. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 186.268.
8. (29) Kevin Harvick,, Chevrolet;
186.176.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
186.167..
10. (98) Paul Menard. Ford, 185.912.
II1. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
185.73.
12. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
185.715.
13. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 185.596.
14. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
185.596.
15. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
185.467.
16.. (43) A J Allmendlnger, Ford,
185.419.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
185.333.
18. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 185.29.
19. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
185.276.
20. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
185.071.
21.(13) Max Papis,Toyota, 184.952.
22. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
184.876.
23. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 184.867.
24. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 184.776.
25. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford,
184.729..
26. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
184.634.
27. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 184.615.
28. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
184.582.
29. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 184.535.
30. (21 I) Bill Elliott, Ford, 184.43 I.
31. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 184.417.
32. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 184.341,
33. (II1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
183.885.
34. (83) Reed Sorenson, Toyota,
183.87.
35. (07) Robby Gordon, .Toyota,
183.744.
36. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
183.439.
37. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
183.388.


38. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
183.337.
39. (34) Tony Raines, Ford, 182.764.
40. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
41. (7) P.J. Jones, Toyota, Owner
Points.
42. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner
Points.,
43. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
183.257.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WEDDAN =

r I WHAT THE PUP'GY
j PINER PIP AT THE ENP
INGRYP OF THE BUFFET LINE,
-- -- 7Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
7 U- I- suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: OZONE JADED DEAFEN BEYOND
I Answer: The mortician sought a career change
because he had a DEAD-END JOB


BRIEFS


YOUTH FOOTBALL
Little League
sign-up -today
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
has youth football
registration scheduled
for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today,
and Aug. 21 and Aug. 28
at Teen Town Recreation
Center. Ages are 8-13, with
Sept. 1 the cutoff date, and
two leagues are offered.
Cost is $40. A mandatory
coaches clinic is 9 a.m. to
noon today at Teen Town.
FDLE background checks
are due at the clinic.
For details, e-mail
christieh@lcfla. com.


Future Tiger
Football Camp
The Future Tiger
Football Camp, sponsored
by the Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
and Columbia Youth'
Football Association is
9-11 a.m. Aug. 28 at
Memorial Stadium. Boys'
and girls ages 7-14 are
eligible for the free camp.
Campers will get lunch
and a T-shirt
Pre-registration is 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. today and Aug. 21
at Teen Town Recreation
Center. Late registration is
the day of the camp. There
-is a limited number of
T-shirts, so sign up early.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.


Boys Club flag
football sign-up
Registration is under
way for the Boys Club of
Columbia County's flag
football program. The
program is for ages 6-7,
and 8-year-olds who weigh
less than 66 pounds.
Practice is twice weekly at
the club and games are on
Saturday. Cost is $40.
For details, call the club
at 752-4184.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Fall league
registration today
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball has


1
4

7

11
12
13
14

16

17
18

19
20

21
24

27
28

30

32


ACROSS

E-mail delivery
Folkloric char-
acter
Mme. Gluck of
opera
GI address
Medicinal plant
Placed
Suit color (2
wds.)
Clare Boothe

Mall tenant
Patron of lost
causes
Dodge City loc.
Shoulder
enhancer
Like bricks
Least experi-
enced
Wood chopper
Film spectacu-
lar
"Hot Lips"
Houlihan
Ouch!


fall season sign-up se
5-7 p.m. Friday and
Aug. 27, and 10 a.m.
2 p.m. today, and Au
and Aug. 28 at South!
.Sports Complex. Fee
$50 includes jersey,
socks and insurance
for the five leagues r
from 5-6 coach pitch
13-15. A parent or gt
must come to registry
and provide a birth
certificate.
For details, call K(
Starters at 623-9497.


Players needed
for travel teal
A 12-under travel
baseball team is lool
for experience played
for local tournament
Practices and tryout
are 5:30 p.m. Sunday
Southside Sports Co
For details, call Cl
Williams at 344-5976


Camp registrar
at Brian's Sp<
Registration for a
fundamental develop
baseball camp for ag
6-8 ends today at Bri
Sports. Camp at the
Ruth practice field is
3 p.m. Monday throi
Wednesday.
For details, call Jo
Wehinger 623-3628.

RUNNING

Clinic today
at Alligator Pa
Eye of the Tiger.
running team is hos
open cross country/
distance clinic from
9-10:30 a.m. today ui
the main pavilion at
Alligator Park. Ther
be AAU sign-ups. Co
dressed for light exe
For details, e-mail
April Morse at
eanbz@bellsouth. net.

