<%BANNER%>






The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01396
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/11/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01396
System ID: UF00028308:01396
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Scarlett's blues g
Frankly, my dear, your
dress is starting to smell.
Daily Briefing, 2A



Wedne '-'a. '" 'I I -FL




UF FLO6RIDA
Wednesday, August 11,2010 www Iake-citvfg


Massive mats of vegetation


conquer Lake Montgomery


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Charl Mattheus sniffs a handful of vegetation from the south end of Lake Montgomery near his home. 'It doesn't smell foul,'
Mattheus says..'You could tell it's not dead.'


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
W hen Charl
Mattheus
and his
family
moved to
Lake City, they purchased
a home with a view to
Lake Montgomery,
But over the past few
months, Mattheus said,
the view the family so
cherished has turned into
a nightmare of overgrown
vegetation covering most
of the south end of the
lake near their home.
"It's horrible," Mattheus
said of the green and
brown floating vegetation
covering the water near
his home. "We're having
a rough time here. It's
starving the lake of oxy-
gen."
Mattheus also said he's
noticed less visitors on the


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Mattheus uses a pool skimmer to scoop up a clump of growth that has formed around the
banks of Lake Montgomery. 'It's horrible,' Mattheus says.


lake since the canopy of
vegetation began to grow
in the summer.
'We always had two-to-
three boats on the lake at


any given time, but I see
nobody now," he said.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission has also


River Valley
Group was






Campbell


annual convention.


noticed the overabun-
dance of vegetation that
is plaguing the south and
LAKE continued on 3A


Rising Star
University of Florida
hosts media day.
Sports, IB


orter


I Vol. 136, No. 175 E 75 cents


Sticky problem:

Charity group

seeks more PBJ


Catholic Charities
says pantries need
peanut butter.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com .
Catholic Charities is
"Jammin' for PBJ" and
needs community support
to get the ball rolling.
"Jammin' for PBJ" is a
collection drive from now
unfil Aug. 31, said Suzanne
Edwards,
executive
director.
The orga-
nization is
looking for
donations
of peanut
Edwards butter and
jelly.
"It's a main staple for
families with children," she
said. "Right now our pan-
tries are empty."
Peanut butter and jelly
is something that stretches
for the household budget,
Edwards said. Children
enjoy eating it.


This is the third year
Catholic Charities has
held the collection drive,
she said. The drive is not
limited to just individual
donations, and businesses
are challenged to collect as
many jars of peanut butter
and jelly as possible.
- "We're all made up of the
community," Edwards said.
All types of peanut but-
ter or jelly are accepted
as donations. Catholic
Charities also welcomes
monetary donations or
other food items to give to
those in need.
Donations can be dropped
off at Catholic Charities,
258 NW Burk Avenue. Call
(386) 754-9180. Epiphany
Catholic Church, 254
Southwest Malone St., is
also accepting donations.
Groups with large amounts
to donate can call Catholic
Charities for a pick up. Any
donations, food or mone-
tary, are tax deductible.
"It's a small way to get
*involved," Edwards said.
"You don't have to get a lot
to make a big impact."


Residents urge

school board to

create task force


Goal: To increase
involvement of
minority parents.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakec reporter. corn
A taskl force targeting
parental involvement as a
factor to help increase aca-
demic progress for minor-
ity students could material-
ize in Columbia County.
Four county residents
addressed the Columbia
County School Board on the
creation of such task force
and parental involvement at
its meeting Tuesday.
Bea Coker, 35, of Lake
City has asked since March
for the board to form the
task force.
While minority stu-
dents have made annual
yearly progress this past
school year in reading or
inath at three schools -
Richardson Middle, Lake
City Middle and Columbia


High Coker said "scores
are still poor across' the
board" for the county's
minority students.
The charge of the task
force, organized by the
board and made up of
volunteers, would be to
increase parental involve-
ment of minority students'
parents, Coker said.
"It is no myth, it is no
secret, that among minori-
ties, parental involvement
is low," she said. *
Meyonne McAllister, 19,
and Monte Tisbale, 17, both
of Lake City, also said they
were in .favor of the task
force and asked the board
to consider the matter.
Linard Johnson, school
board member, said the for-
mation of a task force is a
priority and a necessity.
While schools already
have extra programs in
place to help students
academically, a "more pin-
SCHOOL continued on 5A


Campbell heads statewide fair industry group


FFEA represents
400 members
and 750 events.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
BONITA SPRINGS
- A local man known for
representing and market-
ing Columbia County has


recently added a new title.
Harvey Campbell,
executive director of the
Columbia. County Tourist
Development Council, was
elected to serve as chair-
man of the Florida Festivals
and Events Association for
the 2010 to 2011 year.
According to the FFEA,
Campbell who was rep-
resenting the Suwannee


Marketing
elected for
the position
at the asso-
ciation's
annual
business
meeting,
which was
held during
the group's


Other officers were also
elected at the meeting,
while some officers had
terms renewed.
According to the FFEA,
the organization exists
to build up the festival,
event and fair industry in
Florida. It has more than
400 members and repre-
sents 750 state events.
Campbell said he has


served on the FFEA
board and is honored to
serve as its new chair-
man.
"That organization is
probably the one that
I hold in the highest
regard in terms of edu-
cation and sharing ideas
and that type of thing
as it relates to festivals
and special events," he


said. "Those activities
are a significant asset to
their area in bringing in
people.
"I feel like that group
is the best way to spend
money and time in terms
of improving our profes-
sionalism and how well
we're able to run events,
obtain sponsors and pro-
mote the events."


1 i . I. I


CALL US:
S(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER.
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


93
T-Storm


Chance


sp


WEATHER, 2A


Opinion
Obicuaries
Ad'ice- & Comics
Puzzles ....
Around Florida ...........


-~ C. ~


DAILY
BRIEFING
F il- 1'n reioperned
in wide Gulf area.


COMING
THURSDAY
'--,it t ?h-e Ilate,,
health-related news.


KILLER


Li


,E











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


- 4


ASH 3 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 0-8-1
Evening: 2-1-5


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 0-5-5-4
Evening: 6-3-7-2


ewimatch-
Monday:
2-5-9-18-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Scarlett's dresses in bad shape


AUSTIN, Texas
It's time to find out if fans of
"Gone With the Wind" frankly
give a damn about the fabu-
lous dresses worn by Vivien
Leigh in the multiple Oscar-
winning Civil War drama.
The Harry Ransom Center at the
University of Texas in Austin is try-
ing to raise $30,000 to restore five of
Scarlett O'Hara's now tattered gowns
from the 1939 film.
The Ransom Center is planning
an exhibit to mark the movie's
75th anniversary in 2014, but at
the moment most of them are too
fragile to go on display, according to
Jill Morena, the center's collection
assistant for costumes and personal
effects.
'There are areas where the fab-
ric has been worn through, fragile
seams and other problems," Moren'a
said. "These dresses have been
under a lot of stress."
The Ransom Center acquired
the costumes including O'Hara's
green curtain dress, green velvet
gown, burgundy ball gown, blue
velvet night gown and her wedding
dress in the.mid-1980s as part
of the collection of "Gone With the
Wind" producer David 0. Selznick.
By then, they had already been
through decades of traveling dis-
plays in theaters and had been on
loan to the Metropolitan Museum of
Art in New York.
"Film costumes weren't meant to
last," Morena said. 'They are only
meant to last through the duration of
filming. You won't find them to be as
finished as if you bought something
off the rack."
The costumes are among the most
famous in Hollywood history and they
played a key role in one of the most
popular films ever. "Gone With the
Wind" won eight Acadamy Awards.
Donations can be made on the
Ransom Center website.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated image provided by the Harry Ransom Center at the University of
Texas in Austin shows 'Gone With The Wind' costume designer Walter Plunkett
holding feathers with a sketch of Scarlett O'Hara's burgundy ball gown on the
table. The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas in Austin says if it
cannot raise $30,000 to restore five of O'Hara's gowns, they may be too fragile to
display at its exhibit to mark the 1939 movie's 75th anniversary in 2014.


Fantasia hospitalized
after 'aspirin' overdose
NEW YORK Fantasia's manag-
er says the singer has been hospital-
ized'in stable condition after taking
an overdose of "aspirin and a sleep
aid."
Brian Dickens said in a statement
Tuesday the former "American
Idol" winner was heartbroken and
S"overwhelmed"
after being named
in a legal filing by a
woman who accused
her of breaking up
her marriage.
Dickens says the
Fantasia 26-year-old Fantasia
is "a fighter and a
survivor" and will be released from
a North Carolina hospital soon.


His statement didn't specify where
Fantasia was taken.

Ex-agent insists Naomi
Campbell lied about gem
LEIDSCHENDAM, Netherlands
- Naomi Campbell's former agent
is denying fabricating her testimony
that the fashion model acknowl-
edged receiving diamonds from
former Liberian President Charles
Taylor, who is on trial for war
crimes. Carole White says she was
present in 1997 when Campbell told
the man who headed the Nelson
Mandela Children's Fund the dia-
monds came from Taylor, who is
accused of trading in conflict dia-
monds in exchange for supporting
rebels in Sierra Leone.
N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Arlene Dahl is 82.
* Actress Anna Massey is
73.
* Songwriter-producer
Kenny Gamble is 67.
* Rock musician Jim Kale
(Guess Who) is 67.
* Country singer John
Conlee is 64.
* Computer scientist and
Apple co-founder Steve
Wozniak is 60.
* Wrestler-actor Hulk Hogan



Daily Scripture


is 57.
* Singer Joe Jackson is 56.
* Rhythm-and-blues musi-
cian Chris Dave is 42.
U.Actress Anna Gunn is 42.
* Actress Ashley Jensen
is 42.
* Rock guitarist Charlie
Sexton is 42.
* Hip-hop artist All Shaheed
Muhammad is 40.
* Actor Will Friedle is 34.
* Singer J-Boog is 25.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at LakeCity, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056. -
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)


Lake City Reporter


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................... $26.32
24 Weeks.................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.40
Rates indude 7% sales tax ,
Mail rates
12 Weeks'.......... .... $41.40
24 Weeks.........:.........$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and
clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Fishing reopened
in wide Gulf area
PANAMA CITY BEACH
- A federal fishing ban
has been lifted in more
than 5,000 square miles in
the Gulf of Mexico along
the Florida Panhandle.
That includes waters
from Pensacola to Cape
San Blas and extending
south into the open Gulf.
National Oceanic
Atmospheric
Administration
Administrator Jane
Lubchenco said Tuesday
that no oil has been
observed in those waters
since July 3. She says
fish caught there haven't
shown any signs of con-
tamination, though testing
would continue..
Federal waters west of
Pensacola remain closed.
Large swaths of the Gulf
have been closed to fishing
since the April 20 explo-
sion on the Deepwater
Horizon. NOAA reopened
waters off the Florida pen-
insula last month.
State waters are open
to fishing, with some
restrictions for crabbing
and shrimping near the
Alabama state line.


Reducing waiting
time for licenses


TALLAHASSEE
- Florida's motor vehicle
agency is trying to cut
waiting times to obtain
and renew driver licenses,
which have increased due
to new federal identifica-
tion requirements and
a budgeting glitch, the
state's top motor vehicle
official said Tuesday.
Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles
executive director Julie
Jones told Gov. Charlie
Crist and the Florida
Cabinet that includes open-
ing offices earlier and clos-
ing them later as well as


f>~ _


01 -'.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Capt. Alicia Paul of Panama City Beach washes the deck
of her charter fishing boat at Treasure-Island Marina near
Panama City Beach Tuesday after officials ended the ban on
commercial and recreational fishing in 5,144 square miles of
federal waters off the Florida Panhandle.


ending a hiring freeze and
sending more personnel
to high-volume stations in
urban areas.
- The changes increased
the number of custom-
ers served in Miami area
offices by 8 percent during
the first week they went
into effect last month,
Jones said.
The new identification
requirements began in
January under a federal
law passed in response to
the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks. Since then Florida
has issued 1.9 million Real
ID licenses.

Missing boater
found dead
FORT PIERCE A
Florida boater died in the
Atlantic ocean after falling
overboard.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission says the man
died while attempting to
put out an anchor after the
motor stopped inside an
inlet.
The boater didn't have a
life jacket on when he was
swept out in the ocean by
an outgoing tide.
The body was found
Tuesday morning, hours


after he was reported-over-
board by one of two other
female passengers in the
boat.

Elderly woman
dies in car crash
ORLANDO An
Orlando woman is dead
and three people, including
two children, are injured
following a crash involving
three vehicles in central
Florida.
The Florida Highway
Patrol says 79-year-old
Santos Ledee was driving
in Orlando when he made
a left turn and collided
with another vehicle. The
second car then struck a
third vehicle.

