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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01394
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/08/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01394
System ID: UF00028308:01394
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Sample Ballot
Columbia County
primary election
official sample ballot.
Inside today, 7A
000014 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


a-. -T CChesney


A Netn
Game Plan


VAPWV


,mA. "Ukk%6


Parade goes
country.
Inside today
V


Home run!
Clark hired to lead
Tiger baseball.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Sunday, August 8, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 173 M $ 1.00


TAKING


:ARE


Florida's strict, new law means caregivers must now
pass electronically enhanced background checks


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Samantha Blake, 21, reads with 4-year-olds in her class on Friday. 'It's fun. I like working with them because they're inter-
ested in anything at this age,' she said. 'You can tell them anything and they absorb it like a sponge.'


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Anew state law
has long-range
safety effects
for some of
Florida's most
vulnerable residents, say
many local child- and
adult-care providers.
Florida caregivers who
work with children, the
mentally handicapped or
elderly patients have new
hiring guidelines for the
safety of their clients.
Earlier this year the
Florida legislature adopted
a new law which requires
background screening of
job applicants, employees
and volunteers who come
in contact with the clients.
According to informa-
tion from the Florida
Department of Children
and Families, House Bill
7069, which went into
effect Aug. 1, restricts
child care providers from
hiring anyone who will
have contact with children
in care if they have not
cleared a Level 2 back-
ground screening.,
A Level 2 background
screening consists of a
background check by local
law enforcement authori-
ties, Florida Department of
Law Enforcement and the
FBI to thoroughly inves-
tigate if applicants have a
criminal history.
As part of the new law,
by 2012 fingerprints will
be processed electroni-
cally which reportedly
costs more than hard-copy
fingerprinting, but reduces


the turnaround time for
employers.
Locally, several child-
care providers and caregivw
ers for the mentally chal-
lenged and elderly offered
support for the new law.
Stasia Timmons, Green
Acres Learning Center
owner and director, said
applicants seeking employ-
ment there already are
required to have finger-
printing done. The new
law won't affect hiring
practices at the facility, she
said.
"Background screening


has always been required
for someone to be hired in
a childcare position," she
said. "I believe the costs
for the (electronic) finger-
printing is a little higher
than what is itOwhen we
send it in via mail, but it's
a minor cost when you
weigh-out the advantages."
Timmons said the elec-
tronic fingerprinting pro-
cess will helpcaregivers
get the background results
quicker than in the past,
which in turn will help
increase the safety for the
children.


"I don't necessarily
know that the law was
needed because the
background screening has
been required, however,
I was an employee of the
Columbia County School
system and they do the
electronic fingerprinting,"
she said. "Things are a
little more streamlined
and everybody goes in
this direction. I don't know
if it was necessary, but it
makes sense for every-
thing to go in the same
SECURITY continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Stasia Timmons, 31, conducts a tickle session on 2-year-olds Ryann Sampson (left) and
Hope Hanover. 'I am passionate about children,' the owner and co-director of Green Acres
Learning Center said. 'What I get out of it is very rewarding. It's fulfilling to watch them grow.
We are a part of their everyday routine. The consistency and love in a daily routine is impor-
tant in their growing.' .


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jerry Schuck, of Action Sighs, puts up a sign Friday afternoon
advertising early voting at the Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections office which begins Monday for the primary election.


Get out and


vote, early


ballots begin


Columbia County
offers two sites for
early voting.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Local voters can begin
casting ballots for their
political choices Monday as
Election 2010 early voting
begins for the Aug. 24 pri-
mary election.
"All party affiliations can
vote in the local elections
for our county," said Liz
Home, Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections.


"For the state, they have
to vote by party. For the
county, no matter wheth-
er voters are registered
as Democrat, Republican,
independent or whatever,
they can vote non-partisan
for the local election."
Early voting begins Aug.
9 at Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections
offices at- 971 W. Duval St.
and in Fort White at the
Fort White Community
Center, 17579 SW State
Road 47.
SThe polling sites will
be opened from 8:30 a.m.
VOTE continued on 3A


Creating futures


ANTONIA ROBINSONI Lake City Reporter
Billy Sheely Johnson (center) thanks CHS FFA for her special
FFA jacket while Shawn Mayo Jr., senior chapter president,
and Shelby Harden, vice president, look on.

FFA memorial fields

honor for 1942 grad


Event pays tribute
to memory of
William Sheely.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Columbia High School
FFA members paid tribute
to one of their own during
a Membership Memorial


Saturday.
.William Franklin "Bill"
Sheely was a 1942 graduate
of CHS, and served in the
Army Air Corps as an area
gunner. He died in combat
July 7, 1944, and in 1950
a chapter of the FFA was
named in his honor.
The FFA chapter pre-
sented Sheely's daughter,
FFA continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752.9400


92 2
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, IOA


Opinion
Business
Obituaries
Advice & Comics .
Puzzles ......


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Bud, '.tiin for
.,. , I -. f.,: I .p


.' l


~~'"~COMING


COMING
TUESDAY
to pm unitr ,i le-drid:
to l:ir, our .'. eel.


a~i~MUM, 'ni s1i


W C y I .- . .


I"


I lll !ll !








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


($ 4 FLORIDA
,da ezmatch. ,lH II

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
16-17-19-28 19 8-12-15-16-24 Afternoon: 9-4-5 Afternoon: 8-4-1-4 6-8-26-28-36-50 x5 19-28-30-37-53
Evening: 1-0-3 Evening: 1-9-2-0 PB36 x4


AROUND THE NATION



Well capping: Relief but fear of abandonment


By ALLEN G. BREED and
ADAM GELLER
AP National Writers
he gusher has
finally been
beaten back,
and from 400
miles up gov-
ernment satellites assure
' that the oil in the Gulf of
Mexico is disappearing.
But Dave Marino only
wishes he could put that
kind of distance between
himself and the Deepwater
Horizon spill.
As northern breezes
drove tides lower in the
last few days, tempera-
tures well into the 90s
'seemed to reliquify the
'sludge lodged in marshes
. hear Marino's home of
'Myrtle Grove, La., releas-
ing a steady, black drip
from the high grasses.
'Walking on the beach at
Isle Grand Terre, Marino
. looked back to see oil ooz-
ing from his footprints in
the sand.
'"There's still oil out
here," says Marino, a fire-
fighter who runs a charter
fishing boat on the side.
"'It's all over the place. Not
,'much has changed."
But with BP cautiously
:declaring its "static kill"
:a success in plugging the
'once-runaway well, and
:'the Obama administra-
tion's claims that crews
and nature had taken care
:of all but a quarter of the
-estimated 207 million gal-
-.lons of crude that have
"poured from the blowout,
'Marino and others can
'already feel the nation's
,gaze turning away.


ASSOCIATED PRESS


This July 31, file picture shows oil-contaminated marsh grass in Barataria Bay on the coast of Louisiana.


President Barack
Obama and BP have
pledged to stay the course
until all the oil is cleaned
up, all "legitimate claims"
are paid and those hurt
are made whole.
Still, as Gulf Coast resi-,
dents pause to think about
what they've been through
and try to look forward,
they can't help but glance


over their shoulders.
After Hurricane Katrina
in 2005, the country's
attention was focused on
the region like a laser
beam. For the first time
in decades, it seemed that
the rest of America finally
understood that the slow
death of the nation's larg-
est network of coastal wet-
lands a death blamed,


in large part, on ditches
and canals dug by the oil
and gas industry was
a threat to them and
therefore, something they
should care about.
"We all said that that
was a game-changer -
that things were going to
be done differently," says
Casey DeMoss Roberts,
assistant director of water


resources for the Gulf
Restoration Network, an
environmental advocacy
group. "All the disparate
interests were going to get
together, work together
and come up with a single
plan."
But the zeal for restora-
tion ran headlong into the
great recession. And as
the death tolls mounted


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Lady Gaga back at Lollapalooza 3 years later


ady Gaga has come
a long'way since her
appearance three years
ago at the Lollapalooza
music festival but she
hasn't forgotten some critics' less-
than-stellar reviews of that perfor-
mance.
The voice behind "Paparazzi" and
"Bad Romance" commanded thou-
sands of screaming fans in Chicago
. on Friday night to forget anyone
who ever .said they weren't pretty
enough or skinny enough or that
"your Lollapalooza BMI stage show
was a (expletive) trainwreck. You're
a (expletive) superstar. You were
born that way!",
The order was met with a roar
from the sea of mostly teens and 20-
somethings squished in front of the
stage, bouncing up and down with
their fists in the air.
It was redeeming moment and
a far cry from Lady Gaga's first
appearance at the festival in 2007,
when she sang and played keyboard
in a glittery bra and tiny, black bot-
toms. Recordings of the daytime per-
formance show a distracted crowd
and a sparse stage.
Three years later, a towering
image of a scantily clad Lady Gaga
flashed on a billowing white curtain.
The singer started the show in a
black jacket with sky-high 'shoulder
pads. Next, she donned a shiny red
cape, later dancing around in a trans-
parent dress.
"My name is Lady Gaga. I thank
you for coming to my show. I didn't
used to be brave. In fact I wasn't
very brave at all," she told her fans.
"But you have made me brave, little
monsters. So now I'm going to brave
for you. Tonight, I want you to free
yourself."

Reports: Williams to
wed US actress
LONDON British media say
pop singer Robbie Williams is to
marry his girlfriend, U.S. actress
Ayda Field, in an intimate ceremony.
The Daily Mail tabloid says the 36-
year-old pop star plans to have a low-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lady Gaga performs during the fifth annual concert festival at Lollapalooza in
Grant Park Friday, in Chicago.


key wedding among close friends
and family in California Saturday.
There are conflicting reports
about the location of the ceremony.
The Daily Mail said the wedding
would be held in Williams' mansion
in Beverly Hills, while other reports
say the singer will tie the knot with
Field on the island of Santa Catalina
off the coast of California.
His representatives declined to
comment on media reports of his
wedding. Williams is popular in
Britain and the rest of Europe, first
as a member of the boy band Take
That, and later when he pursued a
solo singing career.

Tony Judt, author of
'Postwar,' dies at 62
NEW YORK The highly praised


and controversial historian Tony
Judt has died in New York.
A New York University spokesman
says Judt died Friday night due to
complications of amyotrophic lateral
sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's dis-
ease. He was 62.
Judt was a professor of European
studies at the school. He was a
Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2006 for his
nearly 900-page history of modern
Europe, "Postwar."
Judt continued to write a series
of personal essays early this year
despite a two-year battle with ALS
that left him paralyzed.
His illness and determination to
tell the tale brought sympathy and
admiration for a historian not known
for sparing feelings.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Producer Dino
DeLaurentiis is 91.
* Actress Esther Williams
is 89.
* Actor Richard Anderson
is 84.
* Joan Mondale, wife of
former Vice President
* Walter F Mondale, is 80.


Daily ScriDture


* Actress Nita Talbot is 80.
* Singer Mel Tillis is 78.
* Actor Dustin Hoffman
is 73.
* Actress Connie Stevens
is 72.
* Country singer Phil
Balsley (The Statler
Brothers) is 71.


He said to them, "Because of
your little faith.Amen, I say to
you, if you have faith the size of
a mustard seed, you will say to
this mountain, 'Move from here
to there,' and it will move."

-Matthew, 17:20


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Fax number .............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation ...............755-5445 SINESS
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
lashed Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
All material her ein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers should
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
NEWS (rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
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52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


in Iraq and Afghanistan,
banks collapsed and the
auto industry teetered
on the brink of disaster,
people's attention and
efforts turned elsewhere,
she says.
"And then we have the
BP disaster," says Roberts.
"And again people are
saying, 'OK Now THIS is
the game-changer. We're
going to get it right with
the coast this time."'
And yet doubts and
uncertainties are every-
where.
So much has happened
since April 20, when 11
men died in the explosion
that sank the Deepwater
Horizon 50 miles off-
shore. All along the coast,
residents still reeling from
closed fisheries, empty
restaurant seats and vacant
hotel rooms wonder what,
if anything, we've learned
from it all. And they worry
that the nation will for-
get them, that the depths
of the Gulf may hide far
greater damage than BP
admits, that a region long
admired for its resilience
may this time have been
pushed beyond repair.
"Katrina wiped out half
the parish I grew up in,"
says Kerry St. Pe', director
of the Barataria-Terrebone
National.Estuary Program,
whose family has lived
along south Louisiana's
bayous since 1760. "You
can't keep hammering the
way people make their
livings and how people
live and still maintain this
culture because people will
eventually just give up."


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


County to address budget


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn

County commission-
ers will meet at 9 a.m.
Monday to find ways to cut
$1.4 million from its bud-
get, a county official said
Friday.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will meet


for a budget workshop to
discuss its current status,
expenditure reductions and
possible expenditure reduc-
tions of the fiscal year 2010
to 2011 budget.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said he will pres-
ent the board a floor budget
- a budget that can "sup-
port the same level of ser-
vice as the current year."


FFA: Chapter named


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Brandi Lee, 19, plays the game of Life on Friday with a group of second-, third- and fifth-graders in an after-school program at
the Green Acres Learning Center in Lake City. 'It's a big responsibility to help encourage them when they need it,' Lee said.
'We get to be positive role models in their lives.'

SECURITY: Includes electronic fingerprinting


Continued From Page 1A

direction."
Sheryll Walker, Happy
House Inc. executive
director, said the new
laws could have more
of an impact on smaller
childcare centers than the
Happy House facility.
"HB 7069 won't affect
us a whole lot, but for the
smaller centers, it's going
to be tough," Walker said.
"We don't use substitutes
here, we hire permanent
people that are here all the
time, so when someone is
sick we have an extra five
or six people and that's all
they do is fill in. I think
the intent of the legisla-
tion was good, but when
it comes into practice it's
going to make it difficult
on some of the smaller
centers to stay with their
(child to caregiver) ratio."
Walker also said she
believes the new law was
needed.
"I think there definitely


Continued From Page 1A

to 4:30 p.m. Monday to
Saturday until Aug. 21.
All voters are eligible to
participate in early voting.
To cast ballots in early vot-
ing, voters need to provide
a photo identification with
their signatures.
"A drivers license usually
takes care of everything,"
Horne said. "They can vote
with that or either a Florida
identification card. If you
don't want to go to the polls
on election day, you can
come in and early vote."
According to Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections office data, there
are 39,723 registered vot-
ers in Columbia County.
Horne said traditionally
37 percent of the local reg-
istered voters take part in "
early voting.
"I hope we have more
than 37 percent vote this
year," she said. "I hope peo-
ple will really get out and
voice their opinion by vot-
ing. Educate yourself and
get out a vote."

3rd spacewalk
to restore
cooling system

By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL A
pair of space station astro-
nauts had to hammer loose
a stuck connector during an
urgent spacewalk to restore
a crucial cooling system
Saturday, then an ammonia
leak erupted and hampered
the entire repair effort.
Despite making one of
the longest spacewalks
ever, Douglas Wheelock
and Tracy Caldwell Dyson
had to give up trying and
retreat inside.


needs to be more checks
and balances for people
before they start working
with children, because
there are no mistakes with
children," she said. "At the
same time, with it taking
five-to-seven, days to get '
something back, when
you lose an employee
and you're a small center,
it's very difficult to get
somebody in there and
keep the ratio and have an
opening for your parents
- because parents need
to work. It's a 'Catch 22.',
Their intent was good, but
it's just going to be hard
to practice for smaller cen-
ters."
Walker said the new
laws will impact safety for
the children and other
people who use caregiver
services.
"The more background
checks you do, the safer
the children are," she said,
noting the costs of finger-


printing won't be passed
along to Happy House par-
ents. 'The costs of these
background checks are a
little bit more, but they're
quicker, it's not as much
paperwork and not as
much work to get it done.."
Carol Jewett, execu-
tive director of CARC-
Advocates For Citizens
With Disabilities, Inc., said
she expects the new law to
have little, if any impact on
hiring practices.
"Once it's up and run-
ning, I don't think it will
affect our hiring practices
much," she said. "It will
cost maybe a few days


delay in being able to hire
and waiting for the results
to get back."
However, she said she
believes the new laws will
increase client safety.
"It will increase client
safety because we won't be
able to work the individ-
ual until the background
screening has been
received," she said.
Jewett said she's in favor
of the new hiring man-
dates. ,
"I think that any extra
safety precautions that we
can do is for the better of
our clients," she said.


/ "Nanny" .
"' Brown
Nov.'4, 1952-Aug. 8,2009 L l /
It has been one year since
OUR PRECIOUS ANGEL
went home to be with the Lord.
You are forever in our hearts.
Love always, your husband "LO",
.your children Pumpkin, Puddin, "Lil Lo"
and a host of other family and friends..


For additional informa-
tion about the election and
candidates, visit www.vote-
columbia.com.


Discover \vhy Warren Butfett. Ned Jarrelt,.
Harvev MNacKa). Lee lacocca. Heather Rene French.
Mary Ka Ash and man) others credit Dale Carnegie
i% ith making a significant impact on their success.


Sponsored h) the Lake (l'il)-C'olunmia ('oun Chuambler r oil C'oninirrce
and L.ake ('il) Rep)orler


) -.I 1 1 1" 1 ,-11 ']* ** . *-.

For Information call the Chamber at 752-3690 or
. Dale Carnegie at 1-800-733-1001
- -* 84V J. -b


Continued From Page 1A

Billy Sheely Johnson, with
an official FFA jacket.
The jacket has the names
of two FFA chapters, the
one named after Sheely
and the Columbia FFA, said
Harden. #
Also during the pro-
gram, Lake City Mayor
Stephen Witt read a proc-
lamation in Sheely's honor,
Congressman Ander
Crenshaw sent a letter to
the family and a aircraft
flew over as a memorial of
his military service.
The memorial paid trib-
ute to Sheely and brought
awareness to the sacrifices
made defending the coun-
try, said Greg Harden,
Columbia FFA Alumni
president.
Words couldn't express
her gratitude for the memo-
rial, Johnson said. It was an
overwhelming honor.
"I thank the young folks
for remembering my dad


06MonthSmiles.com


who died over 60 years
ago," she said.
Her father has lived on in
the hearts of his family and
the tribute shows he lives
on in the hearts of the com-
munity, Johnson said.
He exemplified FFA
motto Learning to Do,
Doing to Learn, Earning-to
Live, Living to Serve dur-
ing his brief life, she said.
Sheely's family recently
established the William
Franklin Sheely Memorial
Scholarship, Johnson said.
It will be awarded at the
2011 graduation to an
deserving FFA student
from CHS or Fort White
High School who strives
to apply the FFA motto in
their life.
"It is our hope a student
will be inspired by Bill
Sheely's legacy of learn-
ing to do, doing to learn,.
earning to live and living to
serve," she said.


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OPINION


Sunday, August 8, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Time to

ease the

burden of

US debt

I t's a message few voters
may want to hear, but it's
one they need to listen to
ahead of this fall's elec-
tions: The U.S. govern-
ment can either start now to
reduce its debt load, with some
unavoidable pain, or it likely
will be forced to take much
more drastic and painful steps
in coming decades to stop a
financial crisis.
SIn a brief released recently,
the Congressional Budget
Office extended two trend lines
one based on current law
and the second on expected
changes to those laws. The
eventual outcomes under either
scenario including deep cuts
in government services, higher
unemployment rates, steeper
rates of inflation and higher
interest rates on loans would
cause considerable harm to
almost all Americans.
If the current trend contin-
ues, the nation's debt would
equal about 80 percent of gross
domestic product within 25
years. At only one other time
in the nation's history, during.
World War II, has debt climbed
above 50 percent of GDP.
Would that level of debt be
enough to trigger the type of
financial meltdown that Ireland
and Greece have encountered
in recent years? That's uncer-
tain. But the higher the debt,
the higher the odds of a fiscal
catastrophe.
The CBO's second projec-
tion contains even worse news.
Under that scenario, which is
the more likely course given
recent patterns in Washington,
D.C., the debt would hit 90
percent of GDP within 10 years
and would soar to 110 percent
by 2025. Such debt levels would
be unsustainable, forcing the
government to take drastic
steps to simultaneously cut
spending and raise taxes.
Voters need to press every
congressional candidate this fall
for specifics on how he or she
would help to shrink the defi-
cit if elected. The nation can't
afford to continue business as
usual on Capitol Hill. t's more
critical than ever that the lead-
ers Americans elect this fall
understand that reality.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
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get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
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This mission will be accomplished "
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
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address and telephone number for
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Lake City, FL.32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


The economic out-
look is often a game
of expectations, and
in that regard the
employment picture
took a beating last month.
Overall, the nation lost
131,000 jobs in July; the forecast
had been for 65,000. Private-
sector jobs were expected to
increase by 90,000; instead, only
71,000 were added. We knew
that 143,000 temporary Census
jobs would end in June, but the
public sector lost another 59,000
jobs beyond that. The job-loss
figure for June had been pegged
at 125,000; this past week, it was
revised upward to 221,000.
The unemployment rate
remained unchanged at 9.5 per-
cent; but only because 181,000.
people gave up and quit looking
for work.
President Barack Obama


www.lakecityreporter.com


Our choices for local contested races


With early vot-
ing beginning
Monday, politi-
cal season is
officially under
way in Columbia County. The
following are our recommenda-
tions for local candidates in con-
tested races.
State Representative
Republican Primary Dist. 11
Elizabeth Porter is the clear
choice to represent Republicans
in the fall. She is our choice in
the Republican primary for Dist.
11 State Representative.
Far and away, Porter has
more in-depth knowledge of
the issues facing Floridians
and has a plan on how to tackle
the enormous tasks of working
to balance the state's budget.
Porter thinks government is too
big, redundant in many areas,
and we agree. She also is on
target that unemployment is our
most daunting problem in Dist.
11, but she sends a clear mes-
sage that people need proper
skills training and a job, not sim-
ply a government handout.
Porter's experience in local
county government allows her
inside knowledge that unfunded
mandates handed down from
Tallahassee don't work. She's
seen the stress these cause
local budgets that already are
strapped.
In the Republican primary,
she's the candidate with the
best plan to help Dist. 11 move
forward.

Columbia County Dist. 4
Stephen Bailey has proved
himself an effective leader in
Columbia County Dist. 4 and
there's no reason to think he
won't continue growing in the
role of county commissioner
during the next four years.
Bailey is our recommenda-


tion for the Dist. 4.post because
of his in-depth knowledge of
emergency services, namely the
inner workings of the county
fire department, and his under-
standing of the critical pieces
that must come together to
make Columbia County grow
sensibly from the inland port
site to the freeway interchanges
in the county. He supported the
Ellisville utility project until an
11th-hour addition to the ordi-
nance forced mandatory hook-
ups on existing residents. When
that occurred, he changed his
position and voted against the
proposal.
Bailey is a leader and we
need him on the county com-
mission. A lifelong resident of
the district, he is entrenched in
his family agriculture business.
He lives and works in Dist. 4.
Bailey's humility also impressed
us. He was quick to admit as
a first-term commissioner, he
made mistakes from which he
learned.
Overall, he did an excellent
job for the county during the
past four years and he deserves
to keep his seat

Columbia County Dist. 2
Political newcomer Mark
Kazmierski said he wants the
chance to serve his community
and he deserves the opportu-
*nity. Kazmierski is our recom-
mendation to represent Dist. 2.
Kazmierski has demonstrated
an intricate knowledge of the
challenges facing both his dis-
trict and Columbia County. He
has his sights set in the right
direction on job creation -
while voicing the need to pro-
tect what sets Columbia County
apart from other counties in
North Florida its abundant
natural resources.
What impressed us about
Kazmierski is the study he's


conducted info the challenges
facing the county and the
opportunities on the table. He
speaks like a stockholder about
the Inland Port project but
swears he's not and has a
plan that involves county sup-
port of the private sector to
drive economic development
without giving away the store.
That's a plan that Columbia
County can grow with and
that's why Kazmierski has
earned the chance to aid that
growth in a county commis-
sioner seat.