INDIANS CROSS COUI

Meeting at trn
set for Monda
The Fort White H
cross country team'
begin the season wit
meeting at 6 p.m. M


34 Second-high-
est voice
.36 Baba
37 Not tippy
39 Columnar
arrangement of
data
41 Future fish
42 Three before V
43 Stoolie.
45 Fast mammals
48 Metal thread
49 Crosses riskily
52 Rara -
53 Thought
54 Get a move on
55 Lie down
56 Nick or scratch
57 Devotee, suffix

DOWN

1 Game piece
2 Mineral springs
3 Citizen's con-
cern (abbv.)
4 Ms. Burstyn
5 Costello or
Gehrig


et for at the Fort White track.
All interested athletes in
to grades 6-12 are
g. 21 encouraged to attend,
side along with their parents.
e of Coaches will be
hat, introduced, and a practice
. Ages schedule, workout
range requirements and team
to vision shared. An
aardian up-to-date physical is
ration required to compete.
For.details, contact Bill
Jones at
evin ncanes@earthlink.net.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
1d Fall season

mi sign-up ongoing

Girls Softball
king Association of Columbia
rs County has registration for
s. its fall league through
Ls Aug.' 29 at Brian's Sports.
ys at Ages are 4-17 for T-ball,
implex. machine pitch and
hris fastpitch leagues. Cost is
$45 or $65 for two players
from the. same family. A
3tion birth certificate is required
S at registration.
orts For details on coaching,
scholarships, evaluations
pment or registration, e-mail
pes information@
ian's girlssoftballassociation. org.
Babe
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
ugh Fundraiser set

sh at Phish Heads
The Fort White
Quarterback Club is
hosting a fundraiser from
6-9 p.m. Wednesday at
ark. Phish Heads restaurant on
Main Boulevard in Lake
City. Senior football
ting an players and coaches will
'long be waiting and bussing
tables for tips.
under For details, call Shayne
Morgan at (386) 397-4954.
e will
Dme TIGERS FOOTBALL
rise. Quarterback Club
I coachQ
Meeting Monday
There will be a
NTRY. Quarterback Club Meeting
at 7 p.m. onf Monday at
ack the Columbia High field
Bly house.
S All parents are
igh encouraged to attend and
will support Tiger Football.
tha
onday 0 From staff reports


Answer to Previous Puzzle


BLT VxO W G UT
LAO ORERO POSH
*ESP DIAL LUAU
WHISKERS ERGS
IAN EVADE
V OUS TINES
WIT ISS REEFS
SLABS MIB MOA
WEST YURT
MASS ATE
OMEN TALISMAN
LIRA EMIT G NU
EARS EACH MTN
SKY TSE TIC


Lawyer's charge
Refers to
Praise
Squeakers
Lime cooler
Rub against


S Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com I


15 Dress part
18 Prominent fea-
ture
20 Treaty
21 Plane's cargo
section
22 Line of rota-
tion
23 Held on to
24 Vex
25 Ear cleaner
26 Money drawer
29 Whey-faced
31 Deadlock
33 Quite sincere
35 Canada's capi-
tal
38 choy
40, Psychics may
see it
42 More timid
43 Basketball
team
44 Part of the eye
46 Grades 1-12
47 Winter sports
gear
48 "The of the
Roses"
49 Lehrer or
Carrey
50 BASIC alterna-
tive
51 Adjust a clock


2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421














JoePa still going


strong at Penn State


By GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
- Joe Paterno is now peer-
less in his profession.
His friend and last
remaining contempo-
rary among major college
football coaches, Bobby
Bowden, retired after last
season. With Bowden out
at Florida State, the career
victories record is pretty
much Paterno's to keep
- whether he cares about
it or not.
Paterno knows he's in
the twilight of his own Hall
of Fame career at Penn
State, but still gives no hint
of exactly when that will
come. These days, nobody
seems to be itching to see
Joe go.
At 83 years old, Paterno's
health has become as
closely watched as that of a
pope every hint of a limp
analyzed, every slip-up with
words parsed.
But at this point it makes
no sense asking when Joe
will go. His contract runs
through 2011 for whatever
that's worth. In the mean-
time, in case you didn't
notice, the Nittany Lions
are humming again, rack-
ing up wins (11 last year)
and challenging for champi-.
onships. And that still gets
JoePa fired up.
"You like the competi-
tion," he said Thursday at
Beaver Stadium. "If you
don't like it, you ought to
get out of it, that's the way
I've always felt about it."
Paterno has 394 victories,
while Bowden finished with
389 minus 12 that were
vacated by Florida State
this year because of an aca-
demic cheating scandal.
The next milestone for
Paterno is the 400-win


club, a mark that only
Eddie Robinson (408) and
John Gagliardi (471) have
reached. JoePa could get
there by late October.
"You know, when I'm
down and looking up, are
they going to put 399 on
top of me or are they going
to put 401," Paterno asked
at Big Ten media day in
Chicago. "Who the hell
cares? I won't know."
But the legion of blue
and white fans are no doubt
keeping -track and not
just of wins and losses.
The health watch start-
ed in earnest in 2006 after
Paterno tore left knee liga-
ments in a sideline collision
with a player during a game
at Wisconsin.
Early in the 2008 season,
Paterno hurt his hip after
trying to show his players
how to execute an onside
kick in practice. He needed
hip replacement surgery in
December but only after
leading the Nittany Lions to
a Big Ten title and the Rose
Bowl. Both the knee and
hip injuries forced Paterno
to coach from the press
box.
Earlier this year, Paterno
was able to shed his smoky
thick-rimmed glasses after
getting laser eye surgery.
"Robo-coach," he was nick-
rfamed by one of his staff-
ers.
A new concern emerged
this offseason after Paterno
missed Big Ten meetings
in May and three appear-
ances before alumni groups
around the state, stops typi-
cally part of His summer
schedule.
The rumor mill churned
anew. Was this really it for
JoePa?
His spokesmen and family
said Paterno was sidelined
by a nagging intestinal bug.