Girl, 8, injured
in ATV crash
NAVARRE An 8-
year-old girl was seriously
injured after crashing an
ATV into a brick home
in north Florida. The girl
was driving the ATV early
Tuesday around her own
home when the crash
occurred. She was wearing
a helmet. She was flown to
a Pensacola hospital.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


1, CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE .' CHANCE CHANCE
I -STORMS -STORMS STORMS T-STORMS -STORMS


HI 993 LO 75 HI 94 LO75 HI 94 L076 HI 94 LO 76 HI 94 O076


I WWszI


Pensacola
94/79'


Valdosta
94/75
Tallahassee Lake City,
94/77 93/75
', Gainesville *
SPanama City ,2/75
2/77 Ocala *
,92/76


Tamna 0e


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


90
75
90
71
98 in 1925
67 in 2008

0.08"
1.62"
33.79"
2.15"
32.28"


ty
lacksoH0le Cape Canaveral
92/76 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
9^7 Galnesvlle
0 Jacksonville
S* Key West
iando Cape Canaveral Key West
377 /77 Lake City
Miami


West Palm Beach
90/77 *
"^ FLt.LauderdalO
FL Myerst. 90/78 0
91/77 ? Naples .
S91/77 Miami
Key West /77
90/82


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrse tom.
Sunset tornm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:55 a.m.
8:16 p.m.
6:56 a.m.
8:15 p.m.

8:36 a.m.
9.14 p.m.
9:45 a.m.
9:50 p.m.


Aug. Aug. Sept. Sept.
16 24 1 8
First Full Last New


Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


10

10mnitestob n
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Thursday
88/78/t
92/78/t
90/80/t
92/78/t
S92/75/t
95/76/t
89/80/t
94/75/t
91/79/t
92/77/t
93/76/t
94/77/t
92/79/t
93/80/t
95/77/t
92/79/t
94/75/pc
90/77/t


Friday
90/78/t
92/78/pc
91/81/pc
93/79/pc
93/76/pc
94/77/t
89/81/t
94/76/pc
92/79/t
92/78/pc
93/76/pc
94/78/pc
91/78/t
95/81/pc
95/77/t
92/80/pc
96/76/pc
91/79/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
-Channel.



weather.com


- j Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 0 2010 Weather Central
SLLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


.r


"God is our refuge and
strength, an ever-present help
in trouble."
Psalm 46:1


AROUND FLORIDA


I


FM In


,,.--, ~ ~~


.i lllll ml


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


.' Yr. vo. :., :" 1 .


,4


92/









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


DePratter's plan:

Stimulate local

j economic growth


Young artists display work after joining art program
Participants in the Young Da Vinci Art Program display their work during their last class at the Columbia County Public
Library West Branch. The program was sponsored by the library and the Art League of North Florida.



LAKE: Fish kill in 2007 annihilated grass carp


Continued From Page 1A
central areas of the lake.
The agency's freshwater
fish biologists are formu-
lating a plan to attack the
submerged vegetation,
which is mainly southern
naiad and coontail.
Karen Parker, public
information coordina-
tor for FWC's North
Central region, said this t
is not the first time Lake
Montgomery has expe- t
rienced a problem with F
excessive vegetation. (
"It happened years
ago," she said. 'That's
when they first put the a
grass carp in there, but 1
it's been quite a few years t
back."
The FWC introduced t
triploid grass carp into g
the lake to eat and control i
the vegetation. In 2007, a
fish kill struck the area, t
decimating the grass I
carp population. The trip- t
loid carp are sterile and t
unable to reproduce. a
"They are imported
from Asia and you have to f
have a permit for them," t
Parker said. 'They've r


OBITUARIES

Vera Marie Duncan
Vera Marie Duncan 81, went to
be with her Lord and Savior Jesus
Christ on August 9, 2010 follow-
ing a brief ill-
ness. She was
born in Nettle-
ton, Arkansas
S on October
8, 1928. Af-
ter graduating
in 1945 from
Nettleton High
SSchool as Valedictorian, she con-
tinued her education at Arkansas
State University graduating in
1949 with a Bachelor of Science
degree with a major in Business
Administration and a minor in
Social Science and Education.
She was a charter member of the
Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority and
worked in the college Business
Office for six years. Marie mar-
ried Alya Duncan in 1951 and
moved with him and their two
children to Lake City, FL in 1957.
She was employed with the State
of Florida as a Social Worker.
Marie also served as Second Vice
President on the Lake Shore Hos-
pital Auxiliary. She was a mem-
ber of First Baptist Church where
she served many years as a book-
keeper, a Sunday School teacher
and a librarian. Her n'ain interest
were reading and traveling. She
was a loving and devoted wife,
mother, grandmother and great
grandmother. She and Alva were
married for 58 years before he
went to be with Jesus in Janu-
ary, 2010. She leaves behind her
daughter Sharon Kirby (Garland),
her son, Mark Duncan (Sherry),
two grandsons, Chris Duncan
* (Andrea) and Sean Duncan (Am-
ber) and one great granddaughter,
Taylor Duncan. One sister, Kay
Allen, from Germantown, TN.,
also survives. In lieu of flowers,
the family request that donations
be made to Suwannee Valley Ha-
ven Hospice, 6037 W. US High-
way 90, Lake City, FL 32055 or
First Baptist Church, 182 NE Jus-
tice Street, Lake City, FL 32025.
Memorial Services will be held
on Thursday, August 12, 2010 at
11:00 a.m. in the chapel at Gate-
way Forest Lawn Funeral Homes
with Pastor Steven Ahrens of-
ficiating, Visitation will be held
from 10:00 11:00 a.m. on the
day of the memorial service. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of GATEWAY FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 U.S. Hwy. 441 S., Lake
City, FL 32025, (386)752-1954.
Please sign our guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.corn

S Obituaries are paid advertise-
, ments. For details, call the Lake
t City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


"It happened years ago.That's
when they first put the grass carp
in there, but it's been quite
a few years back."
Karen Parker
Public information coordinator
FWC North Central Region


been genetically altered
at the hatchery to keep
hem from spawning in
Florida waters. If they
did spawn, the population
would grow to the point
where they would destroy
ill the vegetation in the
ake and we don't want
hat."
Parker said she was
old by fisheries biolo-
gists who visited the site
n March that vegetation
was beginning to grow on
he south end of the lake.
Now, during the summer,
he vegetation has grown
o six-feet tall in some
areas.
"It's a problem in the
act we want some vegeta-
ion in there because it
provides some cover for


the fingerlings, provides
oxygen in the water, and
removes nutrients from
the water. However, if it
gets too thick, the organic
matter can collect on the
bottom of the lake and
basically kill the lake,"
Parker said.
Fisheries biologists
estimate about 35 percent
of the lake is covered with
the mass of floating vegeta-
tion.
'We'd like to reduce that
down to about 15 percent,"
Parker said. "The vegeta-
tion has gotten extremely
thick. Biologists will try
to reduce the vegetation.
They don't want to get rid
of all of it They're looking
at using a blue dye, which
will basically reduce the


OB,' YN

DA NA GREENE,_MD
.WOMEN'S H t AI H W H A WOMAN'S I TOUCH




b..... ,;







*Meet with a provider the day you come in
eSame day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Crisis Center
*Free pregnancy tests
SCall for appt. Monri.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance









Fall Leagues



Now Forming
Mens Womens Mixed Seniors
Sign up today and you'll have a
weekly reservation for fun.


Saturday Homing


Youth League RegistMtion


August 1 -L15


Z-Aupm

hike city
iiJIA jll ~ g g 'BJil




flV LLUU


amount of light that filters
through the water. This
will reduce the amount
of vegetation in the lake.
Once the dye treatment
is completed they will.
restock the grass carp
back into the lake."
The dye treatment
will be done in the near
future.
Officials expect 40-45
gallons of dye would be
needed for the treatment
,of the lake.
Lake Montgomery con-
sists of 36 acres and the
treatment is expected to
cost about $5,000.
"We expect to do it
within the next month,"
Parker said. "It takes
about six months for the
dye to do its job, then the
grass carp will be added."


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Stimulating local eco-
nomic growth and pro-
moting Columbia County
are just a few of Rusty
DePratter's goals to accom-
plish if he is elected.
DePratter, 51, is running
forthe County Commission
District 2 seat.
Asked why he is seeking
office, DePratter replied,
"To try
to make
things bet-
ter."
"I just
believe in
good eth-
ics and
DePratter honesty,"
DePratter
said, "and to find solu-
tions, not excuses."
He and his wife, Cori,
have two children -
Ethan, 21, and Katelyn,
18. DePratter also has a
stepson, Jeremy Fisher,
26.
DePratter said being
self-employed through his
business, North Florida
Fence Company, for the
past 19 years has allowed
him to gain experience in
the business world.
He said the county
runs through budgets,
contracts and bids, all of
which he is familiar with.
The most important
issue currently facing
the county is the reces-
sion and how to deal
with it locally, DePratter


said.
"I think somebody's got
to step up and have ideas
of how to start address-
ing it," he said.
If elected, DePratter
said his priorities for
District 2 include
establishing a district
sheriff's office in Fort
White and ensuring
adequate fire and res-
cue services in the dis-
trict's south end.
Another priority is
promoting the county
and Lake City through
the Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council to .attract new-
comers to relocate to
the area, he said.
"That is a main fac-
tor to revitalizing our
local environment,"
DePratter said. "It's
because of the great
place that we live. Lake
City has a lot, it's a very
good place to live."
DePratter said he h.,s
attended county meet-
ings and read the Lake
City Reporter for more
than 20 years to stay
current on area issues.
He said he is willirg
to work with other com-
missioners and will give
all the time needed to
the county commission
seat if elected.
"This is an elected
position, but it is a
paid job," he said, "and
you're paid to devote
all time necessary to
get the job done."


r

;... We can see you today '- NEW

or tomorrow...: Patient *
. ..P.mt rienl tl


OPEN REGISTRATION
ENDS
August 20
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS)


ADD/DROP
August 23-27
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS)
ALL FEES ARE DUE EACH DAY

Registrar's Office Hours:
8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday
8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday

Now August 13
7:30 a.mri.- 6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday


Semester

YOU MAY ACCESS SCHEDULE
INFORMATION ONLINE AT:
www.fgc.edu



FLORIDA
AA GATEWAY
4 COLLEGE


FOR INFORMATION CALL:
Registrar: (386) 754-4205 Admissions: (386) 754-4396

Florida Gateway College does not discriminate in education or employment related decisions on the basis of race, color, religion,
national origin, gender, age, disability, marital status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status in accordance with
the law. The Equity Officer is Sharon Best, director of human resources, and may be reached at
(386) 754-4313, Building 001, Room 136, 149 SE College Place, Lake City, FL 32025.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














OPINION


Wednesday,August I I, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Enhancing

security the

right thing

for Florida

Safeguarding Florida's
most at-risk popula-
tions children, the
elderly and the men-
tally challenged is
no task to be taken slightly.
That's why a slight, but signifi-
cant, change in the way caregiv-
ers are required to submit to
background checks is a good
thing for our community.
As of Aug. 1, Florida law
mandates that people hired to
work as caregivers with either
children or adults undergo a
Level 2 security check, includ-
ing electronic fingerprinting.
Although the fingerprinting
system and the law it supports
are currently snagged by tech-
nical challenges, when it's fully
operational it could prove to be
a lifesaver. That's because turn-
around time the time from.
which an employee is hired to
the date a background check is
finalized will be dramatically
reduced, and in many cases
instantaneous.
The challenge now before
the state is two-fold. One is to
ensure the system is fully oper-
ational as soon as possible, and
in any case no later than 2012,
the year the full effect of the
law takes place. The second is
to ensure that small caregiver
operations aren't priced out of
business by requiring signifi-
cantly higher security check
fees.
So far, it looks like the
state legislature is on board
with both of these needs. We
hope they stay the course
because enhanced background
checks are the right thing to,
and the right time to begin
them is now.

HIG H LIG H TS
IN HISTORY
Today is Wednesday, Aug.
11, the 223rd day of 2010.
There are 142 days left in the
year.
N On Aug. 11, 1965, rioting
and looting that claimed 34
lives broke out in the predomi-
nantly black Watts section of
Los Angeles.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of '
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LET
PO


TERS
LICY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two.
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Offering a prayer for my mother


On the eve of what
would have been
her 85th birthday,
I went to church to
give thanks for all
that my mother was to me, and
all that she was not
There are things we want to
remember about those we love,
and things we'd rather forget.
But to understand the whole, it
helps to have all its parts.
My mother was a 5,000-piece
jigsaw puzzle. More than a few
of those pieces are missing.
She's been gone 15 years and
still, for some reason, I keep
trying to fit them together.
Pulling into the church park-
ing lot, I cut off another late-
comer and grabbed the last
space within survival distance
of the door. (In the desert, in
August, when it's 109, every
inch counts.)
As I unfolded the sunshade
and nearly lost my religion
trying to wedge it against the
windshield, I suddenly felt my
face wrinkle up in a grin. If my
mother could only see me now,
she'd be spinning in her grave.
This was not, to put it mildly,
a place of worship she would
have chosen for me. For one
thing, it was not Southern
Baptist, the denomination in
which I was "raised right"; it
was Lutheran, of all things,
which in her freely offered
opinion would have been about
as godly as spending Sunday
morning at Walmart.
Second, and more important,
it was not located in the small
Southern town where I grew up,
and where she lived most of her


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com
life until she died; it was in Las
Vegas, of all places,, where I now
make my home, a fact that, had
she known, would've confirmed
her greatest fear that I'm either
a heathen or just plain crazy.
We didn't often see anything'
eye-to-eye, she and I. And yet I
long to see her more clearly.
I slipped into the back row
near the end of the first hymn,
and tried to hum the tune. It
wasn't really a hymn, at least,
not one of the ones I learned as
a child, the ones my mother and
her sisters sang on the porch.
In all my childhood memo-
ries, I can hear their voices,
singing, laughing, swapping
stories, fighting like a pack of
feral cats.
Born in the midst of nine
girls, my mother had little
chance to feel "special." She
married my father at 15, bore
the first of four children at 17,
and became a grandmother
at 36. She never finished high
school, but earned an education
in what she called the "school
of hard knocks," worked as a
waitress and a mill hand most of
her life.
I know her history dates,
places, marriages, facts about
as well as I know my own.