City Council Dist. 10
Clarence Tucker Jr. has been
in leadership roles on both
the giving and receiving ends
- most of his life. It's this type
of experience that makes him
our recommendation for Lake
City's Dist. 10.
Tucker has spent three
decades in the Florida National
Guard, but its his local com-
munity involvement that's most
impressive about this Columbia
High School grad. He knows
what needs fixing in his district
- crime and roads rise to the
top of the list and he knows
that none of those concerns can
be attacked with simple resur-
facing.
Tucker's right when he
says its important to grow our
tax base, and he's put forth
some solid ideas to help the
city accomplish that goal. He's
knowledgeable about.the needs
and challenges of the city's
downtown arena, and he's on
board with the necessity of,
city-county cooperation for both
growth and vital services.
Tucker's combined passion,
community knowledge and lead-
ership traits make him a clear
choice for Dist. 10.


put a good face on the figures,
noting that the private sec-
tor had added jobs for seven
straight months and that hard-
hit manufacturing had added
183,000 jobs in that time, "the
most robust seven months of
manufacturing growth in over a
decade." And manufacturing did
add 36,000 jobs in July after add-
ing 13,000 in June, but that has
to be seen against the backdrop
of a work force in which 14.6
million people are looking for
jobs.
As uninspiring as the July
numbers were, analysts said
they weren't gloomy enough to
point to another downturn, the
dreaded double dip.
Obama counseled that "climb-
ing out of any recession, much
less a hole as deep as this one,
takes some time. The road
to recovery doesn't follow a


I
straight line. ... So what we need
to do is to keep pushing for-
ward. We can't go backwards."
Nor is there much else the
president can do. The House
is returning to Washington for
final passage of a $26.1 billion
bill to save 160,000 teaching
jobs and pay states' Medicaid
bills, but that will be the last
stimulus measure of this
Congress.
Unless the jobs picture
improves dramatically in the
next three months, things
are likely to go badly for the
Democrats this November. With
corporate profits near all-time
highs and companies sitting on
record amounts of cash, it's pos-
sible there could be an abrupt
upturn before then but no
one's betting on it.

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Todd Wilson
twilsonJiakecityreporter.com


Political

picks sum

of all parts

Today we announce
our candidate rec-
ommendations for
this election cycle.
Our picks in the
four contested districts appear
to the left of this column.
Based on research and inter-
views, considering the major
issues facing our city, county
and region, we are offering
our recommendations based
on what we learned during the
process.
We are not attempting to tell
anyone how to cast their vote.
This is simply the best advice
we feel we could give a voter
who can't make up their mind
or isn't inclined to ask as many
questions as we did.
Our choices are not the
selections of any one news-
paper staff member. Our
editorial board completed the
interviews and votes were
taken with the majority opin-
ion ruling. Information was
gathered on each candidate,
including biographical details
from their resumes, work and
professional history, ideas and
responses to several standard
questions. We watched closely
as last week's television forum
on live television played out.
We listened to the candidates.
We considered what their pres-
ence was in our community
and what impact their pres- -
ence has had prior to them
becoming a candidate for
public office. Some of them we
had seen; some not.
Every candidate in each of
the contested races was invited
to participate.
Candidates in each district
answered a basic framework
of the same questions. Once
these were answered, in some
cases, the candidates' respons-
es led us to another question.
And, at the end of the inter-
views, each candidate had the
opportunity of making any
point we did not ask about.
We found good-natured and
good-humored candidates in
each group, Every one of them
had a clearly defined reason
why they felt compelled to run
for office. And running for
public office is no small accom-
plishment in itself. We salute
all of the candidates for giving
it a shot, taking action and get-
ting themselves qualified for
the ballot.
One of the amazing things
we noticed was that a few
of the candidates have very
limited knowledge of some of
the most pressing issues fac-
ing our city and county. If you
are voting this year, please
make sure your candidates
understand at least the basics
of how economic development
projects are structured at the
county level or what the city's
long-term utility service goal
is.
It's not too much to ask of
a person seeking public office
to expect them to know the
basics. Most of them did; a
few did not. So choose wisely
before you fill out your ballot
Election seasons are crazy
times, but very important for
our future. Make an informed
choice, get out and cast your
vote. Early voting begins
Monday morning and goes for
the next two weeks. Then elec-
tion day is Tuesday, Aug. 24.
Exercise this basic,


American right and help your
city, county and state along by
making good choices.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


OTHER OPINION


Recovery leaving the jobless behind












BRIEFS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 6 photo, Connie Plessala organizes Louisiana blue crabs into bins behind the counter of Big Fisherman Seafood
in New Orleans.'


Seafood tries to shake oily image


By MARY FOSTER and
BRIAN SKOLOFF
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS The
rich fishing grounds of the
Gulf of Mexico are begin-
ning to reopen more than
three months after crude
began gushing from the
sea floor. But those who
harvest, process and sell
the catch face a new crisis
- convincing wary con-
sumers it's not only deli-
cious, but also safe.
As BP PLC closed the
books on a defining week
in its battle to contain the
oil, with engineers finally
forcing the surging crude
underground with a torrent
of mud and cement, people
along the Gulf Coast began
looking to the future -
including the fishing indus-
try, which has a tough sell
despite tests showing the
catch seems safe to eat
"We have a huge per-
ception problem," said
Ewell Smith, director of
the Louisiana Seafood
Promotion and Marketing
Board. "We have lost mar-
kets across the country,
and some of them may be
lost for good."


Kagan now

the fourth

woman on

high court
Associated Press

WASHINGTON- Elena
Kagan was sworn in
Saturday as the 112th jus-
tice and fourth woman ever
to serve on the Supreme
Court.
Chief Justice John
Roberts administered the
oath to Kagan in a brief pri-
vate ceremony at the court.
Kagan, joined by family and
friends, pledged to faithfully
and impartially uphold the
law.
Afterward, she smiled
broadly as a crowd of onlook-
ers stood and applauded.
'We look forward to serv-
ing with you," Roberts said.
Kagan, a former Harvard
Law School dean who most
recently was solicitor gen-
eral, was President Barack
Obama's choice to succeed
retired Justice John Paul
Stevens. Republicans criti-
cized her as a political lib-
eral, before the Senate con-
firmed her this past week
on a vote of 63-37.
She was sworn in twice
Saturday by Roberts -
reciting one oath as pre-
scribed by the Constitution
during a ceremony in a con-
ference room at the court
with only her family present.
Kagan then recited a sec-
ond oath, taken by judges,
with her family and friends.


The Gulf accounts for a
majority of the domestic
shrimp and oysters eaten
by Americans and about 2
percent of overall U.S. sea-
food consumption. But with
safety suspicions abound-
ing, consumers are turning
up their noses and some
wary suppliers appear to be
turning to imports.
Tammy McNaught
arrived in New Orleans
from San Francisco on
Saturday for a long week-
end, and after seeing
months"of news coverage
about the oil spill was try-
ing to decide whether she
would eat seafood and how
much.
"It's probably nothing,
but I'm not sure if it is safe.
However, if it's deep fried,
you know it is going to
be OK," McNaught said,
laughing.
At the annual Great
American Seafood Cookoff,
held Saturday in New
Orleans, competition was
secondary this year to
spreading good word about
Gulf seafood.
"Right now the general
perception is that Gulf sea-
food is tainted. And I'm
sure some of it is," said


Peter Fischbach, of Toms
River, N.J., a chef with
Gourmet Dining Services.
"But the stuff that's tainted
is not on the market It's
not safe; it's not edible. It's
not going to make its way
to the market."
BP this week finished
pumping mud and cement
into the well that blew
out after the Deepwater
Horizon rig exploded April
20, killing 11 workers.
Spokesman Max McGahan
said Saturday that engi-
neers were still waiting for
the cement to harden so
work could begin on drill-
ing the final 100 feet of a
relief well.
When that relief well
intersects the broken well,
workers will pump more
cement and mud in a "bot-
tom kill" to seal the well
permanently.
The well's apparent suf-,
focation coincided with the
release of a federal report
this week showing that only
about a quarter of the oil
lost to the leak remains in
or along the shores of the
Gulf, with the rest having
dissipated or otherwise dis-
appeared. The remaining
53 million gallons, though,


would be enough alone to
rank among the nation's
worst spills.
Some fishing grounds
remain closed as that oil
continues to wash through
the Gulf, but state and
federal tests have shown
samples of seafood in some
areas safe to eat. The Food
and Drug Administration
says chemical dispersants
used to break up the oil
do not pose a public health
concern.
Doug Suttles, BP's chief
operating officer, sought to
ease consumers' minds and
palates by saying this week
he would eat Gulf seafood
himself and "serve it to my
family."
Such assurances appear
to be doing little to quell
distaste for Gulf seafood,
though.
Some processors are
having difficulty selling the
seafood they can get, even
to long-established custom-
ers.
"I've talked to suppliers
who have sold 20 years to
companies and are now
being told no," Smith said.
"A lot of people are substi-
tuting imported product for
Gulf product."


Nuke deal could
allow enrichment

WASHINGTON The
Obama administration has
told U.S. lawmakers that
a nuclear cooperation deal
with Vietnam is unlikely to
include a coveted promise
by the Hanoi government
not to enrich uranium, con-
gressional aides say.
The United States had
sought a no-enrichment
pledge, which the State
Department promotes as
the "gold standard" for
civilian nuclear cooperation
accords.
It would have been mod-
eled on a deal last year
in which the United Arab
Emirates pledged, in return
for U.S. nuclear equipment
and reactors, not to enrich
uranium or extract plutoni-
um from used reactor fuel
procedures that would
provide material that could
be used in a nuclear weap-
on.
The Obama administra-
tion has been eager to send
a strong nonproliferation
message, especially to Iran,
which the United States and
others accuse of covertly
seeking nuclear weapons.
Iran says its nuclear pro-
gram is only for peaceful
purposes, but it has resist-
ed international pressure to.
,stop enriching uranium.

WikiLeaks hard to
officially plug
. WASHINGTON An
online whistle-blower's
threat to release more clas-
sified Pentagon and State
Department documents is
raising difficult questions
of what the government
can or would do, legally,
technically or even militar-
ily to stop it.
Constrained by the glob-


Ched
Gvsna





I,


al reach of the Internet,
sophisticated encryption
software and the domestic
legal system, the answer
seems to be: Not much.
But if the U.S. govern-
ment believes that the
release of classified docu-
ments WikiLeaks is prepar-
ing to disclose will threaten
national security or put
lives at risk, cyber and legal
experts say the options
could expand to include
cyber strikes to take down
the WikiLeaks website and
destroy its files or covert
operations to steal or dis-
able the files.
It all sounds, at times,
like a spy movie, where the
possibilities extend as far as
the imagination can reach.
But most outsiders agree
that reality is probably far
less dramatic.

Obama caps
birthday with golf
WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama is
capping his birthday week
with an afternoon of golfing
on Saturday and a barbecue
on Sunday.
The White House says
the president went golf-
ing on Saturday with eight
friends, some with ties to
his college days, his home-
town of Chicago and his
childhood home state of
Hawaii. They were spend-
ing the afternoon at the
Andrews Air Force Base
course.
On Sunday, Obama plans
to host a barbecue for
friends at the White House,
ending a week in which he
turned 49 without his fam-
ily around.
First lady Michelle
Obama and daughter Sasha
are vacationing in Spain;
Malia, has been at camp.
* Associated Press


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lakecityreporter.com *CURRENTS Magazine


" '


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010 Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Class Meeting
The Class of 1973 will
have a meeting at 5 p.m.
today at the Richardson
Community Center. Call
Estralita Taylor at (386)
867-6718 or Maenell Bailey
ht (386) 961-1630.

Boys Club Registration
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for the fall
session which runs from
Aug. 23 through Dec. 1.
Boys and girls ages 6 to 14
are eligible to attend and
the Club picks up from all
elementary and middle
schools. Call 752-4184.

Monday
Early Voting
Early voting for the
2010 Primary Election
will be from 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Monday through
Saturday beginning Aug.
9 and running through
Aug. 21. Early Voting loca-
tions are at the Supervisor
of Elections' Lake City
Office at 971 W. Duval
St. and at the Fort White
Community Center at
17579 SW SR 47. Voters
should bring a picture and
signature ID.

Support Group Meeting
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City will meet from 5:30
to 6:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at Baya
Pharmacy East, 780 St
Baya Drive. Call (386) 752-
4198 or (386) 755-0522.

Tuesday

Freshman Orientation
Columbia High School
will host their annual
"Camp Tiger" Freshman
Orientation for incoming
freshman students and
their parents from 9 a.m.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake Qity Reporter

Old school: Public library hosts initial class in fine manners
Trinitee Smith, 7, of Orlando, works on eating properly during a free etiquette class Saturday at the Columbia County Public
Library. This was the first in a series of four classes hosted by Bea Coker, author of 'Etiquette for the African American.' The
classes will also focus on learning to appreciate other cultures.


to 12 p.m. Aug. 10. All are
encouraged to attend. Call
Chelsey Hendry at (386)
466-9682 or the front office
at (386) 755-8080.

Wednesday
Newcomer's Meeting
The Lake City
Newcomer's monthly
meeting will be at 11
a.m. Aug. 11 at Quail
Heights Country Club.
The luncheon is $10 and
the program this month
is the annual bingo game.


All members, guests and
friends along with any
newcomers are invited.
Call 719-5661 or 935-1548.

Thursday
Southside Idol
Registration for
Southside Idol Night is
from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Aug. 23-27 at Southside
Community Center.
Children in grades four
through eight are able to
register. The Center is
located at 692 SW Saint


Margaret's St. Call Wayne
Jernigan, Liz Coker or
Tiffanni Aguirre at 758-
5448 or 758-5450.

Friday
Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
ducation at High Springs
Community Theater is
"The Spell Of Sleeping
Beauty" at 7 p.m. Aug.
13. All tickets are $5 and
available at The Framery,
The Coffee Clutch in High
Springs and through Pay


Pal at www.highspringcom-
munitytheater.com.

Saturday
Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
duction at High Springs
Community Theater is
"'The Spell Of Sleeping
Beauty" at 7 p.m. Aug.
14. All tickets are $5 and
available at The Framery,
The Coffee Clutch in High
Springs and through Pay
Pal at www.highspringcom-
munitytheater.com.


AARP meeting
The Lake City Chapter
of AARP will meet at
11 a.m. Aug. 14 at the
Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison Ct
James Montgomery is
the guest speaker. Please
bring food for a covered
dish lunch at noon. Call
752-3703

Sock hop
Christian Service Center
is having a "sock hop"
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Aug. 14 at Lake City Mall.
Pick up a yellow school
bus with a child's name in
center court and buy a pair
of sneakers and socks for
them. Call 755-1770.

Sunday, Aug. 15
Youth Production
The annual youth pro-
duction at High Springs
Community Theater is
"The Spell Of Sleeping
Beauty" at 2 p.m. Aug.
15, 20 and 21. All tickets
are $5 and available at
The Framery, The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs
and through Pay Pal at
www.highspringcommunity-
theat'ercom.

Saturday, Aug. 21
Backpack Give Away
Christ Central
Ministries will be hosting
Operation Backpack #VI
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug.
21 at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. They will be
.giving away backpacks and
school supplies. School
physical and haircuts will
also be offered.

Tuesday Aug. 24
Elections
Election Day for the
2010 August Primary is
from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug.
24.


Sock Hop a shoe-in with


Columbia County children


By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter

A local service center will
be helping children return
to school with a fresh pair
of socks and shoes.
The Lake City Christian
Service Center will be host-
ing its sixth annual Sock
Hop from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
on Aug. 14.
People will have the
opportunity to purchase
socks, and tennis shoes for
children in kindergarten
through 12th grade who
. are in' need in Columbia


County. The event will take
place in the center court of
the Lake City Mall where
people pick up a yellow
school bus with a child's
name and buy a pair of
sneakers and socks in the
size listed.
There will also be enter-
tainment during the day
featuring performances
by The Dixie Dancers,
Lake City Dance Arts, a
fashion show by Bon
Worth and Maurices,
an Elvis performance by
Randall Wainwright, Bard
Gymnastics, ATA Black


Belt Academy and The
Shirley's.
Shirley McManus, ser-
vice center executive direc-
tor, said Lake City Christian
Service Center will be help-
ing more than 200 children
go back to school with new
socks and shoes.
"Ift's amazing how many
children are without good
shoes," said McManus.
"Most of the shoes we have
here are worn and brand
new socks and shoes are
good for children."
For more information,
call (386) 755-1770.


.IX" h'


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter

Class in manners includes dish duty, too
Brandon Kite, 7, of Lake City, clears off the table during etiquette classes Saturday at the
Columbia County Public Library.


OBITUARIES


Eva Mobley Griffitts

Mrs. Eva Mobley Griffitts, 96, of
Lake City, passed away peace-
fully on Friday, August 6, 2010,
in the Health Center of Lake City
following an extended illness. A
native of Martin County, North
Carolina, Mrs. Griffitts was the
daughter of the late Louis and
Effie Estelle Roberson Mobley.
She had been a resident of Lake
City since 1940 having moved
here from Raleigh, North Caro-
lina. Mrs. Griffitts attended and
graduated from the State Hospi-
tal School of Nursing in Raleigh
and the Medical College of Vir-
ginia. She worked for 30 years as
a registered nurse with the V.A.
Medical Center here in Lake
City. Mrs. Griffitts was very ac-
tive in the commimity until her
ill health. She was a past member
of the Lake City Garden Club,
the Woman's Club, the Business
& Professional Women's Club,
the AARP, the Florida Nurses
Association and the National As-
sociation of Retired Federal Em-
ployees. She also served on the
Lake Shore Hospital Auxiliary
for 22 years. Mrs. Griffitts was a
Charter and still current member
of the Wesley Memorial United
Methodist Church. She was pre-
ceded in death by her husband,
Thomas P. Griffitts; a brother,
Rufus N. Mobley and sisters,
Mayree Mobley and Edna L.
Gregory. Mrs. Griffitts is sur-
vived by a brother, Benjamin K.
Mobley (Cherry) of Asheboro,
North Carolina; a sister, Selma
Marie Wilkins of Jacksonville,
FL; three nieces, June Wilkins of
Jacksonville, FL; Marlene Greg-
ory of Atlanta, GA; Ann M. Miles
(James) of Raleigh, N.C.; two
nephews, David Wilkins (Kathy)
of Greensboro, N.C.; Benjamin
K. Mobley, Jr. of Graham, N.C.,
her great-nephew, David Miles
of Raleigh, N.C. and her clear
friend, Gladys Milligan of Lake
City, FL. Funeral services for
Mrs. Griffitts will be conducted
at 11:00 A.M., on Monday, Au-
gust 9, 2010 in the Wesley Me-
morial United Methodist Church
with Pastor Louie Mabrey offi-


f
citing. Interment will follow in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
The family will receive friends
at the funeral home from 5-7:00
Sunday, August 8. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FU-
NERAL HOME, 458 S. Mari-
on Ave. Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234. Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Elna Khachigan
Elna Khachigan went home to
Heaven August 6, 2010 from
Lake City Medical Center.
Survivors include son Glenn
(Martha Jo) Khachigan, grand-
daughter Kristin (Josh) Roberts
and grandson Steven (Amber)
Khachigan, and great grandsons
Griffin and Grayson Roberts.
She was predeceased by husband
Simon Khachigan in 1984 and
daughter Cheryl in 1995. She
was born September 8, 1925 to
Benjamin Hollie and Lula Mae
Fielding. She graduated from
Columbia High School in 1942.
She lived in Tampa, Florida dur-
ing World War 11 where she met
her husband Simon. After the war
ended, they married and moved
to his hometown of Bronx, New
York. They returned to Lake City
in 1967 and later moved to Avon
Park where she lived for nine
years, before her return to Lake
City. She was a member of the
First United Methodist Church
and an active member of the Fel-
lowship Sunday School class un-
til ill health prevented her attend-
ing. She was a loving mother and
grandmother who was especially
proud of her grandchildren and
twin great-grandsons. The fam-
ily is especially grateful for the
compassionate and professional
care of Dr. Ankem Ravindra, the
staff at Lake City Medical Cen-
ter, and Haven Hospice. Funeral
Services will be held at 4 P.M.,
Monday. August 9, 2010 at the
chapel of Gateway Forest Lawn
Funeral Home with Family Visi-
tation on Sunday. August 8, 2010
from 4 to 6 P.M.. also at Gateway
Forest Lawn Funeral Home. In-
terment will be at Siloam Meth-


odist Church cemetery. In lieu
of flowers, the family request
memorials to the Building Pro-
gram of First United Methodist
Church, Lake City; Siloam Meth-
odist Church; or Haven Hospice.

Dewey Ray Wilks, Sr.
Mr. Dewey Ray Wilks, Sr., 65, of
Fort White, Florida, died Thurs-
day, August 5, 2010, in the Lake
City Medical Center following a
brief illness. He was a native of
Donaldsonville, Georgia and re-
sided in Lake City before moving
to Fort White more than 20 years
ago. He owned and operated
Dewey's Auto Body Repair for
many yeas after working for nu-
merous automobile companies in
the Lake City area for more than
30 years. He was a member of
the Pine Grove Baptist Church,
a veteran of the Vietnam War, a
Master Gardener and member of
the Suwannee Valley Day Lily
Society. He enjoyed hunting
and fishing in the river near his
home. He was preceded in death
by his parents, James Ray Wilks
and Juanita Johnson Wilks. He
is survived by his wife, Linda
K. Wilks, of Fort White, FL;
his daughter, Lynn Knowles,
of Gainesville, FL; two sons,
Dewey Ray (Rhonda) Wilks, Jr.
of Jacksonville, FL and Claude
James (Brook) Wilks of Fort
White, FL; one sister, Shirley
Flame, of Ocala, FL; two broth-
ers, James Wilks, of Lake City,
FL, and Don Wilks, of Ocala,
FL; thirteen grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren also
survive. Funeral services will be
conducted at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
August 10, 2010 in the Chapel
of Guerry Funeral Home with
Rev. Paul Moreau officiating.
Interment will be in Swift Creek
Cemetery, Union County, FL.
Visitation will be from 6 to 8 P.M.
Monday, August 9 at GUER-
RY FUNERAL HOME, 2659
SW Main Blvd. Lake City, Fla.



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428






'LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


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LAKE CITY REPORTER POLITICS SUNdAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


GOP candidates

for Fla. governor

put aside attacks


By MITCH STACY
Associated Press

MIAMI-- Bill McCollum
and Rick Scott on Saturday
put aside the bitter attacks
that have dominated their
gubernatorial campaigns,
instead touting their ultra-
conservative principles
and strong religious faith
in speeches to a statewide
Christian organization.
McCollum, the state
attorney general, and Scott,
a wealthy businessman
and political upstart, each
posed for pictures, shook
hands and received warm
welcomes from the crowd
of about 250 attending the
Christian Family Coalition
candidates forum.
Both promised, if elected,
to create hundreds of thou-
sands of new jobs by cut-
ting taxes, loosening regu-
lations, and generally mak-
ing it cheaper and easier to
do business in Florida. Both
vowed to fight implementa-
tion of President Barack
Obama's health care plan
and oppose same-sex mar-
riage and abortion. Both
said their religious faith
would help guide them as
they governed the state.
Absent was the mudsling-
ing and name-calling that
dominated their campaign
commercials and overshad-
owed the issues in two tele-
vised debates earlier in the
week. The only reference
to their political feud came
when McCollum accused
Scott of "misinterpreting my
views" on Arizona's tough
new immigration law.
The 57-year-old Scott,
a tea party favorite who


rose to prominence lead-
ing a national fight against
Obama's health care plan,
has positioned himself as
an outsider and success-
ful businessman taking on
a "career politician" who's
part of the problem.
McCollum, a congress-
man for two decades who
twice ran unsuccessfully
for the U.S. Senate, has
battered Scott with ques-
tions about his leadership
of the Columbia/HCA hos-
pital chain, which ousted
him as CEO in 1997 amid
a massive Medicare fraud
scandal.
But on Saturday, they
talked about themselves
instead of each other.
McCollum, 66, said he
is most proud of initiating
a federal lawsuit as attor-
ney general to try to block
Obama's health care plan,
an action that attorneys
general in 19 other states
have since joined as plain-
tiffs.
"I'm going to continue to
stand up to the federal gov-
ernment," he said, drawing
cheers from the audience.
Scott talked about how
he rose from humble
beginnings to build a hos-
pital company that treated
100,000 patients a day while
driving down health care
costs. He later started a
chain of urgent care cen-
ters with menu-style pric-
ing that has grown to 34
locations in Florida. He
didn't mention the fraud
scandal in his speech, but
he has said repeatedly that
he didn't know about any
criminal activity. He was
never charged.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican gubernatorial candidate U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp (R-Tenn.) consoles his daughter Coty Wamp, 21, and his son
Weston Wamp, 23, moments after polls fell out of his favor during the Republican primary race against Bill Haslam and Ron
Ramsey on Thursday at the Chattanoogan Hotel in downtown Chattanooga, Tenn.