Paterno in June also told
The Associated Press he
had a second ailment after
suffering an overreaction
to antibiotics prescribed for
dental work.
Speaking slightly slow-
er and in a lower tone of
voice the first day of Big
Ten media days, Paterno
pleaded he was just fine
and ready for the season.
He repeated as much in
State College on Thursday.
"I have one request," he
said to start off the news
conference at the packed
Beaver Stadium media
room. "Please, don't ask if
I'm going to die. Believe
me, I got a few more days
left."
His son and quarter-
backs coach, Jay ,Paterno,
watches the back-and-forth
with some amusement. "It
used to be they'd ask him
when (was he) going to
retire. Now they're asking
when is he going to kick
the bucket," he joked.
For his part, the younger
Paterno hasn't noticed his
father slowing down.
"It didn't concern me
.because I've been at the
house with my kids. He's
chased them ... I haven't
seen that element of him
slowing down," Jay Paterno
said.
The boss, though, has
said he's less of a hands-
on coach on the field than
he used to be, allowing his
loyal assistants to do the
bulk of that work though
Paterno is still known to
pull a player aside for some
face time if he's unhappy.
Paterno said he prefers "to
stick his two cents in" at
staff meetings.
Paterno also plans to
make fewer appearances on
Thursday night radio show
broadcast throughout the


state. He said it's become
more of a problem for him
in recent years because he
has to go on the air right
after practice.
"It's a pain in the rear
end. I want to get home.
I want to start doodling,
figure out what has to get
done, so that maybe I can
figure out a couple things
for the game on Saturday,"
Joe Paterno said. "And
I don't get paid a lot of
money."
He's also got aWednesday
speaking engagement
with hardcore fans and a
pregame radio show on
Saturday, and Paterno said
he wasn't sure how many
of those appearances he
would get to.
Linebackers coach Ron
Vanderlinden disagreed
with Paterno's suggestion
Thursday that the head
coach might be letting
the. assistants "carry him"
more.
"That's one of the great
marks of his leadership,


that he lets you coach on
the field, which makes it
a lot more fun. You don't
have somebody looking
over your shoulder all the
time," Vanderlinden said.
"But, if he sees something
he wants to discuss with
you, he will definitely talk it
over in the staff room."
Whenever Paterno does
call it quits, here's a list of
some names who could be
in the running to take over,
with internal candidates
listed first:
Tom Bradley, Penn
State defensive coordinator.
The energetic Bradley, a
master recruiter, is archi-
tect of a defense consis-
tently among the best in
the country. He's the most
talked-about internal candi-
date among fans.
Larry Johnson,
Penn State defensive line
coach. Another top-notch
recruiter, Johnson has
opened a pipeline into the
Washington-Baltimore area
that has helped get recent


stars like Derrick Williams
and Aaron Maybin to
Happy Valley. Also known
for developing top linemen
such as Maybin, Tamba
Hali and, most recently,
Jared Odrick.
Jay Paterno. He has
the marquee name and has
answered critics question-
ing whether he benefited
from nepotism by devel-
oping QB success stori, s
in Michael Robinson and
Daryll Clark, dough tne
Anthony Morelli era was
considered a flop. His father
has said that Penn State
might not be the best place
for him to start his head
coaching career.
Al Golden, Temple
coach. He spearheaded
the Owls' .ise from FBS
afterthought to MAC title
contender. Played tight end
for Paterno from 1987-91,
and coached linebackers at
Penn State in 2000. Golden
has also made coaching
stops at Boston College and
Virginia.


* .CHS: Scrimmage today


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Matt Kuchar walks up the' stairs on the 18th hole after his second round of the PGA Championship golf tournament Friday at
Whistling Straits in Haven, Wis.


Kuchar in control at PGA Championship


By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

SHEBOYGAN, Wis.
- The only thing clear
after two days of fog-
induced havoc at the PGA
Championship is that Matt
Kuchar is playing very,
very well.
Kuchar ran off three
straight birdies on his way
to a 69 Friday and, at 8
under, the early second-
round lead. But half of the
field won't complete their
second rounds Friday after
morning fog delayed the
start of play for a second
straight day.
"We'll just wait and see
what happens," Kuchar
said. "They could get lucky
if the storm blows through
and then they get some
clear skies and some calm
conditions. But sitting
around right now, it's nice
to be done."
Nick Watney led a group
of the not-so-famous eager