But I know little of what went
on in her heart. The pieces are
all scattered and frayed.
I remember how she fought
to keep my blind brother in
school until he learned to read
Braille.
I recall once seeing her eyes
well up when we passed on the
street a man she had loved.
I can still feel the brush of
her hand on my hair the day I
left home to go off to college.
And I will never forget that
light, how she shined, when I
came home;after years away to
introduce her to my first child.
I don't know why some things
were so hard for her. Like say-
ing "I love you," or "I'm proud
of you," or "I'm sorry I hurt
you" things she wanted to
say, but struggled to find the
words.
Those were some of the
pieces she took with her to her
grave,
What I do know about my
mother- and what I hope my
children will say of me, too is
that she did the best she could.
That is my prayer for her
85th birthday, in this "heathen"
church in Sin City, of all places,
where it's 109 in the parking lot
and they serve wine, not grape
juice, for communion.
I want her to know she did
her best. I may be crazy, but
I'm no heathen. Grace is suf-
ficient for any sin. We all do the
best we can. And sometimes it's
'enough.


N Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,


M OR g
S PEND IN


LETTERS TO

No wiggle room,
Illegal is illegal
To the Editor:
We send millions of dollars
and thousands of highly trained
troops to Afghanistan to work
to establish a safe and free
country for the Afghan people.
At the same time, President
Barack Obama treats the people
of Arizona as if they were some
terrible enemy of America.
Obama treats Iran with greater
respect than he does Arizona.
What part of "illegal immi-
gration" does Obama and our
federal government not under-
stand? It has always been my
understanding that if something
was illegal, the law requires that


THE EDITOR

act to cease. Sometimes an indi-
vidual may go to jail or prison
for committing an illegal act.
However, Obama supports the
flooding of illegal immigrants
into the United States. Arizona
has become very much like a
third world country. The people
of Arizona live in fear of their
lives and the safety of their
property. A large number of the
people entering our country via
the Mexican border are crimi-
nals and drug traffickers.
We have been advised that
seven South American countries
support Mexico in their protest
against Arizona. When did for-
eign countries gain the right
to dictate policies and laws for


the United States? Is it possible
that some of these countries are
doing as Fidel Castro did for
Cuba in the 1960s and are emp-
tying their prisons and jails by
shipping their criminals to us?
How can the president of the
United States, who has taken
a solemn oath to protect every
citizen and every state in our
great union, support such activ-
ity? We should be defending
and supporting Arizona. It is
inconceivable that our president
would have the audacity to sue
one of our states, especially in
favor of a foreign country! May
G6d have mercy on Arizona,
and on America.
Jacquelyn B. Hunter
Lake City


Tom Mayer
tmayer@lakecityreportercom

Random

acts of

kindness

on 3 fronts

in a naughty world,"
said Portia in Act
V of Shakespeare's
"Merchant of Venice."
"So shines a good deed in
Columbia County," more than
one of you said to me in refer-
ence to a challenge I offered
last week in this space.'
Give me, I wrote, examples
of people in our all-too-self-
ish society performing acts of
kindness and generosity.
Three reports rise to the
.top.
An old man shuffling
down CR 242 in 90-plus degree
heat is asked if he wants a
ride. He slips into the air-
conditioned car and tells the
driver he is headed to the
"package store." The old man
is delivered to his destination.
Judgment is not
An expensive library book
is found outside a book drop.
It is picked up and properly
returned.
A man with his worldly
belongings surrounding his
table at a fast food restaurant is
sipping from a used paper cup.
A bag of food is dropped off at
his table, no questions asked.
No thanks required.
Random acts of kindness
surround us daily, don't'they?
Political season
And on the subject of kind-
ness, it was my honor to meet
recently with almost every can-
didate in our local contested
political races.
Although each candidate
presented a unique perspec-
tive on the needs of Lake City
and Columbia County, the
one commonality our editorial
board heard was this: "I want
to make things better."
Some of those people run-
ning for office had specific
plans, and others were able
to discourse in more general
terms, but every individual
who had chosen the daunting
task of entering a political con-
test did it to make the county
they shared with their families,
friends and neighbors the best
place it can be.
Such a commitment goes
beyond simple kindness to an
altruistic spirit that is, fortu-
nately, not as rare as it some-
times seems.
Back to school
Students at Epiphany
Catholic School begin classes
this week, and the rest of the
county isn't far behind. An
interesting story we ran in
Sunday's paper detailed the ris-
ing cost of school supplies.
Gone are the days, as one
woman we interviewed for the
story said, when all you need-
ed to get through the school
day was a pencil and paper.
Now, a major merchant
association estimates that'
parents will spend an average
100 outfitting a student with
school supplies. As parents
of advanced grade students
know, it only goes up from
there. When a TI-84 graphing
calculator tops out at $129, you
know you're in for some major
expense.
Fortunately, there are sev-
eral organizations that will
again this year offer a back-
pack full of supplies to children
who need them. We've already
published several stories with
details, and we'll continue to
publish that information in our
Community Calendar as the
separate events draw near.
Thank you to those groups
and individuals that are once
more donating in time of
increasing need.
Tom Mayer is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


200 incoming freshmen roar at Tiger Camp

By ANTONIA ROBINSON The camp featured ice "Our group was up here
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com breaker games, a tour scav- during the work week." 17 A
enger hunt and more. This year's Tiger Camp -
After attending Tiger "We brought them all was a lot more sociable -


Camp, 15-year-old
Daquesha Pough of Lake
City is looking forward to a
new school year.
"It looks like I'll have a
good year," she said.
More than 200 incom-
ing freshmen attended the
annual orientation Tuesday
at Columbia High School.
Tiger Camp is designed
to help incoming freshmen
become familiar with the
school, said Jill Hunter,
director of student activi-
ties. It is separate from the
regular school orientation.
"We want them to feel
more comfortable with
their first day of school,"
she said.


back together for their
first freshman pep rally,"
Hunter said.
Pough said Tiger Camp
was fun and exciting.
"There was a lot of spir-
it," she said.
She said she was nervous
about starting high school,
but the camp helped ease
some fears.
"I'm excited," Pough
said. "It made me feel like
it will be fun every day."
The Student Government
Association and class offi-
cers coordinated Tiger
Camp.
'"We worked really hard,"
said Katherine Mathis,
Tiger Camp organizer.


from what she heard, she
said.
It was fun meeting new
people at Tiger Camp, said
Lorrae Blalock, 14, of Lake
City.
"Everybody will get to
know each other," she
said.
In addition to new friends,
students learned 'the ins
and outs of the school.
"They know where
everything is now," Mathis
said.
Students who attended
Richardson and Lake City
Middle School come togeth-
er for the same focus.
'"We're all tigers now,"
Hunter said.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High School Student Government Association dance at a pep rally
during Tiger Camp Tuesday. Tiger camp is an orientation program for incoming freshmen at
the school.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen- .
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.
Monday, Aug. 9
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Alicia A Lehman,
23, 21 Sandra Lane,
Portsmouth, Va., warrant-
Violation of probation on
original charge of grand
theft.
Shauntell Levon Hall,
35, 7544 Patrice Court,
Jacksonville, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of petit
theft.
Donald D. Meisky Jr.,
45, 495 SW Atlas St., Fort
White, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of cruelty to ani-
mals.
Coeta Michelle
Robinson, 28, 61.5 NE
Broadway Ave., warrant
Aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon (three
counts) and battery (two
counts).
Terrence Demar
Smith, 24, 199 NE James
Ave., warrant Aggravated
assault, felony criminal'
mischief, battery and war-
.rant. Violation of probation



SCHOOL
From Page 1A

pointed effort" needs to be
born to meet the task force
request he said.
Johnson suggested
authorizing Keith Couey,
director of student, family
and employee relations, to
recruit for the task force.
Mike Millikin, superin-
tendent of schools, said the
district will begin work on
School Advisory Council
formations at each school
to continue to tackle the
parental involvement issue
surrounding minority stu-
dent performance. Johnson
stressed he thought it
would take more than that
Keith Hudson, board
member and chairman,
said citizen comments are
beneficial. Coker has been
relentless on her task force
suggestion, he said, a char-
acteristic that is causing
change.
"As a result from that,
I can see this moving for-
ward," Hudson said.
Also on Tuesday:
Joseph George, 47,
Annie Mattox Recreation
Center Inc. Board of
Trustees member,
addressed the board on
what the district is doing
to involve parents and the
community in students'
lives.
Johnson and Millikin
called for the board to
meet for a State of the
School meeting at Niblack
Elementary to address
areas of need to improve
the school's performance.
Niblack dropped in its
school grade from an A
to a D in the 2009 to 2010
school year, the furthest
drop in the district.


on original charge of bat-
tery.
Tuesday, Aug. 10
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jeremy R. Randles,
34, 358 NW Yates Loop,
criminal mischief (damage
to county vehicle), battery
on law enforcement officer,
burglary of conveyance,
aggravated battery, theft,
disorderly intoxication,
disturbing the peace and
resisting arrest with vio-
lence.

i From staff reports.


Feds: Storms delay drilling for final BP plug


By JEFFREY COLLINS
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS An
approaching tropical
depression forced crews to
suspend drilling Tuesday
on the final stretch of a
relief well aimed at shoot-
ing a permanent under-
ground plug into BP's
busted oil well in the Gulf
of Mexico.
Retired- Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen said the
suspension could mean a
delay of two or three days
in completing the relief


" NEW GYMNASTICS GYM

S'llee I's
Gymnastics
U Of Live Oak is now in Lake City
nilGSjS Tom Cheek, owner and coach invites
S .A r everyone to come check us out.
3228 NW HWY 41
[3 miles from Hardees]
cell 205-8363 or 590-2519


^ Stece MMarc


IKazmierski

SFor County Commissioner

DO district 2


Gulffof Mexico from the effect of the oilsp.il




Why pay daycare when you
can have your child in an
Accredited Educational Program?

THE BLAKE SCHOOL
since 1967
Open for Registration
2010-2011 School Year

Starting at age 3,
Successfully educating students
Through the 12th

Accredited by
A.I.S.F., S.A.C.S. & N.C.P.S.A.

Call today 386-752-8874


well, one of the last steps
toward ending any threat
from the well that spewed
more than 200 million
gallons of oil over three
months before a temporary
cap sealed it in mid-July.
Crews will pop in a tem-


porary plug to keep what
they've drilled so far safe,
but they won't send work-
ers back to land. They have
about 30 to 50 feet left to
drill.
The relief well is meant
to allow BP PLC to pump


mud and cement into the
broken one from deep
underground for a so-called
bottom kill, a permanent
seal that would comple-
ment a mud and cement
plug injected into the top of
the well last week.


MATTRESS OUTLET



THE BEST BRANDS AT THE BEST PRICES


By advertising in the
Lake City Reporter, The
Icy Hut has brought
in new customers
looking for a cool
and refreshing treat
on these hot summer
days.


Making the Reporter a part of our
advertising plan was a positive to our
business. People that looked at our
store while driving by and others that
didn't know about The Icy Hut are no
longer strangers. They have become
our regular customers. We thank all of
our customers and the Reporter for all
of your support.


L C-


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CU RRENTS Magazine


I"ome of the Italian Icy!
101 N. MarionAve., Lake City
en o. at .m. to 7 .
a,. 364-4532 m


GW V 1% W
I- v 10-..No"
Mon-Fri 10-6 Sat 10-5
***EXPRESS DELIVERY AVAILABLE ** -

BED BEDS BEDS


FOR THE ICY HUT


Find out ways to grow
your customer base
by calling 752-1293.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


~Xlo~









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims

Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


/ grew up on the Gulf Coast. I know these waters. And I'm
doing everything I can to clean them up.
Fred Lemond, BP Cleanup Operations

BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And that
includes keeping you informed.

Searching For And Cleaning Up The Oil
You may have heard that oil is no longer flowing into the Gulf. But
every morning our spotter planes and helicopters continue to
search for oil off the coast, heading to areas previously mapped
with satellite imagery and infrared photography. If oil is found, they
radio down to the ships and boats of all sizes that are supporting.
the cleanup effort and working to collect the oil. These are local
shrimping and fishing boats organized into task forces and strike
teams, plus specialized skimmers mobilized from around the world.

We have recovered more than 35 million gallons of oil-water
mixture from the Gulf. Other methods have also helped remove
millions of additional gallons of oil from the water. We've deployed
millions of feet of boom to protect beaches and sensitive
wildlife areas.