Washington ties dash hopes for promotion


By BEN EVANS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON .- Ah,
the cruelty. Veteran law-
makers who toiled for
years in Congress waiting
for a chance at political pro-
motion have discovered an
inconvenient truth: This
election year, Washington
experience is a career-
ender.
Four House members
who abandoned their seats
to run for governor have
failed to survive their party
primaries, and the list
could grow in the coming
weeks. Tennessee Rep.
Zach Wamp was the latest
to stumble in Thursday's
Republican primary.
Add these losses to the
six incumbents who have
been defeated in their re-
election bids and it sig-
nals an electorate sour on
Washington.
"People hate Congress,"
said nine-term Rep. Pete


Hoekstra of Michigan, who
was pounded by rivals' ads
about Wall Street bailouts,
money for district projects
and rising debt in his losing
bid for the GOP guberna-
torial nomination. "It was
a hurdle that had to be
overcome, or it was some
baggage that you had to
carry."
Recent surveys have
shown Americans hold law-
makers in particularly low
esteem: Just one in four
people said they approved
of Congress' job perfor-
mance in the most recent
Associated Press-GfK poll.
Job losses and spiraling
debt have left a significant
number of Americans cer-
tain the country is on the
wrong track. The fierce
partisanship in Washington
has convinced many that a
broken government can do
little to solve the country's
woes.
The disfavor is evident
this election, and both par-


ties have suffered from the
anti-establishment senti-
ment. Four House incum-
bents and two senators
have lost primaries to keep
their jobs. Another five
have lost bids for governor,
including Sen. Kay Bailey
Hutchison, R-Texas, who
unlike her. House counter-
parts didn't give up her day
job.
Two former congress-
men Republican Nathan
Deal of Georgia and Neil
Abercrombie of Hawaii
- are battling to win party
nods for governor. Deal
faces Karen Handel in
Tuesday's runoff.
Michigan's Hoekstra
tried to. emphasize his 15
years as a furniture com-
pany executive, but it was
his 18 years on Capitol Hill
that opponents used to
pummel him in his second-
place finish to Rick Snyder.
While Hoekstra doesn't
attribute his loss to the anti-
Washington mood alone, he


said it was a strong factor.
Snyder's resume a
venture capitalist and for-
mer president of computer
maker Gateway Inc. was
more convincing in a state
where the faltering econo-
my dominates voters' con-
cerns.
In Tennessee, the eight-
term Wamp lost badly
to Knoxville Mayor Bill
Haslam, who constantly
reminded voters that Wamp
was a Washington insider.
"Congressman Wamp's
Washington career is 15
years of earmarks, debt
and broken promises,"'
read one mailer.
Wamp said the onslaught
crippled him.
"There's a lot of anxi-
ety and anger about what's
happening in Washington,
D.C., 'and I couldn't con-
trol that," Wamp said in his
concession speech. "At the
end of the day, a lot of that
rubbed off on me, whether
I was responsible for it or
not."


ANDREW WARDLOWIThe News Herald
Allison Carter reacts as she is handed an opossum during
the 41st Annual Wausau Fun Day and Possum Festival on
Saturday in Wausau.


Sink the only governor

candidate to eat possum
at Wausau annual festival


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press
WAUSAU Democrat
Alex Sink can make a claim
her eventual Republican
opponent for governor
won't be able to make: She
ate possum on the cam-
paign trail.
Yes, possum the mar-
supial that looks sort of like
a giant rat and likes to hang
from its tail.
Sink was one of several
statewide candidates to


attend the annual Possum
Festival Saturday.
Only she and U.S. Rep.
Adam Putnam, an agricul-
ture commissioner candi-
date, actually.ate the tough,
chewy beady-eyed mam-
mal that tastes exactly how
you'd imagine.
It's a tradition that's gone
on for decades.
Loranne Ausley, running
for chief financial officer,
had a 1974 picture of her
father at the festival when
he ran for state Senate.


GOP cautiously confident of big gains this fall


By LIZ SIDOTI
AP National Political Writer
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
The head of the Republican
Party recently urged mem-
bers to step up their efforts
for the fall elections amid
cautious confidence about
the GOP winning several
governorships and perhaps
seizing control of Congress
from President. Barack
Obama's party.
"We can't rest now,"
GOP chairman Michael
Steele told the Republican
National Committee.
"Everything we've been
doing, and all that we must
do, needs to be ramped up
and maxed out in the next
three months."
"Sleep? What's that? We
can't sleep until November
3rd," he added.
Three months before the


elections,
it was all
business
and little
celebra-
tion as the
168-mem-
ber com- Steele
mittee
met this
week to finalize Tampa, as
the 2012 GOP convention
city and set the presidential
primary calendar that will
begin in February of that
year.
Unlike in years past,
no White House hope-
fuls showed up. And
Republicans attending the
meeting were sober about
the GOP's prospects in
November; a single sign
said: "Playing to win in
2010."
Steele did, however) try
to rile up the committee


and got a standing ovation
with calls to fire House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
Wearing a red "Fire Pelosi"
cap, he announced that the
RNC would sponsor a "Fire
Pelosi" bus tour this fall.
"Get on the bus," he
yelled as a cardboard bus
was pushed out onto the
stage from which he spoke.
It said: "Need a job? Fire
Pelosi."
The mostly serious tone
of the meeting reflected the
challenge Republicans have
ahead of them as they seek
to take advantage of con-
ditions that at first blush
seem ripe for a power shift
in Democratic-controlled
Washington.
"We've got to start talk-
ing about issues," said Pat
Brady, the. state party chair-
man in Illinois.
"By mid-September, we


can't just be the party of
'We aren't the Democrats
because people are really
fed up."
No one doubts the GOP
will win some Democratic-
held congressional seats.
The president's party near-
ly always loses seats dur-
ing the first midterm elec-
tions of the presidency. The
GOP rank and file also "is
energized and independent
voters are leaning toward
Republicans.
The question is whether
Republicans have it togeth-
er enough to gain 40 seats
in the House and 10 in the
Senate to take control of
Capitol Hill with less
money than the Democrats,
.without the White .House
bully pulpit and as tea party
activists expose a fissure
between conservatives and
moderates in the GOP.


BRIEFS


Resort PAC to pay
$300,000 fine
WASHINGTON A
resort industry political
action committee is pay-
ing a $300,000 civil fine for
campaign finance violations
including raising illegal for-
eign and corporate money.
The Federal Election
Commission said Thursday
that it reached agreement
with the American Resort
Development Association-
Resort Owners Coalition
PAC and its treasurer to
settle PAC violations.
The violations include


misstating its financial activ-
ities, seeking donations
improperly and receiving
prohibited foreign national
and corporate money in
recent years.
The FEC says auditors
turned up at least $13,242 in
foreign money and $3,274
in corporate money. Its
report doesn't say whether
any of the prohibited con-
tributions wound up going
to candidates.

Elvis runs: Gov.
race all shook up
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -


Elvis Presley is running for
Arkansas governor. '
No, not tfiat Elvis.
Elvis D. Presley of Star
City filed papers with the
secretary of state's office
on Wednesday to run as a
write-in candidate for gov-
ernor.
Presley indicated in the
paperwork that he wants
to "supply the people with
a broader array of employ-
ment and newer chain of
state government."
He declined to tell The
Associated Press how he got
his name but says he is an
Elvis impersonator in his
spare time.


Democratic Gov. Mike
Beebe is seeking re-elec-
tion in November. He faces
Republican Jim Keet and
Green Party nominee Jim
Lendall in November. Two
other candidates have filed
to run as write-ins for gov-
ernor.
Presley must still file
with each of the state's 75
counties.

Senate hopeful
Meek begins tour
SANFORD Rep.
Kendrick Meek climbed
into an RV on Wednesday


with a large image of
his face on the side and
began a 10-day tour that
he hopes pumps up excite-
ment for his Senate cam-
. paign in which he trails
billionaire Jeff Greene in
the Democratic primary.

Health care back
in crosshairs
WASHINGTON -
Missouri voters' over-
whelming opposition
to requiring nearly all
Americans to buy health
insurance puts one of
the least popular parts of


President Barack Obama's
health care overhaul law
back in the political cross-
hairs.
Even if the vote sets no
legally binding precedent,
it will help mobilize foes of
Obama's agenda in the fall
midterm elections.
On Tuesday, Missouri
voters cast 71 percent of
their ballots in favor of a
state measure to bar the
government from requir-
ing people to carry health
insurance, and penalizing
those who don't.
* Associated Press


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428










Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press
HAVANA A live-
ly and healthy-looking
Fidel Castro appealed to
President Barack Obama
to stave off global nuclear
war in an emphatic address
to parliament Saturday that
marked his first official
government appearance
since emergency surgery
four years ago.
Castro, who turns 84 in
a week, wore olive-green
fatigues devoid of any mili-
tary insignia and arrived
on the arm of a subordi-
nate who steadied him as
he walked. The approxi-
mately 600 lawmakers
present sprang to their
feet and applauded, as the
gray-bearded revolutionary
stepped to a podium that
had been set up for him,
grinning broadly and wav-
ing.
"Fidel, Fidel, Fidel!"
chanted the members of
parliament. "Long live
Fidel!"
Castro has been warn-
ing in written opinion col-
umns for months that the
U.S. and Israel will launch
a nuclear attack on Iran and
that Washington could also
target North Korea pre-
dicting Armageddon-like
devastation and fighting he
expected to have already
begun by now.
"Eight weeks ago, I
thought that the imminent
danger of war didn't have
a possible solution. So dra-
matic was the problem that
I didn't see another way
out," Castro told the leg-
islature. "I am sure that
it won't be like that and,
instead ... gne man will
make the decision alone,
the president of the United
States."
He added of Obama,
"Surely with his multiple
worries, he hasn't realized


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fidel Castro (left) speaks during a special session of parliament, his first official government
appearance in front of lawmakers in four years in Havana, Cuba, Saturday. Castro, who turns
84 on Aug. 13, is making near daily appearances in and around Havana, after spending four
years almost completely out of the public eye following emergency intestinal surgery that
forced him to cede power to his younger brother Raul.


this yet, but his advisers
have."
Castro didn't mention
domestic Cuban politics
or the foundering econo-
my instead sticking to
the threat of war, the issue
for which he convened
Saturday's special session
of parliament
Still, his attendance,
along with a slew of recent
'public appearances fol-
lowing a nearly four-year
absence from public view,
is sure to raise more ques-
tions about how much of
a leadership role Castro is
ready to reassume.
Is he itching to retake
his position as Cuba's
"maximum leader" or
simply well enough to warn


lawmakers in person that
the end of the world could
be near?
Castro's speech lasted
barely 11 minutes pos-
sibly a record for the man
who became famous for his
hourslong discourses dur-
ing 49 years in power -
and was largely devoid of
his usual America bashing.
He referred to the United
States as "the empire" only
a few times though he
did say that if Obama didn't
intervene he would "be
ordering the instantaneous
death ... of hundreds of
millions of people, among
them an incalculable num-
ber of inhabitants of his
own homeland."
In Washington, there


was no immediate response
from the White House.
Castro moved to a seat
after his speech, and was
briefly approached by his
wife, Delia Soto del. Valle.
The couple rarely appeared
in public together in the
past, but Soto has been
seen with Castro more fre-
quently of late.
It was Castro's first
appearance in parliament or
at a' government act since
shortly before a health cri-
sis in July 2006 that forced
him to cede lower to his
younger brother Raul
- first temporarily, then
permanently. He under-
went emergency intestinal
surgery prompted by an
illness.


BRIEFS


ACLU pushes
prison probe
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
- Puerto Rico's prisons
department 'says it is
investigating the deaths
of 53 inmates detailed in
a report by the American
Civil Liberties Union.
Corrections Secretary
Carlos Molina Rodriguez
says the. probe's findings
may be sent to the island's
Justice Department if nec-
essary.
Molina said in a state-
ment Friday that the num-
ber of inmate deaths has
dropped 40 percent over
the last 17 months.
The ACLU released a
report Thursday saying
that some of the deaths
that occurred between
2002 and 2008 potentially
could have been prevented
with better medical care.
All but one of those
who died were in pretrial
detention, and about three-
fourths percent perished
within their first week of
confinement.

Basra blasts kill
10, wound 35
BAGHDAD -
Explosions killed at least
10 people and wounded
35 Saturday night at a
downtown market in Iraq's


second-largest city, coming
. at the end of a violent day
that also saw the slaying
of seven policemen around.
the country.
It was the latest spate of
attacks to come as all but
50,000 U.S. military troops
head home by the end of
the month
Officials differed over
the cause of the blasts
that came within minutes
of each other at the al-
Ashaar market in Basra,
340 miles southeast of
Baghdad.

Medical mission
ends in death
KABUL, Afghanistan
They hiked for more
than 10 hours over rugged
mountains unarmed
and without security to
bring medical care to iso-,
lated Afghan villagers until
their humanitarian mission
took a tragic turn.
Ten members of the
Christian medical team
six Americans, two
Afghans, one German
and a Briton were
gunned down in a grue-
some slaughter that the
Taliban said they carried
out, alleging the volunteers
were spying and trying
to convert Muslims to
Christianity.
0 Associated Press


Heavy rains prompt floods in Europe, 8 dead


Associated Press

WARSAW, Poland -
Flooding caused by heavy
rains has killed at least eight
people in Poland, Germany
and the Czech Republic,
officials said Saturday.
Lenka Moravcova, a
spokeswoman for a rescue
service in the northern
Czech Republic, said three
men drowned in a region
on the border with Poland
and Germany Saturday. A
fourth victim was found
drowned late Saturday.
Details were not given.
At least a thousand peo-
ple had to be evacuated,
some from areas below two


dams threatened by rising
waters. People in the towns
of Chrastava and Frydlant
were rescued by police and
military helicopters from
the roofs of their homes.
Three summer camps for
children were evacuated.
Meteorologists warned
the rains were not expected
to stop until Sunday.,
Police said floods killed
three people in the eastern
German state of Saxony.
Authorities in the city
of Chemnitz told German
news agency DAPD that
three bodies were found
Saturday in the basement
of a flooded building in
the town of Neukirchen in


Saxony.
Police said a 72-year-old
woman, her 74-year-old
husband and a 63-year-old
man apparently drowned
while trying to carry furni-
ture upstairs from the base-
ment. All three lived in the
building.
Heavy rains in Poland
caused flooding in most of
a town of 18,000 people and
killed one person.
The floods struck late
Friday but worsened on
Saturday, leaving three-
fourths of the southwest-
ern town of Bogatynia
inundated after the
Miedzianka River over-
flowed its banks.


Television news pro-
grams broadcast images
of men knee-high in water
flowing through the town's
streets. In some 'places the
water was even higher,
almost burying some cars.
Firefighters used boats
to evacuate people trapped
in homes. Emergency
workers from neighboring
Germany also mobilized to
help the town.


OPEN REGISTRATION
ENDS
August 20
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS)


ADD/DROP
August 23-27
(INCLUDES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS)
ALL FEES ARE DUE EACH DAY

Registrar's Office Hours:
8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday
8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday

Now-August 13
7:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday


Semester

YOU MAY ACCESS SCHEDULE
INFORMATION ONLINE AT:
www.fgc.edu



FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
AA**A**


FOR INFORMATION CALL:


Registrar: (386) 754-4205


* Admissions: (386) 754-4396


Florida Gateway College does not discriminate in education or employment related decisions on the basis of race, color, religion,
national origin, gender, age, disability, marital status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status in accordance with
the law. The Equity Officer is Sharon Best, director of human resources, and may be reached at
(386) 754-4313, Building 001, Room 136,149 SE College Place, Lake City, FL 32025.


Castro makes first official appearance


S. ..

i : 4
Thinking of
Charl i Sparks


S ame

Day Srvic


LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


THE WEATHER




S SCT. ,- SCT. SCT. -* SCT. SCT.
STORMS -STORMS STORMS -STORMS -STORMS



HI92 LO 75 HI 96L 74 HI.93LO73 HI.94L.0 73 HI93LO7,
--i--- -r >N- -- --< I ._inii.iiN< ^^*MI


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms will develop along a passing cold front in
the Midwest today. Some thunderstorms in this area could be strong to severe. Showers and
thunderstorms are also in the forecast for portions of the central Plains, the central Rockies
and portions of the Desert Southwest.


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74 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
City 92, 75 Daytona Beach
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92/75 9477 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
"92/75 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
93/77 90/76 Miami
Tampa. .Naples
91/80 West Palm Beach Ocala
88/76 Orlando
*' Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 89/77 0 Pensacola
92/77 Naples Tallahassee
89/78 Miami Tampa
K ' 90/77 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
90/81


Monday
911 - 1,
92/76/t
88/76/t
92/76/t
94/74/pc
93/75/t
88/80/t
96/74/pc
91/76/t
90/76/t
94/74/t
92/75/t
94/79/t
96/79/s.
97/76/t
91/78/t
96/75/pc
88/74/t


Tuesday

9i p
91
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92 T7 p.
9 1 4

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Showers
Ice








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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 99, Blythe, Calif. Low: 860,Truckee, CaIf.


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


[ AK-CT ALM ANC'


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
:Re:ord nign
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
rjornail year to-date


92
77
91
71
99 in 1927
64 in 1996


0.00"
0.60"
32.77"
1.49"
31.62"


SUN
Sunrise today 6:54 a.m.
Sunset today 8:18 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:54 a.m. VERY HIGIt
Sunset tom. 8:18 p.m. 10 miutesto ulli
Today's
MOON ultra-violet
Moonrise today 5:04 a.m. radiation risk
Moonset today 7:12 p.m. for the area on
a scale from 0
Moonrise tom. 6:15 a.m. to +.
Moonset tom. 7:56 p.m.



Aug. Aug. Aug. Sept. ,Fore,
9 16 24 1 zSie' icsC
New First Full Last ,j LLC,
''f wWW


Arat c0U;ii
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.




weather.com


casts, data and graph-
@ 2010 Weather Central
Madison, Wis.
w.weatherpubllsher.com


CITY
Albany NY'
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY


76/59/0
85/65/0
57/53/0
89/72/0
85/60/0
87/64/0
93/75/0
88/62/0
84/64/0
79/63/0
72/53/0
87/74/0
83/64/0
87/69/0
86/53/0
80/62/0
85/60/0
79/62/0
90/73/0
96/79/0
90/78/0
88/59/0


86/64/pc
90/65/t
60/53/sh
95/76/pc
89/70/pc
93/59/pc
98/71/t
94/64/pc
91/59/pc
83/70/pc
81/69/t
92/76/p'c
91/63/pc,
94/71/pc
86/56/pc
90/74/pc
88/65/s
86/69/pc
94/72/pc
101/79/t
92/77/t
90/63/t


Des Moinesi
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
88/70/0
79/59/0
93/75/0 ,
59/52/0
85/71/0
81/60/0
82/76/0
95/81/0
82/65/0
94/77/0
93/78/0
89/72/0
95/83/0
92/77/0
67/60/0
94/77/0
.94/81/0
84/68/.07
95/78/0
92/80/0
86/68/0
93/74/0


Hi/Lo/W CITY
92/75/pc Omaha
86/72/pc Orlando
97/74/pc Philadelphia
. 72/52/t Phoenix
91/70/pc Pittsburgh
86/67/pc Portland ME
88/74/sh Portland OR
95/78/pc Raleigh
90/68/p.c Rapid City
96/76/t Reno
92/75/t Richmond
97/80/pc Sacramento
99/77/s St. Louis
98/78/t Salt Lake City.
67/57/pc San Antonio
98/78/pc San Diego
90/77/t San Francisco
92/74/t Seattle
95/76/t Spokane
93/79/pc Tampa
89/71/pc Tucson
100/77/pc Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
89/73/0 95/77/pc
95/78/.31 93/77/t
86/67/0 89/68/pc
97/77/.03 101/81/pc
80/58/0 ,6. I. 6 L
7. 1 I,' 80/63/pc
f9. 5.9 76/55/pc
88/72/0 93/70/pc
90/61/0 97/64/pc
82/61/0 89/58/pc
88/68/0 9 ",1 p,.:
74/54/0 84/56/s
88/69/0 9; ,4 p,:
90/71/0 88/66/pc
-i3 :, 0 *96 ;8 p.:
66/62/0 68/60/pc
65/55/0 .60/53/pc
61/56/.01 67/54/pc
78/60/0 8 1 5. pC
89/81/.09 91/80/t
88/72/.06 94/75/t
86/68/0 91/72/pc


Mix '. 1.1 '~i'n~
r.-I.a v,,--"",t--.!Saturday"-- Today 3d


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Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
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Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston
..


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
88/77/.38 91/77/sh
66/61/.14 69/55/sh
89/73/0 93/69/s.
59/52/0 59/50/sh
84/70/0 93/69/t
73/64/0 80/57/sh
57/36/0 60/44/pc
100/79/0 97/73/s
77/48/0 80/51/sh
93/73/0 91/73/t
88/59/0 '80/48/pc
93/79/0 86/82/t
90/81/0 91/73/pc


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobil
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
63/25/0
66/59/0
70/61/;11
97/66/0
75/59/0
68/50/0
97/70/0
72/59/0
93/68/0
96/87/0
70/52/0
88/79/0
79/59/0


Today


Today
Hi/Lo/W
60/15/s
66/55/sh
.80/54/sh
96/64/s.
77/57/sh
79/66/s
100/65/s
73/53/sh
91/78/t
87/80/t
69/41/pc
86/75/t
77/54/pc


CITY
RIo
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
.Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
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'5 63 0
81/61/0
91/80/0
90/80/0
57/37/0
84/77/0
86/79/.01
57/45/0
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73/52/0
64/57/.33
81/63/.22


KEYTO CONDITIONS: I.-, i...i,, .1, -.J.._;., f=fai ft-foy h-hti:, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
.i,- i1t,,.-.... : =l i-,, F A=Ii.i,,J_- h i .' ..A : w- w indy.


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Lak.e City 183SW aslcom Norisur G-ille- E.. Campus 1200A1Ith Ave.W.Cljmpus1900SW34thlt, Jonesville 107 NWi1'ug Teraemunter's Walk 51 m1STeIrI Squar 725 SW75hSt.3
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Today I
HI/LP/W
77/62/s
86/64/s
89/80/sh
85/80/s
59 39'pc
89/73/t
?. -5 pv.:
62/41/pc
94/77/pc
87/78/sh
81/72/sh
75/57/sh
7. 6i0 I


3 ~,~ ~---l---C-'~--lllI"l-"LIL~


I 3 1^


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


Get Connected


. . . I








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Sunday, August 8, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Parent's meeting
today at 6 p.m.
A mandatory meeting
for junior varsity and
varsity parents of Fort
White High football
players is 6 p.m. today at
the Fort White gym.
For details, call coach
Demetric Jackson at
(386) 365-3304.
FORT WHITE VOLLEYBALL
Tryouts begin at
3 p.m. Monday
Fort White varsity and
junior varsity volleyball
tryouts are 3-5 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday at
the gym.
For details, call coach
Doug Wohlstein at
497-5952.
CHS VOLLEYBALL
Varsity tryouts
-begin Monday
Columbia High
varsity volleyball tryouts
are 9-11 a.m. Monday.
Junior varsity tryouts are
4-6 p.m. Thursday.
For details, contact
coach Casie McCallister
at casiek32@hotmail.com.
WOLVES FOOTBALL
Fall practice
begins Monday
Richardson Middle
School football
practice begins at
3:30 p.m. Monday.
Players should report
to the gym at 2:45 p.m.
Physical.and consent
forms are required.
For details, call coach
Al Nelson at 623-4127.
CHS FOOTBALL
Parent's meeting
set for Tuesday
A mandatory meeting
for freshman, junior
varsity and varsity
parents of Columbia
High football players is
7 p.m. Tuesday in the
school auditorium.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.
LADY TIGER" GOLF
Contact coach
for information
Girls interested in
trying out for the
Columbia High golf team
should contact coach
Candace Christie for
information..
For details, call
Christie (386) 984-5196.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Boys Club flag
football sign-up
Registration is under
way for the Boys Club
of Columbia County's
flag football program.
The program is for ages
6-7, and 8-year-olds
who weigh less than 66
pounds. Games are on
Saturday. Cost is $40.
For details, call the
club at 752-4184.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.