to extend the season streak
that sawfirst-timers Graeme
McDowell (U.S. Open) and
Louis Oosthuizen (British
Open) become major cham-
pions. Watney, who missed
the cut in his two previous
PGAs, is at 7 under (68).
Bryce Molder, Kuchar's
teammate at Georgia Tech,
is three strokes behind his
good friend after shooting
5-under 67. Also at 5 under
are Jason Dufner (66), 19-
year-old Noh Seung-yul
(71), Dustin Johnson (68),
Simon Khan (70), Rory
Mcllroy (68) and 2007
Masters champion Zach
Johnson (70).
'"This is what we practice
to do," Molder said. 'To
see if our game and our
practice and the work that
we do off the course and on
the course can pay off."
Phil Mickelson, who has
yet another opportunity to
take the world No. 1 rank-
ing from Tiger Woods,
had the makings of a great


day with six birdies. But it
was undercut by a double-
bogey at 18 and another
bogey, and he's at 2 under
for the tournament along
with Ernie Els.
"This is a penalizing golf
course to not play from
the fairway. And I certain-
ly explored a lot of areas
here," Lefty said.
Mickelson also hit a fan
with his tee shot on 15
- though Mickelson made
up for it by giving the guy
a glove that he signed and
wrote "Sorry" on, even put-
ting a frowning face inside
the "o."
Steve Stricker might
have felt like that frowning
guy after his tee shot on 17
landed below the par-3's
elevated green. He banged
it against the embankment
not once, but twice, and
wound up with a triple-
bogey. He's at even par for
the tournament.
Though the fog has
made the PGA seem more


like a British Open there
was rain Friday afternoon,
too Kuchar Was proof
that decent scores were
available on the 7,514-yard,
links-style monster. Maybe
that was a good sign for
Tiger Woods, who finished
his first round at an encour-
aging 1-under 71 and had
to wait until dinnertime to
begin a second round he
certainly wouldn't com-
plete by sundown.
Bubba Watson and
Francesco Molinari, whose
68s gave them the clubhouse
lead before the first round
was suspended for darkness
Thursday night, also had
late tee times Friday.
"I'm very pleased with
the way I've been playing.
It's been a great year," said
Kuchar, who has eight top
10s, including a tie for sixth
at the U.S. Open. "Not too
much trouble to report. I'm
putting well, staying out of
trouble and I find myself at
8 under par."


Continued From Page 1B
disappointing. You just don't
see a lot of injuries like
that. It's not common. That
injury very seldom happens
in football."
Still, the Tigers continued
through practice, despite'
the injury coming early on
in the session.
"The boys fought
through," Howard said.
'We all gathered together
to say our prayers and hope
they get back. Everyone
was concerned."
In a rough day for the
Tiger program, Howard
was able to find a couple of
positives. Among them, the
development of the offen-
sive line.


. "We didn't scrimmage,
but the offensive line was
further along than I thought
they would be," he said.
"They still have a way to go,
but they were better than
I thought they would be at
this point. Of course, Timmy
Jernigan looks tough, and
Cameron Wimberly had a'
pretty good day."
Howard plans on having
the Tigers scrimmage at 1
p.m. today for the first time
this season.
"We'll have a certain
amount of plays," he said.
'We'll adjust the amount of
plays. The big thing is we
don't want any more injuries.
Well have to monitor it"


INDIANS: OpenAug.
Continued From Page 1B


'We will' try to keep the
players from going both
ways," Snider said. "There
will be some cross-training
to add depth."
Snider said the camp
achieved its goal of togeth-
erness.
"This environment is con-
ducive to it, when you sleep,
eat and practice together,"
Snider said. "By developing
family, you have the making
of a strong family. Coach
(Demetric) Jackson breaks
every practice down with


27


'tiwahe' (family).
"From the spring we
sensed a good chem-
istry and there was' a lot
of togetherness at FCA
camp. The combination of
those bonds us closer as a
family."
With teachers reporting
next week, the Indians will
practice at 3:15 p.m. Picture
day is Monday.
The season opens with a
kickoff classic game against
Columbia High on Aug. 27
in Fort White.


GATORS: Reloading


Continued From Page 1B

players from the previous
season. This year, Florida
will have to break in a new
mold.
"Last year, we did not have
to evaluate drills, because it
was the same group of guys
that came back," Meyer
said. "If you hire a guy from
a different system, and he is
used to drilling his players a
certain way and it has noth-
ing to do with what we do,
then it slows down the devel-
opment of the players. So,


it has been ridiculous, the
amount of time and detail we
have spent on each drill
With the amount .)f drill
time spent, Meyer m-
have a few sleepless nights.
"I will watch every drill,"
he said. "I will stay up late
tonight watching every drill,
not so much the plays, but
the development of those
guys, because there are a
bunch of players that need
to be developed and it is
going really well."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Penn State coach Joe Paterno (second from right) jokes with seniors Ollie Ogbu (85), Evah
Royster (second from left), Brett Brackett (center rear) and Stefen Wisniewski (right) curing
football media day on Thursday in State College, Pa.