Hurricane Preparedness
In the event of a hurricane, our first priority is keeping people safe.
In coordination with the Coast Guard and local officials, we may
suspend operations temporarily but have organized to resume
them as soon as possible.

Our Responsibility
We have already spent more than $3.9 billion responding to the
spill and on the cleanup, and none of this will be paid by taxpayers.
We will work in the Gulf as long as it takes to get this done. We
may not always be perfect but we will do everything we can to
make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP, E&P


bp










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, August I 1, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FALCONS FOOTBALL
Fall practice
begins today
Lake City Middle
School football practice
begins at 5:30 p.m. today.
Physical and consent
forms are required.
For details, call coach
Billy Jennings at
984-6281.
CHS VOLLEYBALL
Junior varsity
tryouts Thursday
Columbia High junior
varsity volleyball tryouts
are 4-6 p.m. Thursday.
Participants must bring
a copy of their up-to-date
physical.
For details, contact
coach Casie McCallister ,
at casiek32@hotmail.com.
CHS GOLF
Boys meeting
set for Thursday
A meeting for boys
interested in trying
out for the Columbia
High golf team is 1 p.m.
Thursday in the Career
Center at the school.
For details, call coach
Steve Smithy at 365-4436.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Little League
sign-up Saturday
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
has youth football
registration scheduled
for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, and Aug. 21
and Aug. 28 at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Ages are 8-13, with
Sept. 1 the cutoff date,
and two leagues are
offered. Cost is $40.
A mandatory coaches
clinic for the league is
9 a.m. to noon Saturday
at Teen Town.
FDLE background
checks are due at the
coaches clinic.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607 or e-mail
christieh@lcfla. com.

Boys Club flag
football sign-up
Registration is under
way for the Boys Club
of Columbia County's
flag football program.
The program is for ages
6-7, and 8-year-olds
who weigh less than 66
pounds.
Practice is twice
weekly at the club and
games are on Saturday.
Cost is $40.
For details, call the
club at 752-4184.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fall league
registration set
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has fall season sign-up
set for 5-7 p.m. Friday,
and Aug. 20 and
Aug. 27, and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, and
Aug. 21 and Aug. 28
at Southside Sports
Complex.
Fee of $50 includes
jersey, hat, socks and
insurance. Ages for the
five leagues range from
5-6 coach pitch to 13-15.
A parent or guardian
must come to the
registration and provide
a birth certificate.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810 or
Kevin Stalters at
623-9497.


* From staff reports


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Dec. 5, 2009, file photo shows Alabama coach Nick Saban reacting after a 32-13 win
over Florida in the NCAA college football SEC championship game at the Georgia Dome in
Atlanta.


Southeastern
Conference rules
football world.
By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
ATLANTA Excuse the
Southeastern Conference if
it views the national cham-
pionship race as a rather
private affair neighbor
against neighbor, battling
it out through the fall until
there are only two teams'
left standing, setting up. a
final showdown in Atlanta
on the first Saturday. in
December.
Oh sure, there's still that'
little formality known as the
BCS championship game.
But down in Dixie, that
extra contest is viewed as
nothing more than a chance
to really rub it in, just in


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida wide receiver Andre Debose answers'questions for reporters at the University of Florida media day on
Tuesday in Gainesville.

Debose returns after season-ending injury


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
GAINESVILLE To say that
Florida lost a lot when they lost true
freshman Andre Debose to a season-
ending injury before the start of the
2009 season is questionable.
Still, a lot was made of the her-
alded recruit as he stepped foot into


the Florida Gators football program
last fall. Debose was one of the stars
of Florida's media day on Tuesday, as
he has been' throughout much of the
spring and summer.
Much is expected of him in his
first season in action, as the player
who has been dubbed the next Percy
Harvin finally steps onto the field.
"I feel like it's been a blessing in


disguise in many ways," Debose said.
"Coming in as a freshman having a
lot of hype, it kind of calmed things
down. I'm really enjoying how things
are without all the hype."
The hype hasn't been as persis-
tent around Debose this fall, and
he can get back to playing football.
GATORS continued on 3B


case anyone wishes to defy
this indisputable gospel:
When it comes to college
football, the SEC is SECond
to none.
"Every team in the con-
ference takes pride in being
in the SEC, and we're not
afraid to say that," Arkansas
tight end D.J. Williams said.
"We feel like we're in the
best conference, and that's
where the best competi-
tion is. Not to take anything
away from great teams
in other conferences, but
that's just how we feel as a
conference."
The case is compelling.
The last four national
champions have come
from the same conference:
Florida; LSU, Florida again,.
then Alabama last season
- a streak of dominance
SEC continued on 3B


Tigers

hard

at work

Howard high on
Quarterbacks'
development.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Coach Craig Howard is
hoping the old saying that
players are made in the
spring and summer holds
true for Columbia High
football. After losing record
breakers from last year's
team, the Tigers come into
fall largely untested at key
positions.
"I think there's a lot of
work to do to get the young
guys old and fast," he said.
"We're playing the big bad
wolves right off the bat.
Fort White beat us, and
then we have the Brooks
County (Ga.) game. There's.
no rest for the weary."
Howard's goal is that the
long days of summer will
make the games in the fall
easy.
"We've got to do labor,"
he said. "We're punching
the clock in August. There's
no school, so we devote the
day to football. The kids
have to come with their
flashlight and their lunch
bucket."
The idea is to have the
freshman operating on a
varsity level by the time
the kickoff classic arrives
against the Indians.
CHS continued on 3B


Jaguars scrimmage

Falcons in Atlanta


Jacksonville seeks
to improve pass
rush in practice.
By GEORGE HENRY
Associated Press
FLOWERYBRANCH, Ga.
- Jacksonville quarterback
David Garrard moved his
offense easily through the
Atlanta Falcons' defense.,
Atlanta quarterback Matt
Ryan was just as impres-
sive against the Jaguars'
defense, and Jacksonville
coach Jack Del Rio could
not turn away.
Maybe Ryan and Garrard
were just having good prac-
tices. Maybe the Jaguars'
and Falcons' defenses will
improve this season.
Or maybe both teams are


still trying to solve some
of the -problems that kept
Jacksonville and Atlanta out
of the playoffs last season.
Del Rio didn't know that
Garrard completed all of
his passes in red zone drills
because he was watching
the Jaguars' defense on
another field.
"Glad to hear that," Del
Rio said. "I didn't get a look
over there. We were spend-
ing a lot of time over here
dealing with Matt Ryan."
Falcons coach Mike
Smith thought his run
defense was solid, but there
are still too many gaps in
zone coverage, and some
players are too slow in their
route progressions.
"We've been seeing the
JAGS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars cornerback Scotty McGee (30) hits Atlanta Falcons receiver Brian
Finneran (86) during NFL football training camp at the Atlanta Falcons Training Complex on
Tuesday in Flowery Branch, Ga.. The Jaguars are in town to scrimmage the Falcons.


Second to none


I -










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S.Women'sAmateur
Championship, first round matches, at
Charlotte, N.C.
LITTLE LEAGUE
Noon
.ESPN2 Playoffs, Great Lakes
Regional Semifinal, at Indianapolis
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, Southeast Regional
Semifinal, at Warner Robins, Ga.
4 p.m.
,ESPN2 Playoffs, Great Lakes
Regional Semifinal, at Indianapolis
6 p.m.
*ESPN2 Playoffs, Southeast Regional
Semifinal, at Warner Robins, Ga.
-MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN N.Y.Yankees at Texas
WGN Minnesota at ChicagoWhite
Sox
SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Girls, Big League World
Series, championship game, at Kalamazoo,
Mich.

BASEBALL

AL .standings


New York
Tampa Bay
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore

Chicago
Minnesota
Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas Cit


East Division
W L
69 42
68 44
S64 49
59 52
38 74
Central Division
W L
63 49
63 49
54 58
47 65,
ty 47 65
West Division


W L Pct GB
Texas 64 47 .577 -
Oakland 56 55 .505 8
Los Angeles 57 57 .500 8'b
Seattle 43 70 .381' 22
Monday's Games
Boston 2, N.Y.Yankees I
Baltimore 3, Chicago White-Sox 2,
10 innings
Tampa Bay 6, Detroit 3
*LA.Angels 6, Kansas City 4
Seattle 3, Oakland I
Tuesday's Games
.Baltimore at Cleveland (n)
Tampa Bay at Detroit (n)
Boston at Toionto (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Texas (n)
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox (n)
Kansas City at LA.Angels (n)
Oakland at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Girza 11-6) at Detroit
(Verlander 12-7), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Greinke 7-11) at LA.
Angels (jer.Weaver 11-7), 3:35 p.m.
'Oakland (Braden 6-8) at Seattle
(French I-2), 3:40 p.m.
Baltimore (Bergesen 3-9) at Cleveland
(Tomlin I-I), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (C.Buchholz 12-5) at Toronto
(Marcum 10-5), 7:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 9-8) at Texas
(CI.Lee 10-5), 8:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Perkins 0-0) at Chicago
White Sox (Danks I 1-8), 8:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Boston at Toronto, 12:37 p.m.
'Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:05.p.m.


Minnesota at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division


W L
Atlanta 64 48
Philadelphia 62 49
New York 55 56
Florida 54 56
Washington 49 63
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 64 49
St. Louis 62 49
Milwaukee 53 60
Houston 48 63
Chicago 47 65
Pittsburgh 39 72
West Division
W L
San Diego 64 46
San Francisco 64 49
Colorado 58 53
Los Angeles 58 54
Arizona 44 69


Pct GB
.571 -
.559 1 '
.495 8'h
.491 9
.438 15

Pct GB
.566 -
.559 I
.469 II
.432 15
.420 16'
.351 24

Pct GB
.582 -
.566 I%
.523 6h
.518 7
.389 21%'h


Monday's Games
St. Louis 7, Cincinnati 3
Houston I 0,Atlanta 4
Arizona 7, Milwaukee 4, 10 innings
San Francisco 4, Chicago Cubs 3, II
innings
Tuesday's Games
Florida atWashington (n)
LA. Dodgers at Philadelphia (n)
Colorado at N.Y. Mets (n)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (n)
Atlanta at Houston (n)
Arizona at Milwaukee (n)
Pittsburgh at San Diego (n)
'Chicago Cubs at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
St. Louis (Wainwright 16-6) at
Cincinnati (Arroyo 12-6), 12:35 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 8-8) at Houston
(W.Rodriguez 9-11i), 2:05 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 5-8) at Washington
(Olsen 3-3), 7:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Billingsley 9-6) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 6-13), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Francis .4-4) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 7-5), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 2-0) at Milwaukee
(Bush 5-9), 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 1-1) at San
Diego (Correia 8-7), 10:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Gorzelanny 6-6) at San
Francisco (Zito 8-6). 10:15 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Colorado at N.Y. Mets, 12:10 p.m.
Arizona at Milwaukee,"2:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco,
3:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Diego, 6:35 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Preseason schedule

Thursday's Games
New Orleans at New England,
7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Baltimore, 8 p.m.
Oakland at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Friday's Games
Buffalo at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Kansas City atAtlanta,8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay at Miami, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 8 p.m.
Chicago at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games


San Francisco at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Denver at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at N.Y.Jets. 8 p.m.

Arena Football playoffs
Conference Championships
Thursday
National: Milwaukee at Spokane,
8 p.m.
Saturday
American: Orlando at Tampa Bay,
7:30 p.m.
Arena Bowl XXIII
Friday, Aug.20

GOLF

Golf week

PGA OF AMERICA
PGA Championship
Site: Sheboygan,Wis.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Whistling Straits, Straits
Course (7,514 yards, par 72).
Purse: TBA ($7.5 million in 2009).
Winner's share: TBA ($1.35 million in
2009).
Television: TNT (Thursday-Friday,
I-8 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, II a.m.-2 p.m.)
and CBS (Saturday-Sunday, 2-7 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pga.com/pga
championship
PGA Tour site:http://www.pgatour.com
PGA European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Price Cutter Charity Championship
Site: Springfield, Mo.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Highland Springs Country
Club (7, I 15 yards, par 72).
Purse: $625,000. Winner's share:
$112,500.
Television: None.'
LPGATOUR
Next event: Safeway Classic,
Aug 20-22, Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club,
Ghost Creek Course, North Plains, Ore.
Online: http:l//www.lpgo.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Next event The Tradition, Aug. 19-22,
Sunriver Resort, Crosswater Golf Club,
Sunriver, Ore.
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
Men
NGA HOOTERS TOUR:
Chattahoochee Hospice Classic,
Thursday-Sunday, Overlook Golf Links,
LaGrange, Ga. Online: http://www.nga
hooterstour.com
Women
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: U.S.
Women's Amateur, through Sunday,
Charlotte Country Club, Charlotte,
N.C. Television: Golf Channel (today,
3-5 p.m.; Thursday, 4-6 a.m., 3-5 p.m.;
Friday-Saturday, 2-4 am., 3-5 p.m.; Sunday,
1-3 a.m., 3-5 p.m.; Monday, 2-4 a.m.)
Online: http://www.usgo.org