* From staff reportsI


Hall welcomes new class


Smith, Rice lead
new members
into football HOE
Associated Press

CANTON, Ohio -
Holding back tears after a
minute-long standing ova-
tion, NFL career rushing
leader Emmitt Smith has
been inducted into the Pro
Football Hall of Fame.
Finishing off a hat trick
for the "Triplets," Smith
joined Dallas Cowboys
teammates Troy Aikman
and Michael Irvin in the
shrine Saturday night. He
enters as the NFL's top
runner with 18,355 yards
and leader in touchdowns
rushing (164), seasons with
1,000 or rpore yards on the
ground (11) and games with
100 yards rushing (78).


Smith made the hall in
his first year of eligibil-
ity and won three Super
Bowls, taking MVP honors
in the 1994 game.
Smith immediately paid
tribute to Walter Payton,
the man he surpassed for
the rushing record, saying,
"He had a heart that said I
can achieve, I will achieve,
and I will be successful.
Now, here I am standing at
the same podium he did."

Rice holds
pass-catching records
While being inducted
into the Hall of Fame, NFL
receiving leader Jerry Rice
says he believes he still
could play.
The man who holds every"
important pass-catching
record as the game breaker
in the West Coast offense


for the San Francisco
49ers was elected in his
first year of eligibility. He
became the top receiver in
the pro game's most dan-
gerous scheme, combining
with Joe Montana and then
Steve Young to establish
marks that might never be
broken.
Rice caught 1,549 passes
for 22,895 yards. and 208
touchdowns, easily shatter-
ing the previous records.
Yet, he says, at 47, "I.
played for 20 years and I
still believe in my heart I
could play today."

Uttle made big
impression
Finally, Floyd Little has
been inducted into the Pro
Football Hall of Fame.


HOF continued on 2B


Home run for


Clark calls CHS
baseball job his
dream career.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
One of their
own will be
the next coach
at Columbia
High as J.T
Clark takes the step up to
head varsity baseball coach
for the Tigers.
For Clark, the job was
one that he had dreamed
about since he was a boy.
At 28, Clark will be one
of the youngest coaches
in the area, but he's
hoping his age dill help
him start a long tradition
of state championship-
caliber baseball teams for
Columbia.
"I'm definitely excited to
finally get the opportunity,"
he said. "I sat down with
the administrators, and I
got a great feel from them.
They definitely wanted me,
and I definitely wanted to
be here. I went to school
here, played here and live
here. I'm ready to start, or
I should say continue, the
tradition, and I hope to be
here for a long time."
Clark didn't leave any
question as to whether this
was his dream job. For
Clark, Colambia was the
Mecca.
"At this point in my life,

CLARK continued on 4B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Dallas Cowboys great Emmitt Smith walks to the
stage before enshrinement ceremonies at the Pro Football
Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio Saturday. Smith joins Jerry
Rice, John Randle, Floyd Little, Dick LeBeau, Rickey Jackson
and Russ Grimm in the 2010 class.


Tigers


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High has hired J.T. Clark as the new varsity baseball coach for the Tigers. Clark
is a former Columbia player and also coaches football at the high school. He was an assis-
tant coach under Greg Gillman during the 2010 season and coached the Tigers' summer
baseball program.


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Smith

saved

Florida

football
Emmitt Smith
officially
entered the
Pro Football
Hall of Fame
on Saturday with all the
accolades,
Smith is the all-time
leading rusher in the NFL
and also has the record
for most touchdowns and,
carries. He was an'MVP
in both the regular season
and Super Bowl.
Smith chalked up one
of best hold-out coups in
1993. The Cowboys were
defending Super Bowl
champions and started
the season 0-2 with Smith
out of the line-up. Facing
-a mutiny among the
players, Jerry Jones gave
in to Smith's demands and
Dallas went on to repeat.
Smith's professional
highlights have played all
SMITH continued.on 3B


Running success


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 7, 2009, file photo, Florida running back Jeffery Demps (2) celebrates with
offensive lineman Mike Pouncey (55) during an NCAA college football game against
Vanderbilt in Gainesville.


Gators confident
in run game, even
without Tebow.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Florida's running game was
a bruising, bashing attack
the last three years. It was
practical, predictable and
one of the most potent in
the country.
It was, for the most part,
the Tim Tebow show.
Running backs often
stood around and watched
the beefy quarterback keep
the ball, serving as the
team's short-yardage spe-
cialist and its go-to guy. He
ran more than 600 times
the last three seasons, gain-
ing nearly 2,500 yards and
scoring 49 touchdowns.
Without Tebow, Florida's
running game will be con-


siderably different this
fall. But with all the tal-
ent in the backfield, it also
remains the team's biggest
strength.
"We've got an interest-
ing dynamic back there to
really cause some stress,"
offensive coordinator Steve
Addazio said Friday.
It starts with Jeff Demps,
the junior who just might
be the fastest guy in col-
lege. Demps captured track
national championships
this year in the 60-meter
dash and the 100 meters.
He became the first per-
son in school history to win
tiles in two sports.
He's open to the possibili-
ty of trying to make the U.S.
team for the 2012 Olympics
in London, but his focus
remains on the Gators.
"At the end of the day,
I'm still a football player,"
GATORS continued on 4B


-.. --- -II I -










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Heluva
Good! Sour Cream Dips, atWatkins Glen,
N.Y.
2:30 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, Honda Indy 200, at
Lexington, Ohio
GOLF
II a.m.
TGC PGATour/WGC, Bridgestone
Invitational. final round, at Akron, Ohio
I p.m.
CBS PGATour/WGC, Bridgestone
Invitational, final round, at Akron, Ohio
3 p.m.
, TGC Champions Tour, 3M
Championship, final round, at Blaine,
Minn.
7 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Turning Stone
Resort Championship, final round, at
Verona. N.Y. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS San Francisco at Atlanta
2:10 p.m.
WGN Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPNI Boston at N.Y.Yankees
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NBC Preseason, Hall of Fame
Game, Cincinnati vs. Dallas, at Canton,
Ohio
SOCCER
9 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, New York at Chicago
SWIMMING
4:30 p.m.
NBC National Championships, at
Irvine, Calif. (same-day tape)
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP, Legg Mason Classic,
championship match, at Washington
5 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Mercury
Insurance Open, championship match, at
Carlsbad, Calif.

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m..
ESPN -,- St. Louis at Cincinnati

BASEBALL

AL standings


East.Division
W L
NewYork 68 41
Tampa Bay 67 43
Boston 63 48
Toronto 58 52
Baltimore 36 73
Central Division
W -.... --L--
Chicago 62 47
Minnesota 61 49
Detroit 53 56
Cleveland 47 63
Kansas City 46 63
West Division
W L


Pct GB
.624 -
.6091 1/2
.568 6
.527101/2
.330 32

'Pct -GB
.569 -
.5551 1/2
.486 9
.427151/2
.422 16

Pct GB


Texas 64 46 .582 -
Oakland 55 54 .5058 1/2
Los Angeles 55 56 .4959 1/2
Seattle 41 69 .373 .23
Friday's Games
Boston 6, N.Y.Yankees 3
Baltimore 2, Chicago ,White Sox I,
10 innings
L.A.Angels 4, Detroit 2
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 6
Toronto 2,Tampa Bay I
Texas 5, Oakland I
Seattle 7,iKansas City I
Saturday's Games
Toronto 17,Tampa Bay II
N.Y.Yankees 5, Boston 2
Oakland 6,Texas 2
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore (n)
L.A.Angels at Detroit (n)
Minnesota at Cleveland (n)
Kansas City at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
L.A. Angels (T.Bell 1-2) at Detroit


(Porcello 4-10), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 4-1) at Cleveland
(D.Huff 2-10), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 10-3) atToronto
(Morrow 8-6), 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 10-8) at
Baltimore (Guthrie 5-1 1), 1:35 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 9-8) at Oakland (Cahill
11 -4), 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 5-6) at Seattle
(j.Vargas 7-5), 4:10 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 3-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(A.J.Burnett 9-9), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at N.Y.Yankees. 2:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore,
7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at L.A.Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 63 47
Philadelphia 61 49
New York 55 55
Florida 54 56
Washington 49 61
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 63, 48
St. Louis 61 49
Milwaukee 52 59
Houston 47 62
Chicago 47 63
Pittsburgh 38 71
West Division
W L
San Diego 63 45


Pct GB
.568 -
.5551 1/2
.468 II
.431 15
.427151/2
.349- 24


San Francisco 63 48 .5681 1/2
Colorado 57 52 .5236 1/2
Los Angeles 56 54 .509 8
Arizona 42 68 .382 22
Friday's Games
Cincinnati 3, Chicago Cubs 0
Colorado 6, Pittsburgh 3
St. Louis 7, Florida 0
Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Mets 5
San Francisco 3,Atlanta 2, II innings
Milwaukee 6, Houston 5
Arizona 2, San Diego I
Washington 6, L.A. Dodgers 3
Saturday's Games
Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 3
N.Y. Mets I, Philadelphia 0
Milwaukee 5, Houston 2
Atlanta 3, San Francisco 0
Florida 5, St. Louis 4, 10 innings
Colorado at Pittsburgh (n)
San Diego atArizona (n)
Washington at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
St. Louis (Suppan 1-6) at Florida (West
0-1), 1:10 p.m.
Colorado (Rogers 1-2) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 7-9), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 7-4) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 13-8), 1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (U.Sanchez 8-6) at
Atlanta (D.Lowe 10-9), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (WWright I I) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 10-5), 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Tr.Wood 2-1) at Chicago
Cubs (Diamond 0-1), 2:20 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 11-5) at Arizona
(J.Saunders 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
Washington (Marquis 0-3) at L.A.
Dodgers (Lilly 4-8),4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis ac Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Arizona at Milwaukee. 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco,
10:15 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL calendar,

Today Pro Football Hall of Fame
Game, Ciricinnati vs. Dalls at Canton,
Ohio.
Aug. 12-16 First preseason
weekend.
Aug. 31 Roster cutdown to
maximum of 7S players.
Sept, 4 Roster cutdown to
maximum of 53 players.
Sept. 9 Opening game of regular
season.

Arena Football playoffs


First Round
Friday
Orlando 73, Jacksonville 69
Spokane 57,Arizona 49
Saturday
Tampa Bay at Tulsa (n)
Chicago at Milwaukee (n)

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips
at the Glen
Site:Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (ESPN,
noon-4 p.m.),
Track: Watkins Glen International
(road course, 2.45 miles).
Race distance: 220.5 miles, 90 laps.
INDYCAR
Honda Indy 200
Site: Lexington, Ohio.
Schedule:Today, race, 2:30 p.m. (Versus,
2-5 p.m.).
Track: Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course
(road course,'2.258 miles).
Race distance: 191.25 miles, 85 laps.

Sprint Cup qualifying

1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 124.432.
2. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
123.814.
3. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet.
123.699.
4. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
123.619.
5. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 123.524.
6. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
123.429.
7.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 123.41.
8. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 123.369.
9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
123.326.
10. (18) Kyle Busch.Toyota, 123.234.
II. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
123.165.
12. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
123.102.
13. (83) Boris Said,Toyota, 123.078.,
14. (II11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
122.937.
15. (7) Robby GordonToyota, 122.85.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
122.783. "
17. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford,
122.635.
18. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 122.582.
19. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
122.56.
20. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
- 122.517.
21. (36) Ron Fellows, Chevrolet,
122.339.
22. (31) Jeff Burton; Chevrolet,
122.308.
23. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 122.286.
24. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
122.21.
25. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
121.95.
26. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
121.801.
27. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
121.791.
28.(13) Max Papis,Toyota, 121.721.
'29. (09) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
121.613.
30. (00) David Reutlmann, Toyota,
121.528.
31. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 121.406.
32. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
121.404.
33. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet,
121.339.
34. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
121.274. .
35.(6) David Ragar', Ford, 121.013.
36. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 120.599.
37. (87)' Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
120.54.
38. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 120.489.
39. (07) P.J.Jones.Toyota, 120.26.
40. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
120.17.
41, (37) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner
Points.
42. (34) Kevin Conway, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (38) David Gilliland, Ford,
120.213.


HOF: Jackson first Saint inducted

Continued From Page 1B


A star running back for
the Denver Broncos from
1967-75 despite being the
only offensive threat on
the team, Little had to wait
nearly three decades since
becoming eligible before
getting elected..

First Saint inducted

Rickey Jackson is the first
New Orleans Saint inducted
into the Pro Football Hall of
Fame.
It's been quite a year for
the franchise that began
play in 1967. On Feb. '6,
Jackson was elected to
the hall. The next day, the
Saints beat the Indianapolis
Colts for their first NFL
championship.

Grimm leads Hogs to
HOF

Russ Grimm has
become the first member
of Washington's renowned
"Hogs" offensive line
inducted into the Pro
Football Hall of Fame.
The outstanding guard
from 1981-91 won three
Super Bowls with the
Redskins; a team whose


offense was
the Hogs.


built around


LeBeau's wait over

Former Detroit Lions
standout cornerback Dick
Lebeau has been inducted




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

I DOIMI


into the Pro Football Hall
of Fame.
LeBeau finished his
14-year career in 1972 with
62 interceptions, still eighth
in NFL history. He led the
league in picks in 1970 with
nine.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange 'the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: THE
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: VAGUE CUBIT FABLED JIGGER
Answer: Even when the brothers got mad at each
other, their anger was "RELATIVE"


Miami's Ojomo says



missing '09 season



made him better


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES -
Adewale Ojomo leaned
back in his seat and
smiled.
Silly as it sounds, that
represents progress for
the Miami defensive line-
man. Such a gesture was
impossible for him a year
ago.
Ojomo missed Miami's
entire 2009 season after a
locker-room fight before
the season left him with a
broken jaw that needed to
be wired shut for nearly
two months. He lost 40
pounds during that ordeal,
unable to regain the size
and strength in time to get
back on the field with the.
Hurricanes.
So when Miami opens
this season against Florida
A&M on Sept 2, more than
20 months will have passed
since Ojomo played.
"I wouldn't call it anger.
I would call it motivation,"
said Ojomo, who grew up
in the Miami suburb of
Hialeah. "I work harder
than ever now and am
more determined. I look
at things totally different.
Sometimes in life, you take
things for granted. I don't
take anything for granted.
Not one practice, not one
weight-room lift, because I
don't have to be there."
That's a lesson he learned
the hard way.
Miami coach Randy
Shannon originally said
Ojomo: got hurt. "hors-
ing around in the locker
room with a couple play-
ers" last Aug. 16, before it
was learned that he was
involved in a fight with a
walk-on candidate whom
the team never identified
since ,that person wAs not
on 'the roster. The walk-
on was quickly dismissed
from his tryout
SA day later after the ini-
tial diagnosis, the team
announced. Ojomo had
surgery, and an indefinite


ACROSS

1 Oxford-or
wedge
5 Peacock net-
work
8 Schmoozes.
12 Gym iterations
13 Geologic divi-
sion
14 Toward shelter
15 Kuwait neigh-
bor
16 Sneezer's mal-
' ady (2 wds.)
1.8 Fuzzy
20 Make happy.
21 Hosp. locale
22 alai
23 Prefix with
structure
26 Coerced
29 Shower liner
30 Ballard and
Ryan
31 Campground
inits. *
33 Zoo animal
34 Snow boots


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami defensive lineman Adewale Ojomo stretches out
during the NCAA college football team's first day of practice
on Thursday in Coral Gables.


absence turned into a year-
long one.
Now he's back, and
Ojomo who still will not
talk about the specifics of
the fight insists he's bet-
ter than ever.
"Ojomo's just ready to
go," Shannon said this
week. "He's been here.
Excited about coming
back. He's going to bring
some excitement and he's
grown a lot, mentally and
physically."
The Ojomo situation
from a year ago is simi-
lar to one that popped
up in recent days at
Southern California. USC
cornerback T.J. Bryant had
surgery on his left cheek-
bone Thursday, about a


35 Projection
room unit
36 Safe from harm
38 Thick of things
39 I love (Lat.)
40 Winatnunmy
41 Infield fly
(hyph.)
44 Lab glassware
47 Slope
49 Fence part
51 Ms. Dinesen
52 MGM motto
word
53 spumante
54 Microscope
part
55 Bovary title
56 Mallard kin

DOWN

1 Hindu Mr.
2 Kind of tea
3 Gem
4 'Lawyer's hon-
orific
5 Hindu states-
man


week after fighting team-
mate Stanley Havili. Bryant
will miss at least three
weeks.
"Ifs something we're not
excited about right now,"
USC coach Lane Kiffin
said.
That matches the senti-
ment Miami, had over the
Ojomo matter this time last.
summer.
As a redshirt freshman in
2008, Ojomo showed signs
of serious promise.
Ojomo started three
games for Miami that sea-
son, with 22 tackles and
three sacks, enough to get
those around the program
to believe that he would
be a major contributor in
2009.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PREY GAFF MUM
LURE -IOL OHO
ULNA ZEROHOUR
GEISHA EIG.H.T



IN K LONG DIOR
NEIL NYET BUG
COMA TALE



GLADHHAND THA
OIL EVEN LAND
GEE RERBA ELKS


6 Heehaw
7 Coral islet
8 Highland tongue
9 Thomas -
Edison
10 Red vegetable


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


11 Desiccated
17 Has apprehen-
sions
19 VCR maker
22 Pleasures
23 "Is--
bird?"
24 Bites
25 Run away
26 Turn toward
27 Used sparing-
ly'
28 Accomplishes
30 Syrup brand
32 Neighbor of
CTRL
34 Draws water
35 Hockey nut (2
wds.)
37 Makes water-
tight
38 Mamma -!
40 Heavy fliers
41 Donahue of
TV
42 Seine tributary
43 Blueprint
44 House ad
abbr.
45 Assuage
46 Hayworth of
old films
48 "- -
Woman"
50 Small, in
Dogpatch


8-9 2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


RITTHY




STIMCY
I U













Ambrose wins Zippo 200


By JOHN KEKIS
Associated Press

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y.
- Sonoma just faded a lit-
tle bit from the psyche of
Marcos Ambrose.
Starting from the pole for
the first time at. Watkins
GlenInternational,Ambrose
dominated the Nationwide.,
Zippo 200 on Saturday and
won the race for the third
straight time. He, led 60 of
82 laps, had a perfect driver
rating of 150, and beat Joey
Logano by 2.8 seconds.
"Ift's been a roller-coaster
ride for me," said Ambrose,.
who announced less than
two weeks ago that he was
leaving JTG-Daugherty rac-
ing at the end of the sea-
son. 'We've been through
so much together. The last
three weeks have been chal-
lenging. My future is uncer-
tain. It just feels really sat-
isfying to think that we've
come this far and leave as
good friends at the end of
the season."
"This is probably better
than the last one," crew
chief Frank Kerr added.
"We've had such a bad year.
Sonoma is a thorn in our
side." ,
Ambrose was poised to
capture his first Sprint Cup
victory at Sonoma in June
when things went awry.
He stalled his No. 47 while
leading under a late caution,
was unable to keep pace,
had to restart seventh when
he couldn't get it retired,
and finished sixth.


The memory is still there,
but it's fading.
"This is the most satis-
fying win I've ever had,"
Ambrose said.
Ambrose quickly pulled
away from Logano on the
final restart with 15 laps
remaining and coasted to
.,the finish line after building
a lead of nearly 4 seconds.
"He's the man. He's
pretty good here. I did the
best I can," Logano said
after his -best finish on a
road course. "I'm happy
with second. That's the first
time I said that. I learned
a lot We're getting closer
and closer."
Kevin Harvick somehow
avoided a 10-car wreck and
overcame a dustup,on the
first lap and a speeding pen-
alty on pit road to finish
third. Points leader Brad
Keselowski was fourth, fol-
lowed by Kyle Busch, who
was seeking his fourth
straight win and 10th of the
season.
Ron Fellows, Nelson
Piquet, Jacques Villeneuve,
Steve Wallace and Michael
McDowell rounded out the
top 10. Carl Edwards, sec-
ond in points, finished 33rd
after losing a cylinder and
dropped 327 points behind
Keselowski.
Ambrose had won the
previous two Nationwide
races here but never had
started from the pole. That
changed on Saturday morn-
ing. He set a' qualifying
record with a lap of 122.410
mph to break the record of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marcos Ambrose celebrates winning the NASCAR Nationwide
Series' Zippo 200 at The Glen auto race on Saturday in
Watkins Glen, N.Y.


121.999 mph set a year ago
by Harvick.
Ambrose led the first 18
laps, taking command at the
start with Logano dogging
him lap after lap. Ambrose
opened a wide lead, staying
out as the rest of the lead-
ers pitted for the first time,


but he lost time when Colin
Braun spun in front of him
on lap 19 and was second to
Logano after pitting.
There was a huge chain-
reaction crash involving 10
cars coming out of the first
turn on a restart after the
first caution.


Woods seems lost with no way out


By TIM DAHLBERG
AP Sports Columnist

The revelations that
once seemed to come daily
have now largely stopped.
,No more mistresses have
stepped forward, and no
more apologies are neces-
sary.
Nine months after the
secret world of Tiger Woods
was laid bare, even the tab-
loids and celebrity websites
seem to have lost interest.
The only real questions left
are how much his wife will
get in a divorce and when
she will get it.
'Indeed, these should
almost be good times for
Woods. The worst of his
humiliations are just a
memory, the trips to rehab
are apparently over, and
even the, British tabloids
couldn't beat him down. at
St. Andrews.
Plus he's got millions of
people who still think he's
the greatest thing to ever
grace a 2-iron.
All good, except for one
thing. The greatest player
of our time doesn't seem
to have a clue on the golf
course anymore.
His latest attempt at
preserving his name and
finding his game came this
week in Ohio, where the
best players in the world
gathered for a tournament
Woods has owned in the
past.
There was once a
day just last year, for
example when Woods
simply showed up at the
Bridgestone Invitational,
stuck a tee in the ground,
and strolled his way to yet
another win.
That day now seems so
far, far away.
On Saturday he finished
his round long before the
leaders even teed off. By
the time he was done he
had posted his worst 54-
hole score ever as a pro,
and was fighting to stay out
of last place.
Someone named
Katsumasa Miyamoto beat
him by 13 shots on this day
alone. Ernie Els beat him
by 11.
You can almost see the
embarrassment in his face.
To someone once so domi-
nant he used to intimidate
opponents, playing golf
among the also-rans is as
humiliating as being caught
with a handful of mistresses
in a Vegas hotel room.


ASSOCIATED.PRESS
Tiger Woods after finishing the 18th hole of the third round of the Bridgestone Invitational golf
tournament at Firestone Country Club, Saturday, in Akron, Ohio. Woods is 11-over par after
three round.