4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
OUR SUPER-SPECIAL IS $5.qq FOR
THE SEST HOMEMADE BANANA SPLIT
YOU EVER TASTED a-

/ FAROR


$09


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Teen longs for a baby to fill

hole left in her broken heart


DEAR ABBY: I am a
girl who has had my heart
broken for the first time.
I know I should get over
this boy, but I can't stop
thinking about him. My
mom loved him. We hung
out every weekend for six
months.
I thought I might have
been pregnant. I'm not
- but I want to be. I know
I'm not ready to be a mom,
but I want someone to love
me and depend on me. I
need someone who won't
leave me. I know my baby
wouldn't.
Should I become a mom?
How do 'I get over my boy-
friend? Do I stop talking to
him and just be his friend?
Abby, tell me the right way.
- LOVESICK IN YUC-
CA VALLEY,. CALIF.
DEAR LOVESICK:
Becoming a mother is not
the way out of your heart-
ache. Any young woman
considering having a child
must ask herself how she
canr provide financially and
emotionally for that child.
Most teenaged girls who
become pregnant do not
complete their high school
education, and it has a neg-
ative impact on their ability


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
to provide for themselves
and their children.
The right way to work
through this breakup is to
talk to your mother or an-
other trusted adult about
your feelings. Stop trying
to maintain contact with
your former boyfriend.
To continue will only pro-
long your pain. Dedicate
yourself to achieving the
most you can for yourself
in sports and academics.
It will give you less time to
brood, and the more you
achieve the more sought-
after you will become.
It won't happen over-
hight. It will take time, con-
centration and dedication.
If you take my advice you
will come out of this disap-
pointment a much happier
person. But having a baby
is NOT the answer.
DEAR ABBY: Eight
months ago I began a
weight-loss program the


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD

HELP!


0 L
0


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Organize your
day so you don't have time
to think. Anxiety will be the
enemy, coupled with any-
one trying to limit you or
add to your responsibilities.
You shouldn't have any un-
certainties about what you
want to complete. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Time spent re-
searching something you
want to pursue or talking
to someone with experi-
ence should fill your day. It
I may be time to incorporate
a little more fun into your
life. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Your creative
idea can interest people
with the potential to cap-
ture you mentally; physical-
ly and emotionally. Getting
a creative project started
will lead to an interesting
encounter with someone
'e from your past. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't trust any-
one to do your work for
you or to be honest about
What's required of you.
Ask questions before you
go down a path that will
lead nowhere. Problems at
home with family or your.
- residence can be expected.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Take note of who your


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

allies are and reciprocate.
A short trip back in time to
the places you used to en-
joy should be taken. An old
pastime can be turned into
a lucrative hobby. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Focus on what you
can get done and forget
about the unsettled busi-
ness that has been bogging
you down. An opportunity
will open up when you least
expect it Take care of any
problem at home promptly.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Love and romance
are heading your direction.
If you are single, take part
in a singles event and you
won't be alone for long. If
already in a relationship,
plan something special
and the rewards will be
outstanding. Express your
true feelings. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. .21): Don't be afraid
to make some sudden al-
terations to your plans. The
more you have lined up,
the easier it will be for you
to maintain control. Your
personal touch will encour-
age others to be, a part of
your plans. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Share your


knowledge and expertise
with others. The more
help you offer, the better
positioned you will be for
advancement. Get involved
in a group or interest that.
can help you turn a profit.
4 ****-
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You may be
in control, confident and
know exactly what you
want but it won't be so easy
when your emotions come
into play. Try not to push
anyone you care about or
you may meet with opposi-
tion or even worse, alien-
ation. For now, listen and
observe. **
I AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Tie up loose
ends so you can start anew.
There is ground to cover if
you are to figure out a way
to raise your .standard of
living. Joining forces with
someone who has the po-
tential to add to what you .
have to offer will benefit
you both. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): A creative
idea you have will lead to
financial gain. Don't be
afraid to take on a unique
project. Not everyone will
get what you are trying
to do but the person who
does will become your ally
and partner in the venture.
*****


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
EULY, CONNIE FINO vHFATVER GOES ON
TED'S SODDEN BET-MEEN THEM IS
RELATIONSHIP IS NO CONCERN OF
THEIR BUSINESS. OURS. .


CLASSIC PEANUTS


AT LEAsT I DCN'T
THINK YOU WILL.,


IS IT REALLY THE 8EST
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/// SIR, WHY
WOULD I LIE ,
C ( 10 V 'ou-


IF YOU CAN'T TRUST A KIO IN A
5 ANANA SUIT, WHO
^ frUsr?
,lo -



| ^^ Ac: m


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: W equals U
"CDZN NHNIXABN NCFN KRA LVZNF
YRN LDFYVZN AT PNYYDBP ACJ NI, D
MNPDB NVSR JVX KDYR SATTNN VBJ
AMDYWVIDNF." MDCC SAFMX
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It's too bad I'm not as wonderful a person as people
say I am... the world could use a few people like that." Alan Alda
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 8-14


same week as my best
friend, "Darby." We both
have the same amount
to lose, but she is using
an expensive "liquid fast"
combined with a private
personal trainer at a gym.
She has already spent a
few thousand dollars.
I am working complete-
ly on my own, and have
lost 30 pounds. Darby has
lost 32.
She came over to visit
and brought with her
a huge stack of her old
clothes, saying they no lon-
ger fit, but implying they
would fit me! I do weigh a
bit more than she does, but
I am 4 inches taller.
I was offended, but too
shocked to say anything. I
put the clothes in my coat
closet to dispose of later.
What should I have said
to my "friend"? I am really
hurt. INSULTED IN
SAN FRANCISCO
'DEAR INSULTED:
How about this? "Thank
you. Perhaps I can have
them taken in or length-
ened or save them for a
short, fat friend."