BOWLING

League reports

IResults of Lake City Bowl league play:
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: I. Team 7 (120-60);
2. The Techs (112.5-67.5); 3: What the
#*@!? (103.5-76.5).
High handicap game: I. Ricky Hewett
299; 2. Jim Rhoads 288; 3. George Rye
284.
High handicap series: I. Ricky Hewett
805; 2.Jim Rhoads 767; 3.Josh Bisque 732.
High average: I.Wally Howard 210.81;
2.J.J. Hilbert 206.7; 3.John Janki 204.59.
(results from Aug. 2)


Harvin suffering migraines


Associated Press

MANKATO, Minn. -
Minnesota Vikings wide
receiver Percy Harvin
remains on leave from
practice, coping with.
migraine headaches.
Coach Brad Childress
confirmed Tuesday that
Harvin has had "some"
migraines recently.
Childress said Harvin is
resting at his home in the
Twin Cities area.
"I'm not sure when he'll
be with the team," Childress
said.
The second-year stand-
out from Florida, who made
the Pro Bowl as a rookie



Late Models

back at NFS

on Saturday

From staff reports

The Late Models returns
to North Florida Speedway
on Saturday. The division
will run a 25-lap feature that
pays $1,500 to the winner.
Mark Whitener of
Middleburg has been the
man to beat in the division.
He has put his No. 58 in the
winner's circle five times
this season.
Sportsman, Open Wheel
Modified, Pure Stock and
Street Stock divisions also
are on the schedule.
Grandstands open at
5 p.m., and racing begins at
7 p.m.


kickoff returned, left the
Vikings nine days ago when
his grandmother died and
has not been back to camp.
Harvin has had migraines
for most of his life. Last sea-
son, the condition kept him
out of a December game
and out of practice for most
of the week before the NFC
championship game.
"God willing, he is going
to .work through this,"
Childress said.
. Harvin has seen several
specialists and visited the
Mayo Clinic in Rochester to
seek a cure.
"It's ongoing," Childress
said, adding: "The only
thing that would be wrong



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

URROF I


is if we quit trying to find
things and throw our hands
up in the air."
Wide receiver Sidney
Rice has not practiced
yet because a hip injury,
further testing the team's
depth at the position. The
Vikings signed wide receiv-
er Freddie Brown, releas-
ing safety Terrell Skinner
to make room.
Asked what he likes
about Brown, Childress
said: "He's fresh. With
eight receivers in here we
are running the legs off of
some of these guys." "
Brown was a
seventh-round draft pick by
Cincinnati in 2009.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


CYSTOL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CEASE FOCUS FUMBLE BARREL
Answer: What the garbage collectors had to do when
their truck was full REFUSE REFUSE


GOLF REPORTS


Keen notches pair of wins


Shelton Keen won the
Top of the Hill on Aug. 2.
Jack Tuggle was second.
Nine ladies played in
the monthly scramble on
Aug. 3. The team of Susie
Mick, Darlene Horn, and
Flo Neu won.'
Wednesday Blitz winners
from Aug. 4:
A Division Emerson
Darst, first; Chet Carter
and Ralph Beekman, tied
for second;
B Division Shelton


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

Keen, first; Frog Niewisch
and Randy Heavrin, tied for
second;
C Division John
Taylor, first; Rocky Ford,'
second;
D Division Garrett
Shay, first; Richard Skipper,
second.
Keen scored two skins,


while Todd Carter and
Niewisch each had one.
The Wednesday Night
Scramble had 30 golfers.
The team of Chet Carter,
Tony Johnson and Ricky
Crawford Jr. won first place
with 7 under.
The second-place team
winners were Rob Cassube,
Peter Francis and Keith
Hudson.
The Wednesday Night
Scramble and weekend
blitz are open to everyone.


Patterson aces out blitz field


Steve Patterson had
a routine round in the
Wednesday Blitz.
That is, if four birdies
and a hole-in-one for a
score of 30 on the first nine
can be considered routine.
He cooled off a bit on the
back nine but easily took
the blitz at +14.
Jordan Hale and Buddy.
Slay tied for second, six
shots back with respect-
able scores of +8.
To no one's surprise,
Patterson's third career ace
and second on The Country
Club at Lake City's fifth
hole held up for one of his
two skins. Hale sweetened
his second-place finish


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

with two skins and Mike
McCranie had one.
Dave Mehl was anoth-
er runaway winner in the
Saturday Blitz. He had the
day's only positive score at
+10 for a 10-stroke win over
Bruce Gibson and Steve
Patterson.
Mehl's eagle on
No. 16 was good for his
only skin. Steve Thomas
had two skins, followed, by
Bob Randall, Don Howard,
Gibson and Patterson with
one each.


Seven was the winning
number in both Good Old
Boys matches. Monty
Montgomery, Bobby
Simmons and Jim Ste-Yens
posted that number to win
Match 1 over Ed Snow,
Carl Wilson and Howard
Whitaker, who had +5.
Likewise, Jim Evans,
Jim Bell and Dan Stephens
totaled 7 team points to edge
Derrick Tuell, Joe Persons
and Nick Whitehurst by a
shot in the second match.
'Montgomery had
the week's low round of
35-34-69. Snow and
Stephens tied for second
best at 77, followed by
Sinupons with a 79.


Lefty reveals health issue


By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

SHEBOYGAN, Wis.-
Phil Mickelson is being
treated for a form of
arthritis that surfaced just
before .the U.S. Open and
left him in so.much pain he
couldn't walk.
Mickelson revealed
Tuesday that he has pso-
riatic arthritis, a condition
he said causes the immune
system to attack the body's
joints and tendons.
"I didn't want excuses.
Second, I don't want to
discuss something when I
don't know what .the out-
come will be," Mickelson


ACROSS

1 Element 54
6 Jar or vial
12 Toughened
14 Hid, as treasure
15 Canal city
16 Dirty
17 Signs off on
18 Mil. branch
19 Not at all ruddy
21 Have title to
23 Wham!
26 Booster seat
user
27 RR terminal
28 Shish -
30 Crumb-toter
31 Alley from Moo
32 Lagoon maker
33 Formal
35 Peoria's st.
37 Nest-egg let-
ters
38 Where
Hawkeye
served
39 Road sign sym-
bol'


said. "I feel better about it
and I'm a lot more at ease
about it"
The four-time major win-
ner, who could take over
the world No. 1 ranking for
the first time at the PGA
Championship this week,
said he woke up five days
before the U.S. Open with
"intense pain" in his ten-
dons and joints that left him
unable to move. He'd feel
better after stretching, and
. he went ahead and played
at Pebble Beach, where he
shot 66 on Friday to put
himself in contention. He
wound up tied for fourth.
'But the condition got
progressively worse', even-


40 Bench warmer
41 Jarrett of
NASCAR
42 That guy
43 Qt. parts
44 Unseal, to
Blake
46 Kimono fasten-
er
48 Victor's wreath
51 Like some milk
55 High-pH solu-
tion
56 Lampoon
57 Handles (2
wds.)
58 Snake venom,-
for one

DOWN

1 Ovid's 14
2 Vane dir.
3 Cloister dweller
4 Hunter constel-
lation
5 Head support
6 Air rifle (2wds)
7 Not theirs


tually spreading to his
knees, hips and elbows.
After the British Open, he
made a trip to the Mayo
Clinic in Rochester, Minn.,
where doctors confirmed
the diagnosis of psoriatic
arthritis. According to
the Mayo Clinic website,
the condition causes joint
pain, stiffness and swelling.
While there is no cure, it is.-,
manageable.
Mickelson said he is on
medication, which has alle-
viated most of the symp-
toms. He's also become
a vegetarian almost'as
shocking a revelation for
the burger connoisseur as.
the illness itself.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

Q UJO PARK O -BEY
TNT SEAL LACE
ICH ARNEE ICON
PUEBLO EWOK
TRAM ASSN
SHIRT PEA
DUCT IRE BIOL
EGOS FOE IN-NS
ELL TINKER
YEAR ECHO
SNUB DRHOOK
TOLD SHUI PHI
AWA Y MADE EEL
MEWS TIER DDT


8 Elephant's
squeal
9 Nonrusting
metal
10 Drumstick
11 Ben & Jerry rival


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


13 Explorer
Hernando -

19 Chinese soup
20 Raiment
22 Elk
24 Woodwind
player
25 Marine mam-
mal
26 Take to -
(reprimand)
27 Fumiturebuy
28 Curly cabbage
29 Divulge a
secret
34 Homburg
cousins
36 Defective
autos
42 Sun, in com-
bos
43 Chili bean
45 Attack, as with
snowballs
47 Gravy dish
48 Vegas
49 Stein filler
50 Luau instru-
ment
52 Predicament
53 Meyers of
"Kate & Allie"
54 Kayo count


2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


SCENES FROM MEDIA DAY


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida quarterback John Brantley answers questions from the media during the University of
Florida media day on Tuesday in Gainesville.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida head football coach Urban Meyer
answers questions from the media during the University of
Florida media day on Tuesday in Gainesville.


GATORS
Continued From Page 1B
Debose has been the talk
of the coaching staff this
fall. There has been much
talk of'the type of catches
he pulls in. It's said that he 4
makes .the hard play look
routine, but Debose doesn't
buy into it
"I'm not too good at mak-
ing the one-handed catch-
es," he said. "I'm good at
looking the ball in."
That's something that
the Gators will be look-
ing for after losing their
top two pass catchers in
Riley Cooper and Aaron
Hernandez to the NFL
Draft.
Florida also breaks in
a new quarterback, and
Debose has already made a
connection.
"Johnny (Brantley) is
doing a good job of stepping
in and being a leader," he
said. "He's the best quarter-
back I've ever had."
Debose probably won't
have much time to be out
of the light as he will be
counted upon to be one of
Florida's top receivers in
the fall. For now, he's enjoy-
ing laying low.
"I like the anonymous
Andre Debose," he said. "I'm
Snot too much of a rah-rah in
the spotlight kind of guy."
For Florida, they hope
Debose catches his way to
the spotlight this fall.


JAGS: Scrimmage Falcons Tuesday


Continued From Page 1B

same type of routes from
our offense for 31 practices
and we've seen some differ-
ent ones here over the last
day and a half," Smith said.
"I think it's good for us.
Not only does it stimulate
our .players, but it stimu-
lates our coaches in terms
of how we've got to get our
guys ready to go.".
Jacksonville and Atlanta
ranked among the worst
pass defenses last season.
The Jaguars' 14 sacks were.
a league low. Opponents
completed 67.6 percent of
their passes, second-high-
est in the NFL.
The Falcons allowed
55 completions of 20 or
more yards, second-most
in the NFC and fifth over-
all. Atlanta's run and pass
defense combined gave up
the league's highest per-
centage on third down at


45.3 percent.
Both the Jaguars and
Falcons have attempted
to upgrade their defensive
lines over the past two off-
seasons.
Atlanta drafted tackle
Peria Jerry 24th overall
last year and chose Corey
Peters in the third round
this year. Jerry, however,
has missed much of train-
ing camp after sitting out 15
games with a knee injury
last year.
Jacksonville picked tack-
le Tyson Alualu 10th overall
and used a third-round spot
to take tackle D'Anthony
Smith. However, Smith
might not take a snap this
season after an Achilles'
injury last week.
The Falcons and Jaguars
also acquired help at line-
backer to improve their
coverage of curl routes,


screens and other short
passing attempts that can
hurt a defense.
Atlanta drafted out-
side linebacker Sean
Weatherspoon 19th overall,
and it will be no surprise if
starts the season opener at
Pittsburgh. Weatherspoon
has impressed Falcons
coaches since camp start-
ed.
Jacksonville traded
a fourth-round pick to
Oakland for middle line-
backer Kirk Morrison. His
arrival allowed Daryl Smith
to stay outside where the
Jaguars can use his speed
off the edge.
The right end spots for
Atlanta and Jacksonville
will be critical in creating
pressure in the pocket. John
Abraham of the Falcons is
coming off his lowest sack
total (5'/2) in the six seasons.


CHS: Quarterbacks making progress


Continued From Page 1E

"I was looking around
and we have three fresh-
man in the starting lineup,"
Howard said. "I was like,
there's no Tiger Powell,
Cameron Sweat or Jamaal
Montague, but the boys are
working extremely hard."
-Howard hasn't been shy
about the work being done
by his quarterbacks. In a
tight competition, both
have shown dedication
according to the coach, but
Nigel Atkinson is the clear
starter. %


"Nigel has really
improved, and Jayce Barber
is right there pushing him,"
he said. "Competition
is really good. I'm a big
believer that the best coach
is competition. They're
both young and have years
to develop. We're looking
good on the varsity level for
a couple of years."
Howard said that even if
Atkinson starts, that Barber
will find his way onto the
field.
'We'll work him at tight


end and wide receiver," he
said. "He knows the offense.
We'll have some packages
where they'll both be on the
field at the same time."
No matter who is taking the
snaps, the goal of the offense
will remain the same.
"The key guy is Adrian
Hill," Howard noted. "We've
got to put the ball in his
hands. I've said it before,'
but he's got the best hands
that I've seen in 37 years of
coaching. He's going to be
a dandy for us."