Suddenly, his whole leg-
acy is in as much jeopardy
as his once pristine image.
Once thought to be a cinch
to break Jack Nicklaus'
record and be declared the
greatest golfer ever, Woods
has lost both his mystique
and his confidence. He now
goes into the final major
of the season next week,
where the odds .are better
that he will miss the cut than
win the PGA Championship
for a fifth time.
Unless Phil Mickelson
implodes over the week-
end, Woods will lose the
No. 1 ranking for the first
time in more than five
years. Unless he sud-
denly finds his game on
Sunday he's headed to his
worst finish since his first
tournament as a pro 14
years ago.
And he's going to be
making Corey Pavin's job
as Ryder Cup captain a
lot harder than Pavin ever
imagined it would be.
Shockingly enough,
there's a good chance
Woods won't make the
team when the points are
added up at the end of the
PGA Championship. Even
more shocking,' there's a
growing school of thought
that Pavin should not make
him a captain's pick for the
team that travels to Wales
next month to defend the
cup.
Tiger Woods not quali-
fying would have been
unimaginable in Ryder
Cups of past. Tiger Woods


not being picked to play
would have been utterly
unthinkable.
Why all this is happening
is pretty easy to understand
if you watch Woods play. He
sprays the ball into trees
both left and right off the
tee, can't get his iron shots
close, and has lost the magi-
cal putting stroke that for
years enabled him to get
the ball into the hole seem-
ingly almost at will.
But the reasons behind
his demise remain a mys-
tery that Woods refuses to
share with anyone outside
his inner circle.
He's 34 now, a time when
the putter doesn't always
respond to commands like
it did in his youth. He's
got a swing that he can't
seem to execute the same
way twice in a row. And,
unlike times past when
he left his money matters
to others when he was
competing, he has to deal
with lawyers who are scur-
rying to find ways to help
him hold onto his many
millions.
But there's more. The
old Woods was a practice
fanatic, working on his
game constantly and almost
always on the range or
practice green after a round
to find out ways to be even
better the next day..
Contrast that to Friday
when he finished around
noon, then almost ran for
his SUV in an attempt to get
away from both the media
and a golf game that even


he can't seem to stomach
anymore. Phil Mickelson,
meanwhile, played late,
then hit the range after
shooting a 68.
Barring a miracle next
week at Whistling Straits,
Woods will go into the
Masters next year without
a major championship win
in almost three full years.
And, while he stubbornly
insists things are getting
better, the scorecards don't
lie when they say he's get-
ting worse.
Woods will be wearing
his usual Sunday red when
he goes out among the first
groups in the final round of
the Bridgestone. But that
will be the only thing famil-
iar to those who get up
early enough to watch.
He's got no chance to
win, no chance to even
compete. The forced smile
on his face makes it look
as if the fiercest competitor
ever seen on the links has
now basically given up on
himself.
I wrote a few months
back that maybe the worst
thing that could happen for
the public still fascinated by
Woods was that he would
become a mediocre player,
challenging here and there
but no longer able to dom-
inate like he had in the
past.
I was wrong. What's
worse is what is happening
now.
His game is gone. And
the increasing reality is, it
may not come back.


Reporter file photo
Florida running back Emmitt Smith carries the ball against
Vanderbilt on Oct. 14, 1989. Smith rushed for 202 yards in
the Gators' 34-11 victory. He went on to become a
first-round pick of the Dallas Cowboys in 1990 and won
the Offensive Rookie of the Year. On Saturday, Smith was
elected to the Hall of Fame after a career that included
three Super Bowls and an MVP in 1993.


SMITH: Left his mark
Continued From Page 1B


week on TV, but he is far
more important to Florida
Gator fans.
Smith may even be
more important to the
Gators than Tim Tebow.
How so, for the man
who played on teams that
went 20-16 in three years
and never beat Florida
State, Georgia or Auburn?
And, Florida was 1-2 in
thinor bowl games in his
Career.
It was Smith's signing
by Galen Hall in 1987
out of Escambia High in
Pensacola that might have
prevented the Florida
program from going
under for years.
The probation and
penalties that cost Florida
SEC titles in 1984-85 were
beginning to take hold.
Hall saved one year when
veterans led by Kerwin
Bell beat all three foes
mentioned above in 1986,
despite a 6-5 record.
By 1987, Miami was the
baddest program on the
planet. The Huiricanes
mauled Florida 31-4 in
,the opening game of the
season at Florida Field.
Smith didn't start, but
played and two games
later at Alabama he .
rushed for 224 yards in a
23-14 win. The love affair
was on.
Florida State began
its double-digit run of
Top-4 seasons in 1987,
another bitter pill for
Florida that had won six
straight games over the
Seminoles.
There wasn't much
for Gator fans to cheer
for, but they could watch
Smith carry that rock and
marvel at the moves of
the "slowest man nobody
could catch."
Carry it he could.
Smith ran 700 times at
Florida and gained close
to 4,000 yards, including


a school record 1,599 in
1989. He rushed for 316
yards in a game against
New Mexico and scored
36 touchdowns in his
career. He totaled 23 100-
yard games.
Florida fans not only
had a source of pride,
it took the pressure off
Hall to produce. He was
able to stockpile players,
rather than rush them
into action too early, and it
set the table for the early
success of Steve Spurrier.
Hall was fired midway
through the 1989 season.
Spurrier went 9-2
and 10-2 in his first two
seasons (1990-91) at
Florida,, and gave credit
to Hall for the talent he
inherited.
Smith saved Florida
football'and has been a
friend to the area. He
returned to school and
got his degree. It brought
' tears to many eyes when
he walked for his diploma
and it was televised.
While at Florida,
Smith was a speaker
at a Columbia High
football banquet. He
had a joke or two for
coach Joe Montgomery,
who had squared off
against Smith's team in
Pensacola.
Smith also attended
a Florida Sports Hall of
Fame induction ceremony
in Lake City as the Pro
Male Athlete of the Year.
He took over like he was
one of the inductees and
the following of sports
writers and fans made it
seem so.
Smith was so beloved
that a hard-core
Washington Redskins fan
and Dallas despiser had
to put his hate on hold
while Smith played for the
Cowboys. Three Super
Bowls was an easy price
to pay.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


CLARK: Accepts dream job at CHS _


Continued From Page 1.

yes, this is it," he said. "I
take tremendous pride in
the school. I don't see any
reason that I couldn't be
doing this for a long time.
You hear of coaches like
Don Soriano with Bolles
that had over 500 wins.
John Staples in Baker
County actually did two
stints. To be successful
over a long period of time
it helps to have someone
that has been there."
Clark has been a part
of the past two baseball
coaches at Columbia's
staff. He coached under
Andy Bennett, who was
the head man of the Tigers
for five seasons, and under
Gillman, who coached the
Tigers to a district title
in his only season. He's
taking pieces of what he
learned from both coaches
and applying it to his new
style.
"I really enjoyed
coaching under them,"
Clark said. "Andy really got
me back into baseball, and
taught me the importance
of field maintenance. He
put so much pride into
it, and passed that on to
me. Greg, I really enjoyed
coaching under. He took
the job and wasn't aware of
the tradition, but quickly
grasped it. He put up the
competition level, and had
us playing schools like
Chiles out of Tallahassee.
He's so old that he's seen
everything. He had advice
from years of doing it, and
had a reason for doing it
that way. I learned from his
experience."

Learning from home
Still, the biggest
influence on Clark was
his father, Tom, who he
watched coach growing up.
"He taught me so many
different things," he said.
"A lot of people wanted
to grow up and be a MLB
player. I knew I wanted
to coach. My mom asked
me the other day if I ever
knew I'd be the coach, and
I knew it, absolutely."
Clark recounted how
he spent hours watching
his father coach in his
adolescent years, and
admitted that much of
what he'll implement will
be directly a result of his
father.
'The way I run it, will
be the way he would run
it," Clark said. "From the
way we stretch, to the way
we bat, shag balls and
defensive stuff, we're going
to do it the exact same way
right down to the signs."
Clark also knows that


he'll have a mentor that's
easy to get in touch with if
he's needing advice on the
field.
"If I'm ever in a spot,
where I don't know
something, I know he'll
answer," he said. "Hell
probably have advice, and
we won't tell me what to
do. He'll tell me what he
has done, and well talk
through it."

Pros and cons
Despite being
introduced to the sport
through a coaching family,
Clark realizes there are
both pros and cons to
his hire. He's hoping to
quickly dissolve of any of
the negatives through his
work:
'The main pro is that
. I can be there for a long
time," he said. "It's my
dream to stay here a long
time. As far as a con,
people could view me as
too friendly to the players,
but I think that could be a
pro as well. I was in high
school 10 years ago, and I
know what they're dealing
with."
Clark will be involved
in the football program
during the fall, but he
doesn't see it as a negative
to the baseball program.
"The only con is that I
won't be there during some
of the fall conditioning," he
said. "I think in the long
run it might help me be
more accessible to some
of the other kids. A big
reason I'm staying on is
because I committed. If
I was to hire a coach, I
wouldn't want them to quit
on me, so I wouldn't want
to do that."
Clark's other reason for
staying with the football
program is a simple one,
school pride.
"It all goes back to
school pride," he said. "I
want to do as much as I
can for the high school.
It might also help us get
more support. I noticed a
lot of the football players
coming to watch us last
year. In the past, that felt
like it needed an act of
congress. If there are fans
in the stand, it makes the
environment electric. If
there's only five or six
people there, it's like
playing in a library."

Setting goals
Coming off a district
championship last season,
the expectations of the
Tiger program will be
high. Clark likes them that


way, and extended his
personal expectations past
his first season.
The new coach hopes
to have a repeat of 2010,
not only in 2011, but
Clark's looking to have the
Tigers as perennial state
contenders.
"I'm a psychology major,
so I'm very goal-oriented,"
he said. "First, I want
to repeat the success of
last year. That's my first
goal, to win a district
championship every year.
It's impossible to win a
state championship before
you win the district"
Clark pointed out that
the team will be young, but
despite that disadvantage,
he believes the Tigers will
contend.
"We lost six seniors, but
we have three returners
in Mikey Kirkman,
Kellan Bailey and Zach
Espenship," he said. "My
goal is to have them ready
to go as quick as possible.
It doesn't matter if we go
25-0 or 0-25 in the regular
season. Thafs the thing
about high school baseball,
it doesn't matter before
the district tournament.
If you go 25-0, and don't
achieve your goal, it's all
for nothing."
Clark believes the recipe
for success comes from a
year-around work ethic.
He'll have the Tigers
working on strength and
conditioning throughout
the fall in order to achieve
his long-term goal.
"We've got to get
stronger, and we'll be
speed oriented," he said.
"It's funny hearing that
from me, since I'm slow as
dirt, but we're going to get
them stronger and faster."
Clark believes that will
pay off in the long term,
as he wants to have the
Tigers marked as one of
the top programs in the
state.
"We want to be a playoff
team every year," he aid.
"I want us to be a threat to
reach the finals. Right now,
we're known as a football
school. I want people to
think baseball when they
hear Columbia as well
as football. I want us to
be a team that is feared
throughout the state."

Putting the pieces
together
Clark jump started
his career as Columbia's
baseball coach this
summer by guiding the
Tigers summer program.
"Luckily, the team has
played for me over the


GATORS: Have potent backfield


Continued From Page 11

Demps said.
A good one, too.
Demps has rushed for
1,350 yards and 14 touch-
downs the last two seasons.
He averages 7.6 yards a
carry, putting him on pace
to shatter the school record.
(6.4 yards per carry) set by
Eli Williams (1994-97).
He should get more
chances this fall, especially
in short-yardage and goal-
line situations.
"It's exciting just to give
us a chance to get that feel-
ing at crunch time, putting
the running backs in and
see what we're going to do,"
Demps said.
Demps certainly will
share the workload.
Emmanuel Moody, a
212-pound senior who
transferred from Southern
California in 2007, believes
he's healthy after having
two ankle surgeries since
January. Moody has carried
58 times in each of the last
two seasons, both of them
plagued by nagging inju-
ries.
His right ankle has been
the biggest issue. Moody
injured his ankle last
November, returned the
following month and then
developed bone spurs. He
had surgery to remove them
earlier this year, returned


too soon, developed more
bone spurs and went back
under the knife.
"It's getting there," said
Moody, who has missed
nine games because of
ankle problems. "I should
be ready to go before the
first game starts. I'm prac-
ticing, I'm going all out. I
went through all the work-
outs. But I don't how it's
going to be with pads on."
If Moody misses any time
this fall, it could open the
door for sophomore Mike
Gillislee and highly touted
freshman Mack Brown.
Gillislee averaged 8.6
yards per carry in mop-up
duty last season and ended
the season with a 52-yard run
in the Sugar Bowl against
Cincinnati. Brown joined
the mix a few weeks ago
and could make an immedi-
ate impact. He gained more
than 1,700 yards in his final
two years at King High in
Lithonia, Ga.
Adding to Florida's back-
field depth are speedsters
Chris Rainey and Andre
Debose, two hybrid play-
makers expected to be used
like coach Urban Meyer
did Percy Harvin two years
ago.
Rainey has 1,237 yards
rushing, including several
long ones, and nine TDs.


Debose was the team's top
recruit in 2009, but missed
the entire season after hav-
ing surgery to repair a torn
hamstring.
"You can't win our con-
ference if you can't run the
ball," Addazio said. "You
better be tough, you better
be able to run it and you
better have balance. If you
don't have those three com-
ponents, you've got prob-
lems."
The Gators are confident
they will be able to run
it, with the biggest ques-
tion being who will take on
Tebow's workload.
"It's third-and-1, what
are you going to do with
the ball?" Addazio said.
"That was really a flat
Tebow-run scenario:
fourth-and-2, third-and-2,
third-and-1. I think you'll
see more opportunity for
tailback runs in those sce-
narios. We saw more I-for-
mation last year, but not
as much as we might have
thought we might have
done. Probably will see
more this year, more tradi-
tional two-back offense."
Its a welcome change for
Moody.
'* We're excited," he said.
'There's more carries to go
around, more balls to go
around now."


Reporter file photo
Columbia High coach J.T. Clark is pictured in his playing days at Lake City Community
College under his dad Tom Clark as coach. Clark ripped a single as his dad watched.at third.


summer," he said. "That
helped them get use to my
spin on it. It also helped
them get experience. I
compare it to being a
graduate fresh out of
Harvard. You've got to get
the experience. We lost
some great kids, and it was
a special group. The past is
the past, and now we look
to the future."
SNow that most of the
players are familiar with
Clark, he hopes to put
together a staff that the
future Tigers will become
accustomed to as well. He's
already decided on one
coach, and has an idea on
who the other coach will be.
"Joey Edge is going to
be one of my coaches,"
Clark said. "I know he'll
do an excellent job. He's
going to be very involved,"
Clark said. "He'll have an
impact on the fall program,
while I'm still making sure
its my program. I'm sure
that he'll do a great job.
It'll keep the kids that don't
play another sport from
sitting on their butts and
playing Playstation, and
I'll be out there any day
that I don't have to be (at
football)."
If Clark has it his way,
he'll be out on the baseball
fields for a long time to
come.


DECISION



i2010


Before You Vote


The Race for Governor and U.S. Senate
Florida voters have key decisions to make in the race for Governor and U.S. Senate.
Read continuing coverage in this newspaper and tutne-in to the statewide debates to learn
more about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you.
For more information visit www.beforeyouvote.org.

Primary Debates *


Democratic Primary Debate
Tues., August 10, 2010
Televised from the studios of WKMG in
Orlando*


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*Watch the debates on these stations Aug. 10: SE Florida -WPLG, Channel 10 (ABC);W. Palm Beach -WPT'I,
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
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Editor
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BUSINESS


Sunday, August 8, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Harvey Campbell
(386) 758-!312


Volunteers

needed for

Great River

cleanup

he Columbia
County Tourist
Development
Council is proud
to announce a
new initiative with the Lake
City Holiday Inn Hotel &
Suites and Fabulous Coach
Lines from Branford to pro-,
vide packages for round-
trip motor coach transpor-
tation to select University
of Florida football games
this fall.
Themed as "Journey to
the Swamp," fans of teams
being hosted by the Gators,
University of Florida fans
and local residents will be
able to enjoy the comforts
of a-luxury motorcoach,
equipped with restrooms,
and leave the driving and
traffic hassles to profes-
sional drivers.
Two-night packages at
the Holiday Inn will be
priced at $149 per night
and includes the roojn and
a full made-to-order break-
fast for two in the Atlantis
Cafe each morning. The
CLEANUP continued on 3A


It's back-to-school time


Shopping for supplies can become expensive


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com

new school year
is Aug. 23, and
many parents
will soon be,
busy buying supplies.
'There is a lot and even
more so when you have
college students as well,"
said Bea Coker, mother
of three children in pre-K,
middle school and college.
On her list Basic school
supplies items include
pens, pencils, paper, bind-
ers and even Kleenex and
hand sanitizer.
Shopping for those sup-
plies can become expen-
sive, Coker said. On her
son alone she spent $100.
"When I was in school
you needed pencil and
paper and that was it," she
said.
Prices can run as high
as $4.49 for items such as
a pack of pencils, $3.49 for
college ruled paper and
$5.79 for a binder.
Coker said prices jump
more if a backpack is
needed. Backpacks range
in cost from $29.99 and
more.
Supply lists may contain
a lot of items, but many
are only suggested, said
Mike Millikin Columbia
County School District
Superintendent
"Very few are required,"


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County officials advice parents to first check with schools before buying supplies for their children. Generic items
can save them cash, officials say.


he said. Parents should
first check with schools
before purchasing any sup-
ply items.
"We encourage parents
before they go shopping to
call the school where their
child will be attending and


ask if a special or generic
list is at the school or
posted at various stores,"
Millikin said.


Bigger stores in town,
such as Walmart or Office
Max, have school supply
lists, he said.


Every grade is a little
different, but pens, pen-
SCHOOL continued on 3A


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SCHOOL: Groups-providing supplies


Continued From Page 1A

cils and paper are always
needed, Millikin said. -
Parents can wait until after
the first day of school or
open house to buy more
specific, essential items.
Schools will also work
with parents if they are
having difficulties purchas-
ing supplies, he said.
Coker said she buys
additional school supply
to send to the teachers.
Teachers used to be able
to provide supplies if stu-
dents let them home, but
budget cuts have reduced


their resources.
"Now is really the time
to be buying and sending'
it," she said.
Several groups in the
community are assisting in
providing school supplies.
True Church of God and
Unity is collecting dona-
tions for a backpack drive
that runs until Aug. 17.
The church wants to pass
out at least 50 backpacks
filled with basic school
supplies. Call (386) 344-
3926 for more information.
Christ Central Ministries


is hosting Operation
Backpack from 9-a.m.
to 2 p.m. Aug. 21 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Backpacks
and school supplies are
some of the items avail-
able for the community.
Richardson Community
Center is also hosting a
backpack and supplies
-giveaway, from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Aug. 21.
"We're very thankful
for community organiza-
tions that have supply
*drives," Millikin said.


Several
church groups,
such as the
Christ Central
Ministries and
the True Church
of God are
assisting in
providing school
supplies, includ-
ing backpacks.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Allred

joins

Westfield

Realty

BrodieAllredhasjoined
Westfield Realty, said
Charlie Sparks of Broker/
Westfield Realty Group.
Allred spent the past 10
years in the real estate
industry as an appraiser
and investing consultant
Allred
has a
*. thorough
it under-
standing
of the
local real
Alred estate
market.
Allred is known for his
professionalism, integ-
rity, and honesty, and is
committed to treating his
customers with that same
level of service,
"We are very pleased
to have someone, with
the professional caliber
such as Brodie (Allred),
join our Westfield Realty
Group," Sparks said.


CLEANUP: Participants can bring own canoes, get free shirts


Continued From Page 1A
price also includes transpor-
tation for two to the football
game with the motor coach
leaving the hotel two-hours
before kick-off, taking you
to the main entrance at
Florida Field, and return-
ing to Lake City 30-minutes
after the final horn.
This package is being
marketed to both fans
of the visiting teams and
University of Florida fans.
Other activities will include
a pre-game tail-gate party
and victory party in the
Holiday Inn lounge after
games.
Local fans can also take
advantage of the round-trip
transportation for $20 per
person. Tickets will be avail-
able at the Holiday Inn or
by purchasing them online
at www.fabulouscoach.com .
and clicking on "Navigator.'
Advance purchase of tickets
is required.
The bus packages will be
available for Gator home
games against Kentucky
on Sept 25, LSU on Oct 9,
Mississippi State on Oct.
16 and South Carolina on
Nov. 13. The Lake City


"Journey to the Swamp"
packages will augment the
Park & Ride "Navigator"
service which Fabulous
Coach Lines will operate in
Gainesville.

Great River Cleanup
The Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council will also partner
with the Lake City Reporter
and Power County 102 as
part of the Great Suwannee
River Cleanup starting at 8
a.m. on Oct 23. We will be
soliciting volunteers from
the community to assist in
the cleanup. Participants
will be given a free T-shirt;
trash bags and grabbers will
be provided. Volunteers can
bring their own canoes or
equipment will be provided.
Our group will be clean-
ing-up a nine-mile stretch
of Florida's quintessential
river, starting at Big Shoals
State Park canoe launch and
ending at Stephen Foster's
canoe launch. Lunch will
also be provided for volun-
teers. To sign-up or obtain
additional information,


contact Brenda Clemente at
(386) 758-1312 or online at
brenda_clemente@columbia-
countyfla.com,
More than 30 organiza-
tions have already signed-up
to sponsor sections of the
river from South Georgia
to the Gulf of Mexico. For
more information contact
www.currentproblems.org.

Sports tourneys
As many of you are
aware, sports tournaments
have become big business in
Lake City, Columbia County
and the Suwannee River
Valley. During 2010, we will
host approximately 26 tour-
naments in Lake City, Fort
White and Live Oak with the
bulk of those events held at
the Southside Recreation
Complex. We are appre-
ciative of all of our youth
sports organizations for
hosting these events and the
Columbia County Landscape
and Parks Department has
been spectacular in its main-
tenance and upkeep of the
fields during tournaments.
Thus far, we already have


19 tournaments scheduled
for 2011. During the inau-
gural Florida Travel Ball
state convention hosted in
Lake City in mid-July, it was
announced that the Amateur
Athletic Association 8-and-
under machine pitch World
Series will be coming to our
community. We expect 60-80
teams to be in town for the
week-long tournament
We will also get an infu-
sion of additional events
with the completion of the
new concession & restroom
building at the adult softball
complex this month. The
Columbia County Board *
of. Commissioners and for-
mer Commissioner James
Montgomery have been
instrumental in the construc-
tion of this top-notch new
facility.
In addition, we would
like to express our apprecia-
tion to Herb Sellers, owner
of Century Ambulance
Service for the company's
generous $10,000 donation
of a new 12-passenger tram,
which will be utilized at both
the Southside Recreation
Complex and other area


special events. The tram is
ADA compliant and will be
an additional nice touch of
hospitality for players, par-
ents and friends visiting our
community.

Vacation Guide
The Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council still has a good
supply of the 32-page, full
color "Suwannee River
Valley Vacation Guide." We
supply the guide to area
hotels and distribute them
at all of the Public Library
branches, the Chamber of
Commerce and outdoor
adventure providers.
Local real estate firms
have also utilized the
guides in packages sent
to prospective home and
land buyers and we place
them in hospitality bags
and when mailing out tour-
ism information. If you
want copies of the Visitors
Guide, please call our
office at (386) 758-1312.

* Harvey Campbell is Lake
City/Columbia County director
of tourism.


I: Ask the


1


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. ........ - -----


] I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW oTHE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


SNYSE A Amex Nasdaq
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Diary
Advanced 1,441
Declined 1,363
New Highs 178
New Lows 107
Total,issues 2,884
Unchanged 80
Volume 9,571,412,504





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3.6 ... +.70 -4.7 71.08
1.6 ... +.22 +2.1 26.88
2.9 ... +.50 +5.0 16.44
1.6 ... +.23 +1.2 9.86


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.68 26.54 +.60
AMD NY ... 7.45 -.04
AutoZone NY ... 207.39 -4.18
BP PLC NY ... 41.33 +2.86
BkofAm NY .04 13.96 -.08
BobEvans Nasd .72 25.72 -.50
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.02 -.05
CSX NY .96 53.40 +.68
Chevron NY 2.88 78.73 +2.52
Cisco Nasd ... 24.07 +1.00
Citigrp NY ... 4.06 -.04
CocaCl NY 1.76 56.75 +1.64
Comcast Nasd .38 18.64 -.83
Delhaize NY 2.02 76.27 +1.84
DirFnBear NY ... 13.48 -.34
DrxFBull s NY .15 22.96 +.35
EMCCp NY ... 20.24 +.45
ExxonMbl NY 1.76 61.97 +2.29
FamilyDIr NY .62 42.00 +.65
FordM NY ... 13.04 +.27
GenElec NY .48 16.45 +.33
HomeDp NY .95 28.68 +.17
iShEMktS NY .59 42.08 +.68
iShR2K NY .77 65.14 +.12
Intel Nasd .63 20.65 +.21
JPMorgCh NY .20 40.44 +.16
LVSands NY ... 28.81 +1.95
Lowes NY .44 20.28 -.46


+2.3 -5.3
-0.5 -23.0
-2.0 +31.2
+7.4 -28.7
-0.6 -7.3
-1.9 -11.2
-0.4 -24.8
+1.3 +10.1
+3.3 +2.3
+4.3 +.5
-1.0 +22.7
+3.0 -.4
-4.3 +11.2
+2.5 -.6
-2.5 -30.6
+1.5 -7.1
+2.3 +15.9
+3.8 -9.1
+1.6 +50.9
+2.1 +30.4
+2.0 +8.7
+0.6 -.9
+1.6 +1.4
+0.2 +4.3
+1.0. +1.2
+0.4 -2.8
+7.3 +92.8
-2.2 -13.3


Name Ex Div
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.20
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .52
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NewsCpA Nasd .15
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ..
OcciPet NY 1.52
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .26
PrUShS&PNY
QwestCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.22
SearsHldgsNasd
SiriusXM Nasd ..
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnciNY .17
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
YRC Wwd h Nasd


Last


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg
-.15 -1.4 +17.4
+2.01 +2.9 +14.9
+.30 +4.1-28.2
-.26 -1.0 -16.2
+.51 +6.8 +3.1
-.01 -0.1 -29.4
+1.05 +8.0 +3.0
+1.41 +2.7 +1.7
+1.02 +11.3 -4.1
-1.60 -2.1 -6.2
-2.82 -11.4 -18.0
+.99 +1.5 +8.4
+1.42 +9.6 -10.7
+8.67 +8.3 +4.6
+.95 +2.1 +2.2
-1.27 -3.9 -10.7
+.03 +0.5 +85.2
-.15 -0.3 +5.7
+2.12 +1.9 +.9
+2.23 +3.1 -12.2
+.02 +1.9 +75.0
+.55 +1.6 +7.7
-.12 -2.6 +21.6
+.07 +0.5 +2.6
+.90 +2.9 +11.1
+.60 +1.2 -3.1
+.07 +0.3 +2.8
-.08 -21.3 -63.0


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 10,653.56
1-week change: 187.62 (1.8%)
11.,500 : .