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010

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Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
advertiser on the first da y of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Print and Online
www.lailicciiyrcportcr.comi


Legal

STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL
JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAIN-
ING COMMISSION,
Petitioner
vs.
CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, Case
#28886
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHARLES J. WILLIAMS,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that. an Ad-
ministrative Complaint has been
filed against you seeking to revoke
your CORRECTIONAL Certificate
in accordance with Section
943.1395, F.S., and any rules pro-
mulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written
copy of your intent to request a hear-
ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S.
upon Michael Crews, PROGRAM
DIRECTOR, Criminal Justice Pro-
fessionalism Program, Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement, P. 0.
Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before September
29, 2010. Failure to do so will result
in a default being entered against you
to Revoke said certification pursuant
to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule
11B-27, FA.C.
Dated: July 29, 2010
Ernest W. George
CHAIRMAN CRIMINAL JUS-
TICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Cliff Chitwood, Division
Representative
04540848
July 31, 2010
August 7, 14, 21, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2010-158-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
HAZEL V. TRULUCK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Hazel V. Truluck, deceased, whose
date of death was November 22,
2009, File Number 2010-158-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court. for Co-
lumbia County, Probate Division, the
address of which is P.O. Box 2069,.
Lake City, Florida 32056. The names
and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court,
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS AU-
GUST 7, 2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Kyle E. Petteway
23349 Northwest CR 236, Suite 10
High Springs, Florida
32643(386)454-1298
Florida Bar I. D. 0062316
Personal Representative:
Michael S. Breen
1182 SW Truluck Terr.
Ft. White, FL 32038
04541167
August 7, 14, 2010







Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219


Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-479CA
JUDGE: BRYAN
IN RE: Forfeiture of:
One (1) 2004 Ford F-350
VIN: 1FTWW32P04EB78309
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PRO-
CEEDINGS
ALL PERSONS who claim an inter-
est in the following property, 2004
Ford F-350, VIN:
1FTWW32P04EB78309, which was
seized because said property is al-
leged to be contraband as defined by
Sections 932.701 (2)(a)(1-6), Florida
Statutes (2009), by the Department
of Highway Safety and Motor Vehi-
cles, Division of Florida Highway
Patrol, on or about June 24, 2010, in
Columbia County, Florida: Any
owner, entity, bona fide lienholder,
or person in possession of the prop-
erty when seized has the right within
fifteen (15) days of initial receipt of
notice, to contact Sandra R. Coulter,
Assistant General Counsel, Depart-
ment of Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles, 2900 Apalachee Parkway,
Room A-432, Tallahassee, Florida,
32399, by certified mail return re-
ceipt requested to obtain a copy of
the Complaint and Order Finding
Probable Cause filed in the above
styled court.
04541168
August 7, 14, 2010
PUBLIC AUCTION
2005 HD
VIN #IHD1GMW155K301431
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: SEPTEMBER 3,2010
8:00AM
05523544
AUGUST 14, 2010

100 Job
Opportunities

04541248
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a part-time Legal Assistant
position available. Performs
legal secretarial duties including
preparing legal papers and
"correspondence such as
summonses, complaints,
motions, subpoenas and other
pleadings as needed. Additional
support services for a wide
variety of legal functions.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Minimum two
years previous clerical
experience in a legal setting.
Excellent typing and computer
skills required. Applications
may be obtained from any
First Federal Branch and
submitted to Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, Fl. 32056 or email
Turbeville.Jt(Sffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

05523527 M


WORLD AIR SERVICES

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have beep waiting for!
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
Aircraft Mechanics
Aircraft Structural Mechanics
Production Supervisors
Quality Control Manager/
Supervisor/Inspector
Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careers(Spemcoair.com;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at
www.pemcoair.com.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL DRIVER needed.
Must qualify for school board
approval. Call 386-623-3386 for
info and appointment
Green Acres Learning Center
seeking qualified applicants for a
teaching position, preferably with
40 hr DCF training, apply in
person 1126 SW Main Blvd


Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Lve Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746


100 Job
100 Opportunities

Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW,
OFFICE MANAGER.
Local Finance Office looking for
enterprising capable individual,
bookkeeping, filing, other D2D
tasks, good pay, opportunity to
advance. Fax Resume to:
386-755-8608
Saturday Welding Class
Enjoy working outdoors? Like to
earn a good income, have
equipment in need of repair?
Consider Saturday Welding class
at Florida Gateway College. No
high school diploma or GED
needed. Financial aid avail. Call
(386) 754-4214 for details.
Stylist Needed
@ La Fleur de Jeunesse Day Spa.
Following preferred, for more info
call Frances 386-365-1557
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
WAITRESS/WAITER
Experience Required. Apply in
person. Part-time 297 N Marion
Ave. DeSoto Drugs Restaurant

n Sales
Employment

05523543
Route Sales salary and commis-
sion paid, van required,will
train, Please fax resume to
Map Supply, Inc 336-731-2297