Hale wins Lake City Open


From staff reports

Jordan Hale opened with
a 69 and held on for the
win in the Championship
Flight of the Lake City
Open.
The 31st annual edition
of the tournament was
played over the weekend.
Saturday's round was at
Quail Heights Country
Club and Sunday's final
was at The Country Club
at Lake City. There was a
field of 68.
Hale had a 77 at Lake
City to hold off Richard
Francis (73-74-147) by one
shot. Todd Carter was
third with 75-74-149.
The top finishers in each
flight follow:
First -- Keith Shaw
75-78-153, Shayne Edge
77-78-155, Cory DePratter
78-84-162;
Second Travis
Green 73-81-154, Donald
Roberts 80-76-156, Mike
Kahlich 78-81-159;
Third David
Crawford 82-85-167, Rocky
Ford 83-91-174, Luther
Huffman 87-87-174;
Fourth (net) -
Shelton Keen 69-71-140,


COURTESY PHOTO
Jordan Hale (right) shows off the 31st annual Lake City
Open championship trophy. He is joined by The Country
Club at Lake City pro Carl Ste-Marie.


Andrew Johnson 75-72-147,
Tom Gillespie 77-73-150,
Phillip Russell 77-75-152;
M Senior Championship
- Gross, Buddy Slay 77-
74-151; Net, John Rajer
70-73-143, John Raulerson
73-72-145;
Senior First Gross,
Jackie Ayers 85-82-167;


Net, Jim Womack 67-70-
137, Ron Miracle 75-73-
148.
Skins games were
contested each day. Ed
Higgs, Hale and Carter
won skins on Saturday;
Alan Moody, Eddy Keith,
Roberts and Francis won
skins on Sunday.


SEC: Has past two national titles


Continued From Page 1.
unmatched in the 74-year
history of The Associated
Press rankings, much less
the far-shorter history of
the Bowl Championship
Series.
The last two seasons,
Alabama and Florida faced
off in the SEC champion-
ship game ranked No. 1
and No. 2, their Georgia
Dome showdown serving
as a de facto national title
game, even if both had to
wait another month and
win one more time to be
officially crowned.
"In football, it's about
winning," Tennessee defen-
sive end Chris Walker said.
"There's obviously talent
in other conferences, but if
*you want to go by winning,
I think we're it."
No argument there.
Last season, the SEC
had the best outside
record among the six BCS
conferences (47-10, .825),
easily outpacing the next-
best Big East (36-10, .783),
as well as the two leagues
generally considered its
main challengers, the Big
Ten (36-15, .706) and Big
12 (39-17, .696).
To those who think the
SEC beefs up its.out-of-con-
ference credentials against
cupcake opposition, that
argument was snuffed out
by a 15-8 mark against
schools from other BCS
leagues. The Big East (11-
9) was the only other con-
ference to finish above .500
in that category, while the
Atlantic Conference (12-
15), Big Ten (9-11), Pac-10
(9-11) and Big 12 (8-10)
lagged far behind.
LSU senior safety Jai
Eugene notices a striking
contrast when the Tigers
play outside the confer-
ence.
"There is a difference
in game speed," he said.
"Everything moves a little
faster in the SEC. Also,
the SEC is definitely more
physical.".
The biggest battles are
played out inside the SEC.,
Auburn-Alabama.Alabama-
Tennessee. Tennessee-
Florida. Florida-Georgia.
Georgia-Auburn. Auburn-
LSU. LSU-Arkansas.
"The passion and tradi-
tion of each program is so
strong, it makes those rival-
ries just huge," Georgia
coach Mark Richt said.
"Every game you play feels
like a big, big game. When
I was at Florida State (as
an assistant), that wasn't
always the case. It didn't
seem like every game we
played was a big monster
game, but every game we
play now feels like a mon-
ster. It's very difficult to
stay at that peak perfor-
mance week in and week
out. But if you don't, you're
going to be in trouble."
What makes the SEC the


nation's top college football
conference? Here are a few
theories:
Tradition. Everyone
knows that success tends to
breed more success, and no
league has a deeper group
of teams that have been
,to the mountaintop. Half
of the SEC's 12 members
have captured at least one
Associated Press national
title, led by Alabama with
seven. In fact, four different
'schools (Alabama, Florida,
LSU and Tennessee) have
finished No. 1 in the AP
poll over the last 12 years.
No other league can match
that depth or the urgen-
cy among the rank-and-file
to keep winning titles. Fans
get a little greedy once
they've seen their team
hoist the biggest trophy
of all.
Coaching. The best
are drawn to the SEC like
moths to light, spurred by
the chance to win champi-
onships and the willingness
of schools to dole out big
money in hopes of keeping
up with their neighbors.
Nick Saban left the NFL
for a $4 million-a-year job
at Alabama and needed all
of three seasons to lead
the Crimson Tide back to
the top. Urban Meyer is
an offensive mastermind
who restored the tradition
established -at Florida by
Steve Spurrier. Les Miles
picked up where Sabah left
off at LSU, Richt has .guid-
ed Georgia to a pair of SEC
titles, and Bobby Petrino
appears on the verge of
taking Arkansas to national
prominence.
Big money. The SEC is
rolling in dough, thanks to
huge television packages (a
$2.25 billion contract with
ESPN, a $55 million-a-year
deal with CBS) and some
of the largest stadiums
in the country, which are
generally filled to capac-
ity. Tennessee's Neyland
Stadium and Alabama's
Bryant-Denny hold more
than 100,000, Georgia's
Sanford Stadium and LSU's
Tiger Stadium seat more
than 92,000, while Florida,
Auburn and South Carolina
all have facilities that can
accommodate at least
80,000. Only two stadiums
in the conference seat fewer
than 60,000.
Talent, talent and
more talent. Some of the
best high school football
in the country is played
right in the SEC's back-
yard. Florida has a boun-
tiful recruiting base in
the Sunshine State, while
Georgia rarely has to ven-
ture outside of its bound-
aries to put together one
of the nation's top teams.
Alabama and Louisiana
also churn out plenty of
top prospects each year,
many of whom choose to


play close to home.
Leadership at the
top. The last two guys
running the conference
office former commis-
sioner Roy Kramer, cur-
rent commish Mike Slive
are wily administrators
who've used their power
and influence to keep the.
SEC at the head of the
pack. Think expansion is
something new? Way back
in the early 1990s, Kramer
sought out Arkansas and
South Carolina as new
members, giving the league
the 12 schools it needed
to launch college football's
first conference champi-
onship game. Slive wisely
followed in Kramer's foot-
steps, aggressively taking
the SEC into a brave new
multimedia world.
Passion. The Deep
South certainly doesn't
hold a monopoly when it.
comes to loving football,
but one could make a pret-
ty compelling argument
that no other region has
such an affection for the
college game. The sport
cemented its hold during
the civil rights era first
as a source of segregated
pride for white-only teams;.
then as an inevitable tool
for breaking- down racial
barriers. Also, major league
sports were a relatively
late arrival, allowing the
fan base to remain mono:
lithic in its affections. Even
now, a city such as Atlanta,
with teams in all four major
professional leagues, is
still viewed by many as
a college town at heart:
Five of the nine .states.
within the SEC's footprint
Alabama, Mississippi,
South Carolina, Kentucky
and Arkansas have
never had a major profes-
sional franchise.
"Growing up in the
South, everybody is a huge
SEC football fan," said
Georgia's Hutson Mason,
a freshman quarterback.
"You're almost forced into
it."
While offense wows the
fans, it's defense that wins
championships. And the
SEC appears to put special
emphasis on that side of
the ball.
Last season, Alabama
gave up the second-fewest
points in the country (11.7
per game), Florida ranked
fourth and LSU was 11th. At.
NFL draft time, seven of the
first 26 picks came from the
SEC five of those were
defensive players, more
than any other conference.
in the opening round.
"The SEC has great.
defenses," LSU center T-
Bpb Hebert said. "Defense
is the key to every cham-
pionship team. Some of
the defensive linemen and
linebackers in the SEC are
really special players."


3B:


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010





I Columbia County's Most Wanted I


Randy Lee Parris
WANTED AS OF 5/24/10
DOB: 8/2/77
Wanted for: Dealing in Stolen
Property-Trafficking; Misdemeanor
VOP for Possession of Less than 20
Grams Cannabis


Avery Kelsey
WANTED AS OF 6/14/10
DOB: 7/12/85
Wanted for: VOP Possession of a
Controlled Substance with Intent to
Sell or Deliver





Christopher Burnett
WANTED AS OF 6728/10
DOB: 8/7/84 '
Height: 5' 6"
Weight: 130 Ibs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Blue
Wanted for: Credit Card Fraud;
Unauthorized Use




Linda Lou Davis
*WANTED AS OF 7/12/10
DOB: 4/24/58
Height: 5' 7"
Weight: 130 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Hazel
Wanted for: Felony Driving Under
the Influence; Driving While License
Suspended or Revoked




Elizabeth Nanette Perez
WANTED AS OF 7/26/10
DOB: 2/17/81
Height: 5' 6"
Weight: 150 lbs.
Hair: Red Eyes: Blue
Tattoos: Left arm, right side of neck
and lower back
Wanted for: FTA Pre-Trial conference
for Uttering a Forgery


Irving Jeffrey White
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10
AKA: Swerve
DOB: 8/12/89
Height: 5' 5"
Weight: 160 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Wanted for: Robbery, Grand Theft III



Fabian Forte Johnson
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10
DOB: 3/6/75
Height: 6' 2"
Weight: 178 lbs. -
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
*History of Violence and
Prior Resisting Arrest
Tattoo Left Arm: "TAZ";
Tattoo Back: Girl Cartoon
Scar Right Knee: 3" long
Wanted for: VOP Possession of
Controlled Substance: Cocaine


--
, 49
\AW &


Robert B. Sparrow
WANTED AS OF 6/14/10
DOB: 1/17/81
Wanted for: VOP Burglary of a
Structure/Conveyance; Grand Theft
III, VOP Burglary of a Structure/
"Conveyance; Grand Theft III


Daniel Allan Huth
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10
DOB: 4/27/76
Height: 6' 2"
Weight: 178 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Brown
Wanted for: VOP Criminal Use of
Personal ID Information, Forgery, and
False ID To Law Enforcement Officer


Mario Bonet
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10#
DOD: 6/13/78
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 320 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Wanted for: VOP Credit Card Fraud:
Unauthorized Use


(386) 754-7099


-OR SUBMIT A WEB


TIPAT

www.columbiacrimestoppers.net


The likeness of suspects are supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Columbia County Crime Stoppers, Inc. and their volunteers are
jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


Eddie Murphy
WANTED AS OF 5/17/10
AKA: James Eddie, Man-Man,
Eddie Murphey
DOB: 6/10/93
Height: 5' 04"
Weight: 120 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Wanted for: 26 Counts Burglary of
Structure/Conveyance, 15 Counts
Grand Theft I[I, 3 Counts Dealing In
Stolen Property; Trafficking, 7 Counts
Petit Theft


Eva Harger
WANTED AS 6/21/10
DOB: 2/19/80.
Height: 5' 03"
Weight: 145 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Wanted for: Grand Theft III




Ronald Aaron Geiger
WANTED AS OF 7/6/10
DOB: 3/31/78
Height: 6' 1"
Weight: 165 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Green
Wanted for: VOP Criminal Mischief; 2
4 Child Support Writs



Sylvester Hamilton
WANTED AS OF 7/19/10
DOB: 1/1/79
Height: 5' 11"
Weight: 220 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
*Absconder and a Violent Felony
Offender of Special Concern
Wanted for: VOP Possession of
Controlled Substance, Possession of
Controlled Substance With Intent To
Sell or Deliver

Shelly Hooey
WANTED AS OF 8/2/10
AKA: Shelly Dehass
DOB: 1/18/79
Height: 4' 11"
Weight: 135 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Hazel
Tattoos: Birds on both left and
right chest
Wanted for: VOP Possession of
Controlled Substance; VOP Petit Theft

Natasha Michele Gordon
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10
DOB: 11/4/88
Height: 5' 6"
Weight: 171 lbs.
Hair: Bladk Eyes: Brown
Tattoo Left Leg: stars; Tattoo Right
Leg: words; Tattoo Right Arm: words
Wanted for: VOP Fleeing a Police
Officer, Grand Theft III


Robert Tyrone Smith
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10
DOB: 6/19/73
Height: 5' 10" Weight: 165 Ibs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
*History of Violence and Prior Resist-
ing Arrest
Wanted for: VOP Possession of
Controlled Substance, Possession of
20 Grams Cannabis or Less, Resisting
Officer Without Violence, Driving
While License Suspended or Revoked;
(additional case) VOP Possession of
Controlled Substance, Resisting Officer
Without Violence, Driving While License
Suspended or Revoked


Christopher Peterson
WANTED AS OF 6/28/10
DOB: 5/26/73
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 17Q Ibs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Blue
Wanted for: Grand Theft; Non-Support




Clarence Jackson
WANTED AS OF 7/12/10
DOB: 11/5/50
*Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 180 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Wanted for: VOP: Grand Theft; Court
Ordered Revocation: Grand Theft




Aljanor Cornelius Taylor
WANTED AS OF 7/19/10
AKA: Aljandro Taylor
DOB: 8/5/81
Height: 6' 1"
Weight: 185 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
*Absconcer .
Wanted for: VOP Grand Theft,
Cheating