11,000


10,500


1 0,000 ............. .


9,500
F


208.44


MON


M.""" ..........


-38.00 44.05 -5.45


TUES WED THUR


-21.42


FRI


M .. J. . J. .. .


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Miinit
Name ODj iSMnst NAV 4-Ak 12-mo 5-yVear Load Invi
PiMi. 0 T..IR.ri CLI 13"'ii 1 1 4.1 .1 8 8* ) lB .A iA NfL I 000)i)J)
V ir ,.u3r ,1 T,:,II ].]* LB 1.3 :. r I ' 1 ",'A .') 8 iB N L riJo
Amnrn.:ar, Furnl. G,rr,rA nm LC I 1 : 3~3 1 0 ,11 1h *1 4. ;5. ;5 "
AT.'r.,:ar, Fund. C,apirn.:BuA r HM s1 r '.i 4780 .rf q .H11 C .3 C ''5 25
Fl-e dlh ":.-a, LUC ,i 4 4., 5,' 1 ." .3i2 .,i 2A .3 6'A NL 2 'j0
Afnrn, ajfun.d .i:pWrldrirlAr m Wi 4-12 .: 1 .1).1 .11l .6C .4 9A 5 ;5 1 '0
,T.ren, r, Furn: Ir.,ArmrA Tr MA 4.8 J31. I. 7u0 .9 e WIA .3 1,'B 5r. '50
Vriuu.i/3 5l.'r, Lb 4t. t. 11:1/.1 .9 i 4 ."B 0 2~C Nt 3 00"
Vir..u. lr, 1 '11,.1 LB 41, i. I 10.'1 :8 .9 1 .14 I/B .t 04C IL W.V. 00.
',mr,':ar, Fujrn Inr, C,.ATAA L L 4z Jr.4 .. 64 .12 SiC .'1 )''..J
0 C3, C'... Stl:u LV /9$486 L -' .i ". .1:3.1C i.D [IL 00
Arr i,.,,r., Fu, EurPa.,;GirA m rr t t. :I 9' 1 .1 h1",: 3-B 4 i 31 A 74, i0
.:.- C.j. Inrfln FV 36.r.8" ' .12 .11 .14 2jA .4 8IA NL 241)0
A T,n ,j ir IFur'de WAMuilr.vA ri LV 3I. 14 II .) 1 .' 3 15 4(A i5A ) '.7
PIMC OT.:.1IIArA.]m CI 3': 8::i 11 4J .1 13OB 78A IL I :10 L)0 C.
Fj,,l eT,-Fjrhnr ti r.nii meA ,n CA 11;i;2 2f' I II .I :.iA -40.B 12. 1 1.11.1
Anr,:n.:air Fund.: NfewPerspA m WS 30,154 25.58 +8.7 +13.3/B +5.1/A 5.75 250
A,T.wr...r, Furl-:Frir,.A m LB 29,724 32.82 +9.0 +13.7/C +3.0/A 5.75 250
Vi.,,.uarr,.:,.iAl,'n LB 29,636 27.86 +9.5 +15.8/A +0.9/B NL 100,000
,T, r..,..r. Fur,nl: B,A m MA 29,359 16.65 +7.0 +13.8/B +2.5/C 5.75 250
S1i.gual..lW iAir. MA 28,516. 29.44 +6.8 +13.4/B +4.8/A NL 10,000
Vanguard 500Adml LB 28,336 103.46 +9.3 +14.8/B +0.3/C NL 100,000
PIMCOToiRetA m CI 28,027 11.44 +1.7 +12.8/B +7.61A 3.75 1,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 27,718 12.36 +1.7 +12.2/C +3.7/E 3.75 253
Fidelity Divrintl d FB 26,227 27.39 +10.1 +7.8/D +2.2/C NL 2,L0O
Vanguard Totlntl d FB 26,161 14.41 +10.8 +10.9/B +4.5/B NL 3,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 25,891 70.63 +10.1 +18.8/A +4.2/A NL 2,500
CA-Conservative Allocation, Cl-Intrmediate-Tem Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foregn LargeGwt, FV -Foren
Large Value, IH -World Alcation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Lare Value, MA-Moderate Allocaton, MB -MiCap Bend, I a -
MidCap Value, SH -Specaly-lheath, WS -World Stock, Toal Retur: Chn in NAV h dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund peiomevs.
others with sameobjective: A is in taop20%, Ein bottom 20%. M Innit nvti: Minimum $ needed to finest in fund. Source:Monmingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last I Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iShSing .38
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver
iShChina25 .68
iShEMkts .59
iShB20 T 3.73
iS Eafe 1.38
iShR2K .77
iShREst 1.81
ITW 1.36
IBM 2.60
IntlGame .24
IntPap .50
Interpublic ...
ItauUnibH .55
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk ...
Kellogg 1.62
Keycorp .04
Kimco .64
KingPhrm ..
Kinross g .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ..
LennarA .16
UllyEli 1.96
Limited .60


+8.1 12.42
-2.1 12.70
+9.3 18.07
-.7 41.95
+1.4 42.08
+11.4 100.10
-2.8 53.75
+4.3 65.14
+13.9 52.28
-5.0 45.61
-.6 130.14
-17.4 15.50
-10.2 24.06
+25.9 9.29
-4.4 21.83
-2.8 40.44
-23.5 13.29
-6.9 59.96
+8.5 29.55
+4.9 27.99
-5.7 50.15
+47.2 8.17
+11.3 15.06
-28.4 8.79
-14.3 15.76
-9.8 48.63
+11.7 30.36
-27.1 4.38
+92.8 28.81
+12.7 14.39
+3.2 36.87
+35.8 26.13


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 20 +1.00 +.5 24.07
... 46 +3.30 +40.2 58.32
... ... -.53 -4.6 6.45
31 +6.37 +34.4 60.93
2.0 15 -.83 +11.2 18.64
2.2 14 -.90 +10.4 17.56
.. 5 -1.10 -41.9 8.00
1.5 20 +.04 -4.4 56.54
... 62 -.22 +25.3 70.62
... 22 +1.12 +142.6 13.95
66 +.55 +5.6 11.15
.. 16 -.12 -8.6 13.12
... ... +6.14 +48.6 39.05
... 25 +1.45 +15.8 38.61
.. 31 -.42 +24.5 38.19
... -.02 -60.3 .25
.. 17 +.76 +.3 20.84
.. 19 +.38 -16.0 4.89
... ... +.49 -14.1 15.12
.. 11 +.54 -8.8 21.45
... +1.14 -3.8 17.07
2.5 ... +.13 +21.1 11.13
+.04 -53.6 .70
1.1 18 +1.93 -4.4 24.61
,.. 26 +1.17 +7.3 46.35
.3 ... -.02 +30.2 12.69
-.05 -15.6 6.17
9 +.65 -19.6 23.67
... ... -.01 -69.3 .09
... 12 +1.52 +43.9 8.00
5.0 9 +1.73 -1.5 30.24
... ... -.38 +41.2 69.18
... -.06 +.4 5.57
... 11 +2.50 -17.2 35.82
... 22+15.37 -19.3 500.22
... 39 +1.95 +11.0 16.09
4,9 11 -.13 -11.6 12.14
3,1 12 +.21 +1.2 20.65


Name Div
Intuit
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
Kulicke
LeapWirlss ...
Level3
UbtyMIntA ...
UfeTech
UnearTch .92
MarvellT
Mattel .75
Maximlntg .84
MediCo
MelcoCrwn ..
Microchp 1.37
MicronT
Microsoft .52
Momenta ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsppB .15
Nvidia
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
PDLBio 1.00
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .36
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Popular
Power-One...
PwShsQQQ.26
.priceline
Qloqic


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... 47+15.77+114.8 118.32
.1 25 +1.05 +3.0 14.10
.0 28 +.98 -.9 15.77
.. 21 +.36 -48.9 9.55
13 +.08 -22.6 6.83
.8 20 +.74 -.6 24.38
.6 7 +.21 -6.3 6.43
... 19 +.13 -5.0 8.23
.8 72 -.36 +25.3 45.46
.2 ... -.30 +5.1 16.13
.9 19 -.43 -16.6 25.56
.6 44 -.27 -18.7 13.57
... ... -.19 +18.6 2.68
... ... -.08+183.9 12.35
.6 ... +.95 +2.2 46.76
26+70.85 +35.2 295.25
29 +.31 -14.0 16.23


Name Div
LincNat .04
LizClaib
LloydBkg 1.45
LaPac ...
MBIA ...
MEMC
MF Global ...
MFA Fncl .76
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20
Manitowoc .08
Manpwl .74
Manulife g .52
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .11
MarlntA .16
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McDrmlnt s ...
McKesson .72
MedcoHlth ...
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ..
Monsanto 1.12
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
MuellerWat .07





Name DIV
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ...
RossStrs .64
STEC
SanDisk
SeagateT
SiriusXM
SkywksSol
Solarfun
Sonus
Staples .36
StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SykesEnt ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr ...
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .71
TriQuint
UAL
UrbanOut
Veecolnst ...
Verisign
VirgnMdah .16
Vivus ..
Vodafone 1.32
WholeFd ...
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1,00
XOMAh
Xilinx .64
YRCWwdh...
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
.2 13 -1.35 -.8 24.69
. +.67 -3.9 5.41
.. +.55 +48.3 4.85
... ... +.16 +6.6 7.44
. +.19 +122.9 8.87
... +.42 -26.7 9.98
+.99 +6.8 7.42
10.4 8 ... -.1 7.34
.. -.44 +41.0 8.15.
-.15 +17.4 10.71
1.0 18 +.79 +16.0 19.44
.7 ... +.41 +8.0 10.77
1.6 ... -.62 -13.2 47.36
... -2.25 -25.5 13.66
2.9 13 +.94 +10.2 34.39
... ... +1.95 +8.6 50.17
.5 37 +1.27 +29.1 35.18
.6 ... +.11 +31.0-, 7.14
2.7 ... +.66 -20.8 10.94
.7 ... +3.57 -18.7 34.15
8 +1.45 +9.6. 13.58
1.1 13 -.01 +.5 62.81
16 -.36 -25.5 47.64
2.4 14 +.84 -14.0 37.81
4.3 13 +.52 -4.3 34.98
1.8 12 -.64 +17.2 41.42
... 16 +.16 +19.4 9.11
1.8 24 +2.76 -25.9 60.60
.7 9 +.66 -6.6 27,65
.4 28 +3.59 -14.3 51.19
... 47 +.51 +3.1 8.00
2,2 ... -.65 -39.8 3.13




Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.0 19 +.57 -16.5 38.65
... 13 +.23 -7.8 4.40
... 11 -4.08 -20.9 53.45
1.3 13 -2.44 +17.6 50.22
... 15 -1.88 -16.0 13.72
... 10 +1.44 +55.7 45.14
-.34 -32.9 12.21
+.02 +75.0 1.05
22 +.77 +29.0 18.30
39 +1.20 +39.7 10.66
... 98 +.06 +39.3 2.94
1.8 18 -.16 -18.0 20.17
... ... -.17 +181.4 1.97
2.1 24 +.61 +9.8 25.33
2.0 16 +.67 -15.4 14.99
... 63 -3.96 -53.3 11.89
.. 13 +.07 -27.1 13.04
... 16 +.70 -15.2 16.44
1.1 14 +.14 +25.4 7.12
1.4 20 +1.19 -11,3 49.85
... 17 +.64 +26.2 7.57
... ... -1.42 +72.9 22.32
... 23 +.95 -5.4 33.11
... 17 -3.39 +20.8 39.91
... 25 +1.35 +21.7 29.50
.7 ... +21 +29.2 21.74
... ... -.36 -42.4 5.30
5.3 ... +1,27 +7.2 24.75
... 29 -1.49 +32.9 36.48
8.7 18 +.15 +5.1 11.55
1.1 ... +3.84 +57.2 91.52
-.00 -58.5 .29
2.3 16 -.01 +11.4 27.91
... ... -.08 -63.0 .31
.. 24 +.46 -14.5 14.34
.2 ... -.54 +68.7 21.64


NCR Corp ...
Nabors
NBkGreece ...
NatGrid 7.17
NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .40
NY CmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .60
NextEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .56
Nordstrm .80
NordlkSo 1.44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt ...
OfficeMax ..
OilSvHT 2.66
Omncre .09
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMI Grp ...
PNC .40
PPL Corp 1.40
PatriotCoal ..
PeabdyE .28
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.18
Petrobras 1.18
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.32
PitnyBw 1.46
PlainsEx ...
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
PrinFncl .50
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ...
ProUltSP .40
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSRE rs...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProLogis .60
Prudentl .70
PSEG 1.37
PulteGrp ...
QuantaSvc
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ...
RadianGrp .01
RadioShk .25
RangeRs .16
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
SLM Cp ...
SpdrDJIA 2.48
SpdrGold ...
S&P500ETF2.22
SpdrHome .12
SpdrRetl ,56
SpdrOGEx .23
SpdrMetM .35
Safeway .48
SandRdge ..
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .52
SiderNac s .58
SilvWhtn g .:.
Smithintl .48


14 -.07 +22.5 13.63
... -.43 -17.9 17.98
... +.16 -41.3 3.06
... +1.94 -12.9- 42.52
12 +2.47 -5.6 41.63
16 -.01 -10.2 13.79
13 -.04 +18.7 17.22'
14 +.87 +9.1 16.37
15 +1.14 +20.6 57.04
14 +1.41 +1.7 53.71
15 +.30 +9.2 16.80
6 +2.47 -15.4 34.43
... +.01 -25.9 9.52
16 -.04 -9.6 33.96
17 +1.15 +8.9 57.06
15 -1.60 -6.2 76.33
... +.22 -29.6 4.54
22 -1.67 -.6 12.62
... +3.36 -8.7 108.50
12 -2.89 -10.1 21.74
14 +1.24 +2.2 45.64
... -.08 +21.0 3.05
11 -.56 +11.4 58.83
20 -.51 -17.1 26.78
21 +.78 -16.9 12.84
24 +3.56 +7.6 48.64
18 -2.82 -18.0 21.81
17 +.99 +8.4 65.90
22 +1.46 -28.2 17.23
... +1.63 -21.6 33.25
... +2.16 -19.6 38.33
9 +1.42 -10.7 16.24
14 +1.15 +8.3 52.19
10 -3.70 -9.0 20.71
19 +3.23 -6.8 25.78
24 +8.67 +4.6 113.54
... -.39 +1.2 23.35
11 -1.61 -.2 24.00
...-1.00 -4.6 50.16
... -1.27 -10.7 31.29
..-1.03 -13.0 25.65
... +2.37 +1.4 60.31
... -.72 -13.3 16.50
... +1.36 -.4 38.10
... -.07 -28.3 35.78
... -.64 -38.8 22.94
... -.22 -18.4 19.78
.. -.12 -22.0 19.66
... -1.82, -18.4 29.63
... +.49 -15.3 10.74
... +.30 -18.5 11.16
9 +1.79 +18.7 59.08
11 -.16 -1.5 32.74
... -.11 -13.3 8.67
23 -2.09 -7.0 19.39
21 +.03 +35.2 5.69
.. -.02 -31.3 3.93
-1.18 +1.5 7.42
12 -1.54 +2.6 20.00
... +1.47 -22.6 38.59
9 -.13 -10.4 46.14
... +.07 +39.9 7.40
8 +.12 +7.5 12.12
... +1.99 +2.5 106.69
... +2.35- +9.8 117.84
... +2.12 +.9 112.39
. -.08 -.8 14.99
... +.06 +7.2 38.18.
+1.72 +2.6 42.30
... +2.64 +1.8 52.53
... +.77 +.1 21.31
... -.62 -44.0, 5.28
35 +.05 +21.8 14.84
25 +2.68 -4.2 62.34
26 +.49 -18.8 15.28
.. +.41 -.6 27.75
... +.60 +8.9 17.39
43 +.98 +32.0 19.83
72 +1.87 +59.6 43.35


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAid .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.00
SprintNex ..
SP Matls .52
SP HIthC .55
SP CnSt .75
SP Consum .42
SP Engy 1.00
SPDR Fncl .17
SP Inds .59
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.26
StateStr .04
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX. .60
TaiwSemi .47
Target 1.00
TeckResg .40
TenetHlth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
TexInst .48
Textron .08
ThermoFis ...
Tiffany 1.00
TW Cable 1.60
TimeWam .85
TitanMet ..
Total SA 3.23
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
Tycolntl .842
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Airwy ...
UnilevNV .67
UtdMicro .08
UPSB 1.88
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ..
USOilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhfthGp .50
UnumGrp .37
Vale SA .52
Vale SApf .52
ValeroE '.20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.90
ViacomB .60
VimpelC n ..
Visa .50
Vonage
Walgm .70;
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ...
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20 '
WmsCos .50
XL Grp .40
XcelEngy 1.01
Xerox .17
Yamana g .08
YumBmds .84


14 +.55
100 -.10
23 +1.00
15 +1.14
-.12
... +.48
... +1.14
... +.11
... +.59
... +1.80
.. +.07
.. +.56
.... +.36
... +.62
... +.16
79 +.30
15 -.42
... -.10
.. -.11
16 -.36
13 +.16
... -.14
15 +1.00
... -.62
16 -.18
12 +.08
25 -.14
12 +.77
... +.06
20 +.91
18 +1.27
17 -1.36
15 +.90
86 -1.50
... +2.84
6+10.90
8 -.18
16 -.60
.. -.37
.. +.53
... -1.36
... -1.26
... -.04
23 +1.70
17 -.68
... -.69
... +.86
... +4.17
9 +3.00
8,-1.01
...+1.20
+.78
... +1.07
... +.77
... +.49
12 +.56
... +1.25
20 -1.21
15 -.12
13 -.55
... +.33
5 +4.33
11 +.07
26 -.01
4 -.20
.. -.27
13 +.06
... +.95
28 +1.43
40 +.26
14 +.13
14 -.15
29 +.56
19 +1.06


AMEX MosftActive


Name DIv YId
AbdAsPac .42 6.4
Advntrx rs ...
AldNevG ...
AmApparel ...
AmO&G ...
AntaresP ...
Augusta g ... ..
Aurizon g ...
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ...
BlonderT ...
CAMACn ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01 .1
CheniereEn ...
ChiArmM ...
ClayFront .38 1.8
Crystallx g ...
DejourE g ...
DenisnM g ...
Endvrilnt
EndvSilv g ...
FiveStar
FrkStPrp .76 6.2
Fronteerg ...
GabGldNR 1.68 10.1
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
Hemisphrx ...
Hyperdyn ...
Inuvo
Kemet
KodiakOg ...
UbertvAcq ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... +.15 +6.0 6.59
... -.02 -77.4 1.98
62 +1.98 +27.5 19.23
70 -.22 -55.2 1.39
23 +.28 +81.0 7.60
... +.17 +48.2 1.69
... +.11 -5.0 2.30
... +.39 +18.7 5.34
... +.50 -3.4 40.84
.. +.61 -8.7 23.63
17 +.89 +83.3 2.09
... +.07 -21.4 3.67
.., +.01 -34.1 .45
... -43.3 .51
.. +.33 +7.5 14.82
... +.14 +24.0 3.00
8 +.20 +26.2 4.00
... +1.16 +17.4 21.54
.. -.03 +7.9 .41
.. -.03 +22.5 .37
... +19.7 1.52
... +.07 +20.4 1.30
.. +.19 -3.6 3.51
12 +.77 +27.4 4.42
36 +.01 -16.4 12.22
.. +.60 +67.9 6.60
... +.70 +1.5 16.57
-.01 -37.0 .33
-.13 +53.4 3.19
54 +.26 +39.4 4.35
... +.59 +7.7 6.17
+.02 +5.8 1.81
+.00 -6.1 .53
-.10 +20.7 1.05
+.11 -20.6 .27
+.63 +223.5 3.85
-.19 +42.3 3.16
+.36 +6.6 10.31


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIl YId PE Chg %Chg Last


LibAcq wt ...
MadCatzg ...
MagHRes ...
Metalico
MetroHIth ...
Minefnd g ..
NIVS IntT ...
Nevsun g ...
NDragon ...
NwGold g ...
NkPall g
NthnO&G
Nth gtMg ,
NovaGldg .
Oilsandsg ...
OrienPapn
Palatin
ParaG&S
PionDrill ...
ProceraNt
RadientPh ..
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G...
SeabGd g ...
SulphCo ..
TanzRyg ...
Taseko
TmsatlPt n ..
TwoHrblnv .95
US Gold ...
Uluru
Uranerz
UraniumEn...
VantageDrl...
Wesco 1.64
YM Bioa ...


+.30 +103.2 1.40
-.02 +22.9 .43
-.12+186.5 4.44
-.35 -22.0 3.84
+.04 +92.5 3.83
+.43 -12.6 9.00
+.22 -4.7 2.46
+.32 +60.5 3.90
+.01 -38.5 .08
+.57 +52.2 5.54
+.03 -4.0 3.36
+.21 +25.8 14.89
-.05 -5.5 2,91
+.27 +5.4 6.46
+,03 -50.0 .58
+1.05 -47.5 5.50
+.03 -42.7 .21
+.01 -2.1 1.42
+.06 -15.4 6.68
-.03 +28.0 .56
-.17+216.7 .76
+.02 -19.5 .99
+.21 -20.2 3.76
..+425.0 1.26
+.10 +6.0 25.72
+.09 -50.7 .33
+.28 +54.2 5.38
+.23 +1.9 4.30
-.04 -8.8 3.12
+.02 -13.8 8.45
-.02 +98.8 4.93
+.01 -46.8 .12
+.06 -.8 1.29
-.16 -31.0 2.61
+.03 -15.5 1.36
-1.99 -1.9 336.50
+.18 +8.1 1.46


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When issued. l = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the weekGalners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares, Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.14 0.14
6-month 0.19 0.19
5-year 1.50 1.59
10-year 2.82 2.90
30-year 4.00 3.97


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0889 1.0933
Britain 1.5967 1.5878
Canada 1.0297 1.0173
Eliro .7532 .7588
Japan 85.43 85.87
Mexico 12.6670 12.5470
Switzerind 1.0376 1.0480
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-.
ers show dollar in foreign currency.










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


4 ines 6 dayF.s $ 1
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00 or less.
Each item must Include a price.




One Item per ad


This is a non-refundable rate.



One itm per ad 61
4 lines 6 das h additional

ayu line $1.10
Rate applies toprivate Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or las.
Each item must Include a price.






This is a non-refundablerate.a
One Item per ad $ 237 0
4 lines 6 days E itio nal






,in elind a e I$.1
Rate applies tO pdvate Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.



Each Item must Include a price
Thia Is a flo-redal rate. -A














One item per ad
4 lines 6 days d tonal






on line $1.45
RIRate applies to pdvate Irdvidual sellg
Spersona merchandise tot $2,500 o s



Thncludes 2 igns a non-re nable'rate.