120 Medical
1 Employment

05523327
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05523522
HANDS LAKE'
SHORE/LIVE OAK
has the following positions
available:
Marketing Director
Degree in Marketing or related
field with 5+ years marketing
experience in healthcare
industry
Accounts Payable Clerk
High school diploma required.
2-3 years AP experience
preferred
Benefit/Disability
Coordinator
Considerable knowledge of
principles and practices of
personnel administration and
Federal and State laws
governing employment, with
emphasis on FMLA/STD?LTD
managementl-2 years experi-
ence in Human Resources re-
quired. AS degree preferred.

Emergeny Room Director
(Live Oak)
BSN required with 5+ years of
experience in ED Nursing

Patient Access Manager
(Live Oak)
Management of busy patient
registration department.
Responsibilities include
management of staff, patient
flow, registration, collections
and insurance verification. AS
degree preferred, 3-5 years in,
hospital setting with
management experience
required.
FULL TIME -
Physical Therapist
Registered Nurse -
Mother/Baby
Registered Nurse Med/Surg
Registered Nurse ICU
Laboratory Technologist
IT Techs

Competitive salary and
benefit package.

Resumes WITH cover letter
may be faxed to (386)292-8295
or email to
angela .altman@hma.com
EOE, M/F/V/D,
Drug Free Workplace.

Medical Office has an
immediate opening in
the financial department.
F/T, HS Diploma Req.,
Medical Exp. A Must -
Please fax resume to


386-628-9231, Attn: H/R Dept
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


240 SSchools &
240 Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-08/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-09/13/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Amazon Green Female Parrot.
about 6 yrs. old, non-escaper,
clean talk, Ig vocabulary, great
entertainer/companion w/rollling
cage. $400. FIRM 386-752-0347
BEAUTIFUL PUPS
Chocolate Labradors
Registered $350
386-965-2231
Free to good home,
Female Chihuahua 2 yrs old,
spayed,fawn color, very sweet &
lovable 386-755-1034
Lovely Rat Terrier.
3.5 months old
$100.
386-697-9950
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

2 MARES $500 each, gentle,l
mini horse, 1 mustang, both take
saddle and rider, lead well, make
great family horse 386:965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furm. China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
Dishwasher & Stove
$50 EACH
Leave Message 386-344-5706
or 386-344-1783
GE White Washer/Dryer set
Works Good
$225.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Computer Desk
with Hutch top, dark wood,
$35.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Tall Bookshelf
$35.00 obo
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
Youth Bed, metal frame + mat-
tress, head and foot board,
blue in color $135 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


1 Equipment
41 O awn e & arden
Craftsman Riding Mower, 20 hp
turbo cool engine, 42 cut, auto,
runs great, $550 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
High WheelPUSH MOWER.
5.5 engine Runs super!
22" cut. $100.00
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

411 Machinery &
411 Tools
Lrg Craftsman Dbl Tool Box,
with side closets, include name
brand auto tools, $1200 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Fri & Sat. 7:30 -?
Hwy 47 to Woodcrest S/D (Kirby
Road) on SW Woodview Way.
Look for signs. Lots of everything.
Fri/Sat/Sun 8A- 6P,


NEW dresses & p/suits
$35 ea, all sizes 908-472-0651
3720 NW Huntsboro St #101,L. C.
Garage Sale-Sat.only. 8-?
Back to school clothes, furniture,
tanning bed, some antiques
and so much more. 386-344-5772


430 Garage Sales

HUGE SALE
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
695 SE St Johns, Piano,
jewlery,clothing,too much to list.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Saturday 7-noon.
165 SW Morning Glory Dr.
(Rolling Meadows) 5 pc Living
Set, tools, mower & other items.
Saturday Only 8a-12p,
Forest Country on Branford Hwy,
kids clothing/shoes, housewares &
electronics, follow signs


440 Miscellaneous

Air-Pro Air compressor,
tank on wheels,l hp,
$50 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-9840387
Diamond Plate Tool Box
for small truck, in good shape
$60
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 3876-965-2231
Upgraded Running Boards
Rubber covered. Fits Ford truck.
Extended or King cab. $100.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


450 Good Things
450to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


520 Boats for Sale

12' JON Boat. New troll motor
& trailer. Life Jackets, oars &
paddles. $1,500 FIRM.
Cell 386-871-7005. Anytime
14FT. V-HULL ALUMINUM
BOAT With trailer and
trolling motor. $850.
386-755-4247