Jacqueline M. Lima
WANTED AS OF 8/2/10
DOB: 8/24/52
Height: 5' 0"
Weight: 100 lbs.
Hair: Gray Eyes: Blue
Wanted for: Grand Theft 111




Arthur Anthony Messina
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10
DOB: 10/19/32
Height: 5' 11"
Weight: 200 lbs.
Hair: Black/Gray Eyes: Brown
Wanted for: Possession of Controlled
Substance, Obtaining A Controlled
Substance By Fraud Or Forgery


Jeffrey Ray Salisbury
WANTED AS OF 8/9/10
DOB: 1/12/86
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 180 lbs.
.Hair: Blonde Eyes: Blue
Wanted for: Prior Resisting Arrest;
VOP Escape














olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City


and


Aou. i a .o. u

Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 1


Picket Fences opens with superior service, unique offerings


Whether it
is used
or new,
antique or
contem-
porary, there's something
to fit everyone's needs or
style at Picket Fences.
"I try to have something
for everyone," said Gena
Stone, owner. "I'm trying
to reach all people to give
everybody a chance to
have something from the
store."
The store is full of new
and gently used home
decor items, such as
antique furniture, and also
offers gifts, jewelry, glass-
ware and collectibles.
"It's a little bit of every-
thing," Stone said. "Just a
lot of things for the home."
Picket Fences opened
July 2009 with the help of
family and friends that she
will be "forever grateful
for," Stone said.
After working in the
construction field, Stone
wanted to try her hand at
selling items she bought
and "just dove in," she
said.
Stone previously ran
a booth in High Springs
before finding the store's
current location in Lake
City, a location that has
widened her customer
base.
"I wanted more people
in closer proximity," she
said. "I really like Lake
City. It's great."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Gena Stone, owner of Picket Fences, sits in her store, at 417 SW Main Blvd., surrounded by many of the shop's unique offer-


ings.
Merchandise prices can
be as low as one dollar or
as high as $2,000 Stone
said she sold a stained
glass window for the lat-
ter, the highest price she's
ever marked -but the
average price of a gift is
about $15.
Her philosophy is pric-
ing items to give the
customer a bargain, Stone
said.
"I want to provide a bar-
gain to the people because


I got a bargain," she said.
"I want to pass that along.
That's what I feel is right."
Items available to the
customers come either
from Stone's search for
bargains or merchandise
provided by her local
vendor, Christina Aguilar,
which also includes gifts,
glassware and home d6cor.
"She brings in a great
variety of stuff at excellent
prices," Stone said.
Traveling to North


Carolina, south Florida
and everywhere in
between, Stone will comb
garage sales and estate
sales or buy at auctions
to stock Picket Fences. If
she sees something sitting
on someone's residential
porch that she's interested
in, she said it's worth
knocking on the front door
and asking about it.
"If you're brave enough
to do it, go for it," Stone
said.


Stone also noted that
she will look at pieces
before she buys them for
the store because she is
choosy about quality.
"It's not coming in here
if it isn't good quality," she
said.
With different merchan-
dise always coming in as
items sell, Stone said the
stock is always chang-
ing and offers new items
every day for customers to
snatch up.


"There's a constant rota-
tion of merchandise," she
said. "People need to stop
in often because it changes
that much. And if you see
something you want, you
need to get it, because it
won't be here. All of my
customers that are local
have experienced that."
Taking care of the cus-
tomer is what matters to
Stone, even if she has to
send them to another local
business so they can find
what they are looking for.
'To me, the customer's
the most important," she
said. "I want to please that
person, and if I don't have
what they want, then I may
send them to Decotique or
to Rowann's or somewhere
else that may have what
they want. That's what
makes good customer
service. I like to please
the customer, and if I can,
I will."
Stone, said she makes
friends with her customers
and enjoys those that regu-
larly stop by.
Lake City Reporter
advertising also brings in
new customers and gets a
good response, Stone said.
"It's just been very, very
good service," she said.
Picket Fences is open
Monday through Friday
from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
and on Saturdays from
11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. It is
closed Sundays.
The store is located at
417 SW Main Boulevard.
Call (386) 438-5376.









2C LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


WE ADDED A NEW
PERFORMANCE TEST,
BUT LEARNED THAT THE
TEST ITSELF IS FLAWED.

0


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


NOW OUR PRODUCT
FAILS OUR OWN
TESTS AND OUR
CUSTOMERS ARE
ASKING TO SEE THE
TEST RESULTS.


DO I H
PERMIT
TO FAK
TEST D
2


iAVE I DIDN'T
5SION EVEN
E THE KNOW
)ATA? DATA
CAN BE
REAL.


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Cold-hearted comment turns

bedroom into deep freeze


"'


DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend and I have been dat-
ing for a year. When we got
together he had just gotten
out of a five-year relation-
ship. He says he loves me,
but he recently told me that
she was better in bed than I
am!
I have lost confidence in
our relationship and don't
enjoy making love with him
now, knowing I don't mea-
sure up. His ex was better
looking than I am, but I don't
understand why he would
say that. I have told him he
hurt my feelings, but he
doesn't care. What do I do
now? HURT IN BIG SKY
COUNTRY
DEAR HURT: Now you
ask yourself whether you
want to continue a relation-
ship with someone so tact-
less that he would drop a
bomb on you like that one.
It's telling that whefi you 'let
him know you were hurt, he
let you know he didn't care.
There are diplomatic
ways for partners to com-
municate what they prefer
when they are intimate. One
of them involves positive re-
inforcement when their part-
ner does something right.
Another is simply saying
in plain English what feels
good. It appears that your
boyfriend is insensitive to
the max, my dear. But what
you do about it is something
no one but you can decide.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You need time
to think about how you
want to handle your cur-
rent relationships. Taking
a day off will help you gain
greater perspective regard-,.
'ing your bptidWkid fot'fr'
future. Don't feel you have
to react to the changes
around you. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20):, Someone may
be feeding you false infor-
mation about an organiza-
. tion or volunteer service
that is looking for recruits.
Ask questions and don't
donate to any group you
know little about. Someone
you care about will have a
surprise for you. *****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Be patient when
dealing with affairs of the
home. The less critical you
are, the easier it will be to
get things done the, way
you want. Love is on the
rise. ** .
CANCER (June 21-
'July 22): Don't waste time
or give in to demands be-
ing put on you by people
wanting to dump respon-
sibilities in your lap. Don't
get angry or procrastinate.
Instead, get work out of the
way so you can spend time
with friends or a relaxing
pastime. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): People, places and
pastimes should all come
into play. Love, intrigue
anr serious commitment
all "have the potential to
lead you in a positive direc-.
tion. You will learn from
traveling or communicat-
ing with others. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept..
22): Things may be diffi-
cult to resolve with regard
to joint financial ventures
and settlements. Collect or
repay old debts., A physi-
cal 'challenge will require
mind over matter. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Make a commitment
to follow through with
your longtime plans or
fulfill a promise you have
made. Your creativity is
skyrocketing. The experi-
ences you create now will
lead to greater rewards,
friendships and knowl-
edge. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): A fresh look at
an old project will bring
it back to life. This time,'
present what you have and
someone will be intrigued
with its potential. A part-
nership is likely'to develop,
adding greater diversity to
the final product. *.***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Your master-
ful way of presenting what.
you have to offer will take
everyone by storm. Love
is apparent, shaking this an
ideal time to enhance your
current relationship or
find someone, compatible.
Avoid emotional conversa-
tions that might jeopardize
your position. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't pres-
ent or discuss your plans
just yet. You will be faced
with controversy and op-
position. Focus on making'
money, settling deals and
taking care of any health
issues you face. *****k
.AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You have to take
care of loose ends. Pay off
debts or collect what's
owed you. Deals, contracts,
settlements and health is-
sues can all be taken care
of satisfactorily. A friend
from the past will enhance
your future emotionally
and financially. *** .
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Take control
of whatever situation you
face and make the changes
required quickly. A part-
nership will benefit you in
more ways than you can
imagine. Trust in what oth-
ers offer and you will move
ahead fast. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from, quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another,
Today's clue: N equals'
"D H Z K 'E K.F F H J P V D F K H S W Z

GWJKIFT SWFK D GWJKIF JKH KZHT

SWFK D KZH; LR TWJHZS HZFT E.WJE

LMGW AFEEFV." YNMEJVGlW
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Just because something doesn't do what you
planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless." Thomas A. Edison
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. .8-11
CLASSIC PEANUTS


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR ABBY: I have
been married 11 years to
my husband, who is one of
nine children. My sister-in-
law has asked me for a copy
of one of our wedding pic-
tures, which is the last time
all of them were together.
Since the wedding, one -of
my husband's sibs has died
and another is serving a long
stretch in prison.
The problem .is,' she.
wants to digitally ,remove
me from the picture!. I don't
want to give my sister-in-law
a copy knowing 111 be edited
out. It's hurtful, and after all
these years it makes me feel
like she'hasn't fully accepted
me as part of the family. Am I
overreacting?.- BLOCKED
OUT IN TEXAS
DEAR BLOCKED OUT:
Your sister-in-law wasn't very
diplomatic, but what she is
trying to memorialize is the
last time her biological fam-
ily was intact. The situation
is poignant, really. My advice
is not to take this personally.
Give her the picture before
any hard feelings "develop."
DEAR ABBY: My 12-


year-old niece, "Amanda," is
on her cell phone constantly.
She is the smartest %id I
know, but she is failing her
classes and has started to lie
about everything. I raised
her until she was 5 I was
only 12 myself when I start-
ed so I am very close to
her. Or.so I thought.
Amanda lives with her
dad and stepmom, who are
doing their best to raise
her, but nothing is working.
When she was growing up
she never lied, and I mean
never. I have told her not to
be afraid to talk to me about
anything, but she hasn't, and
it hurts me that she can't
come to me. What do you
suggest I do? WORRIED
AUNT IN WASHINGTON
DEAR WORRIED
AUNT: Speak to Amanda's
father and suggest that he
confiscate her cell phone
until her grades improve. If
she is texting instead of pay-
ing attention in class, and
talking instead of doing her
homework, that would be a
step in the right direction.
And continue to tell your
niece that if she needs to
talk to you about "anything,"
you are and will always be
- there for her.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.





LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 3C















You already know you love shopping here, we think you'd love working here too. With flexible
schedules, friendly faces, a supportive environment, and of course, employee discounts, we've got
everything you need to maximize your career potential! And now that we're right in your neigh-
borhood, T.J. Maxx has the job that fits your life, and the resources to take you to the next level!

Monday, August 16 &

Tuesday, August 17

1 0am- 7pm

Lake City Mall
(Former Rex Electronics) 2469 West US
Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
For more information,.or if unable to attend, please call our Hiring Line:
1-866-TJ MAXX-5 /(I-866-856-2995).
TJX is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to workplace diversity.

Y e .

w www.tjmaxx.com
1j, J ,4 r'CCD^ arih k1h i-'wT ii- T4 mat C WINNERS" HOM !: S F N s c STYLESENSE


Pii


.40pl
' ,- h -' ,. .......











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


[proal ads~


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoAppear: Call by: Fax/Emal by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fr., 10:00a.n Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00am. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trarfs-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was .incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.eom


Legal

Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in. Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 08/24/2010
Time: 8:00 A.M.
2006 Chevrolet
VIN# 2GCEK13T961191121
1993 Buick
VIN# 1G4AG55N9P6476011
1998 Kia
VIN#KNAFB 1215W5723206
04541244
August 11, 2010 .
100 Job
Opportunities
04541208
The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
positions available:
Court Program Specialist II,
Lake City.
(Family Court Case Manager)
User Support Analyst,
Lake City
OPS Court Program
Specialist I, Live Oak
(Foreclosure Case Manager)
OPS Secretary, Live Oak
Positions serve Columbia,
Dixie, Hamilton, Lafayette,
Madison, Suwannee, and
Taylor Counties.
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org

05523425


WORLD- AIR SERVICES

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have been waiting for!
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
Aircraft Mechanics.
Aircraft Structural Mechanics
Production Supervisors
Quality Control Manager/
Supervisor/Inspector
Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careers(@)pemcoair.com ;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at
www.pemcoair.com.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

04541231
Drivers: Intermodal
OwnerOps Needed!
Rite-way Transport is
Expanding in Jacksonville
18mo TT Exp. TWIC Card.
JAXPORT Badge. Free Secure
Yard Parking. CDL-A;-
Paid More with Haz/Tanker
904-781-0457
Fax 904-781-6330

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
F/T Shipping Receiving Helper
Good driving record required,
some experience helpful, apply in
person@ Nextran Truck Center
328 SW Ring Cr, Lake City
no phone calls please
Mechanic Position open.
Mechanical skills with a Positive
Attitude. Apply at Fabulous Coach
Lines. (866)352-7295


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!

Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219

Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Green Acres Learning Center
seeking qualified applicants for a
teaching position, preferably with
40 hr DCF training, apply in
person 1126 SW Main Blvd
04540698
Do you get satisfaction from
making something?
Do you get excited about
technology?
Do you like to analyze problems
and come up with creative
solutions?
If so, a degree or certificate in
Engineering Technology
at Florida Gateway College
is for you!
Engineering Technicians are in
demand by manufacturing and
other high-tech industries.
Enroll now for the Fall semester.
Classes begin Aug. 23.
Financial Aid available.
Call 386-754-4442 for details.
Popeye's has Management Op-
portunities, min 2 yrs fast food
mgm't. exp. a must to be consid-
ered, hith ins & competitive salary
avail For consideration, call -
Richard @ 904-254-2666 or send
resume to 121 N Main Blvd
Receptionist/Clerk Full-Time.
Candidate must be dependable,
excellent attention to detail, have
the ability to multi-task, and be
computer literate. Must have some
bookkeeping background as well
as excellent telephone and verbal
communication skills. Salary
based on skills and experience.
Fax resume to 755-7331

1 Medical
10 Employment

05523327
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake.City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

4 Schools &
140v Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-08/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-09/13/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

Amazon Green Female Parrot.
about 6 yrs. old, non-escaper,
clean talk, Ig vocabulary, great
entertainer/companion w/rollling
cage. $400. FIRM 386-752-0347


BEAUTIFUL PUPS
Chocolate Labradors
Registered $350
386-965-2231


FREE (1) Male kitten-nut
(1) Female Kitten-spaye
CALL FOR INFO
386-755-0920


Free to good home,
Female Chihuahua 2 yrs old,
spayed,fawn color, very sweet &
lovable 386-755-1034
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they



Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
RABBIT DOG
1 Adult male Beagle $150.
386-719-4802 or
386-623-9427

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies


2 MARES $500 each, gentle,l
mini horse, 1 mustang, both take
saddle and rider, lead well, make
great family horse 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furnm, China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE White Washer/Dryer set
Works Good
$225.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Computer Desk
with Hutch top, dark wood,
$35.00
1 386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Tall Bookshelf
$35.00 obo
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
Youth Bed, metal frame + mat-
tress, head and foot board,
blue in color $135 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment


Craftsman Riding Mower, 20 hp
turbo cool engine, 42 cut, auto,
runs great, $550 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


High WheelPUSH MOWER.
5.5 engine Runs super!
22" cut. $100.00
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927


411 Machinery &
411 Tools
Lrg Craftsman Dbl Tool Box,
with side closets, include name
brand auto tools, $1200 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Air-Pro Air compressor,
tank on wheels,1 hp,
$50 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-9840387
Diamond Plate Tool Box
for small truck, in good shape
$60
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 3876-965-2231
Upgraded Running Boards
Rubber covered. Fits Ford truck.
Extended or King cab. $100.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

450 GoodThings
to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

520 Boats for Sale
14FT. V-HULL ALUMINUM
BOAT With trailer and
trolling motor. $850.
386-755-4247

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent


14 Wide, 3/2-$550.mo, 2/2-$475.
ered. mo. Clean, Quiet Country Park
er Water, septic, garbage included
-d. 758-2280 References, NO PETS!


2 Br Mobile Homes in quiet park.
$250 moves you in, Rent starts at
$350 and up. 1st come 1st Serve!
No pets. Call 386-755-5488
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
FT. WHITE area 3br/2ba DW on
40 ac. $725 mo. 1st, last &
security required.
Call 386-312-8371 or 961-6734
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Move in special $399, 2/1,
spacious yard, $450 per month,
easy qualifying 386-755-2423 or
386-697-1623
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
1978 S/W 2 bdrm, in Paradise
Village MH Park 195 SE Bikini
Dr, Lake City, Lot # 25, 2 blks
from College, great for student,
asking $6,000 OBO 850-295-4717
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
LAND/HOME PACKAGES
I specialize in Land/Home pkgs
FHA, VA & USDA Loans Avail!
I also have a 2400 sqft Home on
1/2 ac. for only $450. a mo.
owner financing avail!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452
or jetdec(@windstream.net
Brand New "2011"
4/2 doublewide setup & Del. for
only $39,995. or payments of
$265. a month!.Call Eric
@ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec(@windstream.net
"TRADE IN" 28'X44' 3/2
Doublewide with metal roof for
Only $7;000.obo Call 386-752-
1452 jetdec(@windstream.net


'730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

04541176






Unfurnished Rentals
COLUMBIA COUNTY
4BR/2BA- 1,248 sqft
$695mo
2BR/1BA
$495mo
4BR/2B 2,081 sqft
$850mo
2BR/1B 700 sqft
$495mo
4BR/2B 1,248 sqft
$695mo
3BR/1B 936 sqft
$725mo
S2BR/1B 896 sqft
$695mo
2BR/1B 915 sqft
$595mo
3BR/2B 1,174sqft
$700mo
4BR/3B 1,536 sqft
$750mo
4BR/2B 2,422 sqft
$1,300mo
3BR/1.5B-1,278sqft
$795mo 3
MADISON COUNTY
2BR/1B
$450mo

JENNINGS
4BR/2BA 1,584 sqft
$625mo
a 386-719-5600 -
04541181
FOR RENT IN A
GREAT LOCATION
3/2 newer brick duplex,
both units are available.
Approximately 1300 sf. with a
one car garage. A real deal at
only $790./month with
security. Call BJ Federico at
386-365-5884 to schedule your
showing. Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/2ba home for rent in Wise
Estates. Brick exterior. new
flooring, great location. $1100.
mo. lst,last, & sec. 386-965-8633
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,150
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-758-3166
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo..386-752-3225
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &'
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep. Tom 386-
961-1086 DCA Realtor
Office Space for Rent 200-2000
sqft, 5 offices, 1 conference rm,
2ba. Nice outside patio. Located
off Main Blvd. 386-755-3649
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7


805 Lots for Sale
Lot for Sale 2.76 ac, 2.ac, 1.5 ac,
2.5 ac. River Oaks S/D. Timber-
lake S/D. Owner Fianc. Sm down.
386-344-4629 or 344-8929
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?














Apply Online or In Personl 1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
S386.754.8562
Sh- E1 www.sitel.com EOE


h!iil
lIBliI


i


BRAND NEW 2011-
2BR/2BA
S For only $22,900
Call John T. 386-344-5234
MUST SELL 2br/lba Singlewide
Set/Del/AC/Skirt/& Step
on your property for $17,500.00
Call John T. 386-344-5234
HUGE 28X80 4br/2ba, Living
room & den. Set/Del/AC
Skirt/Steps .For only $34,837.
Call John 386-344-5234
BRAND NEW 3/2 Home
for only $25,316.00. .
Owner Finance Available
Call John 386-344-5234
DON'T MISS THIS
28X66 4br/2ba with set-up, Del,
AC, Skirt Steps. For Only $29,900
Call John 386-344-5234

n50 Mobile Home
U60 &Land
D/W on almost 1/2 acre lot, 3/2,
new AC, appliances included,
$50,000 on Branford Hwy
386-208-0665 or 386-466-2825

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
U5523300
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-1002
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Unfurnished 2br Apt.
w/Gorgeous Lake View. Must see!
$500. mo plus deposit.
Close to shopping. 386-344-0579
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
STUDIO Cable & all utilities in-
cluded. Furnished
$500. mo. & $150. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950

7n3 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3 Bedroom/1 Bath
$540 month, $500 Sec Dep,
on Nassau Street,
386-697-9950
Very nice older home, 2br/2ba
w/fenced yard, garage, huge Fl.
room. CHA, appli. Application,
credit check & lease req'd. 1st, last
& sec. $650/mo. (904)259-4126


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


810 Home for Sale
FSBO 3br/lba block w/metal roof,
carport. New tile & paint. Ready
now. 3 ac units/gas heat. Double
lot, chain link fence w/privacy in
back. Access from Monroe St & St
Johns St, dbl drive gates. Room to
park.lg vehicles. Lg storage bldg
& Ig yd. Great family home or in-
vestment rental. Home appraised
/contracted to sell for $71000 in
09. Now,$65000. Drive by 973 SE
Monroe St. then call 352-371-1709
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
Lease Option 4br/2ba, 5 ac. 1 mi
to Food Lion. Indoor pets ok Close
& private. $800. mo. 1st, last &
sec. 386-755-9333 or 755-7773
SALE/RENT: 3/2 brick ranch. 8.5
ac. 8 mi form LC. 3 fish ponds,
paved road. Owner Financ. $1000.
mo. 386-344-4629 or 344-8929
Sale/Rent: 4/2 Ranch on 6.5 ac.
10 mi SW of LC. Fenced. Remod-
eled, paved/private drive, owner
Finan. $1000. mo 386-344-8929
82O Farms &
Acreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles
ATV-M/C Hauler 750#
capacity, fits standard 2" receiver
used once cost $840 selling for
$500 OBO 386-719-6537
ELECTRIC SCOOTER,
camp ground type.
Paid $375. Sell for $250.
386-497-2910

950 Cars for Sale
1993 FORD Escort.
Reliable transportation
$700 obo.
386-963-4869
2001 Chrysler Town & Country
Limited Van Great condition
Good family vehicle Have mainte-
nance records $4,700 752-0290


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


LakeCtyReporter


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can plaice your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include asnapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


uuo uouge5 1.1
4x4 Big Ram
20'" Factory rims, Hemi
full power, extra clean.
10,290 mip
$26,000
Call
386-755-2909


cUUi ruium i-uru ot
Exc. cond. All Options
incl cust cover. Seats 6.
Bought in '08 for carpool
(now over) Great MPG.
$8,875
Call
386-752-3204
386-961-4561


Fr More Det^^ail Cl
Mar at r' 3B-755-5440


C ",N A F U C E E M A 0
Q H I I X B E F FJ W T
U E A T U D Y F S H S
B B C SI ,U V B A Q U
E R E Q D CiN IN Y H C
U A P K G U X IL Y, L W
/.


V
H


F 0


H M OE G L S


B I G V \N
Lake City
Reporter's
popular weekly
word search is
a great way to
get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
week at a price
any business
can afford.


Fo mreino*m-n ( 6 5
Deadineis ednsda at0. p


CelebrateYour Freedom From Work
AI


Disc Golf Canoe -Bubba- -Slide

Swimming Kids'tGameS

Watermelon Eating ConteS

&SO Much More.






S... night and sleep underthestarSi

Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In
Our Famous Tree House!



f~~lt~. :40, =*IiM p


A+ EveCare

D 9L Eyeglasses
** Contacts
-. r Exams
Sunglasses



555-5555


- =eg


Classified Department: 755-5440


i






Classified Department: 755-544Q


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010


Grand Oening Aug u S 9r1h2 Ch




Sfabird, qi and Meeting all your sewing needs!
Over 2.000 Bolts of Fabric


cutorm siwn outL,, ito
216 SW Mlaiz Blvd. Lake City
(0.4;t to W aty',")
754-374-1
www.amyggeis.co.m


- Fabric, notions, zippers
- Simplicity patterns
* Quilting
* Authorized Sales & Service for
Singer Sewing Machines


Ur-.

SI ~HAIRCUT I SENIOR DAYS I
I EVERYDAY HAIRCUT
Haircut Just For YouI ,4 1
Hwy 90 between
.Wendy'sa and McDonald's Regular Price 9" r u I
Wa 961-8119 4
Bayas& Country Club -
% 758-3093 II
..Gateway Plaza I HIGHLIGHTS
Full Service Store 5 FOILS FOR
752.07065ILSFO 1
Branford Crossing I CHEMICAL I
752-0066 I IiI SERVICE AT I
I Gateway Lopa 0on Only C


Rotate &
Balance
S Prts & :'ervace Tires
' R2Wf W U H 9 Most cars & trucks
4310 W USHwy 90 x&supplies
(3 8b) 75S"0631 8 Not valid with any other offer
". expires 8/31/10
Monday-Friday 7am-spi.in L m ......
'i "*' .- : ",\- ': .- ':. =* '",*' ..*. / ;.: /*" ..: '.. 'y. '.."


Full Synthetic ,
Oil Change
$3495,
Includes up to 5 quarts
of 011 and FiIter

Most cars & trucks
expires 8/31/10
am onw am


"Always fresh and always on time!"
Lindsey Skinner
Lake City
"It's about time a sub tastes like. a
suh. Thanks Willy J'A!"
Loretta Holmes
Lake Cityl
Listen to Mix 94.3 and Big 98 to win FREE SUBSI
Open Monday Saturday loam-9pm
Sunday llam-7pm
(386) 752-7949 3525 pttp NorrWis
S=Acwo i wrouW,) ...


r- ---------- -------- --- -- -


EUROTOP
Serta SUPREME


WAS
I TWIN SET W08-


NOW
s244'


I .. ... . .. .. ..
' .. -*rSUPER
I'DEAL.
I r r -- *'r ,.. ,; '
WAS NOW
QUEEN SET sZ- s374


' FULL SET SW $344; KING SET sgWO- 94g
L -.-----------_ J L-- --------------J
1678 US Hwy 19 w
(h f Lake Coty., FL
Ei~pr u 8 ol 3 M abwm anGGGaO m Lirj 8 VlO WnM


h-iTjal
C4STPAIOAN


Ui aM3 ee v s .
~Z29? X3U~970~ AwlKFU


44 45 6# MAbt BWD 755-0490


NEED


Hf T w W


For "myou, can: 5Nl 4IJ T!oday


I


1L


we as .. s


|I
I


v mr -1w4aw 44wr v MR w 604"Op