LiOnmited to service type advertis-
$10.80 linesacays additional line .
Rate tplres to pivate Indvduals selling








ThiYou can call us at 755-run 5440,









Onclassified pr ads in person, and some
nad categors will require prepay-









lment. Our officer is located at 180
in o l sif lay.ite$165








Lpoir to sepriter
$10.Adist80 ea additional linemaby:
Includes an additional $2 Mn.,9:00 a..per
W wednesday n.,0:00a Minsertion.m.























laursday Wfo WednesdayWed.,9:00 m.
You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. -
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment.. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-


portencom





































which was incorrect Further, the
AduistoAhear shall by: Fable for anal by:
Tuesday Mon.,f advertise:am. Mon., 9:ordereda.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:nor fora.m. Mon9:y generall.
Thursday Wed.,10:00 a~m. Wed., 9:00 am.
Friday Thirs., 1000 a.m. Thurs., HO am.
Saturday Fri., 10:11 a.m. Fri.,9:00am,
Sunday Fr., 10:00 a.m. kl.,9:00am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Ad Errors- Please read your ad,
on. the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect imploymensertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt corre-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations Normal advertising

























abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.liatlieetyrcporter.coni


020 Lost & Found
Reward,for LOST,DOG mixed
breed male, neutered, brindle
color, approx 100 lbs, between
North 441 & Falling Creek Rd
area 386-965-4967 or 965-4966

10 Job
100 JOpportunities

04541207



CHAPLAIN/RECREATION
DIRECTOR
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is seeking to fill our
non-denominational Chaplain
/Recreation Director (Youth
Minister) position. This
position is responsible for
planning, developing, conduct-
ing, and coordinating the Boys
Ranch Religious and Recrea-
tional Program for youth
between the ages of 8 and 18.
Educational requirements
require graduation from an
accredited college, seminary or
university with a Bachelor's
Degree preferably in theology or
religious education. Two years
experience in a youth oriented
Ministerial Service and in the'
field of recreation is required.
Supervisory experience is
preferred. Excellent salary and
benefits. Housing is provided
on the Boys Ranch campus.
Contact Linda Mather at
386/842-5555. Fax resume to:
386/842-1029. EOE/DFWP

04541208
The Third Judicial Circuit ,
.currently has the following
positions available:
Court Program Specialist H,
Lake City.
(Family Court Case Manager)
User Support Analyst,
Lake City
OPS Court Program.
Specialist I, Live Oak
(Foreclosure Case Manager)
OPS Secretary, Live Oak
Positions serve Columbia,
Dixie, Hamilton, Lafayette,
Madison, Suwannee, and
Taylor Counties.
For more information go to:
www.iud3.flcourts.org

05523420
State Veterans Domiciliary
Home Lake City Florida
is accepting applications for the
following position:
OPS Part-Time Motor Vehicle
Operator
Experience in driving large vans
required;Experience in working
with handicapped preferred
Applicant must have Valid Driv-
er's License with a clean driving
record Req #50504023
Position closes 8/10/2010
Apply online at https://people-
first.myflorida.com
Call Kim Graham
386-758-0600 x3117

04540698
Do you get satisfaction from
making something?
Do you get excited about
technology?
Do you like to analyze problems
and come up with creative
solutions?
If so, a degree or certificate in
Engineering Technology
at Florida Gateway College
is for you!
Engineering Technicians are in
demand by manufacturing and
other high-tech industries.
Enroll now for the Fall semester.
Classes begin Aug. 23.
Financial Aid available.
Call 386-754-4442 for details.







Home Improvements
lDavis ReDnair All Home im nrnve-


o100 Opportunities

05523425


VW 0 R L D AIR S ERV C E S

AVIATION
PROFESSIONALS
Join the Industry Leader!
This is the opportunity you
have been waiting for!
Pemco World Air Services,
located in Dothan, Alabama,
currently has immediate
openings in the following
classifications:
Aircraft Mechanics
Aircraft Structural Mechanics
Production Supervisors
Quality Control Manager/ '
Supervisor/Inspector
Planning Manager
If you have experience in the
aviation industry in any of the
above positions call us at
334-983-7002;
email your resume to
careers(@pemcoair.com;
Fax your resume to
334-983-7046
or visit our website at
www.pemc6air.com.
Salary is commensurate with
experience. We offer an
excellent benefit package.
EOE M/F/D/V

04540823
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
o CDL, No Problems!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236

AVON!!!, EARNup to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.


F K I

A T S

C A L


R 0 C K A N D


1to Job
100 Opportunities
Experienced Cashier Only!
must have reliable transportation,
must be able to multi-task, can
work ANY hours needed (no Sun-
days), P/T may become F/T,apply
@ 347 SW Main Blvd St 102
Live on site Maintenance Person
in quiet MH park. In exchange for
home & possible wages. Must
have transportation phone,&
tools. Must be avid in mobile
home repairs.386-755-5488
Local Contractor seeking qualified
electricians able to work out of
town occasionally. Commercial/
Industrial experience a plus. Please
Fax resume to (386) 752-3737
Mechanic Position open.
Mechanical skills with a Positive
Attitude. Apply at Fabulous Coach
Lines. (866)352-7295
Popeye's has Management Op.-
portunities, min 2 yrs fast food
mgm't. exp. a must to be consid-
ered, hith ins & competitive salary
avail For consideration, call
Richard @ 904-254-2666 or send.
resume to 121 N Main Blvd

120 Medical
120 Employment

04541222
OT/COTA
Hiring in Jasper, FL for a F/T
OT or COTA; Sign-on Bonus
available! Contact Jennifer at
888-531-2204 or
i.anderson(@fprehab.com

05523327
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328 .-

Care 4 America Inc.
An Accredited Not-For-Profit
agency has an opening for an
IN-Home-Therapist, Masters'
Level Mental Health Counselor,
Social Worker etc. Flexible Hours,
Starting Pay $30.00 up. EOE
SSubcontractor. Call or Email
Resume 352-375-3335 '
Drtomii@aol.com
P/T CNA or LPN needed.
.Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


120 Medical
20 Employment

05523427



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
C.N.A. in PRN Pool
Evening & Midnight
Shifts
PRN RN
Lake City
Adult/Child Case
Manager
Live Oak/Lake
Butler/Starke/Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist
Outpatient
CO III Rehab
Bachelors in Psyche,
Social Work or Related
CO IV
Discharge Planner
Lake City
www.mbhci.org
to see our current
needs aqd online
applications
EOE, DFWP



A240 Schools &
2T4 Education

05523478
Wyo Tech A premier
transportation training school
specializing in automotive,
diesel, marine, and motorcycle
technician programs will be
holding an informational
session in your area on August
10, at 7pm. in The Hilton Hotel
and Conference Center, 1714
SW 34th St., Gainesville, FL


0 L 0 L


310 Pets & Supplies
BEAUTIFUL PUPS
Chocolate Labradors
Registered
386-965-2231
FREE (1) Male kitten-nutered.
(1) Female Kitten-spayed.
CALL FOR INFO.
396-755-0920
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and hhve a health
certificate from a licensed.
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
RABBIT DOG
1 Adult male Beagle $150.
386-719-4802 or
386-623-9427
Toy Poodle, Registered, Health
Certificate, 1 Male, White, 6
Months, Beautiful and Loving.
$500. obo. Call: 352-318-9452

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
Pigs for sale
different ages and sizes,
call for details
386-965-2215

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp..Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
KENMORE DISHWASHER
almond & black in color
works great! $50.00
Sold


* 32607. Please call t reeve your KENMORE STOVE
spot for this event. David slide in w/hood, l
Starnes 386-266-7306 or Jim almond & black in color,
Berger 727-457-0989 $75.00 call Sold

REPORTER ClassifiedslIn Print and On Line


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E'sle ENTRY FORM


Wi Nalme: _- _
jE1IEIK
Phone Number:

11E DN 1JR IN Address:
Find all 16 of the 'Elvis' related words hidden in the word Subscriber: I-] Yes [I] No
search above. Words can be found in the banners on the


ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and return it to the
Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Ouval Street, Lake City, FL by
5:00pm, for your chance to win


S m m m m m m m m m m R -


I lMelmphs I


ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lie & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic. 3322 W US Hwy 90
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg. 386-755-2502

Services


Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!

Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200
Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lie.
CBC 013063 &.Ins. 386-497-3219

Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


SEagle

Properties
(386) 752-9226

Office Space

Oak Hill Plaza
TOm (386) 961-1086


I


'TACO
BELL
386-755-9673


Z;IAImY I IW=

1191 SW Bascom Norris Dr
Suite 103
Lake City, FL
(386) 754-1724
www.anytimefitness.com'


Lake City

Kiddg Club
"Where learning isftin "
Pre-K & VPK

755-0256
1290 SE Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025


BlueHawaii1
I ^ I *rac i'eland


Live Oak
(386) 364-1000
Lake City .






Stt


Eadie


insurance Agency

4447 NW American Lane


ISELL.

lhFIND'IT


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I DCA Realtor ||III 38)7265
PSBSan Baana Roc an Roll Pink3Hl Cadillac Left th BuidinXg5EII


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S S E E Z N I
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H A W A I- .I I


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W A F R O K V A N D X U L


www.lakecityreporter.com


LIN


Deadline is Monday, August 9, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.

Lake City Reporter


w\


(386) 752-7034










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$100. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture
'MAPLE BEDROOM
Chest and Dresser set
$100.00 for both
Sold

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Multi-Family, Aug 7 & 8 house-
hold items, furniture and more
Branford Hwy & 242
(look for signs)
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only 8a-?, church pews, swivel
and office chairs, baby clothes
and more 334 E Duval St,
E of Lake City Reporter

450 Good Things
to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

S520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2", trolling motor optional,
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$550.mo, 2/2-$475.
mo. Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2/2 S/W $550 monthly, central
heat/air, 1 + wooded acres, 6 miles
east of Live Oak, in Houston area,
1st, last & security 386-935-4014
2BR/1BA MH
No Pets.
$450. mo. $300. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
4br/3ba, 10 ac. Fenced/cross. 2 car
garage, out bldg. Close to Suwan-
nee River Music Pk. $800, 1st, last
& sec. Neg. w/ref. 386-963-1157
Back To School specials! 2 Br
Mobile Homes in quiet park.
$250 moves you in, Rent starts at
$350 and up. 1st come 1st Serve!
No pets. Call 386-755-5488
FT. WHITE area 3br/2ba DW on
40 ac. $725 mo. 1st, last &
security required.
Call 386-312-8371 or 961-6734
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5.pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Move in special $399, 2/1,
spacious yard, $450 per month;
easy qualifying 386-755-2423 or
386-697-1623
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
, $550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
1978 S/W 2 bdrm, in Paradise
Village MH Park 195 SE Bikini
Dr, Lake City, Lot # 25, 2 blks
from College, great for student,
asking $6,000 OBO 850-295-4717
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch- .
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
LAND/HOME PACKAGES
I specialize in Land/Home pkgs
FHA, VA & USDA Loans Avail!
I also have a 2400 sqft Home on
1/2 ac. for only $450. a mo.
owner financing avail!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452
or jetdec(S windstream.net
Brarid New "2011"
4/2 doublewide setup & Del. for
only $39,995. or payments of
$265. a month! Call Eric
@ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec(5 windstream.net
"TRADE IN" 28'X44' 3/2
Doublewide with metal roof for
Only $7,000.obo Call 386-752-
1452 jetdec@(windstream.net
BRAND NEW 2011


2BR/2BA
For only $22,900
Call John T. 386-344-5234
MUST SELL 2br/lba Singlew',ide
Set/Del/AC/Skirt/& Step
on your property for $17,500.00
Call John T. 386-344-5234
HUGE 28X80 4br/2ba, Living
room & den. Set/Del/AC
Skirt/Steps .For only $34,837.
Call John 386-344-5234
BRAND NEW 3/2 Home
for only $25,316.00.
Owner Finance Available
Call John 386-344-5234
DON'T MISS THIS
28X66 4br/2ba with set-up, Del,
AC, Skirt Steps. For Only $29,900
Call John 386-344-5234


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
I For Rent Home For Rent


0552.33A
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR'apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-1002
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Unfurnished 2br Apt.
w/Gorgeous Lake View. Must see!
$500. mo plus deposit.
Close to shopping. 386-344-0579
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73O Unfurnished
7I3 JHome For Rent

04541176





Unfurnished Rentals
COLUMBIA COUNTY
4BR/2BA- 1,248 sqft
$695mo
2BR/1BA
$495mo
4BR/2B 2,081 sqft
$850mo
2BR/lB 700 sqft
$495mo
4BR/2B 1,248 sqft
$695mo
3BR/lB 936 sqft
$725mo
2BR/1B 896 sqft
$695mo
2BR/1B 915 sqft
$595mo
3BR/2B 1,174sqft
$700mo
4BR/3B 1,536 sqft
$750mo
4BR/2B 2,422 sqft
$1,300mo
3BR/1.5B-1,278sqft
$795mo
MADISON'COUNTY
2BR/1B
$450mo
J.ENNINGS
4BR/2BA 1,584 sqft
$625mo
386-719-5600

04541181
FOR RENT IN A
GREAT LOCATION
3/2 newer brick duplex,
both units are available.
Approximately 1300 sf. with a
one car garage. A real deal at
only $790./month with
security. Call BJ Federico at
386-365-5884 to schedule your
showing. Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.
lbr/lba small home w/Carport.
W/D avail. Fenced yard. So. Hwy.
41 Includes all utilities & sat. TV
$650/mo. Pets OK. 386/758-2408
2/1 HOUSE in the country,
rent is $450 monthly,
plus security,
386-752-5205
3 bdrm/2bath Brick Home,
Hwy 47 between interstate &town,
large yard carport $950/month
$500 dep 386-755-4098
3bdrm home, 1 acre fenced lot
w/carport, in Three River Estates
in Ft White, $600 mo,
336-953-0013


3br/2ba home for rent in Wise
Estates. Brick exterior. new
flooring, great location. $1100.
mo. Ist,last, & sec. 386-965-8633
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Very nice older home, 2br/2ba
w/fenced yard, garage, huge Fl.
room. CHA, appli. Application,
credit check & lease req'd. 1st, last
& sec. $650/mo. (904)259-4126

750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep. Tom 386-
961-1086 DCA Realtor
Office Space for Rent 200-2000
sqft, 5 offices, 1 conference rm,
2ba. Nice outside patio. Located
off Main Blvd. 386-755-3649
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7

805 Lots for Sale
Lot for Sale 2.76 ac, 2.ac, 1.5 ac,
2.5 ac. River Oaks S/D. Timber-
lake S/D. Owner Fianc. Sm down.
386-344-4629 or 344-8929
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
FSBO 3br/lba block w/metal roof,
carport. New tile & paint. Ready
now. 3 ac units/gas heat. Double
lot, chain link fence w/privacy in
back. Access from Monroe St & St
Johns St, dbl drive gates. Room to
park Ig vehicles. Lg storage bldg
& Ig yd. Great family home or in-
vestment rental. Home appraised
/contracted to sell for $71000 in
09. Now,$65000. Drive by 973 SE
Monroe St. then call 352-371-1709
FSBO Owner Fian. 2/1 New: Ele,
plumbing, AC/heat, roof, floors.
$5,000. dn. $433/mo. $49,900
810 St. Johns St 386-755-6916
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.


and mke So sh


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ADVERTISE YOUR



GARAGE SALE

WITH THE..


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS LAKE CITY REPORTER
AA& froA ,'V n


1IOnlyDrO

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO'
adsO@akecityreporter.com -- ------

Uli -i'* Q a m n m


8o6-697-4'136 or 697-413 II. II,. 1 0 U 1LIII, vU p..I.
Lease Option 4br/2ba, 5 ac. 1 mi
to Food Lion. Indoor pets ok Close F REPRTER W S FOR YO
& private. $800. mo. 1st, last &
sec. 386-755-9333 o6r 755-7773

FLORIDA
GATEWAY 18 EastDualSt
COLLEGE
(Fo erly Lake City Community Colege oa355
(Formerly Lake City Community College)


COORDINATOR
GRAPHICS PRODUCTION
Create, proof, and post Web copy
and online marketing efforts including
e-mail campaigns as well as print
media. Web content development and
graphics and coordinate offline
marketing copy with creative effort of
online presentation. Requires
Bachelors degree in computer arts
and design or Bachelors degree in
graphic design. Knowledge of layout
concepts and all media formats.
Knowledge of photographic and
videographic techniques ability in
verbal and written communication.
Knowledge of Adobe Premium Suite
CS2 and CS3, lndesign, Illustrator,
and Photoshop desired.
Salary: $37,500 plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 8/12/10
College employment application and
photocopies of transcripts required.
Position details and applications
available on Web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrafqc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Associatlon of Colleges and Schools.
VPiADAlEA,1:O College in Education and
Emnlovment


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


Apply Online or In Personl

SITEL


4 LINES 3 DAYS.

2 FREE SIGNS!



(386) 755-5440


141


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.




2006 35 Ft. Denali 2008 Dodge SLT
5th wheel camper tow 1975 Ford 351 2000 SeaPro Dig Lm
truck combo, 3 slides, 17ft. center console, radio BigRam
many extras, like new with Kingcab GPS, depth fnder 90hp 20" Factory rims, Hemi full
2002 Chevy Silverado All original. Runs good. trolling motor. Exc. cond. power, extra clean. 10,290
crew cab PU w/6.6CI turbo $2,000 mi. KKB suggested
diesel, Call $6,500 price $31,38Q.
386-752-5788 call $26,000
$37,900 386-752-5788 386-752-5788 call
Call 386-365-1845Call
386-758-2465 386-365-1845 386-365-1845 1 386-755-2909


2007. Ford Taurus SE
Exc. cond. All options
incl cust cover. Seats 6.
Bought in '08 for carpool
(now over) Great MPG.
$8,875
Call
386-752-3204
386-961-4561


In Print, Online




1 Low Price!


orMoe etis-al Mr


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


810 Home for Sale
SALE/RENT: 3/2 brick ranch. 8.5
ac. 8 mi form LC. 3 fish ponds,
paved road. Owner Financ. $1000.
mo. 386-344-4629 or 344-8929
Sale/Rent: 4/2 Ranch on 6.5 ac.
10 mi SW of LC. Fenced. Remod-
eled, paved/private drive, owner
Finan. $1000. mo 386-344-8929

820 Farms &
Acreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles
ATV-M/C Hauler 750#
capacity, fits standard 2" receiver
used once cost $840 selling for
$500 OBO 386-719-6537
ELECTRIC SCOOTER,
camp ground type.
Paid $375. Sell for $250.
386-497-2910

940 Trucks
2008 Dodge SLT. Big Ram, extra
clean. 20" Factory Rims, Hemi full
pwr. 10,290mi. KBB suggested
$31,380. Price $26,000 755-2909

950 Cars for Sale
07 Ford Taurus SE. Exc cond. All
options incl cust cover. Seats 6.
Bought 08 for carpool (now over)
Great MPG $8,875. 386-752-3204
S 1993 FORD Escort.
Reliable transportation
$700 obo.
386-963-4869
2001 Chrysler Town & Country
Limited Van Great condition
Good family vehicle Have mainte-
nance records $4,700 752-0290




Contact us


at the paper.


Lake City Reporter


'I' I


- -I-.


Classified Department: 755-5440







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


i, l ~, Meeting all your sewing needs!
.i / o Over 2.000 Bolts of Fabric
u017o ElOui dozF-0E Fabric. notions. zippers
216 SW !,/LJin Bv*d, L-ike City Sirnplicity patterns
(Mesct to W ady'sy) *Q,,i .r.-
75 4-3 74 1 Authorized Sales & Service for
www.am.ygeaes.cow Singer Sewing Machines



1 HAIRCUT SENIOR DAYS
I EVERYDAY HAIRCUT
Hairculust or You n n
Hwy 90 between I I
Wendy's and McDonald's Regular Price '9" Tues-Thurs Only
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758-3093 I- am A4 III Cfr o
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Branford Crossing I ( I CHEMICAL
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G Gateway Location Only 1 Gateway Location Only 1
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Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 8/31/10
mm m, 4


Most cars & trucks
expires 8/31/10
N k *ii *4$ &^ S** ^


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HAVE YOU TRIED IT?
"bAlways fresh and always on lime!"
//i/hALt'l S/in,',u'r

"It's about time a sub tastes like a
sub. Thanks Willy J's!"
Loretta Ihrules.
Lake City
Listen to Mix 94.3 and Big 98 to win FREE SUBSI
Open Monday Saturday loam-9pm
Sunday liam-7pm
(386) 752-7949 3525 Bascom Norris
(Acro from WaI-Mart,mt to Lowe ) i


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pr - --- ..- - - - --------------


S EUROTOP
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FULL SET s- 344, KING SET ~99 $494
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WITH CHIPS (40 0SHARINe)


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Story ideas?

Contact,
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, August 8, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Too much

shade may

sprout turf

problems


As your land-
scape matures,
so do your
trees. The.
canopies fill out
and the shade produced.
becomes heavier.
If you are having difficul-
ties with your plants that
you haven't experienced
before, they could be relat-
ed to the increased shade
in the landscape. Increased
shade may also contribute
to moist conditions and
less air movement, the fun-
damental factors of disease
problems.
Your turfgrass may
be suffering from the
increasing shade provided
by those growing trees.
Turfgrass qualifies as a
groundcover, but turf does
not perform well in dense
shade. There are some
very attractive substitute
groundcovers that are
adaptable to problem situ-
ations for North Florida
landscapes.
Proper selection of an
alternative groundcover for
a portion of the turf area
can minimize irrigation,
fertilization and mowing
after becoming established.
It usually takes about two
years to establish another
groundcover. After that, the
plantings may only need
an occasional trimming to
keep them tidy.
Asiatic jasmine is a lovely
groundcover plant that is
drought tolerant and will
grow in the sun or shade.
It is also disease and insect
tolerant, so pesticides are
rarely needed. It spreads
rapidly and produces a
very thick cover which
should be mowed periodi-
cally to 5 or 6 inches high.
Mowing keeps the jasmine
looking neat and reduces
tfie risk of fungus during
wet weather.
Two exceptional grass-
like perennials that do well
in the shade are liriope and
dwarf mondo grass. They
both spread by under-
ground rhizomes which
help to stabilize an area
prone to erosion. A neat
appearance is maintained
by mowing the faded foli-
age in late winter before
the new growth begins.
Both are fairly disease and
insect resistant.
Turfgrass is still the best.
choice, however, for areas
of high recreational use. If
you decide that turf is your
best option but shade has
become a problem, take a
look at your large shrubs
and landscape trees. By
trimming up lower tree
branches, light intensity can
be increased. Selectively
removing or pruning over-
grown border shrubs can
also lighten an area. Learn
more at http://solutionsfory-
ourlife.com.
Find out how to recycle
that yard waste on Saturday,
Aug. 21, at a presentation by
the UF Master Gardeners.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Reflections of Lake City members Teresa Williams (from left), Doris Myers and Diane Holbrook finish a musical performance during practice at the Veterans
of Foreign Wars Post 2206 in Lake City. The volunteer organization will perform at 3 p.m. on Aug. 14 at the Lake City Mall.


REFLECTING


Veterans perform to pay tribute to USO shows


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

dashing vests
or sparkling
red, white and
blue gowns, a
spirited group of local vet-
erans dives into the music
of decades past to create
an unforgettable musical
production.
The patriotism, music
and entertainment of an
old-time United Service
Organization show is
brought back to life almost
weekly by Reflections of
Lake City, a 15-member
group volunteering its
time to practice, travel and
perform shows for mostly
veteran-oriented audi-
ences.
"This show is a tribute
to the USO shows," said
Doris Myers, one of the
group's entertainers.
The band-like group,
which practices each
Wednesday at the
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 2206 in Lake City,
originally formed in 2000.
"It started out as four
ladies that did it as a joke,
something new to try,"
Myers said.
The group has been
performing since, growing
both in membership and
shows performed.
And they are in
demand.
Linda Marriott, music
coordinator, said the
group averages about one
show a weekend and per-
forms eight to 10 shows
a year at the VFW Post
2206.
It has traveled as far
north to Gainesville, .


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Alberto Marriott (from left), Carol Underhill and Wayne Williams test their skills during a dry run.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Reflections of Lake City has performed at local
festivals and domiciliaries, VFWs, nursing homes and
churches. Pictured are Myers (from left), Wayne Williams,
Linda Harris, Holbrook, Underhill, Alberto Marriott, Teresa
Williams, Thomas Davis, Linda Marriott, Shirley McManus
and Joe Starling.