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1BR/1BATH
Low Deposit Moves you in.
$395 a monthly. Only 1 !
.,.. 86-755-5,488 ... .
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3 bdrm/2bath MH,
N of town, $575 monthly
plus Sec dep,
386-288-6280
3/2 d/w; on 1/2 acre,
all major appliances, included as
well as W/D. Spacious & com-
pletely remodeled. Great location
Asking $650 first, $650 Deposit
Call 305-537-8751
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Clean older 2br/lba MH in park
on Racetrack Rd. Lot #7. CH/A
Washer /Dryer, Ice maker. $425
mo. $100. dep. 386-755-6422
Furnished or Unfurnished Clean
2 &3br's, In quiet, private park.
Large lot Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Inchldes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
SWMH 3/2 on I ac. Very nice.
No pets! Smoke free environment.
Close to town. 650.mo + $500 dep.
386-288-6786
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640n Mobile Homes
0- (for Sale
1978 S/W 2 bdrm, in Paradise
Village MH Park 195 SE Bikini
Dr, Lake City, Lot # 25, 2 blks
from College, great for student,
asking $6,000 OBO 850-295-4717
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824

650 Mobile Home
O & Land
D/W on almost 1/2 acre lot, 3/2,
new AC, appliances included,
$50,000 on Branford Hwy
386-208-0665 or 386-466-2825

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent


Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455


BUY ITfc


kSiLhlT


iailD'1Ii









LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
I or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR APT.
Downtown Location. Clean.
$500 mo. plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755.3456
2BR/2BA w/loft
$650. mo plus security.
Call Michelle
386-752-9626
3 bdrm/2 bath,very clean, no lawn
maint, washer/dryer inside,
$650 month, w/$650 sec,
no pets or smoking, 386-755-3929
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Unfurnished 2br Apt.
w/Gorgeous Lake View. Must see!
Close to shopping. 386-344-2972
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
I From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
S For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
04541176




Unfurnished Rentals
COLUMBIA COUNTY
4BR/2BA- 1,248 sqft
$695mo
2BR/1BA
$495mo
4BR/2B 2,081 sqft
$850mo
2BR/1B- 700sqft
$495mo
4BR/2B 1,248 sqft
$695mo
3BR/1B 936 sqft
$725mo
2BR/1B 896 sqft
$695mo
2BR/1B -915 sqft
$595mo
3BR/2B 1,174sqft
$700mo
4BR/3B 1,536 sqft
$750mo
4BR/2B 2,422 sqft
$1,300mo
3BR/1.5B-1,278sqft
$795mo
MADISON COUNTY
2BR/1B
$450mo
.IENNINGS
4BR/2BA- 1,584 sqft
$625mo
386-719-5600 -
04541182
FOR RENT IN A
GREAT LOCATION
3/2 newer brick duplex,
both units are available.
Approximately 1300 sf. with a
one car garage. A real deal at
only $790./month with
security. Call BJ Federico at
386-365-5884 to schedule your
showing. Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/2ba home for rent in Wise
Estates. Brick exterior, new
flooring, great location. $1100.
mo. Ist,last, & sec. 386-965-8633
4/4 IMMACULATE home for
lease in-pristine neighborhood,
over 4300 sq ft, large kitchen,.fire-
place, lawn maintenance included,
min 1 yr lease, $2500 per month,
contact 386-243-0698
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, fplace, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,150
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-984-9599
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LG 3BR/2BA house
Nice property. $745. mo.
$600 security. Application req'd.
386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,


1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374.
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeffrey. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

750 Business &
S Office Rentals
I055235311
WAREHOUSE SPACE
For Lease near 1-75 in
Cannon Creek.
1247sf w-office,
restroom & utilities included.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757.
Westfield Realty Group.


750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep. Tom 386-
961-1086 DCA Realtor
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft., Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7

805 Lots for Sale
Lot for Sale 2.76 ac, 2.ac. 1.5 ac.
2.5 ac. River Oaks S/D. Timber-
lake S/D. Owner Fianc. Sm down.
386-344-4629 or 344-8929
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children-under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669.9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO 3br/lba block w/metal roof,
carport. New tile & paint. Ready
now. 3 ac units/gas heat. Double
lot, chain link fence w/privacy in
back. Access from Monroe St & St
Johns St, dbl drive gates. Room to
park Ig vehicles. Lg storage bldg
& lg yd. Great family home or in-
vestment rental. Home appraised
/contracted to sell for $71000 in
09. Now.$65000. Drive by 973 SE
Monroe St. then call 352-371-1709
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dt. $433/mo, $49,900
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
SALE/RENT: 3/2 brick ranch. 8.5
ac. 8 mi form LC. 3 fish ponds,
paved road. Owner Financ. $1000.
mo. 386-344-4629 or 344-8929
Sale/Renit: 4/2 Ranch on 6.5 ac.
10 mi SW of LC. Fenced. Remod-
eled, paved/private drive, owner
Finan. $1000. mo 386-344-8929
820 Farms &
SAcreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


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180 East Duval St
Lake City, Florida 32055


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2008 Dodge SLT
4x4 Big Ram
20" Factory rims, Hemi
full power, extra clean.
10,290 mi.
$26,000
Call
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