Ga., and as far south to
Homestead to give shows,
Marriott said.
The group was
also made a part of
the Congressional
Record of the House of
Representatives in 2002.
"It has grown into some-
thing we never realized it
would," Myers said.
Carol Underhill, group
chaplain, said the group
- made up of all veter-
ans or veterans' spouses


- performs "mainly" for
veterans, but does "branch
out" for other audiences.
With multiple costume
changes and some com-
edy acts in between, a
Reflections show encom-
passes oldies classic
music like The Andrews
Sisters, The McGuire
Sisters, 1950s and '60s
rock and roll and patriotic
numbers.
"The key is we use the
words and music of the


original artists," Marriott
said.
Reflections has per-
formed in public at ven-
ues such as the Olustee
festival, domiciliaries,
VFWs, nursing homes and
churches.
"Pretty much anyone
who asks us to go,"
Marriott said.
Both Marriott and
Underhill said the group"
can cater to a certain era
or age group when per-
forming.
The group sticks togeth-
er and has bonded over
time.
'"The group is family-
oriented," said Teresa
Williams, president.
"We're there for each
other."
"It's a big part of our
life," Myers said. "As the
Lord keeps giving us one
day at a time, we'll keep
on chuggin.'"
Some of the members
also stressed that they
perform to support the
veterans and give shows
that can be moving experi-
ences for the audience.
'"We do it for the guys


and the ladies in the ser-
vice," Williams said. "They
enjoy our performance
and you see their faces.
The faces of the guys
when you do some of
those songs."
"You see these guys in
wheelchairs struggling
to stand up during 'God
Bless America,'" Marriott
said.
The shows also spur
memories for the veterans
and their families, Myers
said.
'The memories it brings
back to people in the audi-
ence, it's amazing," she
said.
Some of those memo-
ries are good memories,
too.
"When you can bring
a big smile to a veteran's
face, it's special," Myers
said. "And I love it."
Reflections of Lake City
will be holding its next
performance, a sockhop
show, at 3 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 14, at the Lake City
Mall.
All Reflections perfor-
mances are free.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


Art: Making a living doing what you love


W hen I
graduated
from high
school, I
was pas-
sionate about pursuing my
dream of an art career.
I loved to draw and
envisioned myself working
in a creative, financially
sound environment.
Yet, I kept hearing the
cliches: "You can't make
a living as an artist!"; "Art
is a hobby, not a career!";
"Artists are only famous
after they die!"
These statements, com-
pounded by the lack of art
educational opportunities
in the rural area where I
lived, were discouraging.
I was determined to not let
my dreams die.
With perseverance and
the support of family,
friends and community, I
achieved my artistic pas-
sion in the fields of interior
design, art education and
a5 a practicing artist.
As professor of art at
Florida Gateway College,


I have seen many creative
students who were dis-
couraged as I once was.
They too often come from
communities where art
is not considered a viable
profession.
In my teaching practice
and as an art academic
advisor, I encourage them
not to give up on their
dreams of becoming an
artist.
I enjoy helping students
explore career possibilities
that enable them to com-
bine their passion for art
with the economic realities
of day-to-day living.
Success as an artist is
measurable by each indi-
vidual.
They may work on a
novice, amateur or pro-
fessional level. Some are
satisfied exhibiting locally,
occasionally selling works
and being actively involved.
in their local art organiza-
tions. Others may seek
opportunities beyond local
venues or desire a steady
income from their work.


Janis Brothers
janis.brothers@fgc.edu

Talent can carry you far
as an artist, but competi-
tion is fierce.
Education can serve as
a defining factor in an art-
ist's success. The College
Board, administrator of
the SAT, found a steady
increase in the number of
college art degrees con-
ferred between 1998 and
2007, rising from 75,000
to 120,000. These degrees
represent 3.9-4.1 percent
of all college degrees con-
ferred during this decade.
Based on this trend, the
importance of art educa-
tion cannot be overlooked.
In addition, many art
fields require an associ-
ates, bachelors or master's


degree.
Artists also need busi-
ness skills to survive.
The Bureau of Labor
statistics estimates that
60 percent of artists and
related workers are self-
employed.
As with any small
business it is important
to establish a business
plan, setting both short-
and long-term goals.
Numerous books and
organizations are available
to assist artists.
Local art agencies and
guilds exist in many com-
munities. The Florida
Division of Cultural Affairs
is an excellent resource for
artists, providing grants,
exhibition opportunities,
professional development
and art advocacy.
So what are the pros-
pects of art careers?
Visual art careers are
plentiful.
The American for the
Arts National Arts Index
found that 2.24 million art-
ists and art-related work-


ers make up the American
workforce.
The U.S. Department
of Labor Bureau of Labor
Statistics estimates a 12
percent increase through
2018 in the demand for
artists and related work-
ers, with salaries currently
ranging from $19,680
to $86,650. Art careers
include animation, archi-
tecture, art administration,
art education, curatorship,
design, gallery ownership,
illustration, multimedia
arts, photography, public
art, and more.
Ifndependent fine artists
create works in drawing,
painting, ceramics, sculp-
ture, printmaking, and
other disciplines. These
artists sell and exhibit
their work through gal-
leries, museums and
collectors 'and often seek
grants, residencies and
fellowships to fund their
practice.
Imagine, making a liv-
ing doing what you love.
Why not reconsider an art


career? Florida Gateway
College can get you start-
ed with the studio/fine art
associates of art degree
track.
This track prepares stu-
dents for transfer into area
university art programs
and art schools, providing
foundational art and art
history courses.
Students can also obtain
advising and assistance in
preparing a body of work
into a portfolio, an admis-
sion requirement in upper
division art schools.
Art courses offered dur-
ing the Fall term include
Drawing I, Painting I,
Photography I and II,
Printmaking I, Design
Fundamentals, Ceramics
I, Jewelry I (Metals), Art
History I (Prehistory
to Gothic) and Art
Appreciation.
Registration for Fall
term is open through
Aug. 20.

* Janis Brothers is a
professor of art at the Florida
Gateway College.


Effort aims to bridge swimming gap for minorities


By LISA ORKIN EMMANUEL
Associated Press

KEY BISCAYNE Six-'
year-old Queen Epps is
decked out in her pink
Spongebob Squarepants
bathing suit and green gog-
gles, ready to learn how to
hold her breath.
She is one of 17 students
from Liberty City one of
Miami's most impoverished
and crime-ridden neighbor-
hoods sitting along the
edge of the pool, splashing
their legs in the water and
holding the sides as they
learn to blow bubbles and
get in and out of the pool.
All are part of the major-
ity of African-American, and
Hispanic' children across
the coci; 'ho dol't know
how to swim and here at
the Swim Gym along the
banks of Biscayne Bay,
they're part of the outreach
effort to help get kids into
the water. k
"It's a safety issue. We
say, you don't send your
son out to play football
without wearing a helmet,
yet people go to the beach
and they don't know how to
swim," said Sue Anderson,
USA Swimming's Director
of Prografis and Services.
USA Swimming com-
missioned a study con-
ducted by the University
of Memphis and released-'
in May that showed 69 per-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Swimming instructor Juan Sebastian Barreneche (right) talks to children during a swimming
class at Swim Gym in Key Biscayne Tuesday.


cent of black children and
58 percent of Hispanic kids
either had low or no swim-
ming ability.
Anderson said USA
Swimming is working
to develop a network of
partners under the Make
A Splash initiative to help
children learn to swim, and
are giving. some of them
grants that will provide free
or reduced-priced lessons.
Parental fear and lack of


parental encouragement
were the top two reasons
children and parents gave
for not swimming, she
said.
"I think we figured out
the level and how embed-
ded the fears are in many
populations. It's like this
- legacy of fear that keeps
getting handed down," said
Carol Irwin, an assistant
professor at the.University
of Memphis who carried


out the study with her hus-
band, Richard, a professor
in health and sport sci-
ences.
Recreational swimming
became popular in the
1920s and '30s with the
construction of resort-style
* public swimming pools
acrossthe country, said Jeff
Wiltse, author of the book
"Contested Waters: A Social
History of Swimming Pools
in America." Competitive


swimming followed in the
1950s and '60s -, but at
private club pools, where
black Americans were
denied access.
Wiltse said the swimming
disparity continues now
because poor and working-
class Americans have lim-.
ited access to pools.
"What we need are large,
desirable swimming facilities
and swim lessons in poor
and working-class neighbor-
hoods," Wiltse said.
The Swim Gym swim-
ming school was founded by
Robeit Strauss, who com-
peted in the 1972 Olympics
in swimming and has since
dedicated his life to teach-
ing the sport He is a local
partner and a spokesman for
USA Swimming in trying to
do outreach to the Hispanic
community.
"I wish I could go into the
community to ,show them
their children will not drown
if they go into the water," he
said.
Jacqueline Clenance,
chief program officer at the
Belafonte Tacolcy Center
Inc. in Liberty City, which
sent today's 17 students to
the program, said its the
second year they have
teamed up with Swim Gym.
Ironically, many of the chil-
dren at the center who live in
downtown Miami will never
go to the beaches that line
Florida's coasts, she said.


"Ift's very often that they
live in a limited circle, a lim-
ited geographical area," she
said.
But the swimming lessons
will have a lasting effect, she
added.
"Let's face it, it could save
their lives in a situation,"
Clenance said. "It has a life-
long impact ... Hopefully,
it will encourage them to
spend more time in the
water."
At the Boys and Girls Club
of San Francisco, aquatics
director Becky Wildman-
Tobriner has been using the
grant from USA Swimming
to pay for gas and transpor-
tation to bring children to
the facility for their swim-
mriing lessons. Their program
--T called Starfish Aquatics
- has a sliding scale for
fees. Children can pay as
little as $5 for eight half hour
classes,
Wildman-Tobriner says
she wants to make swim-
ming accessible to every-
one.
"What we are trying to
do is create a culture of
swimming in the African-
Americau community," she
said. "I think that the kids
that are learning now will
probably grow up and say
'Oh yeah my kids should
learn how to swim.'. Like
most things it takes a few
generations to become part
of life."


First lady down on beets,


up on dietary 'cleanses'


By NANCY BENAC
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Michelle Obama dishes on
the first family's health and
eating habits in a new mag-
azine interview, admitting
she can't stand beets and
that she does an occasional
dietary "cleanse" to clear
her palate and change her
mindset.
In an interview for the
September issue of Ladies'
Home Journal, Mrs. Obama
says she recently was "on
a sort of cleanse" in which
she was just eating vegeta-
bles. The first lady, who's
on a campaign against
childhood obesity, also
says she never talks.about
weight with,her daughters
because the topic's too sen-
sitive, and that she made
the girls take up tennis
under protest.
"I have them do a sport
that they like and a sport
that I like," the first lady
said. "I want them to under-
stand what it feels like to do
something you don't like
and to improve. Because in
life you don't always get to
do the things, you want."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
First lady Michelle Obama
smiles while she visits
Marbella in southern Spain
on Wednesday for a private
trip with longtime family
friends.

Daughters Sasha and
Malia resisted tennis at
first, she says, "but now
they're starting to get bet-
ter and they actually like
it. And I'm like, 'Mom was


right!"'
The first lady also made a
point to show she's human
when it comes to diet and
exercise: .She said there
are days when she skips
her typical 4:30 a.m. work-
out and that on a recent
weekend in Chicago she
"ate everything that was
available. In fact, we had a
take-out food-fest"
And, she can't stand
beets.
"Neither the president
nor I have the beet gene,"
she says.
Mrs. Obama doesn't give
-a lot of detail bout her
cleanses, saying that she
might do one for two days
but that "it isn't a way of
life because I like food too
much."
The cleanses, she said,
"help me clean out my pal-
ate. Because when you
start adding things like
sugars into your diet, you
start craving them. And the
more you eat, the more you
crave."
A cleanse can involve a
temporary change in diet
promoted to rid the body
of toxins and improve well-
being.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010 3D


DEAR ABBY


Blind woman's friend turns


deaf ear to silence request


DEAR ABBY: My son
and his girlfriend decided
to go to an afternoon mati-
nee. Two older women sat
down behind them. When
the movie started, one.of
them began a loud, run-
ning commentary to the
other.
After a few minutes,
my son and his girlfriend
moved to seats four rows
farther down, but they
could still hear the woman
explaining step-by-step
what was happening on the
screen. He turned around
and made a shushing
sound, and in a loud voice
she responded, "My friend
is blind and I'm explaining
what's happening on the
screen."
Other people changed
seats, too. My son under-
stood how a blind person
might want to enjoy hear-
ing a movie, but her com-
panion should have told
her this was a public place
and she would have to wait
until they go home to have
it explained in full, or wait
for the DVD to come out
so they could talk at home
while it was on.
Abby, wasn't it rude to
destroy everyone else's
enjoyment of the film? -
SUZANNE IN LAGUNA
NIGUEL, CALIF.
DEAR SUZANNE:
Yes. Your son should


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com

have taken the problem
to the theater usher or
manager. Many theaters
are equipped with special
descriptive audio for blind
patrons. If that accommo-
dation was not available,
the blind person and her
companion should have sat
toward the front of the the-
ater or in an area that was
less crowded so they didn't
distract other audience
members.
DEAR ABBY: I have
to choose between chorus
and art for an elective for
high school in the fall. I
have been told I have an
excellent voice, but I'm
scared to death about audi-
tioning for chorus. Please
give me some advice.
- ANGEL GIRL IN
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
DEAR ANGEL GIRL:
You have to decide whether
to take advantage of the fact
that you have "an excellent
voice" or spend the rest of
your life singing by yourself
in the shower.


One way to overcome
fear is to confront it in
stages. In other words,
start by singing for a few
friends. If there's a choir at
your church, ask if you can
audition for it When school
starts, ask the choral direc-
tor if you can audition pri-
vately if you're still afraid.
DEAR ABBY: I have
been experiencing some-
thing similar to your "pen-
nies from heaven" letters.
My husband, a master car-
penter for 40 years, passed
away 10 months ago. We
had several projects started
- a shop, a greenhouse
and a room addition.
I have been trying to get
things finished, and when-
ever I think I am not going
to be able to make it, I find
a nail where a nail.shouldn't
be. It was always a joke
between us that he spread
nails like Johnny Appleseed
spread seed. I believe he
is watching out for me and
leaves them to let me know
I will be OK- JO ANN
FROM FORKS, WASH.
DEAR JO ANN: I think
you've "nailed" it. And
because they bring you
comfort, collect them and
- perhaps -- find a cre-
ative way to display them.
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or'
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Jump at any
opportunity to socialize,
network and interact with
people who can inspire
and encourage you. Love
is in the stars. There is
plenty to discuss but it will
be best to talk less and
demonstrate your feelings.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You'll be prone
to taking things the wrong
way and overreacting
to what's said and done.
Focus more on an activity
or hobby that you enjoy
and you will bypass the
tension and stress of an
emotional disagreement or
situation. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Strive for per-
-fection, patience and pur-
suing your dreams, hopes
and wishes. Socializing
and spending time looking
for love or romancing the
person you are currently
with will pan out well for
you. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You'll be walk-
ing on eggshells when
dealing with loved ones.

CELEBRITY


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
It may be time to rethink
your plans for the future.
Uncertainties revolving
around your home, fam-
ily and status will raise
questions that must be
addressed. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You need a change
of scenery and perhaps
some new, exciting friends
around you who can
spark greater enthusiasm.
Throwing a little excite-
ment and adventure into
the mix will do you good.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Consider putting
an end to someone or
something that has been
plaguing you for years. It
will ease your stress and
your uncertainties about
the financial, personal and
legal future. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-
Oct. 22): Don't let your
emotions lead you in an
irreversible direction. You
may not be happy with
everyone around you or
your situation but making
a fuss now will make mat-

CIPHER


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms ore created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
Today's clue: Z equals K
" K N'HN PAY YA PA (MVOZ YA YRN
LAAB). MW Y K N J A B 'Y K VBY YA
FYV X YAA CA B P.. YRN WCYDLVYN
PAVC D F LVIF ." MWEE VCJ I D B
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I'm going to step off... now. That's one small step for
man, one giant leap for mankind." Nell Armstrong
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 7-21


ters worse. **
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Separate your-
self from the crowds and
the adversity that is adding
to your confusion. Talk to
someone you feel under-
stands your emotional
position and can offer you
an objective opinion. Don't
let uncertainty reign.

SAGfITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Associate
with people you feel can
benefit you professionally
and mix business with
pleasure if it will help you
get ahead. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stay away
from controversial situa-
tions. Keep a low profile
and follow your own path,
regardless of what others
want you to do. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can make
your point heard and get
what you want if you go
about it the right way. Love
is in the stars and a union
with someone will not only
make you feel good about
your future, it will help you
financially. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't let, r
someone else's uncertainty
drag you down or cause
you to change your plans.
Follow through with what
you want to do. Stand your
groimd, make up your own
mind and move forward,
knowing you are doing
what's best for you. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


By PLAY BARGAINING By Brendan Emmett Quigley / Edited by Will Shortz 15 16 1


Across
1 Grinder toppings
7 Supreme Court
justice
nominated by
Reagan
13 Real-life actor
Joe who is a
character in
Broadway's
"Jersey Boys"
18 Bunny's
covering?
19 Bent nails
20 Furniture retailer
__ Allen
21 Put a few
monarchs on the
scale?
23 "Orlando"
novelist
2.4 Sister of
Charlotte and
Emily
25 All wrong
26 Huggies rival
28 Gaza Strip org.
29 Wrinkly dog
holder?
33 Espresso topping
35 Engage in debate
36 "I said !"
37 Firecracker's
trajectory
38 Obama whose
Secret Service
code name is
"Rosebud"
40 Snobbery
42 Location for a
fall
45 Bank claims
47 Location for the
Fall
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


48 Helped with the
laundry
50 Political
appointee
51 Cords behind a
computer, often
54 Word with a
German request
57 Blew by a
drummer, maybe
59 Played,the tourist
61 Hurting
62 Smoking
character
65 Relative in the
barrio
66 The golden ratio
67 Line score letters
68 Gel
69 Golfers' wear
71 N.B.A. All-Star
Artest
72 Tractor-trailer
73 One with a pupil
74 Amsterdam air
hub
76 Puppeteer Tony
77 Company that
merged with
Sony in 2001
80 Brunonian rival
81 Compromise of
1877 president
82 1996 Grammy
winner for the
album "The Road
to Ensenada"
83 Camper's rental
85 Alternate road
88 Robert of "The
Sopranos"
89 Poll answer
choice
91, Famed Fokket
flier
95 Toward the
middle
98 "Why is this
happening to
me?!" '


100 Its cap. is
Beirut
101 Prefix with tour
102 Mensa and
others: Abbr.
103 With honor
105 Floral garland
for whoever?
108 Kangaroo ___
109 Character with a
prominent back
110 Gillette model
111 Many P.T.A.
members
112 Duel overseer in
"Hamlet"
114 Indecisive
wolf's question?
120 John Mason
-__, English
priest who wrote
"Good King
Wenceslas"
121 Accustoms
122 Hair-texturizing
tool
123 Heretofore
124 Overage
125 Observation

Down
1 Battle site of 1945
2 River on the Benin
border
3 -like equivalent
4 Available for
purchase
5 Biomedical
research agcy.
6 Secure, with "in"
7 Breastbone-related
8 Clumped
9 "Prince ___
("Aladdin" song)
10 Basketball coach
Kruger
11 Hearth
12 Take as a given
13 Sunday seats


14 W.W. II zone:
Abbr.
15 Mist from a
mall?
16 Leonard
Bernstein called
her "The Bible
of opera"
17 Enlighten
18 Brazilian mister
21 "I ___ ready!"
22 Things shepherds
shepherd
27 Miss who parks
caTs?
30 Military chaplain
31 Suffix with stink
32 Only thing
between you and
*an open window?
33 In hell?
34 ___ close second
(almost.won)
35 Arterial implant
39 "Attack!"
41 Baking spuds
43 "The scavenger
of misery," per
Shaw
44 Served seconds,
say
46 Yearbook
signers: Abbr.
49 Cuts up, in a way
52 Punjabi capital
53 Oil family of TV
54 Oil unit
55 First player to hit
an inside-the-
park home run
during an All-
Star Game, 2007
56 Generous
carhop's prop?
58 Brawl at a ball?
60 "Am ___ fat?"
62 Leno's necklace?
63 Mousse pie
ingredient,
maybe


64 Oily substance
68 Prynne of "The
Scarlet Letter"
70 Absolute
75 Hardly a fan
76 ___-Lee bakery
78 Bird and others,
once
79 Publisher of
Shooting
Illustrated, for
short
81 When doubled, "I
like!". p


84 "___ in Calico"
(jazz standard)
86 Prefix with
copier
87 River to the
Baltic
90 Game in which
it's easy to make
a mess
92 Change tags on
93 Mop brand that
"makes your life
easier"
94 Whooping


95 Dos Equis
competitor
96 Clears
97 Louse
99 Austrian title
104 Where hip-hop
'was born, with
"the"
106 F.D.R. veep
John __ Garner
107 Parkinson's
battler
109 Entertainer born
Tracy Marrow


110 Cries made in
passing?
113 Saint-Martin,
Se.g.
115 Winning Super
Bowl XXXVII
gridder
116 Exist
117 Surgery sites,
for short
118 20%, maybe
119 "I didn't need to
know that," in
modern lingo


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
EPPIE AMPS S NI GEL P EER
F ED ROGER S OCU LI l A L SO
FASTOFEDE Nl N ASAL RROPE
ST 0 A FIEF TENTPAC K ING
GRES A T A ASCAP
T10 N I IIEBiS T H IL T slI l
TLICO U R ,SSR IS THATSL
A TITILIE|E D REAM0 F T H E C R i f
0 F U BS I 8 L 0 E I N E
INROXNMAN L1 MO ALP SCEO
C 0 RN 0 N THE F 0 URTH 0 F|J|U.L Y
AYLA ECTO ANTONIA
SPC|A H ElW NM LAIT A S N
H O O DFoRNoTHING ATDUSK
ESCHEW TiOON EGGO ROE
MONAD ESC ALT E AvIEME

NI XINGBOWLS TACO ABEL
OMEN AER I E EATIN G A M E
PANE I LENE INREGARDTO
EXAM 0OL DER SEA GAUS I


8 7 9


9 8 72 5


3 7


4 3 6 9


9 2 3


6 4 1


2 1 5


56 1


72 8 5


9 8 9 6 C7P V L L


C LL 8 9 9 V 6
iL 6 V LZ 9 8 1C.




ZL 8 7 9 L 6 C 9


7 9 S LI 6 8 L I


6 9 L 8 9 E ZL 7





9 6 9 1L 8 1 6 L

L Z 17 6 9 L 9 8
Lt7ZE6L9L9








4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2010


Making This Right

Beaches

Claims

Cleanup
Economic Investment

Environmental Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


/ grew up on the Gulf Coast. I know these waters. And I'm
doing everything I can to clean them up.
Fred Lemond, BP Cleanup Operations

,BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And that
includes keeping you informed.

Searching For And Cleaning Up The Oil
You may'have heard that oil is no longer flowing into the Gulf. But
every morning our spotter planes and helicopters continue to
search for oil off the coast, heading to areas previously mapped
with satellite imagery and infrared photography. If oil is found, they
radio down to the ships and boats of all sizes that are supporting
the.cleanup effort and working to collect the oil. These are local
shrimping and fishing boats organized into task forces and strike
teams, plus specialized skimmers mobilized from around the world.

We have recovered more than 35 million gallons of oil-water
mixture from the Gulf. Other methods have also helped remove,
millions of additional gallons of oil from the water. We've deployed
millions of feet of boom to protect beaches and sensitive
wildlife areas.

Hurricane Preparedness
In the event of a hurricane, our first priority is keeping people safe.
In coordination with the Coast Guard and local officials, we may
suspend operations temporarily but have organized to resume
them as soon as possible.

Our Responsibility
We have already spent more than $3.9 billion responding to the
spill and on the cleanup, and none of this will be paid by taxpayers.
We will work in the Gulf as long as it takes to get this done. We
may not always be perfect but we will do everything we can to
make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
-"rl,.,r,:igiulfresponse.com


I-
~


2010 BP, E